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Sample records for analysis reveals putative

  1. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Putative Genes Involved in Iridoid Biosynthesis in Rehmannia glutinosa

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    Xianen Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, one of the most widely used herbal medicines in the Orient, is rich in biologically active iridoids. Despite their medicinal importance, no molecular information about the iridoid biosynthesis in this plant is presently available. To explore the transcriptome of R. glutinosa and investigate genes involved in iridoid biosynthesis, we used massively parallel pyrosequencing on the 454 GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset. Based on sequence similarity searches against the public sequence databases, the sequences were first annotated and then subjected to Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG based analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the 454 assembly contained a set of genes putatively involved in iridoid biosynthesis. Significantly, homologues of the secoiridoid pathway genes that were only identified in terpenoid indole alkaloid producing plants were also identified, whose presence implied that route II iridoids and route I iridoids share common enzyme steps in the early stage of biosynthesis. The gene expression patterns of four prenyltransferase transcripts were analyzed using qRT-PCR, which shed light on their putative functions in tissues of R. glutinosa. The data explored in this study will provide valuable information for further studies concerning iridoid biosynthesis.

  2. ESTs analysis reveals putative genes involved in symbiotic seed germination in Dendrobium officinale.

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    Ming-Ming Zhao

    Full Text Available Dendrobiumofficinale (Orchidaceae is one of the world's most endangered plants with great medicinal value. In nature, D. officinale seeds must establish symbiotic relationships with fungi to germinate. However, the molecular events involved in the interaction between fungus and plant during this process are poorly understood. To isolate the genes involved in symbiotic germination, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library of symbiotically germinated D. officinale seeds was constructed. From this library, 1437 expressed sequence tags (ESTs were clustered to 1074 Unigenes (including 902 singletons and 172 contigs, which were searched against the NCBI non-redundant (NR protein database (E-value cutoff, e(-5. Based on sequence similarity with known proteins, 579 differentially expressed genes in D. officinale were identified and classified into different functional categories by Gene Ontology (GO, Clusters of orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. The expression levels of 15 selected genes emblematic of symbiotic germination were confirmed via real-time quantitative PCR. These genes were classified into various categories, including defense and stress response, metabolism, transcriptional regulation, transport process and signal transduction pathways. All transcripts were upregulated in the symbiotically germinated seeds (SGS. The functions of these genes in symbiotic germination were predicted. Furthermore, two fungus-induced calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, which were upregulated 6.76- and 26.69-fold in SGS compared with un-germinated seeds (UGS, were cloned from D. officinale and characterized for the first time. This study provides the first global overview of genes putatively involved in D. officinale symbiotic seed germination and provides a foundation for further functional research regarding symbiotic relationships in orchids.

  3. Analysis of putative nonulosonic acid biosynthesis pathways in Archaea reveals a complex evolutionary history.

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    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-08-01

    Sialic acids and the other nonulosonic acid sugars, legionaminic acid and pseudaminic acid, are nine carbon-containing sugars that can be detected as components of the glycans decorating proteins and other molecules in Eukarya and Bacteria. Yet, despite the prevalence of N-glycosylation in Archaea and the variety of sugars recruited for the archaeal version of this post-translational modification, only a single report of a nonulosonic acid sugar in an archaeal N-linked glycan has appeared. Hence, to obtain a clearer picture of nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis capability in Archaea, 122 sequenced genomes were scanned for the presence of genes involved in the biogenesis of these sugars. The results reveal that while Archaea and Bacteria share a common route of sialic acid biosynthesis, numerous archaeal nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis pathway components were acquired from elsewhere via various routes. Still, the limited number of Archaea encoding components involved in the synthesis of nonulosonic acid sugars implies that such saccharides are not major components of glycans in this domain.

  4. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Proteins Putatively Involved in Toxin Biosynthesis in the Marine Dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella

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    Da-Zhi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alexandrium is a neurotoxin-producing dinoflagellate genus resulting in paralytic shellfish poisonings around the world. However, little is known about the toxin biosynthesis mechanism in Alexandrium. This study compared protein profiles of A. catenella collected at different toxin biosynthesis stages (non-toxin synthesis, initial toxin synthesis and toxin synthesizing coupled with the cell cycle, and identified differentially expressed proteins using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The results showed that toxin biosynthesis of A. catenella occurred within a defined time frame in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Proteomic analysis indicated that 102 protein spots altered significantly in abundance (P < 0.05, and 53 proteins were identified using database searching. These proteins were involved in a variety of biological processes, i.e., protein modification and biosynthesis, metabolism, cell division, oxidative stress, transport, signal transduction, and translation. Among them, nine proteins with known functions in paralytic shellfish toxin-producing cyanobacteria, i.e., methionine S-adenosyltransferase, chloroplast ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, S-adenosylhomocysteinase, adenosylhomocysteinase, ornithine carbamoyltransferase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, sulfotransferase (similar to, alcohol dehydrogenase and arginine deiminase, varied significantly at different toxin biosynthesis stages and formed an interaction network, indicating that they might be involved in toxin biosynthesis in A. catenella. This study is the first step in the dissection of the behavior of the A. catenella proteome during different toxin biosynthesis stages and provides new insights into toxin biosynthesis in dinoflagellates.

  5. Global gene expression analysis reveals reduced abundance of putative microRNA targets in human prostate tumours

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    Xie Yi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs have taken centre stage in the field of human molecular oncology. Several studies have shown that miRNA profiling analyses offer new possibilities in cancer classification, diagnosis and prognosis. However, the function of miRNAs that are dysregulated in tumours remains largely a mystery. Global analysis of miRNA-target gene expression has helped illuminate the role of miRNAs in developmental gene expression programs, but such an approach has not been reported in cancer transcriptomics. Results In this study, we globally analysed the expression patterns of miRNA target genes in prostate cancer by using several public microarray datasets. Intriguingly, we found that, in contrast to global mRNA transcript levels, putative miRNA targets showed a reduced abundance in prostate tumours relative to benign prostate tissue. Additionally, the down-regulation of these miRNA targets positively correlated with the number of types of miRNA target-sites in the 3' untranslated regions of these targets. Further investigation revealed that the globally low expression was mainly driven by the targets of 36 specific miRNAs that were reported to be up-regulated in prostate cancer by a miRNA expression profiling study. We also found that the transcript levels of miRNA targets were lower in androgen-independent prostate cancer than in androgen-dependent prostate cancer. Moreover, when the global analysis was extended to four other cancers, significant differences in transcript levels between miRNA targets and total mRNA backgrounds were found. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis, along with further investigation, suggests that miRNA targets have a significantly reduced transcript abundance in prostate cancer, when compared with the combined pool of all mRNAs. The abnormal expression pattern of miRNA targets in human cancer could be a common feature of the human cancer transcriptome. Our study may help to shed new

  6. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles

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    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  7. Proteomic analysis of ACTN4-interacting proteins reveals it's a putative involvement in mRNA metabolism

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    Khotin, Mikhail, E-mail: h_mg@mail.ru [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Turoverova, Lidia [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Aksenova, Vasilisa [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab., 7/9, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Barlev, Nikolai [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Lancaster Road, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom); Borutinskaite, Veronika Viktorija [Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Department of Developmental Biology, Institute of Biochemistry, LT-08662 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vener, Alexander [Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Bajenova, Olga [Department of Genetics, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab., 7/9, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Magnusson, Karl-Eric [Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University, SE-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Pinaev, George P. [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tentler, Dmitri, E-mail: dtentler@mail.cytspb.rssi.ru [Department of Cell Cultures, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky av., 4, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-25

    Alpha-actinin 4 (ACTN4) is an actin-binding protein. In the cytoplasm, ACTN4 participates in structural organisation of the cytoskeleton via cross-linking of actin filaments. Nuclear localisation of ACTN4 has also been reported, but no clear role in the nucleus has been established. In this report, we describe the identification of proteins associated with ACTN4 in the nucleus. A combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry revealed a large number of ACTN4-bound proteins that are involved in various aspects of mRNA processing and transport. The association of ACTN4 with different ribonucleoproteins suggests that a major function of nuclear ACTN4 may be regulation of mRNA metabolism and signaling.

  8. Phylogenetic and comparative gene expression analysis of barley (Hordeum vulgare)WRKY transcription factor family reveals putatively retained functions betweenmonocots and dicots

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    Mangelsen, Elke; Kilian, Joachim; Berendzen, Kenneth W.; Kolukisaoglu, Uner; Harter, Klaus; Jansson, Christer; Wanke, Dierk

    2008-02-01

    WRKY proteins belong to the WRKY-GCM1 superfamily of zinc finger transcription factors that have been subject to a large plant-specific diversification. For the cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare), three different WRKY proteins have been characterized so far, as regulators in sucrose signaling, in pathogen defense, and in response to cold and drought, respectively. However, their phylogenetic relationship remained unresolved. In this study, we used the available sequence information to identify a minimum number of 45 barley WRKY transcription factor (HvWRKY) genes. According to their structural features the HvWRKY factors were classified into the previously defined polyphyletic WRKY subgroups 1 to 3. Furthermore, we could assign putative orthologs of the HvWRKY proteins in Arabidopsis and rice. While in most cases clades of orthologous proteins were formed within each group or subgroup, other clades were composed of paralogous proteins for the grasses and Arabidopsis only, which is indicative of specific gene radiation events. To gain insight into their putative functions, we examined expression profiles of WRKY genes from publicly available microarray data resources and found group specific expression patterns. While putative orthologs of the HvWRKY transcription factors have been inferred from phylogenetic sequence analysis, we performed a comparative expression analysis of WRKY genes in Arabidopsis and barley. Indeed, highly correlative expression profiles were found between some of the putative orthologs. HvWRKY genes have not only undergone radiation in monocot or dicot species, but exhibit evolutionary traits specific to grasses. HvWRKY proteins exhibited not only sequence similarities between orthologs with Arabidopsis, but also relatedness in their expression patterns. This correlative expression is indicative for a putative conserved function of related WRKY proteins in mono- and dicot species.

  9. A putative Lynch syndrome family carrying MSH2 and MSH6 variants of uncertain significance-functional analysis reveals the pathogenic one

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    Kantelinen, Jukka; Hansen, Thomas V O; Kansikas, Minttu;

    2011-01-01

    Inherited pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 predispose to Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the finding of a variant or variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in affected family members complicates the risk assessment. Here, we describe a putative L...... identified VUS before predictive gene testing and genetic counseling are offered to a family.......Inherited pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 predispose to Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the finding of a variant or variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in affected family members complicates the risk assessment. Here, we describe a putative LS...... family carrying VUS in both MSH2 (c.2768T>A, p.Val923Glu) and MSH6 (c.3563G>A, p.Ser1188Asn). Two colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were studied for mutations and identified as carriers of both variants. In spite of a relatively high mean age of cancer onset (59.5 years) in the family, many CRC patients...

  10. High-resolution analysis of four efficient yeast replication origins reveals new insights into the ORC and putative MCM binding elements.

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    Chang, Fujung; May, Caitlin D; Hoggard, Timothy; Miller, Jeremy; Fox, Catherine A; Weinreich, Michael

    2011-08-01

    In budding yeast, the eukaryotic initiator protein ORC (origin recognition complex) binds to a bipartite sequence consisting of an 11 bp ACS element and an adjacent B1 element. However, the genome contains many more matches to this consensus than actually bind ORC or function as origins in vivo. Although ORC-dependent loading of the replicative MCM helicase at origins is enhanced by a distal B2 element, less is known about this element. Here, we analyzed four highly active origins (ARS309, ARS319, ARS606 and ARS607) by linker scanning mutagenesis and found that sequences adjacent to the ACS contributed substantially to origin activity and ORC binding. Using the sequences of four additional B2 elements we generated a B2 multiple sequence alignment and identified a shared, degenerate 8 bp sequence that was enriched within 228 known origins. In addition, our high-resolution analysis revealed that not all origins exist within nucleosome free regions: a class of Sir2-regulated origins has a stably positioned nucleosome overlapping or near B2. This study illustrates the conserved yet flexible nature of yeast origin architecture to promote ORC binding and origin activity, and helps explain why a strong match to the ORC binding site is insufficient to identify origins within the genome.

  11. A subfamily of putative cytokinin receptors is revealed by an analysis of the evolution of the two-component signaling system of plants.

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    Gruhn, Nijuscha; Halawa, Mhyeddeen; Snel, Berend; Seidl, Michael F; Heyl, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The two-component signaling system--the major signaling pathway of bacteria--is found among higher eukaryotes only in plants, where it regulates diverse processes, such as the signaling of the phytohormone cytokinin. Cytokinin is perceived by a hybrid histidine (His) kinase receptor, and the signal is transduced by a multistep phosphorelay system of His phosphotransfer proteins and different classes of response regulators (RRs). To shed light on the origin and evolution of the two-component signaling system members in plants, we conducted a comprehensive domain-based phylogenetic study across the relevant kingdoms, including Charophyceae algae, the group of green algae giving rise to land plants. Surprisingly, we identified a subfamily of cytokinin receptors with members only from the early diverging land plants Marchantia polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens and then experimentally characterized two members of this subfamily. His phosphotransfer proteins of Charophyceae seemed to be more closely related to land plants than to other groups of green algae. Farther down the signaling pathway, the type-B RRs were found across all plant clades, but many members lack either the canonical Asp residue or the DNA binding domain. In contrast, the type-A RRs seemed to be limited to land plants. Finally, the analysis provided hints that one additional group of RRs, the type-C RRs, might be degenerated receptors and thus, of a different evolutionary origin than bona fide RRs.

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems of the Spider Cupiennius salei Reveals Multiple Putative Cys-Loop Ligand Gated Ion Channel Subunits and an Acetylcholine Binding Protein.

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    Päivi H Torkkeli

    Full Text Available Invertebrates possess a diverse collection of pentameric Cys-loop ligand gated ion channel (LGIC receptors whose molecular structures, evolution and relationships to mammalian counterparts have been intensely investigated in several clinically and agriculturally important species. These receptors are targets for a variety of control agents that may also harm beneficial species. However, little is known about Cys-loop receptors in spiders, which are important natural predators of insects. We assembled de novo transcriptomes from the central and peripheral nervous systems of the Central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei, a model species for neurophysiological, behavioral and developmental studies. We found 15 Cys-loop receptor subunits that are expected to form anion or cation permeable channels, plus a putative acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP that has only previously been reported in molluscs and one annelid. We used phylogenetic and sequence analysis to compare the spider subunits to homologous receptors in other species and predicted the 3D structures of each protein using the I-Tasser server. The quality of homology models improved with increasing sequence identity to the available high-resolution templates. We found that C. salei has orthologous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, GluCl, pHCl, HisCl and nAChα LGIC subunits to other arthropods, but some subgroups are specific to arachnids, or only to spiders. C. salei sequences were phylogenetically closest to gene fragments from the social spider, Stegodyphus mimosarum, indicating high conservation within the Araneomorphae suborder of spiders. C. salei sequences had similar ligand binding and transmembrane regions to other invertebrate and vertebrate LGICs. They also had motifs associated with high sensitivity to insecticides and antiparasitic agents such as fipronil, dieldrin and ivermectin. Development of truly selective control agents for pest species will require information about

  13. Putative glycosyltransferases and other plant Golgi apparatus proteins are revealed by LOPIT proteomics.

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    Nikolovski, Nino; Rubtsov, Denis; Segura, Marcelo P; Miles, Godfrey P; Stevens, Tim J; Dunkley, Tom P J; Munro, Sean; Lilley, Kathryn S; Dupree, Paul

    2012-10-01

    The Golgi apparatus is the central organelle in the secretory pathway and plays key roles in glycosylation, protein sorting, and secretion in plants. Enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of complex polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids are located in this organelle, but the majority of them remain uncharacterized. Here, we studied the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) membrane proteome with a focus on the Golgi apparatus using localization of organelle proteins by isotope tagging. By applying multivariate data analysis to a combined data set of two new and two previously published localization of organelle proteins by isotope tagging experiments, we identified the subcellular localization of 1,110 proteins with high confidence. These include 197 Golgi apparatus proteins, 79 of which have not been localized previously by a high-confidence method, as well as the localization of 304 endoplasmic reticulum and 208 plasma membrane proteins. Comparison of the hydrophobic domains of the localized proteins showed that the single-span transmembrane domains have unique properties in each organelle. Many of the novel Golgi-localized proteins belong to uncharacterized protein families. Structure-based homology analysis identified 12 putative Golgi glycosyltransferase (GT) families that have no functionally characterized members and, therefore, are not yet assigned to a Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes database GT family. The substantial numbers of these putative GTs lead us to estimate that the true number of plant Golgi GTs might be one-third above those currently annotated. Other newly identified proteins are likely to be involved in the transport and interconversion of nucleotide sugar substrates as well as polysaccharide and protein modification.

  14. Characterization of a spontaneous nonmagnetic mutant of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense reveals a large deletion comprising a putative magnetosome island.

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    Schübbe, Sabrina; Kube, Michael; Scheffel, André; Wawer, Cathrin; Heyen, Udo; Meyerdierks, Anke; Madkour, Mohamed H; Mayer, Frank; Reinhardt, Richard; Schüler, Dirk

    2003-10-01

    Frequent spontaneous loss of the magnetic phenotype was observed in stationary-phase cultures of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. A nonmagnetic mutant, designated strain MSR-1B, was isolated and characterized. The mutant lacked any structures resembling magnetosome crystals as well as internal membrane vesicles. The growth of strain MSR-1B was impaired under all growth conditions tested, and the uptake and accumulation of iron were drastically reduced under iron-replete conditions. A large chromosomal deletion of approximately 80 kb was identified in strain MSR-1B, which comprised both the entire mamAB and mamDC clusters as well as further putative operons encoding a number of magnetosome-associated proteins. A bacterial artificial chromosome clone partially covering the deleted region was isolated from the genomic library of wild-type M. gryphiswaldense. Sequence analysis of this fragment revealed that all previously identified mam genes were closely linked with genes encoding other magnetosome-associated proteins within less than 35 kb. In addition, this region was remarkably rich in insertion elements and harbored a considerable number of unknown gene families which appeared to be specific for magnetotactic bacteria. Overall, these findings suggest the existence of a putative large magnetosome island in M. gryphiswaldense and other magnetotactic bacteria.

  15. Pyrosequencing of the Camptotheca acuminata transcriptome reveals putative genes involved in camptothecin biosynthesis and transport

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    Sun Yongzhen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camptotheca acuminata is a Nyssaceae plant, often called the "happy tree", which is indigenous in Southern China. C. acuminata produces the terpenoid indole alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT, which exhibits clinical effects in various cancer treatments. Despite its importance, little is known about the transcriptome of C. acuminata and the mechanism of CPT biosynthesis, as only few nucleotide sequences are included in the GenBank database. Results From a constructed cDNA library of young C. acuminata leaves, a total of 30,358 unigenes, with an average length of 403 bp, were obtained after assembly of 74,858 high quality reads using GS De Novo assembler software. Through functional annotation, a total of 21,213 unigenes were annotated at least once against the NCBI nucleotide (Nt, non-redundant protein (Nr, Uniprot/SwissProt, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG, and Arabidopsis thaliana proteome (TAIR databases. Further analysis identified 521 ESTs representing 20 enzyme genes that are involved in the backbone of the CPT biosynthetic pathway in the library. Three putative genes in the upstream pathway, including genes for geraniol-10-hydroxylase (CaPG10H, secologanin synthase (CaPSCS, and strictosidine synthase (CaPSTR were cloned and analyzed. The expression level of the three genes was also detected using qRT-PCR in C. acuminata. With respect to the branch pathway of CPT synthesis, six cytochrome P450s transcripts were selected as candidate transcripts by detection of transcript expression in different tissues using qRT-PCR. In addition, one glucosidase gene was identified that might participate in CPT biosynthesis. For CPT transport, three of 21 transcripts for multidrug resistance protein (MDR transporters were also screened from the dataset by their annotation result and gene expression analysis. Conclusion This study produced a large amount of transcriptome data from C. acuminata by 454 pyrosequencing. According to

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus westerdijkiae Reveals the Putative Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of Ochratoxin A

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    Chakrabortti, Alolika; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a common mycotoxin that contaminates food and agricultural products. Sequencing of the complete genome of Aspergillus westerdijkiae, a major producer of OTA, reveals more than 50 biosynthetic gene clusters, including a putative OTA biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes a dozen of enzymes, transporters, and regulatory proteins. PMID:27635003

  17. Genetic and genomic diversity studies of Acacia symbionts in Senegal reveal new species of Mesorhizobium with a putative geographical pattern.

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    Diouf, Fatou; Diouf, Diegane; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Le Queré, Antoine; Bakhoum, Niokhor; Fall, Dioumacor; Neyra, Marc; Parrinello, Hugues; Diouf, Mayecor; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Moulin, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Acacia senegal (L) Willd. and Acacia seyal Del. are highly nitrogen-fixing and moderately salt tolerant species. In this study we focused on the genetic and genomic diversity of Acacia mesorhizobia symbionts from diverse origins in Senegal and investigated possible correlations between the genetic diversity of the strains, their soil of origin, and their tolerance to salinity. We first performed a multi-locus sequence analysis on five markers gene fragments on a collection of 47 mesorhizobia strains of A. senegal and A. seyal from 8 localities. Most of the strains (60%) clustered with the M. plurifarium type strain ORS 1032T, while the others form four new clades (MSP1 to MSP4). We sequenced and assembled seven draft genomes: four in the M. plurifarium clade (ORS3356, ORS3365, STM8773 and ORS1032T), one in MSP1 (STM8789), MSP2 (ORS3359) and MSP3 (ORS3324). The average nucleotide identities between these genomes together with the MLSA analysis reveal three new species of Mesorhizobium. A great variability of salt tolerance was found among the strains with a lack of correlation between the genetic diversity of mesorhizobia, their salt tolerance and the soils samples characteristics. A putative geographical pattern of A. senegal symbionts between the dryland north part and the center of Senegal was found, reflecting adaptations to specific local conditions such as the water regime. However, the presence of salt does not seem to be an important structuring factor of Mesorhizobium species.

  18. Genetic and genomic diversity studies of Acacia symbionts in Senegal reveal new species of Mesorhizobium with a putative geographical pattern.

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    Fatou Diouf

    Full Text Available Acacia senegal (L Willd. and Acacia seyal Del. are highly nitrogen-fixing and moderately salt tolerant species. In this study we focused on the genetic and genomic diversity of Acacia mesorhizobia symbionts from diverse origins in Senegal and investigated possible correlations between the genetic diversity of the strains, their soil of origin, and their tolerance to salinity. We first performed a multi-locus sequence analysis on five markers gene fragments on a collection of 47 mesorhizobia strains of A. senegal and A. seyal from 8 localities. Most of the strains (60% clustered with the M. plurifarium type strain ORS 1032T, while the others form four new clades (MSP1 to MSP4. We sequenced and assembled seven draft genomes: four in the M. plurifarium clade (ORS3356, ORS3365, STM8773 and ORS1032T, one in MSP1 (STM8789, MSP2 (ORS3359 and MSP3 (ORS3324. The average nucleotide identities between these genomes together with the MLSA analysis reveal three new species of Mesorhizobium. A great variability of salt tolerance was found among the strains with a lack of correlation between the genetic diversity of mesorhizobia, their salt tolerance and the soils samples characteristics. A putative geographical pattern of A. senegal symbionts between the dryland north part and the center of Senegal was found, reflecting adaptations to specific local conditions such as the water regime. However, the presence of salt does not seem to be an important structuring factor of Mesorhizobium species.

  19. Molecular genetics: DNA analysis of a putative dog clone.

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    Parker, Heidi G; Kruglyak, Leonid; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2006-03-09

    In August 2005, Lee et al. reported the first cloning of a domestic dog from adult somatic cells. This putative dog clone was the result of somatic-cell nuclear transfer from a fibroblast cell of a three-year-old male Afghan hound into a donor oocyte provided by a dog of mixed breed. In light of recent concerns regarding the creation of cloned human cell lines from the same institution, we have undertaken an independent test to determine the validity of the claims made by Lee et al..

  20. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

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    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  1. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

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    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Roszak, Aleksander W. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.walker@glasgow.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  2. Putative bioactive motif of tritrpticin revealed by an antibody with biological receptor-like properties.

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    Raghava Sharma

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides represent one of the most promising future strategies for combating infections and microbial drug resistance. Tritrpticin is a 13mer tryptophan-rich cationic antimicrobial peptide with a broad spectrum of activity whose application in antimicrobial therapy has been hampered by ambiguity about its biological target and consequently the molecular interactions necessary for its antimicrobial activity. The present study provides clues about the mechanism of action of tritripticin by using a unique monoclonal antibody (mAb as a 'physiological' structural scaffold. A pool of mAbs were generated against tritrpticin and based on its high affinity and ability to bind tritrpticin analogs, mAb 6C6D7 was selected and characterized further. In a screening of phage displayed random peptides, this antibody was able to identify a novel antimicrobial peptide with low sequence homology to tritrpticin, suggesting that the mAb possessed the physico-chemical characteristics mimicking the natural receptor. Subsequently, thermodynamics and molecular modeling identified a core group of hydrophobic residues in tritrpticin arranged in a distorted's' shaped conformation as critical for antibody binding. Comparison of the mAb induced conformation with the micelle bound structure of tritrpticin reveals how a common motif may be able to interact with multiple classes of biomolecules thus extending the target range of this innate immune peptide. Based on the concurrence between thermodynamic and structural data our results reveal a template that can be used to design novel antimicrobial pharmacophores while simultaneously demonstrating at a more fundamental level the potential of mAbs to act as receptor surrogates.

  3. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment.

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    Fyfe, Cameron D; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J; Wall, Daniel M; Burchmore, Richard J S; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  4. The molecular diversity of freshwater picoeukaryotes reveals high occurrence of putative parasitoids in the plankton.

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    Emilie Lefèvre

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic microorganisms have been undersampled in biodiversity studies in freshwater environments. We present an original 18S rDNA survey of freshwater picoeukaryotes sampled during spring/summer 2005, complementing an earlier study conducted in autumn 2004 in Lake Pavin (France. These studies were designed to detect the small unidentified heterotrophic flagellates (HF, 0.6-5 microm which are considered the main bacterivores in aquatic systems. Alveolates, Fungi and Stramenopiles represented 65% of the total diversity and differed from the dominant groups known from microscopic studies. Fungi and Telonemia taxa were restricted to the oxic zone which displayed two fold more operational taxonomic units (OTUs than the oxycline. Temporal forcing also appeared as a driving force in the diversification within targeted organisms. Several sequences were not similar to those in databases and were considered as new or unsampled taxa, some of which may be typical of freshwater environments. Two taxa known from marine systems, the genera Telonema and Amoebophrya, were retrieved for the first time in our freshwater study. The analysis of potential trophic strategies displayed among the targeted HF highlighted the dominance of parasites and saprotrophs, and provided indications that these organisms have probably been wrongfully regarded as bacterivores in previous studies. A theoretical exercise based on a new 'parasite/saprotroph-dominated HF hypothesis' demonstrates that the inclusion of parasites and saprotrophs may increase the functional role of the microbial loop as a link for carbon flows in pelagic ecosystems. New interesting perspectives in aquatic microbial ecology are thus opened.

  5. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence.

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    Spain, S L; Pedroso, I; Kadeva, N; Miller, M B; Iacono, W G; McGue, M; Stergiakouli, E; Smith, G D; Putallaz, M; Lubinski, D; Meaburn, E L; Plomin, R; Simpson, M A

    2016-08-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. This study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case-control association analysis with 1409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ >170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (genome-wide complex trait analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (s.e. 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of putative peroxiredoxin in unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria

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    Cui Hongli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic prokaryotes with wide variations in genome sizes and ecological habitats. Peroxiredoxin (PRX is an important protein that plays essential roles in protecting own cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS. PRXs have been identified from mammals, fungi and higher plants. However, knowledge on cyanobacterial PRXs still remains obscure. With the availability of 37 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of PRXs and explored their diversity, distribution, domain structure and evolution. Results Overall 244 putative prx genes were identified, which were abundant in filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria, Acaryochloris marina MBIC 11017, and unicellular cyanobacteria inhabiting freshwater and hot-springs, while poor in all Prochlorococcus and marine Synechococcus strains. Among these putative genes, 25 open reading frames (ORFs encoding hypothetical proteins were identified as prx gene family members and the others were already annotated as prx genes. All 244 putative PRXs were classified into five major subfamilies (1-Cys, 2-Cys, BCP, PRX5_like, and PRX-like according to their domain structures. The catalytic motifs of the cyanobacterial PRXs were similar to those of eukaryotic PRXs and highly conserved in all but the PRX-like subfamily. Classical motif (CXXC of thioredoxin was detected in protein sequences from the PRX-like subfamily. Phylogenetic tree constructed of catalytic domains coincided well with the domain structures of PRXs and the phylogenies based on 16s rRNA. Conclusions The distribution of genes encoding PRXs in different unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria especially those sub-families like PRX-like or 1-Cys PRX correlate with the genome size, eco-physiology, and physiological properties of the organisms. Cyanobacterial and eukaryotic PRXs share similar conserved motifs, indicating that cyanobacteria adopt similar catalytic

  7. Functional analysis of nine putative chemoreceptor proteins in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

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    Meier, Veronika M; Muschler, Paul; Scharf, Birgit E

    2007-03-01

    The genome of the symbiotic soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti contains eight genes coding for methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) McpS to McpZ and one gene coding for a transducer-like protein, IcpA. Seven of the MCPs are localized in the cytoplasmic membrane via two membrane-spanning regions, whereas McpY and IcpA lack such hydrophobic regions. The periplasmic regions of McpU, McpV, and McpX contain the small-ligand-binding domain Cache. In addition, McpU possesses the ligand-binding domain TarH. By probing gene expression with lacZ fusions, we have identified mcpU and mcpX as being highly expressed. Deletion of any one of the receptor genes caused impairments in the chemotactic response toward most organic acids, amino acids, and sugars in a swarm plate assay. The data imply that chemoreceptor proteins in S. meliloti can sense more than one class of carbon source and suggest that many or all receptors work as an ensemble. Tactic responses were virtually eliminated for a strain lacking all nine receptor genes. Capillary assays revealed three important sensors for the strong attractant proline: McpU, McpX, and McpY. Receptor deletions variously affected free-swimming speed and attractant-induced chemokinesis. Noticeably, cells lacking mcpU were swimming 9% slower than the wild-type control. We infer that McpU inhibits the kinase activity of CheA in the absence of an attractant. Cells lacking one of the two soluble receptors were impaired in chemokinetic proficiency by more than 50%. We propose that the internal sensors, IcpA and the PAS domain containing McpY, monitor the metabolic state of S. meliloti.

  8. Large number of putative chemoreception and pheromone biosynthesis genes revealed by analyzing transcriptome from ovipositor-pheromone glands of Chilo suppressalis.

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    Xia, Yi-Han; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Hou, Xiao-Qing; Li, Fei; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2015-01-20

    The chemoreception role of moth ovipositor has long been suggested, but its molecular mechanism is mostly unknown. By transcriptomic analysis of the female ovipositor-pheromone glands (OV-PG) of Chilo suppressalis, we obtained 31 putative chemoreception genes (9 OBPs, 10 CSPs, 2 ORs, 1 SNMP, 8 CXEs and 1 AOX), in addition to 32 genes related to sex pheromone biosynthesis (1 FAS, 6 Dess, 10 FARs, 2 ACOs, 1 ACC, 4 FATPs, 3 ACBPs and 5 ELOs). Tissue expression profiles further revealed that CsupCSP2 and CsupCSP10 were OV-PG biased, while most chemoreception genes were highly and preferably expressed in antennae. This suggests that OV-PG employs mostly the same chemoreception proteins as in antennae, although the physiological roles of these proteins might be different in OV-PG. Of the 32 pheromone biosynthesis related genes, CsupDes4, CsupDes5 and CsupFAR2 are strongly OV-PG biased, and clustered with functionally validated genes from other moths, strongly indicating their involvement in specific step of the pheromone biosynthesis. Our study for the first time identified a large number of putative chemoreception genes, and provided an important basis for exploring the chemoreception mechanisms of OV-PG in C. suppressalis, as well as other moth species.

  9. Comparison of 454-ESTs from Huperzia serrata and Phlegmariurus carinatus reveals putative genes involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis and developmental regulation

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    Steinmetz André

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants of the Huperziaceae family, which comprise the two genera Huperzia and Phlegmariurus, produce various types of lycopodium alkaloids that are used to treat a number of human ailments, such as contusions, swellings and strains. Huperzine A, which belongs to the lycodine type of lycopodium alkaloids, has been used as an anti-Alzheimer's disease drug candidate. Despite their medical importance, little genomic or transcriptomic data are available for the members of this family. We used massive parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset for Huperzia serrata (H. serrata and Phlegmariurus carinatus (P. carinatus as representative members of the Huperzia and Phlegmariurus genera, respectively. H. serrata and P. carinatus are important plants for research on the biosynthesis of lycopodium alkaloids. We focused on gene discovery in the areas of bioactive compound biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation as well as genetic marker detection in these species. Results For H. serrata, 36,763 unique putative transcripts were generated from 140,930 reads totaling over 57,028,559 base pairs; for P. carinatus, 31,812 unique putative transcripts were generated from 79,920 reads totaling over 30,498,684 base pairs. Using BLASTX searches of public databases, 16,274 (44.3% unique putative transcripts from H. serrata and 14,070 (44.2% from P. carinatus were assigned to at least one protein. Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG orthology annotations revealed that the functions of the unique putative transcripts from these two species cover a similarly broad set of molecular functions, biological processes and biochemical pathways. In particular, a total of 20 H. serrata candidate cytochrome P450 genes, which are more abundant in leaves than in roots and might be involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis, were found based on the comparison of H

  10. Structural analysis of a putative SAM-dependent methyltransferase, YtqB, from Bacillus subtilis.

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    Park, Sun Cheol; Song, Wan Seok; Yoon, Sung-il

    2014-04-18

    S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases (MTases) methylate diverse biological molecules using a SAM cofactor. The ytqB gene of Bacillus subtilis encodes a putative MTase and its biological function has never been characterized. To reveal the structural features and the cofactor binding mode of YtqB, we have determined the crystal structures of YtqB alone and in complex with its cofactor, SAM, at 1.9 Å and 2.2 Å resolutions, respectively. YtqB folds into a β-sheet sandwiched by two α-helical layers, and assembles into a dimeric form. Each YtqB monomer contains one SAM binding site, which shapes SAM into a slightly curved conformation and exposes the reactive methyl group of SAM potentially to a substrate. Our comparative structural analysis of YtqB and its homologues indicates that YtqB is a SAM-dependent class I MTase, and provides insights into the substrate binding site of YtqB.

  11. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek (SC); (Toronto); (UV)

    2012-02-15

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

  12. Putatively novel serotypes and the potential for reduced vaccine effectiveness: capsular locus diversity revealed among 5405 pneumococcal genomes

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    van Tonder, Andries J.; Bray, James E.; Quirk, Sigríður J.; Haraldsson, Gunnsteinn; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Hoffmann, Steen; Bentley, Stephen D.; Haraldsson, Ásgeir; Erlendsdóttir, Helga; Kristinsson, Karl G.; Brueggemann, Angela B.

    2017-01-01

    The pneumococcus is a leading global pathogen and a key virulence factor possessed by the majority of pneumococci is an antigenic polysaccharide capsule (‘serotype’), which is encoded by the capsular (cps) locus. Approximately 100 different serotypes are known, but the extent of sequence diversity within the cps loci of individual serotypes is not well understood. Investigating serotype-specific sequence variation is crucial to the design of sequence-based serotyping methodology, understanding pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) effectiveness and the design of future PCVs. The availability of large genome datasets makes it possible to assess population-level variation among pneumococcal serotypes and in this study 5405 pneumococcal genomes were used to investigate cps locus diversity among 49 different serotypes. Pneumococci had been recovered between 1916 and 2014 from people of all ages living in 51 countries. Serotypes were deduced bioinformatically, cps locus sequences were extracted and variation was assessed within the cps locus, in the context of pneumococcal genetic lineages. Overall, cps locus sequence diversity varied markedly: low to moderate diversity was revealed among serogroups/types 1, 3, 7, 9, 11 and 22; whereas serogroups/types 6, 19, 23, 14, 15, 18, 33 and 35 displayed high diversity. Putative novel and/or hybrid cps loci were identified among all serogroups/types apart from 1, 3 and 9. This study demonstrated that cps locus sequence diversity varied widely between serogroups/types. Investigation of the biochemical structure of the polysaccharide capsule of major variants, particularly PCV-related serotypes and those that appear to be novel or hybrids, is warranted. PMID:28133541

  13. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins

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    Karyna eRosario

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs, which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses.

  14. Extra- and intracellular lactose catabolism in Penicillium chrysogenum: phylogenetic and expression analysis of the putative permease and hydrolase genes.

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    Jónás, Ágota; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Sándor, Erzsébet; Jäger, Szilvia; Molnár, Ákos P; Szentirmai, Attila; Karaffa, Levente

    2014-07-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is used as an industrial producer of penicillin. We investigated its catabolism of lactose, an abundant component of whey used in penicillin fermentation, comparing the type strain NRRL 1951 with the high producing strain AS-P-78. Both strains grew similarly on lactose as the sole carbon source under batch conditions, exhibiting almost identical time profiles of sugar depletion. In silico analysis of the genome sequences revealed that P. chrysogenum features at least five putative β-galactosidase (bGal)-encoding genes at the annotated loci Pc22g14540, Pc12g11750, Pc16g12750, Pc14g01510 and Pc06g00600. The first two proteins appear to be orthologs of two Aspergillus nidulans family 2 intracellular glycosyl hydrolases expressed on lactose. The latter three P. chrysogenum proteins appear to be distinct paralogs of the extracellular bGal from A. niger, LacA, a family 35 glycosyl hydrolase. The P. chrysogenum genome also specifies two putative lactose transporter genes at the annotated loci Pc16g06850 and Pc13g08630. These are orthologs of paralogs of the gene encoding the high-affinity lactose permease (lacpA) in A. nidulans for which P. chrysogenum appears to lack the ortholog. Transcript analysis of Pc22g14540 showed that it was expressed exclusively on lactose, whereas Pc12g11750 was weakly expressed on all carbon sources tested, including D-glucose. Pc16g12750 was co-expressed with the two putative intracellular bGal genes on lactose and also responded on L-arabinose. The Pc13g08630 transcript was formed exclusively on lactose. The data strongly suggest that P. chrysogenum exhibits a dual assimilation strategy for lactose, simultaneously employing extracellular and intracellular hydrolysis, without any correlation to the penicillin-producing potential of the studied strains.

  15. Complete coding sequence, sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase (TbOST II).

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    Baticados, Waren N; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Baticados, Abigail M

    2011-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence of putative Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense oligosaccharyl transferase gene was previously reported. Here, we describe the determination of its full-length nucleotide sequence by Inverse PCR (IPCR), subsequent biological sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling. The full-length DNA sequence has an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 2406 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 801 amino acid residues. Protein and DNA sequence analyses revealed that homologues within the genome of other kinetoplastid and various origins exist. Protein topology analysis predicted that Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase clone II (TbOST II) is a transmembrane protein with transmembrane helices in probably an N(cytosol)-C(cytosol) orientation. Data from the GenBank database assembly and sequence analyses in general clearly state that TbOST II is the STT3 subunit of OST in T.b. rhodesiense that necessitates further characterisation and functional studies with RNAi. TbOST II sequence had been deposited in the GenBank (accession number GU245937).

  16. Transcriptome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of Putative Chrysanthemum HD-Zip I and II Genes.

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    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Xin, Jingjing; Chen, Sumei; Zhao, Kunkun; Wu, Dan; Fan, Qingqing; Gao, Tianwei; Chen, Fadi; Guan, Zhiyong

    2016-05-17

    The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factor family is a key transcription factor family and unique to the plant kingdom. It consists of a homeodomain and a leucine zipper that serve in combination as a dimerization motif. The family can be classified into four subfamilies, and these subfamilies participate in the development of hormones and mediation of hormone action and are involved in plant responses to environmental conditions. However, limited information on this gene family is available for the important chrysanthemum ornamental species (Chrysanthemum morifolium). Here, we characterized 17 chrysanthemum HD-Zip genes based on transcriptome sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 17 CmHB genes were distributed in the HD-Zip subfamilies I and II and identified two pairs of putative orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum and four pairs of paralogous proteins in chrysanthemum. The software MEME was used to identify 7 putative motifs with E values less than 1e-3 in the chrysanthemum HD-Zip factors, and they can be clearly classified into two groups based on the composition of the motifs. A bioinformatics analysis predicted that 8 CmHB genes could be targeted by 10 miRNA families, and the expression of these 17 genes in response to phytohormone treatments and abiotic stresses was characterized. The results presented here will promote research on the various functions of the HD-Zip gene family members in plant hormones and stress responses.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of the relationship between disease occurrence and distance from a putative source of pollution

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    Emanuela Dreassi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The relation between disease risk and a point source of pollution is usually investigated using distance from the source as a proxy of exposure. The analysis may be based on case-control data or on aggregated data. The definition of the function relating risk of disease and distance is critical, both in a classical and in a Bayesian framework, because the likelihood is usually very flat, even with large amounts of data. In this paper we investigate how the specification of the function relating risk of disease with distance from the source and of the prior distributions on the parameters of the function affects the results when case-control data and Bayesian methods are used. We consider different popular parametric models for the risk distance function in a Bayesian approach, comparing estimates with those derived by maximum likelihood. As an example we have analyzed the relationship between a putative source of environmental pollution (an asbestos cement plant and the occurrence of pleural malignant mesothelioma in the area of Casale Monferrato (Italy in 1987-1993. Risk of pleural malignant mesothelioma turns out to be strongly related to distance from the asbestos cement plant. However, as the models appeared to be sensitive to modeling choices, we suggest that any analysis of disease risk around a putative source should be integrated with a careful sensitivity analysis and possibly with prior knowledge. The choice of prior distribution is extremely important and should be based on epidemiological considerations.

  18. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

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    Jennifer L Anderson

    Full Text Available Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio, neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate, the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  19. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

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    Anderson, Jennifer L; Rodríguez Marí, Adriana; Braasch, Ingo; Amores, Angel; Hohenlohe, Paul; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H

    2012-01-01

    Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate), the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2) offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA) wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag) markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  20. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

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    Allison Marie Barbaglia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho- lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012. Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein, a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH, which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while

  1. Identification and functional analysis of Penicillium digitatum genes putatively involved in virulence towards citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Mario; Ballester, Ana-Rosa; González-Candelas, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The fungus Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mould rot, is the most destructive post-harvest pathogen of citrus fruit in Mediterranean regions. In order to identify P. digitatum genes up-regulated during the infection of oranges that may constitute putative virulence factors, we followed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA macroarray hybridization approach. The origin of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was determined by comparison against the available genome sequences of both organisms. Genes coding for fungal proteases and plant cell wall-degrading enzymes represent the largest categories in the subtracted cDNA library. Northern blot analysis of a selection of P. digitatum genes, including those coding for proteases, cell wall-related enzymes, redox homoeostasis and detoxification processes, confirmed their up-regulation at varying time points during the infection process. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was used to generate knockout mutants for two genes encoding a pectin lyase (Pnl1) and a naphthalene dioxygenase (Ndo1). Two independent P. digitatum Δndo1 mutants were as virulent as the wild-type. However, the two Δpnl1 mutants analysed were less virulent than the parental strain or an ectopic transformant. Together, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the putative determinants of the virulence mechanisms of P. digitatum.

  2. Characterization of a new Vaccinia virus isolate reveals the C23L gene as a putative genetic marker for autochthonous Group 1 Brazilian Vaccinia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe L Assis

    Full Text Available Since 1999, several Vaccinia virus (VACV isolates, the etiological agents of bovine vaccinia (BV, have been frequently isolated and characterized with various biological and molecular methods. The results from these approaches have grouped these VACV isolates into two different clusters. This dichotomy has elicited debates surrounding the origin of the Brazilian VACV and its epidemiological significance. To ascertain vital information to settle these debates, we and other research groups have made efforts to identify molecular markers to discriminate VACV from other viruses of the genus Orthopoxvirus (OPV and other VACV-BR groups. In this way, some genes have been identified as useful markers to discriminate between the VACV-BR groups. However, new markers are needed to infer ancestry and to correlate each sample or group with its unique epidemiological and biological features. The aims of this work were to characterize a new VACV isolate (VACV DMTV-2005 molecularly and biologically using conserved and non-conserved gene analyses for phylogenetic inference and to search for new genes that would elucidate the VACV-BR dichotomy. The VACV DMTV-2005 isolate reported in this study is biologically and phylogenetically clustered with other strains of Group 1 VACV-BR, the most prevalent VACV group that was isolated during the bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil. Sequence analysis of C23L, the gene that encodes for the CC-chemokine-binding protein, revealed a ten-nucleotide deletion, which is a new Group 1 Brazilian VACV genetic marker. This deletion in the C23L open reading frame produces a premature stop-codon that is shared by all Group 1 VACV-BR strains and may also reflect the VACV-BR dichotomy; the deletion can also be considered to be a putative genetic marker for non-virulent Brazilian VACV isolates and may be used for the detection and molecular characterization of new isolates.

  3. Genetic Characterization of Plasmodium Putative Pantothenate Kinase Genes Reveals Their Essential Role in Malaria Parasite Transmission to the Mosquito

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J.; Cornillot, Emmanuel; Abraham, Amanah; Molina, Emily; Nation, Catherine S.; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Aly, Ahmed S. I.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic machinery for the biosynthesis of Coenzyme A (CoA) from exogenous pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5) has long been considered as an excellent target for the development of selective antimicrobials. Earlier studies in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown that pantothenate analogs interfere with pantothenate phosphorylation and block asexual blood stage development. Although two eukaryotic-type putative pantothenate kinase genes (PanK1 and PanK2) have been identified in all malaria parasite species, their role in the development of Plasmodium life cycle stages remains unknown. Here we report on the genetic characterization of PanK1 and PanK2 in P. yoelii. We show that P. yoelii parasites lacking either PanK1 or PanK2 undergo normal asexual stages development and sexual stages differentiation, however they are severely deficient in ookinete, oocyst and sporozoite formation inside the mosquito vector. Quantitative transcriptional analyses in wild-type and knockout parasites demonstrate an important role for these genes in the regulation of expression of other CoA biosynthesis genes. Together, our data provide the first genetic evidence for the importance of the early steps of pantothenate utilization in the regulation of CoA biosynthesis and malaria parasite transmission to Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:27644319

  4. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis in search for a putative Paramecium beta-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płatek, A; Wiejak, J; Wyroba, E

    1999-01-01

    RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis were performed in order to search for a putative beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) in Paramecium using several beta2-adrenergic-specific molecular probes. Under strictly defined RT-PCR conditions DNA species of expected molecular size about 360 bp were generated with the primers corresponding to the universal mammalian beta2-AR sequence tagged sites (located within the 4th and the 6th transmembrane regions of the receptor). This RT-PCR product hybridized in Southern blot analysis with the oligonucleotide probe designed to the highly conservative beta2-AR region involved in G-proteins interaction and located within the amplified region. Northern hybridization was performed on Paramecium total RNA and mRNA with human beta2-AR cDNA and two oligonucleotide probes: the first included Phe 290 involved in agonist binding (Strader et al., 1995) and the second was the backward RT-PCR primer. All these probes revealed the presence of about 2 kb mRNA which is consistent with the size of beta2-AR transcripts found in higher eukaryotes.

  5. Transcriptome analysis of Solanum melongena L. (eggplant) fruit to identify putative allergens and their epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Kumar Ramagoni; Hemalatha, R; Vijayendra, Chary Anchoju; Arshi, Uz Zaman Syed; Dushyant, Singh Baghel; Dinesh, Kumar Bharadwaj

    2016-01-15

    Eggplant is the third most important Solanaceae crop after tomato and potato, particularly in India and China. A transcriptome analysis of eggplant's fruit was performed to study genes involved in medicinal importance and allergies. Illumina HiSeq 2000 system generated 89,763,638 raw reads (~18 Gb) from eggplant. High quality reads (59,039,694) obtained after trimming process, were assembled into a total of 149,224 non redundant set of transcripts. Out of 80,482 annotated sequences of eggplant fruit (BLASTx results against nr-green plant database), 40,752 transcripts showed significant similarity with predicted proteins of Solanum tuberosum (51%) followed by Solanum lycopersicum (34%) and other sequenced plant genomes. With BLASTx top hit analysis against existing allergens, a total of 1986 homologous allergen sequences were found, which had >37% similarity with 48 different allergens existing in the database. From the 48 putative allergens, 526 B-cell linear epitopes were identified using BepiPred linear epitope prediction tool. Transcript sequences generated from this study can be used to map epitopes of monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera from patients. With the support of this whole transcriptome catalogue of eggplant fruit, complete list of genes can be predicted based on which secondary structures of proteins may be modeled.

  6. Exome sequence analysis of Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma: identification of putative driver mutations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Sho; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Harada, Miho; Masuguchi, Shinichi; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma is a rare, intermediate, malignant tumor. The tumor's etiology remains unknown and there are no specific treatments. OBJECTIVE In this study, we performed exome sequencing using DNA from a Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma patient, and found putative candidates for the responsible mutations. METHOD The genomic DNA for exome sequencing was obtained from the tumor tissue and matched normal tissue from the same individual. Exome sequencing was performed on HiSeq2000 sequencer platform. RESULTS Among oncogenes, germline missense single nucleotide variants were observed in the TP53 and APC genes in both the tumor and normal tissue. As tumor-specific somatic mutations, we identified 81 candidate genes, including 4 nonsense changes, 68 missense changes and 9 insertions/deletions. The mutations in ITGB2, IL-32 and DIDO1 were included in them. CONCLUSION This is a pilot study, and future analysis with more patients is needed to clarify: the detailed pathogenesis of this tumor, the novel diagnostic methods by detecting specific mutations, and the new therapeutic strategies targeting the mutation. PMID:28099595

  7. Peptidomic Analysis of Amniotic Fluid for Identification of Putative Bioactive Peptides in Ventricular Septal Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventricular septal defect (VSD is one of the most common congenital heart diseases and to date the role of peptides in human amniotic fluid in the pathogenesis of VSD have been rarely investigated. Methods: To gain insight into the mechanisms of protein and peptides in cardiovascular development, we constructed a comparative peptidomic profiling of human amniotic fluid between normal and VSD fetuses using a stable isobaric labeling strategy involving tandem mass tag reagents, followed by nano liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results: We identified and quantified 692 non-redundant peptides, 183 of which were differentially expressed in the amniotic fluid of healthy and VSD fetuses; 69 peptides were up regulated and 114 peptides were down regulated. These peptides were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA and identified putative roles in cardiovascular system morphogenesis and cardiogenesis. Conclusion: We concluded that 35 peptides located within the functional domains of their precursor proteins could be candidate bioactive peptides for VSD. The identified peptide changes in amniotic fluid of VSD fetuses may advance our current understanding of congenital heart disease and these peptides may be involved in the etiology of VSD.

  8. Transcriptome profiling of the eyestalk of precocious juvenile Chinese mitten crab reveals putative neuropeptides and differentially expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Muzi; Li, Xuguang; Lu, Quanping; Li, Yuehua; Ge, Jiachun; Pan, Jianlin

    2015-09-15

    Chinese mitten crabs that reach maturity 1 year earlier than normal crabs are known as precocious juvenile crabs. The molecular mechanisms underlying the precocity of the Chinese mitten crab are poorly understood. To identify the genes that may be involved in the control of precocity in Chinese mitten crab, we measured the expression profile of eyestalk genes in precocious and normally developed juvenile crabs using high-throughput sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. We obtained 56,446,284 raw reads from the precocious crabs and 58,029,476 raw reads from the normally developed juvenile crabs. Reads from the two libraries were combined into a single data set. De novo assembly of the combined read set yielded 78,777 unigenes with an average length of 1563 bp. A total of 41,405 unigenes with predicted ORFs were selected for functional annotation. Among these genes, we identified three neuropeptide genes belonging to the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone family and two neuropeptide genes encoding the chromatophorotropic hormones. Transcriptome comparison between the two libraries revealed 42 genes that exhibited significant differential expression, of which 29 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated in the precocious crabs. To confirm the sequencing data, six differentially expressed genes with functional annotations were selected and validated by qRT-PCR. In conclusion, we obtained the comprehensive transcriptome of the eyestalk tissues of precocious juvenile crabs. The sequencing results may provide new insights into the biomolecular basis of precocity in the Chinese mitten crab.

  9. Functional analysis of putative phosphoenolpyruvate transporters localized to the Golgi apparatus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Higuchi, Yujiro; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    The cell surface of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is negatively charged due to the presence of pyruvylated oligosaccharides, which is important for cell-cell recognition. However, the mechanism of pyruvate supply to oligosaccharides is not clearly understood. Here, we analyzed three putative phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transporter genes (pet1(+) , pet2(+) , and pet3(+) ) in S. pombe, identified by sequence homology search against the Arabidopsis thaliana PEP transporter AtPPT1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain carrying a disruption in pet1(+) (pet1Δ) or in pet2(+) (pet2Δ), but not the strain carrying a disruption in pet3(+) (pet3Δ), showed reduced pyruvate level on the cell surface. This reduction in pyruvate level was restored to the control level by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p in respective disruptants. Fluorescence microscope studies revealed that GFP-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p were localized to the Golgi apparatus. Although expression of neither AtPPT1 nor AtPPT2 suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype, that of chimeric constructs, where the N-terminal regions of AtPPT1 and AtPPT2 were replaced by the N-terminal region of Pet1p, partially suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in cell surface negative charge in pet1Δ cells was restored by incubating these cells with recombinant Pvg1p and PEP. Thus, Pet1p and Pet2p are likely involved in transporting PEP from the cytoplasm into the Golgi.

  10. Combining quantitative trait loci and heterogeneous microarray data analyses reveals putative candidate pathways affecting mastitis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska-Sabat, A M; Günther, J; Seyfert, H M; Olsaker, I

    2012-12-01

    Mastitis is a frequent disease and considerable problem for the global dairy industry. Identification of solutions leading to the development of new control strategies is therefore of high importance. In this study, we have integrated genomic data from genome-wide association mapping in cattle with transcriptomic data from microarray studies of several mastitis pathogens and host species in vitro and in vivo. To identify significant candidate pathways directly and indirectly involved in the immune response to mastitis, ingenuity pathway analysis (ipa) and database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery bioinformatic (david) were applied. Several candidate pathways were found. Of great interest are IL-17 and IL-8 signalling pathways, responsible for the recruitment and migration of inflammatory cells into tissue during inflammation and infection. These results may emphasize further functional studies for identification of factors contributing to resistance to mastitis pathogens in cattle.

  11. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrenkrog, Annette M. [School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, PO Box 110410 Gainesville FL 32611 USA; Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, University of Florida, PO Box 110690 Gainesville FL 32610 USA; Neves, Leandro G. [School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, PO Box 110410 Gainesville FL 32611 USA; Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, University of Florida, PO Box 110690 Gainesville FL 32610 USA; Resende, Márcio F. R. [School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, PO Box 110410 Gainesville FL 32611 USA; Genetics and Genomics Graduate Program, University of Florida, PO Box 103610 Gainesville FL 32610 USA; Vazquez, Ana I. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University, 909 Fee Road East Lansing MI 48824 USA; de los Campos, Gustavo [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University, 909 Fee Road East Lansing MI 48824 USA; Statistics Department, Michigan State University, 619 Red Cedar Road MI 48824 USA; Dervinis, Christopher [School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, PO Box 110410 Gainesville FL 32611 USA; Sykes, Robert [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Davis, Mark [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Davenport, Ruth [Biology Department, University of Florida, PO Box 118525 Gainesville FL 32611 USA; Barbazuk, William B. [Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, University of Florida, PO Box 110690 Gainesville FL 32610 USA; Biology Department, University of Florida, PO Box 118525 Gainesville FL 32611 USA; University of Florida Genetics Institute, University of Florida, PO Box 103610 Gainesville FL 32611 USA; Kirst, Matias [School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, PO Box 110410 Gainesville FL 32611 USA; Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, University of Florida, PO Box 110690 Gainesville FL 32610 USA; University of Florida Genetics Institute, University of Florida, PO Box 103610 Gainesville FL 32611 USA

    2016-09-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genes in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. These polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.

  12. Identification of a Putative Quantitative Trait Gene for Resistance to Obesity in Mice Using Transcriptome Analysis and Causal Inference Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Akira

    2017-01-01

    It is still challenging to identify causal genes governing obesity. Pbwg1.5, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for resistance to obesity, was previously discovered from wild Mus musculus castaneus mice and was fine-mapped to a 2.1-Mb genomic region of mouse chromosome 2, where no known gene with an effect on white adipose tissue (WAT) has been reported. The aim of this study was to identify a strong candidate gene for Pbwg1.5 by an integration approach of transcriptome analysis (RNA-sequencing followed by real-time PCR analysis) and the causal inference test (CIT), a statistical method to infer causal relationships between diplotypes, gene expression and trait values. Body weight, body composition and biochemical traits were measured in F2 mice obtained from an intercross between the C57BL/6JJcl strain and a congenic strain carrying Pbwg1.5 on the C57BL/6JJcl background. The F2 mice showed significant diplotype differences in 12 traits including body weight, WAT weight and serum cholesterol/triglyceride levels. The transcriptome analysis revealed that Ly75, Pla2r1, Fap and Gca genes were differentially expressed in the liver and that Fap, Ifih1 and Grb14 were differentially expressed in WAT. However, CITs indicated statistical evidence that only the liver Ly75 gene mediated between genotype and WAT. Ly75 expression was negatively associated with WAT weight. The results suggested that Ly75 is a putative quantitative trait gene for the obesity-resistant Pbwg1.5 QTL discovered from the wild M. m. castaneus mouse. The finding provides a novel insight into a better understanding of the genetic basis for prevention of obesity.

  13. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes investigation revealed atypical enteropathogenic E. coli as putative emerging diarrheal agents in children living in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Regiane C B; Dos Santos, Bruna C; Dos Santos, Luis F; Vieira, Melissa A; Yamatogi, Ricardo S; Mondelli, Alessandro L; Sadatsune, Terue; Sforcin, José M; Gomes, Tânia A T; Hernandes, Rodrigo T

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) pathotypes, a leading cause of diarrhea worldwide, among diarrheal and healthy children, up to 5 years of age, living in the city of Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil. DEC, investigated by PCR detection of virulence factor-encoding genes associated with the distinct pathotypes, was isolated from 18.0% of the patients, and 19.0% of the controls, with enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), the most frequent pathotype, being detected in equal proportion between patients and controls (10.0%). Among the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) isolates, only one isolate was able to produce the localized adherence pattern to HeLa cells, being thus the only typical EPEC identified. All the remaining EPEC were classified as atypical (aEPEC), and detected in 8.0% and 8.5% of the patients and controls, respectively. Regarding the serotypes, 26.5% of the analyzed EPEC isolates belonged to classical EPEC-serogroups, and the only two STEC found were serotyped as O26:H11 (patient) and O119:H7 (control). Antimicrobial susceptibility tests revealed that 43.6%, 29.5% and 2.6% of the DEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and gentamicin, respectively. Our data indicate that EAEC remains prevalent among children living in Botucatu, and revealed atypical EPEC as emerging putative diarrheal agents in this geographical region.

  14. Bioinformatic Analysis of Putative Gene Products Encoded in SARS-HCoV Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵心刚; 韩敬东; 宁元亨; 孟安明; 陈晔光

    2003-01-01

    The cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been identified as a new coronavirus named as SARS-HCoV.Using bioinformatic methods, we have performed a detailed domain search.In addition to the viral structure proteins, we have found that several putative polypeptides share sequence similarity to known domains or proteins.This study may provide a basis for future studies on the infection and replication process of this notorious virus.

  15. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris: Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis and Deduction of Putative Cognate Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-01-20

    ABSTRACT-Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTS) composed of sensory histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR), constitute a key element of the mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to changes in environments. A large number of TCSTSs including 59 putative HKs and 55 RRs were identified from the Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome, indicating their important roles in regulation of cellular metabolism. In this study, the structural and phylogenetic analysis of all putative TCSTSs in D. vulgaris was performed. The results showed D. vulgaris contained an unexpectedly large number of hybrid-type HKs, implying that multiple-step phosphorelay may be a common signal transduction mechanism in D. vulgaris. Most TCSTS components of D. vulgaris were found clustered into several subfamilies previously recognized in other bacteria and extensive co-evolution between D. vulgaris HKs and RRs was observed, suggesting that the concordance of HKs and RRs in cognate phylogenetic groups could be indicative of cognate TCSTSs...

  16. Digital transcriptome analysis of putative sex-determination genes in papaya (Carica papaya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Urasaki

    Full Text Available Papaya (Carica papaya is a trioecious plant species that has male, female and hermaphrodite flowers on different plants. The primitive sex chromosomes genetically determine the sex of the papaya. Although draft sequences of the papaya genome are already available, the genes for sex determination have not been identified, likely due to the complicated structure of its sex-chromosome sequences. To identify the candidate genes for sex determination, we conducted a transcriptome analysis of flower samples from male, female and hermaphrodite plants using high-throughput SuperSAGE for digital gene expression analysis. Among the short sequence tags obtained from the transcripts, 312 unique tags were specifically mapped to the primitive sex chromosome (X or Y(h sequences. An annotation analysis revealed that retroelements are the most abundant sequences observed in the genes corresponding to these tags. The majority of tags on the sex chromosomes were located on the X chromosome, and only 30 tags were commonly mapped to both the X and Y(h chromosome, implying a loss of many genes on the Y(h chromosome. Nevertheless, candidate Y(h chromosome-specific female determination genes, including a MADS-box gene, were identified. Information on these sex chromosome-specific expressed genes will help elucidating sex determination in the papaya.

  17. Digital transcriptome analysis of putative sex-determination genes in papaya (Carica papaya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urasaki, Naoya; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Shudo, Ayano; Ueno, Hiroki; Tamaki, Moritoshi; Miyagi, Norimichi; Adaniya, Shinichi; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is a trioecious plant species that has male, female and hermaphrodite flowers on different plants. The primitive sex chromosomes genetically determine the sex of the papaya. Although draft sequences of the papaya genome are already available, the genes for sex determination have not been identified, likely due to the complicated structure of its sex-chromosome sequences. To identify the candidate genes for sex determination, we conducted a transcriptome analysis of flower samples from male, female and hermaphrodite plants using high-throughput SuperSAGE for digital gene expression analysis. Among the short sequence tags obtained from the transcripts, 312 unique tags were specifically mapped to the primitive sex chromosome (X or Y(h)) sequences. An annotation analysis revealed that retroelements are the most abundant sequences observed in the genes corresponding to these tags. The majority of tags on the sex chromosomes were located on the X chromosome, and only 30 tags were commonly mapped to both the X and Y(h) chromosome, implying a loss of many genes on the Y(h) chromosome. Nevertheless, candidate Y(h) chromosome-specific female determination genes, including a MADS-box gene, were identified. Information on these sex chromosome-specific expressed genes will help elucidating sex determination in the papaya.

  18. Mutation analysis of novel human liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Liao; Tsai-Ping Li; Mu-Jun Zhao; Jing Zhao; Hai Song; Pascal Pineau; Agnès Marchio; Anne Dejean; Pierre Tiollais; Hong-Yang Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To find the point mutations meaningful for inactivationof liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene (LPTS) gene,a human novel liver-related putative tumor suppressor geneand telomerase inhibitor in hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: The entire coding sequence of LPTS genewas examined for mutations by single strand conformationpolymorphism (SSCP) assay and PCR products directsequencing in 56 liver cancer cell lines, 7 ovarian cancerand 7 head & neck tumor cell lines and 70 pairs of HCCtissues samples. The cDNA fragment coding for the mostfrequent mutant protein was subcloned into GST fusionexpression vector. The product was expressed in E. coliand purified by glutathione-agarose column. Telomericrepeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays wereperformed to study the effect of point mutation totelomerase inhibitory activity.RESULTS: SSCP gels showed the abnormal shifting bandsand DNA sequencing found that there were 5 differentmutations and/or polymorphisms in 12 tumor cell lineslocated at exon2, exon5 and exon7. The main alterationswere A(778)A/G and A(880)T in exon7. The change in siteof 778 could not be found in HCC tissue samples, while themutation in position 880 was seen in 7 (10 %) cases. Themutation in the site of 880 had no effect on telomeraseinhibitory activity.CONCLUSION: Alterations identified in this study arepolymorphisms of LPTS gene. LPTS mutations occur in HCCbut are infrequent and of little effect on the telomeraseinhibitory function of the protein. Epigenetics, such asmethylation, acetylation, may play the key role in inactivationof LPTS.

  19. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I; Brown, Eric C; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H H; Gejman, Pablo V

    2015-08-15

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms.

  20. Sequence Divergence of Microsatellites and Phylogeny Analysis in Tetraploid Cotton Species and Their Putative Diploid Ancestors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-Zhen GUO; Dong FANG; Wen-Duo YU; Tian-Zhen ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    To determine the level of microsatellite sequence differences and to use the information to construct a phylogenetic relationship for cultivated tetraploid cotton (Gossypium spp.) species and their putative diploid ancestors, 10 genome-derived microsatellite primer pairs were used to amplify eight species,including two tetraploid and six diploid species, in Gossypium. A total of 92 unique amplicons were resolved using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Each amplicon was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed using standard phylogenetic software. Allelic diversities were caused mostly by changes in the number of simple sequence repeat (SSR) motif repeats and only a small proportion resulted from interruption of the SSR motif within the locus for the same genome. The frequency of base substitutions was 0.5%-1.0% in different genomes, with only few indels found. Based on the combined 10 SSR flanking sequence data, the homology of A-genome diploid species averaged 98.9%, even though most of the amplicons were of the same size, and the sequence homology between G. gossypioides (Ulbr.) Standl. and three other D-genome species (G.raimondii Ulbr., G. davidsonii Kell., and G. thurberi Tod.) was 98.5%, 98.6%, and 98.5%, respectively.Phylogenetic trees of the two allotetraploid species and their putative diploid progenitors showed that homoelogous sequences from the A- and D-subgenome were still present in the polyploid subgenomes and they evolved independently. Meanwhile, homoelogous sequence interaction that duplicated loci in the polyploid subgenomes became phylogenetic sisters was also found in the evolutionary history of tetraploid cotton species. The results of the present study suggest that evaluation of SSR variation at the sequence level can be effective in exploring the evolutionary relationships among Gossypuim species.

  1. Genetic analysis of BIRC4/XIAP as a putative modifier gene of Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karl Heinz; Runz, Heiko; Noe, Barbara; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Merle, Uta; Ferenci, Peter; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Füllekrug, Joachim

    2010-12-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive copper overload disorder caused by mutations in the copper-transporting adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) ATP7B. It presents with a highly variable clinical phenotype ranging from asymptomatic to fulminant hepatic failure or progressive neurological involvement. No clear genotype-phenotype correlation has been established. Thus, variants in modifier genes could have an impact on WD manifestation and severity. Recently, the antiapoptotic protein baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 4 BIRC4/XIAP has been suggested as a regulator of copper-induced cell death. With the aim of investigating a putative role of BIRC4/XIAP as modifier gene in individuals with copper overload, we analyzed a WD patient cohort (n = 98) for sequence variants at the BIRC4/XIAP locus. When compared with clinical data, the previously described coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the BRIC4/XIAP locus (rs28382721, rs28382722, rs28382723, rs5956583, rs28382740, rs12838858, rs28382741) did not correlate with age of onset or clinical presentation in our collective. However, three previously unreported variants in the BIRC4/XIAP gene were identified (c.1-26 T > G; c.1408A > T; p.T470S; c.1019A > G; p.N340S). The two patients with variants leading to amino acid exchanges in the BIRC4/XIAP protein showed a remarkably early disease onset at the age of 5 years. Furthermore, one of these patients was only heterozygous for disease-causing mutations in the ATP7B gene. In summary, these data emphasize the need to further elucidate a role of BIRC4/XIAP variants as putative pathogenetic factors in copper overload disorders.

  2. Molecular identification of aiiA homologous gene from endophytic Enterobacter species and in silico analysis of putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2014-01-03

    The aiiA homologous gene known to encode AHL- lactonase enzyme which hydrolyze the N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing signaling molecules produced by Gram negative bacteria. In this study, the degradation of AHL molecules was determined by cell-free lysate of endophytic Enterobacter species. The percentage of quorum quenching was confirmed and quantified by HPLC method (pEnterobacter asburiae VT65, Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 and Enterobacter ludwigii VT70 strains. Sequence alignment analysis revealed the presence of two zinc binding sites, "HXHXDH" motif as well as tyrosine residue at the position 194. Based on known template available at Swiss-Model, putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase was constructed. The result showed that novel endophytic strains of Enterobacter genera encode the novel aiiA homologous gene and its structural importance for future study.

  3. Determination and Analysis of the Putative AcaCD-Responsive Promoters of Salmonella Genomic Island 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasz, Ferenc; Kiss, János

    2016-01-01

    The integrative genomic island SGI1 and its variants confer multidrug resistance in numerous Salmonella enterica serovariants and several Proteus mirabilis and Acinetobacter strains. SGI1 is mobilized by the IncA/C family plasmids. The island exploits not only the conjugation apparatus of the plasmid, but also utilizes the plasmid-encoded master regulator AcaCD to induce the excision and formation of its transfer-competent form, which is a key step in the horizontal transfer of SGI1. Triggering of SGI1 excision occurs via the AcaCD-dependent activation of xis gene expression. AcaCD binds in Pxis to an unusually long recognition sequence. Beside the Pxis promoter, upstream regions of four additional SGI1 genes, S004, S005, S012 and S018, also contain putative AcaCD-binding sites. Furthermore, SGI1 also encodes an AcaCD-related activator, FlhDCSGI1, which has no known function. Here, we have analysed the functionality of the putative AcaCD-dependent promoter regions and proved their activation by either AcaCD or FlhDCSGI1. Moreover, we provide evidence that both activators act on the same binding site in Pxis and that FlhDCSGI1 is able to complement the acaCD deletion of the IncA/C family plasmid R16a. We determined the transcription start sites for the AcaCD-responsive promoters and showed that orf S004 is expressed probably from a different start codon than predicted earlier. Additionally, expression of S003 from promoter PS004 was ruled out. Pxis and the four SGI1 promoters examined here also lack obvious -35 promoter box and their promoter profile is consistent with the class II-type activation pathway. Although the role of the four additionally analysed AcaCD/FlhDCSGI1-controlled genes in transfer and/or maintenance of SGI1 is not yet clear, the conservation of the whole region suggests the existence of some selection for their functionality. PMID:27727307

  4. Insilico Analysis unveils Putative Metabolic Pathways and Essential Genes within Leishmania donovani ‘Orfeome’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithin eRavooru

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Leishmania, which is active in two broad forms namely, Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL or Kala Azar and Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL. The disease is most prevalent in the tropical regions and poses a threat to more than 70 countries across the globe. In the Indian subcontinent, about 200 million people are estimated to be at risk of developing VL and this area harbours an estimated 67% of the global VL disease burden. The state of Bihar alone has captured almost 50% of the total cases in the Indian region. While no vaccination exists, several pentavalent antimonials and drugs like Paromomycin, Amphotericin, Miltefosine etc., are used in the treatment of Leishmaniasis. However, due to low efficacy of these drugs and the resistance developed by the bug to these medications, there is an urgent need to look into species specific targets. The proteome information available suggests that among the 7960 proteins, a staggering 65% of it remains to be annotated with clarity.Hence, in the present study, we have demonstrated a protocol to integrate the seqeunce and functional information from various databases, such as GO, PFAM, KEGG, String DB, COG and DEG, to assign putative functions to many of the hypothetical seqeucences present in this proteome. These crucial information related to pathways and essential genes show promise for exploring the design strategies towards developing drugs, to tackle this notorious parasitic disease.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of the putative heart of Louis XVII, son of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehaes, E; Pfeiffer, H; Toprak, K; Decorte, R; Brinkmann, B; Cassiman, J J

    2001-03-01

    According to official historiography, the 10-year-old Louis XVII died in the Temple of Paris on June 8, 1795. However, public rumour spread the theory that Louis XVII escaped and that his descendants would be alive today. One such putative 'Louis XVII' was Carl Wilhelm Naundorff, who died in 1845 in Delft (the Netherlands). Comparative mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis gave evidence that his remains could not be identified as those of Louis XVII. In the present study, mtDNA analysis was performed on the heart of the young boy who died in the prison of Paris in 1795. In order to obtain the strongest evidence possible, two laboratories independently analysed the heart. The results showed that the consensus mtDNA sequence of the heart was identical to that of the maternal relatives of Louis XVII.

  6. Natural Leishmania (Viannia) spp. infections in phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Brazilian Amazon region reveal new putative transmission cycles of American cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Adelson Alcimar Almeida; Dos Santos, Thiago Vasconcelos; Jennings, Yara Lúcia Lins; Ishikawa, Edna Aoba Yassui; Barata, Iorlando da Rocha; Silva, Maria das Graças Soares; Lima, José Aprígio Nunes; Shaw, Jeffrey; Lainson, Ralph; Silveira, Fernando Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In Amazonian Brazil the etiological agents of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) belong to at least seven Leishmania species but little is known about the putative phlebotomine sand fly vectors in different biomes. In 2002-2003 a survey of the phlebotomine fauna was undertaken in the "Floresta Nacional do Tapajós", Belterra municipality, in the lower Amazon region, western Pará State, Brazil, where we recently confirmed the presence of a putative hybrid parasite, L. (V.) guyanensis × L. (V.) shawi shawi. Sand flies were collected from Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps, Shannon traps and by aspiration on tree bases. Females were dissected and attempts to isolate any flagellate infections were made by inoculating homogenized midguts into Difco B(45) medium. Isolates were characterized by monoclonal antibodies and isoenzyme electrophoresis. A total of 9,704 sand flies, belonging to 68 species or subspecies, were collected. Infections were found in the following sand flies: L. (V.) naiffi with Psychodopygus hirsutus hirsutus (1) and Ps. davisi (2); and L. (V.) shawi shawi with Nyssomyia whitmani (3) and Lutzomyia gomezi (1). These results provide strong evidence of new putative transmission cycles for L. (V.) naiffi and L. (V.) s. shawi.

  7. Putative regulatory sites unraveled by network-embedded thermodynamic analysis of metabolome data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kümmel, Anne; Panke, Sven; Heinemann, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    As one of the most recent members of the omics family, large-scale quantitative metabolomics data are currently complementing our systems biology data pool and offer the chance to integrate the metabolite level into the functional analysis of cellular networks. Network-embedded thermodynamic analysi

  8. Putative psychosis genes in the prefrontal cortex: combined analysis of gene expression microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolken Robert H

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown similarities between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in phenotypes and in genotypes, and those studies have contributed to an ongoing re-evaluation of the traditional dichotomy between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder with psychotic features may be closely related to schizophrenia and therefore, psychosis may be an alternative phenotype compared to the traditional diagnosis categories. Methods We performed a cross-study analysis of 7 gene expression microarrays that include both psychosis and non-psychosis subjects. These studies include over 400 microarray samples (163 individual subjects on 3 different Affymetrix microarray platforms. Results We found that 110 transcripts are differentially regulated (p Conclusion This study demonstrates the advantages of cross-study analysis in detecting consensus changes in gene expression across multiple microarray studies. Differential gene expression between individuals with and without psychosis suggests that psychosis may be a useful phenotypic variable to complement the traditional diagnosis categories.

  9. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase genes from Arachis hypogaea L.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meng-Jun Li; Ai-Qin Li; Han Xia; Chuan-Zhi Zhao; Chang-Sheng Li; Shu-Bo Wan; Yu-Ping Bi; Xing-Jun Wang

    2009-06-01

    The cultivated peanut is a valuable source of dietary oil and ranks fifth among the world oil crops. Plant fatty acid biosynthesis is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) in plastids and mitochondria. By constructing a full-length cDNA library derived from immature peanut seeds and homology-based cloning, candidate genes of acyl carrier protein (ACP), malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, -ketoacyl-ACP synthase (I, II, III), -ketoacyl-ACP reductase, -hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase and enoyl-ACP reductase were isolated. Sequence alignments revealed that primary structures of type II FAS enzymes were highly conserved in higher plants and the catalytic residues were strictly conserved in Escherichia coli and higher plants. Homologue numbers of each type II FAS gene expressing in developing peanut seeds varied from 1 in KASII, KASIII and HD to 5 in ENR. The number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was quite different in each gene. Peanut type II FAS genes were predicted to target plastids except ACP2 and ACP3. The results suggested that peanut may contain two type II FAS systems in plastids and mitochondria. The type II FAS enzymes in higher plants may have similar functions as those in E. coli.

  10. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase genes from Arachis hypogaea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Jun; Li, Ai-Qin; Xia, Han; Zhao, Chuan-Zhi; Li, Chang-Sheng; Wan, Shu-Bo; Bi, Yu-Ping; Wang, Xing-Jun

    2009-06-01

    The cultivated peanut is a valuable source of dietary oil and ranks fifth among the world oil crops. Plant fatty acid biosynthesis is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) in plastids and mitochondria. By constructing a full-length cDNA library derived from immature peanut seeds and homology-based cloning, candidate genes of acyl carrier protein (ACP), malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (I, II, III), beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, beta-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase and enoyl-ACP reductase were isolated. Sequence alignments revealed that primary structures of type II FAS enzymes were highly conserved in higher plants and the catalytic residues were strictly conserved in Escherichia coli and higher plants. Homologue numbers of each type II FAS gene expressing in developing peanut seeds varied from 1 in KASII, KASIII and HD to 5 in ENR. The number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was quite different in each gene. Peanut type II FAS genes were predicted to target plastids except ACP2 and ACP3. The results suggested that peanut may contain two type II FAS systems in plastids and mitochondria. The type II FAS enzymes in higher plants may have similar functions as those in E. coli.

  11. Expression analysis of putative vitellogenin and lipophorin receptors in honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) queens and workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidugli-Lazzarini, Karina Rosa; do Nascimento, Adriana Mendes; Tanaka, Erica Donato; Piulachs, Maria Dolors; Hartfelder, Klaus; Bitondi, Márcia Gentile; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino

    2008-07-01

    Two members of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family were identified as putative orthologs for a vitellogenin receptor (Amvgr) and a lipophorin receptor (Amlpr) in the Apis mellifera genome. Both receptor sequences have the structural motifs characteristic of LDLR family members and show a high degree of similarity with sequences of other insects. RT-PCR analysis of Amvgr and Amlpr expression detected the presence of both transcripts in different tissues of adult female (ovary, fat body, midgut, head and specifically hypopharyngeal gland), as well as in embryos. In the head RNA samples we found two variant forms of AmLpR: a full length one and a shorter one lacking 29 amino acids in the O-linked sugar domain. In ovaries the expression levels of the two honey bee LDLR members showed opposing trends: whereas Amvgr expression was upregulated as the ovaries became activated, Amlpr transcript levels gradually declined. In situ hybridization analysis performed on ovaries detected Amvgr mRNA exclusively in germ line cells and corroborated the qPCR results showing an increase in Amvgr gene expression concomitant with follicle growth.

  12. Analysis of the transcriptome of Panax notoginseng root uncovers putative triterpene saponin-biosynthetic genes and genetic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Hongmei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panax notoginseng (Burk F.H. Chen is important medicinal plant of the Araliacease family. Triterpene saponins are the bioactive constituents in P. notoginseng. However, available genomic information regarding this plant is limited. Moreover, details of triterpene saponin biosynthesis in the Panax species are largely unknown. Results Using the 454 pyrosequencing technology, a one-quarter GS FLX titanium run resulted in 188,185 reads with an average length of 410 bases for P. notoginseng root. These reads were processed and assembled by 454 GS De Novo Assembler software into 30,852 unique sequences. A total of 70.2% of unique sequences were annotated by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST similarity searches against public sequence databases. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG assignment discovered 41 unique sequences representing 11 genes involved in triterpene saponin backbone biosynthesis in the 454-EST dataset. In particular, the transcript encoding dammarenediol synthase (DS, which is the first committed enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of major triterpene saponins, is highly expressed in the root of four-year-old P. notoginseng. It is worth emphasizing that the candidate cytochrome P450 (Pn02132 and Pn00158 and UDP-glycosyltransferase (Pn00082 gene most likely to be involved in hydroxylation or glycosylation of aglycones for triterpene saponin biosynthesis were discovered from 174 cytochrome P450s and 242 glycosyltransferases by phylogenetic analysis, respectively. Putative transcription factors were detected in 906 unique sequences, including Myb, homeobox, WRKY, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH, and other family proteins. Additionally, a total of 2,772 simple sequence repeat (SSR were identified from 2,361 unique sequences, of which, di-nucleotide motifs were the most abundant motif. Conclusion This study is the first to present a large-scale EST dataset for P. notoginseng root acquired by next

  13. A Systems Biology Approach to Reveal Putative Host-Derived Biomarkers of Periodontitis by Network Topology Characterization of MMP-REDOX/NO and Apoptosis Integrated Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gürsoy, Mervi; Neves de Oliveira, Ben-Hur; Özdemir, Vural; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a formidable global health burden, is a common chronic disease that destroys tooth-supporting tissues. Biomarkers of the early phase of this progressive disease are of utmost importance for global health. In this context, saliva represents a non-invasive biosample. By using systems biology tools, we aimed to (1) identify an integrated interactome between matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-REDOX/nitric oxide (NO) and apoptosis upstream pathways of periodontal inflammation, and (2) characterize the attendant topological network properties to uncover putative biomarkers to be tested in saliva from patients with periodontitis. Hence, we first generated a protein-protein network model of interactions ("BIOMARK" interactome) by using the STRING 10 database, a search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins, with "Experiments" and "Databases" as input options and a confidence score of 0.400. Second, we determined the centrality values (closeness, stress, degree or connectivity, and betweenness) for the "BIOMARK" members by using the Cytoscape software. We found Ubiquitin C (UBC), Jun proto-oncogene (JUN), and matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP14) as the most central hub- and non-hub-bottlenecks among the 211 genes/proteins of the whole interactome. We conclude that UBC, JUN, and MMP14 are likely an optimal candidate group of host-derived biomarkers, in combination with oral pathogenic bacteria-derived proteins, for detecting periodontitis at its early phase by using salivary samples from patients. These findings therefore have broader relevance for systems medicine in global health as well.

  14. Functional MRI of the Reserpine-Induced Putative Rat Model of Fibromyalgia Reveals Discriminatory Patterns of Functional Augmentation to Acute Nociceptive Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jack A.; Shibata, Sayaka; Fujikawa, Akihiko; Takahashi, Masayasu; Saga, Tsuneo; Aoki, Ichio

    2017-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging, applied to pre-clinical models of chronic pain, offers unique advantages in the drive to discover new treatments for this prevalent and oppressive condition. The high spatial and temporal resolution of fMRI affords detailed mapping of regional pharmacodynamics that underlie mechanisms of pain suppression by new analgesics. Despite evidence supporting the translational relevance of this approach, relatively few studies have investigated fMRI abnormalities in rodent models of chronic pain. In this study, we used fMRI to map the BOLD response in a recently developed putative rat model of fibromyalgia to innocuous and acute nociceptive stimuli by applying a step-wise graded electrical forepaw stimulation paradigm, with comparison to healthy controls. We observed discriminatory functional signatures (p < 0.001) to 2 mA electrical forepaw stimulation, found to be innocuous in the control group. As such, this translational approach provides sensitive and quantitative neural correlates of the underlying chronic disease. The regional patterns of functional augmentation were found to be concordant with previous studies of nociception in the anaesthetised rat brain, supporting the specificity of this approach in the study of altered central pain processing in reserpine induced myalgia. The methodology introduced in this work represents a novel platform for emerging treatment evaluation in highly experimentally controlled conditions. PMID:28079057

  15. Discovery of putative capsaicin biosynthetic genes by RNA-Seq and digital gene expression analysis of pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Xin; Zhao, Shu-Niu; Liu, Gao-Feng; Huang, Zu-Mei; Cao, Zhen-Mu; Cheng, Shan-Han; Lin, Shi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    The Indian pepper ‘Guijiangwang’ (Capsicum frutescens L.), one of the world’s hottest chili peppers, is rich in capsaicinoids. The accumulation of the alkaloid capsaicin and its analogs in the epidermal cells of the placenta contribute to the pungency of Capsicum fruits. To identify putative genes involved in capsaicin biosynthesis, RNA-Seq was used to analyze the pepper’s expression profiles over five developmental stages. Five cDNA libraries were constructed from the total RNA of placental tissue and sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq 2000. More than 19 million clean reads were obtained from each library, and greater than 50% of the reads were assignable to reference genes. Digital gene expression (DGE) profile analysis using Solexa sequencing was performed at five fruit developmental stages and resulted in the identification of 135 genes of known function; their expression patterns were compared to the capsaicin accumulation pattern. Ten genes of known function were identified as most likely to be involved in regulating capsaicin synthesis. Additionally, 20 new candidate genes were identified related to capsaicin synthesis. We use a combination of RNA-Seq and DGE analyses to contribute to the understanding of the biosynthetic regulatory mechanism(s) of secondary metabolites in a nonmodel plant and to identify candidate enzyme-encoding genes. PMID:27756914

  16. Molecular cloning and primary sequence analysis of a gene encoding a putative shitinase gene in Brassica oleracea var.capitata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGGUOQING; YONGYANBAI; 等

    1996-01-01

    Chitinase,which catalyzes the hydrolysis of the β-1,4-acetyl-D-glucosamine linkages of the fungal cell wall polymer chitin,is involved in inducible plants defense system.By construction of cabbage(Brassica oleracea var. capitata) genomic library and screening the library with pRCH8,a probe of rice chitinase gene fragment,a chitinase genomic sequence was isolated.The complete uncleotide sequence of the putative cabbage chitinase gene (cabch29) was determined,with its longest open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 413 aa.This polypeptide consists of a 21 aa N-terminal signal peptide,two chitin-binding domains different from those of other classes of plant chitinases,and a catalytic domain.Homology analysis illustrated that this cabch29 gene has 58.8% identity at the nucleotide level with the pRCH8 ORF probe and has 50% identity at the amino acid level tiwh the catalytic domains of chitinase from bean,maize and sugar beet.Meanwhile,several kinds of cis-elements,such as TATA box,CAAT box,GATA motif,ASF-1 binding site,wound-response elements and AATAAA,have also been discovered in the flanking region of cabch29 gene.

  17. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the first Porifera tumor necrosis factor superfamily member and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Ghignone, Stefano; Mussino, Francesca; Vezzulli, Luigi; Cerrano, Carlo; Giovine, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the molecular cloning and characterization of the first Tumor Necrosis Factor homologous and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis: chTNF and chTNFR, respectively. The deduced chTNF amino acid sequence is a type II transmembrane protein containing the typical TNFSF domain. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that chTNF is more related to Chordata TNFs rather than to other invertebrates. chTNF and chTNFR are constitutively expressed both in the ectosome and in the choanosome of the sponge, with higher levels in the ectosome. chTNF and chTNFR mRNAs were monitored in sponge fragmorphs treated with Gram(+) or Gram(-) bacteria. chTNF was significantly upregulated in Gram(+)-treated fragmorphs as compared to controls, while chTNFR was upregulated by both treatments. Finally, the possible chTNF fibrogenic role in sponge fragmorphs was studied by TNF inhibitor treatment measuring fibrillar and non fibrillar collagen gene expression; results indicate that the cytokine is involved in sponge collagen deposition and homeostasis.

  18. Sequence analysis of a 9873 bp fragment of the left arm of yeast chromosome XV that contains the ARG8 and CDC33 genes, a putative riboflavin synthase beta chain gene, and four new open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, C; Aldea, M; Casamayor, A; Lafuente, M J; Gamo, F J; Gancedo, C; Ariño, J; Herrero, E

    1995-09-15

    The DNA sequence of a 9873 bp fragment located near the left telomere of chromosome XV has been determined. Sequence analysis reveals seven open reading frames. One is the ARG8 gene coding for N-acetylornithine aminotransferase. Another corresponds to CDC33, which codes for the initiation factor 4E or cap binding protein. The open reading frame AOE169 can be considered as the putative gene for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae riboflavin synthase beta chain, since its translation product shows strong homology with four prokaryotic riboflavin synthase beta chains.

  19. A gene-rich linkage map in the dioecious species Actinidia chinensis (kiwifruit reveals putative X/Y sex-determining chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Geoffrey P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Actinidia (kiwifruit consists of woody, scrambling vines, native to China, and only recently propagated as a commercial crop. All species described are dioecious, but the genetic mechanism for sex-determination is unknown, as is the genetic basis for many of the cluster of characteristics making up the unique fruit. It is, however, an important crop in the New Zealand economy, and a classical breeding program would benefit greatly by knowledge of the trait alleles carried by both female and male parents. The application of marker assisted selection (MAS in seedling populations would also aid the accurate and efficient development of novel fruit types for the market. Results Gene-rich female, male and consensus linkage maps of the diploid species A. chinensis have been constructed with 644 microsatellite markers. The maps consist of twenty-nine linkage groups corresponding to the haploid number n = 29. We found that sex-linked sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR markers and the 'Flower-sex' phenotype consistently mapped to a single linkage group, in a subtelomeric region, in a section of inconsistent marker order. The region also contained markers of expressed genes, some of unknown function. Recombination, assessed by allelic distribution and marker order stability, was, in the remainder of the linkage group, in accordance with other linkage groups. Fully informative markers to other genes in this linkage group identified the comparative linkage group in the female map, where recombination ratios determining marker order were similar to the autosomes. Conclusion We have created genetic linkage maps that define the 29 linkage groups of the haploid genome, and have revealed the position and extent of the sex-determining locus in A. chinensis. As all Actinidia species are dioecious, we suggest that the sex-determining loci of other Actinidia species will be similar to that region defined in our maps. As the

  20. Genome-wide digital transcript analysis of putative fruitlet abscission related genes regulated by ethephon in litchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiqin eLi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The high level of physiological fruitlet abscission in litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn. causes severe yield loss. Cell separation occurs at the fruit abscission zone (FAZ and can be triggered by ethylene. However, a deep knowledge of the molecular events occurring in the FAZ is still unknown. Here, genome-wide digital transcript abundance (DTA analysis of putative fruit abscission related genes regulated by ethephon in litchi were studied. More than 81 million high quality reads from seven ethephon treated and untreated control libraries were obtained by high-throughput sequencing. Through DTA profile analysis in combination with Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses, a total of 2,730 statistically significant candidate genes were involved in the ethephon-promoted litchi fruitlet abscission. Of these, there were 1,867 early-responsive genes whose expressions were up- or down-regulated from 0 to 1 d after treatment. The most affected genes included those related to ethylene biosynthesis and signaling, auxin transport and signaling, transcription factors, protein ubiquitination, ROS response, calcium signal transduction and cell wall modification. These genes could be clustered into 4 groups and 13 subgroups according to their similar expression patterns. qRT-PCR displayed the expression pattern of 41 selected candidate genes, which proved the accuracy of our DTA data. Ethephon treatment significantly increased fruit abscission and ethylene production of fruitlet. The possible molecular events to control the ethephon-promoted litchi fruitlet abscission were prompted out. The increased ethylene evolution in fruitlet would suppress the synthesis and polar transport of auxin and trigger abscission signaling. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time to monitor the gene expression profile occurring in the FAZ-enriched pedicel during litchi fruit abscission induced by ethephon on the genome-wide level. This study will contribute to

  1. Identifying putative breast cancer-associated long intergenic non-coding RNA loci by high density SNP array analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu eJiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-throughput transcript discoveries have yielded a growing recognition of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs, a class of arbitrarily defined transcripts (>200 nt that are primarily produced from the intergenic space. LincRNAs have been increasingly acknowledged for their expressional dynamics and likely functional associations with cancers. However, differential gene dosage of lincRNA genes between cancer genomes is less studied. By using the high-density Human Omni5-Quad BeadChips (Illumina, we investigated genomic copy number aberrations in a set of seven tumor-normal paired primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs established from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma. This Beadchip platform includes a total of 2,435,915 SNP loci dispersed at an average interval of ~700 nt throughout the intergenic region of the human genome. We mapped annotated or putative lincRNA genes to a subset of 332,539 SNP loci, which were included in our analysis for lincRNA-associated copy number variations (CNV. We have identified 122 lincRNAs, which were affected by somatic CNV with overlapped aberrations ranging from 0.14% to 100% in length. LincRNA-associated aberrations were detected predominantly with copy number losses and preferential clustering to the ends of chromosomes. Interestingly, lincRNA genes appear to be much less susceptible to CNV in comparison to both protein-coding and intergenic regions (CNV affected segments in percentage: 1.8%, 37.5% and 60.6%, respectively. In summary, our study established a novel approach utilizing high-resolution SNP array to identify lincRNA candidates, which could functionally link to tumorigenesis, and provide new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

  2. Deep Sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an Epibiotic Sponge on Cold-Seep Tubeworms, Reveals Methylotrophic, Thiotrophic, and Putative Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Associations

    KAUST Repository

    Arellano, Shawn M.

    2012-10-11

    The encrusting sponge Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila (Poecilosclerida: Myxillidae) is an epibiont on vestimentiferan tubeworms at hydrocarbon seeps on the upper Louisiana slope of the Gulf of Mexico. It has long been suggested that this sponge harbors methylotrophic bacteria due to its low δ13C value and high methanol dehydrogenase activity, yet the full community of microbial associations in M. methanophila remained uncharacterized. In this study, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes representing the microbial community in M. methanophila collected from two hydrocarbon-seep sites (GC234 and Bush Hill) using both Sanger sequencing and next-generation 454 pyrosequencing technologies. Additionally, we compared the microbial community in M. methanophila to that of the biofilm collected from the associated tubeworm. Our results revealed that the microbial diversity in the sponges from both sites was low but the community structure was largely similar, showing a high proportion of methylotrophic bacteria of the genus Methylohalomonas and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria of the genera Cycloclasticus and Neptunomonas. Furthermore, the sponge microbial clone library revealed the dominance of thioautotrophic gammaproteobacterial symbionts in M. methanophila. In contrast, the biofilm communities on the tubeworms were more diverse and dominated by the chemoorganotrophic Moritella at GC234 and methylotrophic Methylomonas and Methylohalomonas at Bush Hill. Overall, our study provides evidence to support previous suggestion that M. methanophila harbors methylotrophic symbionts and also reveals the association of PAH-degrading and thioautotrophic microbes in the sponge. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  3. Small-RNA deep sequencing reveals Arctium tomentosum as a natural host of Alstroemeria virus X and a new putative Emaravirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqi Bi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arctium species (Asteraceae are distributed worldwide and are used as food and rich sources of secondary metabolites for the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., against avian influenza virus. RNA silencing is an antiviral defense mechanism that detects and destroys virus-derived double-stranded RNA, resulting in accumulation of virus-derived small RNAs (21-24 nucleotides that can be used for generic detection of viruses by small-RNA deep sequencing (SRDS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SRDS was used to detect viruses in the biennial wild plant species Arctium tomentosum (woolly burdock; family Asteraceae displaying virus-like symptoms of vein yellowing and leaf mosaic in southern Finland. Assembly of the small-RNA reads resulted in contigs homologous to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX, a positive/single-stranded RNA virus of genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae, or related to negative/single-stranded RNA viruses of the genus Emaravirus. The coat protein gene of AlsVX was 81% and 89% identical to the two AlsVX isolates from Japan and Norway, respectively. The deduced, partial nucleocapsid protein amino acid sequence of the emara-like virus was only 78% or less identical to reported emaraviruses and showed no variability among the virus isolates characterized. This virus--tentatively named as Woolly burdock yellow vein virus--was exclusively associated with yellow vein and leaf mosaic symptoms in woolly burdock, whereas AlsVX was detected in only one of the 52 plants tested. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide novel information about natural virus infections in Acrtium species and reveal woolly burdock as the first natural host of AlsVX besides Alstroemeria (family Alstroemeriaceae. Results also revealed a new virus related to the recently emerged Emaravirus genus and demonstrated applicability of SRDS to detect negative-strand RNA viruses. SRDS potentiates virus surveys of wild plants, a research area underrepresented in

  4. Integrated genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling reveals BCL11B as a putative oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia with 14q32 aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Saman; Sanders, Mathijs A; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M C; Koenders, Jasper E; Kavelaars, Francois G; Abbas, Zabiollah G; Mahamoud, Souad; Chu, Isabel W T; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Peeters, Justine K; van Drunen, Ellen; van Galen, Janneke; Beverloo, H Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M

    2014-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by recurrent molecular aberrations traditionally demonstrated by cytogenetic analyses. We used high density genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling to reveal acquired cryptic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. By genome-wide genotyping of 137 cases of primary acute myeloid leukemia, we disclosed a recurrent focal amplification on chromosome 14q32, which included the genes BCL11B, CCNK, C14orf177 and SETD3, in two cases. In the affected cases, the BCL11B gene showed consistently high mRNA expression, whereas the expression of the other genes was unperturbed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on 40 cases of acute myeloid leukemia with high BCL11B mRNA expression [2.5-fold above median; 40 out of 530 cases (7.5%)] revealed 14q32 abnormalities in two additional cases. In the four BCL11B-rearranged cases the 14q32 locus was fused to different partner chromosomes. In fact, in two cases, we demonstrated that the focal 14q32 amplifications were integrated into transcriptionally active loci. The translocations involving BCL11B result in increased expression of full-length BCL11B protein. The BCL11B-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias expressed both myeloid and T-cell markers. These biphenotypic acute leukemias all carried FLT3 internal tandem duplications, a characteristic marker of acute myeloid leukemia. BCL11B mRNA expression in acute myeloid leukemia appeared to be strongly associated with expression of other T-cell-specific genes. Myeloid 32D(GCSF-R) cells ectopically expressing Bcl11b showed decreased proliferation rate and less maturation. In conclusion, by an integrated approach involving high-throughput genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling we identified BCL11B as a candidate oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia.

  5. Comparative genomics of the type VI secretion systems of Pantoea and Erwinia species reveals the presence of putative effector islands that may be translocated by the VgrG and Hcp proteins

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    De Maayer Pieter

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Type VI secretion apparatus is assembled by a conserved set of proteins encoded within a distinct locus. The putative effector proteins Hcp and VgrG are also encoded within these loci. We have identified numerous distinct Type VI secretion system (T6SS loci in the genomes of several ecologically diverse Pantoea and Erwinia species and detected the presence of putative effector islands associated with the hcp and vgrG genes. Results Between two and four T6SS loci occur among the Pantoea and Erwinia species. While two of the loci (T6SS-1 and T6SS-2 are well conserved among the various strains, the third (T6SS-3 locus is not universally distributed. Additional orthologous loci are present in Pantoea sp. aB-valens and Erwinia billingiae Eb661. Comparative analysis of the T6SS-1 and T6SS-3 loci showed non-conserved islands associated with the vgrG and hcp, and vgrG genes, respectively. These regions had a G+C content far lower than the conserved portions of the loci. Many of the proteins encoded within the hcp and vgrG islands carry conserved domains, which suggests they may serve as effector proteins for the T6SS. A number of the proteins also show homology to the C-terminal extensions of evolved VgrG proteins. Conclusions Extensive diversity was observed in the number and content of the T6SS loci among the Pantoea and Erwinia species. Genomic islands could be observed within some of T6SS loci, which are associated with the hcp and vgrG proteins and carry putative effector domain proteins. We propose new hypotheses concerning a role for these islands in the acquisition of T6SS effectors and the development of novel evolved VgrG and Hcp proteins.

  6. An analysis of sequence variability in eight genes putatively involved in drought response in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, T; Buti, M; Natali, L; Pugliesi, C; Cattonaro, F; Morgante, M; Cavallini, A

    2011-04-01

    With the aim to study variability in genes involved in ecological adaptations, we have analysed sequence polymorphisms of eight unique genes putatively involved in drought response by isolation and analysis of allelic sequences in eight inbred lines of sunflower of different origin and phenotypic characters and showing different drought response in terms of leaf relative water content (RWC). First, gene sequences were amplified by PCR on genomic DNA from a highly inbred line and their products were directly sequenced. In the absence of single nucleotide polymorphisms, the gene was considered as unique. Then, the same PCR reaction was performed on genomic DNAs of eight inbred lines to isolate allelic variants to be compared. The eight selected genes encode a dehydrin, a heat shock protein, a non-specific lipid transfer protein, a z-carotene desaturase, a drought-responsive-element-binding protein, a NAC-domain transcription regulator, an auxin-binding protein, and an ABA responsive-C5 protein. Nucleotide diversity per synonymous and non-synonymous sites was calculated for each gene sequence. The π (a)/π (s) ratio range was usually very low, indicating strong purifying selection, though with locus-to-locus differences. As far as non-coding regions, the intron showed a larger variability than the other regions only in the case of the dehydrin gene. In the other genes tested, in which one or more introns occur, variability in the introns was similar or even lower than in the other regions. On the contrary, 3'-UTRs were usually more variable than the coding regions. Linkage disequilibrium in the selected genes decayed on average within 1,000 bp, with large variation among genes. A pairwise comparison between genetic distances calculated on the eight genes and the difference in RWC showed a significant correlation in the first phases of drought stress. The results are discussed in relation to the function of analysed genes, i.e. involved in gene regulation and signal

  7. Synthesis and Analysis of Putative Terpene Oxidation Products and the Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles that Form from Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, C. J.; Strick, B. F.; Upshur, M.; Shrestha, M.; Velarde, L.; Lu, Z.; Wang, H.; Xiao, D.; Batista, V. S.; Martin, S. T.; Thomson, R. J.; Geiger, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The terpenes isoprene and α-pinene are abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by trees and oxidized in the atmosphere. However, the chemical processes involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles from VOCs are not well understood. In this work, we use a combined synthetic, analytical, and theoretical approach to gain a molecular level understanding of the chemistry involved in the formation of SOA particles from VOC precursors. To this end, we have synthesized putative products of isoprene and α-pinene oxidation and the oligomers that form from them. Specifically, we have focused on the epoxide and 2-methyltetraols that form from isoprene oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, as well as products of α-pinene ozonolysis. In our analysis, we utilize a spectroscopic technique called sum frequency generation (SFG). SFG is a coherent, surface-specific, vibrational spectroscopy that uses infrared and visible laser light fields, overlapped spatially and temporally at a surface, to probe vibrational transitions within molecules. Our use of this technique allows us to assess the chemical identity of aerosol-forming components at their surfaces, where interactions with the gas phase occur. The spectral responses from these compounds are compared to those of synthetic isoprene- and α-pinene-derived aerosol particles, as well as natural aerosol particles collected in tropical and boreal forests to begin to predict the constituents that may be present at the surfaces of these particles. In addition, isotope editing is utilized to gain a better understanding of α-pinene. The rigidity of this molecule makes it difficult to understand spectroscopically. The combination of synthesis with deuterium labeling, theory, and broadband and high-resolution SFG spectroscopy in the C-H and C-D stretching regions allow us to determine the orientation of this important molecule on a surface, which could have implications for its reactivity in the

  8. A combined metabolomic and phylogenetic study reveals putatively prebiotic effects of high molecular weight arabino-oligosaccharides when assessed by in vitro fermentation in bacterial communities derived from humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulek, Karolina; Vigsnæs, Louise Kristine; Schmidt, Line Rieck

    2014-01-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides are defined by their selective stimulation of growth and/or activity of bacteria in the digestive system in ways claimed to be beneficial for health. However, apart from the short chain fatty acids, little is known about bacterial metabolites created by fermentation...... plant structures. Additionally, the combination of qPCR and LC–MS revealed a number of other putative interactions between intestinal microbes and the oligosaccharides, which contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms behind prebiotic impact on human health....... of prebiotics, and the significance of the size of the oligosaccharides remains largely unstudied. By in vitro fermentations in human fecal microbial communities (derived from six different individuals), we studied the effects of high-mass (HA, >1 kDa), low-mass (LA,

  9. Comprehensive analysis of cystatin family genes suggests their putative functions in sexual reproduction, embryogenesis, and seed formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Zhou, Xue-mei; Zou, Jie; Wang, Wei; Wang, Lu; Peng, Xiong-bo; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2014-09-01

    Cystatins are tightly bound and reversible inhibitors of cysteine proteases in C1A and C13 peptidase families, which have been identified in several species and shown to function in vegetative development and response to biotic/abiotic stresses in plants. Recent work revealed their critical role in regulating programmed cell death during embryogenesis in tobacco and suggested their more comprehensive roles in the process of sexual plant reproduction, although little is known about cystatin family genes in the processes. Here, 10 cystatin family genes in Nicotiana tabacum were identified using an expressed sequence tag (EST)-based gene clone strategy. Analysis of their biochemical properties showed that nine of them have the potency to inhibit the activities of both commercial cathepsin L-like proteases and extracted cysteine proteases from seeds, but with different K i values depending on the types of proteases and the developmental stages of the seed tested. This suggests that cystatin-dependent cathepsin L-like proteolytic pathways are probably important for early seed development. Comprehensive expression profile analysis revealed that cystatin family genes showed manifold variations in their transcription levels in different plant cell types, including the sperm, egg, and zygote, especially in the embryo and seed at different developmental stages. More interestingly, intracellular localization analysis of each cystatin revealed that most members of cystatin families are recognized as secretory proteins with signal peptides that direct them to the endoplasmic reticulum. These results suggest their widespread roles in cell fate determination and cell-cell communication in the process of sexual reproduction, especially in gamete and embryo development, as well as in seed formation.

  10. Putative Vitis vinifera Rop- and Rab-GAP-, GEF-, and GDI-interacting proteins uncovered with novel methods for public genomic and EST database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbal, Philippe; Tesniere, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    To understand how grapevine Rop and Rab proteins achieve their functional versatility in signalling, identification of the putative VvRop- and VvRab-interacting proteins was performed using newly designed tools. In this study, sequences encoding eight full-length proteins for VvRop GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), five for VvRabGAPs, six for VvRop guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), one for VvRabGEF, five for VvRop GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs), and three for VvRabGDIs were identified. These proteins had a CRIB motif or PH domain, a TBC domain, a PRONE domain, a DENN domain, or GDI signatures, respectively. By bootstrap analysis, an unrooted consensus phylogenetic tree was constructed which indicated that VvRopGDIs and VvRopGEFs--but not VvRopGAP--belonged to the same clade, and that VvRabGEF1 protein was more closely related to VvRopGAPs than to the other putative VvRab-interacting proteins. Twenty-two genes out of 28 encoding putative VvRop- and VvRab-interacting proteins could be located on identified grapevine chromosomes. Generally one gene was anchored on one chromosome, but in some cases up to four genes were located on the same chromosome. Expression patterns of the genes encoding putative VvRop- and VvRab-interacting proteins were also examined using a newly developed tool based on public expressed sequence tag (EST) database analysis. Expression patterns were sometimes found to be specific to an organ or a developmental stage. Although some limitations exist, the use of EST database analysis is stressed, in particular in the case of species where expression data are obtained at high costs in terms of time and effort.

  11. Mutation of putative N-linked glycosylation sites on the human nucleotide receptor P2X7 reveals a key residue important for receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenertz, Lisa Y; Wang, Ziyi; Guadarrama, Arturo; Hill, Lindsay M; Gavala, Monica L; Bertics, Paul J

    2010-06-08

    The nucleotide receptor P2X(7) is an immunomodulatory cation channel and a potential therapeutic target. P2X(7) is expressed in immune cells such as monocytes and macrophages and is activated by extracellular ATP following tissue injury or infection. Ligand binding to P2X(7) can stimulate ERK1/2, the transcription factor CREB, enzymes linked to the production of reactive oxygen species and interleukin-1 isoforms, and the formation of a nonspecific pore. However, little is known about the biochemistry of P2X(7), including whether the receptor is N-linked glycosylated and if this modification affects receptor function. Here we provide evidence that P2X(7) is sensitive to the glycosidases EndoH and PNGase F and that the human receptor appears glycosylated at N187, N202, N213, N241, and N284. Mutation of N187 results in weakened P2X(7) agonist-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, CREB, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase, as well as a decreased level of pore formation. In further support of a role for glycosylation in receptor function, treatment of RAW 264.7 macrophages with the N-linked glycosylation synthesis inhibitor tunicamycin attenuates P2X(7) agonist-induced, but not phorbol ester-induced, ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Interestingly, residue N187 belongs to an N-linked glycosylation consensus sequence found in six of the seven P2X family members, suggesting this site is fundamentally important to P2X receptor function. To address the mechanism whereby N187 mutation attenuates receptor activity, we developed a live cell proteinase K digestion assay that demonstrated altered cell surface expression of P2X(7) N187A. This is the first report to map human P2X(7) glycosylation sites and reveal residue N187 is critical for receptor trafficking and function.

  12. RT-qPCR analysis of putative beer-spoilage gene expression during growth of Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 and Pediococcus claussenii ATCC BAA-344(T) in beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Pittet, Vanessa; Ziola, Barry

    2012-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) contamination of beer presents a continual economic threat to brewers. Interestingly, only certain isolates of LAB can grow in the hostile beer environment (e.g., as studied here, Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 (Lb464) and a non-ropy isolate of Pediococcus claussenii ATCC BAA-344(T) (Pc344NR)), indicating that significant genetic specialization is required. The genes hitA, horA, horB, horC, and bsrA, which have been proposed to confer beer-spoiling ability to an organism, are suspected of counteracting the antimicrobial effects of hops. However, these genes are not present in the same combination (if at all) across beer-spoiling organisms. As such, we sought to investigate the extent to which these genes participate during Lb464 and Pc344NR mid-logarithmic growth in beer through reverse transcription quantitative PCR analysis. We first determined the optimal reference gene set needed for data normalization and, for each bacterium, established that two genes were needed for accurate assessment of gene expression. Following this, we found that horA expression was induced for Pc344NR, but not for Lb464, during growth in beer. Instead, horC expression was dramatically increased in Lb464 when growing in beer, whereas no change was detected for the other putative beer-spoilage-related genes. This indicates that HorC may be one of the principle mediators enabling growth of Lb464 in beer, whereas in Pc344NR, this may be attributable to HorA. These findings not only reveal that Lb464 and Pc344NR are unique in their beer-specific genetic expression profile but also indicate that a range of genetic specialization exists among beer-spoilage bacteria.

  13. Stereochemical features of the envelope protein Domain III of dengue virus reveals putative antigenic site in the five-fold symmetry axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, R O S; Caliri, A

    2013-01-01

    We bring to attention a characteristic parasitic pattern present in the dengue virus: it undergoes several intensive thermodynamic variations due to host environmental changes, from a vector's digestive tract, through the human bloodstream and intracellular medium. Comparatively, among the known dengue serotypes, we evaluate the effects that these medium variations may induce to the overall structural characteristics of the Domain III of the envelope (E) protein, checking for stereochemical congruences that could lead to the identification of immunologic relevant regions. We used molecular dynamics and principal component analysis to study the protein in solution, for all four dengue serotypes, under distinct pH and temperature. We stated that, while the core of Domain III is remarkably rigid and effectively unaffected by most of the mentioned intensive variations, the loops account for major and distinguishable flexibilities. Therefore, the rigidity of the Domain III core provides a foothold that projects specifically two of these high flexible loop regions towards the inner face of the envelope pores, which are found at every five-fold symmetry axis of the icosahedron-shaped mature virus. These loops bear a remarkable low identity though with high occurrence of ionizable residues, including histidines. Such stereochemical properties can provide very particular serotype-specific electrostatic surface patterns, suggesting a viral fingerprint region, on which other specific molecules and ions can establish chemical interactions in an induced fit mechanism. We assert that the proposed regions share enough relevant features to qualify for further immunologic and pharmacologic essays, such as target peptide synthesis and phage display using dengue patients' sera.

  14. Identification and analysis of candidate fungal tRNA 3'-end processing endonucleases tRNase Zs, homologs of the putative prostate cancer susceptibility protein ELAC2

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    Zhao Wei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background tRNase Z is the endonuclease that is responsible for the 3'-end processing of tRNA precursors, a process essential for tRNA 3'-CCA addition and subsequent tRNA aminoacylation. Based on their sizes, tRNase Zs can be divided into the long (tRNase ZL and short (tRNase ZS forms. tRNase ZL is thought to have arisen from a tandem gene duplication of tRNase ZS with further sequence divergence. The species distribution of tRNase Z is complex. Fungi represent an evolutionarily diverse group of eukaryotes. The recent proliferation of fungal genome sequences provides an opportunity to explore the structural and functional diversity of eukaryotic tRNase Zs. Results We report a survey and analysis of candidate tRNase Zs in 84 completed fungal genomes, spanning a broad diversity of fungi. We find that tRNase ZL is present in all fungi we have examined, whereas tRNase ZS exists only in the fungal phyla Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Zygomycota. Furthermore, we find that unlike the Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina, which contain a single tRNase ZL, Schizosaccharomyces fission yeasts (Taphrinomycotina contain two tRNase ZLs encoded by two different tRNase ZL genes. These two tRNase ZLs are most likely localized to the nucleus and mitochondria, respectively, suggesting partitioning of tRNase Z function between two different tRNase ZLs in fission yeasts. The fungal tRNase Z phylogeny suggests that tRNase ZSs are ancestral to tRNase ZLs. Additionally, the evolutionary relationship of fungal tRNase ZLs is generally consistent with known phylogenetic relationships among the fungal species and supports tRNase ZL gene duplication in certain fungal taxa, including Schizosaccharomyces fission yeasts. Analysis of tRNase Z protein sequences reveals putative atypical substrate binding domains in most fungal tRNase ZSs and in a subset of fungal tRNase ZLs. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of pseudo-substrate recognition and catalytic motifs at

  15. Phenotypic characterization of Leishmania spp. causing cutaneous leishmaniasis in the lower Amazon region, western Pará state, Brazil, reveals a putative hybrid parasite, Leishmania (Viannia guyanensis × Leishmania (Viannia shawi shawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennings Yara Lins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We phenotypically characterized 43 leishmanial parasites from cutaneous leishmaniasis by isoenzyme electrophoresis and the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (23 McAbs. Identifications revealed 11 (25.6% strains of Leishmania (V. braziliensis, 4 (9.3% of L. (V. shawi shawi, 7 (16.3% of L. (V. shawi santarensis, 6 (13.9% of L. (V. guyanensis and L. (V. lainsoni, 2 (4.7% of L. (L. amazonensis, and 7 (16.3% of a putative hybrid parasite, L. (V. guyanensis/L. (V. shawi shawi. McAbs detected three different serodemes of L. (V. braziliensis: I-7, II-1, and III-3 strains. Among the strains of L. (V. shawi we identified two populations: one (7 strains expressing the B19 epitope that was previously considered to be species-specific for L. (V. guyanensis. We have given this population sub-specific rank, naming it L. (V. s. santarensis. The other one (4 strains did not express the B19 epitope like the L. (V. shawi reference strain, which we now designate as L. (V. s. shawi. For the first time in the eastern Brazilian Amazon we register a putative hybrid parasite (7 strains, L. (V. guyanensis/L. (V. s. shawi, characterized by a new 6PGDH three-band profile at the level of L. (V. guyanensis. Its PGM profile, however, was very similar to that of L. (V. s. shawi. These results suggest that the lower Amazon region – western Pará state, Brazil, represents a biome where L. (V. guyanensis and L. (V. s. shawi exchange genetic information.

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ST1022, a putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators isolated from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Noboru; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri, E-mail: tskvel@spring8.or.jp; Matsunaga, Emiko; Shinkai, Akeo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kuramitsu, Seiki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Tayonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yokoyama, Shigeyuki, E-mail: tskvel@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama Institute, RIKEN, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2007-11-01

    A putative member of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, ST1022 from S. tokodaii strain 7, has been purified and crystallized in the absence and presence of the effector l-glutamine. A molecular-replacement solution was found using the FL11 transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus sp. OT3 as a model and structural refinement is under way. The Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators, also known as feast/famine transcriptional regulators, are widely distributed among bacteria and archaea. This family of proteins are likely to be involved in cellular metabolism, with exogenous amino acids functioning as effectors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of ST1022, a member of the Lrp/AsnC family of proteins, is reported with and without exogenous glutamine as the effector molecule. The crystals of native ST1022 and of the putative complex belong to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.771, c = 73.297 Å and a = b = 103.846, c = 73.992 Å, respectively. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis and molecular-replacement solution revealed the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit.

  17. Identification of putative drug targets in Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) using computer aided protein data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Anayet; Khan, Md Arif; Sharmin, Tahmina; Hasan Mazumder, Md Habibul; Chowdhury, Afrin Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium which is evolved from the extensive exposure of Vancomycin to Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that had become the most common cause of hospital and community-acquired infections. Due to the emergence of different antibiotic resistance strains, there is an exigency to develop novel drug targets to address the provocation of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this study, in-silico genome subtraction methodology was used to design potential and pathogen specific drug targets against VRSA. Our study divulged 1987 proteins from the proteome of 34,549 proteins, which have no homologues in human genome after sequential analysis through CD-HIT and BLASTp. The high stringency analysis of the remaining proteins against database of essential genes (DEG) resulted in 169 proteins which are essential for S. aureus. Metabolic pathway analysis of human host and pathogen by KAAS at the KEGG server sorted out 19 proteins involved in unique metabolic pathways. 26 human non-homologous membrane-bound essential proteins including 4 which were also involved in unique metabolic pathway were deduced through PSORTb, CELLO v.2.5, ngLOC. Functional classification of uncharacterized proteins through SVMprot derived 7 human non-homologous membrane-bound hypothetical essential proteins. Study of potential drug target against Drug Bank revealed pbpA-penicillin-binding protein 1 and hypothetical protein MQW_01796 as the best drug target candidate. 2D structure was predicted by PRED-TMBB, 3D structure and functional analysis was also performed. Protein-protein interaction network of potential drug target proteins was analyzed by using STRING. The identified drug targets are expected to have great potential for designing novel drugs against VRSA infections and further screening of the compounds against these new targets may result in the discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be

  18. Protein preparation and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a putative glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase from Streptococcus mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Guan-Jing; Li, Lan-Fen; Li, Dan; Liu, Cong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei, Shi-Cheng, E-mail: kqsc-wei@bjmu.edu.cn [Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Liang, Yu-He, E-mail: kqsc-wei@bjmu.edu.cn; Su, Xiao-Dong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2007-09-01

    A glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase homologue from S. mutans was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.4 Å resolution. The SMU.636 protein from Streptococcus mutans is a putative glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase with 233 residues. The smu.636 gene was PCR-amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET-28a(+). The resultant His-tagged fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity in two steps. Crystals of the fusion protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.83, b = 82.13, c = 134.70 Å.

  19. Analysis of virus genomes from glacial environments reveals novel virus groups with unusual host interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellas, Christopher M.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Barker, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in glacial ecosystems are diverse, active, and subjected to strong viral pressures and infection rates. In this study we analyse putative virus genomes assembled from three dsDNA viromes from cryoconite hole ecosystems of Svalbard and the Greenland Ice Sheet to assess the potential hosts and functional role viruses play in these habitats. We assembled 208 million reads from the virus-size fraction and developed a procedure to select genuine virus scaffolds from cellular contamination. Our curated virus library contained 546 scaffolds up to 230 Kb in length, 54 of which were circular virus consensus genomes. Analysis of virus marker genes revealed a wide range of viruses had been assembled, including bacteriophages, cyanophages, nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and a virophage, with putative hosts identified as Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, eukaryotic algae and amoebae. Whole genome comparisons revealed the majority of circular genome scaffolds (CGS) formed 12 novel groups, two of which contained multiple phage members with plasmid-like properties, including a group of phage-plasmids possessing plasmid-like partition genes and toxin-antitoxin addiction modules to ensure their replication and a satellite phage-plasmid group. Surprisingly we also assembled a phage that not only encoded plasmid partition genes, but a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas adaptive bacterial immune system. One of the spacers was an exact match for another phage in our virome, indicating that in a novel use of the system, the lysogen was potentially capable of conferring immunity on its bacterial host against other phage. Together these results suggest that highly novel and diverse groups of viruses are present in glacial environments, some of which utilize very unusual life strategies and genes to control their replication and maintain a long-term relationship with their hosts

  20. Study of nsLTPs in Lotus japonicus genome reveal a specific epidermal cell member (LjLTP10) regulated by drought stress in aerial organs with a putative role in cutin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, G; Morales-Quintana, L; Parra, C; Berbel, A; Alcorta, M

    2013-07-01

    The cuticle is the first defense against pathogens and the second way water is lost in plants. Hydrophobic layers covering aerial plant organs from primary stages of development form cuticle, including major classes of aliphatic wax components and cutin. Extensive research has been conducted to understand cuticle formation mechanisms in plants. However, many questions remain unresolved in the transport of lipid components to form cuticle. Database studies of the Lotus japonicus genome have revealed the presence of 24 sequences classified as putative non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), which were classified in seven groups; four groups were selected because of their expression in aerial organs. LjLTP8 forms a cluster with DIR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana while LjLTP6, LjLTP9, and LjLTP10 were grouped as type I LTPs. In silico studies showed a high level of structural conservation, and substrate affinity studies revealed palmitoyl-CoA as the most likely ligand for these LTPs, although the Lyso-Myristoyl Phosphatidyl Choline, Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidyl glycerol, and Lyso-stearyl phosphatidyl choline ligands also showed a high affinity with the proteins. The LjLTP6 and LjLTP10 genes were expressed in both the stems and the leaves under normal conditions and were highly induced during drought stress. LjLTP10 was the most induced gene in shoots during drought. The gene was only expressed in the epidermal cells of stems, primordial leaves, and young leaflets. LjLTP10 was positively regulated by MeJA but repressed by abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, and H2O2, while LjLTP6 was weakly induced by MeJA, repressed by H2O2, and not affected by ABA and ethylene. We suggest that LjLTP10 is involved in plant development of stem and leaf cuticle, but also in acclimation to tolerate drought stress in L. japonicus.

  1. Mutagenic analysis of putative domain II and surface residues in mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis Cry19Aa toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong Yul; Nair, Manoj S; Liu, Xinyan Sylvia; Dean, Donald H

    2009-06-01

    The mosquitocidal crystal protein, Cry19Aa, from Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. jegathesan, has high toxicity to Anopheles stephensi and Culex pipiens but is less toxic to Aedes aegypti. To study the functional role of putative domain II and surface residues in mosquito toxicity, 16 alanine substitution mutations were introduced into Cry19Aa. All mutant constructs were expressed as 65-kDa protoxins and subsequently digested by trypsin to produce further fragmented polypeptides of 40 and 25 kDa. With chymotrypsin, however, most protoxins were digested to 60 kDa and minor bands. The circular dichroism spectra of the chymotrypsin-activated toxins of Cry19Aa and muteins, Y324A, W357A, Y412A, Y414A, W416A, D418A and F485A indicated that there was no significant variation in their structure. In mosquito bioassays, Y324A, W357A, Y410A, W416A, D418A and F485A muteins showed substantial reductions in mosquitocidal activity toward A. aegypti and C. pipiens. These muteins also showed reduced competition with wild-type fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate-labeled Cry19Aa for binding to C. pipiens brush border membrane vesicles. These data suggest that the reduction of toxicity was a result of the reduced binding affinity. From these studies we have identified loop residues of domain II that are important in toxicity and receptor binding to Culex larval midgut.

  2. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a putative bacterial class I labdane-related diterpene synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Centeno-Leija, Sara; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-09-01

    Labdane-related diterpenoids are natural products with potential pharmaceutical applications that are rarely found in bacteria. Here, a putative class I labdane-related diterpene synthase (LrdC) identified by genome mining in a streptomycete was successfully crystallized using the microbatch method. Crystals of the LrdC enzyme were obtained in a holo form with its natural cofactor Mg(2+) (LrdC-Mg(2+)) and in complex with inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) (LrdC-Mg(2+)-PPi). Crystals of native LrdC-Mg(2+) diffracted to 2.50 Å resolution and belonged to the trigonal space group P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 107.1, c = 89.2 Å. Crystals of the LrdC-Mg(2+)-PPi complex grown in the same conditions as the native enzyme with PEG 8000 diffracted to 2.36 Å resolution and also belonged to the trigonal space group P3221. Crystals of the LrdC-Mg(2+)-PPi complex grown in a second crystallization condition with PEG 3350 diffracted to 2.57 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.9, b = 104.1, c = 66.5 Å, β = 111.4°. The structure was determined by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) technique using the osmium signal from a potassium hexachloroosmate (IV) derivative.

  3. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-12-04

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species.

  4. Analysis of the expression of putative heat-stress related genes in relation to thermotolerance of cork oak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Barbara; Rodriguez, José Luis; Valledor, Luis; Almeida, Tânia; Santos, Conceição; Cañal, Maria Jesús; Pinto, Glória

    2014-03-15

    Cork oak (Quercus suber L.) is a research priority in the Mediterranean area and because of cork oaks' distribution these stands are experiencing daily stress. Based on projections of intensifying climate change and considering the key role of exploring the recovery abilities, cork oak seedlings were subjected to a cumulative temperature increase from 25°C to 55°C and subsequent recovery. CO2 assimilation rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, anthocyanins, proline and lipid peroxidation were used to evaluate plant performance, while the relative abundance of seven genes encoding for proteins of cork oak with a putative role in thermal/stress regulation (POX1, POX2, HSP10.4, HSP17a.22, CHS, MTL and RBC) was analyzed by qPCR (quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction). A temperature change to 35°C showed abundance alterations in the tested genes; at 45°C, the molecular changes were associated with an antioxidant response, possibly modulated by anthocyanins. At 55°C, HSP17a.22, MTL and proline accumulation were evident. After recovery, physiological balance was restored, whereas POX1, HSP10.4 and MTL abundances were suggested to be involved in increased thermotolerance. The data presented here are expected to pinpoint some pathways changes occurring during such stress and further recovery in this particular Mediterranean species.

  5. RNA-Seq analysis reveals a six-gene SoxR regulon in Streptomyces coelicolor.

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    Nawar Naseer

    Full Text Available The redox-regulated transcription factor SoxR is conserved in diverse bacteria, but emerging studies suggest that this protein plays distinct physiological roles in different bacteria. SoxR regulates a global oxidative stress response (involving > 100 genes against exogenous redox-cycling drugs in Escherichia coli and related enterics. In the antibiotic producers Streptomyces coelicolor and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, however, SoxR regulates a smaller number of genes that encode membrane transporters and proteins with homology to antibiotic-tailoring enzymes. In both S. coelicolor and P. aeruginosa, SoxR-regulated genes are expressed in stationary phase during the production of endogenously-produced redox-active antibiotics. These observations suggest that SoxR evolved to sense endogenous secondary metabolites and activate machinery to process and transport them in antibiotic-producing bacteria. Previous bioinformatics analysis that searched the genome for SoxR-binding sites in putative promoters defined a five-gene SoxR regulon in S. coelicolor including an ABC transporter, two oxidoreductases, a monooxygenase and an epimerase/dehydratase. Since this in silico screen may have missed potential SoxR-targets, we conducted a whole genome transcriptome comparison of wild type S. coelicolor and a soxR-deficient mutant in stationary phase using RNA-Seq. Our analysis revealed a sixth SoxR-regulated gene in S. coelicolor that encodes a putative quinone oxidoreductase. Knowledge of the full complement of genes regulated by SoxR will facilitate studies to elucidate the function of this regulatory molecule in antibiotic producers.

  6. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchell, Karla J F; Jones, Christopher J; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates.

  7. Differential expression patterns in chemosensory and non-chemosensory tissues of putative chemosensory genes identified by transcriptome analysis of insect pest the purple stem borer Sesamia inferens (Walker.

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    Ya-Nan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large number of insect chemosensory genes from different gene subfamilies have been identified and annotated, but their functional diversity and complexity are largely unknown. A systemic examination of expression patterns in chemosensory organs could provide important information. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 92 putative chemosensory genes by analysing the transcriptome of the antennae and female sex pheromone gland of the purple stem borer Sesamia inferens, among them 87 are novel in this species, including 24 transcripts encoding for odorant binding proteins (OBPs, 24 for chemosensory proteins (CSPs, 2 for sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs, 39 for odorant receptors (ORs and 3 for ionotropic receptors (IRs. The transcriptome analyses were validated and quantified with a detailed global expression profiling by Reverse Transcription-PCR for all 92 transcripts and by Quantitative Real Time RT-PCR for selected 16 ones. Among the chemosensory gene subfamilies, CSP transcripts are most widely and evenly expressed in different tissues and stages, OBP transcripts showed a clear antenna bias and most of OR transcripts are only detected in adult antennae. Our results also revealed that some OR transcripts, such as the transcripts of SNMP2 and 2 IRs were expressed in non-chemosensory tissues, and some CSP transcripts were antenna-biased expression. Furthermore, no chemosensory transcript is specific to female sex pheromone gland and very few are found in the heads. CONCLUSION: Our study revealed that there are a large number of chemosensory genes expressed in S. inferens, and some of them displayed unusual expression profile in non-chemosensory tissues. The identification of a large set of putative chemosensory genes of each subfamily from a single insect species, together with their different expression profiles provide further information in understanding the functions of these chemosensory genes in S. inferens as

  8. Depletion of human micro-RNA miR-125b reveals that it is critical for the proliferation of differentiated cells but not for the down-regulation of putative targets during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sun; Kim, Hak Kyun; Chung, Sangmi; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Dutta, Anindya

    2005-04-29

    Micro-RNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate target gene expression post-transcriptionally through base pairing with the target messenger RNA. Functional characterization of micro-RNAs awaits robust experimental methods to knock-down a micro-RNA as well as to assay its function in vivo. In addition to the recently developed method to sequester micro-RNA with 2'-O-methyl antisense oligonucleotide, we report that small interfering RNA against the loop region of a micro-RNA precursor can be used to deplete the micro-RNA. The depletion of miR-125b by this method had a profound effect on the proliferation of adult differentiated cancer cells, and this proliferation defect was rescued by co-transfected mature micro-RNA. This technique has unique advantages over the 2'-O-methyl antisense oligonucleotide and can be used to determine micro-RNA function, assay micro-RNAs in vivo, and identify the contribution of a predicted micro-RNA precursor to the pool of mature micro-RNA in a given cell. miR-125b and let-7 micro-RNAs are induced, whereas their putative targets, lin-28 and lin-41, are decreased during in vitro differentiation of Tera-2 or embryonic stem cells. Experimental increase or decrease of micro-RNA concentrations did not, however, affect the levels of the targets, a finding that is explained by the fact that the down-regulation of the targets appears to be mostly at the transcriptional level in these in vitro differentiation systems. Collectively these results reveal the importance of micro-RNA depletion strategies for directly determining micro-RNA function in vivo.

  9. Linear stability analysis reveals exclusion zone for sliding bed transport

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    Talmon Arnold M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A bend or any another pipe component disturbs solids transport in pipes. Longitudinal pressure profiles downstream of such a component may show a stationary transient harmonic wave, as revealed by a recent settling slurry laboratory experiment. Therefore the fundamental transient response of the two-layer model for fully stratified flow is investigated as a first approach. A linear stability analysis of the sliding bed configuration is conducted. No stationary transient harmonic waves are found in this analysis, but adaptation lengths for exponential recovery are quantified. An example calculation is given for a 0.1 m diameter pipeline.

  10. Invoking Thomas Kuhn: What Citation Analysis Reveals about Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Cathleen C.; Cobern, William W.

    This paper analyzes how Thomas Kuhn's writings are used by others, especially science education researchers. Previous research in citation analysis is used to frame questions related to who cites Kuhn, in what manner and why. Research questions first focus on the variety of disciplines invoking Kuhn and to what extent Structure of Scientific Revolutions (SSR) is cited. The Web of Science database provides material from 1982 for this analysis. The science education literature is analyzed using back issues from 1985 of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and Science Education. An article analysis reveals trends in terms of what Kuhnian ideas are most frequently invoked. Results indicate a wide array of disciplines from beekeeping to law cite Kuhn - especially generic citations to SSR. The science education journal analysis reveals pervasive use of the term paradigm, although use is quite varied. The two areas of research in science education most impacted by Kuhn appear to be conceptual change theory and constructivist epistemologies. Additional uses of Kuhn are discussed. The degree to which Kuhn is invoked in ways supporting the theoretical framework of citation analysis, whether his work is misappropriated, and the impact of Kuhn are discussed.

  11. A Large-Scale Analysis of Genetic Variants within Putative miRNA Binding Sites in Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegeman, Shane; Amankwah, Ernest; Klein, Kerenaftali;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Prostate cancer is the second most common malignancy among men worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 100 risk variants for prostate cancer, which can explain approximately 33% of the familial risk of the disease. We hypothesized that a comprehensive analysis of ge...

  12. Systematic toxicological analysis revealing a rare case of captan ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottzein, Anne K; Musshoff, Frank; Madea, Burkhard

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a case of suicide by intoxication with various pharmaceuticals, particularly anticonvulsants, combined with the fungicide captan. A cause of death could not be ascertained at autopsy. However, systematic toxicological analysis (STA) including a screening via solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for (semi) volatile organic compounds revealed results suggesting a possible cause of death. The effects of captan on the human organism, its metabolism, and distribution will be discussed. Macroscopically, the cause of death was unascertained. STA revealed clonazepam, citalopram, and its metabolites, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, lacosamide, clonazepam, captan, and its metabolite tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI). For the first time, it was detected in human viscera. A quantification of THPI was performed to obtain distribution in the organs. The significance of a complete STA must be emphasized. The presence of THPI would have been missed without previous detection of captan. Consequently, this fatality would not have been investigated satisfactorily.

  13. Network analysis identifies a putative role for the PPAR and type 1 interferon pathways in glucocorticoid actions in asthmatics

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    Diez Diego

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affects ~300 million people worldwide, leading to ~250,000 deaths annually. Glucocorticoids (GCs are well-known therapeutics that are used extensively to suppress airway inflammation in asthmatics. The airway epithelium plays an important role in the initiation and modulation of the inflammatory response. While the role of GCs in disease management is well understood, few studies have examined the holistic effects on the airway epithelium. Methods Gene expression data were used to generate a co-transcriptional network, which was interrogated to identify modules of functionally related genes. In parallel, expression data were mapped to the human protein-protein interaction (PPI network in order to identify modules with differentially expressed genes. A common pathways approach was applied to highlight genes and pathways functionally relevant and significantly altered following GC treatment. Results Co-transcriptional network analysis identified pathways involved in inflammatory processes in the epithelium of asthmatics, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR and PPAR signaling pathways. Analysis of the PPI network identified RXRA, PPARGC1A, STAT1 and IRF9, among others genes, as differentially expressed. Common pathways analysis highlighted TLR and PPAR signaling pathways, providing a link between general inflammatory processes and the actions of GCs. Promoter analysis identified genes regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR and PPAR pathways as well as highlighted the interferon pathway as a target of GCs. Conclusions Network analyses identified known genes and pathways associated with inflammatory processes in the airway epithelium of asthmatics. This workflow illustrated a hypothesis generating experimental design that integrated multiple analysis methods to produce a weight-of-evidence based approach upon which future

  14. Identification and characterisation of the putative phage-related endolysins through full genome sequence analysis in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Meng-Jiun; Soo, Po-Chi; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Hu, Anren; Chen, You-Jie; Chen, Li-Kuang; Chang, Kai-Chih

    2013-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as a major cause of healthcare-associated infections owing to an increase in its antimicrobial resistance to virtually all available drugs. The ability of endolysins (lysozymes) to digest cell walls when applied exogenously to bacterial cells has enabled their use as novel antibacterials. In order to utilise endolysins as a therapeutic alternative to antibiotics, we surveyed the genome sequence of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and successfully identified two phage-related endolysin genes, A1S_1600 and A1S_2016 (termed lysAB3 and lysAB4, respectively). Following cloning and expression/purification, various antibacterial activities of these two phage-related endolysins were determined in vitro. Zymographic assays showed that only purified LysAB3 could lyse the peptidoglycan of the A. baumannii cell wall. When applied exogenously, both LysAB3 and LysAB4 were active against most Acinetobacter spp. tested but had virtually no activity against other non-Acinetobacter spp. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that exposure to 100μg/mL LysAB3 and LysAB4 for up to 60min caused a remarkable modification of the cell shape of A. baumannii. These results indicate that the genes encoding phage-related endolysins can be readily isolated from the bacterial genome and have potential for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  15. The clinicopathologic spectrum of putative extrarenal rhabdoid tumors. An analysis of 42 cases studied with immunohistochemistry or electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, D M; Weeks, D A; Beckwith, J B

    1994-10-01

    The existence of extrarenal rhabdoid tumor (ERRT) as a discrete pathologic entity has been controversial despite frequent reports of its occurrence. We performed immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, or both on 42 cases with this diagnosis sent in consultation to us. Only 12 of the 42 neoplasms had the histological findings of "classic" malignant rhabdoid tumor of the kidney; the remainder displayed a variety of neural, epithelial, myoid, mesenchymal, or ependymal patterns. Electron microscopy also showed that most possessed neural, epithelial, or ependymal features. Immunohistochemistry generally revealed marked polyphenotypia, with immunoreactivity to a wide array of antibodies against neural, epithelial, glial, and myogenic markers. A specific tissue-based diagnostic category could not be assigned in only 11 of the 42 cases, seven of which lacked material for a comprehensive ultrastructural or immunohistochemical study. We conclude that tumors currently diagnosed as ERRT represent a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that may form unique subsets of known entities within the specific site where they arise or that may defy classification into a specific alternative category. Our findings lead us to believe that the term ERRT is not valid as representing a specific diagnostic entity and to prefer the term "poorly differentiated neoplasm with rhabdoid features" for undifferentiated tumors.

  16. Transcriptome Analysis to Identify the Putative Biosynthesis and Transport Genes Associated with the Medicinal Components of Achyranthes bidentata Bl.

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    Jinting Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Achyranthes bidentata is a popular perennial medicine herb used for thousands of years in China to treat various diseases. Although this herb has multiple pharmaceutical purposes in China, no transcriptomic information has been reported for this species. In addition, the understanding of several key pathways and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of oleanolic acid and ecdysterone, two pharmacologically active classes of metabolites and major chemical constituents of A. bidentata root extracts, is limited. The aim of the present study was to characterize the transcriptome profile of the roots and leaves of A. bidentata to uncover the biosynthetic and transport mechanisms of the active components. In this study, we identified 100,987 transcripts, with an average length of 973.64 base pairs. A total of 31,634 (31.33% unigenes were annotated, and 12,762 unigenes were mapped to 303 pathways according to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway database. Moreover, we identified a total of 260 oleanolic acid and ecdysterone genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Furthermore, the key enzymes involved in the oleanolic acid and ecdysterone synthesis pathways were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, revealing that the roots expressed these enzymes to a greater extent than the leaves. In addition, we identified 85 ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, some of which might be involved in the translocation of secondary metabolites.

  17. Analysis of the transcriptome of Erigeron breviscapus uncovers putative scutellarin and chlorogenic acids biosynthetic genes and genetic markers.

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    Ni-Hao Jiang

    Full Text Available Erigeron breviscapus (Vant. Hand-Mazz. is a famous medicinal plant. Scutellarin and chlorogenic acids are the primary active components in this herb. However, the mechanisms of biosynthesis and regulation for scutellarin and chlorogenic acids in E. breviscapus are considerably unknown. In addition, genomic information of this herb is also unavailable.Using Illumina sequencing on GAIIx platform, a total of 64,605,972 raw sequencing reads were generated and assembled into 73,092 non-redundant unigenes. Among them, 44,855 unigenes (61.37% were annotated in the public databases Nr, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, and COG. The transcripts encoding the known enzymes involved in flavonoids and in chlorogenic acids biosynthesis were discovered in the Illumina dataset. Three candidate cytochrome P450 genes were discovered which might encode flavone 6-hydroase converting apigenin to scutellarein. Furthermore, 4 unigenes encoding the homologues of maize P1 (R2R3-MYB transcription factors were defined, which might regulate the biosynthesis of scutellarin. Additionally, a total of 11,077 simple sequence repeat (SSR were identified from 9,255 unigenes. Of SSRs, tri-nucleotide motifs were the most abundant motif. Thirty-six primer pairs for SSRs were randomly selected for validation of the amplification and polymorphism. The result revealed that 34 (94.40% primer pairs were successfully amplified and 19 (52.78% primer pairs exhibited polymorphisms.Using next generation sequencing (NGS technology, this study firstly provides abundant genomic data for E. breviscapus. The candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation of scutellarin and chlorogenic acids were obtained in this study. Additionally, a plenty of genetic makers were generated by identification of SSRs, which is a powerful tool for molecular breeding and genetics applications in this herb.

  18. Taxonomic evaluation of putative Streptomyces scabiei strains held in the ARS Culture Collection (NRRL) using multi-locus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeda, David P

    2016-03-01

    Multi-locus sequence analysis has been demonstrated to be a useful tool for identification of Streptomyces species and was previously applied to phylogenetically differentiate the type strains of species pathogenic on potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). The ARS Culture Collection (NRRL) contains 43 strains identified as Streptomyces scabiei deposited at various times since the 1950s and these were subjected to multi-locus sequence analysis utilising partial sequences of the house-keeping genes atpD, gyrB, recA, rpoB and trpB. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the identity of 17 of these strains as Streptomyces scabiei, 9 of the strains as the potato-pathogenic species Streptomyces europaeiscabiei and 6 strains as potentially new phytopathogenic species. Of the 16 other strains, 12 were identified as members of previously described non-pathogenic Streptomyces species while the remaining 4 strains may represent heretofore unrecognised non-pathogenic species. This study demonstrated the value of this technique for the relatively rapid, simple and sensitive molecular identification of Streptomyces strains held in culture collections.

  19. Putative Alginate Assimilation Process of the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Based on Quantitative Proteomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshiyuki; Morisaka, Hironobu; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Tatsukami, Yohei; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted to assess the assimilation processes of Saccharophagus degradans cultured with glucose, pectin, and alginate as carbon sources. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach was used, employing our unique, long monolithic silica capillary column. In an attempt to select candidate proteins that correlated to alginate assimilation, the production of 23 alginate-specific proteins was identified by statistical analyses of the quantitative proteomic data. Based on the analysis, we propose that S. degradans has an alginate-specific gene cluster for efficient alginate utilization. The alginate-specific proteins of S. degradans were comprised of alginate lyases, enzymes related to carbohydrate metabolism, membrane transporters, and transcription factors. Among them, the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase Sde_3281 annotated in the alginate-specific cluster showed 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid reductase (DehR) activity. Furthermore, we found two different genes (Sde_3280 and Sde_0939) encoding 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconic acid (KDG) kinases (KdgK) that metabolize the KDG derived from alginate and pectin in S. degradans. S. degradans used Sde_3280 to phosphorylate the KDG derived from alginate and Sde_0939 to phosphorylate the KDG derived from pectin. The distinct selection of KdgKs provides an important clue toward the elucidation of how S. degradans recognizes and processes polysaccharides.

  20. Comparative transcriptional analysis reveals differential gene expression between asymmetric and symmetric zygotic divisions in tobacco.

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    Tian-Xiang Hu

    Full Text Available Asymmetric cell divisions occur widely during many developmental processes in plants. In most angiosperms, the first zygotic cell division is asymmetric resulting in two daughter cells of unequal size and with distinct fates. However, the critical molecular mechanisms regulating this division remain unknown. Previously we showed that treatment of tobacco zygotes with beta-glucosyl Yariv (βGlcY could dramatically alter the first zygotic asymmetric division to produce symmetric two-celled proembryos. In the present study, we isolated zygotes and two-celled asymmetric proembryos in vivo by micromanipulation, and obtained symmetric, two-celled proembryos by in vitro cell cultures. Using suppression-subtractive hybridization (SSH and macroarray analysis differential gene expression between the zygote and the asymmetric and symmetric two-celled proembryos was investigated. After sequencing of the differentially expressed clones, a total of 1610 EST clones representing 685 non-redundant transcripts were obtained. Gene ontology (GO term analysis revealed that these transcripts include those involved in physiological processes such as response to stimulus, regulation of gene expression, and localization and formation of anatomical structures. A homology search against known genes from Arabidopsis indicated that some of the above transcripts are involved in asymmetric cell division and embryogenesis. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the up- or down-regulation of the selected candidate transcripts during zygotic division. A few of these transcripts were expressed exclusively in the zygote, or in either type of the two-celled proembryos. Expression analyses of select genes in different tissues and organs also revealed potential roles of these transcripts in fertilization, seed maturation and organ development. The putative roles of few of the identified transcripts in the regulation of zygotic division are discussed. Further functional work on these

  1. Transcriptome analysis reveals positive selection on the divergent between topmouth culter and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li; Tan, Xing-Jun; Xiong, Ya-Feng; Xu, Kang; Zhou, Yi; Zhong, Huan; Liu, Yun; Hong, Yun-Han; Liu, Shao-Jun

    2014-12-01

    The topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis) is a predatory cyprinid fish that distributes widely in the East Asia. Here we report the liver transcriptome in this organism as a model of predatory fish. Sequencing of 5 Gb raw reads led to 27,741 unigenes and produced 11,131 annotatable genes. A total of 7093 (63.7%) genes were found to have putative functions by gene ontology analysis. Importantly, a blast search revealed 4033 culter genes that were orthologous to the zebrafish. Extracted from 38 candidate positive selection genes, 4 genes exhibit strong positive selection based on the ratio of nonsynonymous (Ka) to synonymous substitutions (Ks). In addition, the four genes also indicated the strong positive selection by comparing them between blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) and zebrafish. These genes were involved in activator of gene expression, metabolic processes and development. The transcriptome variation may be reflective of natural selection in the early life history of Cyprinidae. Based on Ks ratios, date of the separation between topmouth culter and zebrafish is approximately 64 million years ago. We conclude that natural selection acts in diversifying the genomes between topmouth culter and zebrafish.

  2. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

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    Trindade, Inês B.; Fonseca, Bruno M. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República (EAN), 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal); Matias, Pedro M. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República (EAN), 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica (iBET), Apartado 12, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Louro, Ricardo O.; Moe, Elin, E-mail: elinmoe@itqb.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República (EAN), 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal)

    2016-08-09

    The gene encoding a putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium S. frigidimarina was successfully cloned, followed by expression and purification of the gene product. Optimized crystals diffracted to 1.35 Å resolution and preliminary crystallographic analysis is promising with respect to structure determination and increased insight into the poorly understood molecular mechanisms underlying iron acquisition. Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI-RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing.

  3. Analysis of SSH library of rice variety Aganni reveals candidate gall midge resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Dhanasekar; Singh, Y Tunginba; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, J S

    2016-03-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae, is a serious insect pest causing extensive yield loss. Interaction between the gall midge and rice genotypes is known to be on a gene-for-gene basis. Here, we report molecular basis of HR- (hypersensitive reaction-negative) type of resistance in Aganni (an indica rice variety possessing gall midge resistance gene Gm8) through the construction and analysis of a suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. In all, 2,800 positive clones were sequenced and analyzed. The high-quality ESTs were assembled into 448 non-redundant gene sequences. Homology search with the NCBI databases, using BlastX and BlastN, revealed that 73% of the clones showed homology to genes with known function and majority of ESTs belonged to the gene ontology category 'biological process'. Validation of 27 putative candidate gall midge resistance genes through real-time PCR, following gall midge infestation, in contrasting parents and their derived pre-NILs (near isogenic lines) revealed induction of specific genes related to defense and metabolism. Interestingly, four genes, belonging to families of leucine-rich repeat (LRR), heat shock protein (HSP), pathogenesis related protein (PR), and NAC domain-containing protein, implicated in conferring HR+ type of resistance, were found to be up-regulated in Aganni. Two of the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI)-scavenging-enzyme-coding genes Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase1, 2 (OsAPx1 and OsAPx2) were found up-regulated in Aganni in incompatible interaction possibly suppressing HR. We suggest that Aganni has a deviant form of inducible, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance but without HR.

  4. Copy Number Analysis of 24 Oncogenes: MDM4 Identified as a Putative Marker for Low Recurrence Risk in Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

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    Samanta Salvi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC generally have a high risk of relapsing locally after primary tumor resection. The search for new predictive markers of local recurrence thus represents an important goal for the management of this disease. We studied the copy number variations (CNVs of 24 oncogenes (MDM4, MYCN, ALK, PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, DHFR, EGFR, MET, SMO, FGFR1, MYC, ABL1, RET, CCND1, CCND2, CDK4, MDM2, AURKB, ERBB2, TOP2A, AURKA, AR and BRAF using multiplex ligation probe amplification technique to verify their role as predictive markers of recurrence. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 43 patients who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB were used; 23 patients had relapsed and 20 were disease-free after 5 years. Amplification frequencies were analyzed for all genes and MDM4 was the only gene that showed significantly higher amplification in non recurrent patients than in recurrent ones (0.65 vs. 0.3; Fisher’s test p = 0.023. Recurrence-free survival analysis confirmed the predictive role of MDM4 (log-rank test p = 0.041. Our preliminary results indicate a putative role for the MDM4 gene in predicting local recurrence of bladder cancer. Confirmation of this hypothesis is needed in a larger cohort of NMIBC patients.

  5. Cloning and functional analysis of putative malonyl-CoA:acyl-carrier protein transacylase gene from the docosahexaenoic acid-producer Schizochytrium sp. TIO1101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rubin; Ge, Yuqing; Yang, Bo; Zhong, Xiaoming; Lin, Xiangzhi; Huang, Zhen

    2013-06-01

    Malonyl-CoA:acyl-carrier protein transacylase (MCAT), which transfers the malonyl group from malonyl-CoA to holo-acyl carrier protein (ACP), is a key enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis. Schizochytrium sp. TIO1101 is a marine protist with high levels of docosahexaenoic acid accumulation. In this study, the putative fabD gene coding MCAT was isolated from Schizochytrium sp. TIO1101. The Schizochytrium MCAT gene (ScTIOfabD) contained an 1176 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 391 amino acids. The ScTIOfabD gene exhibited high novelty in nucleotide and amino acid sequence. The highest amino acid identity was only 35 % between ScTIOMCAT and the reported MCATs. Further studies demonstrated that ScTIOMCAT could bind malonyl-CoA directly and transfer malonyl group from malonyl-CoA to the ACP domain in vitro. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that ScTIOMCAT was relative close to MCATs of yeast strains. Overexpression of ScTIOMCAT in Saccharomyces cereviseae significantly increased the MCAT activity, without negative effects on the growth rate of the host strain. In addition, ScTIOMCAT generated 16.8 and 62 % increase in biomass and fatty acid accumulation, respectively, and did not alter the profile of fatty acid. Our results indicated that the novel MCAT gene from Schizochytrium sp. TIO1101 was crucial for fatty acid synthesis and had potential applications for genetic modifications of oil-producing species.

  6. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of a Putative Octopamine/Tyramine Receptor during the Developmental Stages of the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Xu, Fei; Huang, Baoyu; Li, Yingxiang; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) and its precursor, tyramine (TA), participate in invertebrate development such as growth, maturation, and reproduction by activating their corresponding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although OA was first discovered in mollusks (octopus), subsequent studies on OA, TA and related receptors have primarily been conducted in Ecdysozoa, especially in insects. Accordingly, only limited reports on OA/TA receptors in mollusks are available and their physiological roles remain unclear. Here, a full-length cDNA encoding a putative 524 amino acid OA/TA receptor (CgGPR1) was isolated from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. CgGPR1 was most closely related to the Lymnaea stagnalis OA receptor OAR2 in sequence. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CgGPR1 belongs to a poorly studied subfamily of invertebrate OA/TA receptors. The spatio-temporal expression of CgGPR1 in C. gigas larvae was examined by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. CgGPR1 was expressed during all developmental stages of C. gigas with higher levels at mid-developmental stages, indicating its potential role in embryogenesis and tissue differentiation. Immunoreactive fluorescence of CgGPR1 was mainly observed in the velum, foot, gill and mantle of C. gigas larvae. CgGPR1 transcripts were detected in all the tested organs of adult C. gigas, with highest level in the mantle. Pharmacological analysis showed that cAMP and Ca2+ concentrations remained unchanged in HEK293 cells expressing CgGPR1 upon addition of OA, TA or related amines, suggesting that CgGPR1 modulates other unknown molecules rather than cAMP and Ca2+. Our study sheds light on CgGPR1 function in oysters. PMID:27992549

  7. Metagenomic and whole-genome analysis reveals new lineages of gokushoviruses and biogeographic separation in the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Myriam Labonté

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Much remains to be learned about single-stranded (ss DNA viruses in natural systems, and the evolutionary relationships among them. One of the eight recognized families of ssDNA viruses is the Microviridae, a group of viruses infecting bacteria. In this study we used metagenomic analysis, genome assembly and amplicon sequencing of purified ssDNA to show that bacteriophages belonging to the subfamily Gokushovirinae within the Microviridae are genetically diverse and widespread members of marine microbial communities. Metagenomic analysis of coastal samples from the Gulf of Mexico and British Columbia, Canada, revealed numerous sequences belonging to gokushoviruses and allowed the assembly of five putative genomes with an organization similar to chlamydiamicroviruses. Fragment recruitment to these genomes from different metagenomic data sets is consistent with gokushovirus genotypes being restricted to specific oceanic regions. Conservation among the assembled genomes allowed the design of degenerate primers that target an 800 bp fragment from the gene encoding the major capsid protein. Sequences could be amplified from coastal temperate and subtropical waters, but not from samples collected from the Arctic Ocean, or freshwater lakes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most sequences were distantly related to those from cultured representatives. Moreover, the sequences fell into at least seven distinct evolutionary groups, most of which were represented by one of the assembled metagenomes. Our results greatly expand the known sequence space for gokushoviruses, and reveal biogeographic separation and new evolutionary lineages of gokushoviruses in the oceans.

  8. Identification of Genes Putatively Involved in Chitin Metabolism and Insecticide Detoxification in the Rice Leaf Folder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Larvae through Transcriptomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Zhong Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The rice leaf roller (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis is one of the most destructive agricultural pests. Due to its migratory behavior, it is difficult to control worldwide. To date, little is known about major genes of C. medinalis involved in chitin metabolism and insecticide detoxification. In order to obtain a comprehensive genome dataset of C. medinalis, we conducted de novo transcriptome sequencing which focused on the major feeding stage of fourth-instar larvae, and our work revealed useful information on chitin metabolism and insecticide detoxification and target genes of C. medinalis. We acquired 29,367,797 Illumina reads and assembled these reads into 63,174 unigenes with an average length of 753 bp. Among these unigenes, 31,810 were annotated against the National Center for Biotechnology Information non-redundant (NCBI nr protein database, resulting in 24,246, 8669 and 18,176 assigned to Swiss-Prot, clusters of orthologous group (COG, and gene ontology (GO, respectively. We were able to map 10,043 unigenes into 285 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG. Specifically, 16 genes, including five chitin deacetylases, two chitin synthases, five chitinases and four other related enzymes, were identified to be putatively involved in chitin biosynthesis and degradation, whereas 360 genes, including cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferases, esterases, and acetylcholinesterases, were found to be potentially involved in insecticide detoxification or as insecticide targets. The reliability of the transcriptome data was determined by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR for the selected genes. Our data serves as a new and valuable sequence resource for genomic studies on C. medinalis. The findings should improve our understanding of C. medinalis genetics and contribute to management of this important agricultural pest.

  9. Identification of Genes Putatively Involved in Chitin Metabolism and Insecticide Detoxification in the Rice Leaf Folder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) Larvae through Transcriptomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai-Zhong; Wen, De-Fu; Wang, Wan-Lin; Geng, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Jia-Ping

    2015-09-10

    The rice leaf roller (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) is one of the most destructive agricultural pests. Due to its migratory behavior, it is difficult to control worldwide. To date, little is known about major genes of C. medinalis involved in chitin metabolism and insecticide detoxification. In order to obtain a comprehensive genome dataset of C. medinalis, we conducted de novo transcriptome sequencing which focused on the major feeding stage of fourth-instar larvae, and our work revealed useful information on chitin metabolism and insecticide detoxification and target genes of C. medinalis. We acquired 29,367,797 Illumina reads and assembled these reads into 63,174 unigenes with an average length of 753 bp. Among these unigenes, 31,810 were annotated against the National Center for Biotechnology Information non-redundant (NCBI nr) protein database, resulting in 24,246, 8669 and 18,176 assigned to Swiss-Prot, clusters of orthologous group (COG), and gene ontology (GO), respectively. We were able to map 10,043 unigenes into 285 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG). Specifically, 16 genes, including five chitin deacetylases, two chitin synthases, five chitinases and four other related enzymes, were identified to be putatively involved in chitin biosynthesis and degradation, whereas 360 genes, including cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferases, esterases, and acetylcholinesterases, were found to be potentially involved in insecticide detoxification or as insecticide targets. The reliability of the transcriptome data was determined by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) for the selected genes. Our data serves as a new and valuable sequence resource for genomic studies on C. medinalis. The findings should improve our understanding of C. medinalis genetics and contribute to management of this important agricultural pest.

  10. Construction and analysis of antennal cDNA library from rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), and expression profiles of putative odorant-binding protein and chemosensory protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhong-Jun; Liu, Su; Jiang, Yan-Dong; Zhou, Wen-Wu; Liang, Qing-Mei; Cheng, Jiaan; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Zhu, Zeng-Rong; Gurr, Geoff M

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we constructed a high-quality cDNA library from the antennae of the Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). A total of 1,235 colonies with inserts greater than 0.7 kb were sequenced and analyzed. Homology searching coupled with bioinformatics analysis identified 15 and 7 cDNA sequences, respectively, encoding putative odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs). A phylogenetic tree of CsupCSPs showed that each CsupCSP has orthologs in Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori with strong bootstrapping support. One CSP was either very specific or more related to the CSPs of another species than to conspecific CSP. The expression profiles of the OBPs and CSPs in different tissues were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. The results revealed that of the 11 OBP genes, the transcript levels of CsupOBP1, CsupOBP5, and CsupOBP7 were higher in both male and female antennae than those in other tissues. And CsupCSP7 was highly expressed in both male and female antennae. Based on these results, the possible physiological functions of CsupOBPs and CsupCSPs were discussed.

  11. Chromosomal location and comparative genomics analysis of powdery mildew resistance gene Pm51 in a putative wheat-Thinopyrum ponticum introgression line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Haixian; Li, Guangrong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Xin; Guo, Huijuan; Gong, Wenping; Jia, Juqing; Qiao, Linyi; Ren, Yongkang; Yang, Zujun; Chang, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a very destructive disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Wheat-Thinopyrum ponticum introgression line CH7086 was shown to possess powdery mildew resistance possibly originating from Th. ponticum. Genomic in situ hybridization and molecular characterization of the alien introgression failed to identify alien chromatin. To study the genetics of resistance, CH7086 was crossed with susceptible genotypes. Segregation in F2 populations and F2:3 lines tested with Chinese Bgt race E09 under controlled conditions indicated that CH7086 carries a single dominant gene for powdery mildew resistance. Fourteen SSR and EST-PCR markers linked with the locus were identified. The genetic distances between the locus and the two flanking markers were 1.5 and 3.2 cM, respectively. Based on the locations of the markers by nullisomic-tetrasomic and deletion lines of 'Chinese Spring', the resistance gene was located in deletion bin 2BL-0.89-1.00. Conserved orthologous marker analysis indicated that the genomic region flanking the resistance gene has a high level of collinearity to that of rice chromosome 4 and Brachypodium chromosome 5. Both resistance specificities and tests of allelism suggested the resistance gene in CH7086 was different from previously reported powdery mildew resistance genes on 2BL, and the gene was provisionally designated PmCH86. Molecular analysis of PmCH86 compared with other genes for resistance to Bgt in the 2BL-0.89-1.00 region suggested that PmCH86 may be a new PM resistance gene, and it was therefore designated as Pm51. The closely linked flanking markers could be useful in exploiting this putative wheat-Thinopyrum translocation line for rapid transfer of Pm51 to wheat breeding programs.

  12. The crystal structure of Rv1347c, a putative antibiotic resistance protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, reveals a GCN5-related fold and suggests an alternative function in siderophore biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Card, G L; Peterson, N A; Smith, C A; Rupp, B; Schick, B M; Baker, E N

    2005-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of TB, is a devastating human pathogen. The emergence of multi-drug resistance in recent years has prompted a search for new drug targets and for a better understanding of mechanisms of resistance. Here we focus on the gene product of an open reading frame from M. tuberculosis, Rv1347c, which is annotated as a putative aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase. The Rv1347c protein does not show this activity, however, and we show from its crystal structure, coupled with functional and bioinformatic data, that its most likely role is in the biosynthesis of mycobactin, the M. tuberculosis siderophore. The crystal structure of Rv1347c was determined by MAD phasing from selenomethionine-substituted protein and refined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution (R = 0.227, R{sub free} = 0.257). The protein is monomeric, with a fold that places it in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) family of acyltransferases. Features of the structure are an acylCoA binding site that is shared with other GNAT family members, and an adjacent hydrophobic channel leading to the surface that could accommodate long-chain acyl groups. Modeling the postulated substrate, the N{sup {var_epsilon}}-hydroxylysine side chain of mycobactin, into the acceptor substrate binding groove identifies two residues at the active site, His130 and Asp168, that have putative roles in substrate binding and catalysis.

  13. Molecular analysis of sourdough reveals Lactobacillus mindensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Matthias A; Müller, Martin R A; Vogel, Rudi F

    2003-01-01

    Genotypic fingerprinting to analyse the bacterial flora of an industrial sourdough revealed a coherent group of strains which could not be associated with a valid species. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that these strains formed a homogeneous cluster distinct from their closest relatives, Lactobacillus farciminis, Lactobacillus alimentarius and Lactobacillus kimchii. To characterize them further, physiological (sugar fermentation, formation of DL-lactate, hydrolysis of arginine, growth temperature, CO2 production) and chemotaxonomic properties have been determined. The DNA G +C content was 37.5 0.2 mol%. The peptidoglycan was of the lysine-D-iso-asparagine (L-Lys-D-Asp) type. The strains were homofermentative, Gram-positive, catalase-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile rods. They were found as a major stable component of a rye flour sourdough fermentation. Physiological, biochemical as well as genotypic data suggested them to be a new species of the genus Lactobacillus. This was confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization of genomic DNA, and the name Lactobacillus mindensis is proposed. The type strain of this species is DSM 14500T (=LMG 21508T).

  14. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

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    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  15. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei.

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    Jessica Rhea Sieber

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomic approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detected were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. The proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis macromolecular stability and energy metabolism to S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.

  16. Molecular determinants of juvenile hormone action as revealed by 3D QSAR analysis in Drosophila.

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    Denisa Liszeková

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postembryonic development, including metamorphosis, of many animals is under control of hormones. In Drosophila and other insects these developmental transitions are regulated by the coordinate action of two principal hormones, the steroid ecdysone and the sesquiterpenoid juvenile hormone (JH. While the mode of ecdysone action is relatively well understood, the molecular mode of JH action remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain more insights into the molecular mechanism of JH action, we have tested the biological activity of 86 structurally diverse JH agonists in Drosophila melanogaster. The results were evaluated using 3D QSAR analyses involving CoMFA and CoMSIA procedures. Using this approach we have generated both computer-aided and species-specific pharmacophore fingerprints of JH and its agonists, which revealed that the most active compounds must possess an electronegative atom (oxygen or nitrogen at both ends of the molecule. When either of these electronegative atoms are replaced by carbon or the distance between them is shorter than 11.5 A or longer than 13.5 A, their biological activity is dramatically decreased. The presence of an electron-deficient moiety in the middle of the JH agonist is also essential for high activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The information from 3D QSAR provides guidelines and mechanistic scope for identification of steric and electrostatic properties as well as donor and acceptor hydrogen-bonding that are important features of the ligand-binding cavity of a JH target protein. In order to refine the pharmacophore analysis and evaluate the outcomes of the CoMFA and CoMSIA study we used pseudoreceptor modeling software PrGen to generate a putative binding site surrogate that is composed of eight amino acid residues corresponding to the defined molecular interactions.

  17. The crystal structure of the Rv0301-Rv0300 VapBC-3 toxin-antitoxin complex from M. tuberculosis reveals a Mg2+ ion in the active site and a putative RNA-binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Andrew B; Miallau, Linda; Sawaya, Michael R; Habel, Jeff; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David [UCLA; (UCB)

    2013-01-10

    VapBC pairs account for 45 out of 88 identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) pairs in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv genome. A working model suggests that under times of stress, antitoxin molecules are degraded, releasing the toxins to slow the metabolism of the cell, which in the case of VapC toxins is via their RNase activity. Otherwise the TA pairs remain bound to their promoters, autoinhibiting transcription. The crystal structure of Rv0301-Rv0300, an Mtb VapBC TA complex determined at 1.49 Å resolution, suggests a mechanism for these three functions: RNase activity, its inhibition by antitoxin, and its ability to bind promoter DNA. The Rv0301 toxin consists of a core of five parallel beta strands flanked by alpha helices. Three proximal aspartates coordinate a Mg2+ ion forming the putative RNase active site. The Rv0300 antitoxin monomer is extended in structure, consisting of an N-terminal beta strand followed by four helices. The last two helices wrap around the toxin and terminate near the putative RNase active site, but with different conformations. In one conformation, the C-terminal arginine interferes with Mg2+ ion coordination, suggesting a mechanism by which the antitoxin can inhibit toxin activity. At the N-terminus of the antitoxin, two pairs of Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motifs are related by crystallographic twofold symmetry. The resulting hetero-octameric complex is similar to the FitAB system, but the two RHH motifs are about 30 Å closer together in the Rv0301-Rv0300 complex, suggesting either a different span of the DNA recognition sequence or a conformational change.

  18. Characterization and expression analysis of mcoln1.1 and mcoln1.2, the putative zebrafish co-orthologs of the gene responsible for human mucolipidosis type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benini, Anna; Bozzato, Andrea; Mantovanelli, Silvia; Calvarini, Laura; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Bresciani, Roberto; Moleri, Silvia; Zizioli, Daniela; Beltrame, Monica; Borsani, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene coding for mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). TRPML1 belongs to a transient receptor potential channels (TRP) subfamily, which in mammals includes two other members: mucolipin-2 (TRPML2) and mucolipin-3 (TRPML3). Bioinformatic analysis of the Danio rerio (zebrafish) genome and trascriptome revealed the presence of five different genes related to human mucolipins: mcoln1.1, mcoln1.2, mcoln2, mcoln3.1 and mcoln3.2. We focused our efforts on the characterization of the two putative zebrafish MCOLN1 co-orthologs. Transient-expression experiments in human HeLa cells demonstrated that fish Mcoln1.1 and Mcoln1.2, similarly to TRPML1, localize to late endosomal/lysosomal compartments. Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) experiments showed that both genes are maternally expressed and transcribed at different levels during embryogenesis. RT-PCR analysis in different zebrafish tissues displayed ubiquitary expression for mcoln1.1 and a more tissue-specific pattern for mcoln1.2. Spatial and temporal expression studies using whole-mount in situ hybridization confirmed that both genes are maternally expressed and ubiquitously transcribed during gastrulation and early somitogenesis. Notably, in the next developmental stages they are more expressed in neural regions and in retina layers, tissues affected in MLIV. Interestingly, mcoln1.1 is detected, from 10 somite-stage until to 36 hpf, in the yolk syncytial layer (YSL) and in the intermediate cell mass (ICM), the earliest site of hematopoiesis. Overall, the redundancy of mucolipins together with their expression profile support the biological relevance of this class of proteins in zebrafish. The data herein presented indicate that Danio rerio could be a suitable vertebrate model for the study of some aspects of MLIV pathogenesis.

  19. Isotope analysis reveals foraging area dichotomy for atlantic leatherback turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Caut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea has undergone a dramatic decline over the last 25 years, and this is believed to be primarily the result of mortality associated with fisheries bycatch followed by egg and nesting female harvest. Atlantic leatherback turtles undertake long migrations across ocean basins from subtropical and tropical nesting beaches to productive frontal areas. Migration between two nesting seasons can last 2 or 3 years, a time period termed the remigration interval (RI. Recent satellite transmitter data revealed that Atlantic leatherbacks follow two major dispersion patterns after nesting season, through the North Gulf Stream area or more eastward across the North Equatorial Current. However, information on the whole RI is lacking, precluding the accurate identification of feeding areas where conservation measures may need to be applied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using stable isotopes as dietary tracers we determined the characteristics of feeding grounds of leatherback females nesting in French Guiana. During migration, 3-year RI females differed from 2-year RI females in their isotope values, implying differences in their choice of feeding habitats (offshore vs. more coastal and foraging latitude (North Atlantic vs. West African coasts, respectively. Egg-yolk and blood isotope values are correlated in nesting females, indicating that egg analysis is a useful tool for assessing isotope values in these turtles, including adults when not available. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results complement previous data on turtle movements during the first year following the nesting season, integrating the diet consumed during the year before nesting. We suggest that the French Guiana leatherback population segregates into two distinct isotopic groupings, and highlight the urgent need to determine the feeding habitats of the turtle in the Atlantic in order to protect this species from incidental take by

  20. Quantitative flux analysis reveals folate-dependent NADPH production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Ye, Jiangbin; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Shlomi, Tomer; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-06-01

    ATP is the dominant energy source in animals for mechanical and electrical work (for example, muscle contraction or neuronal firing). For chemical work, there is an equally important role for NADPH, which powers redox defence and reductive biosynthesis. The most direct route to produce NADPH from glucose is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, with malic enzyme sometimes also important. Although the relative contribution of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to ATP production has been extensively analysed, similar analysis of NADPH metabolism has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the ability to directly track, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the passage of deuterium from labelled substrates into NADPH, and combine this approach with carbon labelling and mathematical modelling to measure NADPH fluxes. In proliferating cells, the largest contributor to cytosolic NADPH is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Surprisingly, a nearly comparable contribution comes from serine-driven one-carbon metabolism, in which oxidation of methylene tetrahydrofolate to 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate is coupled to reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. Moreover, tracing of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism revealed complete oxidation of 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate to make NADPH. As folate metabolism has not previously been considered an NADPH producer, confirmation of its functional significance was undertaken through knockdown of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) genes. Depletion of either the cytosolic or mitochondrial MTHFD isozyme resulted in decreased cellular NADPH/NADP+ and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) and increased cell sensitivity to oxidative stress. Thus, although the importance of folate metabolism for proliferating cells has been long recognized and attributed to its function of producing one-carbon units for nucleic acid synthesis, another crucial function of this pathway is generating reducing power.

  1. Molecular evidence for the coordination of nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, revealed by a study on the transcriptional regulation of the agl3EFG operon that encodes a putative carbohydrate transporter in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jin

    2016-03-18

    In the agl3EFGXYZ operon (SCO7167-SCO7162, abbreviated as agl3 operon) of Streptomyces coelicolor M145, agl3EFG genes encode a putative ABC-type carbohydrate transporter. The transcription of this operon has been proved to be repressed by Agl3R (SCO7168), a neighboring GntR-family regulator, and this repression can be released by growth on poor carbon sources. Here in this study, we prove that the transcription of agl3 operon is also directly repressed by GlnR, a central regulator governing the nitrogen metabolism in S. coelicolor. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) employing the agl3 promoter and mixtures of purified recombinant GlnR and Agl3R indicates that GlnR and Agl3R bind to different DNA sequences within the promoter region of agl3 operon, which is further confirmed by the DNase I footprinting assay. As Agl3R and GlnR have been demonstrated to sense the extracellular carbon and nitrogen supplies, respectively, it is hypothesized that the transcription of agl3 operon is stringently governed by the availabilities of extracellular carbon and nitrogen sources. Consistent with the hypothesis, the agl3 operon is further found to be derepressed only under the condition of poor carbon and rich nitrogen supplies, when both regulators are inactivated. It is believed that activation of the expression of agl3 operon may facilitate the absorption of extracellular carbohydrates to balance the ratio of intracellular carbon to nitrogen.

  2. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato. PMID:27540389

  3. Changes in cod muscle proteins during frozen storage revealed by proteome analysis and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgård, Inger Vibeke Holst; Nørrelykke, M.R.; Jessen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    Multivariate data analysis has been combined with proteomics to enhance the recovery of information from 2-DE of cod muscle proteins during different storage conditions. Proteins were extracted according to 11 different storage conditions and samples were resolved by 2-DE. Data generated by 2-DE...... was subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares regression (DPLSR). Applying PCA to 2-DE data revealed the samples to form groups according to frozen storage time, whereas differences due to different storage temperatures or chilled storage in modified atmosphere...... packing did not lead to distinct changes in protein pattern. Applying DPLSR to the 2-DE data enabled the selection of protein spots critical for differentiation between 3 and 6months frozen storage with 12months frozen storage. Some of these protein spots have been identified by MS/MS, revealing myosin...

  4. BAHAMAS: new SNIa analysis reveals inconsistencies with standard cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Shariff, H; Trotta, R; van Dyk, D A

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained by applying our BAyesian HierArchical Modeling for the Analysis of Supernova cosmology (BAHAMAS) software package to the 740 spectroscopically confirmed supernovae type Ia (SNIa) from the "Joint Light-curve Analysis" (JLA) dataset. We simultaneously determine cosmological parameters and standardization parameters, including host galaxy mass corrections, residual scatter and object-by-object intrinsic magnitudes. Combining JLA and Planck Cosmic Microwave Background data, we find significant discrepancies in cosmological parameter constraints with respect to the standard analysis: we find Omega_M = 0.399+/-0.027, 2.8\\sigma\\ higher than previously reported and w = -0.910+/-0.045, 1.6\\sigma\\ higher than the standard analysis. We determine the residual scatter to be sigma_res = 0.104+/-0.005. We confirm (at the 95% probability level) the existence of two sub-populations segregated by host galaxy mass, separated at log_{10}(M/M_solar) = 10, differing in mean intrinsic magnitude by 0.055+...

  5. In-silico analysis of putative HCV epitopes against Pakistani human leukocyte antigen background: An approach towards development of future vaccines for Pakistani population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Naeem Mahmood; Bilal, Muhammad; Mahmood, Malik Siddique; Hussain, Aadil; Mehboob, Muhammad Zubair

    2016-09-01

    Mounting burden of HCV-infected individuals and soaring cost of treatment is a serious source of unease for developing countries. Numbers of various approaches have been anticipated to develop a vaccine against HCV but the majority of them proved ineffective. Development of vaccine by considering geographical distribution of HCV genotypes and host genetics shows potential. In this research article, we have tried to predict most putative HCV epitopes which are efficiently restricted by most common HLA alleles in Pakistani population through different computational algorithms. Thirteen selected, experimentally identified epitopes sequences were used to derived consensus sequences in all genotypes of HCV. Obtained consensus sequences were used to predict their binding affinities with most prevalent HLA alleles in Pakistani population. Two Class-I epitopes from NS4B region, one from Class-I epitope from NS5A and one Class-II epitope from NS3 region showed effective binding and proved to be highly putative to boost immune response. A cocktail of these four have been checked for population coverage and they gave 75.53% for Pakistani Asian and 70.77% for Pakistani Mixed populations with no allergenic response. Computational algorithms are robust way to shortlist potential candidate epitopes for vaccine development but further, in vivo and in-vitro studies are required to confirm their immunogenic properties.

  6. High throughput sequencing analysis of RNA libraries reveals the influences of initial library and PCR methods on SELEX efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mayumi; Wu, Xiwei; Ho, Michelle; Chomchan, Pritsana; Rossi, John J; Burnett, John C; Zhou, Jiehua

    2016-09-22

    The systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) technique is a powerful and effective aptamer-selection procedure. However, modifications to the process can dramatically improve selection efficiency and aptamer performance. For example, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been recently incorporated into SELEX selection protocols to putatively reduce the propagation of byproducts and avoid selection bias that result from differences in PCR efficiency of sequences within the random library. However, a detailed, parallel comparison of the efficacy of conventional solution PCR versus the ddPCR modification in the RNA aptamer-selection process is needed to understand effects on overall SELEX performance. In the present study, we took advantage of powerful high throughput sequencing technology and bioinformatics analysis coupled with SELEX (HT-SELEX) to thoroughly investigate the effects of initial library and PCR methods in the RNA aptamer identification. Our analysis revealed that distinct "biased sequences" and nucleotide composition existed in the initial, unselected libraries purchased from two different manufacturers and that the fate of the "biased sequences" was target-dependent during selection. Our comparison of solution PCR- and ddPCR-driven HT-SELEX demonstrated that PCR method affected not only the nucleotide composition of the enriched sequences, but also the overall SELEX efficiency and aptamer efficacy.

  7. Analysis of the Protein phosphotome of Entamoeba histolytica reveals an intricate phosphorylation network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Tamanna; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most common mechanism for the propagation of intracellular signals. Protein phosphatases and protein kinases play a dynamic antagonistic role in protein phosphorylation. Protein phosphatases make up a significant fraction of eukaryotic proteome. In this article, we report the identification and analysis of protein phosphatases in the intracellular parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Based on an in silico analysis, we classified 250 non-redundant protein phosphatases in E. histolytica. The phosphotome of E. histolytica is 3.1% of its proteome and 1.3 times of the human phosphotome. In this extensive study, we identified 42 new putative phosphatases (39 hypothetical proteins and 3 pseudophosphatases). The presence of pseudophosphatases may have an important role in virulence of E. histolytica. A comprehensive phosphotome analysis of E. histolytica shows spectacular low similarity to human phosphatases, making them potent candidates for drug target.

  8. Transcriptome and Metabolite analysis reveal candidate genes of the cardiac glycoside biosynthetic pathway from Calotropis procera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Akansha; Swarnkar, Vishakha; Pandey, Tushar; Srivastava, Piush; Kanojiya, Sanjeev; Mishra, Dipak Kumar; Tripathi, Vineeta

    2016-01-01

    Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant of immense importance due to its pharmaceutical active components, especially cardiac glycosides (CG). As genomic resources for this plant are limited, the genes involved in CG biosynthetic pathway remain largely unknown till date. Our study on stage and tissue specific metabolite accumulation showed that CG’s were maximally accumulated in stems of 3 month old seedlings. De novo transcriptome sequencing of same was done using high throughput Illumina HiSeq platform generating 44074 unigenes with average mean length of 1785 base pair. Around 66.6% of unigenes were annotated by using various public databases and 5324 unigenes showed significant match in the KEGG database involved in 133 different pathways of plant metabolism. Further KEGG analysis resulted in identification of 336 unigenes involved in cardenolide biosynthesis. Tissue specific expression analysis of 30 putative transcripts involved in terpenoid, steroid and cardenolide pathways showed a positive correlation between metabolite and transcript accumulation. Wound stress elevated CG levels as well the levels of the putative transcripts involved in its biosynthetic pathways. This result further validated the involvement of identified transcripts in CGs biosynthesis. The identified transcripts will lay a substantial foundation for further research on metabolic engineering and regulation of cardiac glycosides biosynthesis pathway genes. PMID:27703261

  9. Penicillium simile sp. nov. revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davolos, Domenico; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; Persiani, Anna Maria; Maggi, Oriana

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of three phenetically identical Penicillium isolates, collected from the bioaerosol in a restoration laboratory in Italy, displayed macro- and microscopic characteristics that were similar though not completely ascribable to Penicillium raistrickii. For this reason, a phylogenetic approach based on DNA sequencing analysis was performed to establish both the taxonomic status and the evolutionary relationships of these three peculiar isolates in relation to previously described species of the genus Penicillium. We used four nuclear loci (both rRNA and protein coding genes) that have previously proved useful for the molecular investigation of taxa belonging to the genus Penicillium at various evolutionary levels. The internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2), domains D1 and D2 of the 28S rDNA, a region of the tubulin beta chain gene (benA) and part of the calmodulin gene (cmd) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Analysis of the rRNA genes and of the benA and cmd sequence data indicates the presence of three isogenic isolates belonging to a genetically distinct species of the genus Penicillium, here described and named Penicillium simile sp. nov. (ATCC MYA-4591(T)  = CBS 129191(T)). This novel species is phylogenetically different from P. raistrickii and other related species of the genus Penicillium (e.g. Penicillium scabrosum), from which it can be distinguished on the basis of morphological trait analysis.

  10. Subfield profitability analysis reveals an economic case for cropland diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, E.; McNunn, G. S.; Schulte, L. A.; Bonner, I. J.; Muth, D. J.; Babcock, B. A.; Sharma, B.; Heaton, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Public agencies and private enterprises increasingly desire to achieve ecosystem service outcomes in agricultural systems, but are limited by perceived conflicts between economic and ecosystem service goals and a lack of tools enabling effective operational management. Here we use Iowa—an agriculturally homogeneous state representative of the Maize Belt—to demonstrate an economic rationale for cropland diversification at the subfield scale. We used a novel computational framework that integrates disparate but publicly available data to map ˜3.3 million unique potential management polygons (9.3 Mha) and reveal subfield opportunities to increase overall field profitability. We analyzed subfield profitability for maize/soybean fields during 2010-2013—four of the most profitable years in recent history—and projected results for 2015. While cropland operating at a loss of US 250 ha-1 or more was negligible between 2010 and 2013 at 18 000-190 000 ha (profitable areas, incorporating conservation management that breaks even (e.g., planting low-input perennials), into low-yielding portions of fields could increase overall cropland profitability by 80%. This approach is applicable to the broader region and differs substantially from the status quo of ‘top-down’ land management for conservation by harnessing private interest to align profitability with the production of ecosystem services.

  11. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Ecological Differentiation in the Genus Carnobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Christelle F.; Borges, Frédéric; Taminiau, Bernard; Daube, Georges; Zagorec, Monique; Remenant, Benoît; Leisner, Jørgen J.; Hansen, Martin A.; Sørensen, Søren J.; Mangavel, Cécile; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) differ in their ability to colonize food and animal-associated habitats: while some species are specialized and colonize a limited number of habitats, other are generalist and are able to colonize multiple animal-linked habitats. In the current study, Carnobacterium was used as a model genus to elucidate the genetic basis of these colonization differences. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene meta-barcoding data showed that C. maltaromaticum followed by C. divergens are the most prevalent species in foods derived from animals (meat, fish, dairy products), and in the gut. According to phylogenetic analyses, these two animal-adapted species belong to one of two deeply branched lineages. The second lineage contains species isolated from habitats where contact with animal is rare. Genome analyses revealed that members of the animal-adapted lineage harbor a larger secretome than members of the other lineage. The predicted cell-surface proteome is highly diversified in C. maltaromaticum and C. divergens with genes involved in adaptation to the animal milieu such as those encoding biopolymer hydrolytic enzymes, a heme uptake system, and biopolymer-binding adhesins. These species also exhibit genes for gut adaptation and respiration. In contrast, Carnobacterium species belonging to the second lineage encode a poorly diversified cell-surface proteome, lack genes for gut adaptation and are unable to respire. These results shed light on the important genomics traits required for adaptation to animal-linked habitats in generalist Carnobacterium. PMID:28337181

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhu Hua

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis”, “tyrosine metabolism”, “flavonoid biosynthesis”, “ascorbate and aldarate metabolism”, “betalains biosynthesis” and “anthocyanin biosynthesis”. In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Qingzhu; Zhou, Qianjun; Gan, Susheng; Wu, Jingyu; Chen, Canbin; Li, Jiaqiang; Ye, Yaoxiong; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis”, “tyrosine metabolism”, “flavonoid biosynthesis”, “ascorbate and aldarate metabolism”, “betalains biosynthesis” and “anthocyanin biosynthesis”. In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level. PMID:27690004

  14. Genome-wide analysis of the Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome reveals interaction of phosphate and sugar metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Renate; Morant, Marc; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2007-01-01

    and carbohydrate levels. Transcript profiling revealed the influence of the two factors individually and the interactions between P- and sugar-dependent gene regulation. A large number of gene transcripts changed more than 2-fold: In response to P starvation, 171 genes were induced and 16 repressed, whereas Suc...... incubation resulted in 337 induced and 307 repressed genes. A number of new candidate genes involved in P acquisition were discovered. In addition, several putative transcription factors and signaling proteins of P sensing were disclosed. Several genes previously identified to be sugar responsive were also...... regulated by P starvation and known P-responsive genes were sugar inducible. Nearly 150 genes were synergistically or antagonistically regulated by the two factors. These genes exhibit more prominent or contrasting regulation in response to Suc and P in combination than expected from the effect of the two...

  15. Mutational analysis of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21)-C3d interaction reveals a putative charged SCR1 binding site for C3d.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Guthridge, Joel M; Asokan, Rengasamy; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael

    2005-02-25

    We have characterized the interaction between the first two short consensus repeats (SCR1-2) of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) and C3d in solution, by utilising the available crystal structures of free and C3d-bound forms of CR2 to create a series of informative mutations targeting specific areas of the CR2-C3d complex. Wild-type and mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on the surface of K562 erythroleukemia cells and their binding ability assessed using C3dg-biotin tetramers complexed to fluorochrome conjugated streptavidin and measured by flow cytometry. Mutations directed at the SCR2-C3d interface (R83A, R83E, G84Y) were found to strongly disrupt C3dg binding, supporting the conclusion that the SCR2 interface reflected in the crystal structure is correct. Previous epitope and peptide mapping studies have also indicated that the PILN11GR13IS sequence of the first inter-cysteine region of SCR1 is essential for the binding of iC3b. Mutations targeting residues within or in close spatial proximity to this area (N11A, N11E, R13A, R13E, Y16A, S32A, S32E), and a number of other positively charged residues located primarily on a contiguous face of SCR1 (R28A, R28E, R36A, R36E, K41A, K41E, K50A, K50E, K57A, K57E, K67A, K67E), have allowed us to reassess those regions on SCR1 that are essential for CR2-C3d binding. The nature of this interaction and the possibility of a direct SCR1-C3d association are discussed extensively. Finally, a D52N mutant was constructed introducing an N-glycosylation sequence at an area central to the CR2 dimer interface. This mutation was designed to disrupt the CR2-C3d interaction, either directly through steric inhibition, or indirectly through disruption of a physiological dimer. However, no difference in C3dg binding relative to wild-type CR2 could be observed for this mutant, suggesting that the dimer may only be found in the crystal form of CR2.

  16. Analysis of septins across kingdoms reveals orthology and new motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malmberg Russell L

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Septins are cytoskeletal GTPase proteins first discovered in the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae where they organize the septum and link nuclear division with cell division. More recently septins have been found in animals where they are important in processes ranging from actin and microtubule organization to embryonic patterning and where defects in septins have been implicated in human disease. Previous studies suggested that many animal septins fell into independent evolutionary groups, confounding cross-kingdom comparison. Results In the current work, we identified 162 septins from fungi, microsporidia and animals and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. There was support for five groups of septins with orthology between kingdoms. Group 1 (which includes S. cerevisiae Cdc10p and human Sept9 and Group 2 (which includes S. cerevisiae Cdc3p and human Sept7 contain sequences from fungi and animals. Group 3 (which includes S. cerevisiae Cdc11p and Group 4 (which includes S. cerevisiae Cdc12p contain sequences from fungi and microsporidia. Group 5 (which includes Aspergillus nidulans AspE contains sequences from filamentous fungi. We suggest a modified nomenclature based on these phylogenetic relationships. Comparative sequence alignments revealed septin derivatives of already known G1, G3 and G4 GTPase motifs, four new motifs from two to twelve amino acids long and six conserved single amino acid positions. One of these new motifs is septin-specific and several are group specific. Conclusion Our studies provide an evolutionary history for this important family of proteins and a framework and consistent nomenclature for comparison of septin orthologs across kingdoms.

  17. Modes of embayed beach dynamics: analysis reveals emergent timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. T.; Murray, A.; Limber, P. W.; Ells, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    Embayed beaches, or beaches positioned between rocky headlands, exhibit morphologic changes over many length and time scales. Beach sediment is transported as a result of the day-to-day wave forcing, causing patterns of erosion and accretion. We use the Rocky Coastline Evolution Model (RCEM) to investigate how patterns of shoreline change depend on wave climate (the distribution of wave-approach angles) and beach characteristics. Measuring changes in beach width through time allows us to track the evolution of the shape of the beach and the movement of sand within it. By using Principle Component Analysis (PCA), these changes can be categorized into modes, where the first few modes explain the majority of the variation in the time series. We analyze these modes and how they vary as a function of wave climate and headland/bay aspect ratio. In the purposefully simple RCEM, sediment transport is wave-driven and affected by wave shadowing behind the headlands. The rock elements in our model experiments (including the headlands) are fixed and unerodable so that this analysis can focus purely on sand dynamics between the headlands, without a sand contribution from the headlands or cliffs behind the beach. The wave climate is characterized by dictating the percentage of offshore waves arriving from the left and the percentage of waves arriving from high angles (very oblique to the coastline orientation). A high-angle dominated wave climate tends to amplify coastline perturbations, whereas a lower-angle wave climate is diffusive. By changing the headland/bay aspect ratio and wave climate, we can perform PCA analysis of generalized embayed beaches with differing anatomy and wave climate forcings. Previous work using PCA analysis of embayed beaches focused on specific locations and shorter timescales (beach dynamics over longer timescales. The first two PCA modes, which explain a majority of the beach width time series variation (typically >70%), are a 'breathing' mode and a

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the putative ABC transporter ATP-binding protein from Thermotoga maritima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Shinkai, Akeo; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Singh, Tej P.; Kaur, Punit; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters) are ATP hydrolysis-dependent transmembrane transporters. Here, the overproduction, purification and crystallization of the putative ABC transporter ATP-binding protein TM0222 from Thermotoga maritima are reported. The protein was crystallized in the hexagonal space group P6422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 148.49, c = 106.96 Å, γ = 120.0°. Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the calculated V M is 2.84 Å3 Da−1, which corresponds to a solvent content of 56.6%. A three-wavelength MAD data set was collected to 2.3 Å resolution from SeMet-substituted TM0222 crystals. Data sets were collected on the BL38B1 beamline at SPring-8, Japan. PMID:18540059

  19. Putative recombination events and evolutionary history of five economically important viruses of fruit trees based on coat protein-encoding gene sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila, Moncef

    2010-06-01

    To enhance the knowledge of recombination as an evolutionary process, 267 accessions retrieved from GenBank were investigated, all belonging to five economically important viruses infecting fruit crops (Plum pox, Apple chlorotic leaf spot, Apple mosaic, Prune dwarf, and Prunus necrotic ringspot viruses). Putative recombinational events were detected in the coat protein (CP)-encoding gene using RECCO and RDP version 3.31beta algorithms. Based on RECCO results, all five viruses were shown to contain potential recombination signals in the CP gene. Reconstructed trees with modified topologies were proposed. Furthermore, RECCO performed better than the RDP package in detecting recombination events and exhibiting their evolution rate along the sequences of the five viruses. RDP, however, provided the possible major and minor parents of the recombinants. Thus, the two methods should be considered complementary.

  20. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  1. Hereditary hemochromatosis: HFE mutation analysis in Greeks reveals genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Terpos, E; Fourlemadis, S; Sakellaropoulos, N; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is common among Caucasians; reported disease frequencies vary from 0.3 to 0.8%. Identification of a candidate HFE gene in 1996 was soon followed by the description of two ancestral mutations, i.e., c.845G-->A (C282Y) and c.187C-->G (H63D). To these was recently added the mutation S65C, which may represent a simple polymorphism. The incidence of HH in Greece is unknown but clinical cases are rare. Also unknown is the carrier frequency of the two mutant alleles. A first estimate of the latter is given in the present report. It is based on data from the genetic analysis of 10 unrelated patients of Greek origin who were referred to our center for genotyping and 158 unselected male blood donors. The allele frequencies for the C282Y and H63D mutations were 0.003 and 0.145, respectively. The C282Y allele was detected in 50% of HH patients. This is considerably lower than the frequencies reported for HH patients in the U.S.A. (82%) and France (91 %) and closer to that reported in Italy (64%). Five patients did not carry any known HFE mutation; three may represent cases of juvenile hemochromatosis, given their early onset with iron overload, hypogonadism, and heart disease. We suggest that genetic heterogeneity is more prominent in Southern Europe. It is also possible that the penetrance of the responsible genes is different across the Mediterranean.

  2. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

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    David P Hall

    Full Text Available Acute mountain sickness (AMS is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS, we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25. These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  3. Systematic mutational analysis of the putative hydrolase PqsE: toward a deeper molecular understanding of virulence acquisition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Benjamin Folch

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen that can establish bacterial communication by synchronizing the behavior of individual cells in a molecular phenomenon known as "quorum sensing". Through an elusive mechanism involving gene products of the pqs operon, the PqsE enzyme is absolutely required for the synthesis of extracellular phenazines, including the toxic blue pigment pyocyanin, effectively allowing cells to achieve full-fledged virulence. Despite several functional and structural attempts at deciphering the role of this relevant enzymatic drug target, no molecular function has yet been ascribed to PqsE. In the present study, we report a series of alanine scanning experiments aimed at altering the biological function of PqsE, allowing us to uncover key amino acid positions involved in the molecular function of this enzyme. We use sequence analysis and structural overlays with members of homologous folds to pinpoint critical positions located in the vicinity of the ligand binding cleft and surrounding environment, revealing the importance of a unique C-terminal α-helical motif in the molecular function of PqsE. Our results suggest that the active site of the enzyme involves residues that extend further into the hydrophobic core of the protein, advocating for a lid-like movement of the two terminal helices. This information should help design virtual libraries of PqsE inhibitors, providing means to counter P. aeruginosa virulence acquisition and helping to reduce nosocomial infections.

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of the microbiome [corrected] of herbivorous insects reveals eco-environmental adaptations: biotechnology applications.

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    Weibing Shi

    Full Text Available Metagenome analysis of the gut symbionts of three different insects was conducted as a means of comparing taxonomic and metabolic diversity of gut microbiomes to diet and life history of the insect hosts. A second goal was the discovery of novel biocatalysts for biorefinery applications. Grasshopper and cutworm gut symbionts were sequenced and compared with the previously identified metagenome of termite gut microbiota. These insect hosts represent three different insect orders and specialize on different food types. The comparative analysis revealed dramatic differences among the three insect species in the abundance and taxonomic composition of the symbiont populations present in the gut. The composition and abundance of symbionts was correlated with their previously identified capacity to degrade and utilize the different types of food consumed by their hosts. The metabolic reconstruction revealed that the gut metabolome of cutworms and grasshoppers was more enriched for genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and transport than wood-feeding termite, whereas the termite gut metabolome was enriched for glycosyl hydrolase (GH enzymes relevant to lignocellulosic biomass degradation. Moreover, termite gut metabolome was more enriched with nitrogen fixation genes than those of grasshopper and cutworm gut, presumably due to the termite's adaptation to the high fiber and less nutritious food types. In order to evaluate and exploit the insect symbionts for biotechnology applications, we cloned and further characterized four biomass-degrading enzymes including one endoglucanase and one xylanase from both the grasshopper and cutworm gut symbionts. The results indicated that the grasshopper symbiont enzymes were generally more efficient in biomass degradation than the homologous enzymes from cutworm symbionts. Together, these results demonstrated a correlation between the composition and putative metabolic functionality of the gut microbiome and host

  5. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  6. Demographic analysis reveals gradual senescence in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano

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    Braeckman Bart P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Free-living flatworms ("Turbellaria" are appropriate model organisms to gain better insight into the role of stem cells in ageing and rejuvenation. Ageing research in flatworms is, however, still scarce. This is partly due to culture difficulties and the lack of a complete set of demographic data, including parameters such as median lifespan and age-specific mortality rate. In this paper, we report on the first flatworm survival analysis. We used the species Macrostomum lignano, which is an emerging model for studying the reciprocal influence between stem cells, ageing and rejuvenation. This species has a median lifespan of 205 ± 13 days (average ± standard deviation [SD] and a 90th percentile lifespan of 373 ± 32 days. The maximum lifespan, however, is more than 745 days, and the average survival curve is characterised by a long tail because a small number of individuals lives twice as long as 90% of the population. Similar to earlier observations in a wide range of animals, in M. lignano the age-specific mortality rate increases exponentially, but levels off at the oldest ages. To compare the senescence of M. lignano with that of other ageing models, we determined the mortality rate doubling time, which is 0.20 ± 0.02 years. As a result, we can conclude that M. lignano shows gradual senescence at a rate similar to the vertebrate ageing models Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus. We argue that M. lignano is a suitable model for ageing and rejuvenation research, and especially for the role of stem cells in these processes, due to its accessible stem cell system and regeneration capacity, and the possibility of combining stem cell studies with demographic analyses.

  7. The sequence of an 11.1 kb fragment on the left arm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VII reveals six open reading frames including NSP49, KEM1 and four putative new genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, I; Coglievina, M; Zaccaria, P; Klima, R; Bruschi, C V

    1995-09-30

    We report the sequence of an 11.1 kb fragment located on the left arm of chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By sequence analysis we have detected six open reading frames (ORFs) longer that 300 bp, which cover 87% of the entire sequence. ORF G1645 is 100% identical to the KEM1 gene, also identified as DST2, XRN1, SEP1 and RAR5, while G1648 is 100% identical to the NSP49 or NUP49 gene. ORF G1642 shares some identity with a hypothetical protein of Caenorhabditis elegans, while the other four ORFs show no significant homology to known proteins.

  8. Integrated analysis of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing reveals diverse transcriptomic aberrations driven by somatic genomic changes in liver cancers.

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    Yuichi Shiraishi

    Full Text Available Recent studies applying high-throughput sequencing technologies have identified several recurrently mutated genes and pathways in multiple cancer genomes. However, transcriptional consequences from these genomic alterations in cancer genome remain unclear. In this study, we performed integrated and comparative analyses of whole genomes and transcriptomes of 22 hepatitis B virus (HBV-related hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs and their matched controls. Comparison of whole genome sequence (WGS and RNA-Seq revealed much evidence that various types of genomic mutations triggered diverse transcriptional changes. Not only splice-site mutations, but also silent mutations in coding regions, deep intronic mutations and structural changes caused splicing aberrations. HBV integrations generated diverse patterns of virus-human fusion transcripts depending on affected gene, such as TERT, CDK15, FN1 and MLL4. Structural variations could drive over-expression of genes such as WNT ligands, with/without creating gene fusions. Furthermore, by taking account of genomic mutations causing transcriptional aberrations, we could improve the sensitivity of deleterious mutation detection in known cancer driver genes (TP53, AXIN1, ARID2, RPS6KA3, and identified recurrent disruptions in putative cancer driver genes such as HNF4A, CPS1, TSC1 and THRAP3 in HCCs. These findings indicate genomic alterations in cancer genome have diverse transcriptomic effects, and integrated analysis of WGS and RNA-Seq can facilitate the interpretation of a large number of genomic alterations detected in cancer genome.

  9. Comparative Analysis of JmjC Domain-containing Proteins Reveals the Potential Histone Demethylases in Arabidopsis and Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Falong Lu; Guanglin Li; Xia Cui; Chunyan Liu; Xiu-Jie Wang; Xiaofeng Cao

    2008-01-01

    Histone methylation homeostasis is achieved by controlling the balance between methylation and demethylation to maintain chromatin function and developmental regulation. In animals, a conserved Jumonji C (JmjC) domain was found In a large group of histone demethylases. However, it is still unclear whether plants also contain the JmjC domaincontaining active histone demethylases. Here we performed genome-wide screen and phylogenetic analysis of JmjC domaincontaining proteins in the dicot plant, Arabidopsis, and monocot plant rice, and found 21 and 20 JmjC domain-containing, respectively. We also examined the expression of JmjC domain-containing proteins and compared them to human JmjC counterparts for potential enzymatic activity. The spatial expression patterns of the Arabidopsis JmjC domaincontaining genes revealed that they are all actively transcribed genes. These active plant JmjC domain-containing genes could possibly function in epigenetic regulation to antagonize the activity of the large number of putative SET domaincontaining histone methyltransferase activity to dynamically regulate histone methylation homeostasis.

  10. Virus host protein interaction network analysis reveals that the HEV ORF3 protein may interrupt the blood coagulation process.

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    Yansheng Geng

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is endemic worldwide and a major cause of acute liver disease in developing countries. However, the molecular mechanisms of liver pathology and clinical disease are not well understood for HEV infection. Open reading frame 3 (ORF3 of HEV encodes a small phosphoprotein, which is assumed to be involved in liver pathology and clinical disease. In this study, the interactions between the HEV ORF3 protein and human proteins were investigated using a stringent, high-throughput yeast two-hybrid (Y2H analysis. Thirty two proteins were shown to interact with genotype 1 ORF3, 28 of which have not been reported previously. These novel interactions were evaluated by coimmunoprecipitation of protein complexes from transfected cells. We found also that the ORF3 proteins of genotype 4 and rabbit HEV interacted with all of the human proteins identified by the genotype 1 ORF3 protein. However, the putative ORF3 protein derived from avian HEV did not interact with the majority of these human proteins. The identified proteins were used to infer an overall interaction map linking the ORF3 protein with components of the host cellular networks. Analysis of this interaction map, based on functional annotation with the Gene Ontology features and KEGG pathways, revealed an enrichment of host proteins involved in complement coagulation, cellular iron ion homeostasis and oxidative stress. Additional canonical pathway analysis highlighted the enriched biological pathways relevant to blood coagulation and hemostasis. Consideration of the clinical manifestations of hepatitis E reported previously and the results of biological analysis from this study suggests that the ORF3 protein is likely to lead to an imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis by interacting with host proteins and triggering the corresponding pathological processes. These results suggest critical approaches to further study of the pathogenesis of the HEV ORF3 protein.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of the Dof transcription factor gene family reveals soybean-specific duplicable and functional characteristics.

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    Yong Guo

    Full Text Available The Dof domain protein family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family involved in a variety of biological processes. There is great diversity in the number of Dof genes in different plants. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max. In the present study, 78 putative Dof genes were identified from the whole-genome sequence of soybean. The predicted GmDof genes were non-randomly distributed within and across 19 out of 20 chromosomes and 97.4% (38 pairs were preferentially retained duplicate paralogous genes located in duplicated regions of the genome. Soybean-specific segmental duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the soybean Dof gene family. These Dof proteins were phylogenetically clustered into nine distinct subgroups among which the gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins revealed four major groups, similar to those reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Most of the GmDofs showed specific expression patterns based on RNA-seq data analyses. The expression patterns of some duplicate genes were partially redundant while others showed functional diversity, suggesting the occurrence of sub-functionalization during subsequent evolution. Comprehensive expression profile analysis also provided insights into the soybean-specific functional divergence among members of the Dof gene family. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these GmDof genes suggested diverse functions associated with different processes. Taken together, our results provide useful information for the functional characterization of soybean Dof genes by combining phylogenetic analysis with global gene-expression profiling.

  12. Variation analysis of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus putative non-structural protein 2 gene and construction of three-dimensional model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jia-hai; CHEN Wei-qing; LING Wen-hua; YU Xin-bing; ZHONG Nan-shan; ZHANG Ding-mei; WANG Guo-ling; GUO Zhong-min; ZHANG Chuan-hai; TAN Bing-yan; OUYANG Li-ping; LIN Li; LIU Yi-min

    2005-01-01

    Background The rapid transmission and high mortality rate made severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) a global threat for which no efficacious therapy is available now. Without sufficient knowledge about the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), it is impossible to define the candidate for the anti-SARS targets. The putative non-structural protein 2 (nsp2) (3CLpro, following the nomenclature by Gao et al, also known as nsp5 in Snidjer et al) of SARS-CoV plays an important role in viral transcription and replication, and is an attractive target for anti-SARS drug development, so we carried on this study to have an insight into putative polymerase nsp2 of SARS-CoV Guangdong (GD) strain.Methods The SARS-CoV strain was isolated from a SARS patient in Guangdong, China, and cultured in Vero E6 cells. The nsp2 gene was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo (pCI-neo/nsp2). Then the recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo/nsp2 was transfected into COS-7 cells using lipofectin reagent to express the nsp2 protein. The expressive protein of SARS-CoV nsp2 was analyzed by 7% sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The nucleotide sequence and protein sequence of GD nsp2 were compared with that of other SARS-CoV strains by nucleotide-nucleotide basic local alignment search tool (BLASTN) and protein-protein basic local alignment search tool (BLASTP) to investigate its variance trend during the transmission. The secondary structure of GD strain and that of other strains were predicted by Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson (GOR) Secondary Structure Prediction. Three-dimensional-PSSM Protein Fold Recognition (Threading) Server was employed to construct the three-dimensional model of the nsp2 protein.Results The putative polymerase nsp2 gene of GD strain was amplified by RT-PCR. The eukaryotic expression vector (pCI-neo/nsp2) was constructed and expressed the protein in COS-7

  13. Isolation and Expression Analysis of Two Cold-Inducible Genes Encoding Putative CBF Transcription Factors from Chinese Cabbage (Brassica pekinensis Rupr.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Two homologous genes of the Arabidopsis C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding factors (CBF/DREB1) transcriptional activator were isolated by RT-PCR from Chinese cabbage (Brassica pekinensis Rupr.cv. Qinbai 5) and were designated as BcCBF1 and BcCBF2. Each encodes a putative CBF/DREB1 protein with an AP2 (Apetal2) DNA-binding domain, a putative nuclear localization signal, and a possible acidic activation domain. Deduced amino acid sequences show that BcCBF1 is very similar to the Arabidopsis CBF1, whereas BcCBF2 is different in that it contains two extra regions of 24 and 20 amino acids in the acidic domain. The mRNA accumulation profiles indicated that the expression of BcCBF1 and BcCBF2 is strongly induced by cold treatment, but does not respond similarly to dehydration or abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. However,the cold-induced accumulation of BcCBF2 mRNA was rapid but short-lived compared with that of BcCBF1.The mRNA levels of both BcCBF1 and BcCBF2 were higher in leaves than in roots when plants were exposed to cold, whereas, salt stress caused higher accumulation of BcCBF2 mRNA in roots than in leaves,suggesting that the organ specificity of the gene expression of the BcCBFs is probably stress dependent.In addition, the accumulation of BcCBF1 and BcCBF2 mRNAs was greatly enhanced by light compared with darkness when seedlings were exposed to cold. It is concluded that the two BcCBF proteins may be involved in the process of plant response to cold stress through an ABA-independent pathway and that there is also a cross-talk between the light signaling conduction pathway and the cold response pathway in B. pekinensis as In Arabidopsis.

  14. Comparative analysis of the Shadoo gene between cattle and buffalo reveals significant differences.

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    Hui Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While prions play a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, the biology of these proteins and the pathophysiology of these diseases remain largely unknown. Since no case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE has ever been reported in buffalo despite their phylogenetic proximity to cattle, genetic differences may be driving the different susceptibilities of these two species to BSE. We thus hypothesized that differences in expression of the most recently identified member of the prion family or Shadoo (SPRN gene may relate to these species-specific differences. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first analyzed and compared the polymorphisms of the SPRN gene (~4.4 kb, including the putative promoter, coding and 3' regions, and further verified the entire ORF and putative promoter. This yielded a total of 117 fixed differences, remarkably: 1 a 12-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the hydrophobic domain of the cattle but not buffalo gene, introducing a four amino acid expansion/contraction in a series of 5 tandem Ala/Gly-containing repeats; 2 two fixed missense mutations (102Ser→Gly and 119Thr→Ala, and three missense mutations (92Pro>Thr/Met, 122Thr>Ile and 139Arg>Trp in the coding region presenting different (P<0.05 genotypic and allelic frequency distributions between cattle and buffalo; and, 3 functional luciferase-reporter experiments for the predicted promoter region, consistent with a significantly higher activity in buffalo than cattle. Supporting these findings, immunoblotting revealed higher relative expression levels of Sho protein in cerebrum from buffalo than from cattle. In addition, for cattle, highest Sho expression was detected in obex, as compared to cerebrum or cerebellum. SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings support Sho as a non-PrP specific marker for prion infections, with obex as the best tissue source for the detection of Sho in TSE rapid tests. Moreover, these discoveries may prove

  15. Isolation and comparative analysis of the wheat TaPT2 promoter: identification in silico of new putative regulatory motifs conserved between monocots and dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, A; Milla, L; Vargas, F; Morales, A; Neupert, C; Meisel, L A; Salvo-G, H; Peñaloza, E; Muñoz, G; Corcuera, L J; Silva, H

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiency is one of the major nutrient stresses affecting plant growth. Plants respond to phosphate (Pi) deficiency through multiple strategies, including the synthesis of high-affinity Pi transporters. In this study, the expression pattern of one putative wheat high-affinity phosphate transporter, TaPT2, was examined in roots and leaves under Pi-deficient conditions. TaPT2 transcript levels increased in roots of Pi-starved plants. A 579 bp fragment of the TaPT2 promoter is sufficient to drive the expression of the GUS reporter gene specifically in roots of Pi-deprived wheat. This TaPT2 promoter fragment was also able to drive expression of the GUS reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, under similar growth conditions. Conserved regions and candidate regulatory motifs were detected by comparing this promoter with Pi transporter promoters from barley, rice, and Arabidopsis. Altogether, these results indicate that there are conserved cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors that enable the TaPT2 promoter to be regulated in a tissue-specific and Pi-dependent fashion in both monocots and dicots.

  16. ZDHHC8 as a candidate gene for schizophrenia: Analysis of a putative functional intronic marker in case-control and family-based association studies

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    Jabs Burkhard

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome 22q11 region is proposed as a major candidate locus for susceptibility genes to schizophrenia. Recently, the gene ZDHHC8 encoding a putative palmitoyltransferase at 22q11 was proposed to increase liability to schizophrenia based on both animal models and human association studies by significant over-transmission of allele rs175174A in female, but not male subjects with schizophrenia. Methods Given the genetic complexity of schizophrenia and the potential genetic heterogeneity in different populations, we examined rs175174 in 204 German proband-parent triads and in an independent case-control study (schizophrenic cases: n = 433; controls: n = 186. Results In the triads heterozygous parents transmitted allele G preferentially to females, and allele A to males (heterogeneity χ2 = 4.43; p = 0.035. The case-control sample provided no further evidence for overall or gender-specific effects regarding allele and genotype frequency distributions. Conclusion The findings on rs175174 at ZDHHC8 are still far from being conclusive, but evidence for sexual dimorphism is moderate, and our data do not support a significant genetic contribution of rs175174 to the aetiopathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  17. Comparative transcriptome analysis using high papaverine mutant of Papaver somniferum reveals pathway and uncharacterized steps of papaverine biosynthesis.

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    Sumya Pathak

    Full Text Available The benzylisoquinoline alkaloid papaverine, synthesized in low amount in most of the opium poppy varieties of Papaver somniferum, is used as a vasodilator muscle relaxant and antispasmodic. Papaverine biosynthesis remains controversial as two different routes utilizing either (S-coclaurine or (S-reticuline have been proposed with uncharacterized intermediate steps. In an attempt to elucidate papaverine biosynthesis and identify putative genes involved in uncharacterized steps, we carried out comparative transcriptome analysis of high papaverine mutant (pap1 and normal cultivar (BR086 of P. somniferum. This natural mutant synthesizes more than 12-fold papaverine in comparison to BR086. We established more than 238 Mb transcriptome data separately for pap1 and BR086. Assembly of reads generated 127,342 and 106,128 unigenes in pap1 and BR086, respectively. Digital gene expression analysis of transcriptomes revealed 3,336 differentially expressing unigenes. Enhanced expression of (S-norcoclaurine-6-O-methyltransferase (6OMT, (S-3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase (4'OMT, norreticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (N7OMT and down-regulation of reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (7OMT in pap1 in comparison to BR086 suggest (S-coclaurine as the route for papaverine biosynthesis. We also identified several methyltransferases and dehydrogenases with enhanced expression in pap1 in comparison to BR086. Our analysis using natural mutant, pap1, concludes that (S-coclaurine is the branch-point intermediate and preferred route for papaverine biosynthesis. Differentially expressing methyltransferases and dehydrogenases identified in this study will help in elucidating complete biosynthetic pathway of papaverine. The information generated will be helpful in developing strategies for enhanced biosynthesis of papaverine through biotechnological approaches.

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Novel Regulators of Growth in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Sibylle Chantal Vonesch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organismal size depends on the interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association (GWA analyses in humans have implied many genes in the control of height but suffer from the inability to control the environment. Genetic analyses in Drosophila have identified conserved signaling pathways controlling size; however, how these pathways control phenotypic diversity is unclear. We performed GWA of size traits using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel of inbred, sequenced lines. We find that the top associated variants differ between traits and sexes; do not map to canonical growth pathway genes, but can be linked to these by epistasis analysis; and are enriched for genes and putative enhancers. Performing GWA on well-studied developmental traits under controlled conditions expands our understanding of developmental processes underlying phenotypic diversity.

  19. Comprehensive Phenotyping in Multiple Sclerosis: Discovery Based Proteomics and the Current Understanding of Putative Biomarkers

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    Kevin C. O’Connor

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no single test for multiple sclerosis (MS. Diagnosis is confirmed through clinical evaluation, abnormalities revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF chemistry. The early and accurate diagnosis of the disease, monitoring of progression, and gauging of therapeutic intervention are important but elusive elements of patient care. Moreover, a deeper understanding of the disease pathology is needed, including discovery of accurate biomarkers for MS. Herein we review putative biomarkers of MS relating to neurodegeneration and contributions to neuropathology, with particular focus on autoimmunity. In addition, novel assessments of biomarkers not driven by hypotheses are discussed, featuring our application of advanced proteomics and metabolomics for comprehensive phenotyping of CSF and blood. This strategy allows comparison of component expression levels in CSF and serum between MS and control groups. Examination of these preliminary data suggests that several CSF proteins in MS are differentially expressed, and thus, represent putative biomarkers deserving of further evaluation.

  20. De Novo Sequencing and Analysis of the Safflower Transcriptome to Discover Putative Genes Associated with Safflor Yellow in Carthamus tinctorius L.

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    Xiuming Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L., an important traditional Chinese medicine, is cultured widely for its pharmacological effects, but little is known regarding the genes related to the metabolic regulation of the safflower’s yellow pigment. To investigate genes related to safflor yellow biosynthesis, 454 pyrosequencing of flower RNA at different developmental stages was performed, generating large databases.In this study, we analyzed 454 sequencing data from different flowering stages in safflower. In total, 1,151,324 raw reads and 1,140,594 clean reads were produced, which were assembled into 51,591 unigenes with an average length of 679 bp and a maximum length of 5109 bp. Among the unigenes, 40,139 were in the early group, 39,768 were obtained from the full group and 28,316 were detected in both samples. With the threshold of “log2 ratio ≥ 1”, there were 34,464 differentially expressed genes, of which 18,043 were up-regulated and 16,421 were down-regulated in the early flower library. Based on the annotations of the unigenes, 281 pathways were predicted. We selected 12 putative genes and analyzed their expression levels using quantitative real time-PCR. The results were consistent with the 454 sequencing results. In addition, the expression of chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase and anthocyanidin synthase, which are involved in safflor yellow biosynthesis and safflower yellow pigment (SYP content, were analyzed in different flowering periods, indicating that their expression levels were related to SYP synthesis. Moreover, to further confirm the results of the 454 pyrosequencing, full-length cDNA of chalcone isomerase (CHI and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS were cloned from safflower petal by RACE (Rapid-amplification of cDNA ends method according to fragment of the transcriptome.

  1. Identification and Characterization of Putative Integron-Like Elements of the Heavy-Metal-Hypertolerant Strains of Pseudomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciok, Anna; Adamczuk, Marcin; Bartosik, Dariusz; Dziewit, Lukasz

    2016-11-28

    Pseudomonas strains isolated from the heavily contaminated Lubin copper mine and Zelazny Most post-flotation waste reservoir in Poland were screened for the presence of integrons. This analysis revealed that two strains carried homologous DNA regions composed of a gene encoding a DNA_BRE_C domain-containing tyrosine recombinase (with no significant sequence similarity to other integrases of integrons) plus a three-component array of putative integron gene cassettes. The predicted gene cassettes encode three putative polypeptides with homology to (i) transmembrane proteins, (ii) GCN5 family acetyltransferases, and (iii) hypothetical proteins of unknown function (homologous proteins are encoded by the gene cassettes of several class 1 integrons). Comparative sequence analyses identified three structural variants of these novel integron-like elements within the sequenced bacterial genomes. Analysis of their distribution revealed that they are found exclusively in strains of the genus Pseudomonas.

  2. Transcriptome meta-analysis reveals common differential and global gene expression profiles in cystic fibrosis and other respiratory disorders and identifies CFTR regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Sousa, Lisete; Falcao, Andre O; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-11-01

    A meta-analysis of 13 independent microarray data sets was performed and gene expression profiles from cystic fibrosis (CF), similar disorders (COPD: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, IPF: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, asthma), environmental conditions (smoking, epithelial injury), related cellular processes (epithelial differentiation/regeneration), and non-respiratory "control" conditions (schizophrenia, dieting), were compared. Similarity among differentially expressed (DE) gene lists was assessed using a permutation test, and a clustergram was constructed, identifying common gene markers. Global gene expression values were standardized using a novel approach, revealing that similarities between independent data sets run deeper than shared DE genes. Correlation of gene expression values identified putative gene regulators of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, of potential therapeutic significance. Our study provides a novel perspective on CF epithelial gene expression in the context of other lung disorders and conditions, and highlights the contribution of differentiation/EMT and injury to gene signatures of respiratory disease.

  3. Systematic analysis of reportedly distinct populations of multipotent bone marrow-derived stem cells reveals a lack of distinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodie, Tracey A; Blickarz, Courtney E; Devarakonda, Tara J; He, Chufa; Dash, Ajeeta B; Clarke, Jennifer; Gleneck, Kristen; Shihabuddin, Lamya; Tubo, Ross

    2002-10-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells, having the ability to differentiate into cells of multiple lineages, have been isolated and propagated by varied protocols, including positive (CD105(+))/negative (CD45(-)GlyA(-)) selection with immunomagnetic beads, or direct plating into selective culture media. Each substratum-adherent cell population was subjected to a systematic analysis of their cell surface markers and differentiation potential. In the initial stages of culture, each cell population proliferated slowly, reaching confluence in 10-14 days. Adherent cells proliferated at similar rates whether cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor, medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplemented with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, or medium containing 10% FBS alone. Cell surface marker analysis revealed that more than 95% of the cells were positive for CD105/endoglin, a putative mesenchymal stem cell marker, and negative for CD34, CD31, and CD133, markers of hematopoietic, endothelial, and neural stem cells, respectively, regardless of cell isolation and propagation method. CD44 expression was variable, apparently dependent on serum concentration. Functional similarity of the stem cell populations was also observed, with each different cell population expressing the cell type-specific markers beta-tubulin, type II collagen, and desmin, and demonstrating endothelial tube formation when cultured under conditions favoring neural, cartilage, muscle, and endothelial cell differentiation, respectively. On the basis of these data, adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells cultured in adherent monolayer are virtually indistinguishable, both physically and functionally, regardless of the method of isolation or proliferative expansion.

  4. Identification of Genes Putatively Involved in Chitin Metabolism and Insecticide Detoxification in the Rice Leaf Folder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) Larvae through Transcriptomic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The rice leaf roller (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) is one of the most destructive agricultural pests. Due to its migratory behavior, it is difficult to control worldwide. To date, little is known about major genes of C. medinalis involved in chitin metabolism and insecticide detoxification. In order to obtain a comprehensive genome dataset of C. medinalis, we conducted de novo transcriptome sequencing which focused on the major feeding stage of fourth-instar larvae, and our work revealed usef...

  5. Insight into octoploid strawberry (Fragaria) subgenome composition revealed by GISH analysis of pentaploid hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Poulsen, Elizabeth G; Davis, Thomas M

    2016-02-01

    As the product of interspecific hybridization between its two ancestral octoploid (2n = 8x = 56) species (Fragaria chiloensis and F. virginiana), the cultivated strawberry (F. ×ananassa) is among the most genomically complex of crop plants, harboring subgenomic components derived from as many as four different diploid ancestors. To physically visualize the octoploids' subgenome composition(s), we launched molecular cytogenetic studies using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), comparative GISH (cGISH), and rDNA-FISH techniques. First, GISH resolution in Fragaria was tested by using diploid and triploid hybrids with predetermined genome compositions. Then, observation of an octoploid genome was implemented by hybridizing chromosomes of pentaploid (2n = 5x = 35) hybrids from F. vesca × F. virginiana with genomic DNA probes derived from diploids (2n = 2x = 14) F. vesca and F. iinumae, which have been proposed by phylogenetic studies to be closely related to the octoploids yet highly divergent from each other. GISH and cGISH results indicated that octoploid-derived gametes (n = 4x = 28) carried seven chromosomes with hybridization affinities to F. vesca, while the remaining 21 chromosomes displayed varying affinities to F. iinumae, indicating differing degrees of subgenomic contribution to the octoploids by these two putatively ancestral diploids. Combined rDNA-FISH revealed severe 25S rDNA loss in both the F. vesca- and F. iinumae-like chromosome groups, while only the prior group retained its 5S loci.

  6. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of -gliadin gene sequences reveals significant genomic divergence in Triticeae species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guang-Rong Li; Tao Lang; En-Nian Yang; Cheng Liu; Zu-Jun Yang

    2014-12-01

    Although the unique properties of wheat -gliadin gene family are well characterized, little is known about the evolution and genomic divergence of -gliadin gene family within the Triticeae. We isolated a total of 203 -gliadin gene sequences from 11 representative diploid and polyploid Triticeae species, and found 108 sequences putatively functional. Our results indicate that -gliadin genes may have possibly originated from wild Secale species, where the sequences contain the shortest repetitive domains and display minimum variation. A miniature inverted-repeat transposable element insertion is reported for the first time in -gliadin gene sequence of Thinopyrum intermedium in this study, indicating that the transposable element might have contributed to the diversification of -gliadin genes family among Triticeae genomes. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that the -gliadin gene sequences of Dasypyrum, Australopyrum, Lophopyrum, Eremopyrum and Pseudoroengeria species have amplified several times. A search for four typical toxic epitopes for celiac disease within the Triticeae -gliadin gene sequences showed that the -gliadins of wild Secale, Australopyrum and Agropyron genomes lack all four epitopes, while other Triticeae species have accumulated these epitopes, suggesting that the evolution of these toxic epitopes sequences occurred during the course of speciation, domestication or polyploidization of Triticeae.

  7. Differential proteomic analysis reveals novel links between primary metabolism and antibiotic production in Amycolatopsis balhimycina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, G.; Renzone, G.; Alduina, R.

    2010-01-01

    A differential proteomic analysis, based on 2-DE and MS procedures, was performed on Amycolatopsis balhimycina DSM5908, the actinomycete producing the vancomycin-like antibiotic balhimycin. A comparison of proteomic profiles before and during balhimycin production characterized differentially...... intermediates, were upregulated during antibiotic production. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that 8 out of 14 upregulated genes showed a positive correlation between changes at translational and transcriptional expression level. Furthermore, proteomic analysis of two nonproducing mutants, restricted to a sub...

  8. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis of true morels (Morchella) reveals high levels of endemics in Turkey relative to other regions of Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Hatira; Büyükalaca, Saadet; Hansen, Karen; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to better understand how the phylogenetic diversity of true morels (Morchella) in Turkey compares with species found in other regions of the world. The current research builds on our recently published surveys of 10 Turkish provinces and the northern hemisphere in which DNA sequence data from 247 and 562 collections respectively were analyzed phylogenetically. Herein we report on phylogenetic analyses of 243 additional collections made in spring 2009 and 2010 from eight additional provinces in the Aegean, Black Sea, central Anatolia, eastern Anatolia and Marmara regions of Turkey. Our analysis revealed that five species within the Esculenta clade (yellow morels) and 15 species within the Elata clade (black morels) were present in Turkey. Our preliminary results also indicate that M. anatolica, recently described from a collection in Muğla province in the Aegean region of Turkey, is a closely related sister of M. rufobrunnea; these two species comprise a separate evolutionary lineage from the Esculenta and Elata clades. Nine species of Morchella currently are known only from Turkey, four species were present in Turkey and other European countries and seven species might have been introduced to Turkey anthropogenically. Three of the putatively exotic species in Turkey appear to be endemic to western North America; they are nested within a clade of fire-adapted morels that dates to the late Oligocene, 25 000 000 y ago. Our results indicate that there are roughly twice as many Morchella species in Turkey compared with the other regions of Europe sampled. Knowledge of Morchella species diversity and their biogeographic distribution are crucial for formulating informed conservation policies directed at preventing species loss and ensuring that annual morel harvests are sustainable and ecologically sound.

  9. Transcriptomic analysis reveals ethylene as stimulator and auxin as regulator of adventitious root formation in petunia cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe eDruege

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adventitious root (AR formation in the stem base of cuttings is the basis for propagation of many plant species and petunia is used as model to study this developmental process. Following AR formation from 2 to 192 hours after excision (hpe of cuttings, transcriptome analysis by microarray revealed a change of the character of the rooting zone from stem base to root identity. The greatest shift in the number of differentially expressed genes was observed between 24 and 72 hpe, when the categories storage, mineral nutrient acquisition, anti-oxidative and secondary metabolism, and biotic stimuli showed a notable high number of induced genes. Analyses of phytohormone-related genes disclosed multifaceted changes of the auxin transport system, auxin conjugation and the auxin signal perception machinery indicating a reduction in auxin sensitivity and phase-specific responses of particular auxin-regulated genes. Genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and action showed a more uniform pattern as a high number of respective genes were generally induced during the whole process of AR formation. The important role of ethylene for stimulating AR formation was demonstrated by the application of inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis and perception as well as of the precursor aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, all changing the number and length of AR. A model is proposed showing the putative role of polar auxin transport and resulting auxin accumulation in initiation of subsequent changes in auxin homeostasis and signal perception with a particular role of Aux/IAA expression. These changes might in turn guide the entrance into the different phases of AR formation. Ethylene biosynthesis, which is stimulated by wounding and does probably also respond to other stresses and auxin, acts as important stimulator of AR formation probably via the expression of ethylene responsive transcription factor genes, whereas the timing of different phases seems to be controlled

  10. Large-scale expression analysis reveals distinct microRNA profiles at different stages of human neurodevelopment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs predicted to regulate one third of protein coding genes via mRNA targeting. In conjunction with key transcription factors, such as the repressor REST (RE1 silencing transcription factor, miRNAs play crucial roles in neurogenesis, which requires a highly orchestrated program of gene expression to ensure the appropriate development and function of diverse neural cell types. Whilst previous studies have highlighted select groups of miRNAs during neural development, there remains a need for amenable models in which miRNA expression and function can be analyzed over the duration of neurogenesis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed large-scale expression profiling of miRNAs in human NTera2/D1 (NT2 cells during retinoic acid (RA-induced transition from progenitors to fully differentiated neural phenotypes. Our results revealed dynamic changes of miRNA patterns, resulting in distinct miRNA subsets that could be linked to specific neurodevelopmental stages. Moreover, the cell-type specific miRNA subsets were very similar in NT2-derived differentiated cells and human primary neurons and astrocytes. Further analysis identified miRNAs as putative regulators of REST, as well as candidate miRNAs targeted by REST. Finally, we confirmed the existence of two predicted miRNAs; pred-MIR191 and pred-MIR222 associated with SLAIN1 and FOXP2, respectively, and provided some evidence of their potential co-regulation. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, we demonstrate that regulation of miRNAs occurs in precise patterns indicative of their roles in cell fate commitment, progenitor expansion and differentiation into neurons and glia. Furthermore, the similarity between our NT2 system and primary human cells suggests their roles in molecular pathways critical for human in vivo neurogenesis.

  11. Mutational analysis of the pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin, PP2 reveals Ser-104 is crucial for carbohydrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Bandari, Shyam; Grobe, Kay; Swamy, Musti J

    2014-07-18

    The pumpkin phloem lectin (PP2) is an RNA-binding, defense-related, chitooligosaccharide-specific, homodimeric lectin of Mr 48 kDa expressed at high concentrations in the sieve elements and companion cells of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). In the present study, PP2 was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris with the Saccharomyces α-factor sequence to direct the recombinant protein into the secretory pathway as a prerequisite for unimpaired folding and posttranslational glycosylation of recombinant PP2. Previous computational modeling and ligand docking studies predicted a putative chitooligosaccharide-binding site on the PP2 surface, which was divided into three subsites, with two amino acid residues in each subsite identified as possible candidates for interaction with chitooligosaccharides (CHOs). In this work, mutational analysis and hemagglutination assays were employed to verify the role of the predicted residues in the carbohydrate binding activity of the protein. The results obtained revealed that mutation of Ser-104 to Ala (S104A) at subsite-2 resulted in about 90% loss of agglutination activity of the protein, indicating that Ser-104 is crucial for the binding of CHOs to PP2. Also, L100A (at subsite-1) and K200A (at subsite-3) independently decreased the lectin activity by about 40%, indicating that these two residues also contribute significantly to sugar binding by PP2. Together, these findings confirm that all the three subsites contribute to varying degrees toward PP2-carbohydrate interaction, and confirm the validity of the computational model, as proposed earlier.

  12. Meta-Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Microarray Data Reveals Dysregulation in RNA Splicing Regulatory Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraboschi, Elvezia Maria; Cardamone, Giulia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Gemmati, Donato; Spreafico, Marta; Duga, Stefano; Soldà, Giulia; Asselta, Rosanna

    2015-09-30

    Abnormalities in RNA metabolism and alternative splicing (AS) are emerging as important players in complex disease phenotypes. In particular, accumulating evidence suggests the existence of pathogenic links between multiple sclerosis (MS) and altered AS, including functional studies showing that an imbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms may contribute to disease etiology. Here, we tested whether the altered expression of AS-related genes represents a MS-specific signature. A comprehensive comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of publicly-available microarray datasets (190 MS cases, 182 controls), followed by gene-ontology enrichment analysis, highlighted a significant enrichment for differentially-expressed genes involved in RNA metabolism/AS. In detail, a total of 17 genes were found to be differentially expressed in MS in multiple datasets, with CELF1 being dysregulated in five out of seven studies. We confirmed CELF1 downregulation in MS (p=0.0015) by real-time RT-PCRs on RNA extracted from blood cells of 30 cases and 30 controls. As a proof of concept, we experimentally verified the unbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms in MS of the NFAT5 gene, a putative CELF1 target. In conclusion, for the first time we provide evidence of a consistent dysregulation of splicing-related genes in MS and we discuss its possible implications in modulating specific AS events in MS susceptibility genes.

  13. Proteomic analysis of Lawsonia intracellularis reveals expression of outer membrane proteins during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Eleanor; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Porter, Megan E; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Mclean, Kevin; Smith, David G E

    2014-12-05

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the aetiological agent of the commercially significant porcine disease, proliferative enteropathy. Current understanding of host-pathogen interaction is limited due to the fastidious microaerophilic obligate intracellular nature of the bacterium. In the present study, expression of bacterial proteins during infection was investigated using a mass spectrometry approach. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of two isolates of L. intracellularis from heavily-infected epithelial cell cultures and database mining using fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequences identified 19 proteins. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional classification, proteins were identified with roles in cell metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidative stress protection; seven proteins with putative or unknown function were also identified. Detailed bioinformatic analyses of five uncharacterised proteins, which were expressed by both isolates, identified domains and motifs common to other outer membrane-associated proteins with important roles in pathogenesis including adherence and invasion. Analysis of recombinant proteins on Western blots using immune sera from L. intracellularis-infected pigs identified two proteins, LI0841 and LI0902 as antigenic. The detection of five outer membrane proteins expressed during infection, including two antigenic proteins, demonstrates the potential of this approach to interrogate L. intracellularis host-pathogen interactions and identify novel targets which may be exploited in disease control.

  14. Nontargeted nucleotide analysis based on benzoylhistamine labeling-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS: discovery of putative 6-oxo-thymine in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Poguang; Fisher, David; Rao, Anjana; Giese, Roger W

    2012-04-17

    A method for nontargeted analysis of modified nucleotides in DNA (and RNA) is reported based on labeling with benzoylhistamine (BH) followed by MALDI-MS. The method provides deoxynucleotide-specific detection, accurate measurement of molecular ions, high sensitivity, semiquantitation, and, to the extent studied to date, normalization of response within a factor of <3.

  15. Expression and characterization of rice putative PAUSED gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengguo Yao; Liangfa Ge; Wei Li; Botao Zhao; Chaoqun Li; Kangcheng Ruan; Hongxuan Lin; Youxin Jin

    2008-01-01

    In Arab idopsis, PA USED ( PSD ) encodes the ortholog of loslp/ exportin-t, which mediates the nuclear export of transfer RNA (tRNA) in yeast and mammals. However, in monocot plants such as rice, knowledge of the corresponding ortholog is limited, and its effects on growth development and productivity remain unknown. In this study, we verified a rice transfer-DNA insertional mutantpsd line and analyzed its phenotypes;the mutant displayed severe morphological defects including retarded development and low fertility compared with wild-type rice. Examining intronless tRNA-Tyr and intron-containing pre-tRNA-Ala expression levels in cytoplasmic and nuclear fraction with Northern blot analysis between wild -type and mutant leaf tissue suggested that rice PSD might be involved in tRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.Additionally, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that PSD transcript was expressed throughout normal rice plant development, and subcellular localization assays showed that rice PSD protein was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. In summary, our data implied that the putative PSD gene might be indispensable for normal rice development and its function might be the same as that ofArabidopsis PSD.

  16. Transcriptome analysis reveals key differentially expressed genes involved in wheat grain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonglong Yu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat seed development is an important physiological process of seed maturation and directly affects wheat yield and quality. In this study, we performed dynamic transcriptome microarray analysis of an elite Chinese bread wheat cultivar (Jimai 20 during grain development using the GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. Grain morphology and scanning electron microscope observations showed that the period of 11–15 days post-anthesis (DPA was a key stage for the synthesis and accumulation of seed starch. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and significance analysis of microarrays revealed that the period from 11 to 15 DPA was more important than the 15–20 DPA stage for the synthesis and accumulation of nutritive reserves. Series test of cluster analysis of differential genes revealed five statistically significant gene expression profiles. Gene ontology annotation and enrichment analysis gave further information about differentially expressed genes, and MapMan analysis revealed expression changes within functional groups during seed development. Metabolic pathway network analysis showed that major and minor metabolic pathways regulate one another to ensure regular seed development and nutritive reserve accumulation. We performed gene co-expression network analysis to identify genes that play vital roles in seed development and identified several key genes involved in important metabolic pathways. The transcriptional expression of eight key genes involved in starch and protein synthesis and stress defense was further validated by qRT-PCR. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of wheat seed development and the determinants of yield and quality.

  17. Transcriptome analysis reveals key differentially expressed genes involved in wheat grain development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonglong Yu; Dong Zhu; Chaoying Ma; Hui Cao; Yaping Wang; Yanhao Xu; Wenying Zhang; Yueming Yan

    2016-01-01

    Wheat seed development is an important physiological process of seed maturation and directly affects wheat yield and quality. In this study, we performed dynamic transcriptome microarray analysis of an elite Chinese bread wheat cultivar (Jimai 20) during grain development using the GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. Grain morphology and scanning electron microscope observations showed that the period of 11–15 days post-anthesis (DPA) was a key stage for the synthesis and accumulation of seed starch. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and significance analysis of microarrays revealed that the period from 11 to 15 DPA was more important than the 15–20 DPA stage for the synthesis and accumulation of nutritive reserves. Series test of cluster analysis of differential genes revealed five statistically significant gene expression profiles. Gene ontology annotation and enrichment analysis gave further informa-tion about differentially expressed genes, and MapMan analysis revealed expression changes within functional groups during seed development. Metabolic pathway network analysis showed that major and minor metabolic pathways regulate one another to ensure regular seed development and nutritive reserve accumulation. We performed gene co-expression network analysis to identify genes that play vital roles in seed development and identified several key genes involved in important metabolic pathways. The transcriptional expression of eight key genes involved in starch and protein synthesis and stress defense was further validated by qRT-PCR. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of wheat seed development and the determinants of yield and quality.

  18. Functional characteristics of an endophyte community colonizing rice roots as revealed by metagenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessitsch, A; Hardoim, P; Döring, J; Weilharter, A; Krause, A; Woyke, T; Mitter, B; Hauberg-Lotte, L; Friedrich, F; Rahalkar, M; Hurek, T; Sarkar, A; Bodrossy, L; van Overbeek, L; Brar, D; van Elsas, J D; Reinhold-Hurek, B

    2012-01-01

    Roots are the primary site of interaction between plants and microorganisms. To meet food demands in changing climates, improved yields and stress resistance are increasingly important, stimulating efforts to identify factors that affect plant productivity. The role of bacterial endophytes that reside inside plants remains largely unexplored, because analysis of their specific functions is impeded by difficulties in cultivating most prokaryotes. Here, we present the first metagenomic approach to analyze an endophytic bacterial community resident inside roots of rice, one of the most important staple foods. Metagenome sequences were obtained from endophyte cells extracted from roots of field-grown plants. Putative functions were deduced from protein domains or similarity analyses of protein-encoding gene fragments, and allowed insights into the capacities of endophyte cells. This allowed us to predict traits and metabolic processes important for the endophytic lifestyle, suggesting that the endorhizosphere is an exclusive microhabitat requiring numerous adaptations. Prominent features included flagella, plant-polymer-degrading enzymes, protein secretion systems, iron acquisition and storage, quorum sensing, and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Surprisingly, endophytes might be involved in the entire nitrogen cycle, as protein domains involved in N(2)-fixation, denitrification, and nitrification were detected and selected genes expressed. Our data suggest a high potential of the endophyte community for plant-growth promotion, improvement of plant stress resistance, biocontrol against pathogens, and bioremediation, regardless of their culturability.

  19. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed organelle specific responses to temperature variations in algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, HyeonSeok; Hong, Seong-Joo; Yoo, Chan; Han, Mi-Ae; Lee, Hookeun; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Cho, Suhyung; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is a critical environmental factor that affects microalgal growth. However, microalgal coping mechanisms for temperature variations are unclear. Here, we determined changes in transcriptome, total carbohydrate, total fatty acid methyl ester, and fatty acid composition of Tetraselmis sp. KCTC12432BP, a strain with a broad temperature tolerance range, to elucidate the tolerance mechanisms in response to large temperature variations. Owing to unavailability of genome sequence information, de novo transcriptome assembly coupled with BLAST analysis was performed using strand specific RNA-seq data. This resulted in 26,245 protein-coding transcripts, of which 83.7% could be annotated to putative functions. We identified more than 681 genes differentially expressed, suggesting an organelle-specific response to temperature variation. Among these, the genes related to the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, which are localized in the plastid thylakoid membrane, were upregulated at low temperature. However, the transcripts related to the electron transport chain and biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine localized in mitochondria were upregulated at high temperature. These results show that the low energy uptake by repressed photosynthesis under low and high temperature conditions is compensated by different mechanisms, including photosystem I and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. This study illustrates that microalgae tolerate different temperature conditions through organelle specific mechanisms. PMID:27883062

  20. De novo sequencing and analysis of the American ginseng root transcriptome using a GS FLX Titanium platform to discover putative genes involved in ginsenoside biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lui Edmund MK

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L. is one of the most widely used herbal remedies in the world. Its major bioactive constituents are the triterpene saponins known as ginsenosides. However, little is known about ginsenoside biosynthesis in American ginseng, especially the late steps of the pathway. Results In this study, a one-quarter 454 sequencing run produced 209,747 high-quality reads with an average sequence length of 427 bases. De novo assembly generated 31,088 unique sequences containing 16,592 contigs and 14,496 singletons. About 93.1% of the high-quality reads were assembled into contigs with an average 8-fold coverage. A total of 21,684 (69.8% unique sequences were annotated by a BLAST similarity search against four public sequence databases, and 4,097 of the unique sequences were assigned to specific metabolic pathways by the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Based on the bioinformatic analysis described above, we found all of the known enzymes involved in ginsenoside backbone synthesis, starting from acetyl-CoA via the isoprenoid pathway. Additionally, a total of 150 cytochrome P450 (CYP450 and 235 glycosyltransferase unique sequences were found in the 454 cDNA library, some of which encode enzymes responsible for the conversion of the ginsenoside backbone into the various ginsenosides. Finally, one CYP450 and four UDP-glycosyltransferases were selected as the candidates most likely to be involved in ginsenoside biosynthesis through a methyl jasmonate (MeJA inducibility experiment and tissue-specific expression pattern analysis based on a real-time PCR assay. Conclusions We demonstrated, with the assistance of the MeJA inducibility experiment and tissue-specific expression pattern analysis, that transcriptome analysis based on 454 pyrosequencing is a powerful tool for determining the genes encoding enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in non-model plants. Additionally, the

  1. Antimalarial Activity of 4-Metoxychalcones: Docking Studies as Falcipain/Plasmepsin Inhibitors, ADMET and Lipophilic Efficiency Analysis to Identify a Putative Oral Lead Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eder de Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report the antimalarial activity of nine 4-methoxychalcone derivatives 1a–i and an initial analysis of their ADMET properties. All compounds showed potent activity against the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistant clone W2, with IC50 values ranging from 1.96 µM to 10.99 µM, with moderate or low cytotoxicity against the HeLa cell line. The compound 1a (IC50 = 2.06 µM had the best selectivity index (9.0. All the sulfonamide 4-metychalcone derivatives synthesized had cLogP values between 2 and 5 (mean value 3.79 and molecular weights (MWs below 500. The substitution of the pyrrolidine group in 1i by a morpholine group in 1a reduced the cLogP value from 3.05 in compound 1i to 2.34 in compound 1a. Indeed, compound 1a had the highest LipE value. The binding free energy of compound 1a showed it to be the most optimal chalcone derivative for plasmepsin-2 (−7.3 Kcal/mol. The physicochemical properties and LipE analysis of the dataset allowed us to establish that compound 1a is the highest quality compound of the series and a potential oral lead candidate.

  2. Identification of a putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene in Gracilaria lemaneiformis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyte)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueying; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2008-08-01

    A putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene, designated as SSH466 (GenBank accession No. DQ019223), was one of the genes identified in this work using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method in Gracilaria lemaneiformis. The full length of the gene was obtained using SMART RACE strategy. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene had 1 019 nucleotides, including an open reading frame of 498 nucleotides encoding 166 amino acid residues, 158 nucleotides of 5' untranslated region and 363 nucleotides of 3' non-coding region. Protein motif and secondary structure prediction showed that there existed a transmembrane domain with a unique β-sheet. Thus, SSH466 protein might be a cross-membrane protein. Sequence homology search in the public GenBank databases did not reveal any significant match with SSH466. Virtual Northern blot analysis confirmed that it was a tetrasporophyte-specific gene.

  3. Identification of a Putative Tetrasporophyte-Specific Gene in Gracilaria lemaneiformis(Gracilariales, Rhodophyte)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xueying; ZHANG Xuecheng

    2008-01-01

    A putative tetrasporophyte-specific gene, designated as SSH466 (GenBank accession No. DQ019223), was one of the genes identified in this work using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method in Gracilaria lemaneiformis. The full length of the gene was obtained using SMART RACE strategy. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene had 1 019 nucleotides, including an open reading frame of 498 nucleotides encoding 166 amino acid residues, 158 nucleotides of 5' untranslated region and 363 nucleo- tides of 3' non-coding region. Protein motif and secondary structure prediction showed that there existed a transmembrane domain with a unique β-sheet. Thus, SSH466 protein might be a cross-membrane protein. Sequence homology search in the public GenBank databases did not reveal any significant match with SSH466. Virtual Northern blot analysis confirmed that it was a tetrasporo- phyte-specific gene.

  4. Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit

    OpenAIRE

    Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the exis...

  5. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals Archaeal tRNATyr and tRNATrp Identities in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Mukai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The tRNA identity elements for some amino acids are distinct between the bacterial and archaeal domains. Searching in recent genomic and metagenomic sequence data, we found some candidate phyla radiation (CPR bacteria with archaeal tRNA identity for Tyr-tRNA and Trp-tRNA synthesis. These bacteria possess genes for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS predicted to be derived from DPANN superphylum archaea, while the cognate tRNATyr and tRNATrp genes reveal bacterial or archaeal origins. We identified a trace of domain fusion and swapping in the archaeal-type TyrRS gene of a bacterial lineage, suggesting that CPR bacteria may have used this mechanism to create diverse proteins. Archaeal-type TrpRS of bacteria and a few TrpRS species of DPANN archaea represent a new phylogenetic clade (named TrpRS-A. The TrpRS-A open reading frames (ORFs are always associated with another ORF (named ORF1 encoding an unknown protein without global sequence identity to any known protein. However, our protein structure prediction identified a putative HIGH-motif and KMSKS-motif as well as many α-helices that are characteristic of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS homologs. These results provide another example of the diversity of molecular components that implement the genetic code and provide a clue to the early evolution of life and the genetic code.

  6. Genome-wide analysis reveals novel genes essential for heme homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Severance

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Heme is a cofactor in proteins that function in almost all sub-cellular compartments and in many diverse biological processes. Heme is produced by a conserved biosynthetic pathway that is highly regulated to prevent the accumulation of heme--a cytotoxic, hydrophobic tetrapyrrole. Caenorhabditis elegans and related parasitic nematodes do not synthesize heme, but instead require environmental heme to grow and develop. Heme homeostasis in these auxotrophs is, therefore, regulated in accordance with available dietary heme. We have capitalized on this auxotrophy in C. elegans to study gene expression changes associated with precisely controlled dietary heme concentrations. RNA was isolated from cultures containing 4, 20, or 500 microM heme; derived cDNA probes were hybridized to Affymetrix C. elegans expression arrays. We identified 288 heme-responsive genes (hrgs that were differentially expressed under these conditions. Of these genes, 42% had putative homologs in humans, while genomes of medically relevant heme auxotrophs revealed homologs for 12% in both Trypanosoma and Leishmania and 24% in parasitic nematodes. Depletion of each of the 288 hrgs by RNA-mediated interference (RNAi in a transgenic heme-sensor worm strain identified six genes that regulated heme homeostasis. In addition, seven membrane-spanning transporters involved in heme uptake were identified by RNAi knockdown studies using a toxic heme analog. Comparison of genes that were positive in both of the RNAi screens resulted in the identification of three genes in common that were vital for organismal heme homeostasis in C. elegans. Collectively, our results provide a catalog of genes that are essential for metazoan heme homeostasis and demonstrate the power of C. elegans as a genetic animal model to dissect the regulatory circuits which mediate heme trafficking in both vertebrate hosts and their parasites, which depend on environmental heme for survival.

  7. Identification of a putative methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase by sequence analysis of a 6.8 kb DNA fragment of yeast chromosome VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizon, B; Rodríguez-Torres, M; Rodríguez-Belmonte, E; Cadahia, J L; Cerdan, E

    1996-09-01

    We report the sequence analysis of a 6.8 kb DNA fragment from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VII. This sequence contains five open reading frames (ORFs) greater than 100 amino acids. There is also an incomplete ORF flanking one of the extremes, G2868, which is the 3' end of the SCS3 gene (Hosaka et al., 1994). The translated sequence of ORF G2882 shows similarity to the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Goyette et al., 1994). ORF G2889 shows no significant homologies with the sequences compiled in databases. ORF G2893 corresponds to the gene SUP44, coding for the yeast ribosomal protein S4 (All-Robin et al., 1990). G2873 and G2896 are internal ORFs.

  8. Identification of Putative ORF5 Protein of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 and Functional Analysis of GFP-Fused ORF5 Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizhuang Lv

    Full Text Available Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 is the essential infectious agent responsible for causing porcine circovirus-associated diseases in pigs. To date, eleven RNAs and five viral proteins of PCV2 have been detected. Here, we identified a novel viral gene within the PCV2 genome, termed ORF5, that exists at both the transcriptional and translational level during productive infection of PCV2 in porcine alveolar macrophages 3D4/2 (PAMs. Northern blot analysis was used to demonstrate that the ORF5 gene measures 180 bp in length and overlaps completely with ORF1 when read in the same direction. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to show that the ORF5 protein is not essential for PCV2 replication. To investigate the biological functions of the novel protein, we constructed a recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid capable of expressing PCV2 ORF5. The results show that the GFP-tagged PCV2 ORF5 protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, is degraded via the proteasome, inhibits PAM growth and prolongs the S-phase of the cell cycle. Further studies show that the GFP-tagged PCV2 ORF5 protein induces ER stress and activates NF-κB, which was further confirmed by a significant upregulation in IL-6, IL-8 and COX-2 expression. In addition, five cellular proteins (GPNMB, CYP1A1, YWHAB, ZNF511 and SRSF3 were found to interact with ORF5 via yeast two-hybrid assay. These findings provide novel information on the identification and functional analysis of the PCV2 ORF5 protein and are likely to be of benefit in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of PCV2 pathogenicity. However, additional experiments are needed to validate the expression and function of the ORF5 protein during PCV2 infection in vitro before any definitive conclusion can be drawn.

  9. Structure, regulation, and putative function of the arginine deiminase system of Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruening, Petra; Fulde, Marcus; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important cause of infectious diseases in young pigs. Little is known about the virulence factors or protective antigens of S. suis. Recently, we have identified two proteins of the arginine deiminase system (ADS) of S. suis, which were temperature induced and expressed on the streptococcal surface (N. Winterhoff, R. Goethe, P. Gruening, M. Rohde, H. Kalisz, H. E. Smith, and P. Valentin-Weigand, J. Bacteriol. 184:6768-6776, 2002). In the present study, we analyzed the complete ADS of S. suis. Due to their homologies to the recently published S. gordonii ADS genes, the genes for arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl-transferase, and carbamate kinase, which were previously designated adiS, octS, and ckS, respectively, were renamed arcA, arcB, and arcC, respectively. Our data revealed that arcA, arcB, and arcC of the S. suis ADS are transcribed from an operon (arcABC operon). Additionally, putative ADS-associated genes were cloned and sequenced which, however, did not belong to the arcABC operon. These were the flpS gene upstream of the arcABC operon with homology to the flp transcription regulator of S. gordonii and the arcD, arcT, arcH, and argR genes downstream of the arcABC operon with high homologies to a putative arginine-ornithine antiporter, a putative dipeptidase of S. gordonii, a putative beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase of S. pneumoniae, and a putative arginine repressor of S. gordonii, respectively. The transcriptional start point of the arcABC operon was determined, and promoter analysis provided evidence that multiple factors contribute to the regulation of the ADS. Thus, a putative binding site for a transcription regulator of the Crp/Fnr family, an ArgR-binding site, and two cis-acting catabolite response elements were identified in the promoter-operator region of the operon. Consistent with this, we could demonstrate that the ADS of S. suis is inducible by arginine and reduced O2 tension and subject to carbon catabolite

  10. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding a putative lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase from Arachis hypogaea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Si-Long Chen; Jia-Quan Huang; Lei Yong; Yue-Ting Zhang; Xiao-Ping Ren; Yu-Ning Chen; Hui-Fang Jiang; Li-Ying Yan; Yu-Rong Li; Bo-Shou Liao

    2012-12-01

    Lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase (LPAT) is the important enzyme responsible for the acylation of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), leading to the generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) in plant. Its encoding gene is an essential candidate for oil crops to improve oil composition and increase seed oil content through genetic engineering. In this study, a full-length AhLPAT4 gene was isolated via cDNA library screening and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE); our data demonstrated that AhLPAT4 had 1631 nucleotides, encoding a putative 43.8 kDa protein with 383 amino acid residues. The deduced protein included a conserved acyltransferase domain and four motifs (I–IV) with putative LPA and acyl-CoA catalytic and binding sites. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that AhLPAT4 contained four transmembrane domains (TMDs), localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane; detailed analysis indicated that motif I and motifs II–III in AhLPAT4 were separated by the third TMD, which located on cytosolic and ER luminal side respectively, and hydrophobic residues on the surface of AhLPAT4 protein fold to form a hydrophobic tunnel to accommodate the acyl chain. Subcellular localization analysis confirmed that AhLPAT4 was a cytoplasm protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AhLPAT4 had a high homology (63.7–78.3%) with putative LPAT4 proteins from Glycine max, Arabidopsis thaliana and Ricinus communis. AhLPAT4 was ubiquitously expressed in diverse tissues except in flower, which is almost undetectable. The expression analysis in different developmental stages in peanut seeds indicated that AhLPAT4 did not coincide with oil accumulation.

  11. Integrated network analysis identifies fight-club nodes as a class of hubs encompassing key putative switch genes that induce major transcriptome reprogramming during grapevine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-12-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named "fight-club hubs" characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named "switch genes" was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops.

  12. De novo sequencing and comparative analysis of three red algal species of Family Solieriaceae to discover putative genes associated with carrageenan biosysthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Lipu; WANG Xumin; YU Jun; WU Shuangxiu; SUN Jing; WANG Liang; LIU Tao; CHI Shan; LIU Cui; LI Xingang; YIN Jinlong

    2014-01-01

    Betaphycus gelatinus, Kappaphycus alvarezii and Eucheuma denticulatum of Family Solieriaceae, Order Gi-gartinales, Class Rhodophyceae are three important carrageenan-producing red algal species, which pro-duce different types of carrageenans, beta (β)-carrageenan, kappa (κ)-carrageenan and iota (ι)-carrageenan. So far the carrageenan biosynthesis pathway is not fully understood and few information is about the So-lieriaceae genome and transcriptome sequence. Here, we performed the de novo transcriptome sequencing, assembly, functional annotation and comparative analysis of these three commercial-valuable species using an Illumina short-sequencing platform Hiseq 2000 and bioinformatic software. Furthermore, we compared the different expression of some unigenes involved in some pathways relevant to carrageenan biosynthe-sis. We finally found 861 different expressed KEGG orthologs which contained a glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway (21 orthologs), carbon fixation in photosynthetic organisms (16 orthologs), galactose metabolism (5 orthologs), and fructose and mannose metabolism (9 orthologs) which are parts of the carbohydrate me-tabolism. We also found 8 different expressed KEGG orthologs for sulfur metabolism which might be impor-tantly related to biosynthesis of different types of carrageenans. The results presented in this study provided valuable resources for functional genomics annotation and investigation of mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of carrageenan in Family Solieriaceae.

  13. Hepatic transcriptional analysis in rats treated with Cassia occidentalis seed: involvement of oxidative stress and impairment in xenobiotic metabolism as a putative mechanism of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Gati Krushna; Yadav, Ashish; Yadav, Anuradha; Ansari, Kausar M; Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Vashistha, Vipin M; Raisuddin, S; Das, Mukul

    2014-08-17

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of Cassia occidentalis (CO) seeds on the transcriptional expression patterns of mRNAs in rat liver by microarray analysis. The results indicated that exposure of CO (0.5%) seeds in diet to rats differentially regulated 60 transcripts belonging to various metabolic pathways including, oxidative stress, xenobiotic metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, cell cycle, apoptosis etc. The expression of AKT1, CAT, SOD1, CYP1A1, CYP2B1, TGF-β, BAX, CREB1, JNK1 and IL-6 were validated by the qRT-PCR. In addition, involvement of oxidative stress was observed due to marked depletion of glutathione, increase in lipid peroxidation and modulation of antioxidant enzymes in hepatic tissue of rats treated with 0.5-2.0% CO in diet. Furthermore, significant decrease in the levels of Phase 1 (EROD, MROD and PROD) and Phase 2 (QR and GST) enzymes following 0.5-2.0% CO exposure indicates the impairment of xenobiotic metabolism and possible accumulation of toxic ingredients of the seeds in liver. Overall, the study predicts the involvement of multiple pathways and related biomolecules in CO induced hepatotoxicity and the data may be useful in formulating strategies for therapeutic interventions of suspected CO poisoning study cases.

  14. De novo assembly, functional annotation and comparative analysis of Withania somnifera leaf and root transcriptomes to identify putative genes involved in the withanolides biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Parul; Goel, Ridhi; Pathak, Sumya; Srivastava, Apeksha; Singh, Surya Pratap; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera is one of the most valuable medicinal plants used in Ayurvedic and other indigenous medicine systems due to bioactive molecules known as withanolides. As genomic information regarding this plant is very limited, little information is available about biosynthesis of withanolides. To facilitate the basic understanding about the withanolide biosynthesis pathways, we performed transcriptome sequencing for Withania leaf (101L) and root (101R) which specifically synthesize withaferin A and withanolide A, respectively. Pyrosequencing yielded 8,34,068 and 7,21,755 reads which got assembled into 89,548 and 1,14,814 unique sequences from 101L and 101R, respectively. A total of 47,885 (101L) and 54,123 (101R) could be annotated using TAIR10, NR, tomato and potato databases. Gene Ontology and KEGG analyses provided a detailed view of all the enzymes involved in withanolide backbone synthesis. Our analysis identified members of cytochrome P450, glycosyltransferase and methyltransferase gene families with unique presence or differential expression in leaf and root and might be involved in synthesis of tissue-specific withanolides. We also detected simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in transcriptome data for use in future genetic studies. Comprehensive sequence resource developed for Withania, in this study, will help to elucidate biosynthetic pathway for tissue-specific synthesis of secondary plant products in non-model plant organisms as well as will be helpful in developing strategies for enhanced biosynthesis of withanolides through biotechnological approaches.

  15. De novo assembly, functional annotation and comparative analysis of Withania somnifera leaf and root transcriptomes to identify putative genes involved in the withanolides biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Gupta

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera is one of the most valuable medicinal plants used in Ayurvedic and other indigenous medicine systems due to bioactive molecules known as withanolides. As genomic information regarding this plant is very limited, little information is available about biosynthesis of withanolides. To facilitate the basic understanding about the withanolide biosynthesis pathways, we performed transcriptome sequencing for Withania leaf (101L and root (101R which specifically synthesize withaferin A and withanolide A, respectively. Pyrosequencing yielded 8,34,068 and 7,21,755 reads which got assembled into 89,548 and 1,14,814 unique sequences from 101L and 101R, respectively. A total of 47,885 (101L and 54,123 (101R could be annotated using TAIR10, NR, tomato and potato databases. Gene Ontology and KEGG analyses provided a detailed view of all the enzymes involved in withanolide backbone synthesis. Our analysis identified members of cytochrome P450, glycosyltransferase and methyltransferase gene families with unique presence or differential expression in leaf and root and might be involved in synthesis of tissue-specific withanolides. We also detected simple sequence repeats (SSRs in transcriptome data for use in future genetic studies. Comprehensive sequence resource developed for Withania, in this study, will help to elucidate biosynthetic pathway for tissue-specific synthesis of secondary plant products in non-model plant organisms as well as will be helpful in developing strategies for enhanced biosynthesis of withanolides through biotechnological approaches.

  16. Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Differences in Site-specific Cell Fate Determination in Mammalian Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan eErtaylan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis - the generation of new neurons - is an ongoing process that persists in the adult mammalian brain of several species, including humans. In this work we analyze two discrete brain regions: the subventricular zone (SVZ lining the walls of the lateral ventricles; and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in mice and shed light on the SVZ and SGZ specific neurogenesis. We propose a computational model that relies on the construction and analysis of region specific gene regulatory networks from the publicly available data on these two regions. Using this model a number of putative factors involved in neuronal stem cell (NSC identity and maintenance were identified. We also demonstrate potential gender and niche-derived differences based on cell surface and nuclear receptors via Ar, Hif1a and Nr3c1.We have also conducted cell fate determinant analysis for SVZ NSC populations to Olfactory Bulb interneurons and SGZ NSC populations to the granule cells of the Granular Cell Layer. We report thirty-one candidate cell fate determinant gene pairs, ready to be validated. We focus on Ar - Pax6 in SVZ and Sox2 - Ncor1 in SGZ. Both pairs are expressed and localized in the suggested anatomical structures as shown by in situ hybridization and found to physically interact.Finally, we conclude that there are fundamental differences between SGZ and SVZ neurogenesis. We argue that these regulatory mechanisms are linked to the observed differential neurogenic potential of these regions. The presence of nuclear and cell surface receptors in the region specific regulatory circuits indicate the significance of niche derived extracellular factors, hormones and region specific factors such as the oxygen sensitivity, dictating SGZ and SVZ specific neurogenesis.

  17. [Phylogenetic relationships and intraspecific variation of D-genome Aegilops L. as revealed by RAPD analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriunova, S V; Kochieva, E Z; Chikida, N N; Pukhal'skiĭ, V A

    2004-05-01

    RAPD analysis was carried out to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species, which contain the D genome as a component of the alloploid genome, and diploid Aegilops tauschii, which is a putative donor of the D genome for common wheat. In total, 74 accessions of six D-genome Aegilops species were examined. The highest intraspecific variation (0.03-0.21) was observed for Ae. tauschii. Intraspecific distances between accessions ranged 0.007-0.067 in Ae. cylindrica, 0.017-0.047 in Ae. vavilovii, and 0.00-0.053 in Ae. juvenalis. Likewise, Ae. ventricosa and Ae. crassa showed low intraspecific polymorphism. The among-accession difference in alloploid Ae. ventricosa (genome DvNv) was similar to that of one parental species, Ae. uniaristata (N), and substantially lower than in the other parent, Ae. tauschii (D). The among-accession difference in Ae. cylindrica (CcDc) was considerably lower than in either parent, Ae. tauschii (D) or Ae. caudata (C). With the exception of Ae. cylindrica, all D-genome species--Ae. tauschii (D), Ae. ventricosa (DvNv), Ae. crassa (XcrDcrl and XcrDcrlDcr2), Ae. juvenalis (XjDjUj), and Ae. vavilovii (XvaDvaSva)--formed a single polymorphic cluster, which was distinct from clusters of other species. The only exception, Ae. cylindrica, did not group with the other D-genome species, but clustered with Ae. caudata (C), a donor of the C genome. The cluster of these two species was clearly distinct from the cluster of the other D-genome species and close to a cluster of Ae. umbellulata (genome U) and Ae. ovata (genome UgMg). Thus, RAPD analysis for the first time was used to estimate and to compare the interpopulation polymorphism and to establish the phylogenetic relationships of all diploid and alloploid D-genome Aegilops species.

  18. A putative RNA-interference-based immune system in prokaryotes: computational analysis of the predicted enzymatic machinery, functional analogies with eukaryotic RNAi, and hypothetical mechanisms of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All archaeal and many bacterial genomes contain Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindrome Repeats (CRISPR and variable arrays of the CRISPR-associated (cas genes that have been previously implicated in a novel form of DNA repair on the basis of comparative analysis of their protein product sequences. However, the proximity of CRISPR and cas genes strongly suggests that they have related functions which is hard to reconcile with the repair hypothesis. Results The protein sequences of the numerous cas gene products were classified into ~25 distinct protein families; several new functional and structural predictions are described. Comparative-genomic analysis of CRISPR and cas genes leads to the hypothesis that the CRISPR-Cas system (CASS is a mechanism of defense against invading phages and plasmids that functions analogously to the eukaryotic RNA interference (RNAi systems. Specific functional analogies are drawn between several components of CASS and proteins involved in eukaryotic RNAi, including the double-stranded RNA-specific helicase-nuclease (dicer, the endonuclease cleaving target mRNAs (slicer, and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. However, none of the CASS components is orthologous to its apparent eukaryotic functional counterpart. It is proposed that unique inserts of CRISPR, some of which are homologous to fragments of bacteriophage and plasmid genes, function as prokaryotic siRNAs (psiRNA, by base-pairing with the target mRNAs and promoting their degradation or translation shutdown. Specific hypothetical schemes are developed for the functioning of the predicted prokaryotic siRNA system and for the formation of new CRISPR units with unique inserts encoding psiRNA conferring immunity to the respective newly encountered phages or plasmids. The unique inserts in CRISPR show virtually no similarity even between closely related bacterial strains which suggests their rapid turnover, on evolutionary scale

  19. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raupach Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. Methods fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Conclusions Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  20. Analysis of self-overlap reveals trade-offs in plankton swimming trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariani, Patrizio; Visser, Andre W.; Mazzocchi, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-01

    these contrasting processes. This trade-off can be hypothesized as being evident in the behaviour of plankton, which inhabit a dilute three-dimensional environment with few refuges or orienting landmarks. We present an analysis of the swimming path geometries based on a volumetric Monte Carlo sampling approach......, which is particularly adept at revealing such trade-offs by measuring the self-overlap of the trajectories. Application of this method to experimentally measured trajectories reveals that swimming patterns in copepods are shaped to efficiently explore volumes at small scales, while achieving a large...

  1. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Eleanor; Sherry, Aileen; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Jyothi, Dushyanth; Yaga, Raja; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Everest, Paul; Smith, David G E

    2014-09-01

    Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC-ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith-Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  2. Detailed analysis of Helicobacter pylori Fur-regulated promoters reveals a Fur box core sequence and novel Fur-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pich, Oscar Q; Carpenter, Beth M; Gilbreath, Jeremy J; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-06-01

    In Helicobacter pylori, iron balance is controlled by the Ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an iron-sensing repressor protein that typically regulates expression of genes implicated in iron transport and storage. Herein, we carried out extensive analysis of Fur-regulated promoters and identified a 7-1-7 motif with dyad symmetry (5'-TAATAATnATTATTA-3'), which functions as the Fur box core sequence of H. pylori. Addition of this sequence to the promoter region of a typically non-Fur regulated gene was sufficient to impose Fur-dependent regulation in vivo. Moreover, mutation of this sequence within Fur-controlled promoters negated regulation. Analysis of the H. pylori chromosome for the occurrence of the Fur box established the existence of well-conserved Fur boxes in the promoters of numerous known Fur-regulated genes, and revealed novel putative Fur targets. Transcriptional analysis of the new candidate genes demonstrated Fur-dependent repression of HPG27_51, HPG27_52, HPG27_199, HPG27_445, HPG27_825 and HPG27_1063, as well as Fur-mediated activation of the cytotoxin associated gene A, cagA (HPG27_507). Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed specific binding of Fur to the promoters of each of these genes. Future experiments will determine whether loss of Fur regulation of any of these particular genes contributes to the defects in colonization exhibited by the H. pylori fur mutant.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Genomics and Proteomics in the New Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis X022 Revealed the Metabolic Regulation Mechanism of Carbon Flux Following Cu(2+) Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Meifang; Xie, Junyan; Liu, Xuemei; Li, Yang; Rang, Jie; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Fengjuan; Xia, Liqiu; Hu, Shengbiao; Sun, Yunjun; Ding, Xuezhi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) X022 is a novel strain isolated from soil in China, and showed strong insecticidal activity against several Lepidopteran pests. In this work, we performed whole genome sequencing of this Bt strain using the next-generation sequencing technology, and further conducted a comparative analysis with the proteomics data of the specific spore-release period based on LC-MS/MS approach. The Bt X022 genome consisted of one circular chromosomal DNA and seven plasmids, which were further functionally annotated using the RAST server. Comparative analysis of insecticidal substances showed that X022 contained genes coding for three Cry proteins (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia and Cry2Ab) and a vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3A). However, three insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) (Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac and Cry1Da) were detected by proteomics in the spore-release period. Moreover, a putative biosynthetic gene cluster and the metabolic pathway for poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in Bt X022 were deduced based on the comparative analysis of genomic and proteomic data, which revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux correlated with increased production of ICPs caused by Cu(2+.) Hence, these results provided a deeper understanding of the genetic background and protein expression profile of Bt X022. This study established a foundation for directed genetic modification and further application of this new isolated Bt strain.

  4. Comparative analysis of genomics and proteomics in the new isolated Bacillus thuringiensis X022 revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux following Cu2+ treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meifang eQuan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt X022, which showed strong insecticidal activity against several Lepidopteran pests, is a novel strain isolated from soil in China. In this work, we performed whole genome sequencing of this Bt strain using the next-generation sequencing technology, and further conducted a comparative analysis with the proteomics data of the specific spore-release period based on LC-MS/MS approach. The Bt X022 genome consisted of one circular chromosomal DNA and seven plasmids, which were further functionally annotated using the RAST server. Comparative analysis of insecticidal substances showed that X022 contained genes coding for three Cry proteins (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia and Cry2Ab and a vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3A. However, three insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs (Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac and Cry1Da were detected by proteomics in the spore-release period. Moreover, a putative biosynthetic gene cluster and the metabolic pathway for poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in Bt X022 were deduced based on the comparative analysis of genomic and proteomic data, which revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux correlated with increased production of ICPs caused by Cu2+ . Hence, these results provided a deeper understanding of the genetic background and protein expression profile of Bt X022. This study established a foundation for directed genetic modification and further application of this new isolated Bt strain.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Genomics and Proteomics in the New Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis X022 Revealed the Metabolic Regulation Mechanism of Carbon Flux Following Cu2+ Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Meifang; Xie, Junyan; Liu, Xuemei; Li, Yang; Rang, Jie; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Fengjuan; Xia, Liqiu; Hu, Shengbiao; Sun, Yunjun; Ding, Xuezhi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) X022 is a novel strain isolated from soil in China, and showed strong insecticidal activity against several Lepidopteran pests. In this work, we performed whole genome sequencing of this Bt strain using the next-generation sequencing technology, and further conducted a comparative analysis with the proteomics data of the specific spore-release period based on LC-MS/MS approach. The Bt X022 genome consisted of one circular chromosomal DNA and seven plasmids, which were further functionally annotated using the RAST server. Comparative analysis of insecticidal substances showed that X022 contained genes coding for three Cry proteins (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia and Cry2Ab) and a vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3A). However, three insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) (Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac and Cry1Da) were detected by proteomics in the spore-release period. Moreover, a putative biosynthetic gene cluster and the metabolic pathway for poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in Bt X022 were deduced based on the comparative analysis of genomic and proteomic data, which revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux correlated with increased production of ICPs caused by Cu2+. Hence, these results provided a deeper understanding of the genetic background and protein expression profile of Bt X022. This study established a foundation for directed genetic modification and further application of this new isolated Bt strain. PMID:27303381

  6. Genome-wide analysis of the phosphoinositide kinome from two ciliates reveals novel evolutionary links for phosphoinositide kinases in eukaryotic cells.

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    George Leondaritis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complexity of phosphoinositide signaling in higher eukaryotes is partly due to expansion of specific families and types of phosphoinositide kinases (PIKs that can generate all phosphoinositides via multiple routes. This is particularly evident in the PI3Ks and PIPKs, and it is considered an evolutionary trait associated with metazoan diversification. Yet, there are limited comprehensive studies on the PIK repertoire of free living unicellular organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook a genome-wide analysis of putative PIK genes in two free living ciliated cells, Tetrahymena and Paramecium. The Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia genomes were probed with representative kinases from all families and types. Putative homologs were verified by EST, microarray and deep RNA sequencing database searches and further characterized for domain structure, catalytic efficiency, expression patterns and phylogenetic relationships. In total, we identified and characterized 22 genes in the Tetrahymena thermophila genome and 62 highly homologues genes in Paramecium tetraurelia suggesting a tight evolutionary conservation in the ciliate lineage. Comparison to the kinome of fungi reveals a significant expansion of PIK genes in ciliates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study highlights four important aspects concerning ciliate and other unicellular PIKs. First, ciliate-specific expansion of PI4KIII-like genes. Second, presence of class I PI3Ks which, at least in Tetrahymena, are associated with a metazoan-type machinery for PIP3 signaling. Third, expansion of divergent PIPK enzymes such as the recently described type IV transmembrane PIPKs. Fourth, presence of possible type II PIPKs and presumably inactive PIKs (hence, pseudo-PIKs not previously described. Taken together, our results provide a solid framework for future investigation of the roles of PIKs in ciliates and indicate that novel functions and novel regulatory

  7. Putative bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa in immunosuppressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Girginkardesler, Nogay; Celik, Pınar; Yereli, Kor; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be "flagellated protozoa" have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells.

  8. SNP array analysis reveals novel genomic abnormalities including copy neutral loss of heterozygosity in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas.

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    Ahmed Idbaih

    Full Text Available Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOD are rare glial tumors in adults with relative homogeneous clinical, radiological and histological features at the time of diagnosis but dramatically various clinical courses. Studies have identified several molecular abnormalities with clinical or biological relevance to AOD (e.g. t(1;19(q10;p10, IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1 mutations.To better characterize the clinical and biological behavior of this tumor type, the creation of a national multicentric network, named "Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques (POLA," has been supported by the Institut National du Cancer (InCA. Newly diagnosed and centrally validated AOD patients and their related biological material (tumor and blood samples were prospectively included in the POLA clinical database and tissue bank, respectively.At the molecular level, we have conducted a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, which included 83 patients. Despite a careful central pathological review, AOD have been found to exhibit heterogeneous genomic features. A total of 82% of the tumors exhibited a 1p/19q-co-deletion, while 18% harbor a distinct chromosome pattern. Novel focal abnormalities, including homozygously deleted, amplified and disrupted regions, have been identified. Recurring copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (CNLOH inducing the modulation of gene expression have also been discovered. CNLOH in the CDKN2A locus was associated with protein silencing in 1/3 of the cases. In addition, FUBP1 homozygous deletion was detected in one case suggesting a putative tumor suppressor role of FUBP1 in AOD.Our study showed that the genomic and pathological analyses of AOD are synergistic in detecting relevant clinical and biological subgroups of AOD.

  9. Genome-wide analysis reveals selection for important traits in domestic horse breeds.

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    Jessica L Petersen

    Full Text Available Intense selective pressures applied over short evolutionary time have resulted in homogeneity within, but substantial variation among, horse breeds. Utilizing this population structure, 744 individuals from 33 breeds, and a 54,000 SNP genotyping array, breed-specific targets of selection were identified using an F(ST-based statistic calculated in 500-kb windows across the genome. A 5.5-Mb region of ECA18, in which the myostatin (MSTN gene was centered, contained the highest signature of selection in both the Paint and Quarter Horse. Gene sequencing and histological analysis of gluteal muscle biopsies showed a promoter variant and intronic SNP of MSTN were each significantly associated with higher Type 2B and lower Type 1 muscle fiber proportions in the Quarter Horse, demonstrating a functional consequence of selection at this locus. Signatures of selection on ECA23 in all gaited breeds in the sample led to the identification of a shared, 186-kb haplotype including two doublesex related mab transcription factor genes (DMRT2 and 3. The recent identification of a DMRT3 mutation within this haplotype, which appears necessary for the ability to perform alternative gaits, provides further evidence for selection at this locus. Finally, putative loci for the determination of size were identified in the draft breeds and the Miniature horse on ECA11, as well as when signatures of selection surrounding candidate genes at other loci were examined. This work provides further evidence of the importance of MSTN in racing breeds, provides strong evidence for selection upon gait and size, and illustrates the potential for population-based techniques to find genomic regions driving important phenotypes in the modern horse.

  10. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis reveals accelerated genic evolution in a Tibet fish, Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liandong; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zhaolei; He, Shunping

    2014-12-26

    Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of organismal adaptation to the Tibetan Plateau at a genomic scale can provide insights into the process of adaptive evolution. Many highland species have been investigated and various candidate genes that may be responsible for highland adaptation have been identified. However, we know little about the genomic basis of adaptation to Tibet in fishes. Here, we performed transcriptome sequencing of a schizothoracine fish (Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus) and used it to identify potential genetic mechanisms of highland adaptation. We obtained totally 66,105 assembled unigenes, of which 7,232 were assigned as putative one-to-one orthologs in zebrafish. Comparative gene annotations from several species indicated that at least 350 genes lost and 41 gained since the divergence between G. pachycheilus and zebrafish. An analysis of 6,324 orthologs among zebrafish, fugu, medaka, and spotted gar identified consistent evidence for genome-wide accelerated evolution in G. pachycheilus and only the terminal branch of G. pachycheilus had an elevated Ka/Ks ratio than the ancestral branch. Many functional categories related to hypoxia and energy metabolism exhibited rapid evolution in G. pachycheilus relative to zebrafish. Genes showing signature of rapid evolution and positive selection in the G. pachycheilus lineage were also enriched in functions associated with energy metabolism and hypoxia. The first genomic resources for fish in the Tibetan Plateau and evolutionary analyses provided some novel insights into highland adaptation in fishes and served as a foundation for future studies aiming to identify candidate genes underlying the genetic bases of adaptation to Tibet in fishes.

  11. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  12. Glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases in Archaea: putative components of the N-glycosylation pathway in the third domain of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidovich, Hilla; Eichler, Jerry

    2009-11-01

    The ability of Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea to perform N-glycosylation underlies the importance and possible antiquity of this post-translational protein modification. However, in contrast to the relatively well-studied eukaryal and bacterial pathways, the archaeal N-glycosylation process is less understood. To remedy this disparity, the following study has examined 56 available archaeal genomes with the aim of identifying glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases, including those putatively catalyzing this post-translational processing event. This analysis reveals that while oligosaccharyltransferases, central components of the N-glycosylation pathway, are found across the range of archaeal phenotypes, the N-glycosylation machinery of hyperthermophilic Archaea may well rely on fewer components than do the parallel systems of nonhyperthermophilic Archaea. Moreover, genes encoding predicted glycosyltransferases of hyperthermophilic Archaea tend to be far more scattered within the genome than is the case with nonhyperthermophilic species, where putative glycosyltransferase genes are often clustered around identified oligosaccharyltransferase-encoding sequences.

  13. Complexity of genome evolution by segmental rearrangement in Brassica rapa revealed by sequence-level analysis

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    Paterson Andrew H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Brassica species, related to Arabidopsis thaliana, include an important group of crops and represent an excellent system for studying the evolutionary consequences of polyploidy. Previous studies have led to a proposed structure for an ancestral karyotype and models for the evolution of the B. rapa genome by triplication and segmental rearrangement, but these have not been validated at the sequence level. Results We developed computational tools to analyse the public collection of B. rapa BAC end sequence, in order to identify candidates for representing collinearity discontinuities between the genomes of B. rapa and A. thaliana. For each putative discontinuity, one of the BACs was sequenced and analysed for collinearity with the genome of A. thaliana. Additional BAC clones were identified and sequenced as part of ongoing efforts to sequence four chromosomes of B. rapa. Strikingly few of the 19 inter-chromosomal rearrangements corresponded to the set of collinearity discontinuities anticipated on the basis of previous studies. Our analyses revealed numerous instances of newly detected collinearity blocks. For B. rapa linkage group A8, we were able to develop a model for the derivation of the chromosome from the ancestral karyotype. We were also able to identify a rearrangement event in the ancestor of B. rapa that was not shared with the ancestor of A. thaliana, and is represented in triplicate in the B. rapa genome. In addition to inter-chromosomal rearrangements, we identified and analysed 32 BACs containing the end points of segmental inversion events. Conclusion Our results show that previous studies of segmental collinearity between the A. thaliana, Brassica and ancestral karyotype genomes, although very useful, represent over-simplifications of their true relationships. The presence of numerous cryptic collinear genome segments and the frequent occurrence of segmental inversions mean that inference of the positions

  14. Two putative-aquaporin genes are differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus japonicus

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    Giovannetti Marco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM are widespread symbioses that provide great advantages to the plant, improving its nutritional status and allowing the fungus to complete its life cycle. Nevertheless, molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of AM symbiosis are not yet fully deciphered. Here, we have focused on two putative aquaporin genes, LjNIP1 and LjXIP1, which resulted to be upregulated in a transcriptomic analysis performed on mycorrhizal roots of Lotus japonicus. Results A phylogenetic analysis has shown that the two putative aquaporins belong to different functional families: NIPs and XIPs. Transcriptomic experiments have shown the independence of their expression from their nutritional status but also a close correlation with mycorrhizal and rhizobial interaction. Further transcript quantification has revealed a good correlation between the expression of one of them, LjNIP1, and LjPT4, the phosphate transporter which is considered a marker gene for mycorrhizal functionality. By using laser microdissection, we have demonstrated that one of the two genes, LjNIP1, is expressed exclusively in arbuscule-containing cells. LjNIP1, in agreement with its putative role as an aquaporin, is capable of transferring water when expressed in yeast protoplasts. Confocal analysis have demonstrated that eGFP-LjNIP1, under its endogenous promoter, accumulates in the inner membrane system of arbusculated cells. Conclusions Overall, the results have shown different functionality and expression specificity of two mycorrhiza-inducible aquaporins in L. japonicus. One of them, LjNIP1 can be considered a novel molecular marker of mycorrhizal status at different developmental stages of the arbuscule. At the same time, LjXIP1 results to be the first XIP family aquaporin to be transcriptionally regulated during symbiosis.

  15. Proteomics Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues Reveals Drug Resistance-associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRUZ*, ISA N.; COLEY*, HELEN M.; KRAMER, HOLGER B.; MADHURI, THUMULURU KAVITAH; SAFUWAN, NUR A.M.; ANGELINO, ANA RITA; YANG, MIN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carboplatin and paclitaxel form the cornerstone of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, however, drug resistance to these agents continues to present challenges. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms underlying this resistance remain unclear. Materials and Methods: A 2D-gel proteomics method was used to analyze protein expression levels of three human ovarian cancer cell lines and five biopsy samples. Representative proteins identified were validated via western immunoblotting. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed metabolomic pathway changes. Results: A total of 189 proteins were identified with restricted criteria. Combined treatment targeting the proteasome-ubiquitin pathway resulted in re-sensitisation of drug-resistant cells. In addition, examination of five surgical biopsies of ovarian tissues revealed α-enolase (ENOA), elongation factor Tu, mitochondrial (EFTU), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3P), stress-70 protein, mitochondrial (GRP75), apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), peroxiredoxin (PRDX2) and annexin A (ANXA) as candidate biomarkers of drug-resistant disease. Conclusion: Proteomics combined with pathway analysis provided information for an effective combined treatment approach overcoming drug resistance. Analysis of cell lines and tissues revealed potential prognostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer. *These Authors contributed equally to this study. PMID:28031236

  16. A comprehensive analysis of microProteins reveals their potentially widespread mechanism of transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnani, Enrico; de Klein, Niek; Nam, Hye-In; Kim, Jung-Gun; Pham, Kimberly; Fiume, Elisa; Mudgett, Mary Beth; Rhee, Seung Yon

    2014-01-01

    Truncated transcription factor-like proteins called microProteins (miPs) can modulate transcription factor activities, thereby increasing transcriptional regulatory complexity. To understand their prevalence, evolution, and function, we predicted over 400 genes that encode putative miPs from Arabido

  17. High-resolution analysis of the human retina miRNome reveals isomiR variations and novel microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karali, Marianthi; Persico, Maria; Mutarelli, Margherita; Carissimo, Annamaria; Pizzo, Mariateresa; Singh Marwah, Veer; Ambrosio, Concetta; Pinelli, Michele; Carrella, Diego; Ferrari, Stefano; Ponzin, Diego; Nigro, Vincenzo; di Bernardo, Diego; Banfi, Sandro

    2016-02-29

    MicroRNAs play a fundamental role in retinal development and function. To characterise the miRNome of the human retina, we carried out deep sequencing analysis on sixteen individuals. We established the catalogue of retina-expressed miRNAs, determined their relative abundance and found that a small number of miRNAs accounts for almost 90% of the retina miRNome. We discovered more than 3000 miRNA variants (isomiRs), encompassing a wide range of sequence variations, which include seed modifications that are predicted to have an impact on miRNA action. We demonstrated that a seed-modifying isomiR of the retina-enriched miR-124-3p was endowed with different targeting properties with respect to the corresponding canonical form. Moreover, we identified 51 putative novel, retina-specific miRNAs and experimentally validated the expression for nine of them. Finally, a parallel analysis of the human Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE)/choroid, two tissues that are known to be crucial for retina homeostasis, yielded notably distinct miRNA enrichment patterns compared to the retina. The generated data are accessible through an ad hoc database. This study is the first to reveal the complexity of the human retina miRNome at nucleotide resolution and constitutes a unique resource to assess the contribution of miRNAs to the pathophysiology of the human retina.

  18. New molecular phenotypes in the dst mutants of Arabidopsis revealed by DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Amador, M A; Lidder, P; Johnson, M A; Landgraf, J; Wisman, E; Green, P J

    2001-12-01

    In this study, DNA microarray analysis was used to expand our understanding of the dst1 mutant of Arabidopsis. The dst (downstream) mutants were isolated originally as specifically increasing the steady state level and the half-life of DST-containing transcripts. As such, txhey offer a unique opportunity to study rapid sequence-specific mRNA decay pathways in eukaryotes. These mutants show a threefold to fourfold increase in mRNA abundance for two transgenes and an endogenous gene, all containing DST elements, when examined by RNA gel blot analysis; however, they show no visible aberrant phenotype. Here, we use DNA microarrays to identify genes with altered expression levels in dst1 compared with the parental plants. In addition to verifying the increase in the transgene mRNA levels, which were used to isolate these mutants, we were able to identify new genes with altered mRNA abundance in dst1. RNA gel blot analysis confirmed the microarray data for all genes tested and also was used to catalog the first molecular differences in gene expression between the dst1 and dst2 mutants. These differences revealed previously unknown molecular phenotypes for the dst mutants that will be helpful in future analyses. Cluster analysis of genes altered in dst1 revealed new coexpression patterns that prompt new hypotheses regarding the nature of the dst1 mutation and a possible role of the DST-mediated mRNA decay pathway in plants.

  19. Trypanosoma brucei: a putative RNA polymerase II promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayele, Henry K

    2009-12-01

    RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters are rare in the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei because gene regulation in the parasite is complex and polycistronic. Here, we describe a putative pol II promoter and its structure-function relationship. The promoter has features of an archetypal eukaryotic pol II promoter including putative canonical CCAAT and TATA boxes, and an initiator element. However, the spatial arrangement of these elements is only similar to yeast pol II promoters. Deletion mapping and transcription assays enabled delineation of a minimal promoter that could drive orientation-independent reporter gene expression suggesting that it may be a bidirectional promoter. In vitro transcription in a heterologous nuclear extract revealed that the promoter can be recognized by the basal eukaryotic transcription complex. This suggests that the transcription machinery in the parasite may be very similar to those of other eukaryotes.

  20. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Belianinov, Alex; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-01

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer from information misinterpretation due to low resolving power.

  1. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

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    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  2. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity

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    Eleanor Watson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC–ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith–Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  3. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human...... kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified...... to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially...

  4. Transcriptome-based network analysis reveals a spectrum model of human macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jia; Schmidt, Susanne V; Sander, Jil; Draffehn, Astrid; Krebs, Wolfgang; Quester, Inga; De Nardo, Dominic; Gohel, Trupti D; Emde, Martina; Schmidleithner, Lisa; Ganesan, Hariharasudan; Nino-Castro, Andrea; Mallmann, Michael R; Labzin, Larisa; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Latz, Eicke; Freeman, Tom C; Ulas, Thomas; Schultze, Joachim L

    2014-02-20

    Macrophage activation is associated with profound transcriptional reprogramming. Although much progress has been made in the understanding of macrophage activation, polarization, and function, the transcriptional programs regulating these processes remain poorly characterized. We stimulated human macrophages with diverse activation signals, acquiring a data set of 299 macrophage transcriptomes. Analysis of this data set revealed a spectrum of macrophage activation states extending the current M1 versus M2-polarization model. Network analyses identified central transcriptional regulators associated with all macrophage activation complemented by regulators related to stimulus-specific programs. Applying these transcriptional programs to human alveolar macrophages from smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) revealed an unexpected loss of inflammatory signatures in COPD patients. Finally, by integrating murine data from the ImmGen project we propose a refined, activation-independent core signature for human and murine macrophages. This resource serves as a framework for future research into regulation of macrophage activation in health and disease.

  5. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

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    Anne M. Spain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons.

  6. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Najar, Fares Z.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  7. Electrically active defects in silica-filled epoxy as revealed by light emission analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, E; Teyssedre, G; Laurent, C [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Rowe, S; Robiani, S, E-mail: christian.laurent@laplace.univ-tlse.f [Schneider Electric, Direction des Recherches Materiaux, rue Henri Tarze, F-38050 Grenoble (France)

    2009-08-21

    Epoxy resins have long been used as the insulation of electrical systems. They are generally formulated with a dispersion of micro-fillers to improve thermal and mechanical properties. However, there are concerns about the possible influence of these fillers on the electric behaviour, especially on the long term ageing under functional stresses. At the loose interface between matrix and fillers, macro- and micro-voids in the resin can provide weak points that are difficult to detect using conventional spectroscopy. Light emission analysis from the material under electrical stress is an efficient way to reveal such electrically active defects since internal ionizing events would give rise to photon emission. A detailed analysis of the light emitted by silica-filled and unfilled epoxy samples is presented. The photon counting technique, spectral analysis and imaging give a firm basis to discuss the contributing emission processes to the detected signal. They reveal the existence of ionizing events into internal defects. The sensitivity of the optical method is order of magnitudes higher than the sensitivity of conventional partial discharge detection.

  8. Phylogenomic Analysis Reveals Extensive Phylogenetic Mosaicism in the Human GPCR Superfamily

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    Mathew Woodwark

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel high throughput phylogenomic analysis (HTP was applied to the rhodopsin G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family. Instances of phylogenetic mosaicism between receptors were found to be frequent, often as instances of correlated mosaicism and repeated mosaicism. A null data set was constructed with the same phylogenetic topology as the rhodopsin GPCRs. Comparison of the two data sets revealed that mosaicism was found in GPCRs in a higher frequency than would be expected by homoplasy or the effects of topology alone. Various evolutionary models of differential conservation, recombination and homoplasy are explored which could result in the patterns observed in this analysis. We find that the results are most consistent with frequent recombination events. A complex evolutionary history is illustrated in which it is likely frequent recombination has endowed GPCRs with new functions. The pattern of mosaicism is shown to be informative for functional prediction for orphan receptors. HTP analysis is complementary to conventional phylogenomic analyses revealing mosaicism that would not otherwise have been detectable through conventional phylogenetics.

  9. Multilocus sequence analysis of nectar pseudomonads reveals high genetic diversity and contrasting recombination patterns.

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    Sergio Alvarez-Pérez

    Full Text Available The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas 'sensu stricto' isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD. A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1; P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2; and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3. Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria.

  10. VNTR analysis reveals unexpected genetic diversity within Mycoplasma agalactiae, the main causative agent of contagious agalactia

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    Ayling Roger D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma agalactiae is the main cause of contagious agalactia, a serious disease of sheep and goats, which has major clinical and economic impacts. Previous studies of M. agalactiae have shown it to be unusually homogeneous and there are currently no available epidemiological techniques which enable a high degree of strain differentiation. Results We have developed variable number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis using the sequenced genome of the M. agalactiae type strain PG2. The PG2 genome was found to be replete with tandem repeat sequences and 4 were chosen for further analysis. VNTR 5 was located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170 a predicted lipoprotein. VNTR 14 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG3350 and the hypothetical protein MAG3340. VNTR 17 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG4060 and the hypothetical protein MAG4070 and VNTR 19 spanned the 5' end of the pseudogene for a lipoprotein MAG4310 and the 3' end of the hypothetical lipoprotein MAG4320. We have investigated the genetic diversity of 88 M. agalactiae isolates of wide geographic origin using VNTR analysis and compared it with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. Simpson's index of diversity was calculated to be 0.324 for PFGE and 0.574 for VNTR analysis. VNTR analysis revealed unexpected diversity within M. agalactiae with 9 different VNTR types discovered. Some correlation was found between geographical origin and the VNTR type of the isolates. Conclusion VNTR analysis represents a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. agalactiae for outbreak tracing and control.

  11. Chromosome-specific segmentation revealed by structural analysis of individually isolated chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Kunio; Taima, Akira; Ogasawara, Kiyomoto; Metsugi, Shouichi; Aikawa, Satoko

    2011-04-01

    Analysis of structural rearrangements at the individual chromosomal level is still technologically challenging. Here we optimized a chromosome isolation method using fluorescent marker-assisted laser-capture and laser-beam microdissection and applied it to structural analysis of two aberrant chromosomes found in a lung cancer cell line. A high-density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis of DNA samples prepared from each of the chromosomes revealed that these two chromosomes contained 296 and 263 segments, respectively, ranging from 1.5 kb to 784.3 kb in size, derived from different portions of chromosome 8. Among these segments, 242 were common in both aberrant chromosomes, but 75 were found to be chromosome-specific. Sequences of 263 junction sites connecting the ends of segments were determined using a PCR/Sanger-sequencing procedure. Overlapping microhomologies were found at 169 junction sites. Junction partners came from various portions of chromosome 8 and no biased pattern in the positional distribution of junction partners was detected. These structural characteristics suggested the occurrence of random fragmentation of the entire chromosome 8 followed by random rejoining of these fragments. Based on that, we proposed a model to explain how these aberrant chromosomes are formed. Through these structural analyses, it was demonstrated that the optimized chromosome isolation method described here can provide high-quality chromosomal DNA for high resolution array-CGH analysis and probably for massively parallel sequencing analysis.

  12. Proteomic analysis reveals novel proteins associated with progression and differentiation of colorectal carcinoma

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    Yi Gan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study is to characterize differential proteomic expression among well-differentiation and poor-differentiation colorectal carcinoma tissues and normal mucous epithelium. Materials and Methods: The study is based on quantitative 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by PDquest. Results: Excluding redundancies due to proteolysis and posttranslational modified isoforms of over 600 protein spots, 11 proteins were revealed as regulated with statistical variance being within the 95 th confidence level and were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting in matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Progression-associated proteins belong to the functional complexes of tumorigenesis, proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and the regulation of major histocompatibility complex processing and other functions. Partial but significant overlap was revealed with previous proteomics and transcriptomics studies in CRC. Among various differentiation stage of CRC tissues, we identified calreticulin precursor, MHC class I antigen (human leukocyte antigen A , glutathione S-transferase pi1, keratin 8, heat shock protein 27, tubulin beta chain, triosephosphate, fatty acid-binding protein, hemoglobin (deoxy mutant with val b 1 replaced by met (HBB, and zinc finger protein 312 (FEZF2. Conclusions: Their functional networks were analyzed by Ingenuity systems Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and revealed the potential roles as novel biomarkers for progression in various differentiation stages of CRC.

  13. Analysis of miRNA market trends reveals hotspots of research activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosta, Gary; Razvi, Enal

    2012-04-01

    We have conducted an analysis of the miRNA research marketplace by evaluating the publication trends in the field. In this article, we present the results of our analysis which reveals that hotspots exist in terms of research activities in the miRNA space--these hotspots illustrate the areas in the miRNA research space where specific miRNAs have been extensively studied, and other areas that represent new territory. We frame these data into the context of areas of opportunity for miRNA content harvest versus segments of opportunity for the development of research tools. Also presented in this article are the primary market data from online surveys we have performed with researchers involved in miRNA research around the world. Taken together, these data frame the current state of the miRNA marketplace and provide niches of opportunity for new entrants into this space.

  14. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  15. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  16. A beamformer analysis of MEG data reveals frontal generators of the musically elicited mismatch negativity.

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    Claudia Lappe

    Full Text Available To localize the neural generators of the musically elicited mismatch negativity with high temporal resolution we conducted a beamformer analysis (Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry, SAM on magnetoencephalography (MEG data from a previous musical mismatch study. The stimuli consisted of a six-tone melodic sequence comprising broken chords in C- and G-major. The musical sequence was presented within an oddball paradigm in which the last tone was lowered occasionally (20% by a minor third. The beamforming analysis revealed significant right hemispheric neural activation in the superior temporal (STC, inferior frontal (IFC, superior frontal (SFC and orbitofrontal (OFC cortices within a time window of 100-200 ms after the occurrence of a deviant tone. IFC and SFC activation was also observed in the left hemisphere. The pronounced early right inferior frontal activation of the auditory mismatch negativity has not been shown in MEG studies so far. The activation in STC and IFC is consistent with earlier electroencephalography (EEG, optical imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies that reveal the auditory and inferior frontal cortices as main generators of the auditory MMN. The observed right hemispheric IFC is also in line with some previous music studies showing similar activation patterns after harmonic syntactic violations. The results demonstrate that a deviant tone within a musical sequence recruits immediately a distributed neural network in frontal and prefrontal areas suggesting that top-down processes are involved when expectation violation occurs within well-known stimuli.

  17. Gene set based integrated data analysis reveals phenotypic differences in a brain cancer model.

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    Kjell Petersen

    Full Text Available A key challenge in the data analysis of biological high-throughput experiments is to handle the often low number of samples in the experiments compared to the number of biomolecules that are simultaneously measured. Combining experimental data using independent technologies to illuminate the same biological trends, as well as complementing each other in a larger perspective, is one natural way to overcome this challenge. In this work we investigated if integrating proteomics and transcriptomics data from a brain cancer animal model using gene set based analysis methodology, could enhance the biological interpretation of the data relative to more traditional analysis of the two datasets individually. The brain cancer model used is based on serial passaging of transplanted human brain tumor material (glioblastoma--GBM through several generations in rats. These serial transplantations lead over time to genotypic and phenotypic changes in the tumors and represent a medically relevant model with a rare access to samples and where consequent analyses of individual datasets have revealed relatively few significant findings on their own. We found that the integrated analysis both performed better in terms of significance measure of its findings compared to individual analyses, as well as providing independent verification of the individual results. Thus a better context for overall biological interpretation of the data can be achieved.

  18. Identification of putative insulin-like peptides and components of insulin signaling pathways in parasitic platyhelminths by the use of genome-wide screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Luo, Xuenong; Zhang, Shaohua; Yin, Cai; Dou, Yongxi; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-02-01

    No endogenous insulin-like peptides in parasitic flatworms have been reported. Insulin receptors from flukes and tapeworms have been shown to interact directly with the host-derived insulin molecule, which suggests the exploitation of host-derived insulin. In this study, a strategy of genome-wide searches followed by comprehensive analyses of strictly conserved features of the insulin family was used to demonstrate the presence of putative insulin-like peptides in the genomes of six tapeworms and two flukes. In addition, whole insulin signaling pathways were annotated on a genome-wide scale. Two putative insulin-like peptide genes in each genome of tapeworms and one insulin-like peptide gene in each genome of flukes were identified. The comprehensive analyses revealed that all of these peptides showed the common features shared by other members of the insulin family, and the phylogenetic analysis implied a putative gene duplication event in the Cestoda during the evolution of insulin-like peptide genes. The quantitative expression analysis and immunolocalization results suggested a putative role of these peptides in reproduction. Entire sets of major components of the classic insulin signaling pathway were successfully identified, suggesting that this pathway in parasitic flatworms might also regulate many other important biological activities. We believe that the identification of the insulin-like peptides gives us a better understanding of the insulin signaling pathway in these parasites, as well as host-parasite interactions.

  19. Further insight into reproductive incompatibility between putative cryptic species of the Bemisia tabaci whitefly complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Pan, Li-Long; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), with its global distribution and extensive genetic diversity, is now known to be a complex of over 35 cryptic species. However, a satisfactory resolution of the systematics of this species complex is yet to be achieved. Here, we designed experiments to examine reproductive compatibility among species with different levels of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) divergence. The data show that putative species with mtCOI divergence of >8% between them consistently exhibited complete reproductive isolation. However, two of the putative species, Asia II 9 and Asia II 3, with mtCOI divergence of 4.47% between them, exhibited near complete reproductive compatibility in one direction of their cross, and partial reproductive compatibility in the other direction. Together with some recent reports on this topic from the literature, our data indicates that, while divergence in the mtCOI sequences provides a valid molecular marker for species delimitation in most clades, more genetic markers and more sophisticated molecular phylogeny will be required to achieve adequate delimitation of all species in this whitefly complex. While many attempts have been made to examine the reproductive compatibility among genetic groups of the B. tabaci complex, our study represents the first effort to conduct crossing experiments with putative species that were chosen with considerations of their genetic divergence. In light of the new data, we discuss the best strategy and protocols to conduct further molecular phylogenetic analysis and crossing trials, in order to reveal the overall pattern of reproductive incompatibility among species of this whitefly complex.

  20. Diversity of eukaryotic DNA replication origins revealed by genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Berbenetz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic DNA replication origins differ both in their efficiency and in the characteristic time during S phase when they become active. The biological basis for these differences remains unknown, but they could be a consequence of chromatin structure. The availability of genome-wide maps of nucleosome positions has led to an explosion of information about how nucleosomes are assembled at transcription start sites, but no similar maps exist for DNA replication origins. Here we combine high-resolution genome-wide nucleosome maps with comprehensive annotations of DNA replication origins to identify patterns of nucleosome occupancy at eukaryotic replication origins. On average, replication origins contain a nucleosome depleted region centered next to the ACS element, flanked on both sides by arrays of well-positioned nucleosomes. Our analysis identified DNA sequence properties that correlate with nucleosome occupancy at replication origins genome-wide and that are correlated with the nucleosome-depleted region. Clustering analysis of all annotated replication origins revealed a surprising diversity of nucleosome occupancy patterns. We provide evidence that the origin recognition complex, which binds to the origin, acts as a barrier element to position and phase nucleosomes on both sides of the origin. Finally, analysis of chromatin reconstituted in vitro reveals that origins are inherently nucleosome depleted. Together our data provide a comprehensive, genome-wide view of chromatin structure at replication origins and suggest a model of nucleosome positioning at replication origins in which the underlying sequence occludes nucleosomes to permit binding of the origin recognition complex, which then (likely in concert with nucleosome modifiers and remodelers positions nucleosomes adjacent to the origin to promote replication origin function.

  1. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of KSHV-Infected Cells Reveals Roles of ORF45-Activated RSK during Lytic Replication.

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    Denis Avey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic virus which has adapted unique mechanisms to modulate the cellular microenvironment of its human host. The pathogenesis of KSHV is intimately linked to its manipulation of cellular signaling pathways, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway. We have previously shown that KSHV ORF45 contributes to the sustained activation of both ERK and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK, a major functional mediator of ERK/MAPK signaling during KSHV lytic replication. ORF45-activated RSK is required for optimal KSHV lytic gene expression and progeny virion production, though the underlying mechanisms downstream of this activation are still unclear. We hypothesized that the activation of RSK by ORF45 causes differential phosphorylation of cellular and viral substrates, affecting biological processes essential for efficient KSHV lytic replication. Accordingly, we observed widespread and significant differences in protein phosphorylation upon induction of lytic replication. Mass-spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic screening identified putative substrates of ORF45-activated RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that nuclear proteins, including several transcriptional regulators, were overrepresented among these candidates. We validated the ORF45/RSK-dependent phosphorylation of several putative substrates by employing KSHV BAC mutagenesis, kinase inhibitor treatments, and/or CRISPR-mediated knockout of RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Furthermore, we assessed the consequences of knocking out these substrates on ORF45/RSK-dependent regulation of gene expression and KSHV progeny virion production. Finally, we show data to support that ORF45 regulates the translational efficiency of a subset of viral/cellular genes with complex secondary structure in their 5' UTR. Altogether, these data shed light on the mechanisms by which KSHV ORF45

  2. Analysis of high iron rice lines reveals new miRNAs that target iron transporters in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Datta, Swapan K.; Datta, Karabi

    2016-01-01

    The present study highlights the molecular regulation of iron transport in soyFER1-overexpressing transgenic rice. Accumulation of iron in three different seed developmental stages, milk, dough, and mature, has been examined. The transgenic seeds of the milk stage showed significant augmentation of iron and zinc levels compared with wild-type seeds, and similar results were observed throughout the dough and mature stages. To investigate the regulation of iron transport, the role of miRNAs was studied in roots of transgenic rice. Sequencing of small RNA libraries revealed 153 known and 41 novel miRNAs in roots. Among them, 59 known and 14 novel miRNAs were found to be significantly expressed. miR166, miR399, and miR408 were identified as playing a vital role in iron uptake in roots of transgenic plants . Most importantly, four putative novel miRNAs, namely miR11, miR26, miR30, and miR31, were found to be down-regulated in roots of transgenic plants. For all these four novel miRNAs, natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 4 (NRAMP4), encoding a metal transporter, was predicted as a target gene. It is hypothesized that the NRAMP4 transporter is activated in roots of transgenic plants due to the lower abundance of its corresponding putative novel miRNAs. The relative transcript level of the NRAMP4 transcript was increased from 0.107 in the wild type to 65.24 and 55.39 in transgenic plants, which demonstrates the elevated amount of iron transport in transgenic plants. In addition, up-regulation of OsYSL15, OsFRO2, and OsIRT1 in roots also facilitates iron loading in transgenic seeds. PMID:27729476

  3. Putative melatonin receptors in a human biological clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, S.M.; Weaver, D.R.; Rivkees, S.A.; Stopa, E.G.

    1988-10-07

    In vitro autoradiography with /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin was used to examine melatonin binding sites in human hypothalamus. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was localized to the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a putative biological clock, and was not apparent in other hypothalamic regions. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was consistently found in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalami from adults and fetuses. Densitometric analysis of competition experiments with varying concentrations of melatonin showed monophasic competition curves, with comparable half-maximal inhibition values for the suprachiasmatic nuclei of adults (150 picomolar) and fetuses (110 picomolar). Micromolar concentrations of the melatonin agonist 6-chloromelatonin completely inhibited specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding, whereas the same concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine caused only a partial reduction in specific binding. The results suggest that putative melatonin receptors are located in a human biological clock.

  4. In-source formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), the putatively toxic acetaminophen (paracetamol) metabolite, after derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl bromide and GC-ECNICI-MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Trettin, Arne; Zörner, Alexander A; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias

    2011-05-15

    Pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) bromide (PFB-Br) is a versatile derivatization reagent for numerous classes of compounds. Under electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization (ECNICI) conditions PFB derivatives of acidic compounds readily and abundantly ionize to produce intense anions due to [M-PFB](-). In the present article we investigated the PFB-Br derivatization of unlabelled acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, NAPAP-d(0); paracetamol; MW 151) and tetradeuterated acetaminophen (NAPAP-d(4); MW 155) in anhydrous acetonitrile and their GC-ECNICI-MS behavior using methane as the buffer gas. In addition to the expected anions [M-PFB](-) at m/z 150 from NAPAP-d(0) and m/z 154 from NAPAP-d(4), we observed highly reproducibly almost equally intense anions at m/z 149 and m/z 153, respectively. Selected ion monitoring of these ions is suitable for specific and sensitive quantification of acetaminophen in human plasma and urine. Detailed investigations suggest in-source formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI; MW 149), the putatively toxic acetaminophen metabolite, from the PFB ether derivative of NAPAP. GC-ECNICI-MS of non-derivatized NAPAP did not produce NAPQI. The peak area ratio of m/z 149 to m/z 150 and of m/z 153 to m/z 154 decreased with increasing ion-source temperature in the range 100-250°C. Most likely, NAPQI formed in the ion-source captures secondary electrons to become negatively charged (i.e., [NAPQI](-)) and thus detectable. Formation of NAPQI was not observed under electron ionization (EI) conditions, i.e., by GC-EI-MS, from derivatized and non-derivatized NAPAP. NAPQI was not detectable in flow injection analysis LC-MS of native NAPAP in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode, whereas in negative ESI mode low extent NAPQI formation was observed (ion-sources of mass spectrometers may form intermediates that are produced from activated drugs in enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

  5. Dynamic functional connectivity analysis reveals transient states of dysconnectivity in schizophrenia

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    E. Damaraju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder characterized by functional dysconnectivity or abnormal integration between distant brain regions. Recent functional imaging studies have implicated large-scale thalamo-cortical connectivity as being disrupted in patients. However, observed connectivity differences in schizophrenia have been inconsistent between studies, with reports of hyperconnectivity and hypoconnectivity between the same brain regions. Using resting state eyes-closed functional imaging and independent component analysis on a multi-site data that included 151 schizophrenia patients and 163 age- and gender matched healthy controls, we decomposed the functional brain data into 100 components and identified 47 as functionally relevant intrinsic connectivity networks. We subsequently evaluated group differences in functional network connectivity, both in a static sense, computed as the pairwise Pearson correlations between the full network time courses (5.4 minutes in length, and a dynamic sense, computed using sliding windows (44 s in length and k-means clustering to characterize five discrete functional connectivity states. Static connectivity analysis revealed that compared to healthy controls, patients show significantly stronger connectivity, i.e., hyperconnectivity, between the thalamus and sensory networks (auditory, motor and visual, as well as reduced connectivity (hypoconnectivity between sensory networks from all modalities. Dynamic analysis suggests that (1, on average, schizophrenia patients spend much less time than healthy controls in states typified by strong, large-scale connectivity, and (2, that abnormal connectivity patterns are more pronounced during these connectivity states. In particular, states exhibiting cortical–subcortical antagonism (anti-correlations and strong positive connectivity between sensory networks are those that show the group differences of thalamic hyperconnectivity and sensory hypoconnectivity

  6. Whole-genome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette transporter family genes in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 "full-size," 41 "half-size," and 15 "soluble" putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog) and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein). We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera.

  7. Whole-genome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette transporter family genes in Vitis vinifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birsen Çakır

    Full Text Available The ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 "full-size," 41 "half-size," and 15 "soluble" putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera.

  8. Rapid genome evolution in Pms1 region of rice revealed by comparative sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU JinSheng; FAN YouRong; LIU Nan; SHAN Yan; LI XiangHua; ZHANG QiFa

    2007-01-01

    Pms1, a locus for photoperiod sensitive genic male sterility in rice, was identified and mapped to chromosome 7 in previous studies. Here we report an effort to identify the candidate genes for Pms1 by comparative sequencing of BAC clones from two cultivars Minghui 63 and Nongken 58, the parents for the initial mapping population. Annotation and comparison of the sequences of the two clones resulted in a total of five potential candidates which should be functionally tested. We also conducted comparative analysis of sequences of these two cultivars with two other cultivars, Nipponbare and 93-11,for which sequence data were available in public databases. The analysis revealed large differences in sequence composition among the four genotypes in the Pms1 region primarily due to retroelement activity leading to rapid recent growth and divergence of the genomes. High levels of polymorphism in the forms of indels and SNPs were found both in intra- and inter-subspecific comparisons. Dating analysis using LTRs of the retroelements in this region showed that the substitution rate of LTRs was much higher than reported in the literature. The results provided strong evidence for rapid genomic evolution of this region as a consequence of natural and artificial selection.

  9. Potential microRNA-mediated oncogenic intercellular communication revealed by pan-cancer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2014-11-01

    Carcinogenesis consists of oncogenesis and metastasis, and intriguingly microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in both processes. Although aberrant miRNA activities are prevalent in diverse tumor types, the exact mechanisms for how they regulate cancerous processes are not always clear. To this end, we performed a large-scale pan-cancer analysis via a novel probabilistic approach to infer recurrent miRNA-target interactions implicated in 12 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We discovered ~20,000 recurrent miRNA regulations, which are enriched for cancer-related miRNAs/genes. Notably, miRNA 200 family (miR-200/141/429) is among the most prominent miRNA regulators, which is known to be involved in metastasis. Importantly, the recurrent miRNA regulatory network is not only enriched for cancer pathways but also for extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and ECM-receptor interactions. The results suggest an intriguing cancer mechanism involving miRNA-mediated cell-to-cell communication, which possibly involves delivery of tumorigenic miRNA messengers to adjacent cells via exosomes. Finally, survival analysis revealed 414 recurrent-prognostic associations, where both gene and miRNA involved in each interaction conferred significant prognostic power in one or more cancer types. Together, our comprehensive pan-cancer analysis provided not only biological insights into metastasis but also brought to bear the clinical relevance of the proposed recurrent miRNA-gene associations.

  10. Integrated systems analysis reveals a molecular network underlying autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Shi, Minyi; Ma, Zhihai; Zhao, Shuchun; Euskirchen, Ghia; Ziskin, Jennifer; Urban, Alexander; Hallmayer, Joachim; Snyder, Michael

    2014-12-30

    Autism is a complex disease whose etiology remains elusive. We integrated previously and newly generated data and developed a systems framework involving the interactome, gene expression and genome sequencing to identify a protein interaction module with members strongly enriched for autism candidate genes. Sequencing of 25 patients confirmed the involvement of this module in autism, which was subsequently validated using an independent cohort of over 500 patients. Expression of this module was dichotomized with a ubiquitously expressed subcomponent and another subcomponent preferentially expressed in the corpus callosum, which was significantly affected by our identified mutations in the network center. RNA-sequencing of the corpus callosum from patients with autism exhibited extensive gene mis-expression in this module, and our immunochemical analysis showed that the human corpus callosum is predominantly populated by oligodendrocyte cells. Analysis of functional genomic data further revealed a significant involvement of this module in the development of oligodendrocyte cells in mouse brain. Our analysis delineates a natural network involved in autism, helps uncover novel candidate genes for this disease and improves our understanding of its molecular pathology.

  11. Comprehensive DNA Adduct Analysis Reveals Pulmonary Inflammatory Response Contributes to Genotoxic Action of Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousuke Ishino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized-magnetite (MGT is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields; however, its toxicological properties are not well documented. In our previous report, MGT showed genotoxicity in both in vitro and in vivo assay systems, and it was suggested that inflammatory responses exist behind the genotoxicity. To further clarify mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity, a comprehensive DNA adduct (DNA adductome analysis was conducted using DNA samples derived from the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. In total, 30 and 42 types of DNA adducts were detected in the vehicle control and MGT-treated groups, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA against a subset of DNA adducts was applied and several adducts, which are deduced to be formed by inflammation or oxidative stress, as the case of etheno-deoxycytidine (εdC, revealed higher contributions to MGT exposure. By quantitative-LC-MS/MS analysis, εdC levels were significantly higher in MGT-treated mice than those of the vehicle control. Taken together with our previous data, it is suggested that inflammatory responses might be involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice.

  12. Genomic and physiological analysis reveals versatile metabolic capacity of deep-sea Photobacterium phosphoreum ANT-2200.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng-Da; Santini, Claire-Lise; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Barbe, Valérie; Mangenot, Sophie; Guyomar, Charlotte; Garel, Marc; Chen, Hai-Tao; Li, Xue-Gong; Yin, Qun-Jian; Zhao, Yuan; Armengaud, Jean; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Martini, Séverine; Pradel, Nathalie; Vidaud, Claude; Alberto, François; Médigue, Claudine; Tamburini, Christian; Wu, Long-Fei

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria of the genus Photobacterium thrive worldwide in oceans and show substantial eco-physiological diversity including free-living, symbiotic and piezophilic life styles. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are poorly understood. Here we carried out genomic and physiological analysis of Photobacterium phosphoreum strain ANT-2200, the first deep-sea luminous bacterium of which the genome has been sequenced. Using optical mapping we updated the genomic data and reassembled it into two chromosomes and a large plasmid. Genomic analysis revealed a versatile energy metabolic potential and physiological analysis confirmed its growth capacity by deriving energy from fermentation of glucose or maltose, by respiration with formate as electron donor and trimethlyamine N-oxide (TMAO), nitrate or fumarate as electron acceptors, or by chemo-organo-heterotrophic growth in rich media. Despite that it was isolated at a site with saturated dissolved oxygen, the ANT-2200 strain possesses four gene clusters coding for typical anaerobic enzymes, the TMAO reductases. Elevated hydrostatic pressure enhances the TMAO reductase activity, mainly due to the increase of isoenzyme TorA1. The high copy number of the TMAO reductase isoenzymes and pressure-enhanced activity might imply a strategy developed by bacteria to adapt to deep-sea habitats where the instant TMAO availability may increase with depth.

  13. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  14. Comparative Analysis of 35 Basidiomycete Genomes Reveals Diversity and Uniqueness of the Phylum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Otillar, Robert; Fagnan, Kirsten; Boussau, Bastien; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Held, Benjamin; Nagy, Laszlo; Floudas, Dimitris; Morin, Emmanuelle; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Martin, Francis; Blanchette, Robert; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprobes including wood decaying fungi. To better understand the diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycete fungi including 6 newly sequenced genomes. The genomes of basidiomycetes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. A phylogenetic tree of Basidiomycota was generated using the Phyldog software, which uses all available protein sequence data to simultaneously infer gene and species trees. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) comprising proteins found in only one organism. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay among the members of Agaricomycotina subphylum. There is a correlation of the profile of certain gene families to nutritional mode in Agaricomycotina. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of such profiles, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has liginolytic class II fungal peroxidases. Furthermore, we find that both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics in growth assays. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the high value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  15. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysine ubiquitylation reveals promiscuity at site level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Jannie M R; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Bekker-Jensen, Simon;

    2011-01-01

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to proteins regulates numerous processes in eukaryotic cells. Here we report the identification of 753 unique lysine ubiquitylation sites on 471 proteins using higher-energy collisional dissociation on the LTQ Orbitrap Velos. In total 5756 putative ubiquitin...... substrates were identified. Lysine residues targeted by the ubiquitin-ligase system show no unique sequence feature. Surface accessible lysine residues located in ordered secondary regions, surrounded by smaller and positively charged amino acids are preferred sites of ubiquitylation. Lysine ubiquitylation...

  16. Comparative molecular field analysis using selectivity fields reveals residues in the third transmembrane helix of the serotonin transporter associated with substrate and antagonist recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walline, Crystal C; Nichols, David E; Carroll, F Ivy; Barker, Eric L

    2008-06-01

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) regulates the spatial and temporal actions of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission by removing 5-HT from the synapse. Previous studies have identified residues in the third transmembrane helix (TMH) that may be important for substrate translocation or antagonist recognition. We identified hSERT residues in TMH III that are divergent from Drosophila SERT and used species-scanning mutagenesis to generate reciprocal mutants. Transport inhibition assays suggest that the potency of substituted amphetamines was decreased for the hSERT mutants A169D, I172M, and S174M. In addition, there was a loss of potency for several antidepressants and 3-phenyltropane analogs for the I172M mutant. These results suggest that residues in TMH III may contribute to antagonist recognition. We carried out comparative molecular field analyses using selectivity fields to directly visualize the mutation-induced effects of antagonist potency for antidepressants, 3-phenyltropane analogs, and amphetamines. The hSERT I172M selectivity field analysis for the 3-phenyltropane analogs revealed that electrostatic interactions resulted in decreased potency. The amphetamine and antidepressant selectivity field analyses reveal the observed decreases in potencies for the hSERT I172M mutant are due to a change in tertiary structure of the hSERT protein and are not due to disruption of a direct binding site. Finally, the hSERT mutant A169D displayed altered kinetics for sodium binding, indicating that this residue may lie near the putative sodium binding site. A SERT homology model developed from the Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter structure provides a structural context for further interpreting the results of the TMH III mutations.

  17. A novel meta-analysis approach of cancer transcriptomes reveals prevailing transcriptional networks in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niida, Atsushi; Imoto, Seiya; Nagasaki, Masao; Yamaguchi, Rui; Miyano, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Although microarray technology has revealed transcriptomic diversities underlining various cancer phenotypes, transcriptional programs controlling them have not been well elucidated. To decode transcriptional programs governing cancer transcriptomes, we have recently developed a computational method termed EEM, which searches for expression modules from prescribed gene sets defined by prior biological knowledge like TF binding motifs. In this paper, we extend our EEM approach to predict cancer transcriptional networks. Starting from functional TF binding motifs and expression modules identified by EEM, we predict cancer transcriptional networks containing regulatory TFs, associated GO terms, and interactions between TF binding motifs. To systematically analyze transcriptional programs in broad types of cancer, we applied our EEM-based network prediction method to 122 microarray datasets collected from public databases. The data sets contain about 15000 experiments for tumor samples of various tissue origins including breast, colon, lung etc. This EEM based meta-analysis successfully revealed a prevailing cancer transcriptional network which functions in a large fraction of cancer transcriptomes; they include cell-cycle and immune related sub-networks. This study demonstrates broad applicability of EEM, and opens a way to comprehensive understanding of transcriptional networks in cancer cells.

  18. Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA) Reveals Context Related Influence of Brain Network Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Yael; Winetraub, Yonatan; Raz, Gal; Ben-Simon, Eti; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Hendler, Talma; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-01-01

    Communication between and within brain regions is essential for information processing within functional networks. The current methods to determine the influence of one region on another are either based on temporal resolution, or require a predefined model for the connectivity direction. However these requirements are not always achieved, especially in fMRI studies, which have poor temporal resolution. We thus propose a new graph theory approach that focuses on the correlation influence between selected brain regions, entitled Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA). Partial correlations are used to quantify the level of influence of each node during task performance. As a proof of concept, we conducted the DEPNA on simulated datasets and on two empirical motor and working memory fMRI tasks. The simulations revealed that the DEPNA correctly captures the network’s hierarchy of influence. Applying DEPNA to the functional tasks reveals the dynamics between specific nodes as would be expected from prior knowledge. To conclude, we demonstrate that DEPNA can capture the most influencing nodes in the network, as they emerge during specific cognitive processes. This ability opens a new horizon for example in delineating critical nodes for specific clinical interventions. PMID:27271458

  19. Transcriptome analysis in tardigrade species reveals specific molecular pathways for stress adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Frank; Beisser, Daniela; Grohme, Markus A; Liang, Chunguang; Mali, Brahim; Siegl, Alexander Matthias; Engelmann, Julia C; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Schokraie, Elham; Müller, Tobias; Schnölzer, Martina; Schill, Ralph O; Frohme, Marcus; Dandekar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Hypsibius dujardini, revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardigrade Workbench along with software and databank updates. Our analysis reveals that RNA stability motifs for M. tardigradum are different from typical motifs known from higher animals. M. tardigradum and H. dujardini protein clusters and conserved domains imply metabolic storage pathways for glycogen, glycolipids and specific secondary metabolism as well as stress response pathways (including heat shock proteins, bmh2, and specific repair pathways). Redox-, DNA-, stress- and protein protection pathways complement specific repair capabilities to achieve the strong robustness of M. tardigradum. These pathways are partly conserved in other animals and their manipulation could boost stress adaptation even in human cells. However, the unique combination of resistance and repair pathways make tardigrades and M. tardigradum in particular so highly stress resistant.

  20. Stable isotope analysis of vertebrae reveals ontogenetic changes in habitat in an endothermic pelagic shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Aaron B; Goldman, Kenneth J; Litvin, Steven Y; Madigan, Daniel J; Bigman, Jennifer S; Swithenbank, Alan M; Kline, Thomas C; Block, Barbara A

    2015-01-22

    Ontogenetic changes in habitat are driven by shifting life-history requirements and play an important role in population dynamics. However, large portions of the life history of many pelagic species are still poorly understood or unknown. We used a novel combination of stable isotope analysis of vertebral annuli, Bayesian mixing models, isoscapes and electronic tag data to reconstruct ontogenetic patterns of habitat and resource use in a pelagic apex predator, the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis). Results identified the North Pacific Transition Zone as the major nursery area for salmon sharks and revealed an ontogenetic shift around the age of maturity from oceanic to increased use of neritic habitats. The nursery habitat may reflect trade-offs between prey availability, predation pressure and thermal constraints on juvenile endothermic sharks. The ontogenetic shift in habitat coincided with a reduction of isotopic niche, possibly reflecting specialization upon particular prey or habitats. Using tagging data to inform Bayesian isotopic mixing models revealed that adult sharks primarily use neritic habitats of Alaska yet receive a trophic subsidy from oceanic habitats. Integrating the multiple methods used here provides a powerful approach to retrospectively study the ecology and life history of migratory species throughout their ontogeny.

  1. Precursors of stall and surge processes in gas turbines revealed by wavelet analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremin, I.M.; Ivanov, O.V.; Nechitailo, V.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Furletov, V.I. [Central Institute for Aviation Motors, Moscow (Russian Federation); Terziev, V.G. [TEKO, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-06-01

    Multiresolution wavelet analysis of pressure variations in a gas turbine compressor reveals the existence of precursors of stall and surge processes. Signals from eight pressure sensors positioned at various places within the compressor were recorded and digitized in three different operating modes in stationary conditions with a recording interval of 1 ms during 5-6 s. It has been discovered that there exists a scale of 32 intervals over which the dispersion (variance) of the wavelet coefficients shows a remarkable drop of about 40% for more than 1 s prior to the development of the malfunction. A shuffled sample of the same values of the pressure does not show such a drop demonstrating the dynamical origin of this effect. Higher order correlation moments reveal different slopes in these two regions differing by the variance values. The log-log dependence of the moments does not show clear fractal behavior because the scales of 16 and 32 intervals are not on the straight line of monofractals. This is a clear indication of the nonlinear response of the system at this scale. These results provide a means for automatic regulation of an engine, preventing possible failures. (author)

  2. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings. PMID:27687249

  3. Conformational Dynamics of apo-GlnBP Revealed by Experimental and Computational Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Yitao

    2016-10-13

    The glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) binds l-glutamine and cooperates with its cognate transporters during glutamine uptake. Crystal structure analysis has revealed an open and a closed conformation for apo- and holo-GlnBP, respectively. However, the detailed conformational dynamics have remained unclear. Herein, we combined NMR spectroscopy, MD simulations, and single-molecule FRET techniques to decipher the conformational dynamics of apo-GlnBP. The NMR residual dipolar couplings of apo-GlnBP were in good agreement with a MD-derived structure ensemble consisting of four metastable states. The open and closed conformations are the two major states. This four-state model was further validated by smFRET experiments and suggests the conformational selection mechanism in ligand recognition of GlnBP. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  4. Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011 genome analysis reveals clues for colonization of the insect gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bottacini

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria are known as anaerobic/microaerophilic and fermentative microorganisms, which commonly inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of various animals and insects. Analysis of the 2,167,301 bp genome of Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011, a strain isolated from the hindgut of Apis mellifera var. ligustica, commonly known as the honey bee, revealed its predicted capability for respiratory metabolism. Conservation of the latter gene clusters in various B. asteroides strains enforces the notion that respiration is a common metabolic feature of this ancient bifidobacterial species, which has been lost in currently known mammal-derived Bifidobacterium species. In fact, phylogenomic based analyses suggested an ancient origin of B. asteroides and indicates it as an ancestor of the genus Bifidobacterium. Furthermore, the B. asteroides PRL2011 genome encodes various enzymes for coping with toxic products that arise as a result of oxygen-mediated respiration.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brown Adipose Tissue Reveals Utilization of Coupled and Uncoupled Energy Expenditure Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sebastian; Balaz, Miroslav; Stefanicka, Patrik; Varga, Lukas; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ukropec, Jozef; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-07-15

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become an attractive target to combat the current epidemical spread of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Currently, information on its functional role is primarily derived from rodent studies. Here, we present the first comparative proteotype analysis of primary human brown adipose tissue versus adjacent white adipose tissue, which reveals significant quantitative differences in protein abundances and in turn differential functional capabilities. The majority of the 318 proteins with increased abundance in BAT are associated with mitochondrial metabolism and confirm the increased oxidative capacity. In addition to uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), the main functional effector for uncoupled respiration, we also detected the mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1A/B, CKMT2), as effective modulators of ATP synthase coupled respiration, to be exclusively expressed in BAT. The abundant expression and utilization of both energy expenditure pathways in parallel highlights the complex functional involvement of BAT in human physiology.

  6. Multiplatform analysis of 12 cancer types reveals molecular classification within and across tissues of origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoadley, Katherine A; Yau, Christina; Wolf, Denise M

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic analyses of pathologically defined tumor types identify "within-a-tissue" disease subtypes. However, the extent to which genomic signatures are shared across tissues is still unclear. We performed an integrative analysis using five genome-wide platforms and one proteomic platform...... on 3,527 specimens from 12 cancer types, revealing a unified classification into 11 major subtypes. Five subtypes were nearly identical to their tissue-of-origin counterparts, but several distinct cancer types were found to converge into common subtypes. Lung squamous, head and neck, and a subset...... of bladder cancers coalesced into one subtype typified by TP53 alterations, TP63 amplifications, and high expression of immune and proliferation pathway genes. Of note, bladder cancers split into three pan-cancer subtypes. The multiplatform classification, while correlated with tissue-of-origin, provides...

  7. Anomalous dispersion of Lagrangian particles in local regions of turbulent flows revealed by convex hull analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, J; Mueller, W -C; Chapman, S C; Watkins, N W

    2014-01-01

    Local regions of anomalous particle dispersion, and intermittent events that occur in turbulent flows can greatly influence the global statistical description of the flow. These local behaviors can be identified and analyzed by comparing the growth of neighboring convex hulls of Lagrangian tracer particles. Although in our simulations of homogeneous turbulence the convex hulls generally grow in size, after the Lagrangian particles that define the convex hulls begin to disperse, our analysis reveals short periods when the convex hulls of the Lagrangian particles shrink, evidence that particles are not dispersing simply. Shrinkage can be associated with anisotropic flows, since it occurs most frequently in the presence of a mean magnetic field or thermal convection. We compare dispersion between a wide range of statistically homogeneous and stationary turbulent flows ranging from homogeneous isotropic Navier-Stokes turbulence over different configurations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and Boussinesq convect...

  8. Network-based diffusion analysis reveals cultural transmission of lobtail feeding in humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jenny; Weinrich, Mason; Hoppitt, Will; Rendell, Luke

    2013-04-26

    We used network-based diffusion analysis to reveal the cultural spread of a naturally occurring foraging innovation, lobtail feeding, through a population of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) over a period of 27 years. Support for models with a social transmission component was 6 to 23 orders of magnitude greater than for models without. The spatial and temporal distribution of sand lance, a prey species, was also important in predicting the rate of acquisition. Our results, coupled with existing knowledge about song traditions, show that this species can maintain multiple independently evolving traditions in its populations. These insights strengthen the case that cetaceans represent a peak in the evolution of nonhuman culture, independent of the primate lineage.

  9. Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011 genome analysis reveals clues for colonization of the insect gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottacini, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca; Sánchez, Borja; Foroni, Elena; Duranti, Sabrina; Serafini, Fausta; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are known as anaerobic/microaerophilic and fermentative microorganisms, which commonly inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of various animals and insects. Analysis of the 2,167,301 bp genome of Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011, a strain isolated from the hindgut of Apis mellifera var. ligustica, commonly known as the honey bee, revealed its predicted capability for respiratory metabolism. Conservation of the latter gene clusters in various B. asteroides strains enforces the notion that respiration is a common metabolic feature of this ancient bifidobacterial species, which has been lost in currently known mammal-derived Bifidobacterium species. In fact, phylogenomic based analyses suggested an ancient origin of B. asteroides and indicates it as an ancestor of the genus Bifidobacterium. Furthermore, the B. asteroides PRL2011 genome encodes various enzymes for coping with toxic products that arise as a result of oxygen-mediated respiration.

  10. Male-biased genes in catfish as revealed by RNA-Seq analysis of the testis transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanyue Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Catfish has a male-heterogametic (XY sex determination system, but genes involved in gonadogenesis, spermatogenesis, testicular determination, and sex determination are poorly understood. As a first step of understanding the transcriptome of the testis, here, we conducted RNA-Seq analysis using high throughput Illumina sequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 269.6 million high quality reads were assembled into 193,462 contigs with a N50 length of 806 bp. Of these contigs, 67,923 contigs had hits to a set of 25,307 unigenes, including 167 unique genes that had not been previously identified in catfish. A meta-analysis of expressed genes in the testis and in the gynogen (double haploid female allowed the identification of 5,450 genes that are preferentially expressed in the testis, providing a pool of putative male-biased genes. Gene ontology and annotation analysis suggested that many of these male-biased genes were involved in gonadogenesis, spermatogenesis, testicular determination, gametogenesis, gonad differentiation, and possibly sex determination. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the first transcriptome-level analysis of the catfish testis. Our analysis would lay the basis for sequential follow-up studies of genes involved in sex determination and differentiation in catfish.

  11. Male-Biased Genes in Catfish as Revealed by RNA-Seq Analysis of the Testis Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fanyue; Liu, Shikai; Gao, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Yanliang; Perera, Dayan; Wang, Xiuli; Li, Chao; Sun, Luyang; Zhang, Jiaren; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Catfish has a male-heterogametic (XY) sex determination system, but genes involved in gonadogenesis, spermatogenesis, testicular determination, and sex determination are poorly understood. As a first step of understanding the transcriptome of the testis, here, we conducted RNA-Seq analysis using high throughput Illumina sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 269.6 million high quality reads were assembled into 193,462 contigs with a N50 length of 806 bp. Of these contigs, 67,923 contigs had hits to a set of 25,307 unigenes, including 167 unique genes that had not been previously identified in catfish. A meta-analysis of expressed genes in the testis and in the gynogen (double haploid female) allowed the identification of 5,450 genes that are preferentially expressed in the testis, providing a pool of putative male-biased genes. Gene ontology and annotation analysis suggested that many of these male-biased genes were involved in gonadogenesis, spermatogenesis, testicular determination, gametogenesis, gonad differentiation, and possibly sex determination. Conclusion/Significance We provide the first transcriptome-level analysis of the catfish testis. Our analysis would lay the basis for sequential follow-up studies of genes involved in sex determination and differentiation in catfish. PMID:23874634

  12. Metabolomic analysis reveals metabolic disturbance in the cortex and hippocampus of subchronic MK-801 treated rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although a number of proteins and genes relevant to schizophrenia have been identified in recent years, few are known about the exact metabolic pathway involved in this disease. Our previous proteomic study has revealed the energy metabolism abnormality in subchronic MK-801 treated rat, a well-established animal model for schizophrenia. This prompted us to further investigate metabolite levels in the same rat model to better delineate the metabolism dysfunctions and provide insights into the pathology of schizophrenia. METHODS: Metabolomics, a high-throughput investigatory strategy developed in recent years, can offer comprehensive metabolite-level insights that complement protein and genetic findings. In this study, we employed a nondestructive metabolomic approach (1H-MAS-NMR to investigate the metabolic traits in cortex and hippocampus of MK-801 treated rats. Multivariate statistics and ingenuity pathways analyses (IPA were applied in data processing. The result was further integrated with our previous proteomic findings by IPA analysis to obtain a systematic view on our observations. RESULTS: Clear distinctions between the MK-801 treated group and the control group in both cortex and hippocampus were found by OPLS-DA models (with R(2X = 0.441, Q(2Y = 0.413 and R(2X = 0.698, Q(2Y = 0.677, respectively. The change of a series of metabolites accounted for the separation, such as glutamate, glutamine, citrate and succinate. Most of these metabolites fell in a pathway characterized by down-regulated glutamate synthesis and disturbed Krebs cycle. IPA analysis further confirmed the involvement of energy metabolism abnormality induced by MK-801 treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our metabolomics findings reveal systematic changes in pathways of glutamate metabolism and Krebs cycle in the MK-801 treated rats' cortex and hippocampus, which confirmed and improved our previous proteomic observation and served as a valuable reference to

  13. Cluster analysis reveals a binary effect of storage on boar sperm motility function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Heiko; Petrunkina, Anna M; Harrison, Robin A P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-06-01

    Storage of liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa is associated with a loss of fertilising ability of the preserved spermatozoa, which standard semen parameters barely reflect. Monitoring responses to molecular effectors of sperm function (e.g. bicarbonate) has proven to be a more sensitive approach to investigating storage effects. Bicarbonate not only initiates capacitation in spermatozoa, but also induces motility activation. This occurs at ejaculation, but also happens throughout passage through the oviduct. In the present study we tested whether the specific response of boar sperm subpopulations to bicarbonate, as assessed by motility activation, is altered with the duration of storage in vitro. Three ejaculates from each of seven boars were diluted in Beltsville thawing solution and stored at 17°C. Only minor changes in the parameters of diluted semen were revealed over a period of 72h storage. For assessment of bicarbonate responses, subsamples of diluted spermatozoa were centrifuged through a discontinuous Percoll gradient after 12, 24 and 72h storage. Subsequently, spermatozoa were incubated in two Ca2+-free variants of Tyrode's medium either without (TyrControl) or with (TyrBic) 15mM bicarbonate, and computer-aided sperm analysis motility measurements were made. Cluster analysis of imaging data from motile spermatozoa revealed the presence of five major sperm subpopulations with distinct motility characteristics, differing between TyrBic and TyrControl at any given time (Psperm motility function descriptors to storage: although the quantitative descriptor (percentage of motile spermatozoa) declines in washed semen samples, the qualitative descriptor (percentage of spermatozoa stimulated into fast linear motion by bicarbonate) is sustained independent of the duration of storage.

  14. Partial sequencing of the bottle gourd genome reveals markers useful for phylogenetic analysis and breeding

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    Wang Sha

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bottle gourd [Lagenaria siceraria (Mol. Standl.] is an important cucurbit crop worldwide. Archaeological research indicates that bottle gourd was domesticated more than 10,000 years ago, making it one of the earliest plants cultivated by man. In spite of its widespread importance and long history of cultivation almost nothing has been known about the genome of this species thus far. Results We report here the partial sequencing of bottle gourd genome using the 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. A total of 150,253 sequence reads, which were assembled into 3,994 contigs and 82,522 singletons were generated. The total length of the non-redundant singletons/assemblies is 32 Mb, theoretically covering ~ 10% of the bottle gourd genome. Functional annotation of the sequences revealed a broad range of functional types, covering all the three top-level ontologies. Comparison of the gene sequences between bottle gourd and the model cucurbit cucumber (Cucumis sativus revealed a 90% sequence similarity on average. Using the sequence information, 4395 microsatellite-containing sequences were identified and 400 SSR markers were developed, of which 94% amplified bands of anticipated sizes. Transferability of these markers to four other cucurbit species showed obvious decline with increasing phylogenetic distance. From analyzing polymorphisms of a subset of 14 SSR markers assayed on 44 representative China bottle gourd varieties/landraces, a principal coordinates (PCo analysis output and a UPGMA-based dendrogram were constructed. Bottle gourd accessions tended to group by fruit shape rather than geographic origin, although in certain subclades the lines from the same or close origin did tend to cluster. Conclusions This work provides an initial basis for genome characterization, gene isolation and comparative genomics analysis in bottle gourd. The SSR markers developed would facilitate marker assisted breeding schemes for efficient

  15. Systematic Identification, Evolution and Expression Analysis of the Zea mays PHT1 Gene Family Reveals Several New Members Involved in Root Colonization by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Phosphate Transporter1 (PHT1 family of genes plays pivotal roles in the uptake of inorganic phosphate from soils. However, there is no comprehensive report on the PHT1 family in Zea mays based on the whole genome. In the present study, a total of 13 putative PHT1 genes (ZmPHT1;1 to 13 were identified in the inbred line B73 genome by bioinformatics methods. Then, their function was investigated by a yeast PHO84 mutant complementary experiment and qRT-PCR. Thirteen ZmPHT1 genes distributed on six chromosomes (1, 2, 5, 7, 8 and 10 were divided into two paralogues (Class A and Class B. ZmPHT1;1/ZmPHT1;9 and ZmPHT1;9/ZmPHT1;13 are produced from recent segmental duplication events. ZmPHT1;1/ZmPHT1;13 and ZmPHT1;8/ZmPHT1;10 are produced from early segmental duplication events. All 13 putative ZmPHT1s can completely or partly complement the yeast Pi-uptake mutant, and they were obviously induced in maize under low Pi conditions, except for ZmPHT1;1 (p < 0.01, indicating that the overwhelming majority of ZmPHT1 genes can respond to a low Pi condition. ZmPHT1;2, ZmPHT1;4, ZmPHT1;6, ZmPHT1;7, ZmPHT1;9 and ZmPHT1;11 were up-regulated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, implying that these genes might participate in mediating Pi absorption and/or transport. Analysis of the promoters revealed that the MYCS and P1BS element are widely distributed on the region of different AMF-inducible ZmPHT1 promoters. In light of the above results, five of 13 ZmPHT1 genes were newly-identified AMF-inducible high-affinity phosphate transporters in the maize genome. Our results will lay a foundation for better understanding the PHT1 family evolution and the molecular mechanisms of inorganic phosphate transport under AMF inoculation.

  16. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals similarities and dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains response to nitrogen availability.

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    Catarina Barbosa

    Full Text Available Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23, under low (67 mg/L and high nitrogen (670 mg/L regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12 h, 24 h and 96 h. Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12 h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this

  17. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, Domenico F; Abuin, David S; Tauber, Gabriel A; Pham, Andrew T; Pearson, Chad G

    2015-12-23

    Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs.

  18. Pre-2014 mudslides at Oso revealed by InSAR and multi-source DEM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; QU, F.

    2014-12-01

    The landslide is a process that results in the downward and outward movement of slope-reshaping materials including rocks and soils and annually causes the loss of approximately $3.5 billion and tens of casualties in the United States. The 2014 Oso mudslide was an extreme event costing nearly 40 deaths and damaging civilian properties. Landslides are often unpredictable, but in many cases, catastrophic events are repetitive. Historic record in the Oso mudslide site indicates that there have been serial events in decades, though the extent of sliding events varied from time to time. In our study, the combination of multi-source DEMs, InSAR, and time-series InSAR analysis has enabled to characterize the Oso mudslide. InSAR results from ALOS PALSAR show that there was no significant deformation between mid-2006 and 2011. The combination of time-series InSAR analysis and old-dated DEM indicated revealed topographic changes associated the 2006 sliding event, which is confirmed by the difference of multiple LiDAR DEMs. Precipitation and discharge measurements before the 2006 and 2014 landslide events did not exhibit extremely anomalous records, suggesting the precipitation is not the controlling factor in determining the sliding events at Oso. The lack of surface deformation during 2006-2011 and weak correlation between the precipitation and the sliding event, suggest other factors (such as porosity) might play a critical role on the run-away events at this Oso and other similar landslides.

  19. Large-scale analysis by SAGE reveals new mechanisms of v-erbA oncogene action

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    Faure Claudine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The v-erbA oncogene, carried by the Avian Erythroblastosis Virus, derives from the c-erbAα proto-oncogene that encodes the nuclear receptor for triiodothyronine (T3R. v-ErbA transforms erythroid progenitors in vitro by blocking their differentiation, supposedly by interference with T3R and RAR (Retinoic Acid Receptor. However, v-ErbA target genes involved in its transforming activity still remain to be identified. Results: By using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, we identified 110 genes deregulated by v-ErbA and potentially implicated in the transformation process. Bioinformatic analysis of promoter sequence and transcriptional assays point out a potential role of c-Myb in the v-ErbA effect. Furthermore, grouping of newly identified target genes by function revealed both expected (chromatin/transcription and unexpected (protein metabolism functions potentially deregulated by v-ErbA. We then focused our study on 15 of the new v-ErbA target genes and demonstrated by real time PCR that in majority their expression was activated neither by T3, nor RA, nor during differentiation. This was unexpected based upon the previously known role of v-ErbA. Conclusion: This paper suggests the involvement of a wealth of new unanticipated mechanisms of v-ErbA action.

  20. Transcriptome analysis reveals dynamic changes in the gene expression of tobacco seedlings under low potassium stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Liming Lu; Yong Chen; Lin Lu; Yifei Lu; Liqin Li

    2015-09-01

    Potassium plays a key role in plant development and reproduction. In agricultural practice, potassium deficiency is common worldwide, and leads to crop growth inhibition and output reduction. In this study, we analysed the transcriptome of tobacco seedlings under low potassium stress. Tobacco seedlings with or without decreased potassium treatment were harvested after 0 (control), 6, 12, or 24 h and were submitted for microarray analysis. The results showed that up to 3790 genes were upregulated or downregulated more than 2-fold as a result of the decreased potassium treatment. Gene ontology analysis revealed significantly differentially expressed genes that were categorized as cation binding, transcription regulation, metabolic processes, transporter activity and enzyme regulation. Some potassium, nitrogen and phosphorus transporters; transcription factors; and plant signal molecules, such as CPKs were also significantly differentially expressed under potassium deficiency. Our results indicate that the expression profiles of a large number of genes involved in various plant physiological processes are significantly altered in response to potassium deficiency, which can result in physiological and morphological changes in tobacco plants.

  1. Bach Is the Father of Harmony: Revealed by a 1/f Fluctuation Analysis across Musical Genres.

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    Dan Wu

    Full Text Available Harmony is a fundamental attribute of music. Close connections exist between music and mathematics since both pursue harmony and unity. In music, the consonance of notes played simultaneously partly determines our perception of harmony; associates with aesthetic responses; and influences the emotion expression. The consonance could be considered as a window to understand and analyze harmony. Here for the first time we used a 1/f fluctuation analysis to investigate whether the consonance fluctuation structure in music with a wide range of composers and genres followed the scale free pattern that has been found for pitch, melody, rhythm, human body movements, brain activity, natural images and geographical features. We then used a network graph approach to investigate which composers were the most influential both within and across genres. Our results showed that patterns of consonance in music did follow scale-free characteristics, suggesting that this feature is a universally evolved one in both music and the living world. Furthermore, our network analysis revealed that Bach's harmony patterns were having the most influence on those used by other composers, followed closely by Mozart.

  2. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Different Silk Yields of Two Silkworm Strains.

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    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Cocoon and silk yields are the most important characteristics of sericulture. However, few studies have examined the genes that modulate these features. Further studies of these genes will be useful for improving the products of sericulture. JingSong (JS and Lan10 (L10 are two strains having significantly different cocoon and silk yields. In the current study, RNA-Seq and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR were performed on both strains in order to determine divergence of the silk gland, which controls silk biosynthesis in silkworms. Compared with L10, JS had 1375 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; 738 up-regulated genes and 673 down-regulated genes. Nine enriched gene ontology (GO terms were identified by GO enrichment analysis based on these DEGs. KEGG enrichment analysis results showed that the DEGs were enriched in three pathways, which were mainly associated with the processing and biosynthesis of proteins. The representative genes in the enrichment pathways and ten significant DEGs were further verified by qPCR, the results of which were consistent with the RNA-Seq data. Our study has revealed differences in silk glands between the two silkworm strains and provides a perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms determining silk yield.

  3. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Lactococcus garvieae Strains Isolated from Different Sources Reveals Candidate Virulence Genes

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    Eiji Miyauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus garvieae is a major pathogen for fish. Two complete (ATCC 49156 and Lg2 and three draft (UNIUD074, 8831, and 21881 genome sequences of L. garvieae have recently been released. We here present the results of a comparative genomic analysis of these fish and human isolates of L. garvieae. The pangenome comprised 1,542 core and 1,378 dispensable genes. The sequenced L. garvieae strains shared most of the possible virulence genes, but the capsule gene cluster was found only in fish-pathogenic strain Lg2. The absence of the capsule gene cluster in other nonpathogenic strains isolated from mastitis and vegetable was also confirmed by PCR. The fish and human isolates of L. garvieae contained the specific two and four adhesin genes, respectively, indicating that these adhesion proteins may be involved in the host specificity differences of L. garvieae. The discoveries revealed by the pangenomic analysis may provide significant insights into the biology of L. garvieae.

  4. Metagenomic analysis reveals that bacteriophages are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Jéssica; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis; Simonet, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    A metagenomics approach was applied to explore the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteriophages from hospital wastewater. Metagenomic analysis showed that most phage sequences affiliated to the order Caudovirales, comprising the tailed phage families Podoviridae, Siphoviridae and Myoviridae. Moreover, the relative abundance of ARGs in the phage DNA fraction (0.26%) was higher than in the bacterial DNA fraction (0.18%). These differences were particularly evident for genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) proteins, phosphotransferases, β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of assembled contigs also revealed that blaOXA-10, blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-24 genes belonging to class D β-lactamases as well as a novel blaTEM (98.9% sequence similarity to the blaTEM-1 gene) belonging to class A β-lactamases were detected in a higher proportion in phage DNA. Although preliminary, these findings corroborate the role of bacteriophages as reservoirs of resistance genes and thus highlight the necessity to include them in future studies on the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  5. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM1 characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines. PMID:25389185

  6. Glycoproteomic analysis of seven major allergenic proteins reveals novel post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L; Wandall, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM(1) characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines.

  7. Independent component analysis of DTI data reveals white matter covariances in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xin; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guo, Ting; Sun, Qiaoyue; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with the clinical symptom of the continuous deterioration of cognitive and memory functions. Multiple diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) can successfully explain the white matter damages in AD patients. However, most studies focused on the univariate measures (voxel-based analysis) to examine the differences between AD patients and normal controls (NCs). In this investigation, we applied a multivariate independent component analysis (ICA) to investigate the white matter covariances based on FA measurement from DTI data in 35 AD patients and 45 NCs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. We found that six independent components (ICs) showed significant FA reductions in white matter covariances in AD compared with NC, including the genu and splenium of corpus callosum (IC-1 and IC-2), middle temporal gyral of temporal lobe (IC-3), sub-gyral of frontal lobe (IC-4 and IC-5) and sub-gyral of parietal lobe (IC-6). Our findings revealed covariant white matter loss in AD patients and suggest that the unsupervised data-driven ICA method is effective to explore the changes of FA in AD. This study assists us in understanding the mechanism of white matter covariant reductions in the development of AD.

  8. Bach Is the Father of Harmony: Revealed by a 1/f Fluctuation Analysis across Musical Genres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Kendrick, Keith M; Levitin, Daniel J; Li, Chaoyi; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Harmony is a fundamental attribute of music. Close connections exist between music and mathematics since both pursue harmony and unity. In music, the consonance of notes played simultaneously partly determines our perception of harmony; associates with aesthetic responses; and influences the emotion expression. The consonance could be considered as a window to understand and analyze harmony. Here for the first time we used a 1/f fluctuation analysis to investigate whether the consonance fluctuation structure in music with a wide range of composers and genres followed the scale free pattern that has been found for pitch, melody, rhythm, human body movements, brain activity, natural images and geographical features. We then used a network graph approach to investigate which composers were the most influential both within and across genres. Our results showed that patterns of consonance in music did follow scale-free characteristics, suggesting that this feature is a universally evolved one in both music and the living world. Furthermore, our network analysis revealed that Bach's harmony patterns were having the most influence on those used by other composers, followed closely by Mozart.

  9. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  10. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-05-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  11. Comprehensive Proteomics Analysis of Laticifer Latex Reveals New Insights into Ethylene Stimulation of Natural Rubber Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuchu; Wang, Dan; Sun, Yong; Yang, Qian; Chang, Lili; Wang, Limin; Meng, Xueru; Huang, Qixing; Jin, Xiang; Tong, Zheng

    2015-09-08

    Ethylene is a stimulant to increase natural rubber latex. After ethylene application, both fresh yield and dry matter of latex are substantially improved. Moreover, we found that ethylene improves the generation of small rubber particles. However, most genes involved in rubber biosynthesis are inhibited by exogenous ethylene. Therefore, we conducted a proteomics analysis of ethylene-stimulated rubber latex, and identified 287 abundant proteins as well as 143 ethylene responsive latex proteins (ERLPs) with mass spectrometry from the 2-DE and DIGE gels, respectively. In addition, more than 1,600 proteins, including 404 ERLPs, were identified by iTRAQ. Functional classification of ERLPs revealed that enzymes involved in post-translational modification, carbohydrate metabolism, hydrolase activity, and kinase activity were overrepresented. Some enzymes for rubber particle aggregation were inhibited to prolong latex flow, and thus finally improved latex production. Phosphoproteomics analysis identified 59 differential phosphoproteins; notably, specific isoforms of rubber elongation factor and small rubber particle protein that were phosphorylated mainly at serine residues. This post-translational modification and isoform-specific phosphorylation might be important for ethylene-stimulated latex production. These results not only deepen our understanding of the rubber latex proteome but also provide new insights into the use of ethylene to stimulate rubber latex production.

  12. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  13. Structure analysis reveals the flexibility of the ADAMTS-5 active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Tomasselli, Alfredo G.; Mathis, Karl J.; Schnute, Mark E.; Woodard, Scott S.; Caspers, Nicole; Williams, Jennifer M.; Kiefer, James R.; Munie, Grace; Wittwer, Arthur; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Tortorella, Micky D. (Pfizer)

    2012-03-02

    A ((1S,2R)-2-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl) succinamide derivative (here referred to as Compound 12) shows significant activity toward many matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-13. Modeling studies had predicted that this compound would not bind to ADAMTS-5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5) due to its shallow S1' pocket. However, inhibition analysis revealed it to be a nanomolar inhibitor of both ADAMTS-4 and -5. The observed inconsistency was explained by analysis of crystallographic structures, which showed that Compound 12 in complex with the catalytic domain of ADAMTS-5 (cataTS5) exhibits an unusual conformation in the S1' pocket of the protein. This first demonstration that cataTS5 can undergo an induced conformational change in its active site pocket by a molecule like Compound 12 should enable the design of new aggrecanase inhibitors with better potency and selectivity profiles.

  14. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities.

  15. Comparative transcriptome and proteome analysis to reveal the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Manish; Krishnamurthy, Sneha; Shukla, Devesh; Kiiskila, Jeffrey; Jain, Ajay; Datta, Rupali; Sharma, Nilesh; Sahi, Shivendra V

    2016-02-23

    A large number of plants have been tested and exploited in search of a green chemistry approach for the fabrication of gold or other precious metal nanomaterials. Despite the potential of plant based methods, very little is known about the underlying biochemical reactions and genes involved in the biotransformation mechanism of AuCl4 into gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this research, we thus focused on studying the effect of Au on growth and nanoparticles formation by analyses of transcriptome, proteome and ionome shift in Arabidopsis. Au exposure favored the growth of Arabidopsis seedling and induced formation of nanoparticles in root and shoot, as indicated by optical and hyperspectral imaging. Root transcriptome analysis demonstrated the differential expression of the members of WRKY, MYB and BHLH gene families, which are involved in the Fe and other essential metals homeostasis. The proteome analysis revealed that Glutathione S-transferases were induced in the shoot and suggested its potential role in the biosynthesis AuNPs. This study also demonstrated the role of plant hormone auxin in determining the Au induced root system architecture. This is the first study using an integrated approach to understand the in planta biotransformation of KAuCl4 into AuNPs.

  16. Metagenomic analysis reveals symbiotic relationship among bacteria in Microcystis-dominated community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meili eXie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis bloom, a cyanobacterial mass occurrence often found in eutrophicated water bodies, is one of the most serious threats to freshwater ecosystems worldwide. In nature, Microcystis forms aggregates or colonies that contain heterotrophic bacteria. The Microcystis-bacteria colonies were persistent even when they were maintained in lab culture for a long period. The relationship between Microcystis and the associated bacteria was investigated by a metagenomic approach in this study. We developed a visualization-guided method of binning for genome assembly after total colony DNA sequencing. We found that the method was effective in grouping sequences and it did not require reference genome sequence. Individual genomes of the colony bacteria were obtained and they provided valuable insights into microbial community structures. Analysis of metabolic pathways based on these genomes revealed that while all heterotrophic bacteria were dependent upon Microcystis for carbon and energy, Vitamin B12 biosynthesis, which is required for growth by Microcystis, was accomplished in a cooperative fashion among the bacteria. Our analysis also suggests that individual bacteria in the colony community contributed a complete pathway for degradation of benzoate, which is inhibitory to the cyanobacterial growth, and its ecological implication for Microcystis bloom is discussed.

  17. Proteomic analysis of mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet reveals marker proteins associated with steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jin Lee

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the progression of simple steatosis to steatohepatitis are yet to be elucidated. To identify the proteins involved in the development of liver tissue inflammation, we performed comparative proteomic analysis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet (MCD developed hepatic steatosis characterized by increased free fatty acid (FFA and triglyceride levels as well as alpha-SMA. Two-dimensional proteomic analysis revealed that the change from the normal diet to the MCD diet affected the expressions of 50 proteins. The most-pronounced changes were observed in the expression of proteins involved in Met metabolism and oxidative stress, most of which were significantly downregulated in NASH model animals. Peroxiredoxin (Prx is the most interesting among the modulated proteins identified in this study. In particular, cross-regulated Prx1 and Prx6 are likely to participate in cellular defense against the development of hepatitis. Thus, these Prx isoforms may be a useful new marker for early stage steatohepatitis. Moreover, curcumin treatment results in alleviation of the severity of hepatic inflammation in steatohepatitis. Notably, curcumin administration in MCD-fed mice dramatically reduced CYP2E1 as well as Prx1 expression, while upregulating Prx6 expression. These findings suggest that curcumin may have a protective role against MCD fed-induced oxidative stress.

  18. Bioinformatic analysis of the neprilysin (M13 family of peptidases reveals complex evolutionary and functional relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinney John W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neprilysin (M13 family of endopeptidases are zinc-metalloenzymes, the majority of which are type II integral membrane proteins. The best characterised of this family is neprilysin, which has important roles in inactivating signalling peptides involved in modulating neuronal activity, blood pressure and the immune system. Other family members include the endothelin converting enzymes (ECE-1 and ECE-2, which are responsible for the final step in the synthesis of potent vasoconstrictor endothelins. The ECEs, as well as neprilysin, are considered valuable therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular disease. Other members of the M13 family have not been functionally characterised, but are also likely to have biological roles regulating peptide signalling. The recent sequencing of animal genomes has greatly increased the number of M13 family members in protein databases, information which can be used to reveal evolutionary relationships and to gain insight into conserved biological roles. Results The phylogenetic analysis successfully resolved vertebrate M13 peptidases into seven classes, one of which appears to be specific to mammals, and insect genes into five functional classes and a series of expansions, which may include inactive peptidases. Nematode genes primarily resolved into groups containing no other taxa, bar the two nematode genes associated with Drosophila DmeNEP1 and DmeNEP4. This analysis reconstructed only one relationship between chordate and invertebrate clusters, that of the ECE sub-group and the DmeNEP3 related genes. Analysis of amino acid utilisation in the active site of M13 peptidases reveals a basis for their biochemical properties. A relatively invariant S1' subsite gives the majority of M13 peptidases their strong preference for hydrophobic residues in P1' position. The greater variation in the S2' subsite may be instrumental in determining the specificity of M13 peptidases for their substrates

  19. Deep sequencing analysis of tick-borne encephalitis virus from questing ticks at natural foci reveals similarities between quasispecies pools of the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Naveed; Pettersson, John H-O; Dinnetz, Patrik; Andreassen, Åshild; Johansson, Magnus

    2017-01-10

    Every year, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) causes severe central nervous system infection in 10,000 to 15,000 people in Europe and Asia. TBEV is maintained in the environment by an enzootic cycle that requires a tick vector and a vertebrate host, and the adaptation of TBEV to vertebrate and invertebrate environments is essential for TBEV persistence in nature. This adaptation is facilitated by the error-prone nature of the virus' RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that generates genetically distinct virus variants called quasispecies. TBEV shows a focal geographical distribution pattern where each focus represents a TBEV hotspot. Here we sequenced and characterized two TBEV genomes, JP-296 and JP-554, from questing Ixodes ricinus ticks at a TBEV focus in central Sweden. Phylogenetic analysis showed geographical clustering among the newly sequenced strains and three previously sequenced Scandinavian strains, Toro-2003, Saringe-2009, and Mandal-2009, which originated from same ancestor. Among these five Scandinavian TBEV strains, only Mandal-2009 showed a large deletion within the 3´ non-coding region (NCR) similar to the highly virulent TBEV strain Hypr. Deep sequencing of JP-296, JP-554, and Mandal-2009 revealed significantly high quasispecies diversity for JP-296 and JP-554, with intact 3´NCRs, compared to the low diversity in Mandal-2009, with a truncated 3´NCR. SNP analysis showed that 40% of the SNPs were common between quasispecies populations of JP-296 and JP-554, indicating a putative mechanism for how TBEV persists and is maintained within its natural foci.

  20. Molecular Dynamics of Rab7::REP1::GGTase-II Ternary Complex and Identification of Their Putative Drug Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, Meenakshi; Saini, Vandana; Piplani, Sakshi; Kumar, A

    2013-01-01

    The structure-function correlation of membrane proteins have been a difficult task, particularly in context to transient protein complexes. The molecular simulation of ternary complex of Rab7::REP1::GGTase-II was carried out to understand the basic structural events occurring during the prenylation event of Rab proteins, using the software YASARA. The study suggested that the C-terminus of Rab7 has to be in completely extended conformation during prenylation to reach the active site of RabGGTase-II. Also, attempt was made to find putative drug binding sites on the ternary complex of Rab7::REP1::GGTase-II using Q-SiteFinder programme. The comprehensive consensus probe generated by the program revealed a total of 10 major pockets as putative drug binding sites on Rab7::REP:: GGTase-II ternary complex. These pockets were found on REP protein and GGTase protein subunits. The Rab7 was found to be devoid of any putative drug binding sites in the ternary complex. The phylogenetic analysis of 60 Rab proteins of human was carried out using PHYLIP and study indicated the close phylogenetic relationship between Rab7 and Rab9 proteins of human and hence with further in silico study, the present observations can be extrapolated to Rab9 proteins. The study paves a good platform for further experimental verifications of the findings and other in silico studies like identifying the potential drug targets by searching the putative drug binding sites, generating pharmacophoric pattern, searching or constructing suitable ligand and docking studies.

  1. Time series analysis of satellite data reveals continuous deforestation of New England since the 1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Pontus; Holden, Christopher E.; Bullock, Eric L.; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    2016-06-01

    Land cover and land change were monitored continuously between 1985 and 2011 at 30 m resolution across New England in the Northeastern United States in support of modeling the terrestrial carbon budget. It was found that the forest area has been decreasing throughout the study period in each state of the region since the 1980s. A total of 386 657 ± 98 137 ha (95% confidence interval) of forest has been converted to other land covers since 1985. Mainly driven by low density residential development, the deforestation accelerated in the mid-1990s until 2007 when it plateaued as a result of declining new residential construction and in turn, the financial crisis of 2007-08. The area of forest harvest, estimated at 226 519 ± 66 682 ha, was mapped separately and excluded from the deforestation estimate, while the area of forest expansion on non-forested lands was found to not be significantly different from zero. New England is often held as a principal example of a forest transition with historical widespread deforestation followed by recovery of forestlands as farming activities diminished, but the results of this study support the notion of a reversal of the forest transition as the region again is experiencing widespread deforestation. All available Landsat imagery acquired after 1985 for the study area were collected and used in the analysis. Areas of land cover and land change were estimated from a random sample of reference observations stratified by a twelve-class land change map encompassing the entire study area and period. The statistical analysis revealed that the net change in forest area and the associated modeled impact on the terrestrial carbon balance would have been considerably different if the results of the map were used without inferring the area of forest change by analysis of a reference sample.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of rod photoreceptor homeostasis revealed by in vivo NRL targetome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hao

    Full Text Available A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP-Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP-Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis.

  3. ALE meta-analysis reveals dissociable networks for affective and discriminative aspects of touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, India

    2016-04-01

    Emotionally-laden tactile stimulation-such as a caress on the skin or the feel of velvet-may represent a functionally distinct domain of touch, underpinned by specific cortical pathways. In order to determine whether, and to what extent, cortical functional neuroanatomy supports a distinction between affective and discriminative touch, an activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis was performed. This meta-analysis statistically mapped reported functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activations from 17 published affective touch studies in which tactile stimulation was associated with positive subjective evaluation (n = 291, 34 experimental contrasts). A separate ALE meta-analysis mapped regions most likely to be activated by tactile stimulation during detection and discrimination tasks (n = 1,075, 91 experimental contrasts). These meta-analyses revealed dissociable regions for affective and discriminative touch, with posterior insula (PI) more likely to be activated for affective touch, and primary somatosensory cortices (SI) more likely to be activated for discriminative touch. Secondary somatosensory cortex had a high likelihood of engagement by both affective and discriminative touch. Further, meta-analytic connectivity (MCAM) analyses investigated network-level co-activation likelihoods independent of task or stimulus, across a range of domains and paradigms. Affective-related PI and discriminative-related SI regions co-activated with different networks, implicated in dissociable functions, but sharing somatosensory co-activations. Taken together, these meta-analytic findings suggest that affective and discriminative touch are dissociable both on the regional and network levels. However, their degree of shared activation likelihood in somatosensory cortices indicates that this dissociation reflects functional biases within tactile processing networks, rather than functionally and anatomically distinct pathways.

  4. Comparative sequence analysis of Solanum and Arabidopsis in a hot spot for pathogen resistance on potato chromosome V reveals a patchwork of conserved and rapidly evolving genome segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruggmann Rémy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative phenotypic variation of agronomic characters in crop plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors (quantitative trait loci = QTL. To understand the molecular basis of such QTL, the identification of the underlying genes is of primary interest and DNA sequence analysis of the genomic regions harboring QTL is a prerequisite for that. QTL mapping in potato (Solanum tuberosum has identified a region on chromosome V tagged by DNA markers GP21 and GP179, which contains a number of important QTL, among others QTL for resistance to late blight caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and to root cyst nematodes. Results To obtain genomic sequence for the targeted region on chromosome V, two local BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome contigs were constructed and sequenced, which corresponded to parts of the homologous chromosomes of the diploid, heterozygous genotype P6/210. Two contiguous sequences of 417,445 and 202,781 base pairs were assembled and annotated. Gene-by-gene co-linearity was disrupted by non-allelic insertions of retrotransposon elements, stretches of diverged intergenic sequences, differences in gene content and gene order. The latter was caused by inversion of a 70 kbp genomic fragment. These features were also found in comparison to orthologous sequence contigs from three homeologous chromosomes of Solanum demissum, a wild tuber bearing species. Functional annotation of the sequence identified 48 putative open reading frames (ORF in one contig and 22 in the other, with an average of one ORF every 9 kbp. Ten ORFs were classified as resistance-gene-like, 11 as F-box-containing genes, 13 as transposable elements and three as transcription factors. Comparing potato to Arabidopsis thaliana annotated proteins revealed five micro-syntenic blocks of three to seven ORFs with A. thaliana chromosomes 1, 3 and 5. Conclusion Comparative sequence analysis revealed highly conserved collinear regions

  5. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression in primate taste buds reveals links to diverse processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hevezi

    Full Text Available Efforts to unravel the mechanisms underlying taste sensation (gustation have largely focused on rodents. Here we present the first comprehensive characterization of gene expression in primate taste buds. Our findings reveal unique new insights into the biology of taste buds. We generated a taste bud gene expression database using laser capture microdissection (LCM procured fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds from primates. We also used LCM to collect the top and bottom portions of CV taste buds. Affymetrix genome wide arrays were used to analyze gene expression in all samples. Known taste receptors are preferentially expressed in the top portion of taste buds. Genes associated with the cell cycle and stem cells are preferentially expressed in the bottom portion of taste buds, suggesting that precursor cells are located there. Several chemokines including CXCL14 and CXCL8 are among the highest expressed genes in taste buds, indicating that immune system related processes are active in taste buds. Several genes expressed specifically in endocrine glands including growth hormone releasing hormone and its receptor are also strongly expressed in taste buds, suggesting a link between metabolism and taste. Cell type-specific expression of transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in cell fate, including KIT, reveals the taste bud as an active site of cell regeneration, differentiation, and development. IKBKAP, a gene mutated in familial dysautonomia, a disease that results in loss of taste buds, is expressed in taste cells that communicate with afferent nerve fibers via synaptic transmission. This database highlights the power of LCM coupled with transcriptional profiling to dissect the molecular composition of normal tissues, represents the most comprehensive molecular analysis of primate taste buds to date, and provides a foundation for further studies in diverse aspects of taste biology.

  6. Comparative whole-genome analysis of clinical isolates reveals characteristic architecture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pangenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periwal, Vinita; Patowary, Ashok; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Gupta, Anju; Singh, Meghna; Mittal, Ashish; Jeyapaul, Shamini; Chauhan, Rajendra Kumar; Singh, Ajay Vir; Singh, Pravin Kumar; Garg, Parul; Katoch, Viswa Mohan; Katoch, Kiran; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    The tubercle complex consists of closely related mycobacterium species which appear to be variants of a single species. Comparative genome analysis of different strains could provide useful clues and insights into the genetic diversity of the species. We integrated genome assemblies of 96 strains from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), which included 8 Indian clinical isolates sequenced and assembled in this study, to understand its pangenome architecture. We predicted genes for all the 96 strains and clustered their respective CDSs into homologous gene clusters (HGCs) to reveal a hard-core, soft-core and accessory genome component of MTBC. The hard-core (HGCs shared amongst 100% of the strains) was comprised of 2,066 gene clusters whereas the soft-core (HGCs shared amongst at least 95% of the strains) comprised of 3,374 gene clusters. The change in the core and accessory genome components when observed as a function of their size revealed that MTBC has an open pangenome. We identified 74 HGCs that were absent from reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra but were present in most of clinical isolates. We report PCR validation on 9 candidate genes depicting 7 genes completely absent from H37Rv and H37Ra whereas 2 genes shared partial homology with them accounting to probable insertion and deletion events. The pangenome approach is a promising tool for studying strain specific genetic differences occurring within species. We also suggest that since selecting appropriate target genes for typing purposes requires the expected target gene be present in all isolates being typed, therefore estimating the core-component of the species becomes a subject of prime importance.

  7. Comparative whole-genome analysis of clinical isolates reveals characteristic architecture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pangenome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Periwal

    Full Text Available The tubercle complex consists of closely related mycobacterium species which appear to be variants of a single species. Comparative genome analysis of different strains could provide useful clues and insights into the genetic diversity of the species. We integrated genome assemblies of 96 strains from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC, which included 8 Indian clinical isolates sequenced and assembled in this study, to understand its pangenome architecture. We predicted genes for all the 96 strains and clustered their respective CDSs into homologous gene clusters (HGCs to reveal a hard-core, soft-core and accessory genome component of MTBC. The hard-core (HGCs shared amongst 100% of the strains was comprised of 2,066 gene clusters whereas the soft-core (HGCs shared amongst at least 95% of the strains comprised of 3,374 gene clusters. The change in the core and accessory genome components when observed as a function of their size revealed that MTBC has an open pangenome. We identified 74 HGCs that were absent from reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra but were present in most of clinical isolates. We report PCR validation on 9 candidate genes depicting 7 genes completely absent from H37Rv and H37Ra whereas 2 genes shared partial homology with them accounting to probable insertion and deletion events. The pangenome approach is a promising tool for studying strain specific genetic differences occurring within species. We also suggest that since selecting appropriate target genes for typing purposes requires the expected target gene be present in all isolates being typed, therefore estimating the core-component of the species becomes a subject of prime importance.

  8. Systematic prioritization and integrative analysis of copy number variations in schizophrenia reveal key schizophrenia susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Han, Leng; Luo, Zhenwu; Hu, Fang; Tieu, Roger; Gan, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a common mental disorder with high heritability and strong genetic heterogeneity. Common disease-common variants hypothesis predicts that schizophrenia is attributable in part to common genetic variants. However, recent studies have clearly demonstrated that copy number variations (CNVs) also play pivotal roles in schizophrenia susceptibility and explain a proportion of missing heritability. Though numerous CNVs have been identified, many of the regions affected by CNVs show poor overlapping among different studies, and it is not known whether the genes disrupted by CNVs contribute to the risk of schizophrenia. By using cumulative scoring, we systematically prioritized the genes affected by CNVs in schizophrenia. We identified 8 top genes that are frequently disrupted by CNVs, including NRXN1, CHRNA7, BCL9, CYFIP1, GJA8, NDE1, SNAP29, and GJA5. Integration of genes affected by CNVs with known schizophrenia susceptibility genes (from previous genetic linkage and association studies) reveals that many genes disrupted by CNVs are also associated with schizophrenia. Further protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis indicates that protein products of genes affected by CNVs frequently interact with known schizophrenia-associated proteins. Finally, systematic integration of CNVs prioritization data with genetic association and PPI data identifies key schizophrenia candidate genes. Our results provide a global overview of genes impacted by CNVs in schizophrenia and reveal a densely interconnected molecular network of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia. Though the prioritized top genes represent promising schizophrenia risk genes, further work with different prioritization methods and independent samples is needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, the identified key candidate genes may have important roles in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and further functional characterization of these genes may provide pivotal targets for future therapeutics and

  9. Dysconnection topography in schizophrenia revealed with state-space analysis of EEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jalili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dysconnection hypothesis has been proposed to account for pathophysiological mechanisms underlying schizophrenia. Widespread structural changes suggesting abnormal connectivity in schizophrenia have been imaged. A functional counterpart of the structural maps would be the EEG synchronization maps. However, due to the limits of currently used bivariate methods, functional correlates of dysconnection are limited to the isolated measurements of synchronization between preselected pairs of EEG signals. METHODS/RESULTS: To reveal a whole-head synchronization topography in schizophrenia, we applied a new method of multivariate synchronization analysis called S-estimator to the resting dense-array (128 channels EEG obtained from 14 patients and 14 controls. This method determines synchronization from the embedding dimension in a state-space domain based on the theoretical consequence of the cooperative behavior of simultaneous time series-the shrinking of the state-space embedding dimension. The S-estimator imaging revealed a specific synchronization landscape in schizophrenia patients. Its main features included bilaterally increased synchronization over temporal brain regions and decreased synchronization over the postcentral/parietal region neighboring the midline. The synchronization topography was stable over the course of several months and correlated with the severity of schizophrenia symptoms. In particular, direct correlations linked positive, negative, and general psychopathological symptoms to the hyper-synchronized temporal clusters over both hemispheres. Along with these correlations, general psychopathological symptoms inversely correlated within the hypo-synchronized postcentral midline region. While being similar to the structural maps of cortical changes in schizophrenia, the S-maps go beyond the topography limits, demonstrating a novel aspect of the abnormalities of functional cooperation: namely, regionally reduced or

  10. Comparative analysis of human and bovine protein kinases reveals unique relationship and functional diversity

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    Nuzhat N. Kabir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible protein phosphorylation by protein kinases and phosphatases is a common event in various cellular processes. The eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily, which is one of the largest superfamilies of eukaryotic proteins, plays several roles in cell signaling and diseases. We identified 482 eukaryotic protein kinases and 39 atypical protein kinases in the bovine genome, by searching publicly accessible genetic-sequence databases. Bovines have 512 putative protein kinases, each orthologous to a human kinase. Whereas orthologous kinase pairs are, on an average, 90.6% identical, orthologous kinase catalytic domain pairs are, on an average, 95.9% identical at the amino acid level. This bioinformatic study of bovine protein kinases provides a suitable framework for further characterization of their functional and structural properties.

  11. An angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation switch patch revealed through evolutionary trace analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Yao, Rong; Ma, Jian-Nong;

    2010-01-01

    in the cytoplasmic parts of TM2, TM3, and TM6 to form an activation switch that is common to all family A 7TM receptors. We tested this hypothesis in the rat Angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1a (AT1a) receptor. The receptor has important roles in the cardiovascular system, but has also frequently been applied as a model...... for 7TM receptor activation and signaling. Six mutations: F66A, L67R, L70R, L119R, D125A, and I245F were targeted to the putative switch and assayed for changes in activation state by their ligand binding, signaling, and trafficking properties. All but one receptor mutant (that was not expressed well...

  12. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals the genetic basis of skin color variation in common carp.

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    Yanliang Jiang

    Full Text Available The common carp is an important aquaculture species that is widely distributed across the world. During the long history of carp domestication, numerous carp strains with diverse skin colors have been established. Skin color is used as a visual criterion to determine the market value of carp. However, the genetic basis of common carp skin color has not been extensively studied.In this study, we performed Illumina sequencing on two common carp strains: the reddish Xingguo red carp and the brownish-black Yellow River carp. A total of 435,348,868 reads were generated, resulting in 198,781 assembled contigs that were used as reference sequences. Comparisons of skin transcriptome files revealed 2,012 unigenes with significantly different expression in the two common carp strains, including 874 genes that were up-regulated in Xingguo red carp and 1,138 genes that were up-regulated in Yellow River carp. The expression patterns of 20 randomly selected differentially expressed genes were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Gene pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that melanin biosynthesis, along with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, is highly likely to affect the skin pigmentation process. Several key genes involved in the skin pigmentation process, including TYRP1, SILV, ASIP and xCT, showed significant differences in their expression patterns between the two strains.In this study, we conducted a comparative transcriptome analysis of Xingguo red carp and Yellow River carp skins, and we detected key genes involved in the common carp skin pigmentation process. We propose that common carp skin pigmentation depends upon at least three pathways. Understanding fish skin color genetics will facilitate future molecular selection of the fish skin colors with high market values.

  13. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Genetic Basis of Skin Color Variation in Common Carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanliang; Zhang, Songhao; Xu, Jian; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A.; Sun, Xiaowen; Xu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Background The common carp is an important aquaculture species that is widely distributed across the world. During the long history of carp domestication, numerous carp strains with diverse skin colors have been established. Skin color is used as a visual criterion to determine the market value of carp. However, the genetic basis of common carp skin color has not been extensively studied. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we performed Illumina sequencing on two common carp strains: the reddish Xingguo red carp and the brownish-black Yellow River carp. A total of 435,348,868 reads were generated, resulting in 198,781 assembled contigs that were used as reference sequences. Comparisons of skin transcriptome files revealed 2,012 unigenes with significantly different expression in the two common carp strains, including 874 genes that were up-regulated in Xingguo red carp and 1,138 genes that were up-regulated in Yellow River carp. The expression patterns of 20 randomly selected differentially expressed genes were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Gene pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that melanin biosynthesis, along with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, is highly likely to affect the skin pigmentation process. Several key genes involved in the skin pigmentation process, including TYRP1, SILV, ASIP and xCT, showed significant differences in their expression patterns between the two strains. Conclusions In this study, we conducted a comparative transcriptome analysis of Xingguo red carp and Yellow River carp skins, and we detected key genes involved in the common carp skin pigmentation process. We propose that common carp skin pigmentation depends upon at least three pathways. Understanding fish skin color genetics will facilitate future molecular selection of the fish skin colors with high market values. PMID:25255374

  14. Analysis of the full genome of human group C rotaviruses reveals lineage diversification and reassortment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Martella, Vito; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Fehér, Enikő; Marton, Szilvia; Calderaro, Adriana; Bányai, Krisztián

    2016-08-01

    Group C rotaviruses (RVC) are enteric pathogens of humans and animals. Whole-genome sequences are available only for few RVCs, leaving gaps in our knowledge about their genetic diversity. We determined the full-length genome sequence of two human RVCs (PR2593/2004 and PR713/2012), detected in Italy from hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus infection in 2004 and 2012. In the 11 RNA genomic segments, the two Italian RVCs segregated within separate intra-genotypic lineages showed variation ranging from 1.9 % (VP6) to 15.9 % (VP3) at the nucleotide level. Comprehensive analysis of human RVC sequences available in the databases allowed us to reveal the existence of at least two major genome configurations, defined as type I and type II. Human RVCs of type I were all associated with the M3 VP3 genotype, including the Italian strain PR2593/2004. Conversely, human RVCs of type II were all associated with the M2 VP3 genotype, including the Italian strain PR713/2012. Reassortant RVC strains between these major genome configurations were identified. Although only a few full-genome sequences of human RVCs, mostly of Asian origin, are available, the analysis of human RVC sequences retrieved from the databases indicates that at least two intra-genotypic RVC lineages circulate in European countries. Gathering more sequence data is necessary to develop a standardized genotype and intra-genotypic lineage classification system useful for epidemiological investigations and avoiding confusion in the literature.

  15. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Vibrio Vulnificus Isolates Revealed Biotype 3 Evolutionary Relationships

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    Yael eKotton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1996 a common-source outbreak of severe soft tissue and bloodstream infections erupted among Israeli fish farmers and fish consumers due to changes in fish marketing policies. The causative pathogen was a new strain of Vibrio vulnificus, named biotype 3, which displayed a unique biochemical and genotypic profile. Initial observations suggested that the pathogen erupted as a result of genetic recombination between two distinct populations. We applied a whole genome shotgun sequencing approach using several V. vulnificus strains from Israel in order to study the pan genome of V. vulnificus and determine the phylogenetic relationship of biotype 3 with existing populations. The core genome of V. vulnificus based on 16 draft and complete genomes consisted of 3068 genes, representing between 59% and 78% of the whole genome of 16 strains. The accessory genome varied in size from 781 kbp to 2044 kbp. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole, core, and accessory genomes displayed similar clustering patterns with two main clusters, clinical (C and environmental (E, all biotype 3 strains formed a distinct group within the E cluster. Annotation of accessory genomic regions found in biotype 3 strains and absent from the core genome yielded 1732 genes, of which the vast majority encoded hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, and mobile element proteins. A total of 1916 proteins (including 713 hypothetical proteins were present in all human pathogenic strains (both biotype 3 and non-biotype 3 and absent from the environmental strains. Clustering analysis of the non-hypothetical proteins revealed 148 protein clusters shared by all human pathogenic strains; these included transcriptional regulators, arylsulfatases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, acetyltransferases, GGDEF family proteins, transposases, type IV secretory system (T4SS proteins, and integrases. Our study showed that V. vulnificus biotype 3 evolved from environmental populations and

  16. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Maude M.; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis. P.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  17. Secretome analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus reveals Asp-hemolysin as a major secreted protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartenberg, Dirk; Lapp, Katrin; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Brakhage, Axel A

    2011-11-01

    Surface-associated and secreted proteins represent primarily exposed components of Aspergillus fumigatus during host infection. Several secreted proteins are known to be involved in defense mechanisms or immune evasion, thus, probably contributing to pathogenicity. Furthermore, several secreted antigens were identified as possible biomarkers for the verification of diseases caused by Aspergillus species. Nevertheless, there is only limited knowledge about the composition of the secretome and about molecular functions of particular proteins. To identify secreted proteins potentially essential for virulence, the core secretome of A. fumigatus grown in minimal medium was determined. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic separation and subsequent MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analyses resulted in the identification of 64 different proteins. Additionally, secretome analyses of A. fumigatus utilizing elastin, collagen or keratin as main carbon and nitrogen source were performed. Thereby, the alkaline serine protease Alp1 was identified as the most abundant protein and hence presumably represents an important protease during host infection. Interestingly, the Asp-hemolysin (Asp-HS), which belongs to the protein family of aegerolysins and which was often suggested to be involved in fungal virulence, was present in the secretome under all growth conditions tested. In addition, a second, non-secreted protein with an aegerolysin domain annotated as Asp-hemolysin-like (HS-like) protein can be found to be encoded in the genome of A. fumigatus. Generation and analysis of Asp-HS and HS-like deletion strains revealed no differences in phenotype compared to the corresponding wild-type strain. Furthermore, hemolysis and cytotoxicity was not altered in both single-deletion and double-deletion mutants lacking both aegerolysin genes. All mutant strains showed no attenuation in virulence in a mouse infection model for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Overall, this study provides a comprehensive

  18. Analysis of gene expression during parabolic flights reveals distinct early gravity responses in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry-Hivet, D; Nziengui, H; Rapp, K; Oliveira, O; Paponov, I A; Li, Y; Hauslage, J; Vagt, N; Braun, M; Ditengou, F A; Dovzhenko, A; Palme, K

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots are among most intensively studied biological systems in gravity research. Altered gravity induces asymmetric cell growth leading to root bending. Differential distribution of the phytohormone auxin underlies root responses to gravity, being coordinated by auxin efflux transporters from the PIN family. The objective of this study was to compare early transcriptomic changes in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana wild type, and pin2 and pin3 mutants under parabolic flight conditions and to correlate these changes to auxin distribution. Parabolic flights allow comparison of transient 1-g, hypergravity and microgravity effects in living organisms in parallel. We found common and mutation-related genes differentially expressed in response to transient microgravity phases. Gene ontology analysis of common genes revealed lipid metabolism, response to stress factors and light categories as primarily involved in response to transient microgravity phases, suggesting that fundamental reorganisation of metabolic pathways functions upstream of a further signal mediating hormonal network. Gene expression changes in roots lacking the columella-located PIN3 were stronger than in those deprived of the epidermis and cortex cell-specific PIN2. Moreover, repetitive exposure to microgravity/hypergravity and gravity/hypergravity flight phases induced an up-regulation of auxin responsive genes in wild type and pin2 roots, but not in pin3 roots, suggesting a critical function of PIN3 in mediating auxin fluxes in response to transient microgravity phases. Our study provides important insights towards understanding signal transduction processes in transient microgravity conditions by combining for the first time the parabolic flight platform with the transcriptome analysis of different genetic mutants in the model plant, Arabidopsis.

  19. Proteomic analysis of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare under glutathione reveals high demand for thiamin transport and antioxidant protection.

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    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available Ketogulonicigenium vulgare, though grows poorly when mono-cultured, has been widely used in the industrial production of the precursor of vitamin C with the coculture of Bacillus megaterium. Various efforts have been made to clarify the synergic pattern of this artificial microbial community and to improve the growth and production ability of K. vulgare, but there is still no sound explanation. In previous research, we found that the addition of reduced glutathione into K. vulgare monoculture could significantly improve its growth and productivity. By performing SEM and TEM, we observed that after adding GSH into K. vulgare monoculture, cells became about 4-6 folds elongated, and formed intracytoplasmic membranes (ICM. To explore the molecular mechanism and provide insights into the investigation of the synergic pattern of the co-culture system, we conducted a comparative iTRAQ-2-D-LC-MS/MS-based proteomic analysis of K. vulgare grown under reduced glutathione. Principal component analysis of proteomic data showed that after the addition of glutathione, proteins for thiamin/thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP transport, glutathione transport and the maintenance of membrane integrity, together with several membrane-bound dehydrogenases had significant up-regulation. Besides, several proteins participating in the pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were also up-regulated. Additionally, proteins combating intracellular reactive oxygen species were also up-regulated, which similarly occurred in K. vulgare when the co-cultured B. megaterium cells lysed from our former research results. This study reveals the demand for transmembrane transport of substrates, especially thiamin, and the demand for antioxidant protection of K. vulgare.

  20. Interspecies insertion polymorphism analysis reveals recent activity of transposable elements in extant coelacanths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naville, Magali; Chalopin, Domitille; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Coelacanths are lobe-finned fish represented by two extant species, Latimeria chalumnae in South Africa and Comoros and L. menadoensis in Indonesia. Due to their intermediate phylogenetic position between ray-finned fish and tetrapods in the vertebrate lineage, they are of great interest from an evolutionary point of view. In addition, extant specimens look similar to 300 million-year-old fossils; because of their apparent slowly evolving morphology, coelacanths have been often described as « living fossils ». As an underlying cause of such a morphological stasis, several authors have proposed a slow evolution of the coelacanth genome. Accordingly, sequencing of the L. chalumnae genome has revealed a globally low substitution rate for protein-coding regions compared to other vertebrates. However, genome and gene evolution can also be influenced by transposable elements, which form a major and dynamic part of vertebrate genomes through their ability to move, duplicate and recombine. In this work, we have searched for evidence of transposition activity in coelacanth genomes through the comparative analysis of orthologous genomic regions from both Latimeria species. Comparison of 5.7 Mb (0.2%) of the L. chalumnae genome with orthologous Bacterial Artificial Chromosome clones from L. menadoensis allowed the identification of 27 species-specific transposable element insertions, with a strong relative contribution of CR1 non-LTR retrotransposons. Species-specific homologous recombination between the long terminal repeats of a new coelacanth endogenous retrovirus was also detected. Our analysis suggests that transposon activity is responsible for at least 0.6% of genome divergence between both Latimeria species. Taken together, this study demonstrates that coelacanth genomes are not evolutionary inert: they contain recently active transposable elements, which have significantly contributed to post-speciation genome divergence in Latimeria.

  1. Interspecies insertion polymorphism analysis reveals recent activity of transposable elements in extant coelacanths.

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    Magali Naville

    Full Text Available Coelacanths are lobe-finned fish represented by two extant species, Latimeria chalumnae in South Africa and Comoros and L. menadoensis in Indonesia. Due to their intermediate phylogenetic position between ray-finned fish and tetrapods in the vertebrate lineage, they are of great interest from an evolutionary point of view. In addition, extant specimens look similar to 300 million-year-old fossils; because of their apparent slowly evolving morphology, coelacanths have been often described as « living fossils ». As an underlying cause of such a morphological stasis, several authors have proposed a slow evolution of the coelacanth genome. Accordingly, sequencing of the L. chalumnae genome has revealed a globally low substitution rate for protein-coding regions compared to other vertebrates. However, genome and gene evolution can also be influenced by transposable elements, which form a major and dynamic part of vertebrate genomes through their ability to move, duplicate and recombine. In this work, we have searched for evidence of transposition activity in coelacanth genomes through the comparative analysis of orthologous genomic regions from both Latimeria species. Comparison of 5.7 Mb (0.2% of the L. chalumnae genome with orthologous Bacterial Artificial Chromosome clones from L. menadoensis allowed the identification of 27 species-specific transposable element insertions, with a strong relative contribution of CR1 non-LTR retrotransposons. Species-specific homologous recombination between the long terminal repeats of a new coelacanth endogenous retrovirus was also detected. Our analysis suggests that transposon activity is responsible for at least 0.6% of genome divergence between both Latimeria species. Taken together, this study demonstrates that coelacanth genomes are not evolutionary inert: they contain recently active transposable elements, which have significantly contributed to post-speciation genome divergence in Latimeria.

  2. Complexity of free energy landscapes of peptides revealed by nonlinear principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong H

    2006-12-01

    Employing the recently developed hierarchical nonlinear principal component analysis (NLPCA) method of Saegusa et al. (Neurocomputing 2004;61:57-70 and IEICE Trans Inf Syst 2005;E88-D:2242-2248), the complexities of the free energy landscapes of several peptides, including triglycine, hexaalanine, and the C-terminal beta-hairpin of protein G, were studied. First, the performance of this NLPCA method was compared with the standard linear principal component analysis (PCA). In particular, we compared two methods according to (1) the ability of the dimensionality reduction and (2) the efficient representation of peptide conformations in low-dimensional spaces spanned by the first few principal components. The study revealed that NLPCA reduces the dimensionality of the considered systems much better, than did PCA. For example, in order to get the similar error, which is due to representation of the original data of beta-hairpin in low dimensional space, one needs 4 and 21 principal components of NLPCA and PCA, respectively. Second, by representing the free energy landscapes of the considered systems as a function of the first two principal components obtained from PCA, we obtained the relatively well-structured free energy landscapes. In contrast, the free energy landscapes of NLPCA are much more complicated, exhibiting many states which are hidden in the PCA maps, especially in the unfolded regions. Furthermore, the study also showed that many states in the PCA maps are mixed up by several peptide conformations, while those of the NLPCA maps are more pure. This finding suggests that the NLPCA should be used to capture the essential features of the systems.

  3. Possible Source Populations of the White-backed Planthopper in the Greater Mekong Subregion Revealed by Mitochondrial DNA Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yong; Chu, Dong; Yin, Yan-Qiong; Zhao, Xue-Qing; Chen, Ai-Dong; Khay, Sathya; Douangboupha, Bounneuang; Kyaw, Mu Mu; Kongchuensin, Manita; Ngo, Vien Vinh; Nguyen, Chung Huy

    2016-12-01

    The white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), is a serious pest of rice in Asia. However, little is known regarding the migration of this pest insect from the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) including Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, and Vietnam, into China’s Yunnan Province. To determine the migration patterns of S. furcifera in the GMS and putative secondary immigration inside China’s Yunnan Province, we investigated the population genetic diversity, genetic structure, and gene flow of 42 S. furcifera populations across the six countries in the GMS by intensive sampling using mitochondrial genes. Our study revealed the potential emigration of S. furcifera from the GMS consists primarily of three major sources: 1) the S. furcifera from Laos and Vietnam migrate into south and southeast Yunnan, where they proceed to further migrate into northeast and central Yunnan; 2) the S. furcifera from Myanmar migrate into west Yunnan, and/or central Yunnan, and/or northeast Yunnan; 3) the S. furcifera from Cambodia migrate into southwest Yunnan, where the populations can migrate further into central Yunnan. The new data will not only be helpful in predicting population dynamics of the planthopper, but will also aid in regional control programs for this economically important pest insect.

  4. Gene coexpression analysis reveals complex metabolism of the monoterpene alcohol linalool in Arabidopsis flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginglinger, Jean-François; Boachon, Benoit; Höfer, René; Paetz, Christian; Köllner, Tobias G; Miesch, Laurence; Lugan, Raphael; Baltenweck, Raymonde; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ullmann, Pascaline; Beran, Franziska; Claudel, Patricia; Verstappen, Francel; Fischer, Marc J C; Karst, Francis; Bouwmeester, Harro; Miesch, Michel; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ehlting, Jürgen; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2013-11-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simultaneously expressed at anthesis, mainly in upper anther filaments and in petals. Upon transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, the TPS enzymes colocalize in vesicular structures associated with the plastid surface, whereas the P450 proteins were detected in the endoplasmic reticulum. Whether they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in N. benthamiana, the TPS enzymes formed two different enantiomers of linalool: (-)-(R)-linalool for TPS10 and (+)-(S)-linalool for TPS14. Both P450 enzymes metabolize the two linalool enantiomers to form different but overlapping sets of hydroxylated or epoxidized products. These oxygenated products are not emitted into the floral headspace, but accumulate in floral tissues as further converted or conjugated metabolites. This work reveals complex linalool metabolism in Arabidopsis flowers, the ecological role of which remains to be determined.

  5. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rosini

    Full Text Available The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

  6. Biometric variability of goat populations revealed by means of principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Luanna Chácara; Machado, Théa M Medeiros; Araújo, Adriana Mello; Olson, Timothy A; da Silva, João Batista Lopes; Torres, Robledo Almeida; Costa, Márcio da Silva

    2012-12-01

    The aim was to analyze variation in 12 Brazilian and Moroccan goat populations, and, through principal component analysis (PCA), check the importance of body measures and their indices as a means of distinguishing among individuals and populations. The biometric measurements were wither height (WH), brisket height (BH) and ear length (EL). Thorax depth (WH-BH) and the three indices, TD/WH, EL/TD and EL/WH, were also calculated. Of the seven components extracted, the first three principal components were sufficient to explain 99.5% of the total variance of the data. Graphical dispersion by genetic groups revealed that European dairy breeds clustered together. The Moroccan breeds were separated into two groups, one comprising the Drâa and the other the Zagora and Rhâali breeds. Whereas, on the one side, the Anglo-Nubian and undefined breeds were the closest to one another the goats of the Azul were observed to have the highest variation of all the breeds. The Anglo-Nubian and Boer breeds were similar to each other. The Nambi-type goats remained distinct from all the other populations. In general, the use of graphical representation of PCA values allowed to distinguish genetic groups.

  7. Biometric variability of goat populations revealed by means of principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luanna Chácara Pires

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to analyze variation in 12 Brazilian and Moroccan goat populations, and, through principal component analysis (PCA, check the importance of body measures and their indices as a means of distinguishing among individuals and populations. The biometric measurements were wither height (WH, brisket height (BH and ear length (EL. Thorax depth (WH-BH and the three indices, TD/WH, EL/TD and EL/WH, were also calculated. Of the seven components extracted, the first three principal components were sufficient to explain 99.5% of the total variance of the data. Graphical dispersion by genetic groups revealed that European dairy breeds clustered together. The Moroccan breeds were separated into two groups, one comprising the Drâa and the other the Zagora and Rhâali breeds. Whereas, on the one side, the Anglo-Nubian and undefined breeds were the closest to one another the goats of the Azul were observed to have the highest variation of all the breeds. The Anglo-Nubian and Boer breeds were similar to each other. The Nambi-type goats remained distinct from all the other populations. In general, the use of graphical representation of PCA values allowed to distinguish genetic groups.

  8. Retrospective stable isotope analysis reveals ecosystem responses to river regulation over the last century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Thomas F; Krabbenhoft, Trevor I; Collyer, Michael L; Krabbenhoft, Corey A; Edwards, Melanie S; Sharp, Zachary D

    2015-12-01

    Disruption of natural flow regimes, nutrient pollution, and other consequences of human population growth and development have impacted most major rivers of the world. Alarming losses of aquatic biodiversity coincide with human-caused river alteration, but effects of biotic homogenization on aquatic ecosystem processes are not as well documented. This is because unaltered systems for comparison are scarce, and some ecosystem-wide effects may take decades to manifest. We evaluated aquatic ecosystem responses to extensive river- floodplain engineering and nutrient addition in the Rio Grande of southwestern North America as revealed by changes in trophic structure of, and resource availability to, the fish community. Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA) was conducted on museum-preserved fishes collected over a 70-year period of intensive river management and exponential human population growth. Trophic complexity and resource heterogeneity for fish consumers (measured as "isotopic niche breadth") decreased following sediment deprivation and channelization, and these effects persist into the present. Increased nutrient inputs led to δ15N enrichment in the entire fish community at all affected sites, and a shift to autochthonous sources of carbon at the most proximal site downstream of wastewater release, probably via bottom-up transfer. Overall, retrospective SIA of apex consumers suggests radical change and functional impairment of a floodplain river ecosystem already marked by significant biodiversity loss.

  9. Phylum-specific environmental DNA analysis reveals remarkably high global biodiversity of Cercozoa (Protozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, David; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    This study presents the first 18S rRNA multi-library environmental PCR survey of a single protozoan phylum, Cercozoa Cavalier-Smith 1998, from a range of different habitats. Phylogenetic analysis reveals at least nine novel clades within the phylum, several possibly at the level of order or above. Further experiments are described to ascertain the true ecological and geographical distributions of some clades that might be inferred from the tree to be restricted in either or both ways. These results suggest that the diversity of cercozoan taxa may run into thousands of lineages, making it comparable in diversity to the largest better-characterized protozoan phyla, e.g. Ciliophora (ciliates and suctorians) and Foraminifera. New sequences of cultured Spongomonas, Metromonas and Metopion are also presented. In the light of these additions, and the increased taxon sampling from the environmental libraries, some revisions of cercozoan classification are made: the transfer of Spongomonadea from Reticulofilosa to Monadofilosa; the removal of Metopiida from Sarcomonadea; and the creation of the new order Metromonadida, currently containing the single genus Metromonas. Although Metromonas groups with weak to moderate support with Chlorarachnea, it is here placed in superclass Monadofilosa, to which it is morphologically more similar.

  10. Genome-wide analysis reveals specificities of Cpf1 endonucleases in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daesik; Kim, Jungeun; Hur, Junho K; Been, Kyung Wook; Yoon, Sun-Heui; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-08-01

    Programmable clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) Cpf1 endonucleases are single-RNA-guided (crRNA) enzymes that recognize thymidine-rich protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) sequences and produce cohesive double-stranded breaks (DSBs). Genome editing with CRISPR-Cpf1 endonucleases could provide an alternative to CRISPR-Cas9 endonucleases, but the determinants of targeting specificity are not well understood. Using mismatched crRNAs we found that Cpf1 could tolerate single or double mismatches in the 3' PAM-distal region, but not in the 5' PAM-proximal region. Genome-wide analysis of cleavage sites in vitro for eight Cpf1 nucleases using Digenome-seq revealed that there were 6 (LbCpf1) and 12 (AsCpf1) cleavage sites per crRNA in the human genome, fewer than are present for Cas9 nucleases (>90). Most Cpf1 off-target cleavage sites did not produce mutations in cells. We found mismatches in either the 3' PAM-distal region or in the PAM sequence of 12 off-target sites that were validated in vivo. Off-target effects were completely abrogated by using preassembled, recombinant Cpf1 ribonucleoproteins.

  11. Lipidomic profiling analysis reveals the dynamics of phospholipid molecules in Arabidopsis thaliana seedling growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Sheng Wang; Hong-Yan Yao; Hong-Wei Xue

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput lipidomic profiling provides a sensitive approach for discovering minor lipid species. By using an advance in electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrome-try, a large set of phospholipid molecular species (126 species) with high resolution were identified from Arabidopsis seedling;of them 31 species are newly identified (16 are unique in plants), including 13 species of phosphatidic acid (PA), nine phosphati-dylcholine, six phosphatidylinositol and three phosphatidylser-ine. Further analysis of the lipidomic profile reveals dynamics of phospholipids and distinct species alterations during seedling development. PA molecules are found at the lowest levels in imbibition and fol ow an increasing trend during seedling growth, while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) molecules show the opposite pattern with highest levels at imbibition and a general decreasing trend at later stages. Of PA molecular species, 34:2-, 34:3-, 36:4-, 36:5-, 38:3- and 38:4-PA increase during radicle emergence, and 34:2-and 34:3-PA reach highest levels during hypocotyl and cotyledon emergence from the seed coat. Conversely, molecular species of PE show higher levels in imbibition and decrease in later stages. These results suggest the crucial roles of specific molecular species and homeostasis of phospholipid molecules in seedling growth and provide insights into the mechanisms of how phospholipid molecules are involved in regulating plant development.

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis Revealed the Complex Regulatory Network of Brassinosteroid Effects in Photomorphogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Song; Xiao-Yi Zhou; Li Li; Liang-Jiao Xue; Xi Yang; Hong-Wei Xue

    2009-01-01

    Light and brassinosteroids (BRs) have been proved to be crucial in regulating plant growth and development;however,the mechanism of how they synergistically function is still largely unknown.To explore the underlying mechanisms in photomorphogenesis,genome-wide analyses were carried out through examining the gene expressions of the dark-grown WT or BR biosynthesis-defective mutant det2 seedlings in the presence of light stimuli or exogenous Brassinolide (BL).Results showed that BR deficiency stimulates,while BL treatment suppresses,the expressions of lightresponsive genes and photomorphogenesis,confirming the negative effects of BR in photomorphogenesis.This is consistent with the specific effects of BR on the expression of genes involved in cell wall modification,cellular metabolism and energy utilization during dark-light transition.Further analysis revealed that hormone biosynthesis and signaling-related genes,especially those of auxin,were altered under BL treatment or light stimuli,indicating that BR may modulate photomorphogenesis through synergetic regulation with other hormones.Additionally,suppressed ubiquitin-cycle pathway during light-dark transition hinted the presence of a complicated network among light,hormone,and protein degradation.The study provides the direct evidence of BR effects in photomorphogenesis and identified the genes involved in BR and light signaling pathway,which will help to elucidate the molecular mechanism of plant photomorphogenesis.

  13. Transcriptional analysis of the endothelial response to diabetes reveals a role for galectin-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, April L; Shohet, Ralph V; Maresh, J Gregory

    2011-10-20

    To characterize the endothelial dysfunction associated with Type II diabetes, we surveyed transcriptional responses in the vascular endothelia of mice receiving a diabetogenic, high-fat diet. Tie2-GFP mice were fed a diet containing 60% fat calories (HFD); controls were littermates fed normal chow. Following 4, 6, and 8 wk, aortic and leg muscle tissues were enzymatically dispersed, and endothelial cells were obtained by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Relative mRNA abundance in HFD vs. control endothelia was measured with long-oligo microarrays; highly dysregulated genes were confirmed by real-time PCR and protein quantification. HFD mice were hyperglycemic by 2 wk and displayed vascular insulin resistance and decreased glucose tolerance by 5 and 6 wk, respectively. Endothelial transcripts upregulated by HFD included galectin-3 (Lgals3), 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, and chemokine ligands 8 and 9. Increased LGALS3 protein was detected in muscle endothelium by immunohistology accompanied by elevated LGALS3 in the serum of HFD mice. Our comprehensive analysis of the endothelial transcriptional response in a model of Type II diabetes reveals novel regulation of transcripts with roles in inflammation, insulin sensitivity, oxidative stress, and atherosclerosis. Increased endothelial expression and elevated humoral levels of LGALS3 supports a role for this molecule in the vascular response to diabetes, and its potential as a direct biomarker for the inflammatory state in diabetes.

  14. A quorum-sensing factor in vegetative Dictyostelium discoideum cells revealed by quantitative migration analysis.

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    Laurent Golé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many cells communicate through the production of diffusible signaling molecules that accumulate and once a critical concentration has been reached, can activate or repress a number of target genes in a process termed quorum sensing (QS. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, QS plays an important role during development. However little is known about its effect on cell migration especially in the growth phase. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To investigate the role of cell density on cell migration in the growth phase, we use multisite timelapse microscopy and automated cell tracking. This analysis reveals a high heterogeneity within a given cell population, and the necessity to use large data sets to draw reliable conclusions on cell motion. In average, motion is persistent for short periods of time (t ≤ 5 min, but normal diffusive behavior is recovered over longer time periods. The persistence times are positively correlated with the migrated distances. Interestingly, the migrated distance decreases as well with cell density. The adaptation of cell migration to cell density highlights the role of a secreted quorum sensing factor (QSF on cell migration. Using a simple model describing the balance between the rate of QSF generation and the rate of QSF dilution, we were able to gather all experimental results into a single master curve, showing a sharp cell transition between high and low motile behaviors with increasing QSF. CONCLUSION: This study unambiguously demonstrates the central role played by QSF on amoeboid motion in the growth phase.

  15. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes from Mesobuthus martensii reveals Hox gene duplication in scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Zhiyong; Yu, Yao; Wu, Yingliang; Hao, Pei; He, Yawen; Zhao, Huabin; Li, Yixue; Zhao, Guoping; Li, Xuan; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-06-01

    Homeobox genes belong to a large gene group, which encodes the famous DNA-binding homeodomain that plays a key role in development and cellular differentiation during embryogenesis in animals. Here, one hundred forty-nine homeobox genes were identified from the Asian scorpion, Mesobuthus martensii (Chelicerata: Arachnida: Scorpiones: Buthidae) based on our newly assembled genome sequence with approximately 248 × coverage. The identified homeobox genes were categorized into eight classes including 82 families: 67 ANTP class genes, 33 PRD genes, 11 LIM genes, five POU genes, six SINE genes, 14 TALE genes, five CUT genes, two ZF genes and six unclassified genes. Transcriptome data confirmed that more than half of the genes were expressed in adults. The homeobox gene diversity of the eight classes is similar to the previously analyzed Mandibulata arthropods. Interestingly, it is hypothesized that the scorpion M. martensii may have two Hox clusters. The first complete genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes in Chelicerata not only reveals the repertoire of scorpion, arachnid and chelicerate homeobox genes, but also shows some insights into the evolution of arthropod homeobox genes.

  17. GC--MS analysis reveals production of 2--Phenylethanol from Aspergillus niger endophytic in rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Masood Ahmed; Sanjana, Kaul; Kumar, Dhar Manoj; Lal, Dhar Kanahya

    2010-02-01

    Endophytes include all organisms that during a variable period of their life, colonize the living internal tissues of their hosts without causing detectable symptoms. Several fungal endophytes have been isolated from a variety of plant species which have proved themselves as a rich source of secondary metabolites. The reported natural products from endophytes include antibiotics, immunosuppresants, anticancer compounds, antioxidant agents, etc. For the first time Rosa damacaena (rose) has been explored for its endophytes. The rose oil industry is the major identified deligence for its application in perfumery, flavouring, ointments, and pharmaceuticals including various herbal products. During the present investigation fungal endophytes were isolated from Rosa damacaena. A total of fifty four isolates were isolated out of which sixteen isolates were screened for the production of secondary metabolites. GCMS analysis reveals the production of 2-phenylethanol by one of the isolates JUBT 3M which was identified as Aspergillus niger. This is the first report of production of 2-phenylethanol from endophytic A. niger. 2-phenylethanol is an important constituent of rose oil constituting about 4.06% of rose oil. Presence of 2-phenylethanol indicates that the endophyte of rose may duplicate the biosynthesis of phenyl propanoids by rose plant. Besides this, the other commercial applications of phenylethanol include its use in antiseptics, disinfectants, anti-microbials and preservative in pharmaceuticals.

  18. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals Candidate Targets for Curcumin against Tetranychus cinnabarinus

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    Xuejiao Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetranychus cinnabarinus is an important agricultural pest with a broad host range. We previously identified curcumin as a promising acaricidal compound against T. cinnabarinus. However, the acaricidal mechanism of curcumin remains unknown. In this study, RNA-seq was employed to analyze the transcriptome changes in T. cinnabarinus treated with curcumin or the solvent. A total of 105,706,297 clean sequence reads were generated by sequencing, with more than 90% of the reads successfully mapped to the reference sequence. The RNA-seq identified 111 and 96 differentially expressed genes between curcumin- and solvent-treated mites at 24 and 48 h after treatment, respectively. GO enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes showed that the cellular process was the dominant group at both time points. Finally, we screened 23 differentially expressed genes that were functionally identical or similar to the targets of common insecticide/acaricides or genes that were associated with mite detoxification and metabolism. Calmodulin, phospholipase A2, and phospholipase C were activated upon curcumin treatment suggesting that the calcium channel related genes might play important roles in mite’s response to curcumin. Overall our results revealed the global transcriptional changes in T. cinnabarinus after curcumin treatment to enable further identification of the targets of curcumin in mites.

  19. Latent physiological factors of complex human diseases revealed by independent component analysis of clinarrays

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    Chen David P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis and treatment of patients in the clinical setting is often driven by known symptomatic factors that distinguish one particular condition from another. Treatment based on noticeable symptoms, however, is limited to the types of clinical biomarkers collected, and is prone to overlooking dysfunctions in physiological factors not easily evident to medical practitioners. We used a vector-based representation of patient clinical biomarkers, or clinarrays, to search for latent physiological factors that underlie human diseases directly from clinical laboratory data. Knowledge of these factors could be used to improve assessment of disease severity and help to refine strategies for diagnosis and monitoring disease progression. Results Applying Independent Component Analysis on clinarrays built from patient laboratory measurements revealed both known and novel concomitant physiological factors for asthma, types 1 and 2 diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Serum sodium was found to be the most significant factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and was also significant in asthma. TSH3, a measure of thyroid function, and blood urea nitrogen, indicative of kidney function, were factors unique to type 1 diabetes respective to type 2 diabetes. Platelet count was significant across all the diseases analyzed. Conclusions The results demonstrate that large-scale analyses of clinical biomarkers using unsupervised methods can offer novel insights into the pathophysiological basis of human disease, and suggest novel clinical utility of established laboratory measurements.

  20. Temporal proteomic analysis reveals continuous impairment of intestinal development in neonatal piglets with intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiu; Wu, Weizong; Lin, Gang; Li, Defa; Wu, Guoyao; Wang, Junjun

    2010-02-01

    Efficiency of nutrient utilization is reduced in neonates with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) compared with those with a normal birth weight (NBW). However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we applied temporal proteomic approach, coupled with histological and biochemical analyses, to study dynamic changes of the proteome in the small intestinal mucosa of IUGR piglets during the nursing period (Days 1, 7 and 21). We identified 56 differentially expressed protein spots between IUGR and NBW piglets. These proteins participate in key biological processes, including (1) absorption, digestion and transport of nutrients; (2) cell structure and motility; (3) glucose and energy metabolism; (4) lipid metabolism; (5) amino acid metabolism; (6) mineral and vitamin metabolism; (7) cellular redox homeostasis; (8) stress response; and (9) apoptosis. The results of our temporal proteomics analysis reveal continuous impairment of intestinal development in neonatal piglets with IUGR. The findings have important implications for understanding metabolic defects in the small intestine of IUGR neonates and are expected to provide new strategies to improve their survival and growth.

  1. RNA sequencing analysis of human podocytes reveals glucocorticoid regulated gene networks targeting non-immune pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lulu; Hindmarch, Charles C. T.; Rogers, Mark; Campbell, Colin; Waterfall, Christy; Coghill, Jane; Mathieson, Peter W.; Welsh, Gavin I.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroids that reduce inflammation and are used as immunosuppressive drugs for many diseases. They are also the mainstay for the treatment of minimal change nephropathy (MCN), which is characterised by an absence of inflammation. Their mechanisms of action remain elusive. Evidence suggests that immunomodulatory drugs can directly act on glomerular epithelial cells or ‘podocytes’, the cell type which is the main target of injury in MCN. To understand the nature of glucocorticoid effects on non-immune cell functions, we generated RNA sequencing data from human podocyte cell lines and identified the genes that are significantly regulated in dexamethasone-treated podocytes compared to vehicle-treated cells. The upregulated genes are of functional relevance to cytoskeleton-related processes, whereas the downregulated genes mostly encode pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We observed a tendency for dexamethasone-upregulated genes to be downregulated in MCN patients. Integrative analysis revealed gene networks composed of critical signaling pathways that are likely targeted by dexamethasone in podocytes. PMID:27774996

  2. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  3. Prevalence and characteristics of Streptococcus pneumoniae "putative serotype 6E" isolates from Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin Yang; Park, In Ho; So, Thomas Man-kit; Lalitha, M K; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Yasin, Rohani Md; Carlos, Celia C; Perera, Jennifer; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Van, Pham Hung; Shibl, Atef M; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility, and genotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae “putative serotype 6E” isolates from Asian countries were investigated. A total of 244 S. pneumoniae serogroup 6 isolates obtained from 11 Asian countries were included in this study. Of the 244 serogroup 6 isolates, 101 (41.4%) were typed as "putative serotype 6E," followed by serotypes 6A, 6B, 6C, and 6D (27.0, 20.1, 5.7, and 5.7%, respectively). Multilocus sequence typing revealed that clonal complex (CC) 90, including ST90 and its variants, was the most prevalent clonal group of "putative serotype 6E" isolates (n = 63; 62.4%). CC146 and CC315 were also found frequently in some of the countries. Most of the "putative serotype 6E" isolates showed very high resistance rates against cefuroxime, erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, probably due to their highly resistant to antimicrobials clone, CC90. Our results indicate that “putative serotype 6E” is prevalent in Asian countries. The clonal dissemination of "putative serotype 6E" isolates was also identified.

  4. The Immersive Virtual Reality Experience: A Typology of Users Revealed Through Multiple Correspondence Analysis Combined with Cluster Analysis Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Pedro J; Morais, Diogo; Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Saraiva, Tomaz

    2016-03-01

    Immersive virtual reality is thought to be advantageous by leading to higher levels of presence. However, and despite users getting actively involved in immersive three-dimensional virtual environments that incorporate sound and motion, there are individual factors, such as age, video game knowledge, and the predisposition to immersion, that may be associated with the quality of virtual reality experience. Moreover, one particular concern for users engaged in immersive virtual reality environments (VREs) is the possibility of side effects, such as cybersickness. The literature suggests that at least 60% of virtual reality users report having felt symptoms of cybersickness, which reduces the quality of the virtual reality experience. The aim of this study was thus to profile the right user to be involved in a VRE through head-mounted display. To examine which user characteristics are associated with the most effective virtual reality experience (lower cybersickness), a multiple correspondence analysis combined with cluster analysis technique was performed. Results revealed three distinct profiles, showing that the PC gamer profile is more associated with higher levels of virtual reality effectiveness, that is, higher predisposition to be immersed and reduced cybersickness symptoms in the VRE than console gamer and nongamer. These findings can be a useful orientation in clinical practice and future research as they help identify which users are more predisposed to benefit from immersive VREs.

  5. Proteomic and bioinformatic analysis of epithelial tight junction reveals an unexpected cluster of synaptic molecules

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    Tang Vivian W

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zonula occludens, also known as the tight junction, is a specialized cell-cell interaction characterized by membrane "kisses" between epithelial cells. A cytoplasmic plaque of ~100 nm corresponding to a meshwork of densely packed proteins underlies the tight junction membrane domain. Due to its enormous size and difficulties in obtaining a biochemically pure fraction, the molecular composition of the tight junction remains largely unknown. Results A novel biochemical purification protocol has been developed to isolate tight junction protein complexes from cultured human epithelial cells. After identification of proteins by mass spectroscopy and fingerprint analysis, candidate proteins are scored and assessed individually. A simple algorithm has been devised to incorporate transmembrane domains and protein modification sites for scoring membrane proteins. Using this new scoring system, a total of 912 proteins have been identified. These 912 hits are analyzed using a bioinformatics approach to bin the hits in 4 categories: configuration, molecular function, cellular function, and specialized process. Prominent clusters of proteins related to the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and vesicular traffic have been identified. Weaker clusters of proteins associated with cell growth, cell migration, translation, and transcription are also found. However, the strongest clusters belong to synaptic proteins and signaling molecules. Localization studies of key components of synaptic transmission have confirmed the presence of both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins at the tight junction domain. To correlate proteomics data with structure, the tight junction has been examined using electron microscopy. This has revealed many novel structures including end-on cytoskeletal attachments, vesicles fusing/budding at the tight junction membrane domain, secreted substances encased between the tight junction kisses, endocytosis of tight junction

  6. Differential Genes Expression between Fertile and Infertile Spermatozoa Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis.

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    Sandeep Kumar Bansal

    Full Text Available It was believed earlier that spermatozoa have no traces of RNA because of loss of most of the cytoplasm. Recent studies have revealed the presence of about 3000 different kinds of mRNAs in ejaculated spermatozoa. However, the correlation of transcriptome profile with infertility remains obscure.Total RNA from sperm (after exclusion of somatic cells of 60 men consisting of individuals with known fertility (n=20, idiopathic infertility (normozoospermic patients, n=20, and asthenozoospermia (n=20 was isolated. After RNA quality check on Bioanalyzer, AffymetrixGeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST Array was used for expression profiling, which consisted of >30,000 coding transcripts and >11,000 long intergenic non-coding transcripts.Comparison between all three groups revealed that two thousand and eighty one transcripts were differentially expressed. Analysis of these transcripts showed that some transcripts [ribosomal proteins (RPS25, RPS11, RPS13, RPL30, RPL34, RPL27, RPS5, HINT1, HSP90AB1, SRSF9, EIF4G2, ILF2] were up-regulated in the normozoospermic group, but down-regulated in the asthenozoospermic group in comparison to the control group. Some transcripts were specific to the normozoospermic group (up-regulated: CAPNS1, FAM153C, ARF1, CFL1, RPL19, USP22; down-regulated: ZNF90, SMNDC1, c14orf126, HNRNPK, while some were specific to the asthenozoospermic group (up-regulated: RPL24, HNRNPM, RPL4, PRPF8, HTN3, RPL11, RPL28, RPS16, SLC25A3, C2orf24, RHOA, GDI2, NONO, PARK7; down-regulated: HNRNPC, SMARCAD1, RPS24, RPS24, RPS27A, KIFAP3. A number of differentially expressed transcripts in spermatozoa were related to reproduction (n = 58 and development (n= 210. Some of these transcripts were related to heat shock proteins (DNAJB4, DNAJB14, testis specific genes (TCP11, TESK1, TSPYL1, ADAD1, and Y-chromosome genes (DAZ1, TSPYL1.A complex RNA population in spermatozoa consisted of coding and non-coding RNAs. A number of transcripts that participate in a host of

  7. Revealing the Effects of the Herbal Pair of Euphorbia kansui and Glycyrrhiza on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Ascites with Integrating Network Target Analysis and Experimental Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanqiong; Lin, Ya; Zhao, Haiyu; Guo, Qiuyan; Yan, Chen; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Although the herbal pair of Euphorbia kansui (GS) and Glycyrrhiza (GC) is one of the so-called "eighteen antagonistic medicaments" in Chinese medicinal literature, it is prescribed in a classic Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formula Gansui-Banxia-Tang for cancerous ascites, suggesting that GS and GC may exhibit synergistic or antagonistic effects in different combination designs. Here, we modeled the effects of GS/GC combination with a target interaction network and clarified the associations between the network topologies involving the drug targets and the drug combination effects. Moreover, the "edge-betweenness" values, which is defined as the frequency with which edges are placed on the shortest paths between all pairs of modules in network, were calculated, and the ADRB1-PIK3CG interaction exhibited the greatest edge-betweenness value, suggesting its crucial role in connecting the other edges in the network. Because ADRB1 and PIK3CG were putative targets of GS and GC, respectively, and both had functional interactions with AVPR2 approved as known therapeutic target for ascites, we proposed that the ADRB1-PIK3CG-AVPR2 signal axis might be involved in the effects of the GS-GC combination on ascites. This proposal was further experimentally validated in a H22 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ascites model. Collectively, this systems-level investigation integrated drug target prediction and network analysis to reveal the combination principles of the herbal pair of GS and GC. Experimental validation in an in vivo system provided convincing evidence that different combination designs of GS and GC might result in synergistic or antagonistic effects on HCC ascites that might be partially related to their regulation of the ADRB1-PIK3CG-AVPR2 signal axis.

  8. Evolutionary, structural and functional relationships revealed by comparative analysis of syntenic genes in Rhizobiales

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    Medrano-Soto Arturo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics has provided valuable insights into the nature of gene sequence variation and chromosomal organization of closely related bacterial species. However, questions about the biological significance of gene order conservation, or synteny, remain open. Moreover, few comprehensive studies have been reported for rhizobial genomes. Results We analyzed the genomic sequences of four fast growing Rhizobiales (Sinorhizobium meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Mesorhizobium loti and Brucella melitensis. We made a comprehensive gene classification to define chromosomal orthologs, genes with homologs in other replicons such as plasmids, and those which were species-specific. About two thousand genes were predicted to be orthologs in each chromosome and about 80% of these were syntenic. A striking gene colinearity was found in pairs of organisms and a large fraction of the microsyntenic regions and operons were similar. Syntenic products showed higher identity levels than non-syntenic ones, suggesting a resistance to sequence variation due to functional constraints; also, an unusually high fraction of syntenic products contained membranal segments. Syntenic genes encode a high proportion of essential cell functions, presented a high level of functional relationships and a very low horizontal gene transfer rate. The sequence variability of the proteins can be considered the species signature in response to specific niche adaptation. Comparatively, an analysis with genomes of Enterobacteriales showed a different gene organization but gave similar results in the synteny conservation, essential role of syntenic genes and higher functional linkage among the genes of the microsyntenic regions. Conclusion Syntenic bacterial genes represent a commonly evolved group. They not only reveal the core chromosomal segments present in the last common ancestor and determine the metabolic characteristics shared by these microorganisms

  9. Carbon sources in the Beaufort Sea revealed by molecular lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, I.; Fiorini, S.; Gasser, B.; Martín, J.; Miquel, J. C.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular lipid biomarkers (hydrocarbons, alcohols, sterols and fatty acids) and compound specific isotope analysis of suspended particulate organic matter (SPM) and surface sediments of the Mackenzie Shelf and slope (Southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean), were studied in summer 2009. The concentrations of the molecular lipid markers, characteristic of known organic matter sources, were grouped and used as proxies to evaluate the relative importance of fresh algal, detrital algal, fossil, C3 terrestrial plants, bacterial and zooplankton material in the sedimentary organic matter (OM). Fossil and detrital algal contributions were the major fractions of the freshwater SPM from the Mackenzie River with ~34% each of the total molecular biomarkers. Fresh algal, C3 terrestrial, bacterial and zooplanktonic components represented much lower percentages, 17, 10, 4 and 80%) with a minor contribution of fossil and C3 terrestrial biomarkers. Characterization of the sediments revealed a major sink of refractory algal material mixed with some fresh algal material, fossil hydrocarbons and a small input of C3 terrestrial sources. In particular, the sediments from the shelf and at the mouth of the Amundsen Gulf presented the highest contribution of detrital algal material (60-75%) whereas those from the slope contained the highest proportion of fossil (40%) and C3 terrestrial plant material (10%). Overall, considering that the detrital algal material is marine derived, autochthonous sources contributed more than allochthonous sources to the OM lipid pool. Using the ratio of an allochthonous biomarker (normalized to total organic carbon, TOC) found in the sediments to those measured at the river mouth water, we estimated that the fraction of terrestrial material preserved in the sediments accounted for 30-40% of the total carbon in the inner shelf sediments, 17% in the outer shelf and Amundsen Gulf and up to 25% in the slope sediments.

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of the oleaginous microalga Neochloris oleoabundans reveals metabolic insights into triacylglyceride accumulation

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    Rismani-Yazdi Hamid

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of sequenced genomes for oleaginous microalgae limits our understanding of the mechanisms these organisms utilize to become enriched in triglycerides. Here we report the de novo transcriptome assembly and quantitative gene expression analysis of the oleaginous microalga Neochloris oleoabundans, with a focus on the complex interaction of pathways associated with the production of the triacylglycerol (TAG biofuel precursor. Results After growth under nitrogen replete and nitrogen limiting conditions, we quantified the cellular content of major biomolecules including total lipids, triacylglycerides, starch, protein, and chlorophyll. Transcribed genes were sequenced, the transcriptome was assembled de novo, and the expression of major functional categories, relevant pathways, and important genes was quantified through the mapping of reads to the transcriptome. Over 87 million, 77 base pair high quality reads were produced on the Illumina HiSeq sequencing platform. Metabolite measurements supported by genes and pathway expression results indicated that under the nitrogen-limiting condition, carbon is partitioned toward triglyceride production, which increased fivefold over the nitrogen-replete control. In addition to the observed overexpression of the fatty acid synthesis pathway, TAG production during nitrogen limitation was bolstered by repression of the β-oxidation pathway, up-regulation of genes encoding for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex which funnels acetyl-CoA to lipid biosynthesis, activation of the pentose phosphate pathway to supply reducing equivalents to inorganic nitrogen assimilation and fatty acid biosynthesis, and the up-regulation of lipases—presumably to reconstruct cell membranes in order to supply additional fatty acids for TAG biosynthesis. Conclusions Our quantitative transcriptome study reveals a broad overview of how nitrogen stress results in excess TAG production in N. oleoabundans, and

  11. Diversity in a Polymicrobial Community Revealed by Analysis of Viromes, Endolysins and CRISPR Spacers

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    Treangen, Todd J.; Koren, Sergey; Pop, Mihai; Bhaya, Devaki

    2016-01-01

    The polymicrobial biofilm communities in Mushroom and Octopus Spring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are well characterized, yet little is known about the phage populations. Dominant species, Synechococcus sp. JA-2-3B'a(2–13), Synechococcus sp. JA-3-3Ab, Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl, and Roseiflexus sp. RS-1, contain multiple CRISPR-Cas arrays, suggesting complex interactions with phage predators. To analyze phage populations from Octopus Spring biofilms, we sequenced a viral enriched fraction. To assemble and analyze phage metagenomic data, we developed a custom module, VIRITAS, implemented within the MetAMOS framework. This module bins contigs into groups based on tetranucleotide frequencies and CRISPR spacer-protospacer matching and ORF calling. Using this pipeline we were able to assemble phage sequences into contigs and bin them into three clusters that corroborated with their potential host range. The virome contained 52,348 predicted ORFs; some were clearly phage-like; 9319 ORFs had a recognizable Pfam domain while the rest were hypothetical. Of the recognized domains with CRISPR spacer matches, was the phage endolysin used by lytic phage to disrupt cells. Analysis of the endolysins present in the thermophilic cyanophage contigs revealed a subset of characterized endolysins as well as a Glyco_hydro_108 (PF05838) domain not previously associated with sequenced cyanophages. A search for CRISPR spacer matches to all identified phage endolysins demonstrated that a majority of endolysin domains were targets. This strategy provides a general way to link host and phage as endolysins are known to be widely distributed in bacteriophage. Endolysins can also provide information about host cell wall composition and have the additional potential to be used as targets for novel therapeutics. PMID:27611571

  12. Analysis of newly established EST databases reveals similarities between heart regeneration in newt and fish

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    Weis Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The newt Notophthalmus viridescens possesses the remarkable ability to respond to cardiac damage by formation of new myocardial tissue. Surprisingly little is known about changes in gene activities that occur during the course of regeneration. To begin to decipher the molecular processes, that underlie restoration of functional cardiac tissue, we generated an EST database from regenerating newt hearts and compared the transcriptional profile of selected candidates with genes deregulated during zebrafish heart regeneration. Results A cDNA library of 100,000 cDNA clones was generated from newt hearts 14 days after ventricular injury. Sequencing of 11520 cDNA clones resulted in 2894 assembled contigs. BLAST searches revealed 1695 sequences with potential homology to sequences from the NCBI database. BLAST searches to TrEMBL and Swiss-Prot databases assigned 1116 proteins to Gene Ontology terms. We also identified a relatively large set of 174 ORFs, which are likely to be unique for urodele amphibians. Expression analysis of newt-zebrafish homologues confirmed the deregulation of selected genes during heart regeneration. Sequences, BLAST results and GO annotations were visualized in a relational web based database followed by grouping of identified proteins into clusters of GO Terms. Comparison of data from regenerating zebrafish hearts identified biological processes, which were uniformly overrepresented during cardiac regeneration in newt and zebrafish. Conclusion We concluded that heart regeneration in newts and zebrafish led to the activation of similar sets of genes, which suggests that heart regeneration in both species might follow similar principles. The design of the newly established newt EST database allows identification of molecular pathways important for heart regeneration.

  13. Genome Analysis of Two Pseudonocardia Phylotypes Associated with Acromyrmex Leafcutter Ants Reveals Their Biosynthetic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Neil A; Innocent, Tabitha M; Heine, Daniel; Bassam, Mahmoud Al; Worsley, Sarah F; Trottmann, Felix; Patrick, Elaine H; Yu, Douglas W; Murrell, J C; Schiøtt, Morten; Wilkinson, Barrie; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Hutchings, Matthew I

    2016-01-01

    The attine ants of South and Central America are ancient farmers, having evolved a symbiosis with a fungal food crop >50 million years ago. The most evolutionarily derived attines are the Atta and Acromyrmex leafcutter ants, which harvest fresh leaves to feed their fungus. Acromyrmex and many other attines vertically transmit a mutualistic strain of Pseudonocardia and use antifungal compounds made by these bacteria to protect their fungal partner against co-evolved fungal pathogens of the genus Escovopsis. Pseudonocardia mutualists associated with the attines Apterostigma dentigerum and Trachymyrmex cornetzi make novel cyclic depsipeptide compounds called gerumycins, while a mutualist strain isolated from derived Acromyrmex octospinosus makes an unusual polyene antifungal called nystatin P1. The novelty of these antimicrobials suggests there is merit in exploring secondary metabolites of Pseudonocardia on a genome-wide scale. Here, we report a genomic analysis of the Pseudonocardia phylotypes Ps1 and Ps2 that are consistently associated with Acromyrmex ants collected in Gamboa, Panama. These were previously distinguished solely on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing but genome sequencing of five Ps1 and five Ps2 strains revealed that the phylotypes are distinct species and each encodes between 11 and 15 secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). There are signature BGCs for Ps1 and Ps2 strains and some that are conserved in both. Ps1 strains all contain BGCs encoding nystatin P1-like antifungals, while the Ps2 strains encode novel nystatin-like molecules. Strains show variations in the arrangement of these BGCs that resemble those seen in gerumycin gene clusters. Genome analyses and invasion assays support our hypothesis that vertically transmitted Ps1 and Ps2 strains have antibacterial activity that could help shape the cuticular microbiome. Thus, our work defines the Pseudonocardia species associated with Acromyrmex ants and supports the hypothesis

  14. Particle Motion Analysis Reveals Nanoscale Bond Characteristics and Enhances Dynamic Range for Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Emiel W A; van IJzendoorn, Leo J; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-03-22

    Biofunctionalized colloidal particles are widely used as labels in bioanalytical assays, lab-on-chip devices, biophysical research, and in studies on live biological systems. With detection resolution going down to the level of single particles and single molecules, understanding the nature of the interaction of the particles with surfaces and substrates becomes of paramount importance. Here, we present a comprehensive study of motion patterns of colloidal particles maintained in close proximity to a substrate by short molecular tethers (40 nm). The motion of the particles (500-1000 nm) was optically tracked with a very high localization accuracy (below 3 nm). A surprisingly large variation in motion patterns was observed, which can be attributed to properties of the particle-molecule-substrate system, namely the bond number, the nature of the bond, particle protrusions, and substrate nonuniformities. Experimentally observed motion patterns were compared to numerical Monte Carlo simulations, revealing a close correspondence between the observed motion patterns and properties of the molecular system. Particles bound via single tethers show distinct disc-, ring-, and bell-shaped motion patterns, where the ring- and bell-shaped patterns are caused by protrusions on the particle in the direct vicinity of the molecular attachment point. Double and triple tethered particles exhibit stripe-shaped and triangular-shaped motion patterns, respectively. The developed motion pattern analysis allows for discrimination between particles bound by different bond types, which opens the possibility to improve the limit of detection and the dynamic range of bioanalytical assays, with a projected increase of dynamic range by nearly 2 orders of magnitude.

  15. Evolutionary history of barley cultivation in Europe revealed by genetic analysis of extant landraces

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    Jones Huw

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the evolution of cultivated barley is important for two reasons. First, the evolutionary relationships between different landraces might provide information on the spread and subsequent development of barley cultivation, including the adaptation of the crop to new environments and its response to human selection. Second, evolutionary information would enable landraces with similar traits but different genetic backgrounds to be identified, providing alternative strategies for the introduction of these traits into modern germplasm. Results The evolutionary relationships between 651 barley landraces were inferred from the genotypes for 24 microsatellites. The landraces could be divided into nine populations, each with a different geographical distribution. Comparisons with ear row number, caryopsis structure, seasonal growth habit and flowering time revealed a degree of association between population structure and phenotype, and analysis of climate variables indicated that the landraces are adapted, at least to some extent, to their environment. Human selection and/or environmental adaptation may therefore have played a role in the origin and/or maintenance of one or more of the barley landrace populations. There was also evidence that at least some of the population structure derived from geographical partitioning set up during the initial spread of barley cultivation into Europe, or reflected the later introduction of novel varieties. In particular, three closely-related populations were made up almost entirely of plants with the daylength nonresponsive version of the photoperiod response gene PPD-H1, conferring adaptation to the long annual growth season of northern Europe. These three populations probably originated in the eastern Fertile Crescent and entered Europe after the initial spread of agriculture. Conclusions The discovery of population structure, combined with knowledge of associated phenotypes and

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of Chilling-Imbibed Embryo Revealed Membrane Recovery Related Genes in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Shen, Hangqi; Lin, Cheng; Fu, Hong; Sheteiwy, Mohamed S.; Guan, Yajing; Huang, Yutao; Hu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The delayed seed germination and poor seedling growth caused by imbibitional chilling injury was common phenomenon in maize seedling establishment. In this study, RNA sequencing technology was used to comprehensively investigate the gene expressions in chilling-imbibed maize embryo and to reveal the underlying mechanism of chilling injury at molecular level. Imbibed seeds for 2 h at 5°C (LT2) were selected and transcriptomic comparative analysis was performed. Among 327 DEGs indentified between dry seed (CK0) and LT2, 15 specific genes with plasma membrane (PM) relevant functions belonging to lipid metabolism, stress, signaling and transport were characterized, and most of them showed down-regulation pattern under chilling stress. When transferred to 25°C for recovery (LT3), remarkable changes occurred in maize embryo. There were 873 DEGs including many PM related genes being identified between LT2 and LT3, some of which showing significant increase after 1 h recovery. Moreover, 15 genes encoding intracellular vesicular trafficking proteins were found to be exclusively differential expressed at recovery stage. It suggested that the intracellular vesicle trafficking might be essential for PM recovery through PM turnover. Furthermore, transcriptome analyses on imbibed embryos under normal condition (25°C) were also made as a contrast. A total of 651 DEGs were identified to mainly involved in protein metabolism, transcriptional regulation, signaling, and energy productions. Overall, the RNA-Seq results provided us a deep knowledge of imbibitional chilling injury on plasma membrane and a new view on PM repaired mechanism during early seed imbibition at transcriptional level. The DEGs identified in this work would be useful references in future seed germination research. PMID:28101090

  17. Putative cryptoendolithic life in Devonian pillow basalt, Rheinisches Schiefergebirge, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckmann, J; Bach, W; Behrens, K; Reitner, J

    2008-03-01

    Middle Devonian (Givetian) pillow basalt and inter-pillow breccia from the Rheinisches Schiefergebirge in Germany were found to contain putative biogenic filaments that indicate that life once proliferated within these volcanic rocks. Mineralized filaments are found in carbonate amygdules (vesicles filled by carbonate cement) in the volcanic rock, where they started to form on the internal surface of the once water-filled vesicles. Biogenicity of the filaments is indicated by (1) their size and shape resembling modern microorganisms including a constant diameter along the length of curved filaments, (2) their independence of crystal faces or cleavage planes, (3) branching patterns reminiscent of modern microorganisms, and (4) their spatial clustering and preferential occurrence close to the margin of pillows and in the inter-pillow breccias. A time lag between the deposition of pillow basalt and the activity of endoliths is revealed by the sequence of carbonate cements filling the amygdules. The putative filamentous microorganisms thrived after the formation of early fibrous rim cement, but before later equant calcite spar filled most of the remaining porosity. Microbial clay authigenesis analogous to the encrustation of prokaryotes in modern iron-rich environments led to the preservation of filaments. The filaments predominantly consist of the clay minerals chamosite and illite. Having dwelled in water-filled vesicles, the Devonian basalt-hosted filaments apparently represent cryptoendoliths. This finding suggests that a previously unrecognized niche for life exists within volcanic rock.

  18. Transcriptomic Analysis of Musca domestica to Reveal Key Genes of the Prophenoloxidase-Activating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dianxiang; Liang, Yongli; Wang, Xianwei; Wang, Lei; Qi, Mei; Yu, Yang; Luan, Yuanyuan

    2015-09-01

    The proPO system regulates melanization in arthropods. However, the genes that are involved in the proPO system in housefly Musca domestica remain unclear. Thus, this study analyzed the combined transcriptome obtained from M. domestica larvae, pupae, and adults that were either normal or bacteria-challenged by an Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus mixture. A total of 54,821,138 clean reads (4.93 Gb) were yielded by Illumina sequencing, which were de novo assembled into 89,842 unigenes. Of the 89,842 unigenes, based on a similarity search with known genes in other insects, 24 putative genes related to the proPO system were identified. Eight of the identified genes encoded for peptidoglycan recognition receptors, two encoded for prophenoloxidases, three encoded for prophenoloxidase-activating enzymes, and 11 encoded for serine proteinase inhibitors. The expression levels of these identified genes were investigated by qRT-PCR assay, which were consistent with expected activation process of the proPO system, and their activation functions were confirmed by the measurement of phenoloxidase activity in bacteria-infected larvae after proPO antibody blockage, suggesting these candidate genes might have potentially different roles in the activation of proPO system. Collectively, this study has provided the comprehensive transcriptomic data of an insect and some fundamental basis toward achieving understanding of the activation mechanisms and immune functions of the proPO system in M. domestica.

  19. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes involved in Blister Blight defense in Tea (Camellia sinensis (L) Kuntze)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaswall, Kuldip; Mahajan, Pallavi; Singh, Gagandeep; Parmar, Rajni; Seth, Romit; Raina, Aparnashree; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Shankar, Ravi; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2016-07-01

    To unravel the molecular mechanism of defense against blister blight (BB) disease caused by an obligate biotrophic fungus, Exobasidium vexans, transcriptome of BB interaction with resistance and susceptible tea genotypes was analysed through RNA-seq using Illumina GAIIx at four different stages during ~20-day disease cycle. Approximately 69 million high quality reads were assembled de novo, yielding 37,790 unique transcripts with more than 55% being functionally annotated. Differentially expressed, 149 defense related transcripts/genes, namely defense related enzymes, resistance genes, multidrug resistant transporters, transcription factors, retrotransposons, metacaspases and chaperons were observed in RG, suggesting their role in defending against BB. Being present in the major hub, putative master regulators among these candidates were identified from predetermined protein-protein interaction network of Arabidopsis thaliana. Further, confirmation of abundant expression of well-known RPM1, RPS2 and RPP13 in quantitative Real Time PCR indicates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, possibly induce synthesis of antimicrobial compounds, required to overcome the virulence of E. vexans. Compendiously, the current study provides a comprehensive gene expression and insights into the molecular mechanism of tea defense against BB to serve as a resource for unravelling the possible regulatory mechanism of immunity against various biotic stresses in tea and other crops.

  20. Global transcriptional analysis of Bacillus licheniformis reveals an overlap between heat shock and iron limitation stimulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Allan K; Breüner, Anne; Krzystanek, Marcin; Andersen, Jens T; Poulsen, Thomas A; Olsen, Peter B; Mijakovic, Ivan; Rasmussen, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we characterized the heat shock stimulon of the important industrial microorganism Bacillus licheniformis using DNA microarrays. While sharing a high degree of homology with the closely related model organism Bacillus subtilis, the heat shock stimulon of B. licheniformis exhibited several novel and unexpected features. Most notably, heat shock in B. licheniformis resulted in decreased amounts of mRNA from the ytrABCEF operon, encoding a putative acetoin uptake system, and stimulated the transcription of purine biosynthesis and iron uptake genes. Unexpectedly, deletion of the ytrEF genes did not affect acetoin uptake, but increased heat sensitivity. To investigate the connection between heat stress and iron uptake further, we analyzed the iron limitation response of B. licheniformis by DNA microarrays and concluded that the response mostly involves the genes related to iron uptake and metabolism, while the only heat shock gene affected by iron limitation was clpE. We also attempted to delete the fur gene (encoding the ferric uptake repressor), but unexpectedly found it to be essential in B. licheniformis. Using the fluorescent protein-encoding reporter gene under control of the dhb promoter, which responded to both heat shock and iron-starvation, we confirmed the overlap between these responses.

  1. Analysis of global gene expression in Brachypodium distachyon reveals extensive network plasticity in response to abiotic stress.

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    Henry D Priest

    Full Text Available Brachypodium distachyon is a close relative of many important cereal crops. Abiotic stress tolerance has a significant impact on productivity of agriculturally important food and feedstock crops. Analysis of the transcriptome of Brachypodium after chilling, high-salinity, drought, and heat stresses revealed diverse differential expression of many transcripts. Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis revealed 22 distinct gene modules with specific profiles of expression under each stress. Promoter analysis implicated short DNA sequences directly upstream of module members in the regulation of 21 of 22 modules. Functional analysis of module members revealed enrichment in functional terms for 10 of 22 network modules. Analysis of condition-specific correlations between differentially expressed gene pairs revealed extensive plasticity in the expression relationships of gene pairs. Photosynthesis, cell cycle, and cell wall expression modules were down-regulated by all abiotic stresses. Modules which were up-regulated by each abiotic stress fell into diverse and unique gene ontology GO categories. This study provides genomics resources and improves our understanding of abiotic stress responses of Brachypodium.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of Dof transcription factors reveals functional characteristics during development and response to biotic stresses in pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Won-Hee; Kim, Seungill; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Choi, Doil; Yeom, Seon-In

    2016-01-01

    The DNA-binding with one zinc finger proteins (Dofs) are a plant-specific family of transcription factors. The Dofs are involved in a variety of biological processes such as phytohormone production, seed development, and environmental adaptation. Dofs have been previously identified in several plants, but not in pepper. We identified 33 putative Dof genes in pepper (CaDofs). To gain an overview of the CaDofs, we analyzed phylogenetic relationships, protein motifs, and evolutionary history. We divided the 33 CaDofs, containing 25 motifs, into four major groups distributed on eight chromosomes. We discovered an expansion of the CaDofs dated to a recent duplication event. Segmental duplication that occurred before the speciation of the Solanaceae lineages was predominant among the CaDofs. The global gene-expression profiling of the CaDofs by RNA-seq analysis showed distinct temporal and pathogen-specific variation during development and response to biotic stresses (two TMV strains, PepMoV, and Phytophthora capsici), suggesting functional diversity among the CaDofs. These results will provide the useful clues into the responses of Dofs in biotic stresses and promote a better understanding of their multiple function in pepper and other species. PMID:27653666

  3. In Silico Analysis of a Novel Plasmid from the Coral Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus Reveals Two Potential “Ecological Islands”

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    Jenny Wachter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As virulence often correlates with the presence of plasmid replicons in several Vibrio spp., this study investigated whether non-chromosomal DNA could be found in the coral pathogen, Vibrio coralliilyticus BAA-450. A circular plasmid, 26,631 bp in size, was identified. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the plasmid contained 30 open reading frames, six tRNA genes, 12 inverted repeats, three direct repeats and presented no continuous sequence identity to other replicons within the database. Consequently, these findings indicate that this is a novel, previously unidentified, plasmid. Two putative “ecological islands” were also identified and are predicted to encode for various factors that would facilitate growth and survival under different ecological conditions. In addition, two open reading frames may encode proteins that contribute to the pathogenicity of the organism. Functional cooperativity is also indicated between several plasmid- and chromosomally-encoded proteins, which, in a single instance, would allow a fully functioning nutrient uptake system to be established.

  4. In Silico Analysis of a Novel Plasmid from the Coral Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus Reveals Two Potential “Ecological Islands”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    As virulence often correlates with the presence of plasmid replicons in several Vibrio spp., this study investigated whether non-chromosomal DNA could be found in the coral pathogen, Vibrio coralliilyticus BAA-450. A circular plasmid, 26,631 bp in size, was identified. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the plasmid contained 30 open reading frames, six tRNA genes, 12 inverted repeats, three direct repeats and presented no continuous sequence identity to other replicons within the database. Consequently, these findings indicate that this is a novel, previously unidentified, plasmid. Two putative “ecological islands” were also identified and are predicted to encode for various factors that would facilitate growth and survival under different ecological conditions. In addition, two open reading frames may encode proteins that contribute to the pathogenicity of the organism. Functional cooperativity is also indicated between several plasmid- and chromosomally-encoded proteins, which, in a single instance, would allow a fully functioning nutrient uptake system to be established. PMID:27681896

  5. Proteomic analysis of human skin treated with larval schistosome peptidases reveals distinct invasion strategies among species of blood flukes.

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    Jessica Ingram

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin invasion is the initial step in infection of the human host by schistosome blood flukes. Schistosome larvae have the remarkable ability to overcome the physical and biochemical barriers present in skin in the absence of any mechanical trauma. While a serine peptidase with activity against insoluble elastin appears to be essential for this process in one species of schistosomes, Schistosoma mansoni, it is unknown whether other schistosome species use the same peptidase to facilitate entry into their hosts.Recent genome sequencing projects, together with a number of biochemical studies, identified alternative peptidases that Schistosoma japonicum or Trichobilharzia regenti could use to facilitate migration through skin. In this study, we used comparative proteomic analysis of human skin treated with purified cercarial elastase, the known invasive peptidase of S. mansoni, or S. mansoni cathespin B2, a close homolog of the putative invasive peptidase of S. japonicum, to identify substrates of either peptidase. Select skin proteins were then confirmed as substrates by in vitro digestion assays.This study demonstrates that an S. mansoni ortholog of the candidate invasive peptidase of S. japonicum and T. regenti, cathepsin B2, is capable of efficiently cleaving many of the same host skin substrates as the invasive serine peptidase of S. mansoni, cercarial elastase. At the same time, identification of unique substrates and the broader species specificity of cathepsin B2 suggest that the cercarial elastase gene family amplified as an adaptation of schistosomes to human hosts.

  6. Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis reveals genetic diversity within Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides small colony isolates from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankpa, N D; Manso-silvan, L; Lorenzon, S; Yaya, A; Lombin, L H; Thiaucourt, F

    2010-12-15

    A Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis was conducted on thirteen (13) M. mycoides mycoides Small Colony isolates from Nigeria using Tandem Repeat (TR) 34 which is a predicted lipoprotein located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170. The analysis revealed diversity within the M. mycoides mycoides Small Colony isolates with five different VNTR types indicated. Some correlation was determined between the VNTR types and their geographical origin. VNTR analysis may represent a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. mycoides mycoides Small Colony for possible outbreak tracing and disease control.

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Scrippsiella trochoidea CCMP 3099 Reveals Physiological Changes Related to Nitrate Depletion

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    Joshua Thomas Cooper

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are a major component of marine phytoplankton and many species are recognized for their ability to produce harmful algal blooms (HABs. Scrippsiella trochoidea is a non-toxic, marine dinoflagellate that can be found in both cold and tropic waters where it is known to produce red tide events. Little is known about the genomic makeup of S. trochoidea and a transcriptome study was conducted to shed light on the biochemical and physiological adaptations related to nutrient depletion. Cultures were grown under N and P limiting conditions and transcriptomes were generated via RNAseq technology. De novo assembly reconstructed 107,415 putative transcripts of which only 41% could be annotated. No significant transcriptomic response was observed in response to initial P depletion, however, a strong transcriptional response to N depletion was detected. Among the down-regulated pathways were those for glutamine/glutamate metabolism as well as urea and nitrate/nitrite transporters. Transcripts for ammonia transporters displayed both up- and down-regulation, perhaps related to a shift to higher affinity transporters. Genes for the utilization of DON compounds were up-regulated. These included transcripts for amino acids transporters, polyamine oxidase, and extracellular proteinase and peptidases. N depletion also triggered down regulation of transcripts related to the production of Photosystems I & II and related proteins. These data are consistent with a metabolic strategy that conserves N, while maximizing sustained metabolism by emphasizing the relative contribution of organic N sources. Surprisingly, the transcriptome also contained transcripts potentially related to secondary metabolite production, including a homolog to the Short Isoform Saxitoxin gene (sxtA from Alexandrium fundyense, which was significantly up-regulated under N-depletion. A total of 113 unique hits to Sxt genes, covering 17 of the 34 genes found in C. raciborskii were

  8. Proteomic analysis of Pseudomonas putida reveals an organic solvent tolerance-related gene mmsB.

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    Ye Ni

    Full Text Available Organic solvents are toxic to most microorganisms. However, some organic-solvent-tolerant (OST bacteria tolerate the destructive effects of organic solvent through various accommodative mechanisms. In this work, we developed an OST adapted strain Pseudomonas putida JUCT1 that could grow in the presence of 60% (v/v cyclohexane. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to compare and analyze the total cellular protein of P. putida JUCT1 growing with or without 60% (v/v cyclohexane. Under different solvent conditions, five high-abundance protein spots whose intensity values show over 60% discrepancies were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF spectra. Specifically, they are arginine deiminase, carbon-nitrogen hydrolase family putative hydrolase, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase, protein chain elongation factor EF-Ts, and isochorismatase superfamily hydrolase. The corresponding genes of the latter three proteins, mmsB, tsf, and PSEEN0851, were separately expressed in Escherichia coli to evaluate their effect on OST properties of the host strain. In the presence of 4% (v/v cyclohexane, E. coli harboring mmsB could grow to 1.70 OD(660, whereas cell growth of E. coli JM109 (the control was completely inhibited by 2% (v/v cyclohexane. Transformants carrying tsf or PSEEN0851 also showed an increased resistance to cyclohexane and other organic solvents compared with the control. Of these three genes, mmsB exhibited the most prominent effect on increasing OST of E. coli. Less oxidation product of cyclohexane was detected because mmsB transformants might help keep a lower intracellular cyclohexane level. This study demonstrates a feasible approach for elucidating OST mechanisms of microorganisms, and provides molecular basis to construct organic-solvent-tolerant strains for industrial applications.

  9. A transcriptomic computational analysis of mastic oil-treated Lewis lung carcinomas reveals molecular mechanisms targeting tumor cell growth and survival

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    Roussos Charis

    2009-12-01

    expression profile. Promoter analysis in a representative cluster revealed shared putative cis-elements suggesting a common regulatory transcription mechanism. Conclusions Present results provide novel evidence on the molecular basis of tumor growth inhibition mediated by mastic oil and set a rational basis for application of genomics and bioinformatic methodologies in the screening of natural compounds with potential cancer chemopreventive activities.

  10. Sequence analysis of a 13.4 kbp fragment from the left arm of chromosome XV reveals a malate dehydrogenase gene, a putative Ser/Thr protein kinase, the ribosomal L25 gene and four new open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamayor, A; Khalid, H; Balcells, L; Aldea, M; Casas, C; Herrero, E; Ariño, J

    1996-09-01

    A 13421 bp fragment located near the left telomere of chromosome XV (cosmid pEOA461) has been sequenced. Seven non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) encoding polypeptides longer than 100 residues have been found (AOB859, AOC184, AOE375, AOX142i, AOE423, AOA476 and AOE433). An additional ORF (AOE131) is found within AOA476. Three of them (AOC184, AOA476 and AOE433) show no remarkable identity with proteins deposited in the data banks. ORF AOB859 is quite similar to a hypothetical yeast protein of similar size located in chromosome VI, particularly within the C-terminal half. AOE375 encodes a new member of the glycogen synthase kinase-3 subfamily of Ser/Thr protein kinases. AOX142i is the gene encoding the previously described ribosomal protein L25. AOE423 codes for a protein virtually identical to the MDH2 malate dehydrogenase isozyme. However, our DNA sequence shows a single one-base insertion upstream of the reported initiating codon. This would produce a larger ORF by extending 46 residues the N-terminus of the protein. The existence of this insertion has been confirmed in three different yeast strains, including FY1679.

  11. RNAseq analysis of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis reveals divergent regulation of canonical dauer pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Jonathan D; Minot, Samuel; Berriman, Matthew; Nolan, Thomas J; Lok, James B

    2012-01-01

    The infectious form of many parasitic nematodes, which afflict over one billion people globally, is a developmentally arrested third-stage larva (L3i). The parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis differs from other nematode species that infect humans, in that its life cycle includes both parasitic and free-living forms, which can be leveraged to investigate the mechanisms of L3i arrest and activation. The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a similar developmentally arrested larval form, the dauer, whose formation is controlled by four pathways: cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling, insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling, and biosynthesis of dafachronic acid (DA) ligands that regulate a nuclear hormone receptor. We hypothesized that homologous pathways are present in S. stercoralis, have similar developmental regulation, and are involved in L3i arrest and activation. To test this, we undertook a deep-sequencing study of the polyadenylated transcriptome, generating over 2.3 billion paired-end reads from seven developmental stages. We constructed developmental expression profiles for S. stercoralis homologs of C. elegans dauer genes identified by BLAST searches of the S. stercoralis genome as well as de novo assembled transcripts. Intriguingly, genes encoding cGMP pathway components were coordinately up-regulated in L3i. In comparison to C. elegans, S. stercoralis has a paucity of genes encoding IIS ligands, several of which have abundance profiles suggesting involvement in L3i development. We also identified seven S. stercoralis genes encoding homologs of the single C. elegans dauer regulatory TGFβ ligand, three of which are only expressed in L3i. Putative DA biosynthetic genes did not appear to be coordinately regulated in L3i development. Our data suggest that while dauer pathway genes are present in S. stercoralis and may play a role in L3i development, there are significant differences between the two species

  12. Phylogeographic analysis reveals significant spatial genetic structure of Incarvillea sinensis as a product of mountain building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shaotian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incarvillea sinensis is widely distributed from Southwest China to Northeast China and in the Russian Far East. The distribution of this species was thought to be influenced by the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and Quaternary glaciation. To reveal the imprints of geological events on the spatial genetic structure of Incarvillea sinensis, we examined two cpDNA segments ( trnH- psbA and trnS- trnfM in 705 individuals from 47 localities. Results A total of 16 haplotypes was identified, and significant genetic differentiation was revealed (GST =0.843, NST = 0.975, P  Conclusions The results revealed that the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau likely resulted in the significant divergence between the lineage in the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and the other one outside this area. The diverse niches in the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau created a wide spectrum of habitats to accumulate and accommodate new mutations. The features of genetic diversity of populations outside the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau seemed to reveal the imprints of extinction during the Glacial and the interglacial and postglacial recolonization. Our study is a typical case of the significance of the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and the Quaternary Glacial in spatial genetic structure of eastern Asian plants, and sheds new light on the evolution of biodiversity in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau at the intraspecies level.

  13. Diversity of secondary endosymbionts among different putative species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Li Bing; Yong-Ming Ruan; Qiong Rao; Xiao-Wei Wang; Shu-Sheng Liu

    2013-01-01

    Endosymbionts are important components of arthropod biology.The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae) is a cryptic species complex composed of≥28 putative species.In addition to the primary endosymbiont Portiera aleyrodidarum,six secondary endosymbionts (S-endosymbionts),Hamiltonella,Rickettsia,Wolbachia,Cardinium,Arsenophonus and Fritschea,have been identified in B.tabaci thus far.Here,we tested five of the six S-endosymbiont lineages (excluding Fritschea) from 340 whitely individuals representing six putative species from China.Hamiltonella was detected only in the two exotic invaders,Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM 1) and Mediterranean (MED).Rickettsia was absent in Asia Ⅱ 1 and MED,scarce in Asia Ⅱ 3 (13%),but abundant in Asia Ⅱ 7 (63.2%),China 1 (84.7%) and MEAM1 (100%).Wolbachia,Cardinium and Arsenophonus were absent in the invasive MEAM 1 and MED but mostly abundant in the native putative species.Furthermore,phylogenetic analyses revealed that some S-endosymbionts have several clades and different B.tabaci putative species can harbor different clades of a given S-endosymbiont,demonstrating further the complexity of S-endosymbionts in B.tabaci.All together,our results demonstrate the variation and diversity of S-endosymbionts in different putative species ofB.tabaci,especially between invasive and native whiteflies.

  14. Diversity of secondary endosymbionts among different putative species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Xiao-Li; Ruan, Yong-Ming; Rao, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    Endosymbionts are important components of arthropod biology. The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a cryptic species complex composed of ≥ 28 putative species. In addition to the primary endosymbiont Portiera aleyrodidarum, six secondary endosymbionts (S-endosymbionts), Hamiltonella, Rickettsia, Wolbachia, Cardinium, Arsenophonus and Fritschea, have been identified in B. tabaci thus far. Here, we tested five of the six S-endosymbiont lineages (excluding Fritschea) from 340 whitely individuals representing six putative species from China. Hamiltonella was detected only in the two exotic invaders, Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean (MED). Rickettsia was absent in Asia II 1 and MED, scarce in Asia II 3 (13%), but abundant in Asia II 7 (63.2%), China 1 (84.7%) and MEAM1 (100%). Wolbachia, Cardinium and Arsenophonus were absent in the invasive MEAM1 and MED but mostly abundant in the native putative species. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses revealed that some S-endosymbionts have several clades and different B. tabaci putative species can harbor different clades of a given S-endosymbiont, demonstrating further the complexity of S-endosymbionts in B. tabaci. All together, our results demonstrate the variation and diversity of S-endosymbionts in different putative species of B. tabaci, especially between invasive and native whiteflies.

  15. Putative Nitrogen Sensing Systems in Higher Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hon-Ming Lam; Ying Ann Chiao; Man-Wah Li; Yuk-Kwong Yung; Sang Ji

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) metabolism is essential for the biosynthesis of vital biomolecules. N status thus exerts profound effects on plant growth and development, and must be closely monitored. In bacteria and fungi, a few sophisticated N sensing systems have been extensively studied. In animals, the ability to receive amino acid signals has evolved to become an integral part of the nervous coordination system. In this review, we will summarize recent developments in the search for putative N sensing systems in higher plants based on homologous systems in bacteria, fungi, and animals. Apparently, although plants have separated and diversified from other organisms during the evolution process, striking similarities can be found in their N sensing systems compared with those of their counterparts; however, our understanding of these systems is still incomplete. Significant modifications of the N sensing systems (including cross-talk with other signal transduction pathways) in higher plants may be a strategy of adaptation to their unique mode of life.

  16. Putative respiratory chain of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuric, Vincent; Rouillon, Astrid; Chandad, Fatiha; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The electron transfer chain in Porphyromonas gingivalis, or periodontopathogens, has not yet been characterized. P. gingivalis, a strict anaerobic bacteria and the second colonizer of the oral cavity, is considered to be a major causal agent involved in periodontal diseases. Primary colonizers create a favorable environment for P. gingivalis growth by decreasing oxygen pressure. Oxygen does not appear to be the final electron acceptor of the respiratory chain. Fumarate and cytochrome b have been implicated as major components of the respiratory activity. However, the P. gingivalis genome shows many other enzymes that could be implicated in aerobic or nitrite respiration. Using bioinformatic tools and literature studies of respiratory pathways, the ATP synthesis mechanism from the sodium cycle and nutrients metabolism, the putative respirasome of P. gingivalis has been proposed.

  17. Force-clamp analysis techniques reveal stretched exponential unfolding kinetics in ubiquitin

    CERN Document Server

    Lannon, Herbert; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    Force-clamp spectroscopy reveals the unfolding and disulfide bond rupture times of single protein molecules as a function of the stretching force, point mutations and solvent conditions. The statistics of these times reveal whether the protein domains are independent of one another, the mechanical hierarchy in the polyprotein chain, and the functional form of the probability distribution from which they originate. It is therefore important to use robust statistical tests to decipher the correct theoretical model underlying the process. Here we develop multiple techniques to compare the well-established experimental data set on ubiquitin with existing theoretical models as a case study. We show that robustness against filtering, agreement with a maximum likelihood function that takes into account experimental artifacts, the Kuiper statistic test and alignment with synthetic data all identify the Weibull or stretched exponential distribution as the best fitting model. Our results are inconsistent with recently ...

  18. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

    OpenAIRE

    White, Richard Allen; Power, Ian M.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Southam, Gordon; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacte...

  19. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

    OpenAIRE

    III, Richard Allen White; Ian Malcolm Power; Dipple, Gregory M.; Gordon eSoutham; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bact...

  20. Genome-wide location analysis reveals a role for Sub1 in RNA polymerase III transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavenet, Arounie; Suleau, Audrey; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Ferrari, Roberto; Ducrot, Cécile; Michaut, Magali; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Dieci, Giorgio; Lefebvre, Olivier; Conesa, Christine; Acker, Joël

    2009-01-01

    Human PC4 and the yeast ortholog Sub1 have multiple functions in RNA polymerase II transcription. Genome-wide mapping revealed that Sub1 is present on Pol III-transcribed genes. Sub1 was found to interact with components of the Pol III transcription system and to stimulate the initiation and reinitiation steps in a system reconstituted with all recombinant factors. Sub1 was required for optimal Pol III gene transcription in exponentially growing cells. PMID:19706510

  1. Transcriptome analysis in tardigrade species reveals specific molecular pathways for stress adaptations

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Förster; Daniela Beisser; Grohme, Markus A.; Chunguang Liang; Brahim Mali; Alexander Matthias Siegl; Engelmann, Julia C.; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Elham Schokraie; Tobias Müller; Martina Schnölzer; Schill, Ralph O.; Marcus Frohme; Thomas Dandekar

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade \\(Milnesium\\) \\(tardigradum\\) were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from \\(Hypsibius\\) \\(dujardini\\), revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardig...

  2. Quantitative analysis of proteome and lipidome dynamics reveals functional regulation of global lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casanovas, Albert; Sprenger, Richard R; Tarasov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    architecture and processes during physiological adaptations in yeast. Our results reveal that activation of cardiolipin synthesis and remodeling supports mitochondrial biogenesis in the transition from fermentative to respiratory metabolism, that down-regulation of de novo sterol synthesis machinery prompts......Elucidating how and to what extent lipid metabolism is remodeled under changing conditions is essential for understanding cellular physiology. Here, we analyzed proteome and lipidome dynamics to investigate how regulation of lipid metabolism at the global scale supports remodeling of cellular...

  3. Multilocus analysis reveals large genetic diversity in Kluyveromyces marxianus strains isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoli, Giuseppe; Barrio, Eladio; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna; Belloch, Carmela

    2016-09-16

    In the present study, we have analysed the genetic diversity in Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola cheesemaking environment. Molecular typing methods inter-RTL fingerprint and mtDNA RFLPs, as well as, sequence diversity and heterozygosity in the intergenic region between KmSSB1 and KmRIO2 genes and analysis of the mating locus were applied to 54 K. marxianus strains. Inter-RTL fingerprint revealed a large degree of genetic heterogeneity and clustering allowed differentiation of K. marxianus strains from different geographical origins. In general, inter-LTR profiles were more discriminating than RFLPs of mtDNA; however our results also indicate that both techniques could be complementary unveiling different degrees of genetic diversity. Sequence analysis of the intergenic region between KmSSB1 and KmRIO2 genes revealed 26 variable positions in which a double peak could be observed in the sequence chromatogram. Further analysis revealed the presence of heterozygous strains in the K. marxianus population isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano. On the other hand, all strains isolated from Pecorino di Farindola were homozygous. Two very different groups of haplotypes could be observed as well as mixtures between them. Phylogenetic reconstruction divided K. marxianus dairy strains into two separate populations. A few heterozygous strains in an intermediate position between them could also be observed. Mating type locus analysis revealed a large population of diploid strains containing both MATa and MATα alleles and few haploid strains, most of them presenting the MATα allele. Different scenarios explaining the presence and maintaining of homozygous and heterozygous diploids as well as hybrids between them in the Parmigiano Reggiano K. marxianus population are proposed. A principal component analysis supported the large differences between K. marxianus isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases in opisthokonts reveals unexpected ancestral complexity and novel modern biosynthetic components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Smart

    Full Text Available Glycerolipid synthesis represents a central metabolic process of all forms of life. In the last decade multiple genes coding for enzymes responsible for the first step of the pathway, catalyzed by glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, have been described, and characterized primarily in model organisms like Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mice. Notoriously, the fungal enzymes share low sequence identity with their known animal counterparts, and the nature of their homology is unclear. Furthermore, two mitochondrial GPAT isoforms have been described in animal cells, while no such enzymes have been identified in Fungi. In order to determine if the yeast and mammalian GPATs are representative of the set of enzymes present in their respective groups, and to test the hypothesis that metazoan orthologues are indeed absent from the fungal clade, a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis was performed including organisms spanning the breadth of the Opisthokonta supergroup. Surprisingly, our study unveiled the presence of 'fungal' orthologs in the basal taxa of the holozoa and 'animal' orthologues in the basal holomycetes. This includes a novel clade of fungal homologues, with putative peroxisomal targeting signals, of the mitochondrial/peroxisomal acyltransferases in Metazoa, thus potentially representing an undescribed metabolic capacity in the Fungi. The overall distribution of GPAT homologues is suggestive of high relative complexity in the ancestors of the opisthokont clade, followed by loss and sculpting of the complement in the descendent lineages. Divergence from a general versatile metabolic model, present in ancestrally deduced GPAT complements, points to distinctive contributions of each GPAT isoform to lipid metabolism and homeostasis in contemporary organisms like humans and their fungal pathogens.

  5. Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Exosomes Reveals Modulation of Angiogenesis via Nuclear Factor-KappaB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Johnathon D; Johansson, Henrik J; Graham, Calvin S; Vesterlund, Mattias; Pham, Missy T; Bramlett, Charles S; Montgomery, Elizabeth N; Mellema, Matt S; Bardini, Renee L; Contreras, Zelenia; Hoon, Madeline; Bauer, Gerhard; Fink, Kyle D; Fury, Brian; Hendrix, Kyle J; Chedin, Frederic; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Hwang, Billie; Mulligan, Michael S; Lehtiö, Janne; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are known to facilitate healing of ischemic tissue related diseases through proangiogenic secretory proteins. Recent studies further show that MSC derived exosomes function as paracrine effectors of angiogenesis, however, the identity of which components of the exosome proteome responsible for this effect remains elusive. To address this we used high-resolution isoelectric focusing coupled liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, an unbiased high throughput proteomics approach to comprehensively characterize the proteinaceous contents of MSCs and MSC derived exosomes. We probed the proteome of MSCs and MSC derived exosomes from cells cultured under expansion conditions and under ischemic tissue simulated conditions to elucidate key angiogenic paracrine effectors present and potentially differentially expressed in these conditions. In total, 6,342 proteins were identified in MSCs and 1,927 proteins in MSC derived exosomes, representing to our knowledge the first time these proteomes have been probed comprehensively. Multilayered analyses identified several putative paracrine effectors of angiogenesis present in MSC exosomes and increased in expression in MSCs exposed to ischemic tissue-simulated conditions; these include platelet derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and most notably nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkB) signaling pathway proteins. NFkB signaling was identified as a key mediator of MSC exosome induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells by functional in vitro validation using a specific inhibitor. Collectively, the results of our proteomic analysis show that MSC derived exosomes contain a robust profile of angiogenic paracrine effectors, which have potential for the treatment of ischemic tissue-related diseases.

  6. Promoter Analysis Reveals Globally Differential Regulation of Human Long Non-Coding RNA and Protein-Coding Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2014-10-02

    Transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes is increasingly well-understood on a global scale, yet no comparable information exists for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes, which were recently recognized to be as numerous as protein-coding genes in mammalian genomes. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of the promoters of human lncRNA and protein-coding genes, finding global differences in specific genetic and epigenetic features relevant to transcriptional regulation. These two groups of genes are hence subject to separate transcriptional regulatory programs, including distinct transcription factor (TF) proteins that significantly favor lncRNA, rather than coding-gene, promoters. We report a specific signature of promoter-proximal transcriptional regulation of lncRNA genes, including several distinct transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Experimental DNase I hypersensitive site profiles are consistent with active configurations of these lncRNA TFBS sets in diverse human cell types. TFBS ChIP-seq datasets confirm the binding events that we predicted using computational approaches for a subset of factors. For several TFs known to be directly regulated by lncRNAs, we find that their putative TFBSs are enriched at lncRNA promoters, suggesting that the TFs and the lncRNAs may participate in a bidirectional feedback loop regulatory network. Accordingly, cells may be able to modulate lncRNA expression levels independently of mRNA levels via distinct regulatory pathways. Our results also raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted in the future.

  7. Bulk segregant analysis by high-throughput sequencing reveals a novel xylose utilization gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared W Wenger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation of xylose is a fundamental requirement for the efficient production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass sources. Although they aggressively ferment hexoses, it has long been thought that native Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains cannot grow fermentatively or non-fermentatively on xylose. Population surveys have uncovered a few naturally occurring strains that are weakly xylose-positive, and some S. cerevisiae have been genetically engineered to ferment xylose, but no strain, either natural or engineered, has yet been reported to ferment xylose as efficiently as glucose. Here, we used a medium-throughput screen to identify Saccharomyces strains that can increase in optical density when xylose is presented as the sole carbon source. We identified 38 strains that have this xylose utilization phenotype, including strains of S. cerevisiae, other sensu stricto members, and hybrids between them. All the S. cerevisiae xylose-utilizing strains we identified are wine yeasts, and for those that could produce meiotic progeny, the xylose phenotype segregates as a single gene trait. We mapped this gene by Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA using tiling microarrays and high-throughput sequencing. The gene is a putative xylitol dehydrogenase, which we name XDH1, and is located in the subtelomeric region of the right end of chromosome XV in a region not present in the S288c reference genome. We further characterized the xylose phenotype by performing gene expression microarrays and by genetically dissecting the endogenous Saccharomyces xylose pathway. We have demonstrated that natural S. cerevisiae yeasts are capable of utilizing xylose as the sole carbon source, characterized the genetic basis for this trait as well as the endogenous xylose utilization pathway, and demonstrated the feasibility of BSA using high-throughput sequencing.

  8. Decision makers use norms, not cost-benefit analysis, when choosing to conceal or reveal unfair rewards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Heimann

    Full Text Available We introduce the Conceal or Reveal Dilemma, in which individuals receive unfair benefits, and must decide whether to conceal or to reveal this unfair advantage. This dilemma has two important characteristics: it does not lend itself easily to cost-benefit analysis, neither to the application of any strong universal norm. As a consequence, it is ideally suited to the study of interindividual and intercultural variations in moral-economic norms. In this paper we focus on interindividual variations, and we report four studies showing that individuals cannot be swayed by financial incentives to conceal or to reveal, and follow instead fixed, idiosyncratic strategies. We discuss how this result can be extended to individual and cultural variations in the tendency to display or to hide unfair rewards.

  9. In silico analysis identifies a C3HC4-RING finger domain of a putative E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase located at the C-terminus of a polyglutamine-containing protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Scior

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Almost identical polyglutamine-containing proteins with unknown structures have been found in human, mouse and rat genomes (GenBank AJ277365, AF525300, AY879229. We infer that an identical new gene (RING finger domain of real interest is located in each C-terminal segment. A three-dimensional (3-D model was generated by remote homology modeling and the functional implications are discussed. The model consists of 65 residues from terminal position 707 to 772 of the human protein with a total length of 796 residues. The 3-D model predicts a ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3 as a binding site for ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2. Both enzymes are part of the ubiquitin pathway to label unwanted proteins for subsequent enzymatic degradation. The molecular contact specificities are suggested for both the substrate recognition and the residues at the possible E2-binding surface. The predicted structure, of a ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3, enzyme class number 6.3.2.19, CATH code 3.30.40.10.4 may contribute to explain the process of ubiquitination. The 3-D model supports the idea of a C3HC4-RING finger with a partially new pattern. The putative E2-binding site is formed by a shallow hydrophobic groove on the surface adjacent to the helix and one zinc finger (L722, C739, P740, P741, R744. Solvent-exposed hydrophobic amino acids lie around both zinc fingers (I717, L722, F738, or P765, L766, V767, V733, P734. The 3-D structure was deposited in the protein databank theoretical model repository (2B9G, RCSB Protein Data Bank, NJ.

  10. Interrelations among scientific fields and their relative influence revealed by input-output analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Zhesi; Pei, Jiansuo; Li, Menghui; Wu, Chensheng; Bao, Jianzhang; Wei, Tian; Di, Zengru; Rousseau, Ronald; Wu, Jinshan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we try to answer two questions about any given scientific discipline: First, how important is each subfield and second, how does a specific subfield influence other subfields? We modify the well-known open-system Leontief Input-Output Analysis in economics into a closed-system analysis focusing on eigenvalues and eigenvectors and the effects of removing one subfield. We apply this method to the subfields of physics. This analysis has yielded some promising results for identifying important subfields (for example the field of statistical physics has large influence while it is not among the largest subfields) and describing their influences on each other (for example the subfield of mechanical control of atoms is not among the largest subfields cited by quantum mechanics, but our analysis suggests that these fields are strongly connected). This method is potentially applicable to more general systems that have input-output relations among their elements.

  11. Archetypal analysis of diverse Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptomes reveals adaptation in cystic fibrosis airways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, Juliane Charlotte; Mørup, Morten; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of global gene expression by DNA microarrays is widely used in experimental molecular biology. However, the complexity of such high-dimensional data sets makes it difficult to fully understand the underlying biological features present in the data.The aim of this study...... is to introduce a method for DNA microarray analysis that provides an intuitive interpretation of data through dimension reduction and pattern recognition. We present the first “Archetypal Analysis” of global gene expression. The analysis is based on microarray data from five integrated studies of Pseudomonas...... expression between different groups identified adaptive changes of the bacteria residing in the cystic fibrosis lung. The analysis suggests a similar gene expression pattern between isolates with a high mutation rate (hypermutators) despite accumulation of different mutations for these isolates...

  12. Integrative genetic, epigenetic and pathological analysis of paraganglioma reveals complex dysregulation of NOTCH signaling

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas, rare neoplasms of the paraganglia composed of nests of neurosecretory and glial cells embedded in vascular stroma, provide a remarkable example of organoid tumor architecture. To identify genes and pathways commonly deregulated in head and neck paraganglioma, we integrated high-density genome-wide copy number variation (CNV) analysis with microRNA and immunomorphological studies. Gene-centric CNV analysis of 24 cases identified a list of 104 genes most significan...

  13. Genome-wide analysis reveals the vacuolar pH-stat of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Brett

    Full Text Available Protons, the smallest and most ubiquitous of ions, are central to physiological processes. Transmembrane proton gradients drive ATP synthesis, metabolite transport, receptor recycling and vesicle trafficking, while compartmental pH controls enzyme function. Despite this fundamental importance, the mechanisms underlying pH homeostasis are not entirely accounted for in any organelle or organism. We undertook a genome-wide survey of vacuole pH (pH(v in 4,606 single-gene deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under control, acid and alkali stress conditions to reveal the vacuolar pH-stat. Median pH(v (5.27±0.13 was resistant to acid stress (5.28±0.14 but shifted significantly in response to alkali stress (5.83±0.13. Of 107 mutants that displayed aberrant pH(v under more than one external pH condition, functional categories of transporters, membrane biogenesis and trafficking machinery were significantly enriched. Phospholipid flippases, encoded by the family of P4-type ATPases, emerged as pH regulators, as did the yeast ortholog of Niemann Pick Type C protein, implicated in sterol trafficking. An independent genetic screen revealed that correction of pH(v dysregulation in a neo1(ts mutant restored viability whereas cholesterol accumulation in human NPC1(-/- fibroblasts diminished upon treatment with a proton ionophore. Furthermore, while it is established that lumenal pH affects trafficking, this study revealed a reciprocal link with many mutants defective in anterograde pathways being hyperacidic and retrograde pathway mutants with alkaline vacuoles. In these and other examples, pH perturbations emerge as a hitherto unrecognized phenotype that may contribute to the cellular basis of disease and offer potential therapeutic intervention through pH modulation.

  14. Whole genome sequence analysis of Cryptococcus gattii from the Pacific Northwest reveals unexpected diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Gillece

    Full Text Available A recent emergence of Cryptococcus gattii in the Pacific Northwest involves strains that fall into three primarily clonal molecular subtypes: VGIIa, VGIIb and VGIIc. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST and variable number tandem repeat analysis appear to identify little diversity within these molecular subtypes. Given the apparent expansion of these subtypes into new geographic areas and their ability to cause disease in immunocompetent individuals, differentiation of isolates belonging to these subtypes could be very important from a public health perspective. We used whole genome sequence typing (WGST to perform fine-scale phylogenetic analysis on 20 C. gattii isolates, 18 of which are from the VGII molecular type largely responsible for the Pacific Northwest emergence. Analysis both including and excluding (289,586 SNPs and 56,845 SNPs, respectively molecular types VGI and VGIII isolates resulted in phylogenetic reconstructions consistent, for the most part, with MLST analysis but with far greater resolution among isolates. The WGST analysis presented here resulted in identification of over 100 SNPs among eight VGIIc isolates as well as unique genotypes for each of the VGIIa, VGIIb and VGIIc isolates. Similar levels of genetic diversity were found within each of the molecular subtype isolates, despite the fact that the VGIIb clade is thought to have emerged much earlier. The analysis presented here is the first multi-genome WGST study to focus on the C. gattii molecular subtypes involved in the Pacific Northwest emergence and describes the tools that will further our understanding of this emerging pathogen.

  15. Proteomic analysis of lysine acetylation sites in rat tissues reveals organ specificity and subcellular patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Weinert, Brian Tate;

    2012-01-01

    ,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals...... that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle...

  16. Basal ganglia calcification as a putative cause for cognitive decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ricardo Mendes de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Basal ganglia calcifications (BGC may be present in various medical conditions, such as infections, metabolic, psychiatric and neurological diseases, associated with different etiologies and clinical outcomes, including parkinsonism, psychosis, mood swings and dementia. A literature review was performed highlighting the main neuropsychological findings of BGC, with particular attention to clinical reports of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging studies combined with neuropsychological analysis show that some patients have shown progressive disturbances of selective attention, declarative memory and verbal perseveration. Therefore, the calcification process might represent a putative cause for dementia syndromes, suggesting a probable link among calcinosis, the aging process and eventually with neuronal death. The increasing number of reports available will foster a necessary discussion about cerebral calcinosis and its role in determining symptomatology in dementia patients

  17. Functional expression of SAV3818, a putative TetR-family transcriptional regulatory gene from Streptomyces avermitilis, stimulates antibiotic production in Streptomyces species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Cac Thi Phung; Lee, Han-Na; Choi, Si-Sun; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2009-02-01

    Avermectin and its analogs are major commercial antiparasitic agents in the fields of animal health, agriculture, and human infections. Previously, comparative transcriptome analysis between the low-producer S. avermitilis ATCC31267 and the high-producer S. avermitilis ATCC31780 using a S. avermitilis whole genome chip revealed that 50 genes were overexpressed at least two-fold higher in S. avermitilis ATCC31780. To verify the biological significance of some of the transcriptomics-guided targets, five putative regulatory genes were individually cloned under the strong-andconstitutive promoter of the Streptomyces expression vector pSE34, followed by the transformation into the lowproducer S. avermitilis ATCC31267. Among the putative genes tested, three regulatory genes including SAV213, SAV3818, and SAV4023 exhibited stimulatory effects on avermectin production in S. avermitilis ATCC31267. Moreover, overexpression of SAV3818 also stimulated actinorhodin production in both S. coelicolor M145 and S. lividans TK21, implying that the SAV3818, a putative TetR-family transcriptional regulator, could be a global upregulator acting in antibiotic production in Streptomyces species.

  18. Comparative genomic analysis reveals species-dependent complexities that explain difficulties with microsatellite marker development in molluscs

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Reliable population DNA molecular markers are difficult to develop for molluscs, the reasons for which are largely unknown. Identical protocols for microsatellite marker development were implemented in three gastropods. Success rates were lower for Gibbula cineraria compared to Littorina littorea and L. saxatilis. Comparative genomic analysis of 47.2 kb of microsatellite containing sequences (MCS) revealed a high incidence of cryptic repetitive DNA in their flanking regions. The majority of t...

  19. Adaptations to a Subterranean Environment and Longevity Revealed by the Analysis of Mole Rat Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Fang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Subterranean mammals spend their lives in dark, unventilated environments that are rich in carbon dioxide and ammonia and low in oxygen. Many of these animals are also long-lived and exhibit reduced aging-associated diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. We sequenced the genome of the Damaraland mole rat (DMR, Fukomys damarensis and improved the genome assembly of the naked mole rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber. Comparative genome analyses, along with the transcriptomes of related subterranean rodents, revealed candidate molecular adaptations for subterranean life and longevity, including a divergent insulin peptide, expression of oxygen-carrying globins in the brain, prevention of high CO2-induced pain perception, and enhanced ammonia detoxification. Juxtaposition of the genomes of DMR and other more conventional animals with the genome of NMR revealed several truly exceptional NMR features: unusual thermogenesis, an aberrant melatonin system, pain insensitivity, and unique processing of 28S rRNA. Together, these genomes and transcriptomes extend our understanding of subterranean adaptations, stress resistance, and longevity.

  20. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Selective Metabolic Adaptation of Streptococcus suis to Porcine Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Koczula

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that can cause severe pathologies such as septicemia and meningitis in its natural porcine host as well as in humans. Establishment of disease requires not only virulence of the infecting strain but also an appropriate metabolic activity of the pathogen in its host environment. However, it is yet largely unknown how the streptococcal metabolism adapts to the different host niches encountered during infection. Our previous isotopologue profiling studies on S. suis grown in porcine blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF revealed conserved activities of central carbon metabolism in both body fluids. On the other hand, they suggested differences in the de novo amino acid biosynthesis. This prompted us to further dissect S. suis adaptation to porcine blood and CSF by RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq. In blood, the majority of differentially expressed genes were associated with transport of alternative carbohydrate sources and the carbohydrate metabolism (pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen metabolism. In CSF, predominantly genes involved in the biosynthesis of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids were differentially expressed. Especially, isoleucine biosynthesis seems to be of major importance for S. suis in CSF because several related biosynthetic genes were more highly expressed. In conclusion, our data revealed niche-specific metabolic gene activity which emphasizes a selective adaptation of S. suis to host environments.

  1. High-throughput sequence analysis reveals structural diversity and improved potency among RNA inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzler, Mark A; Lange, Margaret J; Bose, Debojit; Bottoms, Christopher A; Virkler, Katherine F; Sawyer, Andrew W; Whatley, Angela S; Spollen, William; Givan, Scott A; Burke, Donald H

    2013-02-01

    Systematic evolution of ligands through exponential enrichment (SELEX) is a well-established method for generating nucleic acid populations that are enriched for specified functions. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) enhances the power of comparative sequence analysis to reveal details of how RNAs within these populations recognize their targets. We used HTS analysis to evaluate RNA populations selected to bind type I human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (RT). The populations are enriched in RNAs of independent lineages that converge on shared motifs and in clusters of RNAs with nearly identical sequences that share common ancestry. Both of these features informed inferences of the secondary structures of enriched RNAs, their minimal structural requirements and their stabilities in RT-aptamer complexes. Monitoring population dynamics in response to increasing selection pressure revealed RNA inhibitors of RT that are more potent than the previously identified pseudoknots. Improved potency was observed for inhibition of both purified RT in enzymatic assays and viral replication in cell-based assays. Structural and functional details of converged motifs that are obscured by simple consensus descriptions are also revealed by the HTS analysis. The approach presented here can readily be generalized for the efficient and systematic post-SELEX development of aptamers for down-stream applications.

  2. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-03-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  3. Statistical strategies to reveal potential vibrational markers for in vivo analysis by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Mendes, Thiago de; Pinto, Liliane Pereira; Santos, Laurita dos; Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; Téllez Soto, Claudio Alberto; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of biological systems by spectroscopic techniques involves the evaluation of hundreds to thousands of variables. Hence, different statistical approaches are used to elucidate regions that discriminate classes of samples and to propose new vibrational markers for explaining various phenomena like disease monitoring, mechanisms of action of drugs, food, and so on. However, the technical statistics are not always widely discussed in applied sciences. In this context, this work presents a detailed discussion including the various steps necessary for proper statistical analysis. It includes univariate parametric and nonparametric tests, as well as multivariate unsupervised and supervised approaches. The main objective of this study is to promote proper understanding of the application of various statistical tools in these spectroscopic methods used for the analysis of biological samples. The discussion of these methods is performed on a set of in vivo confocal Raman spectra of human skin analysis that aims to identify skin aging markers. In the Appendix, a complete routine of data analysis is executed in a free software that can be used by the scientific community involved in these studies.

  4. Exoplanet hosts reveal lithium depletion: Results from a homogeneous statistical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Figueira, P; Delgado-Mena, E; Adibekyan, V Zh; Sousa, S G; Santos, N C; Israelian, G

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We study the impact of the presence of planets on the lithium abundance of host stars and evaluate the previous claim that planet hosts exhibit lithium depletion when compared to their non-host counterparts. Methods. Using previously published lithium abundances, we remove the confounding effect of the different fundamental stellar parameters by applying a multivariable regression on our dataset. In doing so, we explicitly make an assumption made implicitly by different authors: that lithium abundance depends linearly on fundamental stellar parameters. Using a moderator variable to distinguish stars with planets from those without, we evaluate the existence of an offset in lithium abundances between the two groups. We perform this analysis first for stars that present a clear lithium detection exclusively and include in a second analysis upper lithium measurements. Results. Our analysis shows that under the above-mentioned assumption of linearity, a statistically significant negative offset in lithium a...

  5. Multiplex social ecological network analysis reveals how social changes affect community robustness more than resource depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Jacopo A; BurnSilver, Shauna B; Arenas, Alex; Magdanz, James S; Kofinas, Gary P; De Domenico, Manlio

    2016-11-29

    Network analysis provides a powerful tool to analyze complex influences of social and ecological structures on community and household dynamics. Most network studies of social-ecological systems use simple, undirected, unweighted networks. We analyze multiplex, directed, and weighted networks of subsistence food flows collected in three small indigenous communities in Arctic Alaska potentially facing substantial economic and ecological changes. Our analysis of plausible future scenarios suggests that changes to social relations and key households have greater effects on community robustness than changes to specific wild food resources.

  6. Network Analysis Reveals the Recognition Mechanism for Mannose-binding Lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Jian, Yiren; Zeng, Chen; Computational Biophysics Lab Team

    The specific carbohydrate binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) protein in plants makes it a very useful molecular tool for cancer cell detection and other applications. The biological states of most MBL proteins are dimeric. Using dynamics network analysis on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the model protein of MBL, we elucidate the short- and long-range driving forces behind the dimer formation. The results are further supported by sequence coevolution analysis. We propose a general framework for deciphering the recognition mechanism underlying protein-protein interactions that may have potential applications in signaling pathways.

  7. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, Muhammad A; McArt, Darragh G; Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A; Wilson, Richard H; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-08-28

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p clinically exploitable markers.

  8. Comparative analysis reveals loss of the appetite-regulating peptide hormone ghrelin in falcons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2015-05-15

    Ghrelin and leptin are key peripherally secreted appetite-regulating hormones in vertebrates. Here we consider the ghrelin gene (GHRL) of birds (class Aves), where it has been reported that ghrelin inhibits rather than augments feeding. Thirty-one bird species were compared, revealing that most species harbour a functional copy of GHRL and the coding region for its derived peptides ghrelin and obestatin. We provide evidence for loss of GHRL in saker and peregrine falcons, and this is likely to result from the insertion of an ERVK retrotransposon in intron 0. We hypothesise that the loss of anorexigenic ghrelin is a predatory adaptation that results in increased food-seeking behaviour and feeding in falcons.

  9. Comparative analysis of encephalization in mammals reveals relaxed constraints on anthropoid primate and cetacean brain scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddy, A M; McGowen, M R; Sherwood, C C; Grossman, L I; Goodman, M; Wildman, D E

    2012-05-01

    There is a well-established allometric relationship between brain and body mass in mammals. Deviation of relatively increased brain size from this pattern appears to coincide with enhanced cognitive abilities. To examine whether there is a phylogenetic structure to such episodes of changes in encephalization across mammals, we used phylogenetic techniques to analyse brain mass, body mass and encephalization quotient (EQ) among 630 extant mammalian species. Among all mammals, anthropoid primates and odontocete cetaceans have significantly greater variance in EQ, suggesting that evolutionary constraints that result in a strict correlation between brain and body mass have independently become relaxed. Moreover, ancestral state reconstructions of absolute brain mass, body mass and EQ revealed patterns of increase and decrease in EQ within anthropoid primates and cetaceans. We propose both neutral drift and selective factors may have played a role in the evolution of brain-body allometry.

  10. Quantitative analysis of proteome and lipidome dynamics reveals functional regulation of global lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, Albert; Sprenger, Richard R; Tarasov, Kirill; Ruckerbauer, David E; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Jensen, Ole N; Ejsing, Christer S

    2015-03-19

    Elucidating how and to what extent lipid metabolism is remodeled under changing conditions is essential for understanding cellular physiology. Here, we analyzed proteome and lipidome dynamics to investigate how regulation of lipid metabolism at the global scale supports remodeling of cellular architecture and processes during physiological adaptations in yeast. Our results reveal that activation of cardiolipin synthesis and remodeling supports mitochondrial biogenesis in the transition from fermentative to respiratory metabolism, that down-regulation of de novo sterol synthesis machinery prompts differential turnover of lipid droplet-associated triacylglycerols and sterol esters during respiratory growth, that sphingolipid metabolism is regulated in a previously unrecognized growth stage-specific manner, and that endogenous synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids constitutes an in vivo upstream activator of peroxisomal biogenesis, via the heterodimeric Oaf1/Pip2 transcription factor. Our work demonstrates the pivotal role of lipid metabolism in adaptive processes and provides a resource to investigate its regulation at the cellular level.

  11. Unusually High Archaeal Diversity in a Crystallizer Pond, Pomorie Salterns, Bulgaria, Revealed by Phylogenetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Kambourova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on archaeal diversity in few salterns have revealed heterogeneity between sites and unique structures of separate places that hinder drawing of generalized conclusions. Investigations on the archaeal community composition in P18, the biggest crystallizer pond in Pomorie salterns (PS (34% salinity, demonstrated unusually high number of presented taxa in hypersaline environment. Archaeal clones were grouped in 26 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs assigned to 15 different genera from two orders, Halobacteriales and Haloferacales. All retrieved sequences were related to culturable halophiles or unculturable clones from saline (mostly hypersaline niches. New sequences represented 53.9% of archaeal OTUs. Some of them formed separate branches with 90% similarity to the closest neighbor. Present results significantly differed from the previous investigations in regard to the number of presented genera, the domination of some genera not reported before in such extreme niche, and the identification of previously undiscovered 16S rRNA sequences.

  12. Heavy metal distribution in Suillus luteus mycorrhizas - as revealed by micro-PIXE analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnau, K. E-mail: ubturnau@cyf-kr.edu.pl; Przybylowicz, W.J.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J

    2001-07-01

    Suillus luteus/Pinus sylvestris mycorrhizas, collected from zinc wastes in Southern Poland, were selected as potential biofilters on the basis of earlier studies carried out with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) microanalytical system coupled to scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Using the National Accelerator Centre (NAC) nuclear microprobe, elemental concentrations in the ectomycorrhiza parts were for the first time estimated quantitatively. Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) true elemental maps from freeze-dried and chemically fixed mycorrhizas revealed strong accumulation of Ca, Fe, Zn and Pb within the fungal mantle and in the rhizomorph. Vascular tissue was enriched with P, S and K, while high concentrations of Si and Cl were present in the endodermis. Cu was the only element showing elevated concentrations in the cortex region. Elemental losses and redistributions were found in mycorrhizas prepared by chemical fixation. Some problems related to elemental imaging are discussed.

  13. Crystal structure analysis reveals functional flexibility in the selenocysteine-specific tRNA from mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg M Ganichkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenocysteine tRNAs (tRNA(Sec exhibit a number of unique identity elements that are recognized specifically by proteins of the selenocysteine biosynthetic pathways and decoding machineries. Presently, these identity elements and the mechanisms by which they are interpreted by tRNA(Sec-interacting factors are incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied rational mutagenesis to obtain well diffracting crystals of murine tRNA(Sec. tRNA(Sec lacking the single-stranded 3'-acceptor end ((ΔGCCARNA(Sec yielded a crystal structure at 2.0 Å resolution. The global structure of (ΔGCCARNA(Sec resembles the structure of human tRNA(Sec determined at 3.1 Å resolution. Structural comparisons revealed flexible regions in tRNA(Sec used for induced fit binding to selenophosphate synthetase. Water molecules located in the present structure were involved in the stabilization of two alternative conformations of the anticodon stem-loop. Modeling of a 2'-O-methylated ribose at position U34 of the anticodon loop as found in a sub-population of tRNA(Secin vivo showed how this modification favors an anticodon loop conformation that is functional during decoding on the ribosome. Soaking of crystals in Mn(2+-containing buffer revealed eight potential divalent metal ion binding sites but the located metal ions did not significantly stabilize specific structural features of tRNA(Sec. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the most highly resolved structure of a tRNA(Sec molecule to date and assessed the influence of water molecules and metal ions on the molecule's conformation and dynamics. Our results suggest how conformational changes of tRNA(Sec support its interaction with proteins.

  14. A Bayesian multidimensional scaling procedure for the spatial analysis of revealed choice data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeSarbo, WS; Kim, Y; Fong, D

    1999-01-01

    We present a new Bayesian formulation of a vector multidimensional scaling procedure for the spatial analysis of binary choice data. The Gibbs sampler is gainfully employed to estimate the posterior distribution of the specified scalar products, bilinear model parameters. The computational procedure

  15. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush-cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush-cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochiasp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior.

  16. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush–cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionut Iorgu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush–cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochia sp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper, comparing the new species with several Isophya speciessimilar morphology and acoustic behavior.

  17. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush–cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ionut Iorgu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush–cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochia sp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior.

  18. A fossil subduction zone in the East Greenland Caledonides revealed by a Receiver Function analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Jacobsen, B. H.; Balling, N.;

    evidence for the processes before and under the Caledonian orogeny. We performed a Receiver Function analysis of data from 11 seismological broadband stations forming the Ella-Øarray. This array, maintained by Aarhus University, covered an approximately 270 km long profile, spanning the East Greenland...

  19. In Vivo Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals the Cardiac Targets of β-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Andersen, Martin N; Steffensen, Annette B;

    2013-01-01

    -X-X-pS/T), and integrative analysis of sequence motifs and interaction networks suggested that the kinases AMPK (adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase), Akt, and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) mediate βAR signaling, in addition to the well-established pathways mediated by PKA (cyclic adenosine...

  20. Gene Coexpression Analysis Reveals Complex Metabolism of the Monoterpene Alcohol Linalool in Arabidopsis FlowersW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginglinger, J.F.; Boachon, B.; Hofer, R.; Paetz, C.; Kollner, T.G.; Miesch, L.; Lugan, R.; Baltenweck, R.; Mutterer, J.; Ullman, P.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus

  1. Automated multidimensional image analysis reveals a role for Abl in embryonic wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulueta-Coarasa, Teresa; Tamada, Masako; Lee, Eun J; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2014-07-01

    The embryonic epidermis displays a remarkable ability to repair wounds rapidly. Embryonic wound repair is driven by the evolutionary conserved redistribution of cytoskeletal and junctional proteins around the wound. Drosophila has emerged as a model to screen for factors implicated in wound closure. However, genetic screens have been limited by the use of manual analysis methods. We introduce MEDUSA, a novel image-analysis tool for the automated quantification of multicellular and molecular dynamics from time-lapse confocal microscopy data. We validate MEDUSA by quantifying wound closure in Drosophila embryos, and we show that the results of our automated analysis are comparable to analysis by manual delineation and tracking of the wounds, while significantly reducing the processing time. We demonstrate that MEDUSA can also be applied to the investigation of cellular behaviors in three and four dimensions. Using MEDUSA, we find that the conserved nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Abelson (Abl) contributes to rapid embryonic wound closure. We demonstrate that Abl plays a role in the organization of filamentous actin and the redistribution of the junctional protein β-catenin at the wound margin during embryonic wound repair. Finally, we discuss different models for the role of Abl in the regulation of actin architecture and adhesion dynamics at the wound margin.

  2. Meta-analysis reveals a critical period for management of powdery mildew on Hop cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results of 28 field trials conducted over a 12-year period investigating management of hop powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera macularis were quantitatively summarized by meta-analysis to compare product efficacy and use patterns by mode of action as defined by Fungicide Resistance Action Committe...

  3. Molecular characterization of a putative K-Cl cotransporter in rat brain. A neuronal-specific isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J A; Stevenson, T J; Donaldson, L F

    1996-07-05

    Using a combination of data base searching, polymerase chain reaction, and library screening, we have identified a putative K-Cl cotransporter isoform (KCC2) in rat brain that is specifically localized in neurons. A cDNA of 5566 bases was obtained from overlapping clones and encoded a protein of 1116 amino acids with a deduced molecular mass of 123.6 kDa. Over its full length, the amino acid sequence of KCC2 is 67% identical to the widely distributed K-Cl cotransporter isoform (KCC1) identified in rat brain and rabbit kidney (Gillen, C., Brill, S., Payne, J.A., and Forbush, B., III(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16237-16244) but only approximately25% identical to other members of the cation-chloride cotransporter gene family, including "loop" diuretic-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransport and thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransport. Based on analysis of the primary structure as well as homology with other cation-chloride cotransporters, we predict 12 transmembrane segments bounded by N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions. Four sites for N-linked glycosylation are predicted on an extracellular intermembrane loop between putative transmembrane segments 5 and 6. Northern blot analysis using a KCC2-specific cDNA probe revealed a very highly expressed approximately5.6-kilobase transcript only in brain. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that KCC1 was present in rat primary astrocytes and rat C6 glioma cells but that KCC2 was completely absent from these cells, suggesting KCC2 was not of glial cell origin. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated that the KCC2 transcript was expressed at high levels in neurons throughout the central nervous system, including CA1-CA4 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus, granular cells and Purkinje neurons of the cerebellum, and many groups of neurons throughout the brainstem.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of the oil-rich tea plant, Camellia oleifera, reveals candidate genes related to lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Hua Xia

    Full Text Available Rapidly driven by the need for developing sustainable sources of nutritionally important fatty acids and the rising concerns about environmental impacts after using fossil oil, oil-plants have received increasing awareness nowadays. As an important oil-rich plant in China, Camellia oleifera has played a vital role in providing nu