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  1. Integrative analysis of circadian transcriptome and metabolic network reveals the role of de novo purine synthesis in circadian control of cell cycle.

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    Li, Ying; Li, Guang; Görling, Benjamin; Luy, Burkhard; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Metabolism is the major output of the circadian clock in many organisms. We developed a computational method to integrate both circadian gene expression and metabolic network. Applying this method to zebrafish circadian transcriptome, we have identified large clusters of metabolic genes containing mostly genes in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in the metabolic network showing similar circadian phases. Our metabolomics analysis found that the level of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), an intermediate metabolite in de novo purine synthesis, showed significant circadian oscillation in larval zebrafish. We focused on IMP dehydrogenase (impdh), a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo purine synthesis, with three circadian oscillating gene homologs: impdh1a, impdh1b and impdh2. Functional analysis revealed that impdh2 contributes to the daily rhythm of S phase in the cell cycle while impdh1a contributes to ocular development and pigment synthesis. The three zebrafish homologs of impdh are likely regulated by different circadian transcription factors. We propose that the circadian regulation of de novo purine synthesis that supplies crucial building blocks for DNA replication is an important mechanism conferring circadian rhythmicity on the cell cycle. Our method is widely applicable to study the impact of circadian transcriptome on metabolism in complex organisms.

  2. Integrative Analysis of Circadian Transcriptome and Metabolic Network Reveals the Role of De Novo Purine Synthesis in Circadian Control of Cell Cycle

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    Ying Li; Guang Li; Benjamin Görling; Burkhard Luy; Jiulin Du; Jun Yan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is the major output of the circadian clock in many organisms. We developed a computational method to integrate both circadian gene expression and metabolic network. Applying this method to zebrafish circadian transcriptome, we have identified large clusters of metabolic genes containing mostly genes in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in the metabolic network showing similar circadian phases. Our metabolomics analysis found that the level of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), an inter...

  3. Parallel analysis of Arabidopsis circadian clock mutants reveals different scales of transcriptome and proteome regulation

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    Graf, Alexander; Coman, Diana; Walsh, Sean; Flis, Anna; Stitt, Mark; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates physiological processes central to growth and survival. To date, most plant circadian clock studies have relied on diurnal transcriptome changes to elucidate molecular connections between the circadian clock and observable phenotypes in wild-type plants. Here, we have integrated RNA-sequencing and protein mass spectrometry data to comparatively analyse the lhycca1, prr7prr9, gi and toc1 circadian clock mutant rosette at the end of day and end of night. Each mutant affects specific sets of genes and proteins, suggesting that the circadian clock regulation is modular. Furthermore, each circadian clock mutant maintains its own dynamically fluctuating transcriptome and proteome profile specific to subcellular compartments. Most of the measured protein levels do not correlate with changes in their corresponding transcripts. Transcripts and proteins that have coordinated changes in abundance are enriched for carbohydrate- and cold-responsive genes. Transcriptome changes in all four circadian clock mutants also affect genes encoding starch degradation enzymes, transcription factors and protein kinases. The comprehensive transcriptome and proteome datasets demonstrate that future system-driven research of the circadian clock requires multi-level experimental approaches. Our work also shows that further work is needed to elucidate the roles of post-translational modifications and protein degradation in the regulation of clock-related processes. PMID:28250106

  4. Genome-wide analysis of SREBP1 activity around the clock reveals its combined dependency on nutrient and circadian signals.

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    Federica Gilardi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the circadian clock allows them to anticipate and adapt physiology around the 24 hours. Conversely, metabolism and food consumption regulate the internal clock, pointing the existence of an intricate relationship between nutrient state and circadian homeostasis that is far from being understood. The Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 (SREBP1 is a key regulator of lipid homeostasis. Hepatic SREBP1 function is influenced by the nutrient-response cycle, but also by the circadian machinery. To systematically understand how the interplay of circadian clock and nutrient-driven rhythm regulates SREBP1 activity, we evaluated the genome-wide binding of SREBP1 to its targets throughout the day in C57BL/6 mice. The recruitment of SREBP1 to the DNA showed a highly circadian behaviour, with a maximum during the fed status. However, the temporal expression of SREBP1 targets was not always synchronized with its binding pattern. In particular, different expression phases were observed for SREBP1 target genes depending on their function, suggesting the involvement of other transcription factors in their regulation. Binding sites for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 (HNF4 were specifically enriched in the close proximity of SREBP1 peaks of genes, whose expression was shifted by about 8 hours with respect to SREBP1 binding. Thus, the cross-talk between hepatic HNF4 and SREBP1 may underlie the expression timing of this subgroup of SREBP1 targets. Interestingly, the proper temporal expression profile of these genes was dramatically changed in Bmal1-/- mice upon time-restricted feeding, for which a rhythmic, but slightly delayed, binding of SREBP1 was maintained. Collectively, our results show that besides the nutrient-driven regulation of SREBP1 nuclear translocation, a second layer of modulation of SREBP1 transcriptional activity, strongly dependent from the circadian clock, exists. This system allows us to fine tune the expression timing of SREBP1

  5. Systematic analysis of circadian genes in a population-based sample reveals association of TIMELESS with depression and sleep disturbance.

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    Siddheshwar J Utge

    Full Text Available Disturbances in the circadian pacemaker system are commonly found in individuals with depression and sleep-related problems. We hypothesized that some of the canonical circadian clock genes would be associated with depression accompanied by signs of disturbed sleep, early morning awakening, or daytime fatigue. We tested this hypothesis in a population-based sample of the Health 2000 dataset from Finland, including 384 depressed individuals and 1270 controls, all with detailed information on sleep and daytime vigilance, and analyzed this set of individuals with regard to 113 single-nucleotide polymorphisms of 18 genes of the circadian system. We found significant association between TIMELESS variants and depression with fatigue (D+FAT+ (rs7486220: pointwise P = 0.000099, OR = 1.66; corrected empirical P for the model of D+FAT+ = 0.0056; haplotype 'C-A-A-C' of rs2291739-rs2291738-rs7486220-rs1082214: P = 0.0000075, OR = 1.72 in females, and association to depression with early morning awakening (D+EMA+ (rs1082214: pointwise P = 0.0009, OR = 2.70; corrected empirical P = 0.0374 for the model D+EMA+; haplotype 'G-T' of rs7486220 and rs1082214: P = 0.0001, OR = 3.01 in males. There was significant interaction of gender and TIMELESS (for example with rs1082214, P = 0.000023 to D+EMA+ and P = 0.005 to D+FAT+. We obtained supported evidence for involvement of TIMELESS in sleeping problems in an independent set of control individuals with seasonal changes in mood, sleep duration, energy level and social activity in females (P = 0.036, = 0.123 for rs1082214 and with early morning awakening or fatigue in males (P = 0.038 and P = 0.0016, respectively, for rs1082214. There was also some evidence of interaction between TIMELESS and PER1 in females to D+FAT+ as well as between TIMELESS and ARNTL, RORA or NR1D1 in males to D+EMA+. These findings support a connection between circadian genes and gender-dependent depression and defective sleep regulation.

  6. Single-cell Transcriptional Analysis Reveals Novel Neuronal Phenotypes and Interaction Networks involved In the Central Circadian Clock

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    James Park

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell heterogeneity confounds efforts to understand how a population of cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function. This complexity is prominent in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Here, individual neurons exhibit a remarkable amount of asynchronous behavior and transcriptional heterogeneity. However, SCN neurons are able to generate precisely coordinated synaptic and molecular outputs that synchronize the body to a common circadian cycle by organizing into cellular networks. To understand this emergent cellular network property, it is important to reconcile single-neuron heterogeneity with network organization. In light of recent studies suggesting that transcriptionally heterogeneous cells organize into distinct cellular phenotypes, we characterized the transcriptional, spatial, and functional organization of 352 SCN neurons from mice experiencing phase-shifts in their circadian cycle. Using the community structure detection method and multivariate analytical techniques, we identified previously undescribed neuronal phenotypes that are likely to participate in regulatory networks with known SCN cell types. Based on the newly discovered neuronal phenotypes, we developed a data-driven neuronal network structure in which multiple cell types interact through known synaptic and paracrine signaling mechanisms. These results provide a basis from which to interpret the functional variability of SCN neurons and describe methodologies towards understanding how a population of heterogeneous single cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function.

  7. Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Circadian Clock Regulation of Posttranslational Modifications in the Murine Hippocampus

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    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Xu, Bo; Mehta, Neel; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y. L.; Cheng, Kai; Ning, Zhibin; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous oscillator that drives daily rhythms in physiology, behavior, and gene expression. The underlying mechanisms of circadian timekeeping are cell-autonomous and involve oscillatory expression of core clock genes that is driven by interconnecting transcription–translation feedback loops (TTFLs). Circadian clock TTFLs are further regulated by posttranslational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation. The hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory and the conversion of short- to long-term memory. Several studies have reported the presence of a peripheral oscillator in the hippocampus and have highlighted the importance of circadian regulation in memory formation. Given the general importance of phosphorylation in circadian clock regulation, we performed global quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of the murine hippocampus across the circadian cycle, applying spiked-in labeled reference and high accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). Of the 3,052 proteins and 2,868 phosphosites on 1,368 proteins that were accurately quantified, 1.7% of proteins and 5.2% of phosphorylation events exhibited time-of-day-dependent expression profiles. The majority of circadian phosphopeptides displayed abrupt fluctuations at mid-to-late day without underlying rhythms of protein abundance. Bioinformatic analysis of cyclic phosphorylation events revealed their diverse distribution in different biological pathways, most notably, cytoskeletal organization and neuronal morphogenesis. This study provides the first large-scale, quantitative MS analysis of the circadian phosphoproteome and proteome of the murine hippocampus and highlights the significance of rhythmic regulation at the posttranslational level in this peripheral oscillator. In addition to providing molecular insights into the hippocampal circadian clock, our results will assist in the understanding of genetic factors that underlie rhythms-associated pathological states of

  8. Natural Populations of Drosophila melanogaster Reveal Features of an Uncharacterized Circadian Property: The Lower Temperature Limit of Rhythmicity.

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    Maguire, Sarah E; Schmidt, Paul S; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-06-01

    Most cyclic biological processes are under control of a circadian molecular timing system that synchronizes these phenomena to the 24-h day. One generic property of circadian-controlled processes is that they operate within a specific temperature range, below which the manifestation of rhythm ceases. Little is known about the evolutionary relevance of the lower temperature limit of rhythmicity or about the mechanism underlying the loss of overt circadian behavior below this lower limit, especially in one model organism of chronobiology, Drosophila melanogaster. Natural populations of Drosophila are evolving under divergent selection pressures and so provide a source of diversity necessary to address these issues. Using lines derived from African populations, we find that there is natural variation in the expression of rhythmic behavior under low-temperature conditions. We found evidence that this variability is evolutionarily relevant at extremely low temperature (12 °C) because high-altitude populations exhibit selection for locally adapted genomes that contribute to rhythmic behavior. Lines resistant to 15 °C show an additional layer of diversity in their response to temperature extremes because some lines are resistant to low temperature (15 °C) only, whereas others are cross-resistant to high and low temperature (15 °C and 30 °C). Genetic analysis of one cold-resistant circadian line at 15 °C reveals that the phenotype maps to the X-chromosome but not to the core clock genes, per and sgg. Analysis of the central clock cells of this line reveals that maintenance of rhythm is associated with robust clock function, which is compromised in a standard laboratory strain. These data indicate that the cold-resistant circadian phenotype is clock based. This study highlights the importance of using natural populations to inform us of the basic features of circadian traits, especially those that might be under temperature-based selection.

  9. Circadian phase has profound effects on differential expression analysis.

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    Polly Yingshan Hsu

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioral cycles with a period of approximately 24 hours that are generated by an endogenous clock, or oscillator. Found in diverse organisms, they are precisely controlled and provide growth and fitness benefits. Numerous microarray studies examining circadian control of gene expression have reported that a substantial fraction of the genomes of many organisms is clock-controlled. Here we show that a long-period mutant in Arabidopsis, rve8-1, has a global alteration in phase of all clock-controlled genes. After several days in constant environmental conditions, at which point the mutant and control plants have very different circadian phases, we found 1557 genes to be differentially expressed in rve8-1, almost all of which are clock-regulated. However, after adjusting for this phase difference, only a handful show overall expression level differences between rve8-1 and wild type. Thus the apparent differential expression is mainly due to the phase difference between these two genotypes. These findings prompted us to examine the effect of phase on gene expression within a single genotype. Using samples of wild-type plants harvested at thirty-minute intervals, we demonstrated that even this small difference in circadian phase significantly influences the results of differential expression analysis. Our study demonstrates the robust influence of the circadian clock on the transcriptome and provides a cautionary note for all biologists performing genome-level expression analysis.

  10. Analysis of the redox oscillations in the circadian clockwork

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    Milev, Nikolay B.; Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K.; Edgar, Rachel S.; O’Neill, John S.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of tight coupling between the circadian system and redox homeostasis of the cell has been proposed to coincide roughly with the appearance of the first aerobic organisms, around 3 billion years ago. The rhythmic production of oxygen and its effect on core metabolism are thought to have exerted selective pressure for the temporal segregation of numerous metabolic pathways. Until recently, the only evidence for such coupling came from studies showing circadian cycles in the abundance of various redox metabolites, with many arguing that these oscillations are simply an output from the transcription/translation-feedback loop (TTFL). The recent discovery that the peroxiredoxin (PRX) proteins exhibit circadian cycles in their oxidation status, even in the absence of transcription, demonstrated the existence of autonomous oscillations in the redox status of the cell. The PRXs are a family of cellular thiol peroxidases whose abundance and high reaction rate make them the major cellular sink for cellular peroxides. Interestingly, as part of the normal catalytic cycle, PRXs become inactivated by their own substrate via over-oxidation of the catalytic residue, with the inactivated form of the enzyme displaying circadian accumulation. Here, we describe the biochemical properties of the PRX system, with particular emphasis on the features important for the experimental analysis of these enzymes. We will also present a detailed protocol for measuring PRX over-oxidation across circadian time in adherent cell cultures, red blood cells and fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), providing practical suggestions for ensuring consistency and reproducibility of the results. PMID:25707278

  11. Phase analysis of circadian-related genes in two tissues

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    Li Leping

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent circadian clock studies using gene expression microarray in two different tissues of mouse have revealed not all circadian-related genes are synchronized in phase or peak expression times across tissues in vivo. Instead, some circadian-related genes may be delayed by 4–8 hrs in peak expression in one tissue relative to the other. These interesting biological observations prompt a statistical question regarding how to distinguish the synchronized genes from genes that are systematically lagged in phase/peak expression time across two tissues. Results We propose a set of techniques from circular statistics to analyze phase angles of circadian-related genes in two tissues. We first estimate the phases of a cycling gene separately in each tissue, which are then used to estimate the paired angular difference of the phase angles of the gene in the two tissues. These differences are modeled as a mixture of two von Mises distributions which enables us to cluster genes into two groups; one group having synchronized transcripts with the same phase in the two tissues, the other containing transcripts with a discrepancy in phase between the two tissues. For each cluster of genes we assess the association of phases across the tissue types using circular-circular regression. We also develop a bootstrap methodology based on a circular-circular regression model to evaluate the improvement in fit provided by allowing two components versus a one-component von-Mises model. Conclusion We applied our proposed methodologies to the circadian-related genes common to heart and liver tissues in Storch et al. 2, and found that an estimated 80% of circadian-related transcripts common to heart and liver tissues were synchronized in phase, and the other 20% of transcripts were lagged about 8 hours in liver relative to heart. The bootstrap p-value for being one cluster is 0.063, which suggests the possibility of two clusters. Our methodologies can

  12. Isochron-Based Phase Response Analysis of Circadian Rhythms

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    Gunawan, Rudiyanto; Doyle, Francis J.

    2006-01-01

    Circadian rhythms possess the ability to robustly entrain to the environmental cycles. This ability relies on the phase synchronization of circadian rhythm gene regulation to different environmental cues, of which light is the most obvious and important. The elucidation of the mechanism of circadian entrainment requires an understanding of circadian phase behavior. This article presents two phase analyses of oscillatory systems for infinitesimal and finite perturbations based on isochrons as ...

  13. Combined Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulations Unlock Unprecedented Temporal Elasticity and Reveal Phase-Specific Modulation of the Molecular Circadian Clock of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

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    Patton, Andrew P.; Chesham, Johanna E.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian oscillator encoding time-of-day information. SCN timekeeping is sustained by a cell-autonomous transcriptional–translational feedback loop, whereby expression of the Period and Cryptochrome genes is negatively regulated by their protein products. This loop in turn drives circadian oscillations in gene expression that direct SCN electrical activity and thence behavior. The robustness of SCN timekeeping is further enhanced by interneuronal, circuit-level coupling. The aim of this study was to combine pharmacological and genetic manipulations to push the SCN clockwork toward its limits and, by doing so, probe cell-autonomous and emergent, circuit-level properties. Circadian oscillation of mouse SCN organotypic slice cultures was monitored as PER2::LUC bioluminescence. SCN of three genetic backgrounds—wild-type, short-period CK1εTau/Tau mutant, and long-period Fbxl3Afh/Afh mutant—all responded reversibly to pharmacological manipulation with period-altering compounds: picrotoxin, PF-670462 (4-[1-Cyclohexyl-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]-2-pyrimidinamine dihydrochloride), and KNK437 (N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidine-gamma-butyrolactam). This revealed a remarkably wide operating range of sustained periods extending across 25 h, from ≤17 h to >42 h. Moreover, this range was maintained at network and single-cell levels. Development of a new technique for formal analysis of circadian waveform, first derivative analysis (FDA), revealed internal phase patterning to the circadian oscillation at these extreme periods and differential phase sensitivity of the SCN to genetic and pharmacological manipulations. For example, FDA of the CK1εTau/Tau mutant SCN treated with the CK1ε-specific inhibitor PF-4800567 (3-[(3-Chlorophenoxy)methyl]-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine hydrochloride) revealed that period acceleration in the mutant is due to inappropriately phased

  14. Smith-Magenis syndrome results in disruption of CLOCK gene transcription and reveals an integral role for RAI1 in the maintenance of circadian rhythmicity.

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    Williams, Stephen R; Zies, Deborah; Mullegama, Sureni V; Grotewiel, Michael S; Elsea, Sarah H

    2012-06-08

    Haploinsufficiency of RAI1 results in Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), a disorder characterized by intellectual disability, multiple congenital anomalies, obesity, neurobehavioral abnormalities, and a disrupted circadian sleep-wake pattern. An inverted melatonin rhythm (i.e., melatonin peaks during the day instead of at night) and associated sleep-phase disturbances in individuals with SMS, as well as a short-period circadian rhythm in mice with a chromosomal deletion of Rai1, support SMS as a circadian-rhythm-dysfunction disorder. However, the molecular cause of the circadian defect in SMS has not been described. The circadian oscillator temporally orchestrates metabolism, physiology, and behavior largely through transcriptional modulation. Data support RAI1 as a transcriptional regulator, but the genes it might regulate are largely unknown. Investigation into the role that RAI1 plays in the regulation of gene transcription and circadian maintenance revealed that RAI1 regulates the transcription of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), a key component of the mammalian circadian oscillator that transcriptionally regulates many critical circadian genes. Data further show that haploinsufficiency of RAI1 and Rai1 in SMS fibroblasts and the mouse hypothalamus, respectively, results in the transcriptional dysregulation of the circadian clock and causes altered expression and regulation of multiple circadian genes, including PER2, PER3, CRY1, BMAL1, and others. These data suggest that heterozygous mutation of RAI1 and Rai1 leads to a disrupted circadian rhythm and thus results in an abnormal sleep-wake cycle, which can contribute to an abnormal feeding pattern and dependent cognitive performance. Finally, we conclude that RAI1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CLOCK, pinpointing a novel and important role for this gene in the circadian oscillator.

  15. The comparison between circadian oscillators in mouse liver and pituitary gland reveals different integration of feeding and light schedules.

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    Isabelle M Bur

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian system is composed of multiple peripheral clocks that are synchronized by a central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. This system keeps track of the external world rhythms through entrainment by various time cues, such as the light-dark cycle and the feeding schedule. Alterations of photoperiod and meal time modulate the phase coupling between central and peripheral oscillators. In this study, we used real-time quantitative PCR to assess circadian clock gene expression in the liver and pituitary gland from mice raised under various photoperiods, or under a temporal restricted feeding protocol. Our results revealed unexpected differences between both organs. Whereas the liver oscillator always tracked meal time, the pituitary circadian clockwork showed an intermediate response, in between entrainment by the light regimen and the feeding-fasting rhythm. The same composite response was also observed in the pituitary gland from adrenalectomized mice under daytime restricted feeding, suggesting that circulating glucocorticoids do not inhibit full entrainment of the pituitary clockwork by meal time. Altogether our results reveal further aspects in the complexity of phase entrainment in the circadian system, and suggest that the pituitary may host oscillators able to integrate multiple time cues.

  16. TRiP: Tracking Rhythms in Plants, an automated leaf movement analysis program for circadian period estimation

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    Greenham, Kathleen; Lou, Ping; Remsen, Sara E; Farid, Hany; McClung, C. Robertson

    2015-01-01

    Background A well characterized output of the circadian clock in plants is the daily rhythmic movement of leaves. This process has been used extensively in Arabidopsis to estimate circadian period in natural accessions as well as mutants with known defects in circadian clock function. Current methods for estimating circadian period by leaf movement involve manual steps throughout the analysis and are often limited to analyzing one leaf or cotyledon at a time. Results In this study, we describ...

  17. Circadian gating of the cell cycle revealed in single cyanobacterial cells.

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    Yang, Qiong; Pando, Bernardo F; Dong, Guogang; Golden, Susan S; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2010-03-19

    Although major progress has been made in uncovering the machinery that underlies individual biological clocks, much less is known about how multiple clocks coordinate their oscillations. We simultaneously tracked cell division events and circadian phases of individual cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus and fit the data to a model to determine when cell cycle progression slows as a function of circadian and cell cycle phases. We infer that cell cycle progression in cyanobacteria slows during a specific circadian interval but is uniform across cell cycle phases. Our model is applicable to the quantification of the coupling between biological oscillators in other organisms.

  18. Period-independent novel circadian oscillators revealed by timed exercise and palatable meals

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    Danilo E. F. L. Flôres; Crystal N. Bettilyon; Shin Yamazaki

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is a hierarchical network of oscillators organized to optimally coordinate behavior and physiology with daily environmental cycles. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is at the top of this hierarchy, synchronizing to the environmental light-dark cycle, and coordinates the phases of peripheral clocks. The Period genes are critical components of the molecular timekeeping mechanism of these clocks. Circadian clocks are disabled in Period1/2/3 tri...

  19. Early doors (Edo) mutant mouse reveals the importance of period 2 (PER2) PAS domain structure for circadian pacemaking.

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    Militi, Stefania; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Sandate, Colby R; Chesham, Johanna E; Barnard, Alun R; Parsons, Michael J; Vibert, Jennifer L; Joynson, Greg M; Partch, Carrie L; Hastings, Michael H; Nolan, Patrick M

    2016-03-08

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) defines 24 h of time via a transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loop in which transactivation of Per (period) and Cry (cryptochrome) genes by BMAL1-CLOCK complexes is suppressed by PER-CRY complexes. The molecular/structural basis of how circadian protein complexes function is poorly understood. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, early doors (Edo), in the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain dimerization region of period 2 (PER2) (I324N) that accelerates the circadian clock of Per2(Edo/Edo) mice by 1.5 h. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that Edo alters the packing of the highly conserved interdomain linker of the PER2 PAS core such that, although PER2(Edo) complexes with clock proteins, its vulnerability to degradation mediated by casein kinase 1ε (CSNK1E) is increased. The functional relevance of this mutation is revealed by the ultrashort (Edo/Edo); Csnk1e(Tau/Tau) mice and the SCN. These periods are unprecedented in mice. Thus, Per2(Edo) reveals a direct causal link between the molecular structure of the PER2 PAS core and the pace of SCN circadian timekeeping.

  20. Transcriptomes reveal alterations in gravity impact circadian clocks and activate mechanotransduction pathways with adaptation through epigenetic change.

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    Casey, Theresa; Patel, Osman V; Plaut, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of alterations in gravity on mammalian transcriptomes. Here, we describe the impact of spaceflight on mammary transcriptome of late pregnant rats and the effect of hypergravity exposure on mammary, liver, and adipose transcriptomes in late pregnancy and at the onset of lactation. RNA was isolated from mammary collected on pregnancy day 20 from rats exposed to spaceflight from days 11 to 20 of gestation. To measure the impact of hypergravity on mammary, liver, and adipose transcriptomes we isolated RNA from tissues collected on P20 and lactation day 1 from rats exposed to hypergravity beginning on pregnancy day 9. Gene expression was measured with Affymetrix GeneChips. Microarray analysis of variance revealed alterations in gravity affected the expression of genes that regulate circadian clocks and activate mechanotransduction pathways. Changes in these systems may explain global gene expression changes in immune response, metabolism, and cell proliferation. Expression of genes that modify chromatin structure and methylation was affected, suggesting adaptation to gravity alterations may proceed through epigenetic change. Altered gravity experiments offer insights into the role of forces omnipresent on Earth that shape genomes in heritable ways. Our study is the first to analyze the impact of alterations in gravity on transcriptomes of pregnant and lactating mammals. Findings provide insight into systems that sense gravity and the way in which they affect phenotype, as well as the possibility of sustaining life beyond Earth's orbit.

  1. Digital signal processing reveals circadian baseline oscillation in majority of mammalian genes.

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    Andrey A Ptitsyn

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, circadian periodicity has been described for gene expression in the hypothalamus and multiple peripheral tissues. It is accepted that 10%-15% of all genes oscillate in a daily rhythm, regulated by an intrinsic molecular clock. Statistical analyses of periodicity are limited by the small size of datasets and high levels of stochastic noise. Here, we propose a new approach applying digital signal processing algorithms separately to each group of genes oscillating in the same phase. Combined with the statistical tests for periodicity, this method identifies circadian baseline oscillation in almost 100% of all expressed genes. Consequently, circadian oscillation in gene expression should be evaluated in any study related to biological pathways. Changes in gene expression caused by mutations or regulation of environmental factors (such as photic stimuli or feeding should be considered in the context of changes in the amplitude and phase of genetic oscillations.

  2. Circadian clocks and antiaging: do non-aging microalgae like Euglena reveal anything?

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    Goto, Ken; Beneragama, Chalinda K

    2010-04-01

    Microalgae that divide symmetrically in all aspects do not age. While the evolutionary reason for this is obvious, little attention has been paid to the mechanistic explanations. A great deal of study involving many research fields would be needed to explain the mechanisms if we suppose that the immortality results from a lifelong sufficiency of defense from stress or from an essential part of counteracting age-accompanied damage accumulation. Additionally, little is known about the relationships between homeostasis and circadian clocks in antiaging, although each of these has been studied separately. Here, we present a conceptual generalization of those relationships, as suggested by evidence from non-aging microalgae, mainly Euglena. The circadian gating of mitosis and circadian temporal coordination may respectively reduce radiation- and disharmony-induced stress in which homeostasis cannot be involved, whereas circadian resistance rhythms may greatly help homeostatic defense from radiation- and metabolism-induced stress. We also briefly sketch mammalian aging research to compare the current status of knowledge with that of algal antiaging.

  3. Systematic identification of rhythmic genes reveals camk1gb as a new element in the circadian clockwork.

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    Adi Tovin

    Full Text Available A wide variety of biochemical, physiological, and molecular processes are known to have daily rhythms driven by an endogenous circadian clock. While extensive research has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that constitute the circadian clock, the links between this clock and dependent processes have remained elusive. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and DNA microarrays to systematically identify clock-controlled genes in the zebrafish pineal gland. In addition to a comprehensive view of the expression pattern of known clock components within this master clock tissue, this approach has revealed novel potential elements of the circadian timing system. We have implicated one rhythmically expressed gene, camk1gb, in connecting the clock with downstream physiology of the pineal gland. Remarkably, knockdown of camk1gb disrupts locomotor activity in the whole larva, even though it is predominantly expressed within the pineal gland. Therefore, it appears that camk1gb plays a role in linking the pineal master clock with the periphery.

  4. Circadian variation of the human metabolome captured by real-time breath analysis.

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    Pablo Martinez-Lozano Sinues

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks play a significant role in the correct timing of physiological metabolism, and clock disruption might lead to pathological changes of metabolism. One interesting method to assess the current state of metabolism is metabolomics. Metabolomics tries to capture the entirety of small molecules, i.e. the building blocks of metabolism, in a given matrix, such as blood, saliva or urine. Using mass spectrometric approaches we and others have shown that a significant portion of the human metabolome in saliva and blood exhibits circadian modulation; independent of food intake or sleep/wake rhythms. Recent advances in mass spectrometry techniques have introduced completely non-invasive breathprinting; a method to instantaneously assess small metabolites in human breath. In this proof-of-principle study, we extend these findings about the impact of circadian clocks on metabolomics to exhaled breath. As previously established, our method allows for real-time analysis of a rich matrix during frequent non-invasive sampling. We sampled the breath of three healthy, non-smoking human volunteers in hourly intervals for 24 hours during total sleep deprivation, and found 111 features in the breath of all individuals, 36-49% of which showed significant circadian variation in at least one individual. Our data suggest that real-time mass spectrometric "breathprinting" has high potential to become a useful tool to understand circadian metabolism, and develop new biomarkers to easily and in real-time assess circadian clock phase and function in experimental and clinical settings.

  5. Chronic electromyographic analysis of circadian locomotor activity in crayfish.

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    Tomina, Yusuke; Kibayashi, Akihiro; Yoshii, Taishi; Takahata, Masakazu

    2013-07-15

    Animals generally exhibit circadian rhythms of locomotor activity. They initiate locomotor behavior not only reflexively in response to external stimuli but also spontaneously in the absence of any specific stimulus. The neuronal mechanisms underlying circadian locomotor activity can, therefore, be based on the rhythmic changes in either reflexive efficacy or endogenous activity. In crayfish Procambarus clarkii, it can be determined by analyzing electromyographic (EMG) patterns of walking legs whether the walking behavior is initiated reflexively or spontaneously. In this study, we examined quantitatively the leg muscle activity that underlies the locomotor behavior showing circadian rhythms in crayfish. We newly developed a chronic EMG recording system that allowed the animal to freely behave under a tethered condition for more than 10 days. In the LD condition in which the animals exhibited LD entrainment, the rhythmic burst activity of leg muscles for stepping behavior was preceded by non-rhythmic tonic activation that lasted for 1323±488ms when the animal initiated walking. In DD and LL free-running conditions, the pre-burst activation lasted for 1779±31 and 1517±39ms respectively. In the mechanical stimulus-evoked walking, the pre-burst activation ended within 79±6ms. These data suggest that periodic changes in the crayfish locomotor activity under the condition of LD entrainment or free-running are based on activity changes in the spontaneous initiation mechanism of walking behavior rather than those in the sensori-motor pathway connecting mechanoreceptors with leg movements.

  6. Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... microbes. The study of circadian rhythms is called chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological ... the eyes cross. Do circadian rhythms have a genetic component? Yes. Researchers have already identified genes that ...

  7. Functional analysis of Casein Kinase 1 in a minimal circadian system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerben van Ooijen

    Full Text Available The Earth's rotation has driven the evolution of cellular circadian clocks to facilitate anticipation of the solar cycle. Some evidence for timekeeping mechanism conserved from early unicellular life through to modern organisms was recently identified, but the components of this oscillator are currently unknown. Although very few clock components appear to be shared across higher species, Casein Kinase 1 (CK1 is known to affect timekeeping across metazoans and fungi, but has not previously been implicated in the circadian clock in the plant kingdom. We now show that modulation of CK1 function lengthens circadian rhythms in Ostreococcustauri, a unicellular marine algal species at the base of the green lineage, separated from humans by ~1.5 billion years of evolution. CK1 contributes to timekeeping in a phase-dependent manner, indicating clock-mediated gating of CK1 activity. Label-free proteomic analyses upon overexpression as well as inhibition revealed CK1-responsive phosphorylation events on a set of target proteins, including highly conserved potentially clock-relevant cellular regulator proteins. These results have major implications for our understanding of cellular timekeeping and can inform future studies in any circadian organism.

  8. Differential expression of circadian clock genes in two strains of beetles reveals candidates related to photoperiodic induction of summer diapause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Liu, Wen; Tan, Qian-Qian; Lei, Chao-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Diapause (also known as dormancy) is a state of arrested development induced by photoperiod or temperature that allows insects to survive adverse environmental conditions. By regulating diapause induction, the circadian clock is involved in short-day-induced winter diapause but whether this is also the case in long-day (LD)-induced summer diapause remains unknown. The cabbage beetle Colaphellus bowringi could enter summer diapause under LD conditions. However, a non-photoperiodic-diapause (NPD) strain of this species, which was developed in our laboratory by artificial selection, could not enter diapause under LD photoperiod. Therefore, we identified circadian clock genes in this species and measured differences in their expression between a high diapause (HD) strain and the NPD strain to investigate the potential relationship between circadian clock genes and summer diapause induction in C. bowringi. We successfully cloned eight circadian clock genes and obtained intact ORFs of four; cryptochrome2, double-time, shaggy and vrille. Phylogenetic trees and sequence alignment analyses indicated that these circadian clock genes were conserved across insect taxa. The quantitative real-time PCR indicated that clock, cycle, period, timeless, cryptochrome2, and vrille were differentially expressed between HD and NPD strains reared under LD photoperiod during the diapause induction phase. These findings suggest the potential relationship between circadian clock genes and LD-regulated summer diapause induction in C. bowringi.

  9. A Novel Bmal1 Mutant Mouse Reveals Essential Roles of the C-Terminal Domain on Circadian Rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noheon Park

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock is an endogenous biological timer comprised of transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes. Bmal1 encodes an indispensable transcription factor for the generation of circadian rhythms. Here, we report a new circadian mutant mouse from gene-trapped embryonic stem cells harboring a C-terminus truncated Bmal1 (Bmal1GTΔC allele. The homozygous mutant (Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice immediately lost circadian behavioral rhythms under constant darkness. The heterozygous (Bmal1+/GTΔC mice displayed a gradual loss of rhythms, in contrast to Bmal1+/- mice where rhythms were sustained. Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice also showed arrhythmic mRNA and protein expression in the SCN and liver. Lack of circadian reporter oscillation was also observed in cultured fibroblast cells, indicating that the arrhythmicity of Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice resulted from impaired molecular clock machinery. Expression of clock genes exhibited distinct responses to the mutant allele in Bmal1+/GTΔC and Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice. Despite normal cellular localization and heterodimerization with CLOCK, overexpressed BMAL1GTΔC was unable to activate transcription of Per1 promoter and BMAL1-dependent CLOCK degradation. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of Bmal1 has pivotal roles in the regulation of circadian rhythms and the Bmal1GTΔC mice constitute a novel model system to evaluate circadian functional mechanism of BMAL1.

  10. Computational analysis of mammalian cell division gated by a circadian clock: quantized cell cycles and cell size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámborszky, Judit; Hong, Christian I; Csikász Nagy, Attila

    2007-12-01

    Cell cycle and circadian rhythms are conserved from cyanobacteria to humans with robust cyclic features. Recently, molecular links between these two cyclic processes have been discovered. Core clock transcription factors, Bmal1 and Clock (Clk), directly regulate Wee1 kinase, which inhibits entry into the mitosis. We investigate the effect of this connection on the timing of mammalian cell cycle processes with computational modeling tools. We connect a minimal model of circadian rhythms, which consists of transcription-translation feedback loops, with a modified mammalian cell cycle model from Novak and Tyson (2004). As we vary the mass doubling time (MDT) of the cell cycle, stochastic simulations reveal quantized cell cycles when the activity of Wee1 is influenced by clock components. The quantized cell cycles disappear in the absence of coupling or when the strength of this link is reduced. More intriguingly, our simulations indicate that the circadian clock triggers critical size control in the mammalian cell cycle. A periodic brake on the cell cycle progress via Wee1 enforces size control when the MDT is quite different from the circadian period. No size control is observed in the absence of coupling. The issue of size control in the mammalian system is debatable, whereas it is well established in yeast. It is possible that the size control is more readily observed in cell lines that contain circadian rhythms, since not all cell types have a circadian clock. This would be analogous to an ultradian clock intertwined with quantized cell cycles (and possibly cell size control) in yeast. We present the first coupled model between the mammalian cell cycle and circadian rhythms that reveals quantized cell cycles and cell size control influenced by the clock.

  11. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marcolino-Gomes

    Full Text Available Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  12. Novel biochemical manipulation of brain serotonin reveals a role of serotonin in the circadian rhythm of sleep-wake cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Miyamoto, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Kozo; Tsukada, Koji; Takai, Katsuji

    2012-06-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) neurons have been implicated in the modulation of many physiological functions, including mood regulation, feeding, and sleep. Impaired or altered 5-HT neurotransmission appears to be involved in depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as in sleep disorders. To investigate brain 5-HT functions in sleep, we induced 5-HT deficiency through acute tryptophan depletion in rats by intraperitoneally injecting a tryptophan-degrading enzyme called tryptophan side chain oxidase I (TSOI). After the administration of TSOI (20 units), plasma tryptophan levels selectively decreased to 1-2% of those of controls within 2 h, remained under 1% for 12-24 h, and then recovered between 72 and 96 h. Following plasma tryptophan levels, brain 5-HT levels decreased to ∼30% of the control level after 6 h, remained at this low level for 20-30 h, and returned to normal after 72 h. In contrast, brain norepinephreine and dopamine levels remained unchanged. After TSOI injection, the circadian rhythms of the sleep-wake cycle and locomotive activity were lost and broken into minute(s) ultradian alternations. The hourly slow-wave sleep (SWS) time significantly increased at night, but decreased during the day, whereas rapid eye movement sleep was significantly reduced during the day. However, daily total (cumulative) SWS time was retained at the normal level. As brain 5-HT levels gradually recovered 48 h after TSOI injection, the circadian rhythms of sleep-wake cycles and locomotive activity returned to normal. Our results suggest that 5-HT with a rapid turnover rate plays an important role in the circadian rhythm of sleep-wake cycles.

  13. Revealing a circadian clock in captive arctic-breeding songbirds, lapland longspurs (Calcarius lapponicus), under constant illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Noah T; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Schwabl, Ingrid; Goymann, Wolfgang; Salli, Brady M; Bentley, George E; Buck, C Loren

    2014-12-01

    Most organisms in temperate or tropic regions employ the light-dark (LD) cycle as the primary Zeitgeber to synchronize circadian rhythms. At higher latitudes (>66°33'), continuous illumination during the summer presents a significant time-keeping dilemma for polar-adapted species. Lapland longspurs (Calcarius lapponicus), arctic-breeding migratory songbirds, are one of the few recorded species maintaining an intact diel rhythm in activity and plasma melatonin titers during polar summer. However, it is unknown whether rhythms are endogenous and entrain to low-amplitude polar Zeitgeber signals, such as daily variations in light intensity and the spectral composition of the sun (as measured by color temperature). Wild-caught male and female longspurs were brought into captivity, and locomotor activity was assessed using infrared detection. To examine if rhythms were endogenous, birds were exposed to constant bright light (LL; 1300 lux) or constant darkness (DD; 0.1 lux). All birds exhibited free-running activity rhythms in LL and DD, suggesting the presence of a functional circadian clock. Mean periods in LL (22.86 h) were significantly shorter than those in DD (23.5 h), in accordance with Aschoff's rule. No birds entrained to diel changes in light intensity, color temperature, or both. To examine endogenous molecular clock function, the Per2 gene was partially cloned in longspurs (llPer2) and transcripts were measured in hypothalamic tissue punches, eye, and liver using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Ocular llPer2 gene expression was periodic in LL and elevated at ZT24 (CT24) for LD or constant conditions (LL and DD), but llPer2 rhythmicity was not detected in hypothalamus or liver. Plasma melatonin was significantly lower in LL compared with LD or DD. In conclusion, rhythmic ocular Per2 expression and melatonin secretion may maintain the circadian activity rhythm across the polar day.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of light- and temperature-entrained circadian transcripts in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M van der Linden

    Full Text Available Most organisms have an endogenous circadian clock that is synchronized to environmental signals such as light and temperature. Although circadian rhythms have been described in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans at the behavioral level, these rhythms appear to be relatively non-robust. Moreover, in contrast to other animal models, no circadian transcriptional rhythms have been identified. Thus, whether this organism contains a bona fide circadian clock remains an open question. Here we use genome-wide expression profiling experiments to identify light- and temperature-entrained oscillating transcripts in C. elegans. These transcripts exhibit rhythmic expression with temperature-compensated 24-h periods. In addition, their expression is sustained under constant conditions, suggesting that they are under circadian regulation. Light and temperature cycles strongly drive gene expression and appear to entrain largely nonoverlapping gene sets. We show that mutations in a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel required for sensory transduction abolish both light- and temperature-entrained gene expression, implying that environmental cues act cell nonautonomously to entrain circadian rhythms. Together, these findings demonstrate circadian-regulated transcriptional rhythms in C. elegans and suggest that further analyses in this organism will provide new information about the evolution and function of this biological clock.

  15. Modelling and analysis of the feeding regimen induced entrainment of hepatocyte circadian oscillators using petri nets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Hayat Khan Tareen

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are certain periodic behaviours exhibited by living organism at different levels, including cellular and system-wide scales. Recent studies have found that the circadian rhythms of several peripheral organs in mammals, such as the liver, are able to entrain their clocks to received signals independent of other system level clocks, in particular when responding to signals generated during feeding. These studies have found SIRT1, PARP1, and HSF1 proteins to be the major influencers of the core CLOCKBMAL1:PER-CRY circadian clock. These entities, along with abstracted feeding induced signals were modelled collectively in this study using Petri Nets. The properties of the model show that the circadian system itself is strongly robust, and is able to continually evolve. The modelled feeding regimens suggest that the usual 3 meals/day and 2 meals/day feeding regimens are beneficial with any more or less meals/day negatively affecting the system.

  16. Modelling and analysis of the feeding regimen induced entrainment of hepatocyte circadian oscillators using petri nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareen, Samar Hayat Khan; Ahmad, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are certain periodic behaviours exhibited by living organism at different levels, including cellular and system-wide scales. Recent studies have found that the circadian rhythms of several peripheral organs in mammals, such as the liver, are able to entrain their clocks to received signals independent of other system level clocks, in particular when responding to signals generated during feeding. These studies have found SIRT1, PARP1, and HSF1 proteins to be the major influencers of the core CLOCKBMAL1:PER-CRY circadian clock. These entities, along with abstracted feeding induced signals were modelled collectively in this study using Petri Nets. The properties of the model show that the circadian system itself is strongly robust, and is able to continually evolve. The modelled feeding regimens suggest that the usual 3 meals/day and 2 meals/day feeding regimens are beneficial with any more or less meals/day negatively affecting the system.

  17. System identification of the Arabidopsis plant circadian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Mathias; Somers, David E.; Kim, Pan-Jun

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system generates an endogenous oscillatory rhythm that governs the daily activities of organisms in nature. It offers adaptive advantages to organisms through a coordination of their biological functions with the optimal time of day. In this paper, a model of the circadian system in the plant Arabidopsis (species thaliana) is built by using system identification techniques. Prior knowledge about the physical interactions of the genes and the proteins in the plant circadian system is incorporated in the model building exercise. The model is built by using primarily experimentally-verified direct interactions between the genes and the proteins with the available data on mRNA and protein abundances from the circadian system. Our analysis reveals a great performance of the model in predicting the dynamics of the plant circadian system through the effect of diverse internal and external perturbations (gene knockouts and day-length changes). Furthermore, we found that the circadian oscillatory rhythm is robust and does not vary much with the biochemical parameters except those of a light-sensitive protein P and a transcription factor TOC1. In other words, the circadian rhythmic profile is largely a consequence of the network's architecture rather than its particular parameters. Our work suggests that the current experimental knowledge of the gene-to-protein interactions in the plant Arabidopsis, without considering any additional hypothetical interactions, seems to suffice for system-level modeling of the circadian system of this plant and to present an exemplary platform for the control of network dynamics in complex living organisms.

  18. Microarray analysis of natural socially regulated plasticity in circadian rhythms of honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Southey, Bruce R; Shemesh, Yair; Rubin, Elad B; Cohen, Mira; Robinson, Gene E; Bloch, Guy

    2012-02-01

    Honey bee workers care for ("nurse") the brood around the clock without circadian rhythmicity, but then they forage outside with strong circadian rhythms and a consolidated nightly rest. This chronobiological plasticity is associated with variation in the expression of the canonical "clock genes" that regulate the circadian clock: nurse bees show no brain rhythms of expression, while foragers do. These results suggest that the circadian system is organized differently in nurses and foragers. Nurses switch to activity with circadian rhythms shortly after being removed from the hive, suggesting that at least some clock cells in their brain continue to measure time while in the hive. We performed a microarray genome-wide survey to determine general patterns of brain gene expression in nurses and foragers sampled around the clock. We found 160 and 541 transcripts that exhibited significant sinusoidal oscillations in nurses and foragers, respectively, with peaks of expression distributed throughout the day in both task groups. Consistent with earlier studies, transcripts of genes involved in circadian rhythms, including Clockwork Orange that has not been studied before in bees, oscillated in foragers but not in nurses. The oscillating transcripts also were enriched for genes involved in the visual system, "development" and "response to stimuli" (foragers), "muscle contraction" and "microfilament motor gene expression" (nurses), and "generation of precursor metabolites" and "energy" (both). Transcripts of genes encoding P450 enzymes oscillated in both nurses and foragers but with a different phase. This study identified new putative clock-controlled genes in the honey bee and suggests that some brain functions show circadian rhythmicity even in nurse bees that are active around the clock.

  19. Analysis of daily and circadian gene expression in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Tosini, Gianluca

    2008-02-01

    The mammalian pineal gland is an important component of the circadian system. In the present study, we examined the expression of roughly 8000 genes in the rat pineal gland as a function of time of day under light-dark (LD) cycles and in constant dark (DD) using oligo DNA microarray technique. We identified 47 and 13 genes that showed higher levels at night and day, respectively, under LD. The same patterns of expression were also observed in DD. About half of the genes that peaked at night have a known biological function, i.e., transcription factors and proteins that are involved in signaling cascades, whereas 14 are expressed sequence tags and 8 have an unknown biological function. Twelve of the genes that were up-regulated at night were also up-regulated after 1h NE stimulation, thus suggesting that the expression of these genes is controlled by adrenergic mechanisms. Of the 13 genes that were up-regulated in the daytime, 6 coded for proteins that are involved in intracellular signaling pathways. The results obtained with microarray analysis were well correlated with data obtained using real time quantitative RT-PCR. The present results provide new materials to dissect and understand the pineal physiology.

  20. Analysis of circadian properties and healthy levels of blue light from smartphones at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Hye; Yoo, Heeyeon; Park, Hoo Keun; Do, Young Rag

    2015-06-18

    This study proposes representative figures of merit for circadian and vision performance for healthy and efficient use of smartphone displays. The recently developed figures of merit for circadian luminous efficacy of radiation (CER) and circadian illuminance (CIL) related to human health and circadian rhythm were measured to compare three kinds of commercial smartphone displays. The CIL values for social network service (SNS) messenger screens from all three displays were higher than 41.3 biolux (blx) in a dark room at night, and the highest CIL value reached 50.9 blx. These CIL values corresponded to melatonin suppression values (MSVs) of 7.3% and 11.4%, respectively. Moreover, smartphone use in a bright room at night had much higher CIL and MSV values (58.7 ~ 105.2 blx and 15.4 ~ 36.1%, respectively). This study also analyzed the nonvisual and visual optical properties of the three smartphone displays while varying the distance between the screen and eye and controlling the brightness setting. Finally, a method to possibly attenuate the unhealthy effects of smartphone displays was proposed and investigated by decreasing the emitting wavelength of blue LEDs in a smartphone LCD backlight and subsequently reducing the circadian effect of the display.

  1. Circadian rhythms regulate amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Seon, Yoon Ji; Mourão, Marcio A; Schnell, Santiago; Kim, Doohak; Harada, Hidemitsu; Papagerakis, Silvana; Papagerakis, Petros

    2013-07-01

    Ameloblasts, the cells responsible for making enamel, modify their morphological features in response to specialized functions necessary for synchronized ameloblast differentiation and enamel formation. Secretory and maturation ameloblasts are characterized by the expression of stage-specific genes which follows strictly controlled repetitive patterns. Circadian rhythms are recognized as key regulators of the development and diseases of many tissues including bone. Our aim was to gain novel insights on the role of clock genes in enamel formation and to explore the potential links between circadian rhythms and amelogenesis. Our data shows definitive evidence that the main clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) oscillate in ameloblasts at regular circadian (24 h) intervals both at RNA and protein levels. This study also reveals that the two markers of ameloblast differentiation i.e. amelogenin (Amelx; a marker of secretory stage ameloblasts) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (Klk4, a marker of maturation stage ameloblasts) are downstream targets of clock genes. Both, Amelx and Klk4 show 24h oscillatory expression patterns and their expression levels are up-regulated after Bmal1 over-expression in HAT-7 ameloblast cells. Taken together, these data suggest that both the secretory and the maturation stages of amelogenesis might be under circadian control. Changes in clock gene expression patterns might result in significant alterations of enamel apposition and mineralization.

  2. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasu Sheeba

    2008-12-01

    As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools at our disposal over the past four decades has enabled discovery of the genetic and molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity. More recently, detailed investigation leading to the anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the various neuronal subgroups that comprise the circadian machinery has revealed pathways through which these neurons come together to act as a neuronal circuit. Thus the D. melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit presents a relatively simple and attractive model for the study of neuronal circuits and their functions.

  3. Molecular clock is involved in predictive circadian adjustment of renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Annie Mercier; Centeno, Gabriel; Pradervand, Sylvain; Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Maquelin, Lionel; Cardinaux, Léonard; Bonny, Olivier; Firsov, Dmitri

    2009-09-22

    Renal excretion of water and major electrolytes exhibits a significant circadian rhythm. This functional periodicity is believed to result, at least in part, from circadian changes in secretion/reabsorption capacities of the distal nephron and collecting ducts. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in the distal nephron segments, i.e., distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Temporal expression analysis performed on microdissected mouse DCT/CNT or CCD revealed a marked circadian rhythmicity in the expression of a large number of genes crucially involved in various homeostatic functions of the kidney. This analysis also revealed that both DCT/CNT and CCD possess an intrinsic circadian timing system characterized by robust oscillations in the expression of circadian core clock genes (clock, bma11, npas2, per, cry, nr1d1) and clock-controlled Par bZip transcriptional factors dbp, hlf, and tef. The clock knockout mice or mice devoid of dbp/hlf/tef (triple knockout) exhibit significant changes in renal expression of several key regulators of water or sodium balance (vasopressin V2 receptor, aquaporin-2, aquaporin-4, alphaENaC). Functionally, the loss of clock leads to a complex phenotype characterized by partial diabetes insipidus, dysregulation of sodium excretion rhythms, and a significant decrease in blood pressure. Collectively, this study uncovers a major role of molecular clock in renal function.

  4. Structure, circadian regulation and bioinformatic analysis of the unique sigma factor gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Matthew L; Smith, Annette C; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Purton, Saul; Herrin, David L

    2004-01-01

    In higher plants, the transcription of plastid genes is mediated by at least two types of RNA polymerase (RNAP); a plastid-encoded bacterial RNAP in which promoter specificity is conferred by nuclear-encoded sigma factors, and a nuclear-encoded phage-like RNAP. Green algae, however, appear to possess only the bacterial enzyme. Since transcription of much, if not most, of the chloroplast genome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is regulated by the circadian clock and the nucleus, we sought to identify sigma factor genes that might be responsible for this regulation. We describe a nuclear gene (RPOD) that is predicted to encode an 80 kDa protein that, in addition to a predicted chloroplast transit peptide at the N-terminus, has the conserved motifs (2.1- 4.2) diagnostic of bacterial sigma-70 factors. We also identified two motifs not previously recognized for sigma factors, adjacent PEST sequences and a leucine zipper, both suggested to be involved in protein-protein interactions. PEST sequences were also found in approximately 40% of sigma factors examined, indicating they may be of general significance. Southern blot hybridization and BLAST searches of the genome and EST databases suggest that RPODmay be the only sigma factor gene in C. reinhardtii. The levels of RPODmRNA increased 2- 3-fold in the mid-to-late dark period of light-dark cycling cells, just prior to, or coincident with, the peak in chloroplast transcription. Also, the dark-period peak in RPOD mRNA persisted in cells shifted to continuous light or continuous dark for at least one cycle, indicating that RPODis under circadian clock control. These results suggest that regulation of RPODexpression contributes to the circadian clock's control of chloroplast transcription.

  5. Glaucoma alters the circadian timing system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Drouyer

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a widespread ocular disease and major cause of blindness characterized by progressive, irreversible damage of the optic nerve. Although the degenerative loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC and visual deficits associated with glaucoma have been extensively studied, we hypothesize that glaucoma will also lead to alteration of the circadian timing system. Circadian and non-visual responses to light are mediated by a specialized subset of melanopsin expressing RGCs that provide photic input to mammalian endogenous clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. In order to explore the molecular, anatomical and functional consequences of glaucoma we used a rodent model of chronic ocular hypertension, a primary causal factor of the pathology. Quantitative analysis of retinal projections using sensitive anterograde tracing demonstrates a significant reduction (approximately 50-70% of RGC axon terminals in all visual and non-visual structures and notably in the SCN. The capacity of glaucomatous rats to entrain to light was challenged by exposure to successive shifts of the light dark (LD cycle associated with step-wise decreases in light intensity. Although glaucomatous rats are able to entrain their locomotor activity to the LD cycle at all light levels, they require more time to re-adjust to a shifted LD cycle and show significantly greater variability in activity onsets in comparison with normal rats. Quantitative PCR reveals the novel finding that melanopsin as well as rod and cone opsin mRNAs are significantly reduced in glaucomatous retinas. Our findings demonstrate that glaucoma impacts on all these aspects of the circadian timing system. In light of these results, the classical view of glaucoma as pathology unique to the visual system should be extended to include anatomical and functional alterations of the circadian timing system.

  6. An optimized method for measuring hypocretin-1 peptide in the mouse brain reveals differential circadian regulation of hypocretin-1 levels rostral and caudal to the hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justinussen, Jessica; Holm, A; Kornum, B R

    2015-01-01

    as does prepro-hypocretin mRNA in the hypothalamus. However, in midbrain and brainstem tissue caudal to the hypothalamus, there was less circadian fluctuation and a tendency for higher levels during the light phase. These data suggest that regulation of the hypocretin system differs between brain areas....

  7. Reduced anxiety and depression-like behaviours in the circadian period mutant mouse afterhours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Keers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disruption of the circadian rhythm is a key feature of bipolar disorder. Variation in genes encoding components of the molecular circadian clock has been associated with increased risk of the disorder in clinical populations. Similarly in animal models, disruption of the circadian clock can result in altered mood and anxiety which resemble features of human mania; including hyperactivity, reduced anxiety and reduced depression-like behaviour. One such mutant, after hours (Afh, an ENU-derived mutant with a mutation in a recently identified circadian clock gene Fbxl3, results in a disturbed (long circadian rhythm of approximately 27 hours. METHODOLOGY: Anxiety, exploratory and depression-like behaviours were evaluated in Afh mice using the open-field, elevated plus maze, light-dark box, holeboard and forced swim test. To further validate findings for human mania, polymorphisms in the human homologue of FBXL3, genotyped by three genome wide case control studies, were tested for association with bipolar disorder. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Afh mice showed reduced anxiety- and depression-like behaviour in all of the behavioural tests employed, and some evidence of increased locomotor activity in some tests. An analysis of three separate human data sets revealed a gene wide association between variation in FBXL3 and bipolar disorder (P = 0.009. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with previous studies of mutants with extended circadian periods and suggest that disruption of FBXL3 is associated with mania-like behaviours in both mice and humans.

  8. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.

  9. Circadian Systems and Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    1999-01-01

    Circadian systems direct many metabolic parameters and, at the same time, they appear to be exquisitely shielded from metabolic variations. Although the recent decade of circadian research has brought insights into how circadian periodicity may be generated at the molecular level, little is known ab

  10. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwei; Zhou, Tianshou

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per and clk mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  11. Circadian clock genes contribute to the regulation of hair follicle cycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K Lin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hair follicles undergo recurrent cycling of controlled growth (anagen, regression (catagen, and relative quiescence (telogen with a defined periodicity. Taking a genomics approach to study gene expression during synchronized mouse hair follicle cycling, we discovered that, in addition to circadian fluctuation, CLOCK-regulated genes are also modulated in phase with the hair growth cycle. During telogen and early anagen, circadian clock genes are prominently expressed in the secondary hair germ, which contains precursor cells for the growing follicle. Analysis of Clock and Bmal1 mutant mice reveals a delay in anagen progression, and the secondary hair germ cells show decreased levels of phosphorylated Rb and lack mitotic cells, suggesting that circadian clock genes regulate anagen progression via their effect on the cell cycle. Consistent with a block at the G1 phase of the cell cycle, we show a significant upregulation of p21 in Bmal1 mutant skin. While circadian clock mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of diurnal biological processes, our findings indicate that circadian clock genes may be utilized to modulate the progression of non-diurnal cyclic processes.

  12. Robustness of synthetic circadian clocks to multiple environmental changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Lilia; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Wagner, Nathaniel; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2015-04-04

    A molecular network that mimics circadian clocks from cyanobacteria is constructed in silico. Simulating its oscillatory behaviour under variable conditions reveals its robustness relative to networks of alternative topologies. The principles for synthetic chemical circadian networks to work properly are consequently highlighted.

  13. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep, and Disorders of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattis, Joanna; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-04-01

    Sleep-wake cycles are known to be disrupted in people with neurodegenerative disorders. These findings are now supported by data from animal models for some of these disorders, raising the question of whether the disrupted sleep/circadian regulation contributes to the loss of neural function. As circadian rhythms and sleep consolidation also break down with normal aging, changes in these may be part of what makes aging a risk factor for disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mechanisms underlying the connection between circadian/sleep dysregulation and neurodegeneration remain unclear, but several recent studies provide interesting possibilities. While mechanistic analysis is under way, it is worth considering treatment of circadian/sleep disruption as a means to alleviate symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Akinci

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The circadian rhythm sleep disorders define the clinical conditions where sleep and ndash;wake rhythm is disrupted despite optimum environmental and social conditions. They occur as a result of the changes in endogenous circadian hours or non-compatibility of environmental factors or social life with endogenous circadian rhythm. The sleep and ndash;wake rhythm is disrupted continuously or in repeating phases depending on lack of balance between internal and external cycles. This condition leads to functional impairments which cause insomnia, excessive sleepiness or both in people. Application of detailed sleep anamnesis and sleep diary with actigraphy record, if possible, will be sufficient for diagnosis. The treatment aims to align endogenous circadian rhythm with environmental conditions. The purpose of this article is to review pathology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of circadian rhythm disorder. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 178-189

  15. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  16. Signaling to the circadian clock: plasticity by chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, Yasukazu; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Sahar, Saurabh; Hirayama, Jun; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2007-04-01

    Circadian rhythms govern several fundamental physiological functions in almost all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans. The circadian clocks are intrinsic time-tracking systems with which organisms can anticipate environmental changes and adapt to the appropriate time of day. In mammals, circadian rhythms are generated in pacemaker neurons within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), a small area of the hypothalamus, and are entrained by environmental cues, principally light. Disruption of these rhythms can profoundly influence human health, being linked to depression, insomnia, jet lag, coronary heart disease and a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. It is now well established that circadian clocks operate via transcriptional feedback autoregulatory loops that involve the products of circadian clock genes. Furthermore, peripheral tissues also contain independent clocks, whose oscillatory function is orchestrated by the SCN. The complex program of gene expression that characterizes circadian physiology involves dynamic changes in chromatin transitions. These remodeling events are therefore of great importance to ensure the proper timing and extent of circadian regulation. How signaling influences chromatin remodeling through histone modifications is therefore highly relevant in the context of circadian oscillation. Recent advances in the field have revealed unexpected links between circadian regulators, chromatin remodeling and cellular metabolism.

  17. Non-circadian expression masking clock-driven weak transcription rhythms in U2OS cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hoffmann

    Full Text Available U2OS cells harbor a circadian clock but express only a few rhythmic genes in constant conditions. We identified 3040 binding sites of the circadian regulators BMAL1, CLOCK and CRY1 in the U2OS genome. Most binding sites even in promoters do not correlate with detectable rhythmic transcript levels. Luciferase fusions reveal that the circadian clock supports robust but low amplitude transcription rhythms of representative promoters. However, rhythmic transcription of these potentially clock-controlled genes is masked by non-circadian transcription that overwrites the weaker contribution of the clock in constant conditions. Our data suggest that U2OS cells harbor an intrinsically rather weak circadian oscillator. The oscillator has the potential to regulate a large number of genes. The contribution of circadian versus non-circadian transcription is dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and may determine the apparent complexity of the circadian transcriptome.

  18. Circadian clock proteins in prokaryotes: hidden rhythms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eLoza-Correa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clock genes are vital features of eukaryotes that have evolved such that organisms can adapt to our planet’s rotation in order to anticipate the coming day or night as well as unfavorable seasons. This circadian clock uses oscillation as a timekeeping element. However, circadian clock mechanisms exist also in prokaryotes. The circadian clock of Cyanobacteria is well studied. It is regulated by a cluster of three genes: kaiA, kaiB and kaiC. In this review, we will discuss the circadian system in cyanobacteria, and provide an overview and up-dated phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic organisms that contain the main circadian genes. It is evident that the evolution of the kai genes has been influenced by lateral transfers but further and deeper studies are needed to get an in depth understanding of the exact evolutionary history of these genes. Interestingly, Legionella pneumophila an environmental bacterium and opportunistic human pathogen that parasitizes protozoa in fresh water environments also contains kaiB and kaiC, but their functions are not known. All of the residues described for the biochemical functions of the main pacemaker KaiC in Synechoccous elongates are also conserved in the L. pneumophila KaiC protein.

  19. Circadian clocks are resounding in peripheral tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A Ptitsyn

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are prevalent in most organisms. Even the smallest disturbances in the orchestration of circadian gene expression patterns among different tissues can result in functional asynchrony, at the organism level, and may to contribute to a wide range of physiologic disorders. It has been reported that as many as 5%-10% of transcribed genes in peripheral tissues follow a circadian expression pattern. We have conducted a comprehensive study of circadian gene expression on a large dataset representing three different peripheral tissues. The data have been produced in a large-scale microarray experiment covering replicate daily cycles in murine white and brown adipose tissues as well as in liver. We have applied three alternative algorithmic approaches to identify circadian oscillation in time series expression profiles. Analyses of our own data indicate that the expression of at least 7% to 21% of active genes in mouse liver, and in white and brown adipose tissues follow a daily oscillatory pattern. Indeed, analysis of data from other laboratories suggests that the percentage of genes with an oscillatory pattern may approach 50% in the liver. For the rest of the genes, oscillation appears to be obscured by stochastic noise. Our phase classification and computer simulation studies based on multiple datasets indicate no detectable boundary between oscillating and non-oscillating fractions of genes. We conclude that greater attention should be given to the potential influence of circadian mechanisms on any biological pathway related to metabolism and obesity.

  20. Synergistic interactions between the molecular and neuronal circadian networks drive robust behavioral circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Weiss

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most organisms use 24-hr circadian clocks to keep temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila melanogaster CLOCK (CLK and CYCLE (CYC initiates the circadian system by promoting rhythmic transcription of hundreds of genes. However, it is still not clear whether high amplitude transcriptional oscillations are essential for circadian timekeeping. In order to address this issue, we generated flies in which the amplitude of CLK-driven transcription can be reduced partially (approx. 60% or strongly (90% without affecting the average levels of CLK-target genes. The impaired transcriptional oscillations lead to low amplitude protein oscillations that were not sufficient to drive outputs of peripheral oscillators. However, circadian rhythms in locomotor activity were resistant to partial reduction in transcriptional and protein oscillations. We found that the resilience of the brain oscillator is depending on the neuronal communication among circadian neurons in the brain. Indeed, the capacity of the brain oscillator to overcome low amplitude transcriptional oscillations depends on the action of the neuropeptide PDF and on the pdf-expressing cells having equal or higher amplitude of molecular rhythms than the rest of the circadian neuronal groups in the fly brain. Therefore, our work reveals the importance of high amplitude transcriptional oscillations for cell-autonomous circadian timekeeping. Moreover, we demonstrate that the circadian neuronal network is an essential buffering system that protects against changes in circadian transcription in the brain.

  1. Postnatal constant light compensates Cryptochrome1 and 2 double deficiency for disruption of circadian behavioral rhythms in mice under constant dark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ono

    Full Text Available Clock genes Cryptochrome (Cry1 and Cry2 are essential for expression of circadian rhythms in mice under constant darkness (DD. However, circadian rhythms in clock gene Per1 expression or clock protein PER2 are detected in the cultured suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of neonatal Cry1 and Cry2 double deficient (Cry1 (-/-/Cry2 (-/- mice. A lack of circadian rhythms in adult Cry1 (-/-/Cry2 (-/- mice is most likely due to developmentally disorganized cellular coupling of oscillating neurons in the SCN. On the other hand, neonatal rats exposed to constant light (LL developed a tenable circadian system under prolonged LL which was known to fragment circadian behavioral rhythms. In the present study, Cry1 (-/-/Cry2 (-/- mice were raised under LL from postnatal day 1 for 7 weeks and subsequently exposed to DD for 3 weeks. Spontaneous movement was monitored continuously after weaning and PER2::LUC was measured in the cultured SCN obtained from mice under prolonged DD. Surprisingly, Chi square periodogram analysis revealed significant circadian rhythms of spontaneous movement in the LL-raised Cry1 (-/-/Cry2 (-/- mice, but failed to detect the rhythms in Cry1 (-/-/Cry2 (-/- mice raised under light-dark cycles (LD. By contrast, prolonged LL in adulthood did not rescue the circadian behavioral rhythms in the LD raised Cry1 (-/-/Cry2 (-/- mice. Visual inspection disclosed two distinct activity components with different periods in behavioral rhythms of the LL-raised Cry1(-/-/Cry2(-/- mice under DD: one was shorter and the other was longer than 24 hours. The two components repeatedly merged and separated. The patterns resembled the split behavioral rhythms of wild type mice under prolonged LL. In addition, circadian rhythms in PER2::LUC were detected in some of the LL-raised Cry1(-/-/Cry2(-/- mice under DD. These results indicate that neonatal exposure to LL compensates the CRY double deficiency for the disruption of circadian behavioral rhythms under DD in

  2. Circadian clocks and breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Blakeman, Victoria; Jack L. Williams; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, an...

  3. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    in patients with lower than median pain levels for a three days period after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the series of studies included in this thesis we have systematically shown that circadian disturbances are found in the secretion of hormones, the sleep-wake cycle, core body temperature rhythm......An increasing number of studies have shown that circadian variation in the excretion of hormones, the sleep wake circle, the core body temperature rhythm, the tone of the autonomic nervous system and the activity rhythm are important both in health and in disease processes. An increasing attention...... has also been directed towards the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms in relation to surgery. The attention has been directed to the question whether the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms can affect postoperative recovery, morbidity and mortality. Based on the lack of studies where...

  4. Amplitude metrics for cellular circadian bioluminescence reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Peter C; Taylor, Stephanie R; Abel, John H; Doyle, Francis J

    2014-12-01

    Bioluminescence rhythms from cellular reporters have become the most common method used to quantify oscillations in circadian gene expression. These experimental systems can reveal phase and amplitude change resulting from circadian disturbances, and can be used in conjunction with mathematical models to lend further insight into the mechanistic basis of clock amplitude regulation. However, bioluminescence experiments track the mean output from thousands of noisy, uncoupled oscillators, obscuring the direct effect of a given stimulus on the genetic regulatory network. In many cases, it is unclear whether changes in amplitude are due to individual changes in gene expression level or to a change in coherence of the population. Although such systems can be modeled using explicit stochastic simulations, these models are computationally cumbersome and limit analytical insight into the mechanisms of amplitude change. We therefore develop theoretical and computational tools to approximate the mean expression level in large populations of noninteracting oscillators, and further define computationally efficient amplitude response calculations to describe phase-dependent amplitude change. At the single-cell level, a mechanistic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model is used to calculate the transient response of each cell to a perturbation, whereas population-level dynamics are captured by coupling this detailed model to a phase density function. Our analysis reveals that amplitude changes mediated at either the individual-cell or the population level can be distinguished in tissue-level bioluminescence data without the need for single-cell measurements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by modeling experimental bioluminescence profiles of light-sensitive fibroblasts, reconciling the conclusions of two seemingly contradictory studies. This modeling framework allows a direct comparison between in vitro bioluminescence experiments and in silico ordinary

  5. Extraordinary behavioral entrainment following circadian rhythm bifurcation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elizabeth M; Walbeek, Thijs J; Sun, Jonathan; Johnson, Jeremy; Poonawala, Qays; Gorman, Michael R

    2016-12-08

    The mammalian circadian timing system uses light to synchronize endogenously generated rhythms with the environmental day. Entrainment to schedules that deviate significantly from 24 h (T24) has been viewed as unlikely because the circadian pacemaker appears capable only of small, incremental responses to brief light exposures. Challenging this view, we demonstrate that simple manipulations of light alone induce extreme plasticity in the circadian system of mice. Firstly, exposure to dim nocturnal illumination (entrainment. Continuation of dim light is unnecessary for T15/30 behavioral entrainment following bifurcation. Finally, neither dim light alone nor a shortened night is sufficient for the extraordinary entrainment observed under bifurcation. Thus, we demonstrate in a non-pharmacological, non-genetic manipulation that the circadian system is far more flexible than previously thought. These findings challenge the current conception of entrainment and its underlying principles, and reveal new potential targets for circadian interventions.

  6. Neighborhood-Level Stress and Circadian Cortisol: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Hosseini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective was to find association between basal cortisol and neighborhood-level stress. Systematic searches, including electronic and hand searches, were conducted. The most recent date of the search was July 26, 2013. Primary observational studies included if they considered stress related outcomes in the neighborhood context. Using the EndNote X7 advanced search option; the authors examined the abstracts and titles of the 18,092 articles to exclude obviously irrelevant studies, gray literature, discussion papers, reviews and, studies with no complete data. Two authors independently extracted data from the original reports into pre-designed data extraction forms based on the Data Extraction Template of the Cochrane Consumer and Communication Review Group (CCCRG. Ten studies with a total of 2,134 participants were synthesized and analyzed. Two studies out of ten received expanded meta-analysis. The overall effect size (95% CI for cortisol level for residents in neighborhoods with lower stress compared to inhabitants from higher was 0.12 (0.01, 0.23. This review is demonstrating a link between psychosocial or physical stress and cortisol obtained from saliva. However, living in high disorder neighborhoods results in higher level of cortisol. This represents a biological indicator of psychosocial/physical stress exposure (i.e., neighborhood disorder that reflects variances in stress exposure levels.

  7. Neighborhood-Level Stress and Circadian Cortisol: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Fatemeh; Adha, Nikmatul; Zainol, Rosilawati; Isahak, Marzuki; Nemati, Nahid

    2014-10-01

    The main objective was to find association between basal cortisol and neighborhood-level stress. Systematic searches, including electronic and hand searches, were conducted. The most recent date of the search was July 26, 2013. Primary observational studies included if they considered stress related outcomes in the neighborhood context. Using the EndNote X7 advanced search option; the authors examined the abstracts and titles of the 18,092 articles to exclude obviously irrelevant studies, gray literature, discussion papers, reviews and, studies with no complete data. Two authors independently extracted data from the original reports into pre-designed data extraction forms based on the Data Extraction Template of the Cochrane Consumer and Communication Review Group (CCCRG). Ten studies with a total of 2,134 participants were synthesized and analyzed. Two studies out of ten received expanded meta-analysis. The overall effect size (95% CI) for cortisol level for residents in neighborhoods with lower stress compared to inhabitants from higher was 0.12 (0.01, 0.23). This review is demonstrating a link between psychosocial or physical stress and cortisol obtained from saliva. However, living in high disorder neighborhoods results in higher level of cortisol. This represents a biological indicator of psychosocial/physical stress exposure (i.e., neighborhood disorder) that reflects variances in stress exposure levels.

  8. Sleep, arousal, and circadian rhythms in adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Jacob A; Sharkey, Katherine M; Coles, Meredith E

    2015-04-01

    Findings of this meta-analysis show that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is related to disruptions in both the duration and timing of sleep. PsycINFO and Google Scholar database searches identified 12 relevant studies that compared measures of sleep in individuals with OCD to those of either a healthy control group or published norms. Sleep measures included sleep onset latency, sleep duration, awakening after sleep onset, percentage of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, percentage of slow wave sleep, and prevalence of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Individual effect sizes were pooled using a random effects model. Sleep duration was found to be shorter, and the prevalence of DSPD higher, in individuals with OCD compared to controls. Further, excluding samples with comorbid depression did not meaningfully reduce the magnitude of these effects (although the results were no longer statistically significant) and medication use by participants is unlikely to have systematically altered sleep timing. Overall, available data suggest that sleep disruption is associated with OCD but further research on both sleep duration and sleep timing in individuals with OCD is needed.

  9. Metabolic regulation of circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Michael J; Hearn, Timothy J; Bell, Laura J; Hannah, Matthew A; Webb, Alex A R

    2013-05-01

    Circadian clocks are 24-h timekeeping mechanisms, which have evolved in plants, animals, fungi and bacteria to anticipate changes in light and temperature associated with the rotation of the Earth. The current paradigm to explain how biological clocks provide timing information is based on multiple interlocking transcription-translation negative feedback loops (TTFL), which drive rhythmic gene expression and circadian behaviour of growth and physiology. Metabolism is an important circadian output, which in plants includes photosynthesis, starch metabolism, nutrient assimilation and redox homeostasis. There is increasing evidence in a range of organisms that these metabolic outputs can also contribute to circadian timing and might also comprise independent circadian oscillators. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms of circadian regulation of metabolism by TTFL and consider increasing evidence that rhythmic metabolism contributes to the circadian network. We highlight how this might be relevant to plant circadian clock function.

  10. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenthaler TI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bhanu P Kolla,1,2 R Robert Auger,1,2 Timothy I Morgenthaler11Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Misalignment between endogenous circadian rhythms and the light/dark cycle can result in pathological disturbances in the form of erratic sleep timing (irregular sleep–wake rhythm, complete dissociation from the light/dark cycle (circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type, delayed sleep timing (delayed sleep phase disorder, or advanced sleep timing (advanced sleep phase disorder. Whereas these four conditions are thought to involve predominantly intrinsic mechanisms, circadian dysrhythmias can also be induced by exogenous challenges, such as those imposed by extreme work schedules or rapid transmeridian travel, which overwhelm the ability of the master clock to entrain with commensurate rapidity, and in turn impair approximation to a desired sleep schedule, as evidenced by the shift work and jet lag sleep disorders. This review will focus on etiological underpinnings, clinical assessments, and evidence-based treatment options for circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Topics are subcategorized when applicable, and if sufficient data exist. The length of text associated with each disorder reflects the abundance of associated literature, complexity of management, overlap of methods for assessment and treatment, and the expected prevalence of each condition within general medical practice.Keywords: circadian rhythm sleep disorders, assessment, treatment

  11. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kazuo

    2013-12-01

    Primary pathophysiology of circadian rhythm sleep disorders(CRSDs) is a misalignment between the endogenous circadian rhythm phase and the desired or socially required sleep-wake schedule, or dysfunction of the circadian pacemaker and its afferent/efferent pathways. CRSDs consist of delayed sleep phase type, advanced sleep phase type, free-running type, irregular sleep-wake type, shift work type and jet lag type. Chronotherapy using strong zeitgebers (time cues), such as bright light and melatonin/ melatonin type 2 receptor agonist, is effective when administered with proper timing. Bright light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms. Bright light therapy (appropriately-timed exposure to bright light) for CRSDs is an effective treatment option, and can shift the sleep-wake cycle to earlier or later times, in order to correct for misalignment between the circadian system and the desired sleep-wake schedule. Timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has also been shown to be useful in the treatment of CRSDs.

  12. Circadian entrainment of Neurospora crassa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, M.; Roenneberg, T.

    2007-01-01

    The circadian clock evolved under entraining conditions, yet most circadian experiments and much circadian theory are built around free-running rhythms. The interpretation of entrainment experiments is certainly more complex than that of free-running rhythms due to the relationship between exogenous

  13. Defence responses of arabidopsis thaliana to infection by pseudomonas syringae are regulated by the circadian clock

    KAUST Repository

    Bhardwaj, Vaibhav

    2011-10-31

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime. © 2011 Bhardwaj et al.

  14. Final Report [Regulated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis: A global analysis of differential control by hormones and the circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Pamela J.

    2010-03-18

    The long-term goal of this research was to better understand the influence of mRNA stability on gene regulation, particularly in response to hormones and the circadian clock. The primary aim of this project was to examine this using DNA microarrays, small RNA analysis and other approaches. We accomplished these objectives, although we were only able to detect small changes in mRNA stability in response to these stimuli. However, the work also contributed to a major breakthrough allowing the identification of small RNAs on a genomic scale in eukaryotes. Moreover, the project prompted us to develop a new way to analyze mRNA decay genome wide. Thus, the research was hugely successful beyond our objectives.

  15. Crosstalk between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics and macrophage bactericidal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Ramírez, Jacqueline; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B; Pineda-Olvera, Benjamín; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Biological functions show rhythmic fluctuations with 24-hr periodicity regulated by circadian proteins encoded by the so-called ‘clock’ genes. The absence or deregulation of circadian proteins in mice leads to metabolic disorders and in vitro models have shown that the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages follows a circadian rhythm so showing a link between circadian rhythmicity, metabolism and immunity. Recent evidence reveals that mitochondrial shape, position and size, collectively referred to as mitochondrial dynamics, are related to both cell metabolism and immune function. However, studies addressing the simultaneous crosstalk between circadian rhythm, mitochondrial dynamics and cell immune function are scarce. Here, by using an in vitro model of synchronized murine peritoneal macrophages, we present evidence that the mitochondrial dynamics and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) follow a circadian rhythmic pattern. In addition, it is shown that the fusion of mitochondria along with high Δψm, indicative of high mitochondrial activity, precede the highest phagocytic and bactericidal activity of macrophages on Salmonella typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest a timely coordination between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics, and the bactericidal capacity of macrophages. PMID:24903615

  16. On the adaptive significance of circadian clocks for their owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaze, Koustubh M; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Circadian rhythms are believed to be an evolutionary adaptation to daily environmental cycles resulting from Earth's rotation about its axis. A trait evolved through a process of natural selection is considered as adaptation; therefore, rigorous demonstration of adaptation requires evidence suggesting evolution of a trait by natural selection. Like any other adaptive trait, circadian rhythms are believed to be advantageous to living beings through some perceived function. Circadian rhythms are thought to confer advantage to their owners through scheduling of biological functions at appropriate time of daily environmental cycle (extrinsic advantage), coordination of internal physiology (intrinsic advantage), and through their role in responses to seasonal changes. So far, the adaptive value of circadian rhythms has been tested in several studies and evidence indeed suggests that they confer advantage to their owners. In this review, we have discussed the background for development of the framework currently used to test the hypothesis of adaptive significance of circadian rhythms. Critical examination of evidence reveals that there are several lacunae in our understanding of circadian rhythms as adaptation. Although it is well known that demonstrating a given trait as adaptation (or setting the necessary criteria) is not a trivial task, here we recommend some of the basic criteria and suggest the nature of evidence required to comprehensively understand circadian rhythms as adaptation. Thus, we hope to create some awareness that may benefit future studies in this direction.

  17. Evolutionary links between circadian clocks and photoperiodic diapause in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuti, Megan E; Denlinger, David L

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we explore links between circadian clocks and the clock involved in photoperiodic regulation of diapause in insects. Classical resonance (Nanda-Hamner) and night interruption (Bünsow) experiments suggest a circadian basis for the diapause response in nearly all insects that have been studied. Neuroanatomical studies reveal physical connections between circadian clock cells and centers controlling the photoperiodic diapause response, and both mutations and knockdown of clock genes with RNA interference (RNAi) point to a connection between the clock genes and photoperiodic induction of diapause. We discuss the challenges of determining whether the clock, as a functioning module, or individual clock genes acting pleiotropically are responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of diapause, and how a stable, central circadian clock could be linked to plastic photoperiodic responses without compromising the clock's essential functions. Although we still lack an understanding of the exact mechanisms whereby insects measure day/night length, continued classical and neuroanatomical approaches, as well as forward and reverse genetic experiments, are highly complementary and should enable us to decipher the diverse ways in which circadian clocks have been involved in the evolution of photoperiodic induction of diapause in insects. The components of circadian clocks vary among insect species, and diapause appears to have evolved independently numerous times, thus, we anticipate that not all photoperiodic clocks of insects will interact with circadian clocks in the same fashion.

  18. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have shown that circadian variation in the excretion of hormones, the sleep wake circle, the core body temperature rhythm, the tone of the autonomic nervous system and the activity rhythm are important both in health and in disease processes. An increasing attentio...

  19. How pervasive are circadian oscillations?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Circadian oscillations play a critical role in coordinating the physiology, homeostasis, and behavior of biological systems. Once thought to only be controlled by a master clock, recent high-throughput experiments suggest many genes and metabolites in a cell are potentially capable of circadian oscillations. Each cell can reprogram itself and select a relatively small fraction of this broad repertoire for circadian oscillations, as a result of genetic, environmental, and even diet changes.

  20. Modeling the effects of cell cycle M-phase transcriptional inhibition on circadian oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bin; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Chang, Xiao; Liu, Lei; Li, Yi-Xue

    2008-03-28

    Circadian clocks are endogenous time-keeping systems that temporally organize biological processes. Gating of cell cycle events by a circadian clock is a universal observation that is currently considered a mechanism serving to protect DNA from diurnal exposure to ultraviolet radiation or other mutagens. In this study, we put forward another possibility: that such gating helps to insulate the circadian clock from perturbations induced by transcriptional inhibition during the M phase of the cell cycle. We introduced a periodic pulse of transcriptional inhibition into a previously published mammalian circadian model and simulated the behavior of the modified model under both constant darkness and light-dark cycle conditions. The simulation results under constant darkness indicated that periodic transcriptional inhibition could entrain/lock the circadian clock just as a light-dark cycle does. At equilibrium states, a transcriptional inhibition pulse of certain periods was always locked close to certain circadian phases where inhibition on Per and Bmal1 mRNA synthesis was most balanced. In a light-dark cycle condition, inhibitions imposed at different parts of a circadian period induced different degrees of perturbation to the circadian clock. When imposed at the middle- or late-night phase, the transcriptional inhibition cycle induced the least perturbations to the circadian clock. The late-night time window of least perturbation overlapped with the experimentally observed time window, where mitosis is most frequent. This supports our hypothesis that the circadian clock gates the cell cycle M phase to certain circadian phases to minimize perturbations induced by the latter. This study reveals the hidden effects of the cell division cycle on the circadian clock and, together with the current picture of genome stability maintenance by circadian gating of cell cycle, provides a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon of circading gating of cell cycle.

  1. Modeling the effects of cell cycle M-phase transcriptional inhibition on circadian oscillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Kang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are endogenous time-keeping systems that temporally organize biological processes. Gating of cell cycle events by a circadian clock is a universal observation that is currently considered a mechanism serving to protect DNA from diurnal exposure to ultraviolet radiation or other mutagens. In this study, we put forward another possibility: that such gating helps to insulate the circadian clock from perturbations induced by transcriptional inhibition during the M phase of the cell cycle. We introduced a periodic pulse of transcriptional inhibition into a previously published mammalian circadian model and simulated the behavior of the modified model under both constant darkness and light-dark cycle conditions. The simulation results under constant darkness indicated that periodic transcriptional inhibition could entrain/lock the circadian clock just as a light-dark cycle does. At equilibrium states, a transcriptional inhibition pulse of certain periods was always locked close to certain circadian phases where inhibition on Per and Bmal1 mRNA synthesis was most balanced. In a light-dark cycle condition, inhibitions imposed at different parts of a circadian period induced different degrees of perturbation to the circadian clock. When imposed at the middle- or late-night phase, the transcriptional inhibition cycle induced the least perturbations to the circadian clock. The late-night time window of least perturbation overlapped with the experimentally observed time window, where mitosis is most frequent. This supports our hypothesis that the circadian clock gates the cell cycle M phase to certain circadian phases to minimize perturbations induced by the latter. This study reveals the hidden effects of the cell division cycle on the circadian clock and, together with the current picture of genome stability maintenance by circadian gating of cell cycle, provides a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon of circading gating of

  2. Intercellular Coupling of the Cell Cycle and Circadian Clock in Adult Stem Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsu-Ura, Toru; Dovzhenok, Andrey; Aihara, Eitaro; Rood, Jill; Le, Hung; Ren, Yan; Rosselot, Andrew E; Zhang, Tongli; Lee, Choogon; Obrietan, Karl; Montrose, Marshall H; Lim, Sookkyung; Moore, Sean R; Hong, Christian I

    2016-12-01

    Circadian clock-gated cell division cycles are observed from cyanobacteria to mammals via intracellular molecular connections between these two oscillators. Here we demonstrate WNT-mediated intercellular coupling between the cell cycle and circadian clock in 3D murine intestinal organoids (enteroids). The circadian clock gates a population of cells with heterogeneous cell-cycle times that emerge as 12-hr synchronized cell division cycles. Remarkably, we observe reduced-amplitude oscillations of circadian rhythms in intestinal stem cells and progenitor cells, indicating an intercellular signal arising from differentiated cells governing circadian clock-dependent synchronized cell division cycles. Stochastic simulations and experimental validations reveal Paneth cell-secreted WNT as the key intercellular coupling component linking the circadian clock and cell cycle in enteroids.

  3. 蝗虫节律基因pdp的克隆和功能分析%Cloning and Functional Analysis of Circadian Gene pdp in Locusta migratoria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宇刚; 郭宇辉; 陈光

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究不同条件下蝗虫(Locusta migratoria)节律基因pdp(Pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase)的mRNA表达水平,进一步揭示蝗虫节律的分子机制。[方法]通过中国科学院动物研究所内的转录组数据库中找出pdp基因的原型来设计引物,以群居型东亚飞蝗的头部的反转录cDNA为模板,克隆出pdp基因的全序列。把一天24小时等分成八个点,进行定时取样,以qRT-PCR技术进行不同时段pdp基因表达量的测定;并在不同处理条件下,测定pdp基因的表达量。[结果]节律基因pdp在蝗虫的不同处理条件下变化不大。[结论]该研究对了解飞蝗节律规律﹑种族特点及有效防虫具有重要的现实意义。%[Objective] Through studying mRNA expression levels of circadian gene pdp(Pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase) in Locusta migratoria under different conditions to reveal molecular mechanisms of rhythm of Locusta migratoria.[Methods] The prototype of the pdp gene and design primers were found out based on the database of Institute of Zoology,Chinese Academy of Sciences.Using aggregated locust head cDNA as templates,the complete sequence of the gene pdp was obtained.By dividing a day(24 hours) into eight points,fixed-point samples were taken,and the pdp gene expression levels at different time periods were determined by using qRT-PCR;and the pdp gene expression levels with different treatment were also determined.[Results] The circadian gene pdp in Locusta migratoria changed slightly with different treatment.[Conclusion] The study had extremely realistic significance for understanding the rhythm and population characteristics of Locusta migratoria as well as effective insect-resistant.

  4. A role for Id2 in regulating photic entrainment of the mammalian circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Giles E; Watson, Nathan P; Mantani, Akio; Peirson, Stuart N; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Loros, Jennifer J; Israel, Mark A; Dunlap, Jay C

    2009-02-24

    Inhibitor of DNA binding genes (Id1-Id4) encode helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcriptional repressors associated with development and tumorigenesis [1, 2], but little is known concerning the function(s) of these genes in normal adult animals. Id2 was identified in DNA microarray screens for rhythmically expressed genes [3-5], and further analysis revealed a circadian pattern of expression of all four Id genes in multiple tissues including the suprachiasmatic nucleus. To explore an in vivo function, we generated and characterized deletion mutations of Id2 and of Id4. Id2(-/-) mice exhibit abnormally rapid entrainment and an increase in the magnitude of the phase shift of the pacemaker. A significant proportion of mice also exhibit disrupted rhythms when maintained under constant darkness. Conversely, Id4(-/-) mice did not exhibit a noticeable circadian phenotype. In vitro studies using an mPer1 and an AVP promoter reporter revealed the potential for ID1, ID2, and ID3 proteins to interact with the canonical basic HLH clock proteins BMAL1 and CLOCK. These data suggest that the Id genes may be important for entrainment and operation of the mammalian circadian system, potentially acting through BMAL1 and CLOCK targets.

  5. Glucocorticoids play a key role in circadian cell cycle rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dickmeis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Clock output pathways play a pivotal role by relaying timing information from the circadian clock to a diversity of physiological systems. Both cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms have been implicated as clock outputs; however, the relative importance and interplay between these mechanisms are poorly understood. The cell cycle represents a highly conserved regulatory target of the circadian timing system. Previously, we have demonstrated that in zebrafish, the circadian clock has the capacity to generate daily rhythms of S phase by a cell-autonomous mechanism in vitro. Here, by studying a panel of zebrafish mutants, we reveal that the pituitary-adrenal axis also plays an essential role in establishing these rhythms in the whole animal. Mutants with a reduction or a complete absence of corticotrope pituitary cells show attenuated cell-proliferation rhythms, whereas expression of circadian clock genes is not affected. We show that the corticotrope deficiency is associated with reduced cortisol levels, implicating glucocorticoids as a component of a systemic signaling pathway required for circadian cell cycle rhythmicity. Strikingly, high-amplitude rhythms can be rescued by exposing mutant larvae to a tonic concentration of a glucocorticoid agonist. Our work suggests that cell-autonomous clock mechanisms are not sufficient to establish circadian cell cycle rhythms at the whole-animal level. Instead, they act in concert with a systemic signaling environment of which glucocorticoids are an essential part.

  6. Chronobiology and obesity: Interactions between circadian rhythms and energy regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Keith C; Turek, Fred W

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, genetic, neural, and physiologic basis for the generation and organization of circadian clocks in mammals have revealed profound bidirectional interactions between the circadian clock system and pathways critical for the regulation of metabolism and energy balance. The discovery that mice harboring a mutation in the core circadian gene circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) develop obesity and evidence of the metabolic syndrome represented a seminal moment for the field, clearly establishing a link between circadian rhythms, energy balance, and metabolism at the genetic level. Subsequent studies have characterized in great detail the depth and magnitude of the circadian clock's crucial role in regulating body weight and other metabolic processes. Dietary nutrients have been shown to influence circadian rhythms at both molecular and behavioral levels; and many nuclear hormone receptors, which bind nutrients as well as other circulating ligands, have been observed to exhibit robust circadian rhythms of expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. Furthermore, the daily timing of food intake has itself been shown to affect body weight regulation in mammals, likely through, at least in part, regulation of the temporal expression patterns of metabolic genes. Taken together, these and other related findings have transformed our understanding of the important role of time, on a 24-h scale, in the complex physiologic processes of energy balance and coordinated regulation of metabolism. This research has implications for human metabolic disease and may provide unique and novel insights into the development of new therapeutic strategies to control and combat the epidemic of obesity.

  7. Wheels within wheels: the plant circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Polly Yingshan; Harmer, Stacey L

    2014-04-01

    Circadian clocks integrate environmental signals with internal cues to coordinate diverse physiological outputs so that they occur at the most appropriate season or time of day. Recent studies using systems approaches, primarily in Arabidopsis, have expanded our understanding of the molecular regulation of the central circadian oscillator and its connections to input and output pathways. Similar approaches have also begun to reveal the importance of the clock for key agricultural traits in crop species. In this review, we discuss recent developments in the field, including a new understanding of the molecular architecture underlying the plant clock; mechanistic links between clock components and input and output pathways; and our growing understanding of the importance of clock genes for agronomically important traits.

  8. Advanced Circadian Phase in Mania and Delayed Circadian Phase in Mixed Mania and Depression Returned to Normal after Treatment of Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung-Ho Moon, M.S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances in circadian rhythms have been suggested as a possible cause of bipolar disorder (BD. Included in this study were 31 mood episodes of 26 BD patients, and 18 controls. Circadian rhythms of BD were evaluated at admission, at 2-week intervals during hospitalization, and at discharge. All participants wore wrist actigraphs during the studies. Saliva and buccal cells were obtained at 8:00, 11:00, 15:00, 19:00, and 23:00 for two consecutive days. Collected saliva and buccal cells were used for analysis of the cortisol and gene circadian rhythm, respectively. Circadian rhythms had different phases during acute mood episodes of BD compared to recovered states. In 23 acute manic episodes, circadian phases were ~7 hour advanced (equivalent to ~17 hour delayed. Phases of 21 out of these 23 cases returned to normal by ~7 hour delay along with treatment, but two out of 23 cases returned to normal by ~17 hour advance. In three cases of mixed manic episodes, the phases were ~6–7 hour delayed. For five cases of depressive episodes, circadian rhythms phases were ~4–5 hour delayed. After treatment, circadian phases resembled those of healthy controls. Circadian misalignment due to circadian rhythm phase shifts might be a pathophysiological mechanism of BD.

  9. Advanced Circadian Phase in Mania and Delayed Circadian Phase in Mixed Mania and Depression Returned to Normal after Treatment of Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joung-Ho; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Son, Gi Hoon; Geum, Dongho; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Hyun; Kang, Seung-Gul; Park, Young-Min; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Kim, Leen; Jee, Hee-Jung; An, Hyonggin; Kripke, Daniel F; Lee, Heon-Jeong

    2016-09-01

    Disturbances in circadian rhythms have been suggested as a possible cause of bipolar disorder (BD). Included in this study were 31 mood episodes of 26 BD patients, and 18 controls. Circadian rhythms of BD were evaluated at admission, at 2-week intervals during hospitalization, and at discharge. All participants wore wrist actigraphs during the studies. Saliva and buccal cells were obtained at 8:00, 11:00, 15:00, 19:00, and 23:00 for two consecutive days. Collected saliva and buccal cells were used for analysis of the cortisol and gene circadian rhythm, respectively. Circadian rhythms had different phases during acute mood episodes of BD compared to recovered states. In 23 acute manic episodes, circadian phases were ~7hour advanced (equivalent to ~17hour delayed). Phases of 21 out of these 23 cases returned to normal by ~7hour delay along with treatment, but two out of 23 cases returned to normal by ~17hour advance. In three cases of mixed manic episodes, the phases were ~6-7hour delayed. For five cases of depressive episodes, circadian rhythms phases were ~4-5hour delayed. After treatment, circadian phases resembled those of healthy controls. Circadian misalignment due to circadian rhythm phase shifts might be a pathophysiological mechanism of BD.

  10. Circadian Pacemaker – Temperature Compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerkema, Menno P.; Binder, Marc D.; Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Windhorst, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    One of the defining characteristics of circadian pacemakers and indicates the independence of the speed of circadian clock processes of environmental temperature. Mechanisms involved, so far not elucidated in full detail, entail at least two processes that are similarly affected by temperature chang

  11. Circadian systems biology in Metazoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Ling; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2015-11-01

    Systems biology, which can be defined as integrative biology, comprises multistage processes that can be used to understand components of complex biological systems of living organisms and provides hierarchical information to decoding life. Using systems biology approaches such as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, it is now possible to delineate more complicated interactions between circadian control systems and diseases. The circadian rhythm is a multiscale phenomenon existing within the body that influences numerous physiological activities such as changes in gene expression, protein turnover, metabolism and human behavior. In this review, we describe the relationships between the circadian control system and its related genes or proteins, and circadian rhythm disorders in systems biology studies. To maintain and modulate circadian oscillation, cells possess elaborative feedback loops composed of circadian core proteins that regulate the expression of other genes through their transcriptional activities. The disruption of these rhythms has been reported to be associated with diseases such as arrhythmia, obesity, insulin resistance, carcinogenesis and disruptions in natural oscillations in the control of cell growth. This review demonstrates that lifestyle is considered as a fundamental factor that modifies circadian rhythm, and the development of dysfunctions and diseases could be regulated by an underlying expression network with multiple circadian-associated signals.

  12. Circadian rhythms in microalgae production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, de L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thesis: Circadian rhythms in microalgae production Lenneke de Winter The sun imposes a daily cycle of light and dark on nearly all organisms. The circadian clock evolved to help organisms program their activities at an appropriate time during this daily cycle. For example,

  13. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Junwei, E-mail: wangjunweilj@yahoo.com.c [Cisco School of Informatics, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou Tianshou [School of Mathematics and Computational Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2010-06-14

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per{sup 01} and clk{sup Jrk} mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  14. Circadian Regulation of Macronutrient Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Various intestinal functions exhibit circadian rhythmicity. Disruptions in these rhythms as in shift workers and transcontinental travelers are associated with intestinal discomfort. Circadian rhythms are controlled at the molecular level by core clock and clock-controlled genes. These clock genes are expressed in intestinal cells, suggesting that they might participate in the circadian regulation of intestinal functions. A major function of the intestine is nutrient absorption. Here, we will review absorption of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids and circadian regulation of various transporters involved in their absorption. A better understanding of circadian regulation of intestinal absorption might help control several metabolic disorders and attenuate intestinal discomfort associated with disruptions in sleep-wake cycles.

  15. Circadian rhythm and its role in malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Sobia; Mahmood, Saqib

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations of multiple biological processes directed by endogenous clocks. The circadian timing system comprises peripheral oscillators located in most tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Circadian genes and the proteins produced by these genes constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator which form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circ...

  16. MiR-206-mediated dynamic mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Lianqi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a group of highly conserved small non-coding RNAs with a length of 21~23 nucleotides, microRNAs (miRNAs regulate the gene expression post-transcriptionally by base pairing with the partial or full complementary sequences in target mRNAs, thus resulting in the repression of mRNA translation and the acceleration of mRNA degradation. Recent work has revealed that miRNAs are essential for the development and functioning of the skeletal muscles where they are. In particular, miR-206 has not only been identified as the only miRNA expressed in skeletal muscles, but also exhibited crucial roles in regulation of the muscle development. Although miRNAs are known to regulate various biological processes ranging from development to cancer, much less is known about their role in the dynamic regulation of the mammalian circadian clock. Results A detailed dynamic model of miR-206-mediated mammalian circadian clock system was developed presently by using Hill-type terms, Michaelis-Menten type and mass action kinetics. Based on a system-theoretic approach, the model accurately predicts both the periodicity and the entrainment of the circadian clock. It also explores the dynamics properties of the oscillations mediated by miR-206 by means of sensitivity analysis and alterations of parameters. Our results show that miR-206 is an important regulator of the circadian clock in skeletal muscle, and thus by study of miR-206 the main features of its mediation on the clock may be captured. Simulations of these processes display that the amplitude and frequency of the oscillation can be significantly altered through the miR-206-mediated control. Conclusions MiR-206 has a profound effect on the dynamic mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock, both by control of the amplitude and control or alteration of the frequency to affect the level of the gene expression and to interfere with the temporal sequence of the gene production or delivery. This

  17. Circadian rhythms of fetal liver transcription persist in the absence of canonical circadian clock gene expression rhythms in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwei Li

    Full Text Available The cellular circadian clock and systemic cues drive rhythmicity in the transcriptome of adult peripheral tissues. However, the oscillating status of the circadian clocks in fetal tissues, and their response to maternal cues, are less clear. Most clock genes do not cycle in fetal livers from mice and rats, although tissue level rhythms rapidly emerge when fetal mouse liver explants are cultured in vitro. Thus, in the fetal mouse liver, the circadian clock does not oscillate at the cellular level (but is induced to oscillate in culture. To gain a comprehensive overview of the clock status in the fetal liver during late gestation, we performed microarray analyses on fetal liver tissues. In the fetal liver we did not observe circadian rhythms of clock gene expression or many other transcripts known to be rhythmically expressed in the adult liver. Nevertheless, JTK_CYCLE analysis identified some transcripts in the fetal liver that were rhythmically expressed, albeit at low amplitudes. Upon data filtering by coefficient of variation, the expression levels for transcripts related to pancreatic exocrine enzymes and zymogen secretion were found to undergo synchronized daily fluctuations at high amplitudes. These results suggest that maternal cues influence the fetal liver, despite the fact that we did not detect circadian rhythms of canonical clock gene expression in the fetal liver. These results raise important questions on the role of the circadian clock, or lack thereof, during ontogeny.

  18. Circadian clocks, epigenetics, and cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Selma

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between circadian rhythm and cancer has been suggested for more than a decade based on the observations that shift work and cancer incidence are linked. Accumulating evidence implicates the circadian clock in cancer survival and proliferation pathways. At the molecular level, multiple control mechanisms have been proposed to link circadian transcription and cell-cycle control to tumorigenesis.The circadian gating of the cell cycle and subsequent control of cell proliferation is an area of active investigation. Moreover, the circadian clock is a transcriptional system that is intricately regulated at the epigenetic level. Interestingly, the epigenetic landscape at the level of histone modifications, DNA methylation, and small regulatory RNAs are differentially controlled in cancer cells. This concept raises the possibility that epigenetic control is a common thread linking the clock with cancer, though little scientific evidence is known to date.This review focuses on the link between circadian clock and cancer, and speculates on the possible connections at the epigenetic level that could further link the circadian clock to tumor initiation or progression.

  19. A circadian gene expression atlas in mammals: implications for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ray; Lahens, Nicholas F; Ballance, Heather I; Hughes, Michael E; Hogenesch, John B

    2014-11-11

    To characterize the role of the circadian clock in mouse physiology and behavior, we used RNA-seq and DNA arrays to quantify the transcriptomes of 12 mouse organs over time. We found 43% of all protein coding genes showed circadian rhythms in transcription somewhere in the body, largely in an organ-specific manner. In most organs, we noticed the expression of many oscillating genes peaked during transcriptional "rush hours" preceding dawn and dusk. Looking at the genomic landscape of rhythmic genes, we saw that they clustered together, were longer, and had more spliceforms than nonoscillating genes. Systems-level analysis revealed intricate rhythmic orchestration of gene pathways throughout the body. We also found oscillations in the expression of more than 1,000 known and novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Supporting their potential role in mediating clock function, ncRNAs conserved between mouse and human showed rhythmic expression in similar proportions as protein coding genes. Importantly, we also found that the majority of best-selling drugs and World Health Organization essential medicines directly target the products of rhythmic genes. Many of these drugs have short half-lives and may benefit from timed dosage. In sum, this study highlights critical, systemic, and surprising roles of the mammalian circadian clock and provides a blueprint for advancement in chronotherapy.

  20. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being.

  1. Linear stability analysis reveals exclusion zone for sliding bed transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talmon Arnold M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A bend or any another pipe component disturbs solids transport in pipes. Longitudinal pressure profiles downstream of such a component may show a stationary transient harmonic wave, as revealed by a recent settling slurry laboratory experiment. Therefore the fundamental transient response of the two-layer model for fully stratified flow is investigated as a first approach. A linear stability analysis of the sliding bed configuration is conducted. No stationary transient harmonic waves are found in this analysis, but adaptation lengths for exponential recovery are quantified. An example calculation is given for a 0.1 m diameter pipeline.

  2. Invoking Thomas Kuhn: What Citation Analysis Reveals about Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Cathleen C.; Cobern, William W.

    This paper analyzes how Thomas Kuhn's writings are used by others, especially science education researchers. Previous research in citation analysis is used to frame questions related to who cites Kuhn, in what manner and why. Research questions first focus on the variety of disciplines invoking Kuhn and to what extent Structure of Scientific Revolutions (SSR) is cited. The Web of Science database provides material from 1982 for this analysis. The science education literature is analyzed using back issues from 1985 of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and Science Education. An article analysis reveals trends in terms of what Kuhnian ideas are most frequently invoked. Results indicate a wide array of disciplines from beekeeping to law cite Kuhn - especially generic citations to SSR. The science education journal analysis reveals pervasive use of the term paradigm, although use is quite varied. The two areas of research in science education most impacted by Kuhn appear to be conceptual change theory and constructivist epistemologies. Additional uses of Kuhn are discussed. The degree to which Kuhn is invoked in ways supporting the theoretical framework of citation analysis, whether his work is misappropriated, and the impact of Kuhn are discussed.

  3. Constitutive expression of the Period1 gene impairs behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numano, Rika; Yamazaki, Shin; Umeda, Nanae; Samura, Tomonori; Sujino, Mitsugu; Takahashi, Ri-ichi; Ueda, Masatsugu; Mori, Akiko; Yamada, Kazunori; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Inouye, Shin-ichi T; Menaker, Michael; Tei, Hajime

    2006-03-07

    Three mammalian Period (Per) genes, termed Per1, Per2, and Per3, have been identified as structural homologues of the Drosophila circadian clock gene, period (per). The three Per genes are rhythmically expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the central circadian pacemaker in mammals. The phases of peak mRNA levels for the three Per genes in the SCN are slightly different. Light sequentially induces the transcripts of Per1 and Per2 but not of Per3 in mice. These data and others suggest that each Per gene has a different but partially redundant function in mammals. To elucidate the function of Per1 in the circadian system in vivo, we generated two transgenic rat lines in which the mouse Per1 (mPer1) transcript was constitutively expressed under the control of either the human elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha) or the rat neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter. The transgenic rats exhibited an approximately 0.6-1.0-h longer circadian period than their wild-type siblings in both activity and body temperature rhythms. Entrainment in response to light cycles was dramatically impaired in the transgenic rats. Molecular analysis revealed that the amplitudes of oscillation in the rat Per1 (rPer1) and rat Per2 (rPer2) mRNAs were significantly attenuated in the SCN and eyes of the transgenic rats. These results indicate that either the level of Per1, which is raised by overexpression, or its rhythmic expression, which is damped or abolished in over expressing animals, is critical for normal entrainment of behavior and molecular oscillation of other clock genes.

  4. Circadian Rhythm Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The value of measuring sleep-wake cycles is significantly enhanced by measuring other physiological signals that depend on circadian rhythms (such as heart rate and...

  5. Circadian Influences on Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka A. I. Virag

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or clock genes, are found in all peripheral tissues, including the heart, and influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on cardiovascular disease incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and cardiovascular disease may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations.

  6. The effects of chronic marijuana use on circadian entrainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, Lauren N; Fogler, Kethera; Hall, Kate; Hartmann, Matthew; Dyche, Jeff

    2015-05-01

    Animal literature suggests a connection between marijuana use and altered circadian rhythms. However, the effect has not yet been demonstrated in humans. The present study examined the effect of chronic marijuana use on human circadian function. Participants consisted of current users who reported smoking marijuana daily for at least a year and non-marijuana user controls. Participants took a neurocognitive assessment, wore actigraphs and maintained sleep diaries for three weeks. While no significant cognitive changes were found between groups, data revealed that chronic marijuana use may act as an additional zeitgeber and lead to increased entrainment in human users.

  7. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  8. The melatonin-sensitive circadian clock of the enteric bacterium Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Jiffin K; Cassone, Vincent M

    2016-09-02

    Circadian clocks are fundamental properties of all eukaryotic organisms and at least some prokaryotic organisms. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that the gastrointestinal system contains a circadian clock that controls many, if not all, aspects of gastrointestinal function. We now report that at least one species of intestinal bacteria, Enterobacter aerogenes, responds to the pineal and gastrointestinal hormone melatonin by an increase in swarming activity. This swarming behavior is expressed rhythmically, with a period of approximately 24 hrs. Transformation of E. aerogenes to express luciferase with a MotA promoter reveals circadian patterns of bioluminescence that are synchronized by melatonin and whose periods are temperature compensated from 26°C to 40°C. Bioinformatics suggest similarities between the E. aerogenes and cyanobacterial clocks, suggesting the circadian clock may have evolved very early in the evolution of life. They also point to a coordination of host circadian clocks with those residing in the microbiota themselves.

  9. Cycles in spatial and temporal chromosomal organization driven by the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Hakim, Ofir; Patel, Vishal R; Baldi, Pierre; Hager, Gordon L; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic transitions in the epigenome have been associated with regulated patterns of nuclear organization. The accumulating evidence that chromatin remodeling is implicated in circadian function prompted us to explore whether the clock may control nuclear architecture. We applied the chromosome conformation capture on chip technology in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to demonstrate the presence of circadian long-range interactions using the clock-controlled Dbp gene as bait. The circadian genomic interactions with Dbp were highly specific and were absent in MEFs whose clock was disrupted by ablation of the Bmal1 gene (also called Arntl). We establish that the Dbp circadian interactome contains a wide variety of genes and clock-related DNA elements. These findings reveal a previously unappreciated circadian and clock-dependent shaping of the nuclear landscape.

  10. Aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythmicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeber, R. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    Recent statistical and experimental studies on the role of circadian rhythms in aircrew fatigue and aviation accidents are reviewed from a human-factors perspective, and typical data are presented in extensive graphs. Consideration is given to the biological clock and the limits of endurance, circadian desynchronization, sleep and sleepiness, short-haul and long-haul operational studies, and the potential advantages of cockpit automation.

  11. CREB influences timing and entrainment of the SCN circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boyoung; Li, Aiqing; Hansen, Katelin F; Cao, Ruifeng; Yoon, Jae Hwa; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-12-01

    The transcriptional feedback circuit, which is at the core of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian (i.e., 24 h) clock, is tightly coupled to both external entrainment cues, such as light, as well as rhythmic cues that arise on a system-wide level within the SCN. One potential signaling pathway by which these cues are conveyed to the molecular clock is the CREB/CRE transcriptional cascade. In this study, we employed a tetracycline-inducible CREB repressor mouse strain, in which approximately 60% of the SCN neurons express the transgene, to test CREB functionality in the clock and its effects on overt rhythmicity. We show that attenuated CREB signaling in the SCN led to a significant reduction in light-evoked clock entrainment. An examination of circadian timing revealed that CREB repressor mice exhibited normal free-running rhythms in the absence of external lighting cues. However, under conditions of constant light, which typically leads to a lengthening of the circadian period, CREB repressor mice exhibited a dramatic arrhythmic phenotype, which could be reversed with doxycycline. At a cellular level, the repression of CREB led to a significant reduction in both the expression of the circadian clock proteins PERIOD1 and PERIOD2 and the clock output hormones AVP and VIP. Together, these data support the idea that the CRE transcriptional pathway orchestrates transcriptional events that are essential for both the maintenance of SCN timing and light entrainment of the circadian clock.

  12. GRK2: putting the brakes on the circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Viveros, Lucia; Cheng, Arthur H.

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that terminate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling by phosphorylating the receptor and inducing its internalization. In addition to their canonical function, some GRKs can phosphorylate non-GPCR substrates and regulate GPCR signaling in a kinase-independent manner. GPCRs are abundantly expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a structure in the mammalian brain that serves as the central circadian pacemaker. Various facets of circadian timekeeping are under the influence of GPCR signaling, and thus are potential targets for GRK regulation. Despite this, little attention has been given to the role of GRKs in circadian rhythms. In this research highlight, we discuss our latest findings on the functional involvement of GRK2 in mammalian circadian timekeeping in the SCN. Using grk2 knockout mice, we demonstrate that GRK2 is critical for maintaining proper clock speed and ensuring that the clock is appropriately synchronized to environmental light cycles. Although grk2 deficiency expectedly alters the expression of a key GPCR in the SCN, our study also reveals that GRK2 has a more direct function that touches the heart of the circadian clock. PMID:27088110

  13. Temperature regulates transcription in the zebrafish circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajori Lahiri

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been well-documented that temperature influences key aspects of the circadian clock. Temperature cycles entrain the clock, while the period length of the circadian cycle is adjusted so that it remains relatively constant over a wide range of temperatures (temperature compensation. In vertebrates, the molecular basis of these properties is poorly understood. Here, using the zebrafish as an ectothermic model, we demonstrate first that in the absence of light, exposure of embryos and primary cell lines to temperature cycles entrains circadian rhythms of clock gene expression. Temperature steps drive changes in the basal expression of certain clock genes in a gene-specific manner, a mechanism potentially contributing to entrainment. In the case of the per4 gene, while E-box promoter elements mediate circadian clock regulation, they do not direct the temperature-driven changes in transcription. Second, by studying E-box-regulated transcription as a reporter of the core clock mechanism, we reveal that the zebrafish clock is temperature-compensated. In addition, temperature strongly influences the amplitude of circadian transcriptional rhythms during and following entrainment by light-dark cycles, a property that could confer temperature compensation. Finally, we show temperature-dependent changes in the expression levels, phosphorylation, and function of the clock protein, CLK. This suggests a mechanism that could account for changes in the amplitude of the E-box-directed rhythm. Together, our results imply that several key transcriptional regulatory elements at the core of the zebrafish clock respond to temperature.

  14. Systematic toxicological analysis revealing a rare case of captan ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottzein, Anne K; Musshoff, Frank; Madea, Burkhard

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a case of suicide by intoxication with various pharmaceuticals, particularly anticonvulsants, combined with the fungicide captan. A cause of death could not be ascertained at autopsy. However, systematic toxicological analysis (STA) including a screening via solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for (semi) volatile organic compounds revealed results suggesting a possible cause of death. The effects of captan on the human organism, its metabolism, and distribution will be discussed. Macroscopically, the cause of death was unascertained. STA revealed clonazepam, citalopram, and its metabolites, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, lacosamide, clonazepam, captan, and its metabolite tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI). For the first time, it was detected in human viscera. A quantification of THPI was performed to obtain distribution in the organs. The significance of a complete STA must be emphasized. The presence of THPI would have been missed without previous detection of captan. Consequently, this fatality would not have been investigated satisfactorily.

  15. 蝗虫节律基因pdp的克隆及功能分析%Clone and Functional Analysis of Circadian Gene pdp in Locusta migratoria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宇辉; 陈光

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究不同条件下蝗虫(Locusta migratoria)节律基因Pdp( Pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase)的mRNA表达水平,进一步揭示蝗虫节律的分子机制.[方法]通过中国科学院动物研究所内的转录组数据库中找出pdp基因的原型来设计引物,以群居型东亚飞蝗的头部的反转录cDNA为模板,克隆出pdp基因的全序列.把一天24h等分成8个点,进行定时取样,以qRT-PCR技术进行不同时段pdp基因表达量的测定;并在不同处理条件下.测定pdp基因的表达量.[结果]节律基因pdp在蝗虫的不同处理条件下变化不大.[结论]该研究对了解飞蝗节律规律、种群特点及有效防虫具有重要的现实意义.%[Objective]Through studying mRNA expression levels of circadian gene pdp in Locusta migratoria under different conditions to reveal molecular mechanisms of rhythm of Locusta migratoria. [ Methods ] Based on the database of Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, to find out the prototype of the pdp gene and design primers. Using aggregated locust head cDNA cloning for templates, the complete sequence of the gene pdp was got. By dividing a day (24 hours)into eight points, we take fixed-point samples, and then measure the gene expression using qRT-PCR for different times of day. And then in different processing conditions, the pdp gene expression levels were determined. [ Results ] The rhythms of gene pdp locust changed slightly under different conditions. [ Conclusion ] The study had extremely realistic significance for understanding the rhythm and population characteristics of Locusta migratoria as well as effective insect-resistant.

  16. 大麦(Hordeum vulgare)昼夜节律钟基因CCA1的克隆及表达分析%Cloning and Expression Analysis of Circadian Clock Gene CCA1 in Barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢国芳; 宋萌; 姚涵; 韩渊怀

    2012-01-01

    CCA 1 gene plays an important role in circadian clock sensitivity in rice (Oryza sativa L. ) and Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, CCAl gene in barley was cloned by RT-PCR using homological primers based on the highly conserved region of the multiple alignments of the rice and Arabidopsis. The similarities of this sequence were up to 72% and 69%, respectively, to corresponding mRNA sequences of rice and maize in BLASTx of GenBank database. Using ORF Finder software, a 2157 bp open reading frame was found to code 718 amino acids. Using Compute pI/Mw tool, the amino acid sequence was analyzed, and it revealed that the molecular weight of this protein was about 77 769. 4 Da, and isoelectric point was about 6. 55. We established fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR system with barley inbred lines HUADAMAI 1 and HUADAMAI 2, and studied the expression of CCAl in leaf under 16h/8h (light/ dark) conditions. Expression analysis showed that the gene expression peaked at dawn (ZTO) then gradually declined from ZTO to ZT15, bottomed at ZT15, then increased and returned to the initial level at ZT24. This study will provide information of barley CCAl gene for further studying the function in regulating photoperiod sensitivity in barley, and provide scientific basis for clarifying the mechanism of the circadian synchronization in barley.%昼夜节律钟基因CCA1在调解水稻和拟南芥的光周期反应中起着重要作用.利用BLAST手段以玉米中的CCA1基因序列作为靶序列,调取Genbank数据库信息,并结合RT-PCR方法获得了大麦的cDNA同源序列.BLASTx分析发现其与水稻和玉米的序列相似性分别达到72%和69%.通过ORF Finder软件分析发现,该序列包含一个2157 bp的开放阅读框,编码一个由718个氨基酸残基组成的蛋白序列,其分子量为77769.4 Da,等电点为6.55.采用实时荧光定量PCR分析发现,随光照时间的变化,该基因在大麦叶片中的表达量呈现出白天不断降低而夜晚逐渐

  17. Cloning and Expression Analysis of Circadian Clock Gene CCA1 in Maize%玉米昼夜节律钟基因CCA1的克隆及表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢国芳; 杜伟建; 张雁明; 韩浩坤; 韩渊怀

    2011-01-01

    昼夜节律钟基因CCA1在调解水稻和拟南芥的光周期反应中起着重要作用.本研究利用从水稻和拟南芥中分离到的CCA1基因序列作为靶序列BLAST获取Genbank中的信息,通过RT-PCR方法克隆获得了一条2326bp的玉米CCA1基因cDNA序列.BLAST比对发现其与水稻、大麦和拟南芥的序列相似性分别达73.7%、69.4%和39.8%.利用NCBI中的ORF Finder软件分析,发现该序列包含一个2163bp的开放阅读框,编码720个氨基酸残基,蛋白的分子量约为78819.17Da,等电点为6.468.推测其含有3个myb-DNA结合域、7个N-豆蔻酰化位点、1个G-box蛋白结合域以及1个蛋白跨膜结合域.采用实时荧光定量PCR分析发现,随光照时间的变化,该基因在玉米叶片中的表达量呈现出白天不断降低而夜晚逐渐升高的昼夜变化趋势.本研究为进一步研究玉米CCA1基因在调控玉米光周期敏感现象中的功能,阐明玉米光周期敏感机制提供了科学依据.%CCA 1 gene plays an important role in circadian clock sensitivity in rice (Oryza sative L. ) and Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, CCA1 (2326 bp) was cloned by RT-PCR using homological primers based on the highly conserved region of the multiple alignment of the rice and Arabidopsis. CCA1 from GenBank of NCBI. The similarities of these sequences were up to 73. 7% ,69. 4 and 39. 8% , respectively, to corresponding mRNA sequences of rice, barley and Arabidopsis in BLAST/nr of GenBank database. Using ORF Finder software, a 2163 bp open reading frame was found to code 720 amino acids. Analyzing this ami no acid sequence by Compute pI/Mw tool revealed that the molecular weight of this protein was about 78819.17 Da , and isoelectric point was about 6. 468. The amino acid sequence contained three myb-DNA binding domains, seven N-myristoylation sites, one G-box binding domain and one putative transmembrane spanning region. We established fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR system with maize

  18. Circadian rhythms synchronize mitosis in Neurospora crassa

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Christian I.; Zámborszky, Judit; Baek, Mokryun; Labiscsak, Laszlo; Ju, Kyungsu; Lee, Hyeyeong; Luis F. Larrondo; Goity, Alejandra; Chong, Hin Siong; Belden, William J.; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms provide temporal information to other cellular processes, such as metabolism. We investigate the coupling between the cell cycle and the circadian clock using mathematical modeling and experimentally validate model-driven predictions with a model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa. We demonstrate a conserved coupling mechanism between the cell cycle and the circadian clock in Neurospora as in mammals, which results in circadian clock-gated mitotic cycles. Furthermore, we ...

  19. Circadian rhythm of outside-nest activity in wild (WWCPS, albino and pigmented laboratory rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Stryjek

    Full Text Available The domestication process of the laboratory rat has been going on for several hundred generations in stable environmental conditions, which may have affected their physiological and behavioural functions, including their circadian system. Rats tested in our ethological experiments were laboratory-bred wild Norway rats (WWCPS, two strains of pigmented laboratory rats (Brown Norway and Long Evans, and two strains of albino rats (Sprague-Dawley and Wistar. Rats were placed in purpose-built enclosures and their cycle of activity (time spent actively outside the nest has been studied for one week in standard light conditions and for the next one in round-the-clock darkness. The analysis of circadian pattern of outside-nest activity revealed differences between wild, pigmented laboratory, and albino laboratory strains. During daytime, albino rats showed lower activity than pigmented rats, greater decrease in activity when the light was turned on and greater increase in activity when the light was switched off, than pigmented rats. Moreover albino rats presented higher activity during the night than wild rats. The magnitude of the change in activity between daytime and nighttime was also more pronounced in albino rats. Additionaly, they slept outside the nest more often during the night than during the day. These results can be interpreted in accordance with the proposition that intense light is an aversive stimulus for albino rats, due to lack of pigment in their iris and choroid, which reduces their ability to adapt to light. Pigmented laboratory rats were more active during lights on, not only in comparison to the albino, but also to the wild rats. Since the difference seems to be independent of light intensity, it is likely to be a result of the domestication process. Cosinor analysis revealed a high rhythmicity of circadian cycles in all groups.

  20. Evolutionary Profiling of the Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Wiring of the Circadian Clock in Normal and Perturbed Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-14

    how the circadian cycle adapts to environmental stress. More specifically: As expected, Drosophila melanogaster showed two peaks of activity: one in...transcriptional and post-transcriptional wiring of the circadian clock in normal and perturbed conditions Contract Number: DARPA D13AP00074 Total...out behavioral analysis of the different fly species and their response to temperature changes. Towards this, we tested the circadian locomotor

  1. Disrupting circadian homeostasis of sympathetic signaling promotes tumor development in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell proliferation in all rapidly renewing mammalian tissues follows a circadian rhythm that is often disrupted in advanced-stage tumors. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a clear link between disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer development in humans. Mice lacking the circadian genes Period1 and 2 (Per or Cryptochrome1 and 2 (Cry are deficient in cell cycle regulation and Per2 mutant mice are cancer-prone. However, it remains unclear how circadian rhythm in cell proliferation is generated in vivo and why disruption of circadian rhythm may lead to tumorigenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice lacking Per1 and 2, Cry1 and 2, or one copy of Bmal1, all show increased spontaneous and radiation-induced tumor development. The neoplastic growth of Per-mutant somatic cells is not controlled cell-autonomously but is dependent upon extracellular mitogenic signals. Among the circadian output pathways, the rhythmic sympathetic signaling plays a key role in the central-peripheral timing mechanism that simultaneously activates the cell cycle clock via AP1-controlled Myc induction and p53 via peripheral clock-controlled ATM activation. Jet-lag promptly desynchronizes the central clock-SNS-peripheral clock axis, abolishes the peripheral clock-dependent ATM activation, and activates myc oncogenic potential, leading to tumor development in the same organ systems in wild-type and circadian gene-mutant mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Tumor suppression in vivo is a clock-controlled physiological function. The central circadian clock paces extracellular mitogenic signals that drive peripheral clock-controlled expression of key cell cycle and tumor suppressor genes to generate a circadian rhythm in cell proliferation. Frequent disruption of circadian rhythm is an important tumor promoting factor.

  2. Nutrition and the circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-08-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partitions incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24-h day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation, and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. 'High-fat diets' (HFD) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFD in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases.

  3. Circadian systems : different levels of complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2001-01-01

    After approximately 50 years of circadian research, especially in selected circadian model systems (Drosophila, Neurospora, Gonyaulax and, more recently, cyanobacteria and mammals), we appreciate the enormous complexity of the circadian programme in organisms and cells, as well as in physiological a

  4. Circadian rhythms of photorefractory siberian hamsters remain responsive to melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Matthew P; Paul, Matthew J; Turner, Kevin W; Park, Jin Ho; Driscoll, Joseph R; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Zucker, Irving

    2008-04-01

    Short day lengths increase the duration of nocturnal melatonin (Mel) secretion, which induces the winter phenotype in Siberian hamsters. After several months of continued exposure to short days, hamsters spontaneously revert to the spring-summer phenotype. This transition has been attributed to the development of refractoriness of Mel-binding tissues, including the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), to long-duration Mel signals. The SCN of Siberian hamsters is required for the seasonal response to winter-like Mel signals, and becomes refractory to previously effective long-duration Mel signals restricted to this area. Acute Mel treatment phase shifts circadian locomotor rhythms of photosensitive Siberian hamsters, presumably by affecting circadian oscillators in the SCN. We tested whether seasonal refractoriness of the SCN to long-duration Mel signals also renders the circadian system of Siberian hamsters unresponsive to Mel. Males manifesting free-running circadian rhythms in constant dim red light were injected with Mel or vehicle for 5 days on a 23.5-h T-cycle beginning at circadian time 10. Mel injections caused significantly larger phase advances in activity onset than did the saline vehicle, but the magnitude of phase shifts to Mel did not differ between photorefractory and photosensitive hamsters. Similarly, when entrained to a 16-h light/8-h dark photocycle, photorefractory and photosensitive hamsters did not differ in their response to Mel injected 4 h before the onset of the dark phase. Activity onset in Mel-injected hamsters was masked by light but was revealed to be significantly earlier than in vehicle-injected hamsters upon transfer to constant dim red light. The acute effects of melatonin on circadian behavioral rhythms are preserved in photorefractory hamsters.

  5. Synchronization of the Drosophila circadian clock by temperature cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, F T; Stanewsky, R

    2007-01-01

    The natural light/dark and temperature cycles are considered to be the most prominent factors that synchronize circadian clocks with the environment. Understanding the principles of temperature entrainment significantly lags behind our current knowledge of light entrainment in any organism subject to circadian research. Nevertheless, several effects of temperature on circadian clocks are well understood, and similarities as well as differences to the light-entrainment pathways start to emerge. This chapter provides an overview of the temperature effects on the Drosophila circadian clock with special emphasis on synchronization by temperature cycles. As in other organisms, such temperature cycles can serve as powerful time cues to synchronize the clock. Mutants that specifically interfere with aspects of temperature entrainment have been isolated and will likely help to reveal the underlying mechanisms. These mechanisms involve transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of clock genes. For synchronization of fly behavior by temperature cycles, the generation of a whole organism or systemic signal seems to be required, even though individual fly tissues can be synchronized under isolated culture conditions. If true, the requirement for such a signal would reveal a fundamental difference to the light-entrainment mechanism.

  6. Circadian Insights into Motivated Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, Michael C; Silver, Rae

    2016-01-01

    For an organism to be successful in an evolutionary sense, it and its offspring must survive. Such survival depends on satisfying a number of needs that are driven by motivated behaviors, such as eating, sleeping, and mating. An individual can usually only pursue one motivated behavior at a time. The circadian system provides temporal structure to the organism's 24 hour day, partitioning specific behaviors to particular times of the day. The circadian system also allows anticipation of opportunities to engage in motivated behaviors that occur at predictable times of the day. Such anticipation enhances fitness by ensuring that the organism is physiologically ready to make use of a time-limited resource as soon as it becomes available. This could include activation of the sympathetic nervous system to transition from sleep to wake, or to engage in mating, or to activate of the parasympathetic nervous system to facilitate transitions to sleep, or to prepare the body to digest a meal. In addition to enabling temporal partitioning of motivated behaviors, the circadian system may also regulate the amplitude of the drive state motivating the behavior. For example, the circadian clock modulates not only when it is time to eat, but also how hungry we are. In this chapter we explore the physiology of our circadian clock and its involvement in a number of motivated behaviors such as sleeping, eating, exercise, sexual behavior, and maternal behavior. We also examine ways in which dysfunction of circadian timing can contribute to disease states, particularly in psychiatric conditions that include adherent motivational states.

  7. Effects of Gravity on Insect Circadian Rhythmicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms - endogenous daily rhythmic fluctuations in virtually all characteristics of life - are generated and coordinated by the circadian timing system (CTS). The CTS is synchronized to the external 24-hour day by time cues such as the light/dark cycle. In an environment without time cues, the length of an animal's day is determined by the period of its internal pacemaker (tau) and the animal is said to be free-running. All life on earth evolved under the solar day; the CTS exists as an adaptation that allows organisms to anticipate and to prepare for rhythmic environmental fluctuations. All life on earth also evolved under the force of earth's gravitational environment. While it is therefore not surprising that changes in the lighting environment affect the CTS, it is surprising that changes in the gravitational environment would do so. However, recent data from one of our laboratories using the brn-3.1 knockout mouse revealed that this model, which lacks the sensory receptor hair cells within the neurovestibular system, does not respond to exposure to a hyperdynamic environment in the same fashion as normal mice. The brn-3.1 mice did not show the expected suppression of circadian rhythmicity shown by control mice exposed to 2G. Exposure to altered ambient force environments affects the amplitude, mean and timing of circadian rhythms in species from unicellular organisms to man. In addition, there is a circadian influence on the homeostatic response to acute 2G acceleration and pulses of 2G can act as a time cue, synchronizing the CTS. This is of significance because maintenance of internal and external temporal coordination is critical for normal physiological and psychological function. Typically, during adaptation to an increased gravitational environment (+G), an initial acute reaction is followed by adaptation and, eventually, a new steady state (14-16), which can take weeks to months to establish. Until the development of space stations, exposure

  8. Metabolic Profiling of Intact Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves during Circadian Cycle Using 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustijn, D; Roy, U; van Schadewijk, R; de Groot, H J M; Alia, A

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely used model organism for research in plant biology. While significant advances in understanding plant growth and development have been made by focusing on the molecular genetics of Arabidopsis, extracting and understanding the functional framework of metabolism is challenging, both from a technical perspective due to losses and modification during extraction of metabolites from the leaves, and from the biological perspective, due to random variation obscuring how well the function is performed. The purpose of this work is to establish the in vivo metabolic profile directly from the Arabidopsis thaliana leaves without metabolite extraction, to reduce the complexity of the results by multivariate analysis, and to unravel the mitigation of cellular complexity by predominant functional periodicity. To achieve this, we use the circadian cycle that strongly influences metabolic and physiological processes and exerts control over the photosynthetic machinery. High resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) was applied to obtain the metabolic profile directly from intact Arabidopsis leaves. Combining one- and two-dimensional 1H HR-MAS NMR allowed the identification of several metabolites including sugars and amino acids in intact leaves. Multivariate analysis on HR-MAS NMR spectra of leaves throughout the circadian cycle revealed modules of primary metabolites with significant and consistent variations of their molecular components at different time points of the circadian cycle. Since robust photosynthetic performance in plants relies on the functional periodicity of the circadian rhythm, our results show that HR-MAS NMR promises to be an important non-invasive method that can be used for metabolomics of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered physiology and photosynthetic efficiency.

  9. Metabolic Profiling of Intact Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves during Circadian Cycle Using 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schadewijk, R.; de Groot, H. J. M.; Alia, A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely used model organism for research in plant biology. While significant advances in understanding plant growth and development have been made by focusing on the molecular genetics of Arabidopsis, extracting and understanding the functional framework of metabolism is challenging, both from a technical perspective due to losses and modification during extraction of metabolites from the leaves, and from the biological perspective, due to random variation obscuring how well the function is performed. The purpose of this work is to establish the in vivo metabolic profile directly from the Arabidopsis thaliana leaves without metabolite extraction, to reduce the complexity of the results by multivariate analysis, and to unravel the mitigation of cellular complexity by predominant functional periodicity. To achieve this, we use the circadian cycle that strongly influences metabolic and physiological processes and exerts control over the photosynthetic machinery. High resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) was applied to obtain the metabolic profile directly from intact Arabidopsis leaves. Combining one- and two-dimensional 1H HR-MAS NMR allowed the identification of several metabolites including sugars and amino acids in intact leaves. Multivariate analysis on HR-MAS NMR spectra of leaves throughout the circadian cycle revealed modules of primary metabolites with significant and consistent variations of their molecular components at different time points of the circadian cycle. Since robust photosynthetic performance in plants relies on the functional periodicity of the circadian rhythm, our results show that HR-MAS NMR promises to be an important non-invasive method that can be used for metabolomics of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered physiology and photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:27662620

  10. Sex differences in the circadian regulation of sleep and waking cognition in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, Nayantara; Lazar, Alpar S; McCabe, Patrick J; Lo, June C; Groeger, John A; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2016-05-10

    The sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythmicity both contribute to brain function, but whether this contribution differs between men and women and how it varies across cognitive domains and subjective dimensions has not been established. We examined the circadian and sleep-wake-dependent regulation of cognition in 16 men and 18 women in a forced desynchrony protocol and quantified the separate contributions of circadian phase, prior sleep, and elapsed time awake on cognition and sleep. The largest circadian effects were observed for reported sleepiness, mood, and reported effort; the effects on working memory and temporal processing were smaller. Although these effects were seen in both men and women, there were quantitative differences. The amplitude of the circadian modulation was larger in women in 11 of 39 performance measures so that their performance was more impaired in the early morning hours. Principal components analysis of the performance measures yielded three factors, accuracy, effort, and speed, which reflect core performance characteristics in a range of cognitive tasks and therefore are likely to be important for everyday performance. The largest circadian modulation was observed for effort, whereas accuracy exhibited the largest sex difference in circadian modulation. The sex differences in the circadian modulation of cognition could not be explained by sex differences in the circadian amplitude of plasma melatonin and electroencephalographic slow-wave activity. These data establish the impact of circadian rhythmicity and sex on waking cognition and have implications for understanding the regulation of brain function, cognition, and affect in shift-work, jetlag, and aging.

  11. Integration of light and temperature in the regulation of circadian gene expression in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharine E Boothroyd

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are aligned to the environment via synchronizing signals, or Zeitgebers, such as daily light and temperature cycles, food availability, and social behavior. In this study, we found that genome-wide expression profiles from temperature-entrained flies show a dramatic difference in the presence or absence of a thermocycle. Whereas transcript levels appear to be modified broadly by changes in temperature, there is a specific set of temperature-entrained circadian mRNA profiles that continue to oscillate in constant conditions. There are marked differences in the biological functions represented by temperature-driven or circadian regulation. The set of temperature-entrained circadian transcripts overlaps significantly with a previously defined set of transcripts oscillating in response to a photocycle. In follow-up studies, all thermocycle-entrained circadian transcript rhythms also responded to light/dark entrainment, whereas some photocycle-entrained rhythms did not respond to temperature entrainment. Transcripts encoding the clock components Period, Timeless, Clock, Vrille, PAR-domain protein 1, and Cryptochrome were all confirmed to be rhythmic after entrainment to a daily thermocycle, although the presence of a thermocycle resulted in an unexpected phase difference between period and timeless expression rhythms at the transcript but not the protein level. Generally, transcripts that exhibit circadian rhythms both in response to thermocycles and photocycles maintained the same mutual phase relationships after entrainment by temperature or light. Comparison of the collective temperature- and light-entrained circadian phases of these transcripts indicates that natural environmental light and temperature cycles cooperatively entrain the circadian clock. This interpretation is further supported by comparative analysis of the circadian phases observed for temperature-entrained and light-entrained circadian locomotor behavior. Taken

  12. Coupling between the circadian clock and cell cycle oscillators : implication for healthy cells and malignant growth

    OpenAIRE

    Feillet, Céline‏; Horst, Gijsbertus Theodorus Johannes van der‏; Lévi, Francis A.; Rand, D. A.; Delaunay, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two process...

  13. Individual differences in circadian waveform of Siberian hamsters under multiple lighting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer A; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Gorman, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    Because the circadian clock in the mammalian brain derives from a network of interacting cellular oscillators, characterizing the nature and bases of circadian coupling is fundamental to understanding how the pacemaker operates. Various phenomena involving plasticity in circadian waveform have been theorized to reflect changes in oscillator coupling; however, it remains unclear whether these different behavioral paradigms reference a unitary underlying process. To test whether disparate coupling assays index a common mechanism, we examined whether there is covariation among behavioral responses to various lighting conditions that produce changes in circadian waveform. Siberian hamsters, Phodopus sungorus, were transferred from long to short photoperiods to distinguish short photoperiod responders (SP-R) from nonresponders (SP-NR). Short photoperiod chronotyped hamsters were subsequently transferred, along with unselected controls, to 24-h light:dark:light: dark cycles (LDLD) with dim nighttime illumination, a procedure that induces bifurcated entrainment. Under LDLD, SP-R hamsters were more likely to bifurcate their rhythms than were SP-NR hamsters or unselected controls. After transfer from LDLD to constant dim light, SP-R hamsters were also more likely to become arrhythmic compared to SP-NR hamsters and unselected controls. In contrast, short photoperiod chronotype did not influence more transient changes in circadian waveform. The present data reveal a clear relationship in the plasticity of circadian waveform across 3 distinct lighting conditions, suggesting a common mechanism wherein individual differences reflect variation in circadian coupling.

  14. Maternal and infant activity: Analytic approaches for the study of circadian rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Karen A; Burr, Robert L; Spieker, Susan

    2015-11-01

    The study of infant and mother circadian rhythm entails choice of instruments appropriate for use in the home environment as well as selection of analytic approach that characterizes circadian rhythm. While actigraphy monitoring suits the needs of home study, limited studies have examined mother and infant rhythm derived from actigraphy. Among this existing research a variety of analyses have been employed to characterize 24-h rhythm, reducing ability to evaluate and synthesize findings. Few studies have examined the correspondence of mother and infant circadian parameters for the most frequently cited approaches: cosinor, non-parametric circadian rhythm analysis (NPCRA), and autocorrelation function (ACF). The purpose of this research was to examine analytic approaches in the study of mother and infant circadian activity rhythm. Forty-three healthy mother and infant pairs were studied in the home environment over a 72h period at infant age 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Activity was recorded continuously using actigraphy monitors and mothers completed a diary. Parameters of circadian rhythm were generated from cosinor analysis, NPCRA, and ACF. The correlation among measures of rhythm center (cosinor mesor, NPCRA mid level), strength or fit of 24-h period (cosinor magnitude and R(2), NPCRA amplitude and relative amplitude (RA)), phase (cosinor acrophase, NPCRA M10 and L5 midpoint), and rhythm stability and variability (NPCRA interdaily stability (IS) and intradaily variability (IV), ACF) was assessed, and additionally the effect size (eta(2)) for change over time evaluated. Results suggest that cosinor analysis, NPCRA, and autocorrelation provide several comparable parameters of infant and maternal circadian rhythm center, fit, and phase. IS and IV were strongly correlated with the 24-h cycle fit. The circadian parameters analyzed offer separate insight into rhythm and differing effect size for the detection of change over time. Findings inform selection of analysis and

  15. Circadian modulation of sleep in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasenkov, Roman; Deboer, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is regulated by circadian and homeostatic processes. The sleep homeostat keeps track of the duration of prior sleep and waking and determines the intensity of sleep. In mammals, the homeostatic process is reflected by the slow waves in the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). The circadian process is controlled by a pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus and provides the sleep homeostat with a circadian framework. This review summarizes the changes in sleep obtained after different chronobiological interventions (changes in photoperiod, light availability, and running wheel availability), the influence of mutations or lesions in clock genes on sleep, and research on the interaction between sleep homeostasis and the circadian clock. Research in humans shows that the period of consolidated waking during the day is a consequence of the interaction between an increasing homeostatic sleep drive and a circadian signal, which promotes waking during the day and sleep during the night. In the rat, it was shown that, under constant homeostatic sleep pressure, with similar levels of slow waves in the NREM sleep EEG at all time points of the circadian cycle, still a small circadian modulation of the duration of waking and NREM sleep episodes was observed. Under similar conditions, humans show a clear circadian modulation in REM sleep, whereas in the rat, a circadian modulation in REM sleep was not present. Therefore, in the rat, the sleep homeostatic modulation in phase with the circadian clock seems to amplify the relatively weak circadian changes in sleep induced by the circadian clock. Knowledge about the interaction between sleep and the circadian clock and the circadian modulation of sleep in other species than humans is important to better understand the underlying regulatory mechanisms.

  16. Molecular analysis of sourdough reveals Lactobacillus mindensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Matthias A; Müller, Martin R A; Vogel, Rudi F

    2003-01-01

    Genotypic fingerprinting to analyse the bacterial flora of an industrial sourdough revealed a coherent group of strains which could not be associated with a valid species. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that these strains formed a homogeneous cluster distinct from their closest relatives, Lactobacillus farciminis, Lactobacillus alimentarius and Lactobacillus kimchii. To characterize them further, physiological (sugar fermentation, formation of DL-lactate, hydrolysis of arginine, growth temperature, CO2 production) and chemotaxonomic properties have been determined. The DNA G +C content was 37.5 0.2 mol%. The peptidoglycan was of the lysine-D-iso-asparagine (L-Lys-D-Asp) type. The strains were homofermentative, Gram-positive, catalase-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile rods. They were found as a major stable component of a rye flour sourdough fermentation. Physiological, biochemical as well as genotypic data suggested them to be a new species of the genus Lactobacillus. This was confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization of genomic DNA, and the name Lactobacillus mindensis is proposed. The type strain of this species is DSM 14500T (=LMG 21508T).

  17. Casein kinase 1 proteomics reveal prohibitin 2 function in molecular clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna S Kategaya

    Full Text Available Throughout the day, clock proteins synchronize changes in animal physiology (e.g., wakefulness and appetite with external cues (e.g., daylight and food. In vertebrates, both casein kinase 1 delta and epsilon (CK1δ and CK1ε regulate these circadian changes by phosphorylating other core clock proteins. In addition, CK1 can regulate circadian-dependent transcription in a non-catalytic manner, however, the mechanism is unknown. Furthermore, the extent of functional redundancy between these closely related kinases is debated. To further advance knowledge about CK1δ and CK1ε mechanisms of action in the biological clock, we first carried out proteomic analysis of both kinases in human cells. Next, we tested interesting candidates in a cell-based circadian readout which resulted in the discovery of PROHIBITIN 2 (PHB2 as a modulator of period length. Decreasing the expression of PHB2 increases circadian-driven transcription, thus revealing PHB2 acts as an inhibitor in the molecular clock. While stable binding of PHB2 to either kinase was not detected, knocking down CK1ε expression increases PHB2 protein levels and, unexpectedly, knocking down CK1δ decreases PHB2 transcript levels. Thus, isolating CK1 protein complexes led to the identification of PHB2 as an inhibitor of circadian transcription. Furthermore, we show that CK1δ and CK1ε differentially regulate the expression of PHB2.

  18. Casein kinase 1 proteomics reveal prohibitin 2 function in molecular clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kategaya, Lorna S; Hilliard, Aisha; Zhang, Louying; Asara, John M; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the day, clock proteins synchronize changes in animal physiology (e.g., wakefulness and appetite) with external cues (e.g., daylight and food). In vertebrates, both casein kinase 1 delta and epsilon (CK1δ and CK1ε) regulate these circadian changes by phosphorylating other core clock proteins. In addition, CK1 can regulate circadian-dependent transcription in a non-catalytic manner, however, the mechanism is unknown. Furthermore, the extent of functional redundancy between these closely related kinases is debated. To further advance knowledge about CK1δ and CK1ε mechanisms of action in the biological clock, we first carried out proteomic analysis of both kinases in human cells. Next, we tested interesting candidates in a cell-based circadian readout which resulted in the discovery of PROHIBITIN 2 (PHB2) as a modulator of period length. Decreasing the expression of PHB2 increases circadian-driven transcription, thus revealing PHB2 acts as an inhibitor in the molecular clock. While stable binding of PHB2 to either kinase was not detected, knocking down CK1ε expression increases PHB2 protein levels and, unexpectedly, knocking down CK1δ decreases PHB2 transcript levels. Thus, isolating CK1 protein complexes led to the identification of PHB2 as an inhibitor of circadian transcription. Furthermore, we show that CK1δ and CK1ε differentially regulate the expression of PHB2.

  19. A survey of genomic studies supports association of circadian clock genes with bipolar disorder spectrum illnesses and lithium response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J McCarthy

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythm abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD have led to a search for genetic abnormalities in circadian "clock genes" associated with BD. However, no significant clock gene findings have emerged from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. At least three factors could account for this discrepancy: complex traits are polygenic, the organization of the clock is more complex than previously recognized, and/or genetic risk for BD may be shared across multiple illnesses. To investigate these issues, we considered the clock gene network at three levels: essential "core" clock genes, upstream circadian clock modulators, and downstream clock controlled genes. Using relaxed thresholds for GWAS statistical significance, we determined the rates of clock vs. control genetic associations with BD, and four additional illnesses that share clinical features and/or genetic risk with BD (major depression, schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity. Then we compared the results to a set of lithium-responsive genes. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were both enriched among core clock genes but not among upstream clock modulators. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were also enriched among pervasively rhythmic clock-controlled genes but not among genes that were less pervasively rhythmic or non-rhythmic. Our analysis reveals previously unrecognized associations between clock genes and BD-spectrum illnesses, partly reconciling previously discordant results from past GWAS and candidate gene studies.

  20. Experience-independent development of the hamster circadian visual system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    August Kampf-Lassin

    Full Text Available Experience-dependent functional plasticity is a hallmark of the primary visual system, but it is not known if analogous mechanisms govern development of the circadian visual system. Here we investigated molecular, anatomical, and behavioral consequences of complete monocular light deprivation during extended intervals of postnatal development in Syrian hamsters. Hamsters were raised in constant darkness and opaque contact lenses were applied shortly after eye opening and prior to the introduction of a light-dark cycle. In adulthood, previously-occluded eyes were challenged with visual stimuli. Whereas image-formation and motion-detection were markedly impaired by monocular occlusion, neither entrainment to a light-dark cycle, nor phase-resetting responses to shifts in the light-dark cycle were affected by prior monocular deprivation. Cholera toxin-b subunit fluorescent tract-tracing revealed that in monocularly-deprived hamsters the density of fibers projecting from the retina to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN was comparable regardless of whether such fibers originated from occluded or exposed eyes. In addition, long-term monocular deprivation did not attenuate light-induced c-Fos expression in the SCN. Thus, in contrast to the thalamocortical projections of the primary visual system, retinohypothalamic projections terminating in the SCN develop into normal adult patterns and mediate circadian responses to light largely independent of light experience during development. The data identify a categorical difference in the requirement for light input during postnatal development between circadian and non-circadian visual systems.

  1. Circadian regulation of metabolic homeostasis: causes and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGinnis GR

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Graham R McGinnis, Martin E Young Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Robust circadian rhythms in metabolic processes have been described in both humans and animal models, at the whole body, individual organ, and even cellular level. ­Classically, these time-of-day-dependent rhythms have been considered secondary to fluctuations in energy/nutrient supply/demand associated with feeding/fasting and wake/sleep cycles. Renewed interest in this field has been fueled by studies revealing that these rhythms are driven, at least in part, by intrinsic mechanisms and that disruption of metabolic synchrony invariably increases the risk of cardiometabolic disease. The objectives of this paper are to provide a comprehensive review regarding rhythms in glucose, lipid, and protein/amino acid metabolism, the relative influence of extrinsic (eg, neurohumoral factors versus intrinsic (eg, cell autonomous circadian clocks mediators, the physiologic roles of these rhythms in terms of daily fluctuations in nutrient availability and activity status, as well as the pathologic consequences of dyssynchrony. Keywords: circadian rhythm, circadian clocks, metabolic homeostasis, neurohumoral factors, dyssynchrony, time-of-day-dependent rhythms

  2. ADHD, circadian rhythms and seasonality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wynchank, Dora S.; Bijlenga, Denise; Lamers, Femke; Bron, Tannetje I.; Winthorst, Wim H.; Vogel, Suzan W.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Beekman, Aartjan T.; Kooij, J. Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated whether the association between Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) was mediated by the circadian rhythm. Method: Data of 2239 persons from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used. Two groups we

  3. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-12-07

    Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes activate transcription of period (per) and timeless (tim) genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls) or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans.

  4. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Agrawal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC complexes activate transcription of period (per and timeless (tim genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans.

  5. Effects of circadian clock genes and health-related behavior on metabolic syndrome in a Taiwanese population: Evidence from association and interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Liu, Yu-Li; Yang, Albert C.; Kao, Chung-Feng; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with the circadian clock genes. In this study, we assessed whether 29 circadian clock-related genes (including ADCYAP1, ARNTL, ARNTL2, BHLHE40, CLOCK, CRY1, CRY2, CSNK1D, CSNK1E, GSK3B, HCRTR2, KLF10, NFIL3, NPAS2, NR1D1, NR1D2, PER1, PER2, PER3, REV1, RORA, RORB, RORC, SENP3, SERPINE1, TIMELESS, TIPIN, VIP, and VIPR2) are associated with MetS and its individual components independently and/or through complex interactions in a Taiwanese population. We also analyzed the interactions between environmental factors and these genes in influencing MetS and its individual components. A total of 3,000 Taiwanese subjects from the Taiwan Biobank were assessed in this study. Metabolic traits such as waist circumference, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose were measured. Our data showed a nominal association of MetS with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five key circadian clock genes including ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB; but none of these SNPs persisted significantly after performing Bonferroni correction. Moreover, we identified the effect of GSK3B rs2199503 on high fasting glucose (P = 0.0002). Additionally, we found interactions among the ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, RORA rs8034880, and RORB rs972902 SNPs influenced MetS (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002). Finally, we investigated the influence of interactions between ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, and RORB rs972902 with environmental factors such as alcohol consumption, smoking status, and physical activity on MetS and its individual components (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002). Our study indicates that circadian clock genes such as ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB genes may contribute to the risk of MetS independently as well as through gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. PMID:28296937

  6. Isotope analysis reveals foraging area dichotomy for atlantic leatherback turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Caut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea has undergone a dramatic decline over the last 25 years, and this is believed to be primarily the result of mortality associated with fisheries bycatch followed by egg and nesting female harvest. Atlantic leatherback turtles undertake long migrations across ocean basins from subtropical and tropical nesting beaches to productive frontal areas. Migration between two nesting seasons can last 2 or 3 years, a time period termed the remigration interval (RI. Recent satellite transmitter data revealed that Atlantic leatherbacks follow two major dispersion patterns after nesting season, through the North Gulf Stream area or more eastward across the North Equatorial Current. However, information on the whole RI is lacking, precluding the accurate identification of feeding areas where conservation measures may need to be applied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using stable isotopes as dietary tracers we determined the characteristics of feeding grounds of leatherback females nesting in French Guiana. During migration, 3-year RI females differed from 2-year RI females in their isotope values, implying differences in their choice of feeding habitats (offshore vs. more coastal and foraging latitude (North Atlantic vs. West African coasts, respectively. Egg-yolk and blood isotope values are correlated in nesting females, indicating that egg analysis is a useful tool for assessing isotope values in these turtles, including adults when not available. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results complement previous data on turtle movements during the first year following the nesting season, integrating the diet consumed during the year before nesting. We suggest that the French Guiana leatherback population segregates into two distinct isotopic groupings, and highlight the urgent need to determine the feeding habitats of the turtle in the Atlantic in order to protect this species from incidental take by

  7. Quantitative flux analysis reveals folate-dependent NADPH production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Ye, Jiangbin; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Shlomi, Tomer; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-06-01

    ATP is the dominant energy source in animals for mechanical and electrical work (for example, muscle contraction or neuronal firing). For chemical work, there is an equally important role for NADPH, which powers redox defence and reductive biosynthesis. The most direct route to produce NADPH from glucose is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, with malic enzyme sometimes also important. Although the relative contribution of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to ATP production has been extensively analysed, similar analysis of NADPH metabolism has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the ability to directly track, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the passage of deuterium from labelled substrates into NADPH, and combine this approach with carbon labelling and mathematical modelling to measure NADPH fluxes. In proliferating cells, the largest contributor to cytosolic NADPH is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Surprisingly, a nearly comparable contribution comes from serine-driven one-carbon metabolism, in which oxidation of methylene tetrahydrofolate to 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate is coupled to reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. Moreover, tracing of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism revealed complete oxidation of 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate to make NADPH. As folate metabolism has not previously been considered an NADPH producer, confirmation of its functional significance was undertaken through knockdown of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) genes. Depletion of either the cytosolic or mitochondrial MTHFD isozyme resulted in decreased cellular NADPH/NADP+ and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) and increased cell sensitivity to oxidative stress. Thus, although the importance of folate metabolism for proliferating cells has been long recognized and attributed to its function of producing one-carbon units for nucleic acid synthesis, another crucial function of this pathway is generating reducing power.

  8. Emergence of noise-induced oscillations in the central circadian pacemaker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline H Ko

    Full Text Available Bmal1 is an essential transcriptional activator within the mammalian circadian clock. We report here that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of Bmal1-null mutant mice, unexpectedly, generates stochastic oscillations with periods that overlap the circadian range. Dissociated SCN neurons expressed fluctuating levels of PER2 detected by bioluminescence imaging but could not generate circadian oscillations intrinsically. Inhibition of intercellular communication or cyclic-AMP signaling in SCN slices, which provide a positive feed-forward signal to drive the intracellular negative feedback loop, abolished the stochastic oscillations. Propagation of this feed-forward signal between SCN neurons then promotes quasi-circadian oscillations that arise as an emergent property of the SCN network. Experimental analysis and mathematical modeling argue that both intercellular coupling and molecular noise are required for the stochastic rhythms, providing a novel biological example of noise-induced oscillations. The emergence of stochastic circadian oscillations from the SCN network in the absence of cell-autonomous circadian oscillatory function highlights a previously unrecognized level of circadian organization.

  9. Heterogeneity of cellular circadian clocks in intact plants and its correction under light-dark cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in single-cell analysis have revealed the stochasticity and nongenetic heterogeneity inherent to cellular processes. However, our knowledge of the actual cellular behaviors in a living multicellular organism is still limited. By using a single-cell bioluminescence imaging technique on duckweed, Lemna gibba, we demonstrate that, under constant conditions, cells in the intact plant work as individual circadian clocks that oscillate with their own frequencies and respond independently to external stimuli. Quantitative analysis uncovered the heterogeneity and instability of cellular clocks and partial synchronization between neighboring cells. Furthermore, we found that cellular clocks in the plant body under light-dark cycles showed a centrifugal phase pattern in which the effect of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in period lengths was almost masked. The inherent heterogeneity in the properties of cellular clocks observed under constant conditions is corrected under light-dark cycles to coordinate the daily rhythms of the plant body. These findings provide a novel perspective of spatiotemporal architectures in the plant circadian system.

  10. Circadian profile of cardiac autonomic nervous modulation in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Richardt, Gert; Potratz, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    , awoke around 7 A.M., and had 6 to 8 hours of sleep. Circadian profiles of vagus-associated HRV parameters revealed a marked day-night pattern, with a peak at nighttime and a plateau at daytime. The characteristic nocturnal peak and the day-night amplitude diminished with aging by decade. Estimates...... for vagus-associated parameters (root mean square successive difference [rMSSD], P

  11. Loss of circadian clock gene expression is associated with tumor progression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas, Cristina; van de Sandt, Leonie; Edlund, Karolina; Lohr, Miriam; Hellwig, Birte; Marchan, Rosemarie; Schmidt, Marcus; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Oster, Henrik; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-01-01

    Several studies suggest a link between circadian rhythm disturbances and tumorigenesis. However, the association between circadian clock genes and prognosis in breast cancer has not been systematically studied. Therefore, we examined the expression of 17 clock components in tumors from 766 node-negative breast cancer patients that were untreated in both neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. In addition, their association with metastasis-free survival (MFS) and correlation to clinicopathological parameters were investigated. Aiming to estimate functionality of the clockwork, we studied clock gene expression relationships by correlation analysis. Higher expression of several clock genes (e.g., CLOCK, PER1, PER2, PER3, CRY2, NPAS2 and RORC) was found to be associated with longer MFS in univariate Cox regression analyses (HR<1 and FDR-adjusted P < 0.05). Stratification according to molecular subtype revealed prognostic relevance for PER1, PER3, CRY2 and NFIL3 in the ER+/HER2- subgroup, CLOCK and NPAS2 in the ER-/HER2- subtype, and ARNTL2 in HER2+ breast cancer. In the multivariate Cox model, only PER3 (HR = 0.66; P = 0.016) and RORC (HR = 0.42; P = 0.003) were found to be associated with survival outcome independent of established clinicopathological parameters. Pairwise correlations between functionally-related clock genes (e.g., PER2-PER3 and CRY2-PER3) were stronger in ER+, HER2- and low-grade carcinomas; whereas, weaker correlation coefficients were observed in ER- and HER2+ tumors, high-grade tumors and tumors that progressed to metastatic disease. In conclusion, loss of clock genes is associated with worse prognosis in breast cancer. Coordinated co-expression of clock genes, indicative of a functional circadian clock, is maintained in ER+, HER2-, low grade and non-metastasizing tumors but is compromised in more aggressive carcinomas.

  12. Mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 modulates photic entrainment of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ruifeng; Butcher, Greg Q; Karelina, Kate; Arthur, J Simon; Obrietan, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The master circadian clock in mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is under the entraining influence of the external light cycle. At a mechanistic level, intracellular signaling via the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway appears to play a central role in light-evoked clock entrainment; however, the precise downstream mechanisms by which this pathway influences clock timing are not known. Within this context, we have previously reported that light stimulates activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase effector mitogen-stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) in the SCN. In this study, we utilised MSK1(-/-) mice to further investigate the potential role of MSK1 in circadian clock timing and entrainment. Locomotor activity analysis revealed that MSK1 null mice entrained to a 12 h light/dark cycle and exhibited circadian free-running rhythms in constant darkness. Interestingly, the free-running period in MSK1 null mice was significantly longer than in wild-type control animals, and MSK1 null mice exhibited a significantly greater variance in activity onset. Further, MSK1 null mice exhibited a significant reduction in the phase-delaying response to an early night light pulse (100 lux, 15 min), and, using an 8 h phase-advancing 'jet-lag' experimental paradigm, MSK1 knockout animals exhibited a significantly delayed rate of re-entrainment. At the molecular level, early night light-evoked cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, histone phosphorylation and Period1 gene expression were markedly attenuated in MSK1(-/-) animals relative to wild-type mice. Together, these data provide key new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which MSK1 affects the SCN clock.

  13. Effect of melatonin on endogenous circadian rhythm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Feng; WANG Min; ZANG Ling-he

    2008-01-01

    Objective To further authenticate the role of melatonin on endogenous biologic clock system. Methods Pinealectomized mice were used in the experiments, a series of circadian rhythm of physiology index, such as glucocorticoid, amino acid neurotransmitter, immune function, sensitivity of algesia and body temperature were measured. Results Effects of melatonin on endogenous circadian rhythm roughly appeared four forms: 1) The model of inherent rhythm was invariant, but midvalue was removed. 2) Pacing function: pinealectomy and melatonin administration changed amplitude of the circadian vibration of aspartate, peripheral blood WBC and serum hemolysin. 3) Phase of rhythm changed, such as the effects on percentage of lymphocyte and sensitivity of algesia. 4) No effect, the circadian rhythm of body temperature belong to this form Conclusions Melatonin has effects some circadian rhythm, and it can adjust endogenous inherent rhythm and make the rhythm keep step with environmental cycle. Melatonin may be a kind of Zeitgeber, Pineal gland might being a rhythm bearing organ to some circadian rhythm.

  14. Circadian secretion patterns of ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. de Wet

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin are neuropeptides with potent opioid activity. In a study to investigate the circadian secretion patterns of the above-mentioned, blood samples were collected hourly from 12 healthy males who were subjected to the experiment for 24 hours. Radioimmunoassays were used in the analysis of plasma samples for ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin. Peak concentrations of ß-endorphin were demonstrated from 08:00-09:00, while peak concentrations of leucine enkephalin occured from 23:00-07:00. Trough concentrations of ß-endorphin occurred from 24:00-05:00, while trough con­centrations of leucine enkephalin were demonstrated from 09:00-12:00. The illustrated circadian secretion pattern for ß-endorphin simulates the well-known circadian rhythm of cortisol. The answer to this may be in the fact that ß-endorphin and corticotropin stem from the same precursor. The illustrated circadian secretion pattern for leucine enkephalin simulates that of melatonin. The reason for this is unclear.

  15. Hepatitis B virus X protein disrupts the balance of the expression of circadian rhythm genes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Li; Yu, Chao; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Liu, Li-Ping; Fang, Xiefan; Wu, Chao

    2014-12-01

    The human circadian rhythm is controlled by at least eight circadian clock genes and disruption of the circadian rhythm is associated with cancer development. The present study aims to elucidate the association between the expression of circadian clock genes and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and also to reveal whether the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) is the major regulator that contributes to the disturbance of circadian clock gene expression. The mRNA levels of circadian clock genes in 30 HCC and the paired peritumoral tissues were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). A stable HBx-expressing cell line, Bel-7404-HBx, was established through transfection of HBx plasmids. The mRNA level of circadian clock genes was also detected by RT-qPCR in these cells. Compared with the paired peritumoral tissues, the mRNA levels of the Per1, Per2, Per3 and Cry2 genes in HCC tissue were significantly lower (P0.05). Compared with Bel-7404 cells, the mRNA levels of the CLOCK, Per1 and Per2 genes in Bel-7404-HBx cells were significantly increased, while the mRNA levels of the BMAL1, Per3, Cry1, Cry2 and CKIɛ genes were decreased (Pgenes is common in HCC. HBx disrupts the expression of circadian clock genes and may, therefore, induce the development of HCC.

  16. Assembly of a comprehensive regulatory network for the mammalian circadian clock: a bioinformatics approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lehmann

    Full Text Available By regulating the timing of cellular processes, the circadian clock provides a way to adapt physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. In mammals, a light-entrainable master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN controls peripheral clocks that are present in virtually every body cell. Defective circadian timing is associated with several pathologies such as cancer and metabolic and sleep disorders. To better understand the circadian regulation of cellular processes, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline encompassing the analysis of high-throughput data sets and the exploitation of published knowledge by text-mining. We identified 118 novel potential clock-regulated genes and integrated them into an existing high-quality circadian network, generating the to-date most comprehensive network of circadian regulated genes (NCRG. To validate particular elements in our network, we assessed publicly available ChIP-seq data for BMAL1, REV-ERBα/β and RORα/γ proteins and found strong evidence for circadian regulation of Elavl1, Nme1, Dhx6, Med1 and Rbbp7 all of which are involved in the regulation of tumourigenesis. Furthermore, we identified Ncl and Ddx6, as targets of RORγ and REV-ERBα, β, respectively. Most interestingly, these genes were also reported to be involved in miRNA regulation; in particular, NCL regulates several miRNAs, all involved in cancer aggressiveness. Thus, NCL represents a novel potential link via which the circadian clock, and specifically RORγ, regulates the expression of miRNAs, with particular consequences in breast cancer progression. Our findings bring us one step forward towards a mechanistic understanding of mammalian circadian regulation, and provide further evidence of the influence of circadian deregulation in cancer.

  17. Circadian regulators of intestinal lipid absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, M. Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Among all the metabolites present in the plasma, lipids, mainly triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol, show extensive circadian rhythms. These lipids are transported in the plasma as part of lipoproteins. Lipoproteins are synthesized primarily in the liver and intestine and their production exhibits circadian rhythmicity. Studies have shown that various proteins involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein biosynthesis show circadian expression. Further, intestinal epithelial cells express circa...

  18. Circadian- and Light-Dependent Regulation of Resting Membrane Potential and Spontaneous Action Potential Firing of Drosophila Circadian Pacemaker Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeba, Vasu; Gu, Huaiyu; Sharma, Vijay K.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Holmes, Todd C

    2007-01-01

    The ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) of adult Drosophila brain express oscillating clock proteins and regulate circadian behavior. Whole cell current-clamp recordings of large LNvs in freshly dissected Drosophila whole brain preparations reveal two spontaneous activity patterns that correlate with two underlying patterns of oscillating membrane potential: tonic and burst firing of sodium-dependent action potentials. Resting membrane potential and spontaneous action potential firing are rapidly ...

  19. Folate deprivation modulates the expression of autophagy- and circadian-related genes in HT-22 hippocampal neuron cells through GR-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinwei; Yang, Yang; Li, Xi; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Zhang, Nana; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-08-01

    Folic acid (FA) is an extremely important nutrient for brain formation and development. FA deficiency is highly linked to brain degeneration and age-related diseases, which are also associated with autophagic activities and circadian rhythm in hippocampal neurons. However, little is known how autophagy- and circadian-related genes in hippocampal neurons are regulated under FA deficiency. Here, hippocampal neuroncells (HT-22) were employed to determine the effect of FA deprivation (FD) on the expression of relevant genes and to reveal the potential role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR). FD increased autophagic activities in HT-22 cells, associated with significantly (PGR activation indicated by higher ratio of GR phosphorylation. Out of 17 autophagy-related genes determined, 8 was significantly (PGR binding to the promoter sequence of ATG3 and Per2. Moreover, MeDIP analysis demonstrated significant (PGR-mediated pathway. Our results provide a basis for future investigations into the intracellular regulatory network in response to folate deficiency.

  20. Circadian clocks are designed optimally

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival by synchronizing to the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. Since both properties have been tuned through natural selection, their adaptation can be formalized in the framework of mathematical optimization. By using a succinct model, we found that simultaneous optimization of regularity and entrainability entails inherent features of the circadian mechanism irrespective of model details. At the behavioral level we discovered the existence of a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. At the molecular level we demonstrate the role-sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. We also reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments and predict molecular elements responsible for the clockwork...

  1. Circadian activity rhythms for mothers with an infant in ICU

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    Shih-Yu eLee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms influence sleep and wakefulness. Circadian activity rhythms (CAR are altered in individuals with dementia or seasonal affective disorder. To date, studies exploring CAR and sleep in postpartum women are rare. The purpose of this report is to describe relationships between CAR, sleep disturbance, and fatigue among 72 first-time mothers during their 2nd week postpartum while their newborn remain hospitalized in intensive care unit (ICU. Seventy two mothers were included in this secondary data analysis sample from three separate studies. Participants completed the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS, Numerical Rating Scale for Fatigue (NRS-F, and a sleep diary. The objective sleep data included total sleep time (TST, wake after sleep onset (WASO, and CAR determined by the circadian quotient (amplitude/mesor averaged from at least 48-hours of wrist actigraphy monitoring. The TST of mothers who self-reported as poor sleepers was 354 minutes (SEM= 21.9, with a mean WASO of 19.5% (SEM= 2.8. The overall sleep quality measured by the GSDS was clinically, significantly disrupted (M= 5.5, SD= 1.2. The mean score for morning fatigue was 5.8 (SD= 2.0, indicating moderate fatigue severity. The CAR was .62 (SEM= .04, indicating poor synchronization. The self-reported good sleepers (GSDS < 3 had better CAR (M= .71, SEM= .02 than poor sleepers (GSDS > 3 (t [70] = 2.0, p< .05. A higher circadian equation was associated with higher TST (r= .83, p<.001, less WASO (r= -.50, p< .001, lower self-reported sleep disturbance scores (r= -.35, p= .01, and less morning fatigue (r= -.26. Findings indicate that mothers with a hospitalized infant have both nocturnal sleep problems and disturbed circadian activity rhythms. Factors responsible for these sleep and rhythm disturbances, the adverse effects on mother’s physical and mental well-being, and mother-infant relationship require further study.

  2. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock.

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    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Intracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we established a pivotal role for casein kinase (CK-2-mediated circadian BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation (BMAL1-P in regulating central and peripheral core clocks. Subsequent analysis of the underlying mechanism showed a novel role of CRY as a repressor for protein kinase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions revealed that CRY-mediated periodic binding of CK2β to BMAL1 inhibits BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation by CK2α. The FAD binding domain of CRY1, two C-terminal BMAL1 domains, and particularly BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation/deacetylation by CLOCK/SIRT1, were shown to be critical for CRY-mediated BMAL1-CK2β binding. Reciprocally, BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation is prerequisite for BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation. We propose a dual negative-feedback model in which a CRY-dependent CK2-driven posttranslational BMAL1-P-BMAL1 loop is an integral part of the core clock oscillator.

  3. A Study of Circadian Rhythm and Meteorological Factors Influencing Acute Myocardial Infarction

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M; Mody, S M S

    1998-01-01

    The circadian rhythm in the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was assessed in three hundred and twenty three patients admitted with AMI during the two-year period June 1992 to May 1994. The influence of the following meteorological, solar-geophysical and cosmic parameters in the causation of an infarct was also considered : (1) surface pressure (2) maximum temperature (3) minimum temperature (4) relative humidity (5) cosmic ray index (6) geomagnetic aa index (7) solar flares and (8) sunspot number. A well pronounced diurnal variability in AMI with a peak in the morning hours (6-12 a.m.) was seen. Further analysis of the data by considering one-hour periods revealed the presence of a smaller evening (10 p.m.) increase in incidence, i.e., the existence of a bimodal circadian rhythm. The simultaneous occurrence of the well documented semi-diurnal rhythm in surface pressure and incidence of acute myocardial infarction were evident. This may be one of the factors involved in the causation of the smal...

  4. [Sleep and the circadian rhythm of cortisol in transsexuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puca, F M; Specchio, L M; Minervini, M G; Zaccaro, F; Todarello, O; Dello Russo, G; Giorgino, R; Abbaticchio, G; Lattanzi, V

    1983-09-30

    Polygraphic recordings of nocturnal sleep and hormonal behavior were studied in three male and two female transexual subjects, aged 17 to 26 years, who had required a surgical sex reassignment. The transexual state was assayed by psychological investigations according to the law. All subjects appeared healthy at physical examination and no abnormalities were revealed by basal laboratory data. Chromosomal picture was in accordance with sexual characteristics. Pituitary sella enlargements were excluded by radiographic examination. In each patient two adjustment days were followed by polygraphic recording (EEG,EOG,EMG of chin muscles) of nocturnal sleep and blood drawing for cortisol assay. Blood samples were drawn at 30 minutes intervals for 24 hours, starting from the bedding-time. Hormonal blood concentration were determined by radioimmunoassay. Cosinor method was employed in the analysis of circadian rhythm. In transexual subjects the percentage of sleep intermediate phase, or ambiguous sleep, with reference to total sleep time, was significantly higher than in matched controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  6. Lysosomotropic REV-ERB antagonism: A metabolic connection between circadian rhythm and autophagy may tell cancer cells "it's time to die".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    The discovery that inhibition of a circadian regulator enhances autophagy-dependent cancer cell death reveals potential avenues for the development of new multifunctional anticancer agents. Further studies may elucidate novel crosstalk between circadian rhythm, metabolism, and autophagy that determines cancer cell viability.

  7. Sensitivity Measures for Oscillating Systems: Application to Mammalian Circadian Gene Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie R; Gunawan, Rudiyanto; Petzold, Linda R; Doyle, Francis J

    2008-01-01

    Vital physiological behaviors exhibited daily by bacteria, plants, and animals are governed by endogenous oscillators called circadian clocks. The most salient feature of the circadian clock is its ability to change its internal time (phase) to match that of the external environment. The circadian clock, like many oscillators in nature, is regulated at the cellular level by a complex network of interacting components. As a complementary approach to traditional biological investigation, we utilize mathematical models and systems theoretic tools to elucidate these mechanisms. The models are systems of ordinary differential equations exhibiting stable limit cycle behavior. To study the robustness of circadian phase behavior, we use sensitivity analysis. As the standard set of sensitivity tools are not suitable for the study of phase behavior, we introduce a novel tool, the parametric impulse phase response curve (pIPRC).

  8. Circadian regulation of cell cycle: Molecular connections between aging and the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khapre, Rohini V; Samsa, William E; Kondratov, Roman V

    2010-09-01

    The circadian clock generates oscillations in physiology and behavior, known as circadian rhythms. Links between the circadian clock genes Periods, Bmal1, and Cryptochromes and aging and cancer are emerging. Circadian clock gene expression is changed in human pathologies, and transgenic mice with mutations in clock genes develop cancer and premature aging. Control of genome integrity and cell proliferation play key roles in the development of age-associated pathologies and carcinogenesis. Here, we review recent data on the connection between the circadian clock and control of the cell cycle. The circadian clock regulates the activity and expression of several critical cell cycle and cell cycle check-point-related proteins, and in turn cell cycle-associated proteins regulate circadian clock proteins. DNA damage can reset the circadian clock, which provides a molecular mechanism for reciprocal regulation between the circadian clock and the cell cycle. This circadian clock-dependent control of cell proliferation, together with other known physiological functions of the circadian clock such as the control of metabolism, oxidative and genotoxic stress response, and DNA repair, opens new horizons for understanding the mechanisms behind aging and carcinogenesis.

  9. Circadian Oscillations within the Hippocampus Support Hippocampus-dependent Memory Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Lynn Eckel-Mahan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to sustain memories over long periods of time, sometimes even a lifetime, is one of the most remarkable properties of the brain. Much knowledge has been gained over the past few decades regarding the molecular correlates of memory formation. Once a memory is forged, however, the molecular events that provide permanence are as of yet unclear. Studies in multiple organisms have revealed that circadian rhythmicity is important for the formation, stability, and recall of memories [1]. The neuronal events that provide this link need to be explored further. This article will discuss the findings related to the circadian regulation of memory-dependent processes in the hippocampus. Specifically, the circadian-controlled MAP kinase and cAMP signal transduction pathway plays critical roles in the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. A series of studies have revealed the circadian oscillation of this pathway within the hippocampus, an activity that is absent in memory-deficient, transgenic mice lacking Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclases. Interference with these oscillations proceeding the cellular memory consolidation period impairs the persistence of hippocampus-dependent memory. These data suggest that the persistence of long-term memories may depend upon reactivation of this signal transduction pathway in the hippocampus during the circadian cycle. New data reveals the dependence of hippocampal oscillation in MAPK activity on the SCN, again underscoring the importance of this region in maintaining the circadian physiology of memory. Finally, the downstream ramification of these oscillations in terms of gene expression and epigenetics should be considered, as emerging evidence is pointing strongly to a circadian link between epigenetics and long term synaptic plasticity.

  10. Photoperiodic diapause under the control of circadian clock genes in an insect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeno Tomoko

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most organisms have evolved a circadian clock in order to anticipate daily environmental changes and many of these organisms are also capable of sophisticated measurement of daylength (photoperiodism that is used to regulate seasonal events such as diapause, migration and polymorphism. It has been generally accepted that the same elements are involved in both circadian (daily and seasonal (annual rhythms because both rely upon daily light-dark cycles. However, as reasonable as this sounds, there remains no conclusive evidence of such a molecular machinery in insects. We have approached this issue by using RNA interference (RNAi in Riptortus pedestris. Results The cuticle deposition rhythm exhibited the major properties of circadian rhythms, indicating that the rhythm is regulated by a circadian clock. RNAi directed against the circadian clock genes of period and cycle, which are negative and positive regulators in the circadian clock, respectively, disrupted the cuticle deposition rhythm and distinct cuticle layers were produced by these RNAi. Simultaneously, period RNAi caused the insect to avert diapause under a diapause-inducing photoperiod whereas cycle RNAi induced diapause under a diapause-averting photoperiod. The expression patterns of juvenile hormone-regulated genes and the application of juvenile hormone analogue suggested that neither ovarian development itself nor a downstream cascade of juvenile hormone secretion, were disturbed by period and cycle RNAi. Conclusions This study revealed that the circadian clock genes are crucial not only for daily rhythms but also for photoperiodic diapause. RNAi directed against period and cycle had opposite effects not only in the circadian cuticle deposition rhythm but also in the photoperiodic diapause. These RNAi also had opposite effects on juvenile hormone-regulated gene expression. It is still possible that the circadian clock genes pleiotropically affect ovarian

  11. A circadian clock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelderink-Chen, Zheng; Mazzotta, Gabriella; Sturre, Marcel; Bosman, Jasper; Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Circadian timing is a fundamental biological process, underlying cellular physiology in animals, plants, fungi, and cyanobacteria. Circadian clocks organize gene expression, metabolism, and behavior such that they occur at specific times of day. The biological clocks that orchestrate these daily cha

  12. Circadian dysfunction induces leptin resistance in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt over...

  13. Circadian variation in the pharmacokinetics of verapamil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, C M; Frederiksen, M; Hansen, J F;

    1989-01-01

    Circadian variation in the metabolism of verapamil was investigated in 10 patients with stable angina pectoris during treatment with sustained-release verapamil 360 mg at 08.00 h or 22.0 h. No major difference in exercise parameters was found. During the evening dosage schedule a significantly gr...... or to circadian variation in hepatic microsomal metabolism....

  14. Development of cortisol circadian rhythm in infancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerth, C. de; Zijl, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Cortisol is the final product of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. It is secreted in a pulsatile fashion that displays a circadian rhythm. Infants are born without a circadian rhythm in cortisol and they acquire it during their first year of life. Studies do not agr

  15. Circadian clocks: Omnes viae Romam ducunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenneberg, T; Merrow, M

    2000-10-19

    The circadian clock in all organisms is so intimately linked to light reception that it appears as if evolution has simply wired a timer into the mechanism that processes photic information. Several recent studies have provided new insights into the role of light input pathways in the circadian system of Arabidopsis.

  16. Using circadian entrainment to find cryptic clocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelderink-Chen, Zheng; Olmedo, Maria; Bosman, Jasper; Merrow, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Three properties are most often attributed to the circadian clock: a ca. 24-h free-running rhythm, temperature compensation of the circadian rhythm, and its entrainment to zeitgeber cycles. Relatively few experiments, however, are performed under entrainment conditions. Rather, most chronobiology pr

  17. Changes in cod muscle proteins during frozen storage revealed by proteome analysis and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgård, Inger Vibeke Holst; Nørrelykke, M.R.; Jessen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    Multivariate data analysis has been combined with proteomics to enhance the recovery of information from 2-DE of cod muscle proteins during different storage conditions. Proteins were extracted according to 11 different storage conditions and samples were resolved by 2-DE. Data generated by 2-DE...... was subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares regression (DPLSR). Applying PCA to 2-DE data revealed the samples to form groups according to frozen storage time, whereas differences due to different storage temperatures or chilled storage in modified atmosphere...... packing did not lead to distinct changes in protein pattern. Applying DPLSR to the 2-DE data enabled the selection of protein spots critical for differentiation between 3 and 6months frozen storage with 12months frozen storage. Some of these protein spots have been identified by MS/MS, revealing myosin...

  18. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-01-01

    and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes......The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators...... residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice...

  19. Neurobiology of the circadian system: meeting metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza, Jorge

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic principles of physiology postulated the necessity of the constancy of the internal environment to maintain a physiological equilibrium and do not front serious consequences in health. Now we know that physiology is rhythmic and that a break of this rhythmicity can generate serious consequences in health which even could be lethal. Circadian clocks, headed by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the central nervous system, are the responsible for the generation of circadian rhythms. These clocks are affected by external signals as light (day-night cycles and feeding. This review examines the basic principles of the circadian system and the current knowledge in the neurobiology of biological clocks, making emphasis in the relationship between the circadian system, feeding behaviour, nutrition and metabolism, and the consequences that occur when these systems are not coordinated each other, as the development of metabolic and circadian pathologies.

  20. The circadian clock coordinates ribosome biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Jouffe

    Full Text Available Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis.

  1. BAHAMAS: new SNIa analysis reveals inconsistencies with standard cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Shariff, H; Trotta, R; van Dyk, D A

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained by applying our BAyesian HierArchical Modeling for the Analysis of Supernova cosmology (BAHAMAS) software package to the 740 spectroscopically confirmed supernovae type Ia (SNIa) from the "Joint Light-curve Analysis" (JLA) dataset. We simultaneously determine cosmological parameters and standardization parameters, including host galaxy mass corrections, residual scatter and object-by-object intrinsic magnitudes. Combining JLA and Planck Cosmic Microwave Background data, we find significant discrepancies in cosmological parameter constraints with respect to the standard analysis: we find Omega_M = 0.399+/-0.027, 2.8\\sigma\\ higher than previously reported and w = -0.910+/-0.045, 1.6\\sigma\\ higher than the standard analysis. We determine the residual scatter to be sigma_res = 0.104+/-0.005. We confirm (at the 95% probability level) the existence of two sub-populations segregated by host galaxy mass, separated at log_{10}(M/M_solar) = 10, differing in mean intrinsic magnitude by 0.055+...

  2. The Effect of Cataract Surgery on Circadian Photoentrainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Adam Elias; Sander, Birgit; Haargaard, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    -illumination pupil response (PIPR) to blue light from 10 to 30 seconds after light exposure as a surrogate measure. Secondary outcomes were circadian rhythm analysis using actigraphy and 24-hour salivary melatonin measurements. Finally, objective and subjective sleep quality were determined by actigraphy...... and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. RESULTS: The blue light PIPR increased 2 days (17%) and 3 weeks (24%) after surgery (P

  3. Circadian rhythms synchronize mitosis in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Christian I; Zámborszky, Judit; Baek, Mokryun; Labiscsak, Laszlo; Ju, Kyungsu; Lee, Hyeyeong; Larrondo, Luis F; Goity, Alejandra; Chong, Hin Siong; Belden, William J; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2014-01-28

    The cell cycle and the circadian clock communicate with each other, resulting in circadian-gated cell division cycles. Alterations in this network may lead to diseases such as cancer. Therefore, it is critical to identify molecular components that connect these two oscillators. However, molecular mechanisms between the clock and the cell cycle remain largely unknown. A model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, is a multinucleate system used to elucidate molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms, but not used to investigate the molecular coupling between these two oscillators. In this report, we show that a conserved coupling between the circadian clock and the cell cycle exists via serine/threonine protein kinase-29 (STK-29), the Neurospora homolog of mammalian WEE1 kinase. Based on this finding, we established a mathematical model that predicts circadian oscillations of cell cycle components and circadian clock-dependent synchronized nuclear divisions. We experimentally demonstrate that G1 and G2 cyclins, CLN-1 and CLB-1, respectively, oscillate in a circadian manner with bioluminescence reporters. The oscillations of clb-1 and stk-29 gene expression are abolished in a circadian arrhythmic frq(ko) mutant. Additionally, we show the light-induced phase shifts of a core circadian component, frq, as well as the gene expression of the cell cycle components clb-1 and stk-29, which may alter the timing of divisions. We then used a histone hH1-GFP reporter to observe nuclear divisions over time, and show that a large number of nuclear divisions occur in the evening. Our findings demonstrate the circadian clock-dependent molecular dynamics of cell cycle components that result in synchronized nuclear divisions in Neurospora.

  4. Penicillium simile sp. nov. revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davolos, Domenico; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; Persiani, Anna Maria; Maggi, Oriana

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of three phenetically identical Penicillium isolates, collected from the bioaerosol in a restoration laboratory in Italy, displayed macro- and microscopic characteristics that were similar though not completely ascribable to Penicillium raistrickii. For this reason, a phylogenetic approach based on DNA sequencing analysis was performed to establish both the taxonomic status and the evolutionary relationships of these three peculiar isolates in relation to previously described species of the genus Penicillium. We used four nuclear loci (both rRNA and protein coding genes) that have previously proved useful for the molecular investigation of taxa belonging to the genus Penicillium at various evolutionary levels. The internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2), domains D1 and D2 of the 28S rDNA, a region of the tubulin beta chain gene (benA) and part of the calmodulin gene (cmd) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Analysis of the rRNA genes and of the benA and cmd sequence data indicates the presence of three isogenic isolates belonging to a genetically distinct species of the genus Penicillium, here described and named Penicillium simile sp. nov. (ATCC MYA-4591(T)  = CBS 129191(T)). This novel species is phylogenetically different from P. raistrickii and other related species of the genus Penicillium (e.g. Penicillium scabrosum), from which it can be distinguished on the basis of morphological trait analysis.

  5. Subfield profitability analysis reveals an economic case for cropland diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, E.; McNunn, G. S.; Schulte, L. A.; Bonner, I. J.; Muth, D. J.; Babcock, B. A.; Sharma, B.; Heaton, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Public agencies and private enterprises increasingly desire to achieve ecosystem service outcomes in agricultural systems, but are limited by perceived conflicts between economic and ecosystem service goals and a lack of tools enabling effective operational management. Here we use Iowa—an agriculturally homogeneous state representative of the Maize Belt—to demonstrate an economic rationale for cropland diversification at the subfield scale. We used a novel computational framework that integrates disparate but publicly available data to map ˜3.3 million unique potential management polygons (9.3 Mha) and reveal subfield opportunities to increase overall field profitability. We analyzed subfield profitability for maize/soybean fields during 2010-2013—four of the most profitable years in recent history—and projected results for 2015. While cropland operating at a loss of US 250 ha-1 or more was negligible between 2010 and 2013 at 18 000-190 000 ha (profitable areas, incorporating conservation management that breaks even (e.g., planting low-input perennials), into low-yielding portions of fields could increase overall cropland profitability by 80%. This approach is applicable to the broader region and differs substantially from the status quo of ‘top-down’ land management for conservation by harnessing private interest to align profitability with the production of ecosystem services.

  6. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Ecological Differentiation in the Genus Carnobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Christelle F.; Borges, Frédéric; Taminiau, Bernard; Daube, Georges; Zagorec, Monique; Remenant, Benoît; Leisner, Jørgen J.; Hansen, Martin A.; Sørensen, Søren J.; Mangavel, Cécile; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) differ in their ability to colonize food and animal-associated habitats: while some species are specialized and colonize a limited number of habitats, other are generalist and are able to colonize multiple animal-linked habitats. In the current study, Carnobacterium was used as a model genus to elucidate the genetic basis of these colonization differences. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene meta-barcoding data showed that C. maltaromaticum followed by C. divergens are the most prevalent species in foods derived from animals (meat, fish, dairy products), and in the gut. According to phylogenetic analyses, these two animal-adapted species belong to one of two deeply branched lineages. The second lineage contains species isolated from habitats where contact with animal is rare. Genome analyses revealed that members of the animal-adapted lineage harbor a larger secretome than members of the other lineage. The predicted cell-surface proteome is highly diversified in C. maltaromaticum and C. divergens with genes involved in adaptation to the animal milieu such as those encoding biopolymer hydrolytic enzymes, a heme uptake system, and biopolymer-binding adhesins. These species also exhibit genes for gut adaptation and respiration. In contrast, Carnobacterium species belonging to the second lineage encode a poorly diversified cell-surface proteome, lack genes for gut adaptation and are unable to respire. These results shed light on the important genomics traits required for adaptation to animal-linked habitats in generalist Carnobacterium. PMID:28337181

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes

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    Qingzhu Hua

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis”, “tyrosine metabolism”, “flavonoid biosynthesis”, “ascorbate and aldarate metabolism”, “betalains biosynthesis” and “anthocyanin biosynthesis”. In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level.

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Qingzhu; Zhou, Qianjun; Gan, Susheng; Wu, Jingyu; Chen, Canbin; Li, Jiaqiang; Ye, Yaoxiong; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis”, “tyrosine metabolism”, “flavonoid biosynthesis”, “ascorbate and aldarate metabolism”, “betalains biosynthesis” and “anthocyanin biosynthesis”. In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level. PMID:27690004

  9. Chronobiology at the cellular and molecular levels: models and mechanisms for circadian timekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, L N

    1983-12-01

    This review considers cellular chronobiology and examines, at least in a superficial way, several classes of models and mechanisms that have been proposed for circadian rhythmicity and some of the experimental approaches that have appeared to be most productive. After a brief discussion of temporal organization and the metabolic, epigenetic, and circadian time domains, the general properties of circadian rhythms are enumerated. A survey of independent oscillations in isolated organs, tissues, and cells is followed by a review of selected circadian rhythms in eukaryotic microorganisms, with particular emphasis placed on the rhythm of cell division in the algal flagellate Euglena as a model system illustrating temporal differentiation. In the ensuing section, experimental approaches to circadian clock mechanisms are considered. The dissection of the clock by the use of chemical inhibitors is illustrated for the rhythm of bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax and for the rhythm of photosynthetic capacity in the unicellular green alga Acetabularia. Alternatively, genetic analysis of circadian oscillators is considered in the green alga Chlamydomonas and in the bread mold Neurospora, both of which have yielded clock mutants and mutants having biochemical lesions that exhibit altered clock properties. On the basis of the evidence generated by these experimental approaches, several classes of biochemical and molecular models for circadian clocks have been proposed. These include strictly molecular models, feedback loop (network) models, transcriptional (tape-reading) models, and membrane models; some of their key elements and predictions are discussed. Finally, a number of general unsolved problems at the cellular level are briefly mentioned: cell cycle interfaces, the evolution of circadian rhythmicity, the possibility of multiple cellular oscillators, chronopharmacology and chronotherapy, and cell-cycle clocks in development and aging.

  10. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, Massimo; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Barbaresi, Mariella; Manzella, Nicola; Tomasetti, Marco; Gaetani, Simona; Monaco, Federica; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Santarelli, Lory

    2016-04-26

    The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for 24 h after a day off. Significant differences were observed in peripheral skin temperature and cortisol levels between shift and daytime nurses. No differences in melatonin levels were obtained. Per2 maximum values were significantly different between the two groups. Shift nurses exhibited lower circadian variations compared to daytime nurses, and this may indicate an adjustment of the circadian biological clock to continuous shift schedules. Non-invasive procedures, such as peripheral skin temperature measurement, determination of cortisol and melatonin in saliva, and analysis of clock genes in hair follicle cells, may be effective approaches to extensively study the circadian clock in shift workers.

  11. Neurospora WC-1 recruits SWI/SNF to remodel frequency and initiate a circadian cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Kettenbach, Arminja N; Gerber, Scott A; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2014-09-01

    In the negative feedback loop comprising the Neurospora circadian oscillator, the White Collar Complex (WCC) formed from White Collar-1 (WC-1) and White Collar-2 (WC-2) drives transcription of the circadian pacemaker gene frequency (frq). Although FRQ-dependent repression of WCC has been extensively studied, the mechanism by which the WCC initiates a circadian cycle remains elusive. Structure/function analysis of WC-1 eliminated domains previously thought to transactivate frq expression but instead identified amino acids 100-200 as essential for frq circadian expression. A proteomics-based search for coactivators with WCC uncovered the SWI/SNF (SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable) complex: SWI/SNF interacts with WCC in vivo and in vitro, binds to the Clock box in the frq promoter, and is required both for circadian remodeling of nucleosomes at frq and for rhythmic frq expression; interestingly, SWI/SNF is not required for light-induced frq expression. These data suggest a model in which WC-1 recruits SWI/SNF to remodel and loop chromatin at frq, thereby activating frq expression to initiate the circadian cycle.

  12. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Bracci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for 24 h after a day off. Significant differences were observed in peripheral skin temperature and cortisol levels between shift and daytime nurses. No differences in melatonin levels were obtained. Per2 maximum values were significantly different between the two groups. Shift nurses exhibited lower circadian variations compared to daytime nurses, and this may indicate an adjustment of the circadian biological clock to continuous shift schedules. Non-invasive procedures, such as peripheral skin temperature measurement, determination of cortisol and melatonin in saliva, and analysis of clock genes in hair follicle cells, may be effective approaches to extensively study the circadian clock in shift workers.

  13. Systems-level characterization of the kernel mechanism of the cyanobacterial circadian oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lan; Ranganathan, Rama

    2014-03-01

    Circadian clock is an essential molecular regulatory mechanism that coordinates daily biological processes. Toward understanding the design principles of the circadian mechanism in cyanobacteria, the only prokaryotes reported to possess circadian rhythmicity, mathematical models have been used as important tools to help elucidate the complicated biochemical processes. In this study, we focus on elucidating the underlying systems properties that drive the oscillation of the cyanobacterial clockwork. We apply combined methods of time scale separation, phase space analysis, bifurcation analysis and sensitivity analysis to a model of the in vitro cyanobacterial circadian clock proposed by us recently. The original model is reduced to a three-dimensional slow subsystem by time scale separation. Phase space analysis of the reduced subsystem shows that the null-surface of the Serine-phosphorylated state (S-state) of KaiC is a bistable surface, and that the characteristic of the phase portrait indicates that the kernel mechanism of the clockwork behaves as a relaxation oscillator induced by interlinked positive and negative feedback loops. Phase space analysis together with perturbation analysis supports our previous viewpoint that the S-state of KaiC is plausibly a key component for the protein regulatory network of the cyanobacterial circadian clock.

  14. Analysis of septins across kingdoms reveals orthology and new motifs

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    Malmberg Russell L

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Septins are cytoskeletal GTPase proteins first discovered in the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae where they organize the septum and link nuclear division with cell division. More recently septins have been found in animals where they are important in processes ranging from actin and microtubule organization to embryonic patterning and where defects in septins have been implicated in human disease. Previous studies suggested that many animal septins fell into independent evolutionary groups, confounding cross-kingdom comparison. Results In the current work, we identified 162 septins from fungi, microsporidia and animals and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. There was support for five groups of septins with orthology between kingdoms. Group 1 (which includes S. cerevisiae Cdc10p and human Sept9 and Group 2 (which includes S. cerevisiae Cdc3p and human Sept7 contain sequences from fungi and animals. Group 3 (which includes S. cerevisiae Cdc11p and Group 4 (which includes S. cerevisiae Cdc12p contain sequences from fungi and microsporidia. Group 5 (which includes Aspergillus nidulans AspE contains sequences from filamentous fungi. We suggest a modified nomenclature based on these phylogenetic relationships. Comparative sequence alignments revealed septin derivatives of already known G1, G3 and G4 GTPase motifs, four new motifs from two to twelve amino acids long and six conserved single amino acid positions. One of these new motifs is septin-specific and several are group specific. Conclusion Our studies provide an evolutionary history for this important family of proteins and a framework and consistent nomenclature for comparison of septin orthologs across kingdoms.

  15. Modes of embayed beach dynamics: analysis reveals emergent timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. T.; Murray, A.; Limber, P. W.; Ells, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    Embayed beaches, or beaches positioned between rocky headlands, exhibit morphologic changes over many length and time scales. Beach sediment is transported as a result of the day-to-day wave forcing, causing patterns of erosion and accretion. We use the Rocky Coastline Evolution Model (RCEM) to investigate how patterns of shoreline change depend on wave climate (the distribution of wave-approach angles) and beach characteristics. Measuring changes in beach width through time allows us to track the evolution of the shape of the beach and the movement of sand within it. By using Principle Component Analysis (PCA), these changes can be categorized into modes, where the first few modes explain the majority of the variation in the time series. We analyze these modes and how they vary as a function of wave climate and headland/bay aspect ratio. In the purposefully simple RCEM, sediment transport is wave-driven and affected by wave shadowing behind the headlands. The rock elements in our model experiments (including the headlands) are fixed and unerodable so that this analysis can focus purely on sand dynamics between the headlands, without a sand contribution from the headlands or cliffs behind the beach. The wave climate is characterized by dictating the percentage of offshore waves arriving from the left and the percentage of waves arriving from high angles (very oblique to the coastline orientation). A high-angle dominated wave climate tends to amplify coastline perturbations, whereas a lower-angle wave climate is diffusive. By changing the headland/bay aspect ratio and wave climate, we can perform PCA analysis of generalized embayed beaches with differing anatomy and wave climate forcings. Previous work using PCA analysis of embayed beaches focused on specific locations and shorter timescales (beach dynamics over longer timescales. The first two PCA modes, which explain a majority of the beach width time series variation (typically >70%), are a 'breathing' mode and a

  16. Global transcriptomic analysis of Cyanothece 51142 reveals robust diurnal oscillation of central metabolic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh V.; Aurora, Rajeev; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-04-22

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, and the only prokaryotes known to have a circadian cycle. Unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Cyanothece 51142 can fix atmospheric nitrogen, a process exquisitely sensitive to oxygen. Thus, the intracellular environment of Cyanothece oscillates between aerobic and anaerobic conditions during a day-night cycle. This is accomplished by temporal separation of two processes: photosynthesis during the day, and nitrogen fixation at night. While previous studies have examined periodic changes transcript levels for a limited number of genes in Cyanothece and other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria, a comprehensive study of transcriptional activity in a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium is necessary to understand the impact of the temporal separation of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation on global gene regulation and cellular metabolism. We have examined the expression patterns of nearly 5000 genes in Cyanothece 51142 during two consecutive diurnal periods. We found that ~30% of these genes exhibited robust oscillating expression profiles. Interestingly, this set included genes for almost all central metabolic processes in Cyanothece. A transcriptional network of all genes with significantly oscillating transcript levels revealed that the majority of genes in numerous individual pathways, such as glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and glycogen metabolism, were co-regulated and maximally expressed at distinct phases during the diurnal cycle. Our analyses suggest that the demands of nitrogen fixation greatly influence major metabolic activities inside Cyanothece cells and thus drive various cellular activities. These studies provide a comprehensive picture of how a physiologically relevant diurnal light-dark cycle influences the metabolism in a photosynthetic bacterium

  17. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  18. A circadian biosignature in the labeled release data from Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Miller, Joseph D.; Levin, Gilbert V.; Straat, Patricia A.

    2005-09-01

    rigorous methods of circadian rhythm analysis are laid out to determine whether an endogenous circadian rhythm was present. The data will be analyzed for any free-running rhythm deviating from the Martian diurnal cycle. The possibility that nutrient administration altered the phase (i.e., timing) of the LR oscillations (as has been observed in terrestrial microorganisms) will also be examined. Any indication that the signal may be of biological origin will be tested against the hypothesis that it was caused solely by temperature-induced changes (e.g., temperature-dependent changes in soil physical chemistry). The focus of this paper is to develop broadly accepted methodology to determine definitively whether the LR data exhibit circadian characteristics that imply the involvement of Martian biology.

  19. Weakly circadian cells improve resynchrony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis B Webb

    Full Text Available The mammalian suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN contain thousands of neurons capable of generating near 24-h rhythms. When isolated from their network, SCN neurons exhibit a range of oscillatory phenotypes: sustained or damping oscillations, or arrhythmic patterns. The implications of this variability are unknown. Experimentally, we found that cells within SCN explants recover from pharmacologically-induced desynchrony by re-establishing rhythmicity and synchrony in waves, independent of their intrinsic circadian period We therefore hypothesized that a cell's location within the network may also critically determine its resynchronization. To test this, we employed a deterministic, mechanistic model of circadian oscillators where we could independently control cell-intrinsic and network-connectivity parameters. We found that small changes in key parameters produced the full range of oscillatory phenotypes seen in biological cells, including similar distributions of period, amplitude and ability to cycle. The model also predicted that weaker oscillators could adjust their phase more readily than stronger oscillators. Using these model cells we explored potential biological consequences of their number and placement within the network. We found that the population synchronized to a higher degree when weak oscillators were at highly connected nodes within the network. A mathematically independent phase-amplitude model reproduced these findings. Thus, small differences in cell-intrinsic parameters contribute to large changes in the oscillatory ability of a cell, but the location of weak oscillators within the network also critically shapes the degree of synchronization for the population.

  20. RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Transcriptomic Variations in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Leaves Affected by Climate, Soil, and Tillage Factors

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    Bo Lei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The growth and development of plants are sensitive to their surroundings. Although numerous studies have analyzed plant transcriptomic variation, few have quantified the effect of combinations of factors or identified factor-specific effects. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq analysis on tobacco leaves derived from 10 treatment combinations of three groups of ecological factors, i.e., climate factors (CFs, soil factors (SFs, and tillage factors (TFs. We detected 4980, 2916, and 1605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs that were affected by CFs, SFs, and TFs, which included 2703, 768, and 507 specific and 703 common DEGs (simultaneously regulated by CFs, SFs, and TFs, respectively. GO and KEGG enrichment analyses showed that genes involved in abiotic stress responses and secondary metabolic pathways were overrepresented in the common and CF-specific DEGs. In addition, we noted enrichment in CF-specific DEGs related to the circadian rhythm, SF-specific DEGs involved in mineral nutrient absorption and transport, and SF- and TF-specific DEGs associated with photosynthesis. Based on these results, we propose a model that explains how plants adapt to various ecological factors at the transcriptomic level. Additionally, the identified DEGs lay the foundation for future investigations of stress resistance, circadian rhythm and photosynthesis in tobacco.

  1. Hereditary hemochromatosis: HFE mutation analysis in Greeks reveals genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Terpos, E; Fourlemadis, S; Sakellaropoulos, N; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is common among Caucasians; reported disease frequencies vary from 0.3 to 0.8%. Identification of a candidate HFE gene in 1996 was soon followed by the description of two ancestral mutations, i.e., c.845G-->A (C282Y) and c.187C-->G (H63D). To these was recently added the mutation S65C, which may represent a simple polymorphism. The incidence of HH in Greece is unknown but clinical cases are rare. Also unknown is the carrier frequency of the two mutant alleles. A first estimate of the latter is given in the present report. It is based on data from the genetic analysis of 10 unrelated patients of Greek origin who were referred to our center for genotyping and 158 unselected male blood donors. The allele frequencies for the C282Y and H63D mutations were 0.003 and 0.145, respectively. The C282Y allele was detected in 50% of HH patients. This is considerably lower than the frequencies reported for HH patients in the U.S.A. (82%) and France (91 %) and closer to that reported in Italy (64%). Five patients did not carry any known HFE mutation; three may represent cases of juvenile hemochromatosis, given their early onset with iron overload, hypogonadism, and heart disease. We suggest that genetic heterogeneity is more prominent in Southern Europe. It is also possible that the penetrance of the responsible genes is different across the Mediterranean.

  2. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Hall

    Full Text Available Acute mountain sickness (AMS is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS, we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25. These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  3. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  4. Circadian Clocks in the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Nathalie; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The immune system is a complex set of physiological mechanisms whose general aim is to defend the organism against non-self-bodies, such as pathogens (bacteria, viruses, parasites), as well as cancer cells. Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-h variations found in virtually all physiological processes. These circadian rhythms are generated by circadian clocks, located in most cell types, including cells of the immune system. This review presents an overview of the clocks in the immune system and of the circadian regulation of the function of immune cells. Most immune cells express circadian clock genes and present a wide array of genes expressed with a 24-h rhythm. This has profound impacts on cellular functions, including a daily rhythm in the synthesis and release of cytokines, chemokines and cytolytic factors, the daily gating of the response occurring through pattern recognition receptors, circadian rhythms of cellular functions such as phagocytosis, migration to inflamed or infected tissue, cytolytic activity, and proliferative response to antigens. Consequently, alterations of circadian rhythms (e.g., clock gene mutation in mice or environmental disruption similar to shift work) lead to disturbed immune responses. We discuss the implications of these data for human health and the areas that future research should aim to address.

  5. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  6. Demographic analysis reveals gradual senescence in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braeckman Bart P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Free-living flatworms ("Turbellaria" are appropriate model organisms to gain better insight into the role of stem cells in ageing and rejuvenation. Ageing research in flatworms is, however, still scarce. This is partly due to culture difficulties and the lack of a complete set of demographic data, including parameters such as median lifespan and age-specific mortality rate. In this paper, we report on the first flatworm survival analysis. We used the species Macrostomum lignano, which is an emerging model for studying the reciprocal influence between stem cells, ageing and rejuvenation. This species has a median lifespan of 205 ± 13 days (average ± standard deviation [SD] and a 90th percentile lifespan of 373 ± 32 days. The maximum lifespan, however, is more than 745 days, and the average survival curve is characterised by a long tail because a small number of individuals lives twice as long as 90% of the population. Similar to earlier observations in a wide range of animals, in M. lignano the age-specific mortality rate increases exponentially, but levels off at the oldest ages. To compare the senescence of M. lignano with that of other ageing models, we determined the mortality rate doubling time, which is 0.20 ± 0.02 years. As a result, we can conclude that M. lignano shows gradual senescence at a rate similar to the vertebrate ageing models Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus. We argue that M. lignano is a suitable model for ageing and rejuvenation research, and especially for the role of stem cells in these processes, due to its accessible stem cell system and regeneration capacity, and the possibility of combining stem cell studies with demographic analyses.

  7. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

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    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  8. The effects of hydrogen peroxide on the circadian rhythms of Microcystis aeruginosa.

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    Haifeng Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the principal bloom-forming cyanobacteria present in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems. M. aeruginosa produces cyanotoxins, which can harm human and animal health. Many metabolic pathways in M. aeruginosa, including photosynthesis and microcystin synthesis, are controlled by its circadian rhythms. However, whether xenobiotics affect the cyanobacterial circadian system and change its growth, physiology and biochemistry is unknown. We used real-time PCR to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 on the expression of clock genes and some circadian genes in M. aeruginosa during the light/dark (LD cycle. RESULTS: The results revealed that H(2O(2 changes the expression patterns of clock genes (kaiA, kaiB, kaiC and sasA and significantly decreases the transcript levels of kaiB, kaiC and sasA. H(2O(2 treatment also decreased the transcription of circadian genes, such as photosynthesis-related genes (psaB, psbD1 and rbcL and microcystin-related genes (mcyA, mcyD and mcyH, and changed their circadian expression patterns. Moreover, the physiological functions of M. aeruginosa, including its growth and microcystin synthesis, were greatly influenced by H(2O(2 treatment during LD. These results indicate that changes in the cyanobacterial circadian system can affect its physiological and metabolic pathways. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that a xenobiotic can change the circadian expression patterns of its clock genes to influence clock-controlled gene regulation, and these influences are evident at the level of cellular physiology.

  9. Circadian and dark-pulse activation of orexin/hypocretin neurons

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    Marston Oliver J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporal control of brain and behavioral states emerges as a consequence of the interaction between circadian and homeostatic neural circuits. This interaction permits the daily rhythm of sleep and wake, regulated in parallel by circadian cues originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN and arousal-promoting signals arising from the orexin-containing neurons in the tuberal hypothalamus (TH. Intriguingly, the SCN circadian clock can be reset by arousal-promoting stimuli while activation of orexin/hypocretin neurons is believed to be under circadian control, suggesting the existence of a reciprocal relationship. Unfortunately, since orexin neurons are themselves activated by locomotor promoting cues, it is unclear how these two systems interact to regulate behavioral rhythms. Here mice were placed in conditions of constant light, which suppressed locomotor activity, but also revealed a highly pronounced circadian pattern in orexin neuronal activation. Significantly, activation of orexin neurons in the medial and lateral TH occurred prior to the onset of sustained wheel-running activity. Moreover, exposure to a 6 h dark pulse during the subjective day, a stimulus that promotes arousal and phase advances behavioral rhythms, activated neurons in the medial and lateral TH including those containing orexin. Concurrently, this stimulus suppressed SCN activity while activating cells in the median raphe. In contrast, dark pulse exposure during the subjective night did not reset SCN-controlled behavioral rhythms and caused a transient suppression of neuronal activation in the TH. Collectively these results demonstrate, for the first time, pronounced circadian control of orexin neuron activation and implicate recruitment of orexin cells in dark pulse resetting of the SCN circadian clock.

  10. [Effects of ethanol on the development of circadian time keeping system].

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    Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2007-04-01

    Ethanol exposure during gestation can have devastating consequences on the developing organism. Children who have a history of prenatally exposure to ethanol may show morphological and functional alterations, referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), which is characterized by pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, specific cranial/facial features, and dysfunction of central nervous system, is the most severe end of FASD. FAS or FASD children are known to suffer from disturbance of sleep and/or food intake behaviors. These neuropsychiatric symptoms may be due to impairment of the system regulating circadian rhythms. Recently, animal studies revealed that ethanol exposure during brain development can cause alterations in the circadian rhythm and its regulating system. We examined the effects of pre- or postnatal exposure to ethanol on the circadian rhythm in adulthood by measuring deep body temperature and wheel running activity in rats. After a phase delay in the light/dark cycle, ethanol-exposed rats took longer than control rats to resynchronize to the new light/dark cycle. These results suggest that both pre- and postnatal ethanol exposure impair the development of the circadian clock response to light cue. Because abnormal development of the circadian clock system might contribute to the neuropsychiatric symptoms seen in FASD, it is believed that normalizing the disturbed rhythm improves the symptoms. However, the mechanisms of dysfunction and potential interventions for disturbance of circadian clock system still remain to be elucidated. Further investigations are required to fully understand long-term effects of ethanol on the development of circadian rhythms.

  11. Ablation of the ID2 gene results in altered circadian feeding behavior, and sex-specific enhancement of insulin sensitivity and elevated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue.

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    Deepa Mathew

    Full Text Available Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2 is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our earlier studies have demonstrated a role for ID2 in the input pathway, core clock function and output pathways of the mouse circadian system. We have also reported that Id2 null (Id2-/- mice are lean with low gonadal white adipose tissue deposits and lower lipid content in the liver. These results coincided with altered or disrupted circadian expression profiles of liver genes including those involved in lipid metabolism. In the present phenotypic study we intended to decipher, on a sex-specific basis, the role of ID2 in glucose metabolism and in the circadian regulation of activity, important components of energy balance. We find that Id2-/- mice exhibited altered daily and circadian rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity; activity profiles extended further into the late night/dark phase of the 24-hr cycle, despite mice showing reduced total locomotor activity. Also, male Id2-/- mice consumed a greater amount of food relative to body mass, and displayed less weight gain. Id2-/- females had smaller adipocytes, suggesting sexual-dimorphic programing of adipogenesis. We observed increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in male Id2-/- mice, which was exacerbated in older animals. FDG-PET analysis revealed increased glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue of male Id2-/- mice, suggesting increased glucose metabolism and thermogenesis in these tissues. Reductions in intramuscular triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol were detected in male Id2-/- mice, highlighting its possible mechanistic role in enhanced insulin sensitivity in these mice. Our findings indicate a role for ID2 as a regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, and in the circadian control of feeding/locomotor behavior; and contribute to the understanding of the development of obesity and diabetes, particularly in shift work

  12. Circadian and seasonal responses in Indian weaver bird: subjective interpretation of day and night depends upon both light intensity and contrast between illuminations.

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    Pandey, Rohit Kumar; Bhardwaj, Sanjay Kumar

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated whether changes in illumination modify perception of day and night conditions in a diurnal species, the Indian weaver bird. Birds were initially subjected to a 12-h light:12-h dark regime (12L:12D; L=20 lux, D =0.5 lux). After every 2 wks, the combinations of light illumination in L and D phases were changed as follows: 20:2 lux, 20:5 lux, 20:10 lux, 20:20 lux, 20:100 lux, and 20:200 lux. Finally, birds were released into dim constant light (0.5 lux) for 2 wks to determine the phase and period of the circadian activity rhythm. They were also laparotomized at periodic intervals to examine the effects of the light regimes on the seasonal testicular cycle. All individuals showed a consistently similar response. As evident by the activity pattern under these light regimes, both in total activity during contrasting light phases and during the 2?h in the beginning and end of first light phase, birds interpreted the period of higher light intensity as day, and the period of lower intensity as the night. During the period of similar light intensity, i.e., under LL, birds free-ran with a circadian period ( ~ 24 h). In bright LL (20 lux), the activity rhythm was less distinct, but periodogram analysis revealed the circadian period for the group as 24.46 (+/-) 0.41 h (mean???SE). However, in dim LL at the end of the experiment, all birds exhibited a circadian pattern with average period of 25.52 (+/-) 0.70 h. All birds also showed testicular growth and regression during the 16-wks study. It is suggested that weaver birds interpret day and night subjectively based on both the light intensity and contrast between illuminations during two phases over the 24 h.

  13. Circadian rhythm of rest activity and autonomic nervous system activity at different stages in Parkinson's disease.

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    Niwa, Fumitoshi; Kuriyama, Nagato; Nakagawa, Masanori; Imanishi, Jiro

    2011-12-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often suffer from non-motor symptoms, including sleep and autonomic dysfunctions, controlled by circadian regulation. To evaluate the alteration of circadian rhythm in PD patients, we investigated both rest activities and autonomic functions. Twenty-seven patients with idiopathic PD and 30 age-matched control subjects were recruited. Group comparisons of controls (mean age: 68.93 years), early-PD patients classified as Hoehn-Yahr (HY) stage 1&2 (mean age: 70.78 years), and advanced-PD as HY 3&4 (mean age: 68.61 years) were conducted. Measurement of rest activities was performed using Actigraph for 7 continuous days, and included measuring rhythm patterns (activity patterns recorded in or out of bed) and circadian rhythm amplitudes (power of the cycle being closest to 24h). A power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) using 24-hour ambulatory ECG was also performed. The actigraphic measurements indicated that statistically PD patients have lower activity levels when out of bed and higher activity levels when in bed, and that, the circadian rest-activity rhythm in PD decreases with disease severity. The HRV analysis showed that the total frequency component and low frequency/high frequency ratio were low in PD patients, suggesting that autonomic activities and the circadian rhythm of the sympathetic nervous system are attenuated in PD. This study elucidated the disorganization in the rest activities and HRV of PD patients as well as the gradual alterations in the circadian rhythm. The circadian rhythm disturbances are important to consider the mechanism of non-motor symptoms that occur from early stage of PD.

  14. Circadian activity rhythms for mothers with an infant in ICU.

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    Lee, Shih-Yu; Lee, Kathryn A; Aycock, Dawn; Decker, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms influence sleep and wakefulness. Circadian activity rhythms (CAR) are altered in individuals with dementia or seasonal affective disorder. To date, studies exploring CAR and sleep in postpartum women are rare. The purpose of this report is to describe relationships between CAR, sleep disturbance, and fatigue among 72 first-time mothers during their second week postpartum while their newborn remain hospitalized in intensive care unit. Seventy-two mothers were included in this secondary data analysis sample from three separate studies. Participants completed the general sleep disturbance scale (GSDS), numerical rating scale for fatigue, and a sleep diary. The objective sleep data included total sleep time (TST), wake after sleep onset (WASO), and CAR determined by the circadian quotient (amplitude/mesor) averaged from at least 48-h of wrist actigraphy monitoring. The TST of mothers who self-reported as poor sleepers was 354 min (SEM = 21.9), with a mean WASO of 19.5% (SEM = 2.8). The overall sleep quality measured by the GSDS was clinically, significantly disrupted (M = 5.5, SD = 1.2). The mean score for morning fatigue was 5.8 (SD = 2.0), indicating moderate fatigue severity. The CAR was 0.62 (SEM = 0.04), indicating poor synchronization. The self-reported good sleepers (GSDS  3) (t[70] = 2.0, p sleep disturbance scores (r = -0.35, p = 0.01), and less morning fatigue (r = -0.26). Findings indicate that mothers with a hospitalized infant have both nocturnal sleep problems and disturbed circadian activity rhythms. Factors responsible for these sleep and rhythm disturbances, the adverse effects on mother's physical and mental well-being, and mother-infant relationship require further study.

  15. Synchronization of circadian Per2 rhythms and HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction in mouse fibroblasts after short-term heat shock pulse.

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    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are the general physiological processes of adaptation to daily environmental changes, such as the temperature cycle. A change in temperature is a resetting cue for mammalian circadian oscillators, which are possibly regulated by the heat shock (HS pathway. The HS response (HSR is a universal process that provides protection against stressful conditions, which promote protein-denaturation. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 is essential for HSR. In the study presented here, we investigated whether a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms. Circadian Per2 rhythm and HSF1-mediated gene expression were monitored by a real-time bioluminescence assay for mPer2 promoter-driven luciferase and HS element (HSE; HSF1-binding site-driven luciferase activity, respectively. By an optimal duration HS pulse (43°C for approximately 30 minutes, circadian Per2 rhythm was observed in the whole mouse fibroblast culture, probably indicating the synchronization of the phases of each cell. This rhythm was preceded by an acute elevation in mPer2 and HSF1-mediated gene expression. Mutations in the two predicted HSE sites adjacent (one of them proximally to the E-box in the mPer2 promoter dramatically abolished circadian mPer2 rhythm. Circadian Per2 gene/protein expression was not observed in HSF1-deficient cells. These findings demonstrate that HSF1 is essential to the synchronization of circadian rhythms by the HS pulse. Importantly, the interaction between HSF1 and BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer, a central circadian transcription factor, was observed after the HS pulse. These findings reveal that even a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms and cause the HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction, suggesting the pivotal role of crosstalk between the mammalian circadian and HSR systems.

  16. The impact of circadian phenotype and time since awakening on diurnal performance in athletes.

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    Facer-Childs, Elise; Brandstaetter, Roland

    2015-02-16

    Circadian rhythms, among other factors, have been shown to regulate key physiological processes involved in athletic performance. Personal best performance of athletes in the evening was confirmed across different sports. Contrary to this view, we identified peak performance times in athletes to be different between human "larks" and "owls" (also called "morningness/eveningness types" or "chronotypes" and referred to as circadian phenotypes in this paper), i.e., individuals with well-documented genetic and physiological differences that result in disparities between their biological clocks and how they entrain to exogenous cues, such as the environmental light/dark cycle and social factors. We found time since entrained awakening to be the major predictor of peak performance times, rather than time of day, as well as significant individual performance variations as large as 26% in the course of a day. Our novel approach combining the use of an athlete-specific chronometric test, longitudinal circadian analysis, and physical performance tests to characterize relevant sleep/wake and performance parameters in athletes allows a comprehensive analysis of the link between the circadian system and diurnal performance variation. We establish that the evaluation of an athlete's personal best performance requires consideration of circadian phenotype, performance evaluation at different times of day, and analysis of performance as a function of time since entrained awakening.

  17. Epigenetic silencing of the circadian clock gene CRY1 is associated with an indolent clinical course in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

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    Maher Hanoun

    Full Text Available Disruption of circadian rhythm is believed to play a critical role in cancer development. Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1 is a core component of the mammalian circadian clock and we have previously shown its deregulated expression in a subgroup of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Using real-time RT-PCR in a cohort of 76 CLL patients and 35 normal blood donors we now demonstrate that differential CRY1 mRNA expression in high-risk (HR CD38+/immunoglobulin variable heavy chain gene (IgVH unmutated patients as compared to low-risk (LR CD38-/IgVH mutated patients can be attributed to down-modulation of CRY1 in LR CLL cases. Analysis of the DNA methylation profile of the CRY1 promoter in a subgroup of 57 patients revealed that CRY1 expression in LR CLL cells is silenced by aberrant promoter CpG island hypermethylation. The methylation pattern of the CRY1 promoter proved to have high prognostic impact in CLL where aberrant promoter methylation predicted a favourable outcome. CRY1 mRNA transcript levels did not change over time in the majority of patients where sequential samples were available for analysis. We also compared the CRY1 expression in CLL with other lymphoid malignancies and observed epigenetic silencing of CRY1 in a patient with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL.

  18. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and the menstrual cycle.

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    Baker, Fiona C; Driver, Helen S

    2007-09-01

    Women with ovulatory menstrual cycles have a circadian rhythm superimposed on the menstrual-associated rhythm; in turn, menstrual events affect the circadian rhythm. In this paper, we review circadian rhythms in temperature, selected hormone profiles, and sleep-wake behavior in healthy women at different phases of the menstrual cycle. The effects on menstrual cycle rhythmicity of disrupted circadian rhythms, for example, with shiftwork and altered circadian rhythms in women with menstrual-related mood disturbances, are discussed. Compared to the follicular phase, in the post-ovulation luteal phase, body temperature is elevated, but the amplitude of the temperature rhythm is reduced. Evidence indicates that the amplitude of other rhythms, such as melatonin and cortisol, may also be blunted in the luteal phase. Subjective sleep quality is lowest around menses, but the timing and composition of sleep remains relatively stable across the menstrual cycle in healthy women, apart from an increase in spindle frequency activity and a minor decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep during the luteal phase. Disruption of circadian rhythms is associated with disturbances in menstrual function. Female shiftworkers compared to non-shiftworkers are more likely to report menstrual irregularity and longer menstrual cycles. There also is accumulating evidence that circadian disruption increases the risk of breast cancer in women, possibly due to altered light exposure and reduced melatonin secretion. Further investigations into the biological consequences of circadian disruption in women will offer insight into some menstrual-associated disorders, including mood changes, as well as reproductive function and possible links with breast cancer.

  19. Evolution of circadian organization in vertebrates

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    M. Menaker

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian organization means the way in which the entire circadian system above the cellular level is put together physically and the principles and rules that determine the interactions among its component parts which produce overt rhythms of physiology and behavior. Understanding this organization and its evolution is of practical importance as well as of basic interest. The first major problem that we face is the difficulty of making sense of the apparently great diversity that we observe in circadian organization of diverse vertebrates. Some of this diversity falls neatly into place along phylogenetic lines leading to firm generalizations: i in all vertebrates there is a "circadian axis" consisting of the retinas, the pineal gland and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, ii in many non-mammalian vertebrates of all classes (but not in any mammals the pineal gland is both a photoreceptor and a circadian oscillator, and iii in all non-mammalian vertebrates (but not in any mammals there are extraretinal (and extrapineal circadian photoreceptors. An interesting explanation of some of these facts, especially the differences between mammals and other vertebrates, can be constructed on the assumption that early in their evolution mammals passed through a "nocturnal bottleneck". On the other hand, a good deal of the diversity among the circadian systems of vertebrates does not fall neatly into place along phylogenetic lines. In the present review we will consider how we might better understand such "phylogenetically incoherent" diversity and what sorts of new information may help to further our understanding of the evolution of circadian organization in vertebrates

  20. Circadian rhythms of Per2::Luc in individual primary mouse hepatocytes and cultures.

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    Casey J Guenthner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatocytes, the parenchymal cells of the liver, express core clock genes, such as Period2 and Cryptochrome2, which are involved in the transcriptional/translational feedback loop of the circadian clock. Whether or not the liver is capable of sustaining rhythms independent of a central pacemaker is controversial. Whether and how circadian information may be shared among cells in the liver in order to sustain oscillations is currently unknown. RESULTS: In this study we isolated primary hepatocytes from transgenic Per2(Luc mice and used bioluminescence as a read-out of the state of the circadian clock. Hepatocytes cultured in a collagen gel sandwich configuration exhibited persistent circadian rhythms for several weeks. The amplitude of the rhythms damped, but medium changes consistently reset the phase and amplitude of the cultures. Cry2(-/- Per2(Luc cells oscillated robustly and expressed a longer period. Co-culturing with wildtype cells did not significantly shorten the period, indicating that coupling among hepatocytes is insufficient to synchronize cells with significantly differing periods. However, spatial patterns revealed by cellular imaging of wildtype cultures provided evidence of weak local coupling among the hepatocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results with primary hepatocyte cultures demonstrate that cultured hepatocytes are weakly coupled. While this coupling is not sufficient to sustain global synchrony, it does increase local synchrony, which may stabilize the circadian rhythms of peripheral oscillators, such as the liver, against noise in the entraining signals.

  1. Remodeling the clock: coactivators and signal transduction in the circadian clockworks

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    Weber, Frank

    2009-03-01

    Most organisms on earth such as cyanobacteria, fungi, plants, insects, animals, and humans synchronize their physiological and behavioral activities with the environmental cycles of day and night. Significant progress has been made in unraveling the genetic components that constitute a molecular circadian clock, which facilitates the temporal control of physiology and behavior. Clock genes assemble interlocked transcriptional/translational feedback loops that underlie the circadian oscillations. Recent investigations revealed that posttranslational regulation of clock proteins is crucial for functioning of the molecular oscillator and for precise temporal control of circadian transcription. This review provides an overview of the homologous clockworks in Drosophila and mammals, with a special focus on recent insights in the posttranslational regulation of clock proteins as well as the role of coactivators, repressors, and signal transduction for circadian controlled genome-wide transcription. The emerging mechanisms of clock gene regulation provide an understanding of the temporal control of transcription in general and the circadian orchestration of physiology and behavior in particular.

  2. Gremlin-2 is a BMP antagonist that is regulated by the circadian clock

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    Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Gossan, Nicole; Lu, Yinhui; Hughes, Alun; Hensman, James J.; Bayer, Monika L.; Kjær, Michael; Kadler, Karl E.; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Tendons are prominent members of the family of fibrous connective tissues (FCTs), which collectively are the most abundant tissues in vertebrates and have crucial roles in transmitting mechanical force and linking organs. Tendon diseases are among the most common arthropathy disorders; thus knowledge of tendon gene regulation is essential for a complete understanding of FCT biology. Here we show autonomous circadian rhythms in mouse tendon and primary human tenocytes, controlled by an intrinsic molecular circadian clock. Time-series microarrays identified the first circadian transcriptome of murine tendon, revealing that 4.6% of the transcripts (745 genes) are expressed in a circadian manner. One of these genes was Grem2, which oscillated in antiphase to BMP signaling. Moreover, recombinant human Gremlin-2 blocked BMP2-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5 and osteogenic differentiation of human tenocytes in vitro. We observed dampened Grem2 expression, deregulated BMP signaling, and spontaneously calcifying tendons in young CLOCKΔ19 arrhythmic mice and aged wild-type mice. Thus, disruption of circadian control, through mutations or aging, of Grem2/BMP signaling becomes a new focus for the study of calcific tendinopathy, which affects 1-in-5 people over the age of 50 years. PMID:24897937

  3. Cross-talk between the cellular redox state and the circadian system in Neurospora.

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    Yoshida, Yusuke; Iigusa, Hideo; Wang, Niyan; Hasunuma, Kohji

    2011-01-01

    The circadian system is composed of a number of feedback loops, and multiple feedback loops in the form of oscillators help to maintain stable rhythms. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa exhibits a circadian rhythm during asexual spore formation (conidiation banding) and has a major feedback loop that includes the FREQUENCY (FRQ)/WHITE COLLAR (WC) -1 and -2 oscillator (FWO). A mutation in superoxide dismutase (sod)-1, an antioxidant gene, causes a robust and stable circadian rhythm compared with that of wild-type (Wt). However, the mechanisms underlying the functions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) remain unknown. Here, we show that cellular ROS concentrations change in a circadian manner (ROS oscillation), and the amplitudes of ROS oscillation increase with each cycle and then become steady (ROS homeostasis). The ROS oscillation and homeostasis are produced by the ROS-destroying catalases (CATs) and ROS-generating NADPH oxidase (NOX). cat-1 is also induced by illumination, and it reduces ROS levels. Although ROS oscillation persists in the absence of frq, wc-1 or wc-2, its homeostasis is altered. Furthermore, genetic and biochemical evidence reveals that ROS concentration regulates the transcriptional function of WCC and a higher ROS concentration enhances conidiation banding. These findings suggest that the circadian system engages in cross-talk with the cellular redox state via ROS-regulatory factors.

  4. Coupling between the circadian clock and cell cycle oscillators: Implication for healthy cells and malignant growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Feillet (Céline); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); F.A. Lévi (Francis); D.A. Rand (David); F. Delaunay (Franck)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractUncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift wor

  5. Circadian Rhythm in Cytokines Administration.

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    Trufakin, Valery A; Shurlygina, Anna V

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, a number of diseases involving immune system dysfunction have appeared. This increases the importance of research aimed at finding and developing optimized methods for immune system correction. Numerous studies have found a positive effect in using cytokines to treat a variety of diseases, yet the clinical use of cytokines is limited by their toxicity. Research in the field of chronotherapy, aimed at designing schedules of medicine intake using circadian biorhythms of endogenous production of factors, and receptors' expression to the factors on the target cells, as well as chronopharmacodynamics and chronopharmacokinetics of medicines may contribute to the solution of this problem. Advantages of chronotherapy include a greater effectiveness of treatment, reduced dose of required drugs, and minimized adverse effects. This review presents data on the presence of circadian rhythms of spontaneous and induced cytokine production, as well as the expression of cytokine receptors in the healthy body and in a number of diseases. The article reviews various effects of cytokines, used at different times of the day in humans and experimental animals, as well as possible mechanisms underlying the chronodependent effects of cytokines. The article presents the results of chronotherapeutic modes of administering IL-2, interferons, G-CSF, and GM-CSF in treatment of various types of cancer as well as in experimental models of immune suppression and inflammation, which lead to a greater effectiveness of therapy, the possibility of reducing or increasing the dosage, and reduced drug toxicity. Further research in this field will contribute to the effectiveness and safety of cytokine therapy.

  6. Woolfian border poetics and contemporary circadian novels

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    Anka Ryall

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Virginia Woolf’s circadian novel Mrs Dalloway (1925 has inspired many successors, some of them important works in their own right. Although few of these novels are as explicitly linked to Mrs Dalloway as Michael Cunningham’s The Hours (1998, more recent novels such as Ian McEwan’s Saturday (2005 and Gail Jones’ Five Bells (2011 clearly pay homage to Woolf’s use of the one-day format to reveal whole lives and show how those individual private lives are entangled in history. The essay highlights one particular aspect of these three works, their imaginative and often transformative reworking of elements of Woolfian border poetics, particularly the predominance in Mrs Dalloway of boundary tropes – windows, doors, thresholds – that create a sense of synchronicity between present and past. Adapting Woolf’s boundary tropes to representations of contemporary realities, all three novels in different ways suggest how the present is deepened ”when backed by the past”, as Woolf puts it her memoirs; that is, when the present is not only informed by a remembered past but experienced in terms of both re-enactment and renewal, continuity and change.

  7. Timing of circadian genes in mammalian tissues

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    Korenčič, Anja; Košir, Rok; Bordyugov, Grigory; Lehmann, Robert; Rozman, Damjana; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology. The cell-autonomous clock is governed by an interlocked network of transcriptional feedback loops. Hundreds of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) regulate tissue specific functions. Transcriptome studies reveal that different organs (e.g. liver, heart, adrenal gland) feature substantially varying sets of CCGs with different peak phase distributions. To study the phase variability of CCGs in mammalian peripheral tissues, we develop a core clock model for mouse liver and adrenal gland based on expression profiles and known cis-regulatory sites. ‘Modulation factors’ associated with E-boxes, ROR-elements, and D-boxes can explain variable rhythms of CCGs, which is demonstrated for differential regulation of cytochromes P450 and 12 h harmonics. By varying model parameters we explore how tissue-specific peak phase distributions can be generated. The central role of E-boxes and ROR-elements is confirmed by analysing ChIP-seq data of BMAL1 and REV-ERB transcription factors. PMID:25048020

  8. Neuroimaging, cognition, light and circadian rhythms

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    Giulia eGaggioni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In humans, sleep and wakefulness and the associated cognitive processes are regulated through interactions between sleep homeostasis and the circadian system. Chronic disruption of sleep and circadian rhythmicity is common in our society and there is a need for a better understanding of the brain mechanisms regulating sleep, wakefulness and associated cognitive processes. This review summarizes recent investigations which provide first neural correlates of the combined influence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythmicity on cognitive brain activity. Markers of interindividual variations in sleep-wake regulation, such as chronotype and polymorphisms in sleep and clock genes, are associated with changes in cognitive brain responses in subcortical and cortical areas in response to manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle. This review also includes recent data showing that cognitive brain activity is regulated by light, which is a powerful modulator of cognition and alertness and also directly impacts sleep and circadian rhythmicity. The effect of light varied with age, psychiatric status, PERIOD3 genotype and changes in sleep homeostasis and circadian phase. These data provide new insights into the contribution of demographic characteristics, the sleep-wake cycle, circadian rhythmicity and light to brain functioning.

  9. Circadian genes, the stress axis, and alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Dipak K

    2012-01-01

    The body's internal system to control the daily rhythm of the body's functions (i.e., the circadian system), the body's stress response, and the body's neurobiology are highly interconnected. Thus, the rhythm of the circadian system impacts alcohol use patterns; at the same time, alcohol drinking also can alter circadian functions. The sensitivity of the circadian system to alcohol may result from alcohol's effects on the expression of several of the clock genes that regulate circadian function. The stress response system involves the hypothalamus and pituitary gland in the brain and the adrenal glands, as well as the hormones they secrete, including corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and glucocorticoids. It is controlled by brain-signaling molecules, including endogenous opioids such as β-endorphin. Alcohol consumption influences the activity of this system and vice versa. Finally, interactions exist between the circadian system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and alcohol consumption. Thus, it seems that certain clock genes may control functions of the stress response system and that these interactions are affected by alcohol.

  10. Personalized medicine for pathological circadian dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Rachel L; Kornhauser, Jon M; Tate, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    The recent approval of a therapeutic for a circadian disorder has increased interest in developing additional medicines for disorders characterized by circadian disruption. However, previous experience demonstrates that drug development for central nervous system (CNS) disorders has a high failure rate. Personalized medicine, or the approach to identifying the right treatment for the right patient, has recently become the standard for drug development in the oncology field. In addition to utilizing Companion Diagnostics (CDx) that identify specific genetic biomarkers to prescribe certain targeted therapies, patient profiling is regularly used to enrich for a responsive patient population during clinical trials, resulting in fewer patients required for statistical significance and a higher rate of success for demonstrating efficacy and hence receiving approval for the drug. This personalized medicine approach may be one mechanism that could reduce the high clinical trial failure rate in the development of CNS drugs. This review will discuss current circadian trials, the history of personalized medicine in oncology, lessons learned from a recently approved circadian therapeutic, and how personalized medicine can be tailored for use in future clinical trials for circadian disorders to ultimately lead to the approval of more therapeutics for patients suffering from circadian abnormalities.

  11. Circadian variation of EEG power spectra in NREM and REM sleep in humans: dissociation from body temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    In humans, EEG power spectra in REM and NREM sleep, as well as characteristics of sleep spindles such as their duration, amplitude, frequency and incidence, vary with circadian phase. Recently it has been hypothesized that circadian variations in EEG spectra in humans are caused by variations in brain or body temperature and may not represent phenomena relevant to sleep regulatory processes. To test this directly, a further analysis of EEG power spectra - collected in a forced desynchrony protocol in which sleep episodes were scheduled to a 28-h period while the rhythms of body temperature and plasma melatonin were oscillating at their near 24-h period - was carried out. EEG power spectra were computed for NREM and REM sleep occurring between 90-120 and 270-300 degrees of the circadian melatonin rhythm, i.e. just after the clearance of melatonin from plasma in the 'morning' and just after the 'evening' increase in melatonin secretion. Average body temperatures during scheduled sleep at these two circadian phases were identical (36.72 degrees C). Despite identical body temperatures, the power spectra in NREM sleep were very different at these two circadian phases. EEG activity in the low frequency spindle range was significantly and markedly enhanced after the evening increase in plasma melatonin as compared to the morning phase. For REM sleep, significant differences in power spectra during these two circadian phases, in particular in the alpha range, were also observed. The results confirm that EEG power spectra in NREM and REM sleep vary with circadian phase, suggesting that the direct contribution of temperature to the circadian variation in EEG power spectra is absent or only minor, and are at variance with the hypothesis that circadian variations in EEG power spectra are caused by variations in temperature.

  12. Social memory in the rat: circadian variation and effect of circadian rhythm disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmers, L.G.J.E.; Leus, I.E.; Burbach, J.P.H.; Spruijt, B.M.; Ree, van J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythm can impair long-term passive avoidance memory of rats and mice. The present study investigated whether disruption of circadian rhythm can also impair social memory of male rats. Social memory was assessed using the social discrimination test, in which a short-term olfa

  13. Clock and light regulation of the CREB coactivator CRTC1 in the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kensuke; Norona, Frances E; Alzate-Correa, Diego; Scarberry, Daniel; Hoyt, Kari R; Obrietan, Karl

    2013-05-22

    The CREB/CRE transcriptional pathway has been implicated in circadian clock timing and light-evoked clock resetting. To date, much of the work on CREB in circadian physiology has focused on how changes in the phosphorylation state of CREB regulate the timing processes. However, beyond changes in phosphorylation, CREB-dependent transcription can also be regulated by the CREB coactivator CRTC (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator), also known as TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). Here we profiled both the rhythmic and light-evoked regulation of CRTC1 and CRTC2 in the murine suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the locus of the master mammalian clock. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed rhythmic expression of CRTC1 in the SCN. CRTC1 expression was detected throughout the dorsoventral extent of the SCN in the middle of the subjective day, with limited expression during early night, and late night expression levels intermediate between mid-day and early night levels. In contrast to CRTC1, robust expression of CRTC2 was detected during both the subjective day and night. During early and late subjective night, a brief light pulse induced strong nuclear accumulation of CRTC1 in the SCN. In contrast with CRTC1, photic stimulation did not affect the subcellular localization of CRTC2 in the SCN. Additionally, reporter gene profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that CRTC1 was associated with CREB in the 5' regulatory region of the period1 gene, and that overexpression of CRTC1 leads to a marked upregulation in period1 transcription. Together, these data raise the prospect that CRTC1 plays a role in fundamental aspects of SCN clock timing and entrainment.

  14. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Sinapis alba in Revealing the Glucosinolate and Phytochelatin Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Tongjin; Duan, Mengmeng; Song, Jiangping; Li, Xixiang

    2016-01-01

    Sinapis alba is an important condiment crop and can also be used as a phytoremediation plant. Though it has important economic and agronomic values, sequence data, and the genetic tools are still rare in this plant. In the present study, a de novo transcriptome based on the transcriptions of leaves, stems, and roots was assembled for S. alba for the first time. The transcriptome contains 47,972 unigenes with a mean length of 1185 nt and an N50 of 1672 nt. Among these unigenes, 46,535 (97%) unigenes were annotated by at least one of the following databases: NCBI non-redundant (Nr), Swiss-Prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway, Gene Ontology (GO), and Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs). The tissue expression pattern profiles revealed that 3489, 1361, and 8482 unigenes were predominantly expressed in the leaves, stems, and roots of S. alba, respectively. Genes predominantly expressed in the leaf were enriched in photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related pathways. Genes predominantly expressed in the stem were enriched in not only pathways related to sugar, ether lipid, and amino acid metabolisms but also plant hormone signal transduction and circadian rhythm pathways, while the root-dominant genes were enriched in pathways related to lignin and cellulose syntheses, involved in plant-pathogen interactions, and potentially responsible for heavy metal chelating, and detoxification. Based on this transcriptome, 14,727 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, and 12,830 pairs of primers were developed for 2522 SSR-containing unigenes. Additionally, the glucosinolate (GSL) and phytochelatin metabolic pathways, which give the characteristic flavor and the heavy metal tolerance of this plant, were intensively analyzed. The genes of aliphatic GSLs pathway were predominantly expressed in roots. The absence of aliphatic GSLs in leaf tissues was due to the shutdown of BCAT4, MAM1, and CYP79F1 expressions. Glutathione was extensively

  15. De novo transcriptome analysis of Sinapis alba in revealing the glucosinolate and phytochelatin pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eZhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sinapis alba is an important condiment crop and can also be used as a phytoremediation plant. Though it has important economic and agronomic values, sequence data and the genetic tools are still rare in this plant. In the present study, a de novo transcriptome based on the transcriptions of leaves, stems and roots was assembled for S. alba for the first time. The transcriptome contains 47,972 unigenes with a mean length of 1,185 nt and an N50 of 1,672 nt. Among these unigenes, 46,535 (97% unigenes were annotated by at least one of the following databases: NCBI non-redundant (Nr, Swiss-Prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway, Gene Ontology (GO, and Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs. The tissue expression pattern profiles revealed that 3,489, 1,361 and 8,482 unigenes were predominantly expressed in the leaves, stems and roots of S. alba, respectively. Genes predominantly expressed in the leaf were enriched in photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related pathways. Genes predominantly expressed in the stem were enriched in not only pathways related to sugar, ether lipid and amino acid metabolisms but also plant hormone signal transduction and circadian rhythm pathways, while the root-dominant genes were enriched in pathways related to lignin and cellulose syntheses, involved in plant-pathogen interactions, and potentially responsible for heavy metal chelating and detoxification. Based on this transcriptome, 14,727 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were identified, and 12,830 pairs of primers were developed for 2,522 SSR-containing unigenes. Additionally, the glucosinolate (GSL and phytochelatin metabolic pathways, which give the characteristic flavor and the heavy metal tolerance of this plant, were intensively analyzed. The genes of aliphatic GSLs pathway were predominantly expressed in roots. The absence of aliphatic GSLs in leaf tissues was due to the shutdown of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 expressions. Glutathione was

  16. Relationship of Morning Cortisol to Circadian Phase and Rising Time in Young Adults with Delayed Sleep Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Rea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at further elucidating the relationship between circadian phase, rising time, and the morning cortisol awakening response (CAR. The results presented here are a secondary analysis of experimental data obtained from a study of advanced sleep-wake schedules and light exposures on circadian phase advances measured by dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO. The present results demonstrate that morning CAR is strongly related to rising time and more weakly related to DLMO phase.

  17. Cellular circadian clocks in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2012-10-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are heritable neuropsychiatric disorders associated with disrupted circadian rhythms. The hypothesis that circadian clock dysfunction plays a causal role in these disorders has endured for decades but has been difficult to test and remains controversial. In the meantime, the discovery of clock genes and cellular clocks has revolutionized our understanding of circadian timing. Cellular circadian clocks are located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's primary circadian pacemaker, but also throughout the brain and peripheral tissues. In BD and MDD patients, defects have been found in SCN-dependent rhythms of body temperature and melatonin release. However, these are imperfect and indirect indicators of SCN function. Moreover, the SCN may not be particularly relevant to mood regulation, whereas the lateral habenula, ventral tegmentum, and hippocampus, which also contain cellular clocks, have established roles in this regard. Dysfunction in these non-SCN clocks could contribute directly to the pathophysiology of BD/MDD. We hypothesize that circadian clock dysfunction in non-SCN clocks is a trait marker of mood disorders, encoded by pathological genetic variants. Because network features of the SCN render it uniquely resistant to perturbation, previous studies of SCN outputs in mood disorders patients may have failed to detect genetic defects affecting non-SCN clocks, which include not only mood-regulating neurons in the brain but also peripheral cells accessible in human subjects. Therefore, reporters of rhythmic clock gene expression in cells from patients or mouse models could provide a direct assay of the molecular gears of the clock, in cellular clocks that are likely to be more representative than the SCN of mood-regulating neurons in patients. This approach, informed by the new insights and tools of modern chronobiology, will allow a more definitive test of the role of cellular circadian clocks

  18. The emerging roles of lipids in circadian control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, Yaarit; Aviram, Rona; Asher, Gad

    2015-08-01

    Lipids play vital roles in a wide variety of cellular functions. They act as structural components in cell membranes, serve as a major form of energy storage, and function as key signaling molecules. Mounting evidence points towards a tight interplay between lipids and circadian clocks. In mammals, circadian clocks regulate the daily physiology and metabolism, and disruption of circadian rhythmicity is associated with altered lipid homeostasis and pathologies such as fatty liver and obesity. Concomitantly, emerging evidence suggest that lipids are embedded within the core clock circuitry and participate in circadian control. Recent advances in lipidomics methodologies and their application in chronobiology studies have shed new light on the cross talk between circadian clocks and lipid homeostasis. We review herein the latest literature related to the involvement of lipids in circadian clock's function and highlight the contribution of circadian lipidomics studies to our understanding of circadian rhythmicity and lipid homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  19. Circadian rhythms in the growth and reproduction of the brown alga Undaria pinnatifida and gametogenesis under different photoperiods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhihuai; PANG Shaojun

    2007-01-01

    Circadian growth rhythm of the juvenile sporophyte of the brown alga Undaria pinnatifida was measured with the computer-aided image analysis system in constant florescent white light under constant temperature ( 10 ℃ ). The growth rhythm persisted for 4 d in constant light with a free-running period of 25.6 h. Egg release from filamentous gametophytes pre-cultured in the light - dark regime was evaluated for six consecutive days at fixed time intervals in constant white light and 12 h light per day. Egg release rhythm persisted for 3 d in both regimes, indicating the endogenous nature. Temporal scale of egg release and gametogenesis in 18, 16, 12 and 8 h light per day were evaluated respectively using vegetatively propagated filamentous gametophytes. Egg release occurred 2 h after the onset of dark phase and peaked at midnight. Evaluation of the rates of oogonium formation, egg release or fertilization revealed no significant differences in four light-dark regimes, indicating the great plasticity of sexual reproduction. No photoperiodic effect in gametogenesis in terms of oogonium formation and egg release was found, but fertilization in short days was significantly higher than in long days. Results of this investigation further confirmed the general occurrence of circadian rhythms in intertidal seaweed species.

  20. Prevalence of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders and Associated Factors in Euthymic Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Yuichi; Murakoshi, Akiko; Komada, Yoko; Otsuka, Ayano; Futenma, Kunihiro; Inoue, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that there are certain pathophysiological relationships between bipolar disorder (BD) and circadian rhythm dysfunction. However, apparently no studies have clarified the prevalence of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWD) in patients with BD. This study was set out to investigate the prevalence of CRSWD and associated factors in patients with BD. One hundred four euthymic BD outpatients participated in this study. The subjects were asked to answer questionnaires including demographic variables, clinical course of BD, and family history of psychiatric disorders and suicide. Severity of BD was assessed by the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale. CRSWD was diagnosed by clinical interview, together with sleep logs, according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, third edition (ICSD-3). Thirty-five subjects (32.4%) met the criteria for CRSWD. The age at the time of investigation and that at the onset of BD were both lower in the CRSWD group than in the non-CRSWD group. The rates of family history of psychiatric disorders and suicide in the CRSWD group were higher than those in the non-CRSWD group. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of CRSWD was significantly associated with younger onset age of BD and family history of suicide. The prevalence of CRSWD could be quite high in BD patients. Younger onset age of BD and family history of suicide were associated with presence of CRSWD in BD patients. PMID:27442503

  1. Functional development of the circadian clock in the zebrafish pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Gothilf, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish constitutes a powerful model organism with unique advantages for investigating the vertebrate circadian timing system and its regulation by light. In particular, the remarkably early and rapid development of the zebrafish circadian system has facilitated exploring the factors that control the onset of circadian clock function during embryogenesis. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular basis underlying functional development of the central clock in the zebrafish pineal gland. Furthermore, we examine how the directly light-entrainable clocks in zebrafish cell lines have facilitated unravelling the general mechanisms underlying light-induced clock gene expression. Finally, we summarize how analysis of the light-induced transcriptome and miRNome of the zebrafish pineal gland has provided insight into the regulation of the circadian system by light, including the involvement of microRNAs in shaping the kinetics of light- and clock-regulated mRNA expression. The relative contributions of the pineal gland central clock and the distributed peripheral oscillators to the synchronization of circadian rhythms at the whole animal level are a crucial question that still remains to be elucidated in the zebrafish model.

  2. Expression of the Circadian Clock Genes Pert, Per2 in Sporadic, Familial Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L. Winter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence implicating aberrant circadian clock expression in the development of cancer. Based on our initial experiments identifying a putative interaction between BRCA1, the clock proteins Per1, Per2, as well as the reported involvement of the circadian clock in the development of cancer, we have performed an expression analysis of the circadian clock genes Per1, Per2 in both sporadic, familial primary breast tumors, normal breast tissues using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Significantly decreased levels of Per1 were observed between sporadic tumors, normal samples (P < .00001, as well as a further significant decrease between familial, sporadic breast tumors for both Per1 (P < .00001, Per2 (P < .00001. Decreased Per1 was also associated with estrogen receptor negativity (53% vs 15%, P = .04. These results suggest a role for both Perl, Per2 in normal breast function, show for the first time that deregulation of the circadian clock may be an important factor in the development of familial breast cancer. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle, on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis, potentially promoting carcinogenesis.

  3. Robust synchronization of coupled circadian and cell cycle oscillators in single mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Jonathan; Cannavo, Rosamaria; Gustafson, Kyle; Gobet, Cedric; Gatfield, David; Naef, Felix

    2014-07-15

    Circadian cycles and cell cycles are two fundamental periodic processes with a period in the range of 1 day. Consequently, coupling between such cycles can lead to synchronization. Here, we estimated the mutual interactions between the two oscillators by time-lapse imaging of single mammalian NIH3T3 fibroblasts during several days. The analysis of thousands of circadian cycles in dividing cells clearly indicated that both oscillators tick in a 1:1 mode-locked state, with cell divisions occurring tightly 5 h before the peak in circadian Rev-Erbα-YFP reporter expression. In principle, such synchrony may be caused by either unidirectional or bidirectional coupling. While gating of cell division by the circadian cycle has been most studied, our data combined with stochastic modeling unambiguously show that the reverse coupling is predominant in NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, temperature, genetic, and pharmacological perturbations showed that the two interacting cellular oscillators adopt a synchronized state that is highly robust over a wide range of parameters. These findings have implications for circadian function in proliferative tissues, including epidermis, immune cells, and cancer.

  4. Circadian clocks and cell division: What's the pacemaker?

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2010-01-01

    Evolution has selected a system of two intertwined cell cycles: the cell division cycle (CDC) and the daily (circadian) biological clock. The circadian clock keeps track of solar time and programs biological processes to occur at environmentally appropriate times. One of these processes is the CDC, which is often gated by the circadian clock. The intermeshing of these two cell cycles is probably responsible for the observation that disruption of the circadian system enhances susceptibility to...

  5. Relationships between circadian rhythms and ethanol intake in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Trujillo, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation integrates methods from alcohol and circadian rhythms research to explore relationships between ethanol and circadian rhythms in mice. Ingesting alcohol at certain times of day differentially affects the body; circadian rhythms also impact preference for drinking alcohol at different times of day. The influence of circadian timing on development and maintenance of ethanol drinking patterns was studied in Chapter 2. This showed how establishing a history of ethanol exposure a...

  6. Circadian Regulation of Cortisol Release in Behaviorally Split Golden Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The master circadian clock located within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is necessary for the circadian rhythm of glucocorticoid (GC) release. The pathways by which the SCN sustains rhythmic GC release remain unclear. We studied the circadian regulation of cortisol release in the behaviorally split golden hamster, in which the single bout of circadian locomotor activity splits into two bouts approximately12 h apart after exposing the animals to constant light conditions. We sh...

  7. Developmental programming by androgen affects the circadian timing system in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereness, Amanda L; Murphy, Zachary C; Sellix, Michael T

    2015-04-01

    Circadian clocks play essential roles in the timing of events in the mammalian hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis. The molecular oscillator driving these rhythms has been localized to tissues of the HPO axis. It has been suggested that synchrony among these oscillators is a feature of normal reproductive function. The impact of fertility disorders on clock function and the role of the clock in the etiology of endocrine pathology remain unknown. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a particularly devastating fertility disorder, affecting 5%-10% of women at childbearing age with features including a polycystic ovary, anovulation, and elevated serum androgen. Approximately 40% of these women have metabolic syndrome, marked by hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. It has been suggested that developmental exposure to excess androgen contributes to the etiology of fertility disorders, including PCOS. To better define the role of the timing system in these disorders, we determined the effects of androgen-dependent developmental programming on clock gene expression in tissues of the metabolic and HPO axes. Female PERIOD2::luciferase (PER2::LUC) mice were exposed to androgen (dihydrotestosterone [DHT]) in utero (Days 16-18 of gestation) or for 9-10 wk (DHT pellet) beginning at weaning (pubertal androgen excess [PAE]). As expected, both groups of androgen-treated mice had disrupted estrous cycles. Analysis of PER2::LUC expression in tissue explants revealed that excess androgen produced circadian misalignment via tissue-dependent effects on phase distribution. In vitro treatment with DHT differentially affected the period of PER2::LUC expression in tissue explants and granulosa cells, indicating that androgen has direct and tissue-specific effects on clock gene expression that may account for the effects of developmental programming on the timing system.

  8. Light-Dependent Expression of Four Cryptic Archaeal Circadian Gene Homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eManiscalco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important biological signals that have been found in almost all major groups of life from bacteria to man, yet it remains unclear if any members of the second major prokaryotic domain of life, the Archaea, also possess a biological clock. To investigate this question, we examined the regulation of four cyanobacterial-like circadian gene homologs present in the genome of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. These genes, designated cirA, cirB, cirC, and cirD, display similarity to the KaiC-family of cyanobacterial clock proteins, which act to regulate rhythmic gene expression and to control the timing of cell division. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to examine the expression of each of the four cir genes in response to 12 h light/12 h dark cycles (LD 12:12 during balanced growth in H. volcanii. Our data reveal that there is an approximately two to sixteen-fold increase in cir gene expression when cells are shifted from light to constant darkness and this pattern of gene expression oscillates with the light conditions in a rhythmic manner. Targeted single- and double-gene knockouts in the H. volcanii cir genes results in disruption of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression, although it does not lead to any significant effect on growth under these conditions. Restoration of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression was demonstrated by introducing, in trans, a wild-type copy of individual cir genes into knockout strains. These results are noteworthy as this is the first attempt to characterize the transcriptional expression and regulation of the ubiquitous kaiC homologs found among archaeal genomes.

  9. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, K.; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive (‘circadian resonance hypothesis’). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural c

  10. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natura

  11. Circadian aspects of post-operative morbidity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvaslerud, T.; Hansen, M.V.; Rosenberg, J.;

    2010-01-01

    concerning post-operative circadian disturbances. We also present the literature concerning circadian variation in post-operative morbidity and mortality. PubMed and the Cochrane database were searched for papers using a combination of 'circadian,' 'surgery,' 'post-operative,' 'mortality' and 'morbidity...

  12. Cocaine modulates pathways for photic and nonphotic entrainment of the mammalian SCN circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J David; Brager, Allison J; Stowie, Adam C; Prosser, Rebecca A

    2012-03-15

    Cocaine abuse is highly disruptive to circadian physiological and behavioral rhythms. The present study was undertaken to determine whether such effects are manifest through actions on critical photic and nonphotic regulatory pathways in the master circadian clock of the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Impairment of SCN photic signaling by systemic (intraperitoneal) cocaine injection was evidenced by strong (60%) attenuation of light-induced phase-delay shifts of circadian locomotor activity during the early night. A nonphotic action of cocaine was apparent from its induction of 1-h circadian phase-advance shifts at midday. The serotonin receptor antagonist, metergoline, blocked shifting by 80%, implicating a serotonergic mechanism. Reverse microdialysis perfusion of the SCN with cocaine at midday induced 3.7 h phase-advance shifts. Control perfusions with lidocaine and artificial cerebrospinal fluid had little shifting effect. In complementary in vitro experiments, photic-like phase-delay shifts of the SCN circadian neuronal activity rhythm induced by glutamate application to the SCN were completely blocked by cocaine. Cocaine treatment of SCN slices alone at subjective midday, but not the subjective night, induced 3-h phase-advance shifts. Lidocaine had no shifting effect. Cocaine-induced phase shifts were completely blocked by metergoline, but not by the dopamine receptor antagonist, fluphenazine. Finally, pretreatment of SCN slices for 2 h with a low concentration of serotonin agonist (to block subsequent serotonergic phase resetting) abolished cocaine-induced phase shifts at subjective midday. These results reveal multiple effects of cocaine on adult circadian clock regulation that are registered within the SCN and involve enhanced serotonergic transmission.

  13. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain: molecular clock components in the neocortex and cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-09-01

    The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice with conditional cell-specific clock gene deletions. This prompted us to analyze the molecular clockwork of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum in detail. Here, by use of in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that clock genes are expressed in all six layers of the neocortex and the Purkinje and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes are similar in the neocortex and cerebellum, but they are delayed by 5 h as compared to the SCN, suggestively reflecting a master-slave relationship between the SCN and extra-hypothalamic oscillators. Furthermore, ARNTL protein products are detectable in neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. These findings give reason to further pursue the physiological significance of circadian oscillators in the mouse neocortex and cerebellum.

  14. Differential proteomic analysis reveals novel links between primary metabolism and antibiotic production in Amycolatopsis balhimycina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, G.; Renzone, G.; Alduina, R.

    2010-01-01

    A differential proteomic analysis, based on 2-DE and MS procedures, was performed on Amycolatopsis balhimycina DSM5908, the actinomycete producing the vancomycin-like antibiotic balhimycin. A comparison of proteomic profiles before and during balhimycin production characterized differentially...... intermediates, were upregulated during antibiotic production. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that 8 out of 14 upregulated genes showed a positive correlation between changes at translational and transcriptional expression level. Furthermore, proteomic analysis of two nonproducing mutants, restricted to a sub...

  15. A software solution for recording circadian oscillator features in time-lapse live cell microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmon Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent and bioluminescent time-lapse microscopy approaches have been successfully used to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the mammalian circadian oscillator at the single cell level. However, most of the available software and common methods based on intensity-threshold segmentation and frame-to-frame tracking are not applicable in these experiments. This is due to cell movement and dramatic changes in the fluorescent/bioluminescent reporter protein during the circadian cycle, with the lowest expression level very close to the background intensity. At present, the standard approach to analyze data sets obtained from time lapse microscopy is either manual tracking or application of generic image-processing software/dedicated tracking software. To our knowledge, these existing software solutions for manual and automatic tracking have strong limitations in tracking individual cells if their plane shifts. Results In an attempt to improve existing methodology of time-lapse tracking of a large number of moving cells, we have developed a semi-automatic software package. It extracts the trajectory of the cells by tracking theirs displacements, makes the delineation of cell nucleus or whole cell, and finally yields measurements of various features, like reporter protein expression level or cell displacement. As an example, we present here single cell circadian pattern and motility analysis of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts expressing a fluorescent circadian reporter protein. Using Circadian Gene Express plugin, we performed fast and nonbiased analysis of large fluorescent time lapse microscopy datasets. Conclusions Our software solution, Circadian Gene Express (CGE, is easy to use and allows precise and semi-automatic tracking of moving cells over longer period of time. In spite of significant circadian variations in protein expression with extremely low expression levels at the valley phase, CGE allows accurate and

  16. Insulin Signaling Misregulation underlies Circadian and Cognitive Deficits in a Drosophila Fragile X Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monyak, Rachel E.; Emerson, Danielle; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Chambers, Daniel B.; Rosenfelt, Cory; Langer, Steven; Hinchey, Paul; Choi, Catherine H.; McDonald, Thomas V.; Bolduc, Francois V.; Sehgal, Amita; McBride, Sean M.J.; Jongens, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an undertreated neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by low IQ and a wide range of other symptoms including disordered sleep and autism. Although FXS is the most prevalent inherited cause of intellectual disability, its mechanistic underpinnings are not well understood. Using Drosophila as a model of FXS, we showed that select expression of dfmr1 in the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) of the brain was sufficient to restore normal circadian behavior and to rescue the memory deficits in the fragile X mutant fly. Examination of the insulin-signaling (IS) pathway revealed elevated levels of Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2) in the IPCs and elevated IS in the dfmr1 mutant brain. Consistent with a causal role for elevated IS in dfmr1 mutant phenotypes, expression of dfmr1 specifically in the IPCs reduced IS, and genetic reduction of the insulin pathway also led to amelioration of circadian and memory defects. Furthermore we showed that treatment with the FDA approved drug metformin also rescued memory. Finally, we showed that reduction of IS is required at different time points to rescue circadian behavior and memory. Our results indicate that insulin misregulation underlies the circadian and cognitive phenotypes displayed by the Drosophila fragile X model, and thus reveal a metabolic pathway that can be targeted by new and already approved drugs to treat fragile X patients. PMID:27090306

  17. Optimal Implementations for Reliable Circadian Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori

    2014-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival through synchronizing with the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. We find by using a phase model with multiple inputs that achieving the maximal limit of regularity and entrainability entails many inherent features of the circadian mechanism. At the molecular level, we demonstrate the role sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. At the behavioral level, the optimal phase-response curve inevitably contains a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. We reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments entrained by two types of periodic light pulses. Our results indicate that circadian clocks are designed optimally for reliable clockwork through evolution.

  18. 生物钟周期基因2与胰腺导管腺癌预后的相关性分析%Correlation analysis between period circadian clock 2 gene and the prognosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾玮; 刘孟刚; 刘宏鸣; 谢斌; 袁涛; 杨俊涛; 蓝翔; 陈平

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the prognosis related genes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC)and investigate the molecular regulation mechanism.Methods Gene expression data of 102 PDAC patients with complete clinical survival data were selected from gene expression database of National Center for Biotechnology Information.The 106 transcription regulation gene collection was collected from Transfac database.The 715 microRNA (miRNA)target regulation gene collection was selected according to PicTar and TargetScanS method.Biological pathway data obtained from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG).The known cancer genes were collected from the cancer gene census (CGC) database.Univariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the correlation between gene expression data and survival time,then obtained survival related candidate genes from the whole genome. Then the enriched genes were analyzed by hypergeometric distribution algorithm from three databases. Multiple correction testing was performed by BH-FDR method (FDR < 0.05 ).Kaplan-Meier was performed for survival curve analysis of PDAC.Results The results of data of 102 PDAC patients analyzed by univariate Cox proportional hazards model indicated that 273 genes were significantly related to the survival time of patients (P <0.000 1 ).After 273 survival genes were enrichment analyzed in 106 transcription factor regulation gene collection,12 survival genes enriched transcription factor target gene sets were found.After 273 survival genes were enrichment analyzed in 715 miRNA target regulation gene collection,11 survival genes enriched miRNAs target sets were discovered.After 273 survival genes were enrichment analyzed in pathway data of KEGG,15 survival genes enriched pathways were obtained. Period circadian clock 2 (PER2 )was regulated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (CEBPA)at transcription level and regulated by miRNA-32 after transcription.The prognosis of PDAC was affected by circadian

  19. The circadian variation of premature atrial contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøier Larsen, Bjørn; Kumarathurai, Preman; Wendelboe Nielsen, Olav;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to assess a possible circadian variation of premature atrial contractions (PACs) in a community-based population and to determine if the daily variation could be used to assess a more vulnerable period of PACs in predicting later incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF...... variation in heart rate. After adjusting for relevant risk factors, the risk of AF was equal in all time intervals throughout the day. CONCLUSION: Premature atrial contractions showed a circadian variation in subjects with frequent PACs. No specific time interval of the day was more predictive of AF than...

  20. Immunity's fourth dimension: approaching the circadian-immune connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Alvaro; Silver, Adam C; Walker, Wendy E; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-12-01

    The circadian system ensures the generation and maintenance of self-sustained ~24-h rhythms in physiology that are linked to internal and environmental changes. In mammals, daily variations in light intensity and other cues are integrated by a hypothalamic master clock that conveys circadian information to peripheral molecular clocks that orchestrate physiology. Multiple immune parameters also vary throughout the day and disruption of circadian homeostasis is associated with immune-related disease. Here, we discuss the molecular links between the circadian and immune systems and examine their outputs and disease implications. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie circadian-immune crosstalk may prove valuable for devising novel prophylactic and therapeutic interventions.

  1. Modelling of intercellular synchronization in the Drosophila circadian clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun-Wei; Chen Ai-Min; Zhang Jia-Jun; Yuan Zhan-Jiang; Zhou Tian-Shou

    2009-01-01

    In circadian rhythm generation, intercellular signaling factors are shown to play a crucial role in both sustaining intrinsic cellular rhythmicity and acquiring collective behaviours across a population of circadian neurons. However, the physical mechanism behind their role remains to be fully understood. In this paper, we propose an indirectly coupled multicellular model for the synchronization of Drosophila circadian oscillators combining both intracellular and intercellular dynamics. By simulating different experimental conditions, we find that such an indirect coupling way can synchronize both heterogeneous self-sustained circadian neurons and heterogeneous mutational damped circadian neurons. Moreover, they can also be entrained to ambient light-dark (LD) cycles depending on intercellular signaling.

  2. Questing for circadian dependence in ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction: A multicentric and multiethnic study

    KAUST Repository

    Ammirati, Enrico

    2013-05-09

    Rationale: Four monocentric studies reported that circadian rhythms can affect left ventricular infarct size after ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). Objective: To further validate the circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI in a multicentric and multiethnic population. Methods and Results: We analyzed a prospective cohort of subjects with first STEMI from the First Acute Myocardial Infarction study that enrolled 1099 patients (ischemic time <6 hours) in Italy, Scotland, and China. We confirmed a circadian variation of STEMI incidence with an increased morning incidence (from 6:00 am till noon). We investigated the presence of circadian dependence of infarct size plotting the peak creatine kinase against time onset of ischemia. In addition, we studied the patients from the 3 countries separately, including 624 Italians; all patients were treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. We adopted several levels of analysis with different inclusion criteria consistent with previous studies. In all the analyses, we did not find a clear-cut circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI. Conclusions: Although the circadian dependence of infarct size supported by previous studies poses an intriguing hypothesis, we were unable to converge toward their conclusions in a multicentric and multiethnic setting. Parameters that vary as a function of latitude could potentially obscure the circadian variations observed in monocentric studies. We believe that, to assess whether circadian rhythms can affect the infarct size, future study design should not only include larger samples but also aim to untangle the molecular time-dynamic mechanisms underlying such a relation. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Transcriptome analysis reveals key differentially expressed genes involved in wheat grain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonglong Yu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat seed development is an important physiological process of seed maturation and directly affects wheat yield and quality. In this study, we performed dynamic transcriptome microarray analysis of an elite Chinese bread wheat cultivar (Jimai 20 during grain development using the GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. Grain morphology and scanning electron microscope observations showed that the period of 11–15 days post-anthesis (DPA was a key stage for the synthesis and accumulation of seed starch. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and significance analysis of microarrays revealed that the period from 11 to 15 DPA was more important than the 15–20 DPA stage for the synthesis and accumulation of nutritive reserves. Series test of cluster analysis of differential genes revealed five statistically significant gene expression profiles. Gene ontology annotation and enrichment analysis gave further information about differentially expressed genes, and MapMan analysis revealed expression changes within functional groups during seed development. Metabolic pathway network analysis showed that major and minor metabolic pathways regulate one another to ensure regular seed development and nutritive reserve accumulation. We performed gene co-expression network analysis to identify genes that play vital roles in seed development and identified several key genes involved in important metabolic pathways. The transcriptional expression of eight key genes involved in starch and protein synthesis and stress defense was further validated by qRT-PCR. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of wheat seed development and the determinants of yield and quality.

  4. Transcriptome analysis reveals key differentially expressed genes involved in wheat grain development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonglong Yu; Dong Zhu; Chaoying Ma; Hui Cao; Yaping Wang; Yanhao Xu; Wenying Zhang; Yueming Yan

    2016-01-01

    Wheat seed development is an important physiological process of seed maturation and directly affects wheat yield and quality. In this study, we performed dynamic transcriptome microarray analysis of an elite Chinese bread wheat cultivar (Jimai 20) during grain development using the GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. Grain morphology and scanning electron microscope observations showed that the period of 11–15 days post-anthesis (DPA) was a key stage for the synthesis and accumulation of seed starch. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and significance analysis of microarrays revealed that the period from 11 to 15 DPA was more important than the 15–20 DPA stage for the synthesis and accumulation of nutritive reserves. Series test of cluster analysis of differential genes revealed five statistically significant gene expression profiles. Gene ontology annotation and enrichment analysis gave further informa-tion about differentially expressed genes, and MapMan analysis revealed expression changes within functional groups during seed development. Metabolic pathway network analysis showed that major and minor metabolic pathways regulate one another to ensure regular seed development and nutritive reserve accumulation. We performed gene co-expression network analysis to identify genes that play vital roles in seed development and identified several key genes involved in important metabolic pathways. The transcriptional expression of eight key genes involved in starch and protein synthesis and stress defense was further validated by qRT-PCR. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of wheat seed development and the determinants of yield and quality.

  5. The Pentose Phosphate Pathway Regulates the Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K; Feeney, Kevin A; Wulund, Lisa; Milev, Nikolay B; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Velagapudi, Vidya; O'Neill, John S; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2016-09-13

    The circadian clock is a ubiquitous timekeeping system that organizes the behavior and physiology of organisms over the day and night. Current models rely on transcriptional networks that coordinate circadian gene expression of thousands of transcripts. However, recent studies have uncovered phylogenetically conserved redox rhythms that can occur independently of transcriptional cycles. Here we identify the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), a critical source of the redox cofactor NADPH, as an important regulator of redox and transcriptional oscillations. Our results show that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PPP prolongs the period of circadian rhythms in human cells, mouse tissues, and fruit flies. These metabolic manipulations also cause a remodeling of circadian gene expression programs that involves the circadian transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK, and the redox-sensitive transcription factor NRF2. Thus, the PPP regulates circadian rhythms via NADPH metabolism, suggesting a pivotal role for NADPH availability in circadian timekeeping.

  6. Circadian and Circalunar Clock Interactions in a Marine Annelid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Zantke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Life is controlled by multiple rhythms. Although the interaction of the daily (circadian clock with environmental stimuli, such as light, is well documented, its relationship to endogenous clocks with other periods is little understood. We establish that the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii possesses endogenous circadian and circalunar (monthly clocks and characterize their interactions. The RNAs of likely core circadian oscillator genes localize to a distinct nucleus of the worm’s forebrain. The worm’s forebrain also harbors a circalunar clock entrained by nocturnal light. This monthly clock regulates maturation and persists even when circadian clock oscillations are disrupted by the inhibition of casein kinase 1δ/ε. Both circadian and circalunar clocks converge on the regulation of transcript levels. Furthermore, the circalunar clock changes the period and power of circadian behavior, although the period length of the daily transcriptional oscillations remains unaltered. We conclude that a second endogenous noncircadian clock can influence circadian clock function.

  7. Circadian KaiC phosphorylation: a multi-layer network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congxin Li

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian KaiC phosphorylation in cyanobacteria reconstituted in vitro recently initiates a series of studies experimentally and theoretically to explore its mechanism. In this paper, we report a dynamic diversity in hexameric KaiC phosphoforms using a multi-layer reaction network based on the nonequivalence of the dual phosphorylation sites (S431 and T432 in each KaiC subunit. These diverse oscillatory profiles can generate a kaleidoscopic phase modulation pattern probably responsible for the genome-wide transcription rhythms directly and/or indirectly in cyanobacteria. Particularly, our model reveals that a single KaiC hexamer is an energy-based, phosphorylation-dependent and self-regulated circadian oscillator modulated by KaiA and KaiB. We suggest that T432 is the main regulator for the oscillation amplitude, while S431 is the major phase regulator. S431 and T432 coordinately control the phosphorylation period. Robustness of the Kai network was examined by mixing samples in different phases, and varying protein concentrations and temperature. Similar results were obtained regardless of the deterministic or stochastic method employed. Therefore, the dynamic diversities and robustness of Kai oscillator make it a qualified core pacemaker that controls the cellular processes in cyanobacteria pervasively and accurately.

  8. Do Urgent Caesarean Sections Have a Circadian Rhythm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğru, Serkan; Doğru, Hatice Yılmaz; Karaman, Tuğba; Şahin, Aynur; Tapar, Hakan; Karaman, Serkan; Arıcı, Semih; Özsoy, Asker Zeki; Çakmak, Bülent; İşgüder, Çiğdem Kunt; Delibaş, İlhan Bahri; Karakış, Alkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The primary goal of the present study was to demonstrate the existence of a possible circadian variation in urgent operative deliveries. Methods All urgent caesarean sections between 1 January 2014 and 1 January 2015 with known exact onset times of operation were included in this retrospective study. Cases that were previously scheduled for elective caesarean section were excluded. Information regarding age, delivery date, onset time of operation and type of anaesthesia was collected from the database. Analyses were completed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) version 20.0 software. The statistical significance for all analyses was set at p<0.05. Results A total of 285 urgent caesarean section deliveries were included in the study. There were 126 (44.2%) deliveries during the day shift and 159 (55.8%) during the night shift. 80 patients (28.1%) received general anaesthesia and 65 (22.8%) received spinal anaesthesia in the morning shift, whereas 54 patients (18.9%) received general anaesthesia and 86 (30.2%) received spinal anaesthesia during the night shift. Conclusion The present study suggested that urgent caesarean sections revealed a circadian rhythm during the day. PMID:27366574

  9. Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit

    OpenAIRE

    Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the exis...

  10. Putative pacemakers in the eyestalk and brain of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii show circadian oscillations in levels of mRNA for crustacean hyperglycemic hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janikua Nelson-Mora

    Full Text Available Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH synthesizing cells in the optic lobe, one of the pacemakers of the circadian system, have been shown to be present in crayfish. However, the presence of CHH in the central brain, another putative pacemaker of the multi-oscillatory circadian system, of this decapod and its circadian transcription in the optic lobe and brain have yet to be explored. Therefore, using qualitative and quantitative PCR, we isolated and cloned a CHH mRNA fragment from two putative pacemakers of the multi-oscillatory circadian system of Procambarus clarkii, the optic lobe and the central brain. This CHH transcript synchronized to daily light-dark cycles and oscillated under dark, constant conditions demonstrating statistically significant daily and circadian rhythms in both structures. Furthermore, to investigate the presence of the peptide in the central brain of this decapod, we used immunohistochemical methods. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of CHH-IR in fibers and cells of the protocerebral and tritocerebal clusters and neuropiles, particularly in some neurons located in clusters 6, 14, 15 and 17. The presence of CHH positive neurons in structures of P. clarkii where clock proteins have been reported suggests a relationship between the circadian clockwork and CHH. This work provides new insights into the circadian regulation of CHH, a pleiotropic hormone that regulates many physiological processes such as glucose metabolism and osmoregulatory responses to stress.

  11. Clock is important for food and circadian regulation of macronutrient absorption in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyue; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2009-09-01

    Clock genes respond to external stimuli and exhibit circadian rhythms. This study investigated the expression of clock genes in the small intestine and their contribution in the regulation of nutrient absorption by enterocytes. We examined expression of clock genes and macronutrient transport proteins in the small intestines of wild-type and Clock mutant (Clk(mt/mt)) mice with free or limited access to food. In addition, we studied absorption of macronutrients in these mice. Intestinal clock genes show circadian expression and respond to food entrainment in wild-type mice. Dominant negative Clock in Clk(mt/mt) mice disrupts circadian expression and food entrainment of clock genes. The absorption of lipids and monosaccharides was high in Clk(mt/mt) mice whereas peptide absorption was reduced. Molecular studies revealed that Clock regulates several transport proteins involved in nutrient absorption. Clock plays an important role in light and food entrainment of intestinal functions by regulating nutrient transport proteins. Disruptions in intestinal circadian activity may contribute to hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia.

  12. Association between circadian clock genes and diapause incidence in Drosophila triauraria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Yamada

    Full Text Available Diapause is an adaptive response triggered by seasonal photoperiodicity to overcome unfavorable seasons. The photoperiodic clock is a system that controls seasonal physiological processes, but our knowledge about its physiological mechanisms and genetic architecture remains incomplete. The circadian clock is another system that controls daily rhythmic physiological phenomena. It has been argued that there is a connection between the two clocks. To examine the genetic connection between them, we analyzed the associations of five circadian clock genes (period, timeless, Clock, cycle and cryptochrome with the occurrence of diapause in Drosophila triauraria, which shows a robust reproductive diapause with clear photoperiodicity. Non-diapause strains found in low latitudes were compared in genetic crosses with the diapause strain, in which the diapause trait is clearly dominant. Single nucleotide polymorphism and deletion analyses of the five circadian clock genes in backcross progeny revealed that allelic differences in timeless and cryptochrome between the strains were additively associated with the differences in the incidence of diapause. This suggests that there is a molecular link between certain circadian clock genes and the occurrence of diapause.

  13. Circadian rhythm of C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, M; Günther, R

    1987-01-01

    Ten men with classic rheumatoid arthritis were studied for 23 days in Badgastein, Austria, in August, 1980. One man (patient 07) showed a marked increase of disease activity after a few days. C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations increased from 8.7 mg/dl on day 2 to 13.0 mg/dl on day 16. CRP values expressed as percent mean of a day showed a significant circadian rhythm with the acrophase at -30 degrees. For the same patient we also found significant circadian rhythms in grip strength and pearl stringing with acrophases in the evening and a circadian rhythm in walking time with the acrophase in the early morning. Seven of the ten men in the study had elevated CRP concentrations during the 3 weeks of observation. Population-mean cosinor results of CRP, grip strength, pearl stringing, and walking time revealed acrophases similar to the single cosinor results of patient 07. Our results suggest that inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis is a circadian rhythmic process with lowest disease activity in the evening.

  14. Synchrony of plant cellular circadian clocks with heterogeneous properties under light/dark cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masaaki; Muranaka, Tomoaki; Ito, Shogo; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2017-03-22

    Individual cells in a plant can work independently as circadian clocks, and their properties are the basis of various circadian phenomena. The behaviour of individual cellular clocks in Lemna gibba was orderly under 24-h light/dark cycles despite their heterogeneous free-running periods (FRPs). Here, we reveal the entrainment habits of heterogeneous cellular clocks using non-24-h light/dark cycles (T-cycles). The cellular rhythms of AtCCA1::LUC under T = 16 h cycles showed heterogeneous entrainment that was associated with their heterogeneous FRPs. Under T = 12 h cycles, most cells showed rhythms having ~24-h periods. This suggested that the lower limit of entrainment to the light/dark cycles of heterogeneous cellular circadian clocks is set to a period longer than 12 h, which enables them to be synchronous under ~24-h daily cycles without being perturbed by short light/dark cycles. The entrainment habits of individual cellular clocks are likely to be the basis of the circadian behaviour of plant under the natural day-night cycle with noisy environmental fluctuations. We further suggest that modifications of EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) in individual cells deviate the entrainability to shorter T-cycles possibly by altering both the FRPs and light responsiveness.

  15. Modeling two-oscillator circadian systems entrained by two environmental cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Gisele A; Friesen, W Otto

    2011-01-01

    Several experimental studies have altered the phase relationship between photic and non-photic environmental, 24 h cycles (zeitgebers) in order to assess their role in the synchronization of circadian rhythms. To assist in the interpretation of the complex activity patterns that emerge from these "conflicting zeitgeber" protocols, we present computer simulations of coupled circadian oscillators forced by two independent zeitgebers. This circadian system configuration was first employed by Pittendrigh and Bruce (1959), to model their studies of the light and temperature entrainment of the eclosion oscillator in Drosophila. Whereas most of the recent experiments have restricted conflicting zeitgeber experiments to two experimental conditions, by comparing circadian oscillator phases under two distinct phase relationships between zeitgebers (usually 0 and 12 h), Pittendrigh and Bruce compared eclosion phase under 12 distinct phase relationships, spanning the 24 h interval. Our simulations using non-linear differential equations replicated complex non-linear phenomena, such as "phase jumps" and sudden switches in zeitgeber preferences, which had previously been difficult to interpret. Our simulations reveal that these phenomena generally arise when inter-oscillator coupling is high in relation to the zeitgeber strength. Manipulations in the structural symmetry of the model indicated that these results can be expected to apply to a wide range of system configurations. Finally, our studies recommend the use of the complete protocol employed by Pittendrigh and Bruce, because different system configurations can generate similar results when a "conflicting zeitgeber experiment" incorporates only two phase relationships between zeitgebers.

  16. Coupling between the circadian clock and cell cycle oscillators: implication for healthy cells and malignant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine eFeillet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumour growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer.

  17. Coupling between the Circadian Clock and Cell Cycle Oscillators: Implication for Healthy Cells and Malignant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feillet, Celine; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Levi, Francis; Rand, David A; Delaunay, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumor growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer.

  18. Circadian systems biology: When time matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise Fuhr

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript we review the combination of experimental methodologies, bioinformatics and theoretical models that have been essential to explore this remarkable timing-system. Such an integrative and interdisciplinary approach may provide new strategies with regard to chronotherapeutic treatment and new insights concerning the restoration of the circadian timing in clock-associated diseases.

  19. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both restricted feeding, which phase shifts peripheral clocks, and genetic ablation in Per1(-/-/Per2(-/- (PERDKO mice disrupted normal bile acid control and resulted in hepatic cholestasis. Restricted feeding caused a dramatic, transient elevation in hepatic bile acid levels that was associated with activation of the xenobiotic receptors CAR and PXR and elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, indicative of liver damage. In the PERDKO mice, serum bile acid levels were elevated and the circadian expression of key bile acid synthesis and transport genes, including Cyp7A1 and NTCP, was lost. This was associated with blunted expression of a primary clock output, the transcription factor DBP, which transactivates the promoters of both genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that disruption of the circadian clock results in dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis that mimics cholestatic disease.

  20. Circadian clocks - from genes to complex behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    1999-01-01

    Circadian clocks control temporal structure in practically all organisms and on all levels of biology, from gene expression to complex behaviour and cognition. Over the last decades, research has begun to unravel the physiological and, more recently, molecular mechanisms that underlie this endogenou

  1. Light and the human circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas; Juda, Myriam; Vetter, Céline; Allebrandt, Karla V

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock can only reliably fulfil its function if it is stably entrained. Most clocks use the light-dark cycle as environmental signal (zeitgeber) for this active synchronisation. How we think about clock function and entrainment has been strongly influenced by the early concepts of the f

  2. Circadian Variation in Coronary Stent Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud, Karim D.; Lennon, Ryan J.; Ting, Henry H.; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Holmes, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine the circadian, weekly, and seasonal variation of coronary stent thrombosis. Background Other adverse cardiovascular events such as acute myocardial infarction are known to have higher incidences during the early morning hours, Mondays, and winter months. Methods The

  3. Harmonics of circadian gene transcription in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hughes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is a molecular and cellular oscillator found in most mammalian tissues that regulates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Numerous investigations have addressed the contribution of circadian rhythmicity to cellular, organ, and organismal physiology. We recently developed a method to look at transcriptional oscillations with unprecedented precision and accuracy using high-density time sampling. Here, we report a comparison of oscillating transcription from mouse liver, NIH3T3, and U2OS cells. Several surprising observations resulted from this study, including a 100-fold difference in the number of cycling transcripts in autonomous cellular models of the oscillator versus tissues harvested from intact mice. Strikingly, we found two clusters of genes that cycle at the second and third harmonic of circadian rhythmicity in liver, but not cultured cells. Validation experiments show that 12-hour oscillatory transcripts occur in several other peripheral tissues as well including heart, kidney, and lungs. These harmonics are lost ex vivo, as well as under restricted feeding conditions. Taken in sum, these studies illustrate the importance of time sampling with respect to multiple testing, suggest caution in use of autonomous cellular models to study clock output, and demonstrate the existence of harmonics of circadian gene expression in the mouse.

  4. [Circadian rhythm of human lymphocyte subpopulations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualetti, P; Colantonio, D; Casale, R; Colangeli, S; Natali, G

    1988-01-01

    Circadian rhythm of lymphocyte subsets was investigated in four healthy subjects, males, aged 35-58 years old. After a period of ambiental synchronization, venous blood samples were taken during a span of a day at 0.00 a.m., 4.00 a.m., 8.00 a.m., noon, 4.00 p.m. and 8.00 p.m. Lymphocyte subsets (OKT3, OKT4, OKT8, OKB7, OKJa1) were determined by monoclonal antibodies method, and serum level of cortisol by radioimmunoassay method. The OKT4/OKT8 ratio was also calculated. Data were analyzed by chronograms (mean +/- 1SD) and by cosinor method. Results show a significant circadian rhythm for each lymphocyte subset and for serum cortisol levels. The lowest levels of all circulating subsets were seen between noon and 4.00 p.m. and the highest levels around midnight, inversely related with the circadian rhythm of serum cortisol. The OKT4/OKT8 ratio, on the contrary, was relatively constant during the day, without a significant circadian rhythm. These observations have laboratoristic, clinical, and therapeutic implications and should be considered in the course of immunological studies.

  5. Impact of nutrients on circadian rhythmicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterman, Johanneke E; Kalsbeek, A.; la Fleur, Susanne E; Belsham, Denise D

    2015-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the mammalian hypothalamus functions as an endogenous pacemaker that generates and maintains circadian rhythms throughout the body. Next to this central clock, peripheral oscillators exist in almost all mammalian tissues. Whereas the SCN is mainly entrained to th

  6. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2012-06-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles.

  7. Circadian rhythm characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinoma growth in an orthotopic xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao NB

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ningbo Zhao,* Hong Tang,* Kai Yang, Dan Chen Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Recent studies show that circadian rhythm changes are closely related to the occurrence and development of various tumors, such as breast, liver, and prostate. However, there are significant differences in circadian rhythm between different tumors. At present, the circadian rhythm characteristics of oral cancer remain unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the circadian rhythm characteristics of the in vivo growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC.Materials and methods: Thirty-two nude mice were placed under 12-hour light/12-hour dark cycles. The human OSCC cell line BcaCD885 was inoculated in the cheek of nude mice. After 3 weeks, eight mice were sacrificed at four time points, including 4 hours after light onset (HALO, 10 HALO, 16 HALO, and 22 HALO, during a period of 24 hours. The volume of excised tumors was measured and the proliferative index (PI and apoptotic index (AI of tumor cells were determined by flow cytometry. A cosine analysis method was used to determine whether the tumor volume, PI, and AI obeyed a circadian rhythm.Results: There was a significant circadian rhythm in the tumor volume and PI of OSCC cells. For the tumor volume, there were significant differences between the four time points. The peak and trough values of the tumor volume appeared at 3.23 HALO and 15.23 HALO, whereas the peak and trough values of PI appeared at 6.60 HALO and 18.16 HALO, respectively. However, there was no circadian rhythm in the AI of tumor cells, despite significant differences between the four time points.Conclusion: This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the tumor volume and PI of in vivo growing OSCC undergo circadian rhythms. These results support the assertion that time factor should be

  8. Differentially phased leaf growth and movements in Arabidopsis depend on coordinated circadian and light regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbusch, Tino; Michaud, Olivier; Xenarios, Ioannis; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to vastly studied hypocotyl growth, little is known about diel regulation of leaf growth and its coordination with movements such as changes in leaf elevation angle (hyponasty). We developed a 3D live-leaf growth analysis system enabling simultaneous monitoring of growth and movements. Leaf growth is maximal several hours after dawn, requires light, and is regulated by daylength, suggesting coupling between growth and metabolism. We identify both blade and petiole positioning as important components of leaf movements in Arabidopsis thaliana and reveal a temporal delay between growth and movements. In hypocotyls, the combination of circadian expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) and PIF5 and their light-regulated protein stability drives rhythmic hypocotyl elongation with peak growth at dawn. We find that PIF4 and PIF5 are not essential to sustain rhythmic leaf growth but influence their amplitude. Furthermore, EARLY FLOWERING3, a member of the evening complex (EC), is required to maintain the correct phase between growth and movement. Our study shows that the mechanisms underlying rhythmic hypocotyl and leaf growth differ. Moreover, we reveal the temporal relationship between leaf elongation and movements and demonstrate the importance of the EC for the coordination of these phenotypic traits.

  9. Circadian adaptations to meal timing: Neuroendocrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica F Patton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are generated by central and peripheral circadian oscillators entrained by periodic environmental or physiological stimuli. A master circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus is directly entrained by daily light-dark cycles, and coordinates the timing of other oscillators by direct and indirect neural, hormonal and behavioral outputs. The daily rhythm of food intake provides stimuli that entrain most peripheral and central oscillators, some of which can drive a daily rhythm of food anticipatory activity if food is restricted to one daily mealtime. The location of food-entrainable oscillators (FEOs that drive food anticipatory rhythms, and the food-related stimuli that entrain these oscillators, remain to be clarified. Here, we critically examine the role of peripheral metabolic hormones as potential internal entrainment stimuli or outputs for FEOs controlling food anticipatory rhythms in rats and mice. Hormones for which data are available include corticosterone, ghrelin, leptin, insulin, glucagon, and glucagon-like peptide 1. All of these hormones exhibit daily rhythms of synthesis and secretion that are synchronized by meal timing. There is some evidence that ghrelin and leptin modulate the expression of food anticipatory rhythms, but none of the hormones examined so far are necessary for entrainment. Ghrelin and leptin likely modulate food-entrained rhythms by actions in hypothalamic circuits utilizing melanocortin and orexin signaling, although again food-entrained behavioral rhythms can persist in lesion and gene knockout models in which these systems are disabled. Actions of these hormones on circadian oscillators in central reward circuits remain to be evaluated. Food-entrained activity rhythms are likely mediated by a distributed system of circadian oscillators sensitive to multiple feeding related inputs. Metabolic hormones appear to play a modulatory role within this

  10. Analysis of self-overlap reveals trade-offs in plankton swimming trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariani, Patrizio; Visser, Andre W.; Mazzocchi, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-01

    these contrasting processes. This trade-off can be hypothesized as being evident in the behaviour of plankton, which inhabit a dilute three-dimensional environment with few refuges or orienting landmarks. We present an analysis of the swimming path geometries based on a volumetric Monte Carlo sampling approach......, which is particularly adept at revealing such trade-offs by measuring the self-overlap of the trajectories. Application of this method to experimentally measured trajectories reveals that swimming patterns in copepods are shaped to efficiently explore volumes at small scales, while achieving a large...

  11. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Eleanor; Sherry, Aileen; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Jyothi, Dushyanth; Yaga, Raja; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Everest, Paul; Smith, David G E

    2014-09-01

    Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC-ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith-Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  12. Carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption: an epigenetic viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavaty, Abbas

    2015-08-08

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modifications and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I first discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modifications that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic viewpoint. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  13. Genome-wide and phase-specific DNA-binding rhythms of BMAL1 control circadian output functions in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Rey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock uses interlocked negative feedback loops in which the heterodimeric basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BMAL1/CLOCK is a master regulator. While there is prominent control of liver functions by the circadian clock, the detailed links between circadian regulators and downstream targets are poorly known. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with deep sequencing we obtained a time-resolved and genome-wide map of BMAL1 binding in mouse liver, which allowed us to identify over 2,000 binding sites, with peak binding narrowly centered around Zeitgeber time 6. Annotation of BMAL1 targets confirms carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as the major output of the circadian clock in mouse liver. Moreover, transcription regulators are largely overrepresented, several of which also exhibit circadian activity. Genes of the core circadian oscillator stand out as strongly bound, often at promoter and distal sites. Genomic sequence analysis of the sites identified E-boxes and tandem E1-E2 consensus elements. Electromobility shift assays showed that E1-E2 sites are bound by a dimer of BMAL1/CLOCK heterodimers with a spacing-dependent cooperative interaction, a finding that was further validated in transactivation assays. BMAL1 target genes showed cyclic mRNA expression profiles with a phase distribution centered at Zeitgeber time 10. Importantly, sites with E1-E2 elements showed tighter phases both in binding and mRNA accumulation. Finally, analyzing the temporal profiles of BMAL1 binding, precursor mRNA and mature mRNA levels showed how transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation contribute differentially to circadian expression phase. Together, our analysis of a dynamic protein-DNA interactome uncovered how genes of the core circadian oscillator crosstalk and drive phase-specific circadian output programs in a complex tissue.

  14. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  15. Parents' assessment of circadian preference in elementary school-aged children: Validity and relations to educational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Vsevolod; Roberts, Richard; Preckel, Franzis

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analyses suggest that morning-oriented students obtain better school grades than evening-oriented students. This finding has generally been found for students in high school using self-report data for the assessment of circadian preference. Two studies (N = 2718/192) investigated whether these findings generalize across samples (i.e. elementary school-aged students) and methods (i.e. parent reports). These studies also explored whether the relation between circadian preference and school achievement could be explained within an expectancy-value framework. To this end, the Lark-Owl Chronotype Indicator (LOCI) was modified to obtain parents' evaluations of their children's circadian preference, while students completed a battery of assessments designed to explore the test-criterion evidence. Structural equation modeling and correlational analyses revealed: (1) morning and evening orientation were two separable factors of children's circadian preference; (2) correlations with behavioral (e.g. sleep and eating times) and psychological (e.g. cognitive ability) data supported the test-criterion validity of both factors; (3) morning orientation was positively related to school achievement and (4) consistent with an expectancy-value framework this relation was mediated by children's academic self-concept (ASC). These findings have important research and policy implications for considering circadian preference in the schooling of elementary students.

  16. Association between light at night, melatonin secretion, sleep deprivation, and the internal clock: Health impacts and mechanisms of circadian disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touitou, Yvan; Reinberg, Alain; Touitou, David

    2017-03-15

    Exposure to Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) results in a disruption of the circadian system, which is deleterious to health. In industrialized countries, 75% of the total workforce is estimated to have been involved in shift work and night work. Epidemiologic studies, mainly of nurses, have revealed an association between sustained night work and a 50-100% higher incidence of breast cancer. The potential and multifactorial mechanisms of the effects include the suppression of melatonin secretion by ALAN, sleep deprivation, and circadian disruption. Shift and/or night work generally decreases the time spent sleeping, and it disrupts the circadian time structure. In the long run, this desynchronization is detrimental to health, as underscored by a large number of epidemiological studies that have uncovered elevated rates of several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular risks, obesity, mood disorders and age-related macular degeneration. It amounts to a public health issue in the light of the very substantial number of individuals involved. The IARC has classified shift work in group 2A of "probable carcinogens to humans" since "they involve a circadian disorganization". Countermeasures to the effects of ALAN, such as melatonin, bright light, or psychotropic drugs, have been proposed as a means to combat circadian clock disruption and improve adaptation to shift and night work. We review the evidence for the ALAN impacts on health. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding to combat the detrimental properties of exposure to ALAN and develop strategies of prevention.

  17. Astakine 2--the dark knight linking melatonin to circadian regulation in crustaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apiruck Watthanasurorot

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Daily, circadian rhythms influence essentially all living organisms and affect many physiological processes from sleep and nutrition to immunity. This ability to respond to environmental daily rhythms has been conserved along evolution, and it is found among species from bacteria to mammals. The hematopoietic process of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus is under circadian control and is tightly regulated by astakines, a new family of cytokines sharing a prokineticin (PROK domain. The expression of AST1 and AST2 are light-dependent, and this suggests an evolutionarily conserved function for PROK domain proteins in mediating circadian rhythms. Vertebrate PROKs are transmitters of circadian rhythms of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN in the brain of mammals, but the mechanism by which they function is unknown. Here we demonstrate that high AST2 expression is induced by melatonin in the brain. We identify RACK1 as a binding protein of AST2 and further provide evidence that a complex between AST2 and RACK1 functions as a negative-feedback regulator of the circadian clock. By DNA mobility shift assay, we showed that the AST2-RACK1 complex will interfere with the binding between BMAL1 and CLK and inhibit the E-box binding activity of the complex BMAL1-CLK. Finally, we demonstrate by gene knockdown that AST2 is necessary for melatonin-induced inhibition of the complex formation between BMAL1 and CLK during the dark period. In summary, we provide evidence that melatonin regulates AST2 expression and thereby affects the core clock of the crustacean brain. This process may be very important in all animals that have AST2 molecules, i.e. spiders, ticks, crustaceans, scorpions, several insect groups such as Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Blattodea, but not Diptera and Coleoptera. Our findings further reveal an ancient evolutionary role for the prokineticin superfamily protein that links melatonin to direct regulation of the core clock gene feedback loops.

  18. Circadian rhythms of feeding, oviposition, and emergence of the boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHOIL M.GREENBERG; J.SCOTT ARMSTRONG; MAMOUDOU S(E)TAMOU; THOMAS W.SAPPINGTON; RANDY J.COLEMAN; TONG-XIAN LIU

    2006-01-01

    Circadian rhythm of feeding,oviposition,and emergence of boll weevil adults were determined at five different photophases (24,14,12,10,and 0 hours) and a constant 27℃ temperature,65% RH in the laboratory. Squares from Petri dishes,where they were exposed to boll weevil females,were removed and examined for feeding and oviposition punctures every 4 hours during daylight (0700-1900 h) and every 12 h at night (1900-0700 h) over eight consecutive days. Cohorts of randomly selected egg-punctured squares were sampled from ovipositing females at 0700,1100,1500,and 1900 during 24 hours and under different photophase treatments,and maintained in Petri dishes at 27 ± 1℃,65% RH.Dishes were observed twice daily (1900 and 0700 h) for adults emerging at day or night.Circadian rhythm of oviposition was not affected by the length of the photophase. The boll weevil has round-the-clock circadian rhythm of oviposition,with a daytime preference. We observed that 82.4%-86.0% of the boll weevil eggs were deposited between 0700 and 1900 h,and 14.0%-17.6% between 1900 and 0700 h during a 24-h period. Feeding of boll weevil females in photoperiods 24:0 h (complete light) and 0:24 h (complete darkness) did not significantly change between 0700-1900 h versus 1900-0700 h,while the daily cycle of light and darkness in other photoperiods significantly increased the feeding punctures from 0700-1900 compared with 1900-0700 h. The circadian rhythm of emergence depended significantly on the time of oviposition and the length of the photophase. Investigation of boll weevil circadian rhythm provides a better understanding of boll weevil ecology and reveals potential weak links for improving control technologies targeting their reproductive strategies.

  19. Coupled Oscillations and Circadian Rhythms in Molecular Replication Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Nathaniel; Alasibi, Samaa; Peacock-Lopez, Enrique; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2015-01-02

    Living organisms often display rhythmic and oscillatory behavior. We investigate here a challenge in contemporary Systems Chemistry, that is, to construct "bottom-up" molecular networks that display such complex behavior. We first describe oscillations during self-replication by applying kinetic parameters relevant to peptide replication in an open environment. Small networks of coupled oscillators are then constructed in silico, producing various functions such as logic gates, integrators, counters, triggers, and detectors. These networks are finally utilized to simulate the connectivity and network topology of the Kai proteins circadian clocks from the S. elongatus cyanobacteria, thus producing rhythms whose constant frequency is independent of the input intake rate and robust toward concentration fluctuations. We suggest that this study helps further reveal the underlying principles of biological clocks and may provide clues into their emergence in early molecular evolution.

  20. Proteomics Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues Reveals Drug Resistance-associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRUZ*, ISA N.; COLEY*, HELEN M.; KRAMER, HOLGER B.; MADHURI, THUMULURU KAVITAH; SAFUWAN, NUR A.M.; ANGELINO, ANA RITA; YANG, MIN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carboplatin and paclitaxel form the cornerstone of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, however, drug resistance to these agents continues to present challenges. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms underlying this resistance remain unclear. Materials and Methods: A 2D-gel proteomics method was used to analyze protein expression levels of three human ovarian cancer cell lines and five biopsy samples. Representative proteins identified were validated via western immunoblotting. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed metabolomic pathway changes. Results: A total of 189 proteins were identified with restricted criteria. Combined treatment targeting the proteasome-ubiquitin pathway resulted in re-sensitisation of drug-resistant cells. In addition, examination of five surgical biopsies of ovarian tissues revealed α-enolase (ENOA), elongation factor Tu, mitochondrial (EFTU), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3P), stress-70 protein, mitochondrial (GRP75), apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), peroxiredoxin (PRDX2) and annexin A (ANXA) as candidate biomarkers of drug-resistant disease. Conclusion: Proteomics combined with pathway analysis provided information for an effective combined treatment approach overcoming drug resistance. Analysis of cell lines and tissues revealed potential prognostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer. *These Authors contributed equally to this study. PMID:28031236

  1. Proteomics of the photoneuroendocrine circadian system of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Casper; Rovsing, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The photoneuroendocrine circadian system of the brain consists of (a) specialized photoreceptors in the retina, (b) a circadian generator located in the forebrain that contains "clock genes," (c) specialized nuclei in the forebrain involved in neuroendocrine secretion, and (d) the pineal gland....... The circadian generator is a nucleus, called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The neurons of this nucleus contain "clock genes," the transcription of which exhibits a circadian rhythm. Most circadian rhythms are generated by the neurons of this nucleus and, via neuronal and humoral connections, the SCN...... controls circadian activity of the brain and peripheral tissues. The endogenous oscillator of the SCN is each day entrained to the length of the daily photoperiod by light that reach the retina, and specialized photoreceptors transmit impulses to the SCN via the optic nerves. Mass screening for day...

  2. Circadian aspects of post-operative morbidity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvaslerud, T.; Hansen, M.V.; Rosenberg, J.;

    2010-01-01

    concerning post-operative circadian disturbances. We also present the literature concerning circadian variation in post-operative morbidity and mortality. PubMed and the Cochrane database were searched for papers using a combination of 'circadian,' 'surgery,' 'post-operative,' 'mortality' and 'morbidity.......' Eleven relevant studies were found, and seven of these were excluded due to the use of time of surgery and not time of morbidity or mortality as the main variable. The results from the four articles showed a circadian distribution of morbidity and mortality that mimics the one seen without surgery....... There is a peak incidence of myocardial ischemia, fatal thromboembolism and sudden unexpected death in the morning hours. A circadian variation exists in post-operative morbidity and mortality. The observed circadian variation in post-operative morbidity and mortality may warrant a chronopharmacological approach...

  3. Mechanisms by which circadian rhythm disruption may lead to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Roden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans have evolved in a rhythmic environment and display daily (circadian rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behaviour that are in synchrony with the solar day. Modern lifestyles have compromised the exposure to bright light during the day and dark nights, resulting in the desynchronisation of endogenously generated circadian rhythms from the external environment and loss of coordination between rhythms within the body. This has detrimental effects on physical and mental health, due to the misregulation and uncoupling of important cellular and physiological processes. Long-term shift workers who are exposed to bright light at night experience the greatest disruption of their circadian rhythms. Studies have shown an association between exposure to light at night, circadian rhythm disruption and an increased risk of cancer. Previous reviews have explored the relevance of light and melatonin in cancer, but here we explore the correlation of circadian rhythm disruption and cancer in terms of molecular mechanisms affecting circadian gene expression and melatonin secretion.

  4. LUX ARRHYTHMO encodes a Myb domain protein essential for circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Samuel P; Schultz, Thomas F; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Borevitz, Justin O; Ecker, Joseph R; Kay, Steve A

    2005-07-19

    In higher plants, the circadian clock orchestrates fundamental processes such as light signaling and the transition to flowering. We isolated mutants of the circadian clock from an Arabidopsis thaliana mutagenized reporter line by screening for seedlings with long hypocotyl phenotypes and subsequently assaying for abnormal clock-regulated CAB2::LUC expression. This screen identified five mutant alleles of a clock gene, LUX ARRHYTHMO (LUX), that significantly affect amplitude and robustness of rhythms in both constant white light and dark conditions. In addition, the transition from vegetative to floral development is accelerated and hypocotyl elongation is accentuated in these mutants under light:dark cycles. We genetically mapped the mutations by bulk segregant analysis with high-density oligonucleotide array genotyping to a small putative Myb transcription factor related to other clock components and response regulators in Arabidopsis. The negative arm of the Arabidopsis circadian clock, CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY), is repressed in the lux mutants, whereas TIMING OF CAB2 EXPRESSION (TOC1) is activated. We demonstrate that CCA1 and LHY bind to the evening element motif in the LUX promoter, which strongly suggests that these proteins repress LUX expression, as they do TOC1. The data are also consistent with LUX being necessary for activation of CCA1 and LHY expression.

  5. Robust circadian clocks from coupled protein-modification and transcription–translation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Lubensky, David K.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus uses both a protein phosphorylation cycle and a transcription–translation cycle to generate circadian rhythms that are highly robust against biochemical noise. We use stochastic simulations to analyze how these cycles interact to generate stable rhythms in growing, dividing cells. We find that a protein phosphorylation cycle by itself is robust when protein turnover is low. For high decay or dilution rates (and compensating synthesis rates), however, the phosphorylation-based oscillator loses its integrity. Circadian rhythms thus cannot be generated with a phosphorylation cycle alone when the growth rate, and consequently the rate of protein dilution, is high enough; in practice, a purely posttranslational clock ceases to function well when the cell doubling time drops below the 24-h clock period. At higher growth rates, a transcription–translation cycle becomes essential for generating robust circadian rhythms. Interestingly, although a transcription–translation cycle is necessary to sustain a phosphorylation cycle at high growth rates, a phosphorylation cycle can dramatically enhance the robustness of a transcription–translation cycle at lower protein decay or dilution rates. In fact, the full oscillator built from these two tightly intertwined cycles far outperforms not just each of its two components individually, but also a hypothetical system in which the two parts are coupled as in textbook models of coupled phase oscillators. Our analysis thus predicts that both cycles are required to generate robust circadian rhythms over the full range of growth conditions. PMID:21149676

  6. Circadian variations in expression of the trkB receptor in adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Claudia; Montaruli, Angela; Roveda, Eliana; Barajon, Isabella; Vizzotto, Laura; Grassi Zucconi, Gigliola; Carandente, Franca

    2003-12-19

    The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the central nervous system (CNS) and the expression of its high-affinity trkB receptor on neuron surfaces are known to depend on neuron activity. The expression of BDNF (mRNA and protein) and trkB mRNA shows circadian oscillations in rat hippocampal homogenates. We investigated circadian variations in trkB expression in specific areas of the adult rat hippocampal formation by immunohistochemistry. In sets of two experiments performed in the spring, 39 2-month-old male Wistar rats were accustomed to a 12-h light-12-h dark cycle for 2 weeks. Three animals were then sacrificed every 4 h. Forty-micrometer-thick coronal sections of hippocampal formation were obtained and processed for trkB immunohistochemistry. Cell staining intensity was assessed by image analysis of different hippocampal areas on five sections per animal. Circadian rhythmicity was evaluated by the cosinor method. Statistically significant circadian variations in trkB expression were found in dentate gyrus, entorhinal cortex, and the CA3 and hilar regions of the hippocampus, with highest expression during the first half of the dark (activity) period. These findings suggest a relationship between trkB expression and the physiological neuronal activation of wakefulness. TrkB receptor expression in the hippocampal regions studied was continuous and changes were gradual over the 24-h cycle, suggesting that more complex regulatory mechanisms also intervened.

  7. Robust circadian clocks from coupled protein-modification and transcription-translation cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Lubensky, David K; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-12-28

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus uses both a protein phosphorylation cycle and a transcription-translation cycle to generate circadian rhythms that are highly robust against biochemical noise. We use stochastic simulations to analyze how these cycles interact to generate stable rhythms in growing, dividing cells. We find that a protein phosphorylation cycle by itself is robust when protein turnover is low. For high decay or dilution rates (and compensating synthesis rates), however, the phosphorylation-based oscillator loses its integrity. Circadian rhythms thus cannot be generated with a phosphorylation cycle alone when the growth rate, and consequently the rate of protein dilution, is high enough; in practice, a purely posttranslational clock ceases to function well when the cell doubling time drops below the 24-h clock period. At higher growth rates, a transcription-translation cycle becomes essential for generating robust circadian rhythms. Interestingly, although a transcription-translation cycle is necessary to sustain a phosphorylation cycle at high growth rates, a phosphorylation cycle can dramatically enhance the robustness of a transcription-translation cycle at lower protein decay or dilution rates. In fact, the full oscillator built from these two tightly intertwined cycles far outperforms not just each of its two components individually, but also a hypothetical system in which the two parts are coupled as in textbook models of coupled phase oscillators. Our analysis thus predicts that both cycles are required to generate robust circadian rhythms over the full range of growth conditions.

  8. Cycles of circadian illuminance are sufficient to entrain and maintain circadian locomotor rhythms in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunjoo; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Euna; Do, Young Rag; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-11-01

    Light at night disrupts the circadian clock and causes serious health problems in the modern world. Here, we show that newly developed four-package light-emitting diodes (LEDs) can provide harmless lighting at night. To quantify the effects of light on the circadian clock, we employed the concept of circadian illuminance (CIL). CIL represents the amount of light weighted toward the wavelengths to which the circadian clock is most sensitive, whereas visual illuminance (VIL) represents the total amount of visible light. Exposure to 12 h:12 h cycles of white LED light with high and low CIL values but a constant VIL value (conditions hereafter referred to as CH/CL) can entrain behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms in flies. Moreover, flies re-entrain to phase shift in the CH/CL cycle. Core-clock proteins are required for the rhythmic behaviors seen with this LED lighting scheme. Taken together, this study provides a guide for designing healthful white LED lights for use at night, and proposes the use of the CIL value for estimating the harmful effects of any light source on organismal health.

  9. Probing entrainment of Ostreococcus tauri circadian clock by green and blue light through a mathematical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thommen, Quentin; Pfeuty, Benjamin; Schatt, Philippe; Bijoux, Amandine; Bouget, François-Yves; Lefranc, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Most organisms anticipate daily environmental variations and orchestrate cellular functions thanks to a circadian clock which entrains robustly to the day/night cycle, despite fluctuations in light intensity due to weather or seasonal variations. Marine organisms are also subjected to fluctuations in light spectral composition as their depth varies, due to differential absorption of different wavelengths by sea water. Studying how light input pathways contribute to circadian clock robustness is therefore important. Ostreococcus tauri, a unicellular picoplanktonic marine green alga with low genomic complexity and simple cellular organization, has become a promising model organism for systems biology. Functional and modeling approaches have shown that a core circadian oscillator based on orthologs of Arabidopsis TOC1 and CCA1 clock genes accounts for most experimental data acquired under a wide range of conditions. Some evidence points at putative light input pathway(s) consisting of a two-component signaling system (TCS) controlled by the only two histidine kinases (HK) of O. tauri. LOV-HK is a blue light photoreceptor under circadian control, that is required for circadian clock function. An involvement of Rhodopsin-HK (Rhod-HK) is also conceivable since rhodopsin photoreceptors mediate blue to green light input in animal circadian clocks. Here, we probe the role of LOV-HK and Rhod-HK in mediating light input to the TOC1-CCA1 oscillator using a mathematical model incorporating the TCS hypothesis. This model agrees with clock gene expression time series representative of multiple environmental conditions in blue or green light, characterizing entrainment by light/dark cycles, free-running in constant light, and resetting. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that both blue and green light can reset O. tauri circadian clock. Moreover, our mathematical analysis suggests that Rhod-HK is a blue-green light receptor and drives the clock together with LOV-HK.

  10. Altered dynamics in the circadian oscillation of clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Lippert

    Full Text Available From single cell organisms to the most complex life forms, the 24-hour circadian rhythm is important for numerous aspects of physiology and behavior such as daily periodic fluctuations in body temperature and sleep-wake cycles. Influenced by environmental cues - mainly by light input -, the central pacemaker in the thalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN controls and regulates the internal clock mechanisms which are present in peripheral tissues. In order to correlate modifications in the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm with the pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia, this study aimed to investigate the dynamics of the expression of circadian clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of idiopathic hypersomniacs (IH in comparison to those of healthy controls (HC. Ten clinically and polysomnographically proven IH patients were recruited from the department of sleep medicine of the University Hospital of Muenster. Clinical diagnosis was done by two consecutive polysomnographies (PSG and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT. Fourteen clinical healthy volunteers served as control group. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained via punch biopsy and grown in cell culture. The expression of circadian clock genes was investigated by semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR qRT-PCR analysis, confirming periodical oscillation of expression of the core circadian clock genes BMAL1, PER1/2 and CRY1/2. The amplitude of the rhythmically expressed BMAL1, PER1 and PER2 was significantly dampened in dermal fibroblasts of IH compared to HC over two circadian periods whereas the overall expression of only the key transcriptional factor BMAL1 was significantly reduced in IH. Our study suggests for the first time an aberrant dynamics in the circadian clock in IH. These findings may serve to better understand some clinical features of the pathophysiology in sleep - wake rhythms in IH.

  11. Coupling of a core post-translational pacemaker to a slave transcription/translation feedback loop in a circadian system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Qin

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are the only model circadian clock system in which a circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro. The underlying circadian mechanism appears to comprise two subcomponents: a post-translational oscillator (PTO and a transcriptional/translational feedback loop (TTFL. The PTO and TTFL have been hypothesized to operate as dual oscillator systems in cyanobacteria. However, we find that they have a definite hierarchical interdependency-the PTO is the core pacemaker while the TTFL is a slave oscillator that quickly damps when the PTO stops. By analysis of overexpression experiments and mutant clock proteins, we find that the circadian system is dependent upon the PTO and that suppression of the PTO leads to damped TTFL-based oscillations whose temperature compensation is not stable under different metabolic conditions. Mathematical modeling indicates that the experimental data are compatible with a core PTO driving the TTFL; the combined PTO/TTFL system is resilient to noise. Moreover, the modeling indicates a mechanism by which the TTFL can feed into the PTO such that new synthesis of clock proteins can phase-shift or entrain the core PTO pacemaker. This prediction was experimentally tested and confirmed by entraining the in vivo circadian system with cycles of new clock protein synthesis that modulate the phosphorylation status of the clock proteins in the PTO. In cyanobacteria, the PTO is the self-sustained core pacemaker that can operate independently of the TTFL, but the TTFL damps when the phosphorylation status of the PTO is clamped. However, the TTFL can provide entraining input into the PTO. This study is the first to our knowledge to experimentally and theoretically investigate the dynamics of a circadian clock in which a PTO is coupled to a TTFL. These results have important implications for eukaryotic clock systems in that they can explain how a TTFL could appear to be a core circadian clockwork when in fact the true

  12. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Steven A Brown

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately n...

  13. Persistence, entrainment, and function of circadian rhythms in polar vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cory T; Barnes, Brian M; Buck, C Loren

    2015-03-01

    Polar organisms must cope with an environment that periodically lacks the strongest time-giver, or zeitgeber, of circadian organization-robust, cyclical oscillations between light and darkness. We review the factors influencing the persistence of circadian rhythms in polar vertebrates when the light-dark cycle is absent, the likely mechanisms of entrainment that allow some polar vertebrates to remain synchronized with geophysical time, and the adaptive function of maintaining circadian rhythms in such environments.

  14. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in...

  15. Expanding circadian input, output, and the clock through genomic screens

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Many aspects of mammalian physiology display circadian--or once daily--rhythms, such as heart rate, blood pressure, activity levels, metabolism, and liver regeneration. These rhythms are regulated by an entrainable, self-sustaining, cell-autonomous mechanism found in nearly every cell of the body: the circadian clock. The circadian clock itself represents a regulatory network, composed of interlocking negative feedback loops, that in turn is influenced by two other types of regulatory network...

  16. The association of quality of life with potentially remediable disruptions of circadian sleep/activity rhythms in patients with advanced lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Donald P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer patients routinely develop symptoms consistent with profound circadian disruption, which causes circadian disruption diminished quality of life. This study was initiated to determine the relationship between the severity of potentially remediable cancer-associated circadian disruption and quality of life among patients with advanced lung cancer. Methods We concurrently investigated the relationship between the circadian rhythms of 84 advanced lung cancer patients and their quality of life outcomes as measured by the EORTC QLQ C30 and Ferrans and Powers QLI. The robustness and stability of activity/sleep circadian daily rhythms were measured by actigraphy. Fifty three of the patients in the study were starting their definitive therapy following diagnosis and thirty one patients were beginning second-line therapy. Among the patients who failed prior therapy, the median time between completing definitive therapy and baseline actigraphy was 4.3 months, (interquartile range 2.1 to 9.8 months. Results We found that circadian disruption is universal and severe among these patients compared to non-cancer-bearing individuals. We found that each of these patient's EORTC QLQ C30 domain scores revealed a compromised capacity to perform the routine activities of daily life. The severity of several, but not all, EORTC QLQ C30 symptom items correlate strongly with the degree of individual circadian disruption. In addition, the scores of all four Ferrans/Powers QLI domains correlate strongly with the degree of circadian disruption. Although Ferrans/Powers QLI domain scores show that cancer and its treatment spared these patients' emotional and psychological health, the QLI Health/Function domain score revealed high levels of patients' dissatisfaction with their health which is much worse when circadian disruption is severe. Circadian disruption selectively affects specific Quality of Life domains, such as the Ferrans/Powers Health

  17. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer.

  18. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  19. Circadian rhythm and cell population growth

    CERN Document Server

    Clairambault, Jean; Lepoutre, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Molecular circadian clocks, that are found in all nucleated cells of mammals, are known to dictate rhythms of approximately 24 hours (circa diem) to many physiological processes. This includes metabolism (e.g., temperature, hormonal blood levels) and cell proliferation. It has been observed in tumor-bearing laboratory rodents that a severe disruption of these physiological rhythms results in accelerated tumor growth. The question of accurately representing the control exerted by circadian clocks on healthy and tumour tissue proliferation to explain this phenomenon has given rise to mathematical developments, which we review. The main goal of these previous works was to examine the influence of a periodic control on the cell division cycle in physiologically structured cell populations, comparing the effects of periodic control with no control, and of different periodic controls between them. We state here a general convexity result that may give a theoretical justification to the concept of cancer chronothera...

  20. Pathophysiology and pathogenesis of circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hida Akiko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic, physiological and behavioral processes exhibit 24-hour rhythms in most organisms, including humans. These rhythms are driven by a system of self-sustained clocks and are entrained by environmental cues such as light-dark cycles as well as food intake. In mammals, the circadian clock system is hierarchically organized such that the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus integrates environmental information and synchronizes the phase of oscillators in peripheral tissues. The transcription and translation feedback loops of multiple clock genes are involved in the molecular mechanism of the circadian system. Disturbed circadian rhythms are known to be closely related to many diseases, including sleep disorders. Advanced sleep phase type, delayed sleep phase type and nonentrained type of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs are thought to result from disorganization of the circadian system. Evaluation of circadian phenotypes is indispensable to understanding the pathophysiology of CRSD. It is laborious and costly to assess an individual's circadian properties precisely, however, because the subject is usually required to stay in a laboratory environment free from external cues and masking effects for a minimum of several weeks. More convenient measurements of circadian rhythms are therefore needed to reduce patients' burden. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of CRSD as well as surrogate measurements for assessing an individual's circadian phenotype.

  1. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A; Hoegger, Dominik C; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A

    2013-01-29

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization.

  2. Circadian clock disruption in neurodegenerative diseases: Cause and effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Steven Musiek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Disturbance of the circadian system, manifested as disrupted daily rhythms of physiologic parameters such as sleep, activity, and hormone secretion, has long been observed as a symptom of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer Disease. Circadian abnormalities have generally been considered consequences of the neurodegeneration. Recent evidence suggests, however, that circadian disruption might actually contribute to the neurodegenerative process, and thus might be a modifiable cause of neural injury. Herein we will review the evidence implicating circadian rhythms disturbances and clock gene dysfunction in neurodegeneration, with an emphasis on future research directions and potential therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Circadian Clocks as Modulators of Metabolic Comorbidity in Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandas, Rita; Landgraf, Dominic; McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder are often accompanied by metabolic dysfunction symptoms, including obesity and diabetes. Since the circadian system controls important brain systems that regulate affective, cognitive, and metabolic functions, and neuropsychiatric and metabolic diseases are often correlated with disturbances of circadian rhythms, we hypothesize that dysregulation of circadian clocks plays a central role in metabolic comorbidity in psychiatric disorders. In this review paper, we highlight the role of circadian clocks in glucocorticoid, dopamine, and orexin/melanin-concentrating hormone systems and describe how a dysfunction of these clocks may contribute to the simultaneous development of psychiatric and metabolic symptoms.

  4. [Circadian regulation of sleep-wake cycles and food anticipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Wataru

    2012-06-01

    The circadian clock is crucial for efficient physiological function and drives the temporal regulation of the sleep-wake state, metabolism, and behavior. The timing of food intake and the accompanying behavior are both controlled by the internal clock, which is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN is considered as the master clock because the circadian rhythms for most physiological and behavioral processes are terminated after SCN ablation. The molecular framework of circadian oscillations can be best studied in the SCN. A "core" set of circadian clock genes form autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loops that are believed to drive daily rhythms in individual cells. These clock genes are expressed in a circadian manner not only in the SCN but also in other parts of the brain and many peripheral tissues. Mammals can anticipate a predictable daily mealtime through entrainment of circadian oscillators. Because the restriction of food availability to a specific time of the day elicits anticipatory behavior even after ablation of the SCN, such behaviour is assumed to be controlled by another circadian oscillator. In this paper, we have (1) reviewed studies involving the identification of the circadian clock and (2) aimed to elucidate the complex mechanism underlying feeding-associated rhythms by achieving a deep understanding of the circadian phenotypes of the SCN.

  5. New molecular phenotypes in the dst mutants of Arabidopsis revealed by DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Amador, M A; Lidder, P; Johnson, M A; Landgraf, J; Wisman, E; Green, P J

    2001-12-01

    In this study, DNA microarray analysis was used to expand our understanding of the dst1 mutant of Arabidopsis. The dst (downstream) mutants were isolated originally as specifically increasing the steady state level and the half-life of DST-containing transcripts. As such, txhey offer a unique opportunity to study rapid sequence-specific mRNA decay pathways in eukaryotes. These mutants show a threefold to fourfold increase in mRNA abundance for two transgenes and an endogenous gene, all containing DST elements, when examined by RNA gel blot analysis; however, they show no visible aberrant phenotype. Here, we use DNA microarrays to identify genes with altered expression levels in dst1 compared with the parental plants. In addition to verifying the increase in the transgene mRNA levels, which were used to isolate these mutants, we were able to identify new genes with altered mRNA abundance in dst1. RNA gel blot analysis confirmed the microarray data for all genes tested and also was used to catalog the first molecular differences in gene expression between the dst1 and dst2 mutants. These differences revealed previously unknown molecular phenotypes for the dst mutants that will be helpful in future analyses. Cluster analysis of genes altered in dst1 revealed new coexpression patterns that prompt new hypotheses regarding the nature of the dst1 mutation and a possible role of the DST-mediated mRNA decay pathway in plants.

  6. Circadian Phase Preference in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

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    Kerri L. Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric bipolar disorder (BD rates have notably increased over the past three decades. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with BD, efforts are needed to identify factors useful in earlier detection to help address this serious public health concern. Sleep is particularly important to consider given the sequelae of disrupted sleep on normative functioning and that sleep is included in diagnostic criteria for both Major Depressive and Manic Episodes. Here, we examine one component of sleep—i.e., circadian phase preference with the behavioral construct of morningness/eveningness (M/E. In comparing 30 BD and 45 typically developing control (TDC participants, ages 7–17 years, on the Morningness-Eveningness Scale for Children (MESC, no between-group differences emerged. Similar results were found when comparing three groups (BD−ADHD; BD+ADHD; TDC. Consistent with data available on circadian phase preference in adults with BD, however, we found that BD adolescents, ages 13 years and older, endorsed significantly greater eveningness compared to their TDC peers. While the current findings are limited by reliance on subjective report and the high-rate of comorbid ADHD among the BD group, this finding that BD teens demonstrate an exaggerated shift towards eveningness than would be developmentally expected is important. Future studies should compare the circadian rhythms across the lifespan for individuals diagnosed with BD, as well as identify the point at which BD youth part ways with their healthy peers in terms of phase preference. In addition, given our BD sample was overall euthymic, it may be that M/E is more state vs. trait specific in latency age youth. Further work would benefit from assessing circadian functioning using a combination of rating forms and laboratory-based measures. Improved understanding of sleep in BD may identify behavioral targets for inclusion in prevention and intervention protocols.

  7. The Circadian Clock, Reward, and Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Urs eAlbrecht

    2011-01-01

    During our daily activities, we experience variations in our cognitive performance, which is often accompanied by cravings for small rewards, such as consuming coffee or chocolate. This indicates that the time of day, cognitive performance, and reward may be related to one another. This review will summarize data that describe the influence of the circadian clock on addiction and mood-related behavior and put the data into perspective in relation to memory processes.

  8. The circadian clock, reward and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs eAlbrecht

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available During our daily activities, we experience variations in our cognitive performance, which is often accompanied by cravings for small rewards, such as consuming coffee or chocolate. This indicates that the time of day, cognitive performance and reward may be related to one another. This review will summarize data that describes the influence of the circadian clock on addiction and mood-related behavior and put the data into perspective in relation to memory processes.

  9. Circadian Metabolism in the Light of Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    -tuned the body's clock to anticipate and respond to numerous environmental cues in order to maintain homeostatic balance and promote survival. However, we now live in a society in which these classic circadian entrainment stimuli have been dramatically altered from the conditions under which the clock machinery...... energetic balance and adaptability, and it discusses potential therapeutic strategies to reset clock metabolic control to modern time for the benefit of human health. [on SciFinder(R)]...

  10. Shift work and circadian dysregulation of reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Gamble

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Health impairments, including reproductive issues, are associated with working nights or rotating shifts. For example, shift work has been associated with an increased risk of irregular menstrual cycles, endometriosis, infertility, miscarriage, low birth weight or pre-term delivery, and reduced incidence of breastfeeding. Based on what is known about circadian regulation of endocrine rhythms in rodents (and much less in humans, the circadian clock is an integral regulatory part of the reproductive system. When this 24-h program is disordered by environmental perturbation (such as shift work or genetic alterations, the endocrine system can be impaired. The purpose of this review is to explore the hypothesis that misalignment of reproductive hormones with the environmental light-dark cycle and/or sleep wake rhythms can disrupt menstrual cycles, pregnancy, and parturition. We highlight the role of the circadian clock in regulating human reproductive physiology and shift work-induced pathology within each step of the reproductive axis while exploring potential mechanisms from the animal model literature. In addition to documenting the reproductive hazards of shift work, we also point out important gaps in our knowledge as critical areas for future investigation. For example, future studies should examine whether forced desynchronization disrupts gonadotropin secretion rhythms and whether there are sleep/wake schedules that are better or worse for the adaptation of the reproductive system to shift work. These studies are necessary in order to define not only whether or not shift-work induced circadian misalignment impairs reproductive capacity, but also to identify strategies for the future that can minimize this desynchronization.

  11. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Belianinov, Alex; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-01

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer from information misinterpretation due to low resolving power.

  12. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  13. Imaging Multidimensional Therapeutically Relevant Circadian Relationships

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    Jamil Singletary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks gate cellular proliferation and, thereby, therapeutically target availability within proliferative pathways. This temporal coordination occurs within both cancerous and noncancerous proliferating tissues. The timing within the circadian cycle of the administration of drugs targeting proliferative pathways necessarily impacts the amount of damage done to proliferating tissues and cancers. Concurrently measuring target levels and associated key pathway components in normal and malignant tissues around the circadian clock provides a path toward a fuller understanding of the temporal relationships among the physiologic processes governing the therapeutic index of antiproliferative anticancer therapies. The temporal ordering among these relationships, paramount to determining causation, is less well understood using two- or three-dimensional representations. We have created multidimensional multimedia depictions of the temporal unfolding of putatively causative and the resultant therapeutic effects of a drug that specifically targets these ordered processes at specific times of the day. The systems and methods used to create these depictions are provided, as well as three example supplementary movies.

  14. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Hundahl

    Full Text Available Neuroglobin (Ngb, a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1 and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night.

  15. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundahl, Christian A; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night.

  16. Links between circadian rhythms and psychiatric disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia N Karatsoreos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Determining the cause of psychiatric disorders is a goal of modern neuroscience, and will hopefully lead to the discovery of treatments to either prevent or alleviate the suffering caused by these diseases. One roadblock to attaining this goal is the realization that neuropsychiatric diseases are rarely due to a single gene polymorphism, environmental exposure, or developmental insult. Rather, it is a complex interaction between these various influences that likely leads to the development of clinically relevant syndromes. Our lab is exploring the links between environmental exposures and neurobehavioral function by investigating how disruption of the circadian (daily clock alters the structure and function of neural circuits, with the hypothesis that disrupting this crucial homeostatic system can directly contribute to altered vulnerability of the organism to other factors that interact to produce psychiatric illness. This review explores some historical and more recent findings that link disrupted circadian clocks to neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression, mania, and schizophrenia. We take a comparative approach by exploring the effects observed in human populations, as well as some experimental models used in the laboratory to unravel mechanistic and causal relationships between disruption of the circadian clock and behavioral abnormalities. This is a rich area of research that we predict will contribute greatly to our understanding of how genes, environment, and development interact to modulate an individual’s vulnerability to psychiatric disorders.

  17. Genetic Analysis of Vertbrate Circadian Rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    melatonin rhythm-generating enzyme: Molecular regulation of serotonin N-acetyltransferase in the pineal gland . Rec. Prog. Horm. Res. 52: 307-358 Hurd...Begay,V., Falcon, J., Cahill, G.M., Klein, D.C. and Coon.S.L. 1998. Transcripts Encoding Two Melatonin Synthesis Enzymes in the Teleost Pineal

  18. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Watson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC–ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith–Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  19. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human...... kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified...... to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially...

  20. Transcriptome-based network analysis reveals a spectrum model of human macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jia; Schmidt, Susanne V; Sander, Jil; Draffehn, Astrid; Krebs, Wolfgang; Quester, Inga; De Nardo, Dominic; Gohel, Trupti D; Emde, Martina; Schmidleithner, Lisa; Ganesan, Hariharasudan; Nino-Castro, Andrea; Mallmann, Michael R; Labzin, Larisa; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Latz, Eicke; Freeman, Tom C; Ulas, Thomas; Schultze, Joachim L

    2014-02-20

    Macrophage activation is associated with profound transcriptional reprogramming. Although much progress has been made in the understanding of macrophage activation, polarization, and function, the transcriptional programs regulating these processes remain poorly characterized. We stimulated human macrophages with diverse activation signals, acquiring a data set of 299 macrophage transcriptomes. Analysis of this data set revealed a spectrum of macrophage activation states extending the current M1 versus M2-polarization model. Network analyses identified central transcriptional regulators associated with all macrophage activation complemented by regulators related to stimulus-specific programs. Applying these transcriptional programs to human alveolar macrophages from smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) revealed an unexpected loss of inflammatory signatures in COPD patients. Finally, by integrating murine data from the ImmGen project we propose a refined, activation-independent core signature for human and murine macrophages. This resource serves as a framework for future research into regulation of macrophage activation in health and disease.

  1. Transcriptome analysis by Illumina high-throughout paired-end sequencing reveals the complexity of differential gene expression during in vitro plantlet growth and flowering in Amaranthus tricolor L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengcai Liu

    Full Text Available Amaranthus tricolor L. is a C4 plant, which is consumed as a major leafy vegetable in some tropical countries. Under conditions of high temperature and short daylight, Am. tricolor readily bolts and blooms, degrading leaf quality. A preliminary in vitro flowering study demonstrated that the flowering control pathway in Am. tricolor may differ from that of Arabidopsis. Nevertheless, no transcriptome analysis of the flowering process in Amaranthus has been conducted. To study Am. tricolor floral regulatory mechanisms, we conducted a large-scale transcriptome analysis--based on Illumina HiSeq sequencing of cDNA libraries generated from Am. tricolor at young seedling (YSS, adult seedling (ASS, flower bud (FBS, and flowering (FS stages. A total of 99,312 unigenes were obtained. Using BLASTX, 43,088 unigenes (43.39% were found to have significant similarity with accessions in Nr, Nt, and Swiss-Prot databases. Of these unigenes, 11,291 were mapped to 266 KEGG pathways. Further analysis of the four digital transcriptomes revealed that 735, 17,184, 274, and 206 unigenes were specifically expressed during YSS, ASS, FBS, and FS, respectively, with 59,517 unigenes expressed throughout the four stages. These unigenes were involved in many metabolic pathways related to in vitro flowering. Among these pathways, 259 unigenes were associated with ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, indicating its importance for in vitro flowering in Am. tricolor. Other pathways, such as circadian rhythm and cell cycle, also had important roles. Finally, 26 unigenes were validated by qRT-PCR in samples from Am. tricolor at YSS, ASS, FBS, and FS; their differential expressions at the various stages indicate their possible roles in Am. tricolor growth and development, but the results were somewhat similar to Arabidopsis. Because unigenes involved in many metabolic pathways or of unknown function were revealed to regulate in vitro plantlet growth and flowering in Am. tricolor, the

  2. Biotelemetry transmitter implantation in rodents: impact on growth and circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Lisa R; Walker, Larry D; DuBose, David A; Stephenson, Lou A

    2004-05-01

    The implantation of a biotelemetry transmitter for core body temperature (T(c)) and motor activity (MA) measurements is hypothesized to have effects on growth and circadian rhythmicity depending on animal body-to-transmitter (B:T) size ratio. This study examined the impact of transmitter implantation (TM) on body weight, food intake (FI), water intake (WI), and circadian T(c) and MA rhythms in mice (23.8 +/- 0.04 g) and rats (311.5 +/- 5.1 g) receiving no treatment (NT), anesthesia, laparotomy (LAP), and TM. The B:T size ratio was 6:1 and 84:1 for mice and rats, respectively. In mice, body weight required 14 days to recover to presurgical levels and never attained the level of the other groups. FI recovered in 3 days, whereas WI never reached presurgical levels. Rat body weight did not decrease below presurgical levels. FI and WI recovered to presurgical levels in rats by day 2 postsurgery. Anesthesia decreased mouse body weight for 1 wk, but was without effect in rats. LAP significantly decreased body weight for 5 days in mice and 1 day in rats, showing a significant effect of the surgical procedure in the absence of TM in both species. Circadian T(c) and MA rhythms were evident within the first week in both species, indicating dissociation between circadian rhythmicity and recovery of growth variables. Cosinor analysis showed a TM effect on T(c) min, T(c) max, mesor, amplitude, and period of mice, whereas only the amplitude of the rhythm was affected in rats. These data indicate that a large B:T size ratio is associated with minimization of the adverse effects of surgical implantation. We recommend that B:T size ratio, recovery of presurgical body weight, and display of a robust circadian T(c) and MA rhythm be established before collection of biotelemetry data collection under an experimental paradigm.

  3. Circadian abnormalities in mouse models of Smith-Magenis syndrome: evidence for involvement of RAI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaria, Melanie; Gu, Wenli; Lupski, James R

    2013-07-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM 182290) is a genomic disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, and disordered sleep resulting from an ~3.7 Mb deletion copy number variant (CNV) on chromosome 17p11.2 or from point mutations in the gene RAI1. The reciprocal duplication of this region results in another genomic disorder, Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS; OMIM 610883), characterized by autism, intellectual disability, and congenital anomalies. We previously used chromosome-engineering and gene targeting to generate mouse models for PTLS (Dp(11)17/+), and SMS due to either deletion CNV or gene knock-out (Df(11)17-2/+ and Rai1(+/-) , respectively) and we observed phenotypes in these mouse models consistent with their associated human syndromes. To investigate the contribution of individual genes to the circadian phenotypes observed in SMS, we now report the analysis of free-running period lengths in Rai1(+/-) and Df(11)17-2/+ mice, as well as in mice deficient for another known circadian gene mapping within the commonly deleted/duplicated region, Dexras1, and we compare these results to those previously observed in Dp(11)17/+ mice. Reduced free-running period lengths were seen in Df(11)17-2/+, Rai1(+/-) , and Dexras1(-/-) , but not Dexras1(+/-) mice, suggesting that Rai1 may be the primary gene underlying the circadian defects in SMS. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that cis effects between multiple haploinsufficient genes in the SMS critical interval (e.g., RAI1 and DEXRAS1) either exacerbate the circadian phenotypes observed in SMS patients with deletions or increase their penetrance in certain environments. This study also confirms a previous report of abnormal circadian function in Dexras1(-/-) mice.

  4. Electrically active defects in silica-filled epoxy as revealed by light emission analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, E; Teyssedre, G; Laurent, C [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Rowe, S; Robiani, S, E-mail: christian.laurent@laplace.univ-tlse.f [Schneider Electric, Direction des Recherches Materiaux, rue Henri Tarze, F-38050 Grenoble (France)

    2009-08-21

    Epoxy resins have long been used as the insulation of electrical systems. They are generally formulated with a dispersion of micro-fillers to improve thermal and mechanical properties. However, there are concerns about the possible influence of these fillers on the electric behaviour, especially on the long term ageing under functional stresses. At the loose interface between matrix and fillers, macro- and micro-voids in the resin can provide weak points that are difficult to detect using conventional spectroscopy. Light emission analysis from the material under electrical stress is an efficient way to reveal such electrically active defects since internal ionizing events would give rise to photon emission. A detailed analysis of the light emitted by silica-filled and unfilled epoxy samples is presented. The photon counting technique, spectral analysis and imaging give a firm basis to discuss the contributing emission processes to the detected signal. They reveal the existence of ionizing events into internal defects. The sensitivity of the optical method is order of magnitudes higher than the sensitivity of conventional partial discharge detection.

  5. Phylogenomic Analysis Reveals Extensive Phylogenetic Mosaicism in the Human GPCR Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Woodwark

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel high throughput phylogenomic analysis (HTP was applied to the rhodopsin G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family. Instances of phylogenetic mosaicism between receptors were found to be frequent, often as instances of correlated mosaicism and repeated mosaicism. A null data set was constructed with the same phylogenetic topology as the rhodopsin GPCRs. Comparison of the two data sets revealed that mosaicism was found in GPCRs in a higher frequency than would be expected by homoplasy or the effects of topology alone. Various evolutionary models of differential conservation, recombination and homoplasy are explored which could result in the patterns observed in this analysis. We find that the results are most consistent with frequent recombination events. A complex evolutionary history is illustrated in which it is likely frequent recombination has endowed GPCRs with new functions. The pattern of mosaicism is shown to be informative for functional prediction for orphan receptors. HTP analysis is complementary to conventional phylogenomic analyses revealing mosaicism that would not otherwise have been detectable through conventional phylogenetics.

  6. Multilocus sequence analysis of nectar pseudomonads reveals high genetic diversity and contrasting recombination patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Alvarez-Pérez

    Full Text Available The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas 'sensu stricto' isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD. A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1; P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2; and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3. Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria.

  7. Influence of weeks of circadian misalignment on leptin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Nguyen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available June Nguyen, Kenneth P Wright JrDepartment of Integrative Physiology, Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USAAbstract: The neurobiology of circadian, wakefulness–sleep, and feeding systems interact to influence energy homeostasis. Sleep and circadian disruptions are reported to be associated with increased risk of diabetes and obesity, yet the roles of energy balance hormones in these associations are largely unknown. Therefore, in the current study we aimed to assess the influence of several weeks of circadian misalignment (sleep and wakefulness occurring at an inappropriate biological time on the anorexigenic adipocyte hormone leptin. We utilized data from a previous study designed to assess physiological and cognitive consequences of changes in day length and light exposure as may occur during space flight, including exploration class space missions and exposure to the Martian Sol (day length. We hypothesized that circadian misalignment during an exploration class spaceflight simulation would reduce leptin levels. Following a three-week ~8 hours per night home sleep schedule, 14 healthy participants lived in the laboratory for more than one month. After baseline data collection, participants were scheduled to either 24.0 or 24.6 hours of wakefulness–sleep schedules for 25 days. Changes in the phase of the circadian melatonin rhythm, sleep, and leptin levels were assessed. Half of participants analyzed exhibited circadian misalignment with an average change in phase angle from baseline of ~4 hours and these participants showed reduced leptin levels, sleep latency, stage 2 and total sleep time (7.3 to 6.6 hours and increased wakefulness after sleep onset (all P < 0.05. The control group remained synchronized and showed significant increases in sleep latency and leptin levels. Our findings indicate that weeks of circadian misalignment, such as that which occurs in circadian sleep disorders, alters leptin

  8. Circadian arrhythmia dysregulates emotional behaviors in aged Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Brian J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Patel, Priyesh N; Stevenson, Tyler J

    2014-03-15

    Emotional behaviors are influenced by the circadian timing system. Circadian disruptions are associated with depressive-like symptoms in clinical and preclinical populations. Circadian rhythm robustness declines markedly with aging and may contribute to susceptibility to emotional dysregulation in aged individuals. The present experiments used a model of chronic circadian arrhythmia generated noninvasively, via a series of circadian-disruptive light treatments, to investigate interactions between circadian desynchrony and aging on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, and on limbic neuroinflammatory gene expression that has been linked with emotionality. We also examined whether a social manipulation (group housing) would attenuate effects of arrhythmia on emotionality. In aged (14-18 months of age) male Siberian hamsters, circadian arrhythmia increased behavioral despair and decreased social motivation, but decreased exploratory anxiety. These effects were not evident in younger (5-9 months of age) hamsters. Social housing (3-5 hamsters/cage) abolished the effects of circadian arrhythmia on emotionality. Circadian arrhythmia alone was without effect on hippocampal or cortical interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (Ido) mRNA expression in aged hamsters, but social housing decreased hippocampal IL-1β and Ido mRNAs. The data demonstrate that circadian disruption can negatively impact affective state, and that this effect is pronounced in older individuals. Although clear associations between circadian arrhythmia and constitutive limbic proinflammatory activity were not evident, the present data suggest that social housing markedly inhibits constitutive hippocampal IL-1β and Ido activity, which may contribute to the ameliorating effects of social housing on a number of emotional behaviors.

  9. [Circadian rhythms and light responses of clock gene and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene expressions in the pineal gland of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Qing; Du, Yu-Zhen; Tong, Jian

    2005-02-25

    This study was to investigate the circadian rhythms and light responses of Clock gene and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) gene expressions in the rat pineal gland under the 12 h-light : 12 h-dark cycle condition (LD) and constant darkness (DD). Sprague-Dawley rats housed under the light regime of LD (n=36) for 4 weeks and of DD (n=36) for 8 weeks were sampled for the pineal gland once a group (n=6) every 4 h in a circadian day. The total RNA was extracted from each sample and the semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the temporal changes in mRNA levels of Clock and NAT genes during different circadian times or zeitgeber times. The data were analysed by the cosine function software, Clock Lab software and the amplitude F test was used to reveal the circadian rhythm. The main results obtained are as follows. (1) In DD or LD condition, both of Clock and NAT genes mRNA levels in the pineal gland showed robust circadian oscillation (Ppineal gland were significantly reduced (Ppineal gland (P> 0.05). These findings suggest that the expressions of Clock and NAT genes in the pineal gland not only show remarkably synchronous endogenous circadian rhythmic changes, but also response to the ambient light signal in a reduced manner.

  10. Melatonin promotes circadian rhythm-induced proliferation through Clock/histone deacetylase 3/c-Myc interaction in mouse adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Gan, Lu; Luo, Dan; Sun, Chao

    2017-05-01

    Melatonin is synthesized in the pineal gland and controls circadian rhythm of peripheral adipose tissue, resulting in changes in body weight. Although core regulatory components of clock rhythmicity have been defined, insight into the mechanisms of circadian rhythm-mediated proliferation in adipose tissue is still limited. Here, we showed that melatonin (20 mg/kg/d) promoted circadian and proliferation processes in white adipose tissue. The circadian amplitudes of brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like 1 (Bmal1, Pcircadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock, Pcycle and increased cell numbers (Pcircadian disruption and promoted adipocyte proliferation in chronic jet-lagged mice and obese mice. Thus, our study found that melatonin promoted adipocyte proliferation by forming a Clock/HDAC3/c-Myc complex and subsequently driving the circadian amplitudes of proliferation genes. Our data reveal a novel mechanism that links circadian rhythm to cell proliferation in adipose tissue. These findings also identify a new potential means for melatonin to prevent and treat sleep deprivation-caused obesity.

  11. High expression of the circadian gene mPer2 diminishes the radiosensitivity of NIH 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.; Liu, Y.Y.; Zhu, B.; Li, Y.; Hua, H.; Wang, Y.H.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, Z.; Wang, Z.R. [Sichuan University, Chengdu (China). West China Medical Center. Health Ministry Key Lab. of Chronobiology], e-mail: wangzhengrong@126.com

    2009-10-15

    Period2 is a core circadian gene, which not only maintains the circadian rhythm of cells but also regulates some organic functions. We investigated the effects of mPeriod2 (mPer2) expression on radiosensitivity in normal mouse cells exposed to {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-rays. NIH 3T3 cells were treated with 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) to induce endogenous mPer2 expression or transfected with pcDNA3.1(+)-mPer2 and irradiated with {sup 6}0Co-{gamma}-rays, and then analyzed by several methods such as flow cytometry, colony formation assay, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry and colony formation assay revealed that irradiated NIH 3T3 cells expressing high levels of mPer2 showed a lower death rate (TPA: 24 h 4.3% vs 12 h 6.8% and control 9.4%; transfection: pcDNA3.1-mPer2 3.7% vs pcDNA3.1 11.3% and control 8.2%), more proliferation and clonogenic survival (TPA: 121.7 {+-} 6.51 vs 66.0 {+-} 3.51 and 67.7 {+-} 7.37; transfection: 121.7 {+-} 6.50 vs 65.3 {+-} 3.51 and 69.0 {+-} 4.58) both when treated with TPA and transfected with mPer2. RT-PCR analysis showed an increased expression of bax, bcl-2, p53, cmyc, mre11, and nbs1, and an increased proportionality of bcl-2/bax in the irradiated cells at peak mPer2 expression compared with cells at trough mPer2 expression and control cells. However, no significant difference in rad50 expression was observed among the three groups of cells. Immunohistochemistry also showed increased protein levels of P53, BAX and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in irradiated cells with peak mPer2 levels. Thus, high expression of the circadian gene mPer2 may reduce the radiosensitivity of NIH 3T3 cells. For this effect, mPer2 may directly or indirectly regulate the expressions of cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related genes and DNA repair-related genes. (author)

  12. [New hypnotics ramelteon for the treatment of insomniacs with circadian rhythm disturbance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kazuo

    2012-06-01

    Ramelteon is a new class of sleep agent that selectively binds to the melatonin type 1 (MT1) and type 2 (MT2) receptors in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), instead of binding to GABA-A receptors such as with traditional hypnotics benzodiazepines. Ramelteon exhibits not only acute sleep-promoting effect but also circadian phase-shifting effect via MT1 and MT2 receptors respectively, and has been revealed to contribute to the treatment of acute and chronic insomnia in patients with circadian rhythm sleep disorders(sleep-wake rhythm disorders) or with inappropriate timing of sleep habits. Optimal administration plan for insomniac patients to induce these characteristic sleep-modulating effects by ramelteon was discussed.

  13. Photoperiod sensitivity of the Arabidopsis circadian clock is tissue-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hanako; Araki, Takashi; Endo, Motomu

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-specific functions of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis have recently been revealed. The vasculature clock shows distinctive gene expression profiles compared to the clock in other tissues under light-dark cycles. However, it has not yet been established whether the vasculature clock also shows unique gene expression patterns that correlate with temperature cycles, another important environmental cue. Here, we detected diel phase of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) expression in the vasculature and whole leaf under long-day light-dark cycles and temperature cycles. We found that the vasculature clock had advanced TOC1 phase under light-dark cycles but not under temperature cycles, suggesting that the vasculature clock has lower sensitivity against temperature signals. Furthermore, the phase advancement of TOC1 was seen only under long-day condition but not under short-day condition. These results support our previous conclusion that the circadian clock in vasculature preferentially senses photoperiodic signals.

  14. VNTR analysis reveals unexpected genetic diversity within Mycoplasma agalactiae, the main causative agent of contagious agalactia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayling Roger D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma agalactiae is the main cause of contagious agalactia, a serious disease of sheep and goats, which has major clinical and economic impacts. Previous studies of M. agalactiae have shown it to be unusually homogeneous and there are currently no available epidemiological techniques which enable a high degree of strain differentiation. Results We have developed variable number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis using the sequenced genome of the M. agalactiae type strain PG2. The PG2 genome was found to be replete with tandem repeat sequences and 4 were chosen for further analysis. VNTR 5 was located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170 a predicted lipoprotein. VNTR 14 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG3350 and the hypothetical protein MAG3340. VNTR 17 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG4060 and the hypothetical protein MAG4070 and VNTR 19 spanned the 5' end of the pseudogene for a lipoprotein MAG4310 and the 3' end of the hypothetical lipoprotein MAG4320. We have investigated the genetic diversity of 88 M. agalactiae isolates of wide geographic origin using VNTR analysis and compared it with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. Simpson's index of diversity was calculated to be 0.324 for PFGE and 0.574 for VNTR analysis. VNTR analysis revealed unexpected diversity within M. agalactiae with 9 different VNTR types discovered. Some correlation was found between geographical origin and the VNTR type of the isolates. Conclusion VNTR analysis represents a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. agalactiae for outbreak tracing and control.

  15. Interrelations and circadian changes of electroencephalogram frequencies under baseline conditions and constant sleep pressure in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasenkov, R; Deboer, T

    2011-04-28

    Similar to the nap-protocols applied in humans, the repeated short-sleep deprivation protocol in rats stabilizes slow-wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4 Hz) in the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), thus reflecting a constant sleep pressure or sleep homeostatic level, whereas higher frequencies (7-25 Hz) in these conditions preserve their daily rhythm, therefore demonstrating a strong input from an endogenous circadian clock. How different EEG frequencies in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and waking respond to these constant conditions, how they interrelate to each other within the different vigilance states, and which component of sleep regulation (homeostatic or circadian) is involved, remain unknown. To answer these questions, we applied power spectral analysis and correlation analysis to 1 Hz bin EEG frequency data for different vigilance states in freely moving rats in constant darkness, under baseline conditions and during the repeated short-sleep deprivation protocol. Our analysis suggests that (1) 0.5-5 Hz frequencies in NREM sleep and higher frequencies in REM sleep (above 19 Hz) and waking (above 10 Hz) are sleep-dependent, and thus seem to be under control of the sleep homeostat, while (2) faster frequencies in the NREM sleep EEG (7-25 Hz) and 3-7 Hz activity in the REM sleep EEG are under strong influence of the endogenous circadian clock. Theta activity in waking (5-7 Hz) seems to reflect both circadian and behavior dependent influences. NREM sleep EEG frequencies between 9 and 14 Hz showed both homeostatic and circadian components in their behavior. Thus, frequencies in the EEG of the different vigilance states seem to represent circadian and homeostatic components of sleep regulatory mechanisms, where REM sleep and waking frequency ranges behave similarly to each other and differently from NREM sleep frequencies.

  16. Chromosome-specific segmentation revealed by structural analysis of individually isolated chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Kunio; Taima, Akira; Ogasawara, Kiyomoto; Metsugi, Shouichi; Aikawa, Satoko

    2011-04-01

    Analysis of structural rearrangements at the individual chromosomal level is still technologically challenging. Here we optimized a chromosome isolation method using fluorescent marker-assisted laser-capture and laser-beam microdissection and applied it to structural analysis of two aberrant chromosomes found in a lung cancer cell line. A high-density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis of DNA samples prepared from each of the chromosomes revealed that these two chromosomes contained 296 and 263 segments, respectively, ranging from 1.5 kb to 784.3 kb in size, derived from different portions of chromosome 8. Among these segments, 242 were common in both aberrant chromosomes, but 75 were found to be chromosome-specific. Sequences of 263 junction sites connecting the ends of segments were determined using a PCR/Sanger-sequencing procedure. Overlapping microhomologies were found at 169 junction sites. Junction partners came from various portions of chromosome 8 and no biased pattern in the positional distribution of junction partners was detected. These structural characteristics suggested the occurrence of random fragmentation of the entire chromosome 8 followed by random rejoining of these fragments. Based on that, we proposed a model to explain how these aberrant chromosomes are formed. Through these structural analyses, it was demonstrated that the optimized chromosome isolation method described here can provide high-quality chromosomal DNA for high resolution array-CGH analysis and probably for massively parallel sequencing analysis.

  17. Complementary approaches to understanding the plant circadian clock

    CERN Document Server

    Akman, Ozgur E; Loewe, Laurence; Troein, Carl; 10.4204/EPTCS.19.1

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks are oscillatory genetic networks that help organisms adapt to the 24-hour day/night cycle. The clock of the green alga Ostreococcus tauri is the simplest plant clock discovered so far. Its many advantages as an experimental system facilitate the testing of computational predictions. We present a model of the Ostreococcus clock in the stochastic process algebra Bio-PEPA and exploit its mapping to different analysis techniques, such as ordinary differential equations, stochastic simulation algorithms and model-checking. The small number of molecules reported for this system tests the limits of the continuous approximation underlying differential equations. We investigate the difference between continuous-deterministic and discrete-stochastic approaches. Stochastic simulation and model-checking allow us to formulate new hypotheses on the system behaviour, such as the presence of self-sustained oscillations in single cells under constant light conditions. We investigate how to model the timing of...

  18. Reciprocal cholinergic and GABAergic modulation of the small ventrolateral pacemaker neurons of Drosophila's circadian clock neuron network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelito, Katherine R; Shafer, Orie T

    2012-04-01

    The relatively simple clock neuron network of Drosophila is a valuable model system for the neuronal basis of circadian timekeeping. Unfortunately, many key neuronal classes of this network are inaccessible to electrophysiological analysis. We have therefore adopted the use of genetically encoded sensors to address the physiology of the fly's circadian clock network. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) and cAMP sensors, we have investigated the physiological responses of two specific classes of clock neuron, the large and small ventrolateral neurons (l- and s-LN(v)s), to two neurotransmitters implicated in their modulation: acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Live imaging of l-LN(v) cAMP and Ca(2+) dynamics in response to cholinergic agonist and GABA application were well aligned with published electrophysiological data, indicating that our sensors were capable of faithfully reporting acute physiological responses to these transmitters within single adult clock neuron soma. We extended these live imaging methods to s-LN(v)s, critical neuronal pacemakers whose physiological properties in the adult brain are largely unknown. Our s-LN(v) experiments revealed the predicted excitatory responses to bath-applied cholinergic agonists and the predicted inhibitory effects of GABA and established that the antagonism of ACh and GABA extends to their effects on cAMP signaling. These data support recently published but physiologically untested models of s-LN(v) modulation and lead to the prediction that cholinergic and GABAergic inputs to s-LN(v)s will have opposing effects on the phase and/or period of the molecular clock within these critical pacemaker neurons.

  19. Proteomic analysis reveals novel proteins associated with progression and differentiation of colorectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Gan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study is to characterize differential proteomic expression among well-differentiation and poor-differentiation colorectal carcinoma tissues and normal mucous epithelium. Materials and Methods: The study is based on quantitative 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by PDquest. Results: Excluding redundancies due to proteolysis and posttranslational modified isoforms of over 600 protein spots, 11 proteins were revealed as regulated with statistical variance being within the 95 th confidence level and were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting in matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Progression-associated proteins belong to the functional complexes of tumorigenesis, proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and the regulation of major histocompatibility complex processing and other functions. Partial but significant overlap was revealed with previous proteomics and transcriptomics studies in CRC. Among various differentiation stage of CRC tissues, we identified calreticulin precursor, MHC class I antigen (human leukocyte antigen A , glutathione S-transferase pi1, keratin 8, heat shock protein 27, tubulin beta chain, triosephosphate, fatty acid-binding protein, hemoglobin (deoxy mutant with val b 1 replaced by met (HBB, and zinc finger protein 312 (FEZF2. Conclusions: Their functional networks were analyzed by Ingenuity systems Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and revealed the potential roles as novel biomarkers for progression in various differentiation stages of CRC.

  20. Analysis of miRNA market trends reveals hotspots of research activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosta, Gary; Razvi, Enal

    2012-04-01

    We have conducted an analysis of the miRNA research marketplace by evaluating the publication trends in the field. In this article, we present the results of our analysis which reveals that hotspots exist in terms of research activities in the miRNA space--these hotspots illustrate the areas in the miRNA research space where specific miRNAs have been extensively studied, and other areas that represent new territory. We frame these data into the context of areas of opportunity for miRNA content harvest versus segments of opportunity for the development of research tools. Also presented in this article are the primary market data from online surveys we have performed with researchers involved in miRNA research around the world. Taken together, these data frame the current state of the miRNA marketplace and provide niches of opportunity for new entrants into this space.

  1. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  2. Nature's knockout: the Mel1b receptor is not necessary for reproductive and circadian responses to melatonin in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, D R; Liu, C; Reppert, S M

    1996-11-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction and influences the timing of circadian rhythms. The Mel1a and Mel1b receptors are the high-affinity melatonin receptors present in mammals. Unexpectedly, the Mel1b receptor gene of the Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus, cannot encode a functional receptor; two nonsense mutations are present within the coding region. Southern blot analysis indicates that this is a single copy gene. The Mel1b receptor gene is nonfunctional in outbred populations of P. sungorus and Phodopus campbelli. Siberian hamsters lacking a functional Mel1b receptor nevertheless show seasonal reproductive and circadian responses to melatonin, indicating that the Mel1b receptor is not necessary for these responses. These data support the hypothesis that the Mel1a receptor, which does encode a functional receptor in this species, mediates reproductive and circadian responses to melatonin.

  3. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  4. A beamformer analysis of MEG data reveals frontal generators of the musically elicited mismatch negativity.

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    Claudia Lappe

    Full Text Available To localize the neural generators of the musically elicited mismatch negativity with high temporal resolution we conducted a beamformer analysis (Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry, SAM on magnetoencephalography (MEG data from a previous musical mismatch study. The stimuli consisted of a six-tone melodic sequence comprising broken chords in C- and G-major. The musical sequence was presented within an oddball paradigm in which the last tone was lowered occasionally (20% by a minor third. The beamforming analysis revealed significant right hemispheric neural activation in the superior temporal (STC, inferior frontal (IFC, superior frontal (SFC and orbitofrontal (OFC cortices within a time window of 100-200 ms after the occurrence of a deviant tone. IFC and SFC activation was also observed in the left hemisphere. The pronounced early right inferior frontal activation of the auditory mismatch negativity has not been shown in MEG studies so far. The activation in STC and IFC is consistent with earlier electroencephalography (EEG, optical imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies that reveal the auditory and inferior frontal cortices as main generators of the auditory MMN. The observed right hemispheric IFC is also in line with some previous music studies showing similar activation patterns after harmonic syntactic violations. The results demonstrate that a deviant tone within a musical sequence recruits immediately a distributed neural network in frontal and prefrontal areas suggesting that top-down processes are involved when expectation violation occurs within well-known stimuli.

  5. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchell, Karla J F; Jones, Christopher J; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates.

  6. The cholinergic system, circadian rhythmicity, and time memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, R. A.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the interaction between the mammalian cholinergic system and circadian system, and its possible role in time memory. Several studies made clear that circadian (daily) fluctuations in acetylcholine (ACh) release, cholinergic enzyme activity and cholinergic receptor

  7. Circadian rhythms and endocrine functions in adult insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Guy; Hazan, Esther; Rafaeli, Ada

    2013-01-01

    Many behavioral and physiological processes in adult insects are influenced by both the endocrine and circadian systems, suggesting that these two key physiological systems interact. We reviewed the literature and found that experiments explicitly testing these interactions in adult insects have only been conducted for a few species. There is a shortage of measurements of hormone titers throughout the day under constant conditions even for the juvenile hormones (JHs) and ecdysteroids, the best studied insect hormones. Nevertheless, the available measurements of hormone titers coupled with indirect evidence for circadian modulation of hormone biosynthesis rate, and the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in hormone biosynthesis, binding or degradation are consistent with the hypothesis that the circulating levels of many insect hormones are influenced by the circadian system. Whole genome microarray studies suggest that the modulation of farnesol oxidase levels is important for the circadian regulation of JH biosynthesis in honey bees, mosquitoes, and fruit flies. Several studies have begun to address the functional significance of circadian oscillations in endocrine signaling. The best understood system is the circadian regulation of Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) titers which is important for the temporal organization of sexual behavior in female moths. The evidence that the circadian and endocrine systems interact has important implications for studies of insect physiology and behavior. Additional studies on diverse species and physiological processes are needed for identifying basic principles underlying the interactions between the circadian and endocrine systems in insects.

  8. CRY links the circadian clock and CREB-mediated gluconeogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Megumi Hatori; Satchidananda Panda

    2010-01-01

    @@ Circadian oscillators based on a transcriptional feedback loop exist in almost all cells of animals. The cellular oscillators synchronize each other via paracrine or systemic communications,resulting in rhythmic changes of tissue- and whole body-level physiologies and behaviors. Circadian regulation of metabolism is well documented and disruption of such temporal regulation is known to predispose organisms to metabolic diseases.

  9. The circadian response of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

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    Andrew J Zele

    Full Text Available Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC signal environmental light level to the central circadian clock and contribute to the pupil light reflex. It is unknown if ipRGC activity is subject to extrinsic (central or intrinsic (retinal network-mediated circadian modulation during light entrainment and phase shifting. Eleven younger persons (18-30 years with no ophthalmological, medical or sleep disorders participated. The activity of the inner (ipRGC and outer retina (cone photoreceptors was assessed hourly using the pupil light reflex during a 24 h period of constant environmental illumination (10 lux. Exogenous circadian cues of activity, sleep, posture, caffeine, ambient temperature, caloric intake and ambient illumination were controlled. Dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO was determined from salivary melatonin assay at hourly intervals, and participant melatonin onset values were set to 14 h to adjust clock time to circadian time. Here we demonstrate in humans that the ipRGC controlled post-illumination pupil response has a circadian rhythm independent of external light cues. This circadian variation precedes melatonin onset and the minimum ipRGC driven pupil response occurs post melatonin onset. Outer retinal photoreceptor contributions to the inner retinal ipRGC driven post-illumination pupil response also show circadian variation whereas direct outer retinal cone inputs to the pupil light reflex do not, indicating that intrinsically photosensitive (melanopsin retinal ganglion cells mediate this circadian variation.

  10. Associations between circadian and stress response cortisol in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, S.S.H.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Weerth, C. de

    2017-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning is characterized by the baseline production of cortisol following a circadian rhythm, as well as by the superimposed production of cortisol in response to a stressor. However, it is relatively unknown whether the basal cortisol circadian rhythm i

  11. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Uduak S; Valcin, Jennifer A; Gamble, Karen L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2015-10-14

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  12. Assignment of circadian function for the Neurospora clock gene frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, Martha; Brunner, Michael; Roenneberg, Till

    1999-01-01

    Circadian clocks consist of three elements: entrainment pathways (inputs), the mechanism generating the rhythmicity (oscillator), and the output pathways that control the circadian rhythms. It is difficult to assign molecular clock components to any one of these elements. Experiments show that input

  13. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uduak S. Udoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  14. Heritable circadian period length in a wild bird population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, Barbara; Visser, Marcel E.

    2010-01-01

    Timing is essential, but circadian clocks, which play a crucial role in timekeeping, are almost unaddressed in evolutionary ecology. A key property of circadian clocks is their free-running period length (tau), i.e. the time taken for a full cycle under constant conditions. Under laboratory conditio

  15. Circadian aspects of hyperthermia in mice induced by Aconitum napellus

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    Salvador Sánchez de la Peña

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aconitum napellus (Acn is used topically to relieve pain, itching and inflammation, and internally to reduce febrile states, among others. Any circadian time-related consequences of Acn administration are unknown. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of two doses of Acn on body temperature (BT of mice treated at six different times over 24 hours. Materials and Methods: BALB/c female mice were housed in six chambers (six mice each with air temperature 24 ± 3°C, humidity 60 ± 4%, and a 12-hours light (L/12-hours dark cycle, but with L-onset staggered by 4 hours between chambers so that study at one external test time resulted in six test times (02, 06, 10, 14, 18 and 22 hours [h] after light onset. Rectal temperature (RT; in °C was measured at baseline (B and 1 hour after oral treatment with placebo (P or two doses of Acn (6C and 30C, two studies each in six studies over an 8 day span. The difference in RT for each mouse from the respective B + P timepoint mean RT was computed following each Acn treatment, and data from each of the six studies (original RT and difference from B + P were analyzed for time-effect by analysis of variance (ANOVA and for circadian rhythm by 24-hour cosine fitting. Results: A circadian rhythm in RT was found at B and after P (mean: 35.58°C vs. 35.69°C; peak: 15:31 h vs. 15:40 h and after each Acn dose (30C or 6C. Acn induced hyperthermia and the overall change in BT was rhythmically significant for each dose (mean = +1.95°C vs. +1.70°C, with greatest hyperthermia observed during the L-span for each dose (peak = 08:56 h vs. 05:17 h. Conclusion: Acn administered around the clock induced hyperthermia overall and in a time-dependent manner, with greatest effects during the resting (L span. Thus, time of day may significantly impact the outcome of Acn and other homeopathic treatments and should be considered in determining optimal dosing and treatment time(s in order to increase the

  16. Circadian aspects of hyperthermia in mice induced by Aconitum napellus

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Salvador Sánchez; Sothern, Robert B.; López, Fernando Santillán; Lujambio, Irene Mendoza; Waizel-Bucay, José; Sánchez, Carolina Olarte; Monroy, Claudia Pérez; Betancourt, Eduardo Tena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aconitum napellus (Acn) is used topically to relieve pain, itching and inflammation, and internally to reduce febrile states, among others. Any circadian time-related consequences of Acn administration are unknown. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of two doses of Acn on body temperature (BT) of mice treated at six different times over 24 hours. Materials and Methods: BALB/c female mice were housed in six chambers (six mice each) with air temperature 24 ± 3°C, humidity 60 ± 4%, and a 12-hours light (L)/12-hours dark cycle, but with L-onset staggered by 4 hours between chambers so that study at one external test time resulted in six test times (02, 06, 10, 14, 18 and 22 hours [h] after light onset). Rectal temperature (RT; in °C) was measured at baseline (B) and 1 hour after oral treatment with placebo (P) or two doses of Acn (6C and 30C, two studies each) in six studies over an 8 day span. The difference in RT for each mouse from the respective B + P timepoint mean RT was computed following each Acn treatment, and data from each of the six studies (original RT and difference from B + P) were analyzed for time-effect by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and for circadian rhythm by 24-hour cosine fitting. Results: A circadian rhythm in RT was found at B and after P (mean: 35.58°C vs. 35.69°C; peak: 15:31 h vs. 15:40 h) and after each Acn dose (30C or 6C). Acn induced hyperthermia and the overall change in BT was rhythmically significant for each dose (mean = +1.95°C vs. +1.70°C), with greatest hyperthermia observed during the L-span for each dose (peak = 08:56 h vs. 05:17 h). Conclusion: Acn administered around the clock induced hyperthermia overall and in a time-dependent manner, with greatest effects during the resting (L) span. Thus, time of day may significantly impact the outcome of Acn and other homeopathic treatments and should be considered in determining optimal dosing and treatment time(s) in order to increase the desired

  17. Gene set based integrated data analysis reveals phenotypic differences in a brain cancer model.

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    Kjell Petersen

    Full Text Available A key challenge in the data analysis of biological high-throughput experiments is to handle the often low number of samples in the experiments compared to the number of biomolecules that are simultaneously measured. Combining experimental data using independent technologies to illuminate the same biological trends, as well as complementing each other in a larger perspective, is one natural way to overcome this challenge. In this work we investigated if integrating proteomics and transcriptomics data from a brain cancer animal model using gene set based analysis methodology, could enhance the biological interpretation of the data relative to more traditional analysis of the two datasets individually. The brain cancer model used is based on serial passaging of transplanted human brain tumor material (glioblastoma--GBM through several generations in rats. These serial transplantations lead over time to genotypic and phenotypic changes in the tumors and represent a medically relevant model with a rare access to samples and where consequent analyses of individual datasets have revealed relatively few significant findings on their own. We found that the integrated analysis both performed better in terms of significance measure of its findings compared to individual analyses, as well as providing independent verification of the individual results. Thus a better context for overall biological interpretation of the data can be achieved.

  18. Rhythmic Degradation Explains and Unifies Circadian Transcriptome and Proteome Data

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    Sarah Lück

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rich mammalian cellular circadian output affects thousands of genes in many cell types and has been the subject of genome-wide transcriptome and proteome studies. The results have been enigmatic because transcript peak abundances do not always follow the peaks of gene-expression activity in time. We posited that circadian degradation of mRNAs and proteins plays a pivotal role in setting their peak times. To establish guiding principles, we derived a theoretical framework that fully describes the amplitudes and phases of biomolecules with circadian half-lives. We were able to explain the circadian transcriptome and proteome studies with the same unifying theory, including cases in which transcripts or proteins appeared before the onset of increased production rates. Furthermore, we estimate that 30% of the circadian transcripts in mouse liver and Drosophila heads are affected by rhythmic posttranscriptional regulation.

  19. The in vitro real-time oscillation monitoring system identifies potential entrainment factors for circadian clocks

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    Yasuda Akio

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circadian rhythms are endogenous, self-sustained oscillations with approximately 24-hr rhythmicity that are manifested in various physiological and metabolic processes. The circadian organization of these processes in mammals is governed by the master oscillator within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN of the hypothalamus. Recent findings revealed that circadian oscillators exist in most organs, tissues, and even in immortalized cells, and that the oscillators in peripheral tissues are likely to be coordinated by SCN, the master oscillator. Some candidates for endogenous entrainment factors have sporadically been reported, however, their details remain mainly obscure. Results We developed the in vitro real-time oscillation monitoring system (IV-ROMS by measuring the activity of luciferase coupled to the oscillatory gene promoter using photomultiplier tubes and applied this system to screen and identify factors able to influence circadian rhythmicity. Using this IV-ROMS as the primary screening of entrainment factors for circadian clocks, we identified 12 candidates as the potential entrainment factor in a total of 299 peptides and bioactive lipids. Among them, four candidates (endothelin-1, all-trans retinoic acid, 9-cis retinoic acid, and 13-cis retinoic acid have already been reported as the entrainment factors in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrated that one of the novel candidates, 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2, a natural ligand of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ, triggers the rhythmic expression of endogenous clock genes in NIH3T3 cells. Furthermore, we showed that 15d-PGJ2 transiently induces Cry1, Cry2, and Rorα mRNA expressions and that 15d-PGJ2-induced entrainment signaling pathway is PPAR-γ – and MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38MAPK-independent. Conclusion Here, we identified 15d-PGJ2 as an entrainment factor in vitro. Using our developed IV-ROMS to screen 299 compounds, we found eight

  20. Diversity of eukaryotic DNA replication origins revealed by genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure.

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    Nicolas M Berbenetz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic DNA replication origins differ both in their efficiency and in the characteristic time during S phase when they become active. The biological basis for these differences remains unknown, but they could be a consequence of chromatin structure. The availability of genome-wide maps of nucleosome positions has led to an explosion of information about how nucleosomes are assembled at transcription start sites, but no similar maps exist for DNA replication origins. Here we combine high-resolution genome-wide nucleosome maps with comprehensive annotations of DNA replication origins to identify patterns of nucleosome occupancy at eukaryotic replication origins. On average, replication origins contain a nucleosome depleted region centered next to the ACS element, flanked on both sides by arrays of well-positioned nucleosomes. Our analysis identified DNA sequence properties that correlate with nucleosome occupancy at replication origins genome-wide and that are correlated with the nucleosome-depleted region. Clustering analysis of all annotated replication origins revealed a surprising diversity of nucleosome occupancy patterns. We provide evidence that the origin recognition complex, which binds to the origin, acts as a barrier element to position and phase nucleosomes on both sides of the origin. Finally, analysis of chromatin reconstituted in vitro reveals that origins are inherently nucleosome depleted. Together our data provide a comprehensive, genome-wide view of chromatin structure at replication origins and suggest a model of nucleosome positioning at replication origins in which the underlying sequence occludes nucleosomes to permit binding of the origin recognition complex, which then (likely in concert with nucleosome modifiers and remodelers positions nucleosomes adjacent to the origin to promote replication origin function.

  1. Evaluating the influence of sleep deprivation upon circadian rhythms of exercise metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelpare, W J; Plyley, M J; Shephard, R J

    1992-06-01

    Cardiorespiratory and gas exchange responses to a moderate, standardized treadmill walking task showed a weak circadian rhythm, with larger superimposed peaks attributable to feeding. However, both rhythms became progressively attenuated during a period of sleep deprivation. A method of exploring this phenomenon is illustrated by an analysis of data on walking heart rate, respiratory minute volume, oxygen intake, and rating of perceived exertion, collected on 11 young men at 3-hr intervals during 60 hours of sleep deprivation.

  2. The Circadian Rhythm Gene Arntl2 Is a Metastasis Susceptibility Gene for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer.

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    Ngoc-Han Ha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer mortality is primarily due to metastasis rather than primary tumors, yet relatively little is understood regarding the etiology of metastatic breast cancer. Previously, using a mouse genetics approach, we demonstrated that inherited germline polymorphisms contribute to metastatic disease, and that these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs could be used to predict outcome in breast cancer patients. In this study, a backcross between a highly metastatic (FVB/NJ and low metastatic (MOLF/EiJ mouse strain identified Arntl2, a gene encoding a circadian rhythm transcription factor, as a metastasis susceptibility gene associated with progression, specifically in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Integrated whole genome sequence analysis with DNase hypersensitivity sites reveals SNPs in the predicted promoter of Arntl2. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated substitution of the MOLF promoter, we demonstrate that the SNPs regulate Arntl2 transcription and affect metastatic burden. Finally, analysis of SNPs associated with ARNTL2 expression in human breast cancer patients revealed reproducible associations of ARNTL2 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL SNPs with disease-free survival, consistent with the mouse studies.

  3. The Circadian Rhythm Gene Arntl2 Is a Metastasis Susceptibility Gene for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ngoc-Han; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer mortality is primarily due to metastasis rather than primary tumors, yet relatively little is understood regarding the etiology of metastatic breast cancer. Previously, using a mouse genetics approach, we demonstrated that inherited germline polymorphisms contribute to metastatic disease, and that these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be used to predict outcome in breast cancer patients. In this study, a backcross between a highly metastatic (FVB/NJ) and low metastatic (MOLF/EiJ) mouse strain identified Arntl2, a gene encoding a circadian rhythm transcription factor, as a metastasis susceptibility gene associated with progression, specifically in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Integrated whole genome sequence analysis with DNase hypersensitivity sites reveals SNPs in the predicted promoter of Arntl2. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated substitution of the MOLF promoter, we demonstrate that the SNPs regulate Arntl2 transcription and affect metastatic burden. Finally, analysis of SNPs associated with ARNTL2 expression in human breast cancer patients revealed reproducible associations of ARNTL2 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) SNPs with disease-free survival, consistent with the mouse studies. PMID:27656887

  4. Quantitative Neuropeptidome Analysis Reveals Neuropeptides Are Correlated with Social Behavior Regulation of the Honeybee Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Hu, Han; Qi, Yuping; Huo, Xinmei; Meng, Lifeng; Wu, Bin; Li, Jianke

    2015-10-01

    Neuropeptides play vital roles in orchestrating neural communication and physiological modulation in organisms, acting as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. The highly evolved social structure of honeybees is a good system for understanding how neuropeptides regulate social behaviors; however, much knowledge on neuropeptidomic variation in the age-related division of labor remains unknown. An in-depth comparison of the brain neuropeptidomic dynamics over four time points of age-related polyethism was performed on two strains of honeybees, the Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica, ITb) and the high royal jelly producing bee (RJb, selected for increasing royal jelly production for almost four decades from the ITb in China). Among the 158 identified nonredundant neuropeptides, 77 were previously unreported, significantly expanding the coverage of the honeybee neuropeptidome. The fact that 14 identical neuropeptide precursors changed their expression levels during the division of labor in both the ITb and RJb indicates they are highly related to task transition of honeybee workers. These observations further suggest the two lines of bees employ a similar neuropeptidome modification to tune their respective physiology of age polyethism via regulating excretory system, circadian clock system, and so forth. Noticeably, the enhanced level of neuropeptides implicated in regulating water homeostasis, brood pheromone recognition, foraging capacity, and pollen collection in RJb signify the fact that neuropeptides are also involved in the regulation of RJ secretion. These findings gain novel understanding of honeybee neuropeptidome correlated with social behavior regulation, which is potentially important in neurobiology for honeybees and other insects.

  5. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

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    Kumarasamy Sivarajan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediabetes (PreDM in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV. Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S rats (n = 19 after weaning were fed either an American (AD or a standard (SD diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin, and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP and heart rate (HR were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day and active (night periods. Pulse pressure (PP was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP. Results [mean(SEM]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental basis for examining the relationship between dysglycemia and perturbation of the underlying mechanisms (adipose tissue dysfunction induced local and systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and alteration of adipose tissue precursors for the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system which generate abnormal CBPV.

  6. Circadian rhythms in floral scent emission

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    Myles eFenske

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To successfully recruit pollinators, plants often release attractive floral scents at specific times of day to coincide with pollinator foraging. This timing of scent emission is thought to be evolutionarily beneficial to maximize resource efficiency while attracting only useful pollinators. Temporal regulation of scent emission is tied to the activity of the specific metabolic pathways responsible for scent production. Although floral volatile profiling in various plants indicated a contribution by the circadian clock, the mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates timing of floral scent emission remained elusive. Recent studies using two species in the Solanaceae family provided initial insight into molecular clock regulation of scent emission timing. In Petunia hybrida, the benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP pathway is the major metabolic pathway that produces floral volatiles. Three MYB-type transcription factors, ODORANT1 (ODO1, EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS I (EOBI, and EOBII, all of which show diurnal rhythms in mRNA expression, act as positive regulators for several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway. Recently, in P. hybrida and Nicotiana attenuata, homologs of the Arabidopsis clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY have been shown to have a similar role in the circadian clock in these plants, and to also determine the timing of scent emission. In addition, in P. hybrida, PhLHY directly represses ODO1 and several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway during the morning as an important negative regulator of scent emission. These findings facilitate our understanding of the relationship between a molecular timekeeper and the timing of scent emission, which may influence reproductive success.

  7. Circadian molecular clock in lung pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Isaac K; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-11-15

    Disrupted daily or circadian rhythms of lung function and inflammatory responses are common features of chronic airway diseases. At the molecular level these circadian rhythms depend on the activity of an autoregulatory feedback loop oscillator of clock gene transcription factors, including the BMAL1:CLOCK activator complex and the repressors PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME. The key nuclear receptors and transcription factors REV-ERBα and RORα regulate Bmal1 expression and provide stability to the oscillator. Circadian clock dysfunction is implicated in both immune and inflammatory responses to environmental, inflammatory, and infectious agents. Molecular clock function is altered by exposomes, tobacco smoke, lipopolysaccharide, hyperoxia, allergens, bleomycin, as well as bacterial and viral infections. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates the timing of the clock through acetylation of BMAL1 and PER2 and controls the clock-dependent functions, which can also be affected by environmental stressors. Environmental agents and redox modulation may alter the levels of REV-ERBα and RORα in lung tissue in association with a heightened DNA damage response, cellular senescence, and inflammation. A reciprocal relationship exists between the molecular clock and immune/inflammatory responses in the lungs. Molecular clock function in lung cells may be used as a biomarker of disease severity and exacerbations or for assessing the efficacy of chronotherapy for disease management. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of clock-controlled cellular and molecular functions in the lungs and highlight the repercussions of clock disruption on the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases and their exacerbations. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for the molecular clock as a novel chronopharmacological target for the management of lung pathophysiology.

  8. High-throughput sequencing and pathway analysis reveal alteration of the pituitary transcriptome by 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) in female coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Louisa B. [School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Schultz, Irvin R. [Battelle, Marine Sciences Laboratory – Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 1529 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim, WA 98382 (United States); Goetz, Giles W. [School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Luckenbach, J. Adam [Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA 98112 (United States); Center for Reproductive Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 98164 (United States); Young, Graham [School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center for Reproductive Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 98164 (United States); Goetz, Frederick W. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Manchester Research Station, P.O. Box 130, Manchester, WA 98353 (United States); Swanson, Penny, E-mail: penny.swanson@noaa.gov [Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA 98112 (United States); Center for Reproductive Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 98164 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Studied impacts of ethynylestradiol (EE2) exposure on salmon pituitary transcriptome. •High-throughput sequencing, RNAseq, and pathway analysis were performed. •EE2 altered mRNAs for genes in circadian rhythm, GnRH, and TGFβ signaling pathways. •LH and FSH beta subunit mRNAs were most highly up- and down-regulated by EE2, respectively. •Estrogens may alter processes associated with reproductive timing in salmon. -- Abstract: Considerable research has been done on the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on reproduction and gene expression in the brain, liver and gonads of teleost fish, but information on impacts to the pituitary gland are still limited despite its central role in regulating reproduction. The aim of this study was to further our understanding of the potential effects of natural and synthetic estrogens on the brain–pituitary–gonad axis in fish by determining the effects of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) on the pituitary transcriptome. We exposed sub-adult coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to 0 or 12 ng EE2/L for up to 6 weeks and effects on the pituitary transcriptome of females were assessed using high-throughput Illumina{sup ®} sequencing, RNA-Seq and pathway analysis. After 1 or 6 weeks, 218 and 670 contiguous sequences (contigs) respectively, were differentially expressed in pituitaries of EE2-exposed fish relative to control. Two of the most highly up- and down-regulated contigs were luteinizing hormone β subunit (241-fold and 395-fold at 1 and 6 weeks, respectively) and follicle-stimulating hormone β subunit (−3.4-fold at 6 weeks). Additional contigs related to gonadotropin synthesis and release were differentially expressed in EE2-exposed fish relative to controls. These included contigs involved in gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH) and transforming growth factor-β signaling. There was an over-representation of significantly affected contigs in 33 and 18 canonical pathways at 1 and 6 weeks

  9. Light entrained rhythmic gene expression in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis: the evolution of the animal circadian clock.

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    Adam M Reitzel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian rhythms in behavior and physiology are the observable phenotypes from cycles in expression of, interactions between, and degradation of the underlying molecular components. In bilaterian animals, the core molecular components include Timeless-Timeout, photoreceptive cryptochromes, and several members of the basic-loop-helix-Per-ARNT-Sim (bHLH-PAS family. While many of core circadian genes are conserved throughout the Bilateria, their specific roles vary among species. Here, we identify and experimentally study the rhythmic gene expression of conserved circadian clock members in a sea anemone in order to characterize this gene network in a member of the phylum Cnidaria and to infer critical components of the clockwork used in the last common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified homologs of circadian regulatory genes in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, including a gene most similar to Timeout, three cryptochromes, and several key bHLH-PAS transcription factors. We then maintained N. vectensis either in complete darkness or in a 12 hour light: 12 hour dark cycle in three different light treatments (blue only, full spectrum, blue-depleted. Gene expression varied in response to light cycle and light treatment, with a particularly strong pattern observed for NvClock. The cryptochromes more closely related to the light-sensitive clade of cryptochromes were upregulated in light treatments that included blue wavelengths. With co-immunoprecipitation, we determined that heterodimerization between CLOCK and CYCLE is conserved within N. vectensis. Additionally, we identified E-box motifs, DNA sequences recognized by the CLOCK:CYCLE heterodimer, upstream of genes showing rhythmic expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study reveals conserved molecular and functional components of the circadian clock that were in place at the divergence of the Cnidaria and Bilateria, suggesting

  10. Dynamic functional connectivity analysis reveals transient states of dysconnectivity in schizophrenia

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    E. Damaraju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder characterized by functional dysconnectivity or abnormal integration between distant brain regions. Recent functional imaging studies have implicated large-scale thalamo-cortical connectivity as being disrupted in patients. However, observed connectivity differences in schizophrenia have been inconsistent between studies, with reports of hyperconnectivity and hypoconnectivity between the same brain regions. Using resting state eyes-closed functional imaging and independent component analysis on a multi-site data that included 151 schizophrenia patients and 163 age- and gender matched healthy controls, we decomposed the functional brain data into 100 components and identified 47 as functionally relevant intrinsic connectivity networks. We subsequently evaluated group differences in functional network connectivity, both in a static sense, computed as the pairwise Pearson correlations between the full network time courses (5.4 minutes in length, and a dynamic sense, computed using sliding windows (44 s in length and k-means clustering to characterize five discrete functional connectivity states. Static connectivity analysis revealed that compared to healthy controls, patients show significantly stronger connectivity, i.e., hyperconnectivity, between the thalamus and sensory networks (auditory, motor and visual, as well as reduced connectivity (hypoconnectivity between sensory networks from all modalities. Dynamic analysis suggests that (1, on average, schizophrenia patients spend much less time than healthy controls in states typified by strong, large-scale connectivity, and (2, that abnormal connectivity patterns are more pronounced during these connectivity states. In particular, states exhibiting cortical–subcortical antagonism (anti-correlations and strong positive connectivity between sensory networks are those that show the group differences of thalamic hyperconnectivity and sensory hypoconnectivity

  11. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The circadian master clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the clock of the SCN is driven by a transcriptional/posttranslational autoregulatory network with clock gene products as core elements. Recent investigations...... have shown the presence of peripheral clocks in extra-hypothalamic areas of the central nervous system. However, knowledge on the clock gene network in the cerebral cortex is limited. We here show that the mammalian clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Bmal1, Clock, Nr1d1 and Dbp are expressed...

  12. Circadian Kisspeptin expression in human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pedro, M A; Morán, J; Díaz, I; Murias, L; Fernández-Plaza, C; González, C; Díaz, E

    2015-11-01

    Kisspeptin is an essential gatekeeper of reproductive function. During pregnancy high circulating levels of kisspeptin have been described, however the clear role of this neuropeptide in pregnancy remains unknown. We tested the existence of rhythmic kisspeptin expression in human full-term placenta from healthy pregnant women at six different time points during the day. The data obtained by Western blotting were fitted to a mathematical model (Fourier series), demonstrating, for the first time, the existence of a circadian rhythm in placental kisspeptin expression.

  13. The mammalian circadian clock protein period counteracts cryptochrome in phosphorylation dynamics of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Ritsuko; Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Tokuda, Isao; Matsuo, Takahiro; Sato, Miho; Node, Koichi; Nishida, Eisuke; Akashi, Makoto

    2014-11-14

    The circadian transcription factor CLOCK exhibits a circadian oscillation in its phosphorylation levels. Although it remains unclear whether this phosphorylation contributes to circadian rhythm generation, it has been suggested to be involved in transcriptional activity, intracellular localization, and degradative turnover of CLOCK. Here, we obtained direct evidence that CLOCK phosphorylation may be essential for autonomous circadian oscillation in clock gene expression. Importantly, we found that the circadian transcriptional repressors Cryptochrome (CRY) and Period (PER) showed an opposite effect on CLOCK phosphorylation; CRY impaired BMAL1-dependent CLOCK phosphorylation, whereas PER protected the phosphorylation against CRY. Interestingly, unlike PER1 and PER2, PER3 did not exert a protective action, which correlates with the phenotypic differences among mice lacking the Per genes. Further studies on the regulatory mechanism of CLOCK phosphorylation would thus lead to elucidation of the mechanism of CRY-mediated transcriptional repression and an understanding of the true role of PER in the negative feedback system.

  14. EFFECT OF GENDER DIFFERENCE AND CIRCADIAN RHYTHM ON DIASTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE FOR VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rajagopal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to find out the effect of gender difference and circadian rhythm on diastolic blood pressure for volleyball players. METHODS: To achieve the purpose, a total of thirty volleyball players [men (n = 15 and women (n = 15] age between 19 years and 22 years from Einstein College of Engineering, Tamil Nadu, India were selected as subjects. The two independent variables of gender and circadian variations and dependent variable of diastolic blood pressure were selected for this study. The experimental design used was static group factorial design. The data were collected at 02:00, 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00 and 22:00 hours on diastolic blood pressure by using Erkameter during the academic year of 2009 – 2010. Collected data were subjected to statistical analysis by using two-way factorial (2 x 6 Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Cosinor analysis. RESULTS: There was insignificant difference between genders, significant difference at different times of the day and insignificant circadian rhythmicity exists on diastolic blood pressure for women and significant for men. CONCLUSION: It is recommended to the physical educators to adopt the findings of this study while planning to improve sports skills for the players and athletes.

  15. Genes influencing circadian differences in blood pressure in hypertensive mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Z Marques

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension is a common multifactorial heritable condition in which increased sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system is involved in the elevation in blood pressure (BP, as well as the exaggerated morning surge in BP that is a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke in hypertensive patients. The Schlager BPH/2J mouse is a genetic model of hypertension in which increased sympathetic outflow from the hypothalamus has an important etiological role in the elevation of BP. Schlager hypertensive mice exhibit a large variation in BP between the active and inactive periods of the day, and also show a morning surge in BP. To investigate the genes responsible for the circadian variation in BP in hypertension, hypothalamic tissue was collected from BPH/2J and normotensive BPN/3J mice at the 'peak' (n = 12 and 'trough' (n = 6 of diurnal BP. Using Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays, validation by quantitative real-time PCR and a statistical method that adjusted for clock genes, we identified 212 hypothalamic genes whose expression differed between 'peak' and 'trough' BP in the hypertensive strain. These included genes with known roles in BP regulation, such as vasopressin, oxytocin and thyrotropin releasing hormone, as well as genes not recognized previously as regulators of BP, including chemokine (C-C motif ligand 19, hypocretin and zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of terms for inflammatory response, mitochondrial proton-transporting ATP synthase complex, structural constituent of ribosome, amongst others. In conclusion, we have identified genes whose expression differs between the peak and trough of 24-hour circadian BP in BPH/2J mice, pointing to mechanisms responsible for diurnal variation in BP. The findings may assist in the elucidation of the mechanism for the morning surge in BP in essential hypertension.

  16. Genes influencing circadian differences in blood pressure in hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francine Z; Campain, Anna E; Davern, Pamela J; Yang, Yee Hwa J; Head, Geoffrey A; Morris, Brian J

    2011-04-26

    Essential hypertension is a common multifactorial heritable condition in which increased sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system is involved in the elevation in blood pressure (BP), as well as the exaggerated morning surge in BP that is a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke in hypertensive patients. The Schlager BPH/2J mouse is a genetic model of hypertension in which increased sympathetic outflow from the hypothalamus has an important etiological role in the elevation of BP. Schlager hypertensive mice exhibit a large variation in BP between the active and inactive periods of the day, and also show a morning surge in BP. To investigate the genes responsible for the circadian variation in BP in hypertension, hypothalamic tissue was collected from BPH/2J and normotensive BPN/3J mice at the 'peak' (n = 12) and 'trough' (n = 6) of diurnal BP. Using Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays, validation by quantitative real-time PCR and a statistical method that adjusted for clock genes, we identified 212 hypothalamic genes whose expression differed between 'peak' and 'trough' BP in the hypertensive strain. These included genes with known roles in BP regulation, such as vasopressin, oxytocin and thyrotropin releasing hormone, as well as genes not recognized previously as regulators of BP, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 19, hypocretin and zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of terms for inflammatory response, mitochondrial proton-transporting ATP synthase complex, structural constituent of ribosome, amongst others. In conclusion, we have identified genes whose expression differs between the peak and trough of 24-hour circadian BP in BPH/2J mice, pointing to mechanisms responsible for diurnal variation in BP. The findings may assist in the elucidation of the mechanism for the morning surge in BP in essential hypertension.

  17. Circadian response of annual weeds to glyphosate and glufosinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Krishona B; Sothern, Robert B; Koukkari, Willard L; Durgan, Beverly R; Gunsolus, Jeffrey L

    2002-03-01

    Five field experiments were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in Minnesota to examine the influence of time of day efficacy of glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] and glufosinate [2-amino-4-(hydroxymethyl-phosphinyl)butanoic acid] applications on the control of annual weeds. Each experiment was designed to be a randomized complete block with four replications using plot sizes of 3 x 9 m. Glyphosate and glufosinate were applied at rates of 0.421 kg ae/ha and 0.292 kg ai/ha, respectively, with and without an additional adjuvant that consisted of 20% nonionic surfactant and 80% ammonium sulfate. All treatments were applied with water at 94 L/ha. Times of day for the application of herbicide were 06:00h, 09:00h, 12:00h, 15:00h, 18:00h, 21:00h, and 24:00h. Efficacy was evaluated 14 d after application by visual ratings. At 14 d, a circadian response to each herbicide was found, with greatest annual weed control observed with an application occurring between 09:00h and 18:00h and significantly less weed control observed with an application at 06:00h, 21:00h, or 24:00h. The addition of an adjuvant to both herbicides increased overall efficacy, but did not overcome the rhythmic time of day effect. Results of the multiple regression analysis showed that after environmental temperature, time of day was the second most important predictor of percent weed kill. Thus, circadian timing of herbicide application significantly influenced weed control with both glyphosate and glufosinate.

  18. Rapid genome evolution in Pms1 region of rice revealed by comparative sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU JinSheng; FAN YouRong; LIU Nan; SHAN Yan; LI XiangHua; ZHANG QiFa

    2007-01-01

    Pms1, a locus for photoperiod sensitive genic male sterility in rice, was identified and mapped to chromosome 7 in previous studies. Here we report an effort to identify the candidate genes for Pms1 by comparative sequencing of BAC clones from two cultivars Minghui 63 and Nongken 58, the parents for the initial mapping population. Annotation and comparison of the sequences of the two clones resulted in a total of five potential candidates which should be functionally tested. We also conducted comparative analysis of sequences of these two cultivars with two other cultivars, Nipponbare and 93-11,for which sequence data were available in public databases. The analysis revealed large differences in sequence composition among the four genotypes in the Pms1 region primarily due to retroelement activity leading to rapid recent growth and divergence of the genomes. High levels of polymorphism in the forms of indels and SNPs were found both in intra- and inter-subspecific comparisons. Dating analysis using LTRs of the retroelements in this region showed that the substitution rate of LTRs was much higher than reported in the literature. The results provided strong evidence for rapid genomic evolution of this region as a consequence of natural and artificial selection.

  19. Potential microRNA-mediated oncogenic intercellular communication revealed by pan-cancer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2014-11-01

    Carcinogenesis consists of oncogenesis and metastasis, and intriguingly microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in both processes. Although aberrant miRNA activities are prevalent in diverse tumor types, the exact mechanisms for how they regulate cancerous processes are not always clear. To this end, we performed a large-scale pan-cancer analysis via a novel probabilistic approach to infer recurrent miRNA-target interactions implicated in 12 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We discovered ~20,000 recurrent miRNA regulations, which are enriched for cancer-related miRNAs/genes. Notably, miRNA 200 family (miR-200/141/429) is among the most prominent miRNA regulators, which is known to be involved in metastasis. Importantly, the recurrent miRNA regulatory network is not only enriched for cancer pathways but also for extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and ECM-receptor interactions. The results suggest an intriguing cancer mechanism involving miRNA-mediated cell-to-cell communication, which possibly involves delivery of tumorigenic miRNA messengers to adjacent cells via exosomes. Finally, survival analysis revealed 414 recurrent-prognostic associations, where both gene and miRNA involved in each interaction conferred significant prognostic power in one or more cancer types. Together, our comprehensive pan-cancer analysis provided not only biological insights into metastasis but also brought to bear the clinical relevance of the proposed recurrent miRNA-gene associations.

  20. Integrated systems analysis reveals a molecular network underlying autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Shi, Minyi; Ma, Zhihai; Zhao, Shuchun; Euskirchen, Ghia; Ziskin, Jennifer; Urban, Alexander; Hallmayer, Joachim; Snyder, Michael

    2014-12-30

    Autism is a complex disease whose etiology remains elusive. We integrated previously and newly generated data and developed a systems framework involving the interactome, gene expression and genome sequencing to identify a protein interaction module with members strongly enriched for autism candidate genes. Sequencing of 25 patients confirmed the involvement of this module in autism, which was subsequently validated using an independent cohort of over 500 patients. Expression of this module was dichotomized with a ubiquitously expressed subcomponent and another subcomponent preferentially expressed in the corpus callosum, which was significantly affected by our identified mutations in the network center. RNA-sequencing of the corpus callosum from patients with autism exhibited extensive gene mis-expression in this module, and our immunochemical analysis showed that the human corpus callosum is predominantly populated by oligodendrocyte cells. Analysis of functional genomic data further revealed a significant involvement of this module in the development of oligodendrocyte cells in mouse brain. Our analysis delineates a natural network involved in autism, helps uncover novel candidate genes for this disease and improves our understanding of its molecular pathology.

  1. Comprehensive DNA Adduct Analysis Reveals Pulmonary Inflammatory Response Contributes to Genotoxic Action of Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousuke Ishino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized-magnetite (MGT is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields; however, its toxicological properties are not well documented. In our previous report, MGT showed genotoxicity in both in vitro and in vivo assay systems, and it was suggested that inflammatory responses exist behind the genotoxicity. To further clarify mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity, a comprehensive DNA adduct (DNA adductome analysis was conducted using DNA samples derived from the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. In total, 30 and 42 types of DNA adducts were detected in the vehicle control and MGT-treated groups, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA against a subset of DNA adducts was applied and several adducts, which are deduced to be formed by inflammation or oxidative stress, as the case of etheno-deoxycytidine (εdC, revealed higher contributions to MGT exposure. By quantitative-LC-MS/MS analysis, εdC levels were significantly higher in MGT-treated mice than those of the vehicle control. Taken together with our previous data, it is suggested that inflammatory responses might be involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice.

  2. Genomic and physiological analysis reveals versatile metabolic capacity of deep-sea Photobacterium phosphoreum ANT-2200.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng-Da; Santini, Claire-Lise; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Barbe, Valérie; Mangenot, Sophie; Guyomar, Charlotte; Garel, Marc; Chen, Hai-Tao; Li, Xue-Gong; Yin, Qun-Jian; Zhao, Yuan; Armengaud, Jean; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Martini, Séverine; Pradel, Nathalie; Vidaud, Claude; Alberto, François; Médigue, Claudine; Tamburini, Christian; Wu, Long-Fei

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria of the genus Photobacterium thrive worldwide in oceans and show substantial eco-physiological diversity including free-living, symbiotic and piezophilic life styles. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are poorly understood. Here we carried out genomic and physiological analysis of Photobacterium phosphoreum strain ANT-2200, the first deep-sea luminous bacterium of which the genome has been sequenced. Using optical mapping we updated the genomic data and reassembled it into two chromosomes and a large plasmid. Genomic analysis revealed a versatile energy metabolic potential and physiological analysis confirmed its growth capacity by deriving energy from fermentation of glucose or maltose, by respiration with formate as electron donor and trimethlyamine N-oxide (TMAO), nitrate or fumarate as electron acceptors, or by chemo-organo-heterotrophic growth in rich media. Despite that it was isolated at a site with saturated dissolved oxygen, the ANT-2200 strain possesses four gene clusters coding for typical anaerobic enzymes, the TMAO reductases. Elevated hydrostatic pressure enhances the TMAO reductase activity, mainly due to the increase of isoenzyme TorA1. The high copy number of the TMAO reductase isoenzymes and pressure-enhanced activity might imply a strategy developed by bacteria to adapt to deep-sea habitats where the instant TMAO availability may increase with depth.

  3. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  4. Comparative Analysis of 35 Basidiomycete Genomes Reveals Diversity and Uniqueness of the Phylum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Otillar, Robert; Fagnan, Kirsten; Boussau, Bastien; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Held, Benjamin; Nagy, Laszlo; Floudas, Dimitris; Morin, Emmanuelle; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Martin, Francis; Blanchette, Robert; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprobes including wood decaying fungi. To better understand the diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycete fungi including 6 newly sequenced genomes. The genomes of basidiomycetes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. A phylogenetic tree of Basidiomycota was generated using the Phyldog software, which uses all available protein sequence data to simultaneously infer gene and species trees. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) comprising proteins found in only one organism. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay among the members of Agaricomycotina subphylum. There is a correlation of the profile of certain gene families to nutritional mode in Agaricomycotina. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of such profiles, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has liginolytic class II fungal peroxidases. Furthermore, we find that both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics in growth assays. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the high value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  5. Individual recognition of social rank and social memory performance depends on a functional circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, L; Weinert, D

    2016-11-01

    In a natural environment, social abilities of an animal are important for its survival. Particularly, it must recognize its own social rank and the social rank of a conspecific and have a good social memory. While the role of the circadian system for object and spatial recognition and memory is well known, the impact of the social rank and circadian disruptions on social recognition and memory were not investigated so far. In the present study, individual recognition of social rank and social memory performance of Djungarian hamsters revealing different circadian phenotypes were investigated. Wild type (WT) animals show a clear and well-synchronized daily activity rhythm, whereas in arrhythmic (AR) hamsters, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) do not generate a circadian signal. The aim of the study was to investigate putative consequences of these deteriorations in the circadian system for animalś cognitive abilities. Hamsters were bred and kept under standardized housing conditions with food and water ad libitum and a 14l/10 D lighting regimen. Experimental animals were assigned to different groups (WT and AR) according to their activity pattern obtained by means of infrared motion sensors. Before the experiments, the animals were given to develop a dominant-subordinate relationship in a dyadic encounter. Experiment 1 dealt with individual recognition of social rank. Subordinate and dominant hamsters were tested in an open arena for their behavioral responses towards a familiar (known from the agonistic encounters) or an unfamiliar hamster (from another agonistic encounter) which had the same or an opposite social rank. The investigation time depended on the social rank of the WT subject hamster and its familiarity with the stimulus animal. Both subordinate and dominant WT hamsters preferred an unfamiliar subordinate stimulus animal. In contrast, neither subordinate nor dominant AR hamsters preferred any of the stimulus animals. Thus, disruptions in circadian

  6. Endocrine (plasma cortisol and glucose) and behavioral (locomotor and self-feeding activity) circadian rhythms in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup 1858) exposed to light/dark cycles or constant light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Catarina C V; Aparício, Rocio; Blanco-Vives, Borja; Chereguini, Olvido; Martín, Ignacio; Javier Sánchez-Vazquez, F

    2013-06-01

    The existence of daily rhythms under light/dark (LD) cycles in plasma cortisol, blood glucose and locomotor and self-feeding activities, as well as their persistence (circadian nature) under constant light (LL), was investigated in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis). For the cortisol and glucose rhythms study, 48 soles were equally distributed in 8 tanks and exposed to a 12:12 LD cycle and natural water temperature (experiment 1). After an acclimation period, blood was sampled every 3 h until a 24-h cycle was completed. Blood glucose levels were measured immediately after sampling, while plasma cortisol was measured later by ELISA. In experiment 2, the fish were exposed to LL for 11 days, and after this period, the same sampling procedure was repeated. For the study of locomotor and self-feeding rhythms (experiment 3), two groups of sole were used: one exposed to LD and the other to LL. Each group was distributed within 3 tanks equipped with infrared photocells for the record of locomotor activity, and self-feeders for feeding behavior characterization. The results revealed a marked oscillation in cortisol concentrations during the daily cycle under LD, with a peak (35.65 ± 3.14 ng/ml) in the afternoon (15:00 h) and very low levels during the night (5.30 ± 1.09 ng/ml). This cortisol rhythm persisted under LL conditions, with lower values (mean cortisol concentration = 7.12 ± 1.11 ng/ml) and with the peak shifted by 3 h. Both rhythms were confirmed by COSINOR analysis (p circadian cortisol and behavioral circadian rhythms in flat fish. Such results revealed the importance of taking into account the time of day when assessing stress responses and evaluating physiological indicators of stress in fish.

  7. A novel meta-analysis approach of cancer transcriptomes reveals prevailing transcriptional networks in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niida, Atsushi; Imoto, Seiya; Nagasaki, Masao; Yamaguchi, Rui; Miyano, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Although microarray technology has revealed transcriptomic diversities underlining various cancer phenotypes, transcriptional programs controlling them have not been well elucidated. To decode transcriptional programs governing cancer transcriptomes, we have recently developed a computational method termed EEM, which searches for expression modules from prescribed gene sets defined by prior biological knowledge like TF binding motifs. In this paper, we extend our EEM approach to predict cancer transcriptional networks. Starting from functional TF binding motifs and expression modules identified by EEM, we predict cancer transcriptional networks containing regulatory TFs, associated GO terms, and interactions between TF binding motifs. To systematically analyze transcriptional programs in broad types of cancer, we applied our EEM-based network prediction method to 122 microarray datasets collected from public databases. The data sets contain about 15000 experiments for tumor samples of various tissue origins including breast, colon, lung etc. This EEM based meta-analysis successfully revealed a prevailing cancer transcriptional network which functions in a large fraction of cancer transcriptomes; they include cell-cycle and immune related sub-networks. This study demonstrates broad applicability of EEM, and opens a way to comprehensive understanding of transcriptional networks in cancer cells.

  8. Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA) Reveals Context Related Influence of Brain Network Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Yael; Winetraub, Yonatan; Raz, Gal; Ben-Simon, Eti; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Hendler, Talma; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-01-01

    Communication between and within brain regions is essential for information processing within functional networks. The current methods to determine the influence of one region on another are either based on temporal resolution, or require a predefined model for the connectivity direction. However these requirements are not always achieved, especially in fMRI studies, which have poor temporal resolution. We thus propose a new graph theory approach that focuses on the correlation influence between selected brain regions, entitled Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA). Partial correlations are used to quantify the level of influence of each node during task performance. As a proof of concept, we conducted the DEPNA on simulated datasets and on two empirical motor and working memory fMRI tasks. The simulations revealed that the DEPNA correctly captures the network’s hierarchy of influence. Applying DEPNA to the functional tasks reveals the dynamics between specific nodes as would be expected from prior knowledge. To conclude, we demonstrate that DEPNA can capture the most influencing nodes in the network, as they emerge during specific cognitive processes. This ability opens a new horizon for example in delineating critical nodes for specific clinical interventions. PMID:27271458

  9. Transcriptome analysis in tardigrade species reveals specific molecular pathways for stress adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Frank; Beisser, Daniela; Grohme, Markus A; Liang, Chunguang; Mali, Brahim; Siegl, Alexander Matthias; Engelmann, Julia C; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Schokraie, Elham; Müller, Tobias; Schnölzer, Martina; Schill, Ralph O; Frohme, Marcus; Dandekar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Hypsibius dujardini, revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardigrade Workbench along with software and databank updates. Our analysis reveals that RNA stability motifs for M. tardigradum are different from typical motifs known from higher animals. M. tardigradum and H. dujardini protein clusters and conserved domains imply metabolic storage pathways for glycogen, glycolipids and specific secondary metabolism as well as stress response pathways (including heat shock proteins, bmh2, and specific repair pathways). Redox-, DNA-, stress- and protein protection pathways complement specific repair capabilities to achieve the strong robustness of M. tardigradum. These pathways are partly conserved in other animals and their manipulation could boost stress adaptation even in human cells. However, the unique combination of resistance and repair pathways make tardigrades and M. tardigradum in particular so highly stress resistant.

  10. Stable isotope analysis of vertebrae reveals ontogenetic changes in habitat in an endothermic pelagic shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Aaron B; Goldman, Kenneth J; Litvin, Steven Y; Madigan, Daniel J; Bigman, Jennifer S; Swithenbank, Alan M; Kline, Thomas C; Block, Barbara A

    2015-01-22

    Ontogenetic changes in habitat are driven by shifting life-history requirements and play an important role in population dynamics. However, large portions of the life history of many pelagic species are still poorly understood or unknown. We used a novel combination of stable isotope analysis of vertebral annuli, Bayesian mixing models, isoscapes and electronic tag data to reconstruct ontogenetic patterns of habitat and resource use in a pelagic apex predator, the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis). Results identified the North Pacific Transition Zone as the major nursery area for salmon sharks and revealed an ontogenetic shift around the age of maturity from oceanic to increased use of neritic habitats. The nursery habitat may reflect trade-offs between prey availability, predation pressure and thermal constraints on juvenile endothermic sharks. The ontogenetic shift in habitat coincided with a reduction of isotopic niche, possibly reflecting specialization upon particular prey or habitats. Using tagging data to inform Bayesian isotopic mixing models revealed that adult sharks primarily use neritic habitats of Alaska yet receive a trophic subsidy from oceanic habitats. Integrating the multiple methods used here provides a powerful approach to retrospectively study the ecology and life history of migratory species throughout their ontogeny.

  11. Precursors of stall and surge processes in gas turbines revealed by wavelet analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremin, I.M.; Ivanov, O.V.; Nechitailo, V.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Furletov, V.I. [Central Institute for Aviation Motors, Moscow (Russian Federation); Terziev, V.G. [TEKO, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-06-01

    Multiresolution wavelet analysis of pressure variations in a gas turbine compressor reveals the existence of precursors of stall and surge processes. Signals from eight pressure sensors positioned at various places within the compressor were recorded and digitized in three different operating modes in stationary conditions with a recording interval of 1 ms during 5-6 s. It has been discovered that there exists a scale of 32 intervals over which the dispersion (variance) of the wavelet coefficients shows a remarkable drop of about 40% for more than 1 s prior to the development of the malfunction. A shuffled sample of the same values of the pressure does not show such a drop demonstrating the dynamical origin of this effect. Higher order correlation moments reveal different slopes in these two regions differing by the variance values. The log-log dependence of the moments does not show clear fractal behavior because the scales of 16 and 32 intervals are not on the straight line of monofractals. This is a clear indication of the nonlinear response of the system at this scale. These results provide a means for automatic regulation of an engine, preventing possible failures. (author)

  12. EFFECT OF GENDER DIFFERENCE AND CIRCADIAN RHYTHM ON TOTAL MOOD DISTURBANCE OF VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopal I

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to find out the effect of gender difference and circadian rhythm on total mood disturbance (TMD for volleyball players. METHODS: To achieve the purpose, a total of thirty volleyball players [men (n = 15 and women (n = 15] age between 19 years and 22 years from Einstein College of Engineering, Tamil Nadu, India were selected as subjects. The two independent variables of gender and circadian variations and dependent variable of total mood disturbance were selected for this study. The experimental design used was static group factorial design. The data were collected at 02:00, 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00 and 22:00 hours on total mood disturbance by using profile of mood state (POMS questionnaire during the academic year of 2009 – 2010. Collected data were subjected to statistical analysis by using two-way factorial (2 x 6 Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Cosinor analysis. RESULTS: 1 There was significant difference in total mood disturbance between genders, 2 significant difference in total mood disturbance at different times of the day irrespective of gender status and 3 significant difference in total mood disturbance for men and women volleyball players at different times of the day. 4 Significant circadian rhythmicity exists on total mood disturbance for women and 5 Insignificant circadian rhythmicity exists on total mood disturbance for men. CONCLUSION: It is recommended to the physical educators to adopt the findings of this study while planning to improve sports skills for the players and athletes.

  13. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings. PMID:27687249

  14. Conformational Dynamics of apo-GlnBP Revealed by Experimental and Computational Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Yitao

    2016-10-13

    The glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) binds l-glutamine and cooperates with its cognate transporters during glutamine uptake. Crystal structure analysis has revealed an open and a closed conformation for apo- and holo-GlnBP, respectively. However, the detailed conformational dynamics have remained unclear. Herein, we combined NMR spectroscopy, MD simulations, and single-molecule FRET techniques to decipher the conformational dynamics of apo-GlnBP. The NMR residual dipolar couplings of apo-GlnBP were in good agreement with a MD-derived structure ensemble consisting of four metastable states. The open and closed conformations are the two major states. This four-state model was further validated by smFRET experiments and suggests the conformational selection mechanism in ligand recognition of GlnBP. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  15. Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011 genome analysis reveals clues for colonization of the insect gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bottacini

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria are known as anaerobic/microaerophilic and fermentative microorganisms, which commonly inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of various animals and insects. Analysis of the 2,167,301 bp genome of Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011, a strain isolated from the hindgut of Apis mellifera var. ligustica, commonly known as the honey bee, revealed its predicted capability for respiratory metabolism. Conservation of the latter gene clusters in various B. asteroides strains enforces the notion that respiration is a common metabolic feature of this ancient bifidobacterial species, which has been lost in currently known mammal-derived Bifidobacterium species. In fact, phylogenomic based analyses suggested an ancient origin of B. asteroides and indicates it as an ancestor of the genus Bifidobacterium. Furthermore, the B. asteroides PRL2011 genome encodes various enzymes for coping with toxic products that arise as a result of oxygen-mediated respiration.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brown Adipose Tissue Reveals Utilization of Coupled and Uncoupled Energy Expenditure Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sebastian; Balaz, Miroslav; Stefanicka, Patrik; Varga, Lukas; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ukropec, Jozef; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-07-15

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become an attractive target to combat the current epidemical spread of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Currently, information on its functional role is primarily derived from rodent studies. Here, we present the first comparative proteotype analysis of primary human brown adipose tissue versus adjacent white adipose tissue, which reveals significant quantitative differences in protein abundances and in turn differential functional capabilities. The majority of the 318 proteins with increased abundance in BAT are associated with mitochondrial metabolism and confirm the increased oxidative capacity. In addition to uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), the main functional effector for uncoupled respiration, we also detected the mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1A/B, CKMT2), as effective modulators of ATP synthase coupled respiration, to be exclusively expressed in BAT. The abundant expression and utilization of both energy expenditure pathways in parallel highlights the complex functional involvement of BAT in human physiology.

  17. Multiplatform analysis of 12 cancer types reveals molecular classification within and across tissues of origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoadley, Katherine A; Yau, Christina; Wolf, Denise M

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic analyses of pathologically defined tumor types identify "within-a-tissue" disease subtypes. However, the extent to which genomic signatures are shared across tissues is still unclear. We performed an integrative analysis using five genome-wide platforms and one proteomic platform...... on 3,527 specimens from 12 cancer types, revealing a unified classification into 11 major subtypes. Five subtypes were nearly identical to their tissue-of-origin counterparts, but several distinct cancer types were found to converge into common subtypes. Lung squamous, head and neck, and a subset...... of bladder cancers coalesced into one subtype typified by TP53 alterations, TP63 amplifications, and high expression of immune and proliferation pathway genes. Of note, bladder cancers split into three pan-cancer subtypes. The multiplatform classification, while correlated with tissue-of-origin, provides...

  18. Anomalous dispersion of Lagrangian particles in local regions of turbulent flows revealed by convex hull analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, J; Mueller, W -C; Chapman, S C; Watkins, N W

    2014-01-01

    Local regions of anomalous particle dispersion, and intermittent events that occur in turbulent flows can greatly influence the global statistical description of the flow. These local behaviors can be identified and analyzed by comparing the growth of neighboring convex hulls of Lagrangian tracer particles. Although in our simulations of homogeneous turbulence the convex hulls generally grow in size, after the Lagrangian particles that define the convex hulls begin to disperse, our analysis reveals short periods when the convex hulls of the Lagrangian particles shrink, evidence that particles are not dispersing simply. Shrinkage can be associated with anisotropic flows, since it occurs most frequently in the presence of a mean magnetic field or thermal convection. We compare dispersion between a wide range of statistically homogeneous and stationary turbulent flows ranging from homogeneous isotropic Navier-Stokes turbulence over different configurations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and Boussinesq convect...

  19. Network-based diffusion analysis reveals cultural transmission of lobtail feeding in humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jenny; Weinrich, Mason; Hoppitt, Will; Rendell, Luke

    2013-04-26

    We used network-based diffusion analysis to reveal the cultural spread of a naturally occurring foraging innovation, lobtail feeding, through a population of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) over a period of 27 years. Support for models with a social transmission component was 6 to 23 orders of magnitude greater than for models without. The spatial and temporal distribution of sand lance, a prey species, was also important in predicting the rate of acquisition. Our results, coupled with existing knowledge about song traditions, show that this species can maintain multiple independently evolving traditions in its populations. These insights strengthen the case that cetaceans represent a peak in the evolution of nonhuman culture, independent of the primate lineage.

  20. Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011 genome analysis reveals clues for colonization of the insect gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottacini, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca; Sánchez, Borja; Foroni, Elena; Duranti, Sabrina; Serafini, Fausta; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are known as anaerobic/microaerophilic and fermentative microorganisms, which commonly inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of various animals and insects. Analysis of the 2,167,301 bp genome of Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011, a strain isolated from the hindgut of Apis mellifera var. ligustica, commonly known as the honey bee, revealed its predicted capability for respiratory metabolism. Conservation of the latter gene clusters in various B. asteroides strains enforces the notion that respiration is a common metabolic feature of this ancient bifidobacterial species, which has been lost in currently known mammal-derived Bifidobacterium species. In fact, phylogenomic based analyses suggested an ancient origin of B. asteroides and indicates it as an ancestor of the genus Bifidobacterium. Furthermore, the B. asteroides PRL2011 genome encodes various enzymes for coping with toxic products that arise as a result of oxygen-mediated respiration.

  1. An agent-based model of cellular dynamics and circadian variability in human endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung T Nguyen

    Full Text Available As cellular variability and circadian rhythmicity play critical roles in immune and inflammatory responses, we present in this study an agent-based model of human endotoxemia to examine the interplay between circadian controls, cellular variability and stochastic dynamics of inflammatory cytokines. The model is qualitatively validated by its ability to reproduce circadian dynamics of inflammatory mediators and critical inflammatory responses after endotoxin administration in vivo. Novel computational concepts are proposed to characterize the cellular variability and synchronization of inflammatory cytokines in a population of heterogeneous leukocytes. Our results suggest that there is a decrease in cell-to-cell variability of inflammatory cytokines while their synchronization is increased after endotoxin challenge. Model parameters that are responsible for IκB production stimulated by NFκB activation and for the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines have large impacts on system behaviors. Additionally, examining time-dependent systemic responses revealed that the system is least vulnerable to endotoxin in the early morning and most vulnerable around midnight. Although much remains to be explored, proposed computational concepts and the model we have pioneered will provide important insights for future investigations and extensions, especially for single-cell studies to discover how cellular variability contributes to clinical implications.

  2. The Circadian Clock Modulates Global Daily Cycles of mRNA Ribosome Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missra, Anamika; Ernest, Ben; Lohoff, Tim; Jia, Qidong; Satterlee, James; Ke, Kenneth; von Arnim, Albrecht G

    2015-09-01

    Circadian control of gene expression is well characterized at the transcriptional level, but little is known about diel or circadian control of translation. Genome-wide translation state profiling of mRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown in long day was performed to estimate ribosome loading per mRNA. The experiments revealed extensive translational regulation of key biological processes. Notably, translation of mRNAs for ribosomal proteins and mitochondrial respiration peaked at night. Central clock mRNAs are among those subject to fluctuations in ribosome loading. There was no consistent phase relationship between peak translation states and peak transcript levels. The overlay of distinct transcriptional and translational cycles can be expected to alter the waveform of the protein synthesis rate. Plants that constitutively overexpress the clock gene CCA1 showed phase shifts in peak translation, with a 6-h delay from midnight to dawn or from noon to evening being particularly common. Moreover, cycles of ribosome loading that were detected under continuous light in the wild type collapsed in the CCA1 overexpressor. Finally, at the transcript level, the CCA1-ox strain adopted a global pattern of transcript abundance that was broadly correlated with the light-dark environment. Altogether, these data demonstrate that gene-specific diel cycles of ribosome loading are controlled in part by the circadian clock.

  3. Sleep, performance, circadian rhythms, and light-dark cycles during two space shuttle flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, D. J.; Neri, D. F.; Wyatt, J. K.; Ronda, J. M.; Riel, E.; Ritz-De Cecco, A.; Hughes, R. J.; Elliott, A. R.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Sleep, circadian rhythm, and neurobehavioral performance measures were obtained in five astronauts before, during, and after 16-day or 10-day space missions. In space, scheduled rest-activity cycles were 20-35 min shorter than 24 h. Light-dark cycles were highly variable on the flight deck, and daytime illuminances in other compartments of the spacecraft were very low (5.0-79.4 lx). In space, the amplitude of the body temperature rhythm was reduced and the circadian rhythm of urinary cortisol appeared misaligned relative to the imposed non-24-h sleep-wake schedule. Neurobehavioral performance decrements were observed. Sleep duration, assessed by questionnaires and actigraphy, was only approximately 6.5 h/day. Subjective sleep quality diminished. Polysomnography revealed more wakefulness and less slow-wave sleep during the final third of sleep episodes. Administration of melatonin (0.3 mg) on alternate nights did not improve sleep. After return to earth, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was markedly increased. Crewmembers on these flights experienced circadian rhythm disturbances, sleep loss, decrements in neurobehavioral performance, and postflight changes in REM sleep.

  4. Role of type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in the regulation of Circadian Per1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungtae Na

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are the endogenous oscillators that regulate rhythmic physiological and behavioral changes to correspond to daily light-dark cycles. Molecular dissections have revealed that transcriptional feedback loops of the circadian clock genes drive the molecular oscillation, in which PER/CRY complexes inhibit the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer to constitute a negative feedback loop. In this study, we identified the type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 as an interacting molecule of CRY1. Although the Prmt5 gene was constitutively expressed, increased interaction of PRMT5 with CRY1 was observed when the Per1 gene was repressed both in synchronized mouse liver and NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, rhythmic recruitment of PRMT5 and CRY1 to the Per1 gene promoter was found to be associated with an increased level of histone H4R3 dimethylation and Per1 gene repression. Consistently, decreased histone H4R3 dimethylation and altered rhythmic Per1 gene expression were observed in Prmt5-depleted cells. Taken together, these findings provide an insight into the link between histone arginine methylation by PRMT5 and transcriptional regulation of the circadian Per1 gene.

  5. Circadian sleep-wake cycles, well-being, and light therapy in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromundt, Vivien; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Kyburz, Suzanne; Opwis, Klaus; Dammann, Gerhard; Cajochen, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) frequently suffer from sleep disturbances. The authors investigated circadian rhythms, sleep, and well-being in women with BPD in their habitual life conditions during 3 weeks with morning light therapy (LT) and 3 weeks without LT (oLT). Sleep-wake cycles were measured using wrist actimetry, proximal skin temperature as an indirect index of relaxation, as well as weekly salivary melatonin to document the internal circadian rhythm phase. Questionnaires assessed clinical state throughout the 6-week protocol. Ten matched healthy women followed the same 6-week protocol without light treatment. Women with BPD had significantly worse subjective sleep quality and reduced daytime alertness compared to controls. Sleep-wake cycles in BPD ranged from highly disturbed to extremely regular patterns. Melatonin and proximal skin temperature profiles revealed appropriate synchronization of the circadian system with the sleep-wake cycle in most BPD women and in all controls. Morning LT significantly phase-advanced activity in BPD compared to oLT, shortened sleep duration, decreased movement time, and increased skin temperature during sleep (a marker of relaxation). Although general depression scores and borderline symptoms did not change, daytime alertness improved with morning LT, and atypical depression scores were attenuated. Morning LT is a potential adjunct treatment for BPD.

  6. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex: daily dynamics, localization and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Martin F; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Møller, Morten

    2013-03-01

    The circadian master clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the clock of the SCN is driven by a transcriptional/posttranslational autoregulatory network with clock gene products as core elements. Recent investigations have shown the presence of peripheral clocks in extra-hypothalamic areas of the central nervous system. However, knowledge on the clock gene network in the cerebral cortex is limited. We here show that the mammalian clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Bmal1, Clock, Nr1d1 and Dbp are expressed in the rat neocortex. Among these, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Bmal1, Nr1d1 and Dbp were found to exhibit daily rhythms. The amplitude of circadian oscillation in neocortical clock gene expression was damped and the peak delayed as compared with the SCN. Lesions of the SCN revealed that rhythmic clock gene expression in the neocortex is dependent on the SCN. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that products of the canonical clock gene Per2 are located in perikarya throughout all areas of the neocortex. These findings show that local circadian oscillators driven by the SCN reside within neurons of the neocortex.

  7. Metabolomic analysis reveals metabolic disturbance in the cortex and hippocampus of subchronic MK-801 treated rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although a number of proteins and genes relevant to schizophrenia have been identified in recent years, few are known about the exact metabolic pathway involved in this disease. Our previous proteomic study has revealed the energy metabolism abnormality in subchronic MK-801 treated rat, a well-established animal model for schizophrenia. This prompted us to further investigate metabolite levels in the same rat model to better delineate the metabolism dysfunctions and provide insights into the pathology of schizophrenia. METHODS: Metabolomics, a high-throughput investigatory strategy developed in recent years, can offer comprehensive metabolite-level insights that complement protein and genetic findings. In this study, we employed a nondestructive metabolomic approach (1H-MAS-NMR to investigate the metabolic traits in cortex and hippocampus of MK-801 treated rats. Multivariate statistics and ingenuity pathways analyses (IPA were applied in data processing. The result was further integrated with our previous proteomic findings by IPA analysis to obtain a systematic view on our observations. RESULTS: Clear distinctions between the MK-801 treated group and the control group in both cortex and hippocampus were found by OPLS-DA models (with R(2X = 0.441, Q(2Y = 0.413 and R(2X = 0.698, Q(2Y = 0.677, respectively. The change of a series of metabolites accounted for the separation, such as glutamate, glutamine, citrate and succinate. Most of these metabolites fell in a pathway characterized by down-regulated glutamate synthesis and disturbed Krebs cycle. IPA analysis further confirmed the involvement of energy metabolism abnormality induced by MK-801 treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our metabolomics findings reveal systematic changes in pathways of glutamate metabolism and Krebs cycle in the MK-801 treated rats' cortex and hippocampus, which confirmed and improved our previous proteomic observation and served as a valuable reference to

  8. Cluster analysis reveals a binary effect of storage on boar sperm motility function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Heiko; Petrunkina, Anna M; Harrison, Robin A P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-06-01

    Storage of liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa is associated with a loss of fertilising ability of the preserved spermatozoa, which standard semen parameters barely reflect. Monitoring responses to molecular effectors of sperm function (e.g. bicarbonate) has proven to be a more sensitive approach to investigating storage effects. Bicarbonate not only initiates capacitation in spermatozoa, but also induces motility activation. This occurs at ejaculation, but also happens throughout passage through the oviduct. In the present study we tested whether the specific response of boar sperm subpopulations to bicarbonate, as assessed by motility activation, is altered with the duration of storage in vitro. Three ejaculates from each of seven boars were diluted in Beltsville thawing solution and stored at 17°C. Only minor changes in the parameters of diluted semen were revealed over a period of 72h storage. For assessment of bicarbonate responses, subsamples of diluted spermatozoa were centrifuged through a discontinuous Percoll gradient after 12, 24 and 72h storage. Subsequently, spermatozoa were incubated in two Ca2+-free variants of Tyrode's medium either without (TyrControl) or with (TyrBic) 15mM bicarbonate, and computer-aided sperm analysis motility measurements were made. Cluster analysis of imaging data from motile spermatozoa revealed the presence of five major sperm subpopulations with distinct motility characteristics, differing between TyrBic and TyrControl at any given time (Psperm motility function descriptors to storage: although the quantitative descriptor (percentage of motile spermatozoa) declines in washed semen samples, the qualitative descriptor (percentage of spermatozoa stimulated into fast linear motion by bicarbonate) is sustained independent of the duration of storage.

  9. Comparative transcriptional analysis reveals differential gene expression between asymmetric and symmetric zygotic divisions in tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Xiang Hu

    Full Text Available Asymmetric cell divisions occur widely during many developmental processes in plants. In most angiosperms, the first zygotic cell division is asymmetric resulting in two daughter cells of unequal size and with distinct fates. However, the critical molecular mechanisms regulating this division remain unknown. Previously we showed that treatment of tobacco zygotes with beta-glucosyl Yariv (βGlcY could dramatically alter the first zygotic asymmetric division to produce symmetric two-celled proembryos. In the present study, we isolated zygotes and two-celled asymmetric proembryos in vivo by micromanipulation, and obtained symmetric, two-celled proembryos by in vitro cell cultures. Using suppression-subtractive hybridization (SSH and macroarray analysis differential gene expression between the zygote and the asymmetric and symmetric two-celled proembryos was investigated. After sequencing of the differentially expressed clones, a total of 1610 EST clones representing 685 non-redundant transcripts were obtained. Gene ontology (GO term analysis revealed that these transcripts include those involved in physiological processes such as response to stimulus, regulation of gene expression, and localization and formation of anatomical structures. A homology search against known genes from Arabidopsis indicated that some of the above transcripts are involved in asymmetric cell division and embryogenesis. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the up- or down-regulation of the selected candidate transcripts during zygotic division. A few of these transcripts were expressed exclusively in the zygote, or in either type of the two-celled proembryos. Expression analyses of select genes in different tissues and organs also revealed potential roles of these transcripts in fertilization, seed maturation and organ development. The putative roles of few of the identified transcripts in the regulation of zygotic division are discussed. Further functional work on these

  10. Partial sequencing of the bottle gourd genome reveals markers useful for phylogenetic analysis and breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Sha

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bottle gourd [Lagenaria siceraria (Mol. Standl.] is an important cucurbit crop worldwide. Archaeological research indicates that bottle gourd was domesticated more than 10,000 years ago, making it one of the earliest plants cultivated by man. In spite of its widespread importance and long history of cultivation almost nothing has been known about the genome of this species thus far. Results We report here the partial sequencing of bottle gourd genome using the 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. A total of 150,253 sequence reads, which were assembled into 3,994 contigs and 82,522 singletons were generated. The total length of the non-redundant singletons/assemblies is 32 Mb, theoretically covering ~ 10% of the bottle gourd genome. Functional annotation of the sequences revealed a broad range of functional types, covering all the three top-level ontologies. Comparison of the gene sequences between bottle gourd and the model cucurbit cucumber (Cucumis sativus revealed a 90% sequence similarity on average. Using the sequence information, 4395 microsatellite-containing sequences were identified and 400 SSR markers were developed, of which 94% amplified bands of anticipated sizes. Transferability of these markers to four other cucurbit species showed obvious decline with increasing phylogenetic distance. From analyzing polymorphisms of a subset of 14 SSR markers assayed on 44 representative China bottle gourd varieties/landraces, a principal coordinates (PCo analysis output and a UPGMA-based dendrogram were constructed. Bottle gourd accessions tended to group by fruit shape rather than geographic origin, although in certain subclades the lines from the same or close origin did tend to cluster. Conclusions This work provides an initial basis for genome characterization, gene isolation and comparative genomics analysis in bottle gourd. The SSR markers developed would facilitate marker assisted breeding schemes for efficient

  11. Effects of exercise on circadian rhythms and mobility in aging Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Rakshit, Kuntol; Wambua, Rebecca; Giebultowicz, Tomasz M.; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.

    2013-01-01

    Daily life functions such as sleep and feeding oscillate with circa 24 h period due to endogenous circadian rhythms generated by circadian clocks. Genetic or environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is associated with various aging-related phenotypes. Circadian rhythms decay during normal aging, and there is a need to explore strategies that could avert age-related changes in the circadian system. Exercise was reported to delay aging in mammals. Here, we investigated whether daily exerci...

  12. Four of the six Drosophila rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment in low light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Charles, Alexandra; Michard-Vanhée, Christine; Alejevski, Faredin; Chélot, Elisabeth; Boivin, Antoine; Rouyer, François

    2016-10-01

    Light is the major stimulus for the synchronization of circadian clocks with day-night cycles. The light-driven entrainment of the clock that controls rest-activity rhythms in Drosophila relies on different photoreceptive molecules. Cryptochrome (CRY) is expressed in most brain clock neurons, whereas six different rhodopsins (RH) are present in the light-sensing organs. The compound eye includes outer photoreceptors that express RH1 and inner photoreceptors that each express one of the four rhodopsins RH3-RH6. RH6 is also expressed in the extraretinal Hofbauer-Buchner eyelet, whereas RH2 is only found in the ocelli. In low light, the synchronization of behavioral rhythms relies on either CRY or the canonical rhodopsin phototransduction pathway, which requires the phospholipase C-β encoded by norpA (no receptor potential A). We used norpA(P24) cry(02) double mutants that are circadianly blind in low light and restored NORPA function in each of the six types of photoreceptors, defined as expressing a particular rhodopsin. We first show that the NORPA pathway is less efficient than CRY for synchronizing rest-activity rhythms with delayed light-dark cycles but is important for proper phasing, whereas the two light-sensing pathways can mediate efficient adjustments to phase advances. Four of the six rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment, and all are more efficient for advancing than for delaying the behavioral clock. In contrast, neither RH5-expressing retinal photoreceptors nor RH2-expressing ocellar photoreceptors are sufficient to mediate synchronization through the NORPA pathway. Our results thus reveal different contributions of rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors and suggest the existence of several circuits for rhodopsin-dependent circadian entrainment. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2828-2844, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Circadian rhythm of glycoprotein secretion in the vas deferens of the moth, Spodoptera littoralis

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    Gvakharia B

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproductive systems of male moths contain circadian clocks, which time the release of sperm bundles from the testis to the upper vas deferens (UVD and their subsequent transfer from the UVD to the seminal vesicles. Sperm bundles are released from the testis in the evening and are retained in the vas deferens lumen overnight before being transferred to the seminal vesicles. The biological significance of periodic sperm retention in the UVD lumen is not understood. In this study we asked whether there are circadian rhythms in the UVD that are correlated with sperm retention. Results We investigated the carbohydrate-rich material present in the UVD wall and lumen during the daily cycle of sperm release using the periodic acid-Shiff reaction (PAS. Males raised in 16:8 light-dark cycles (LD showed a clear rhythm in the levels of PAS-positive granules in the apical portion of the UVD epithelium. The peak of granule accumulation occurred in the middle of the night and coincided with the maximum presence of sperm bundles in the UVD lumen. These rhythms persisted in constant darkness (DD, indicating that they have circadian nature. They were abolished, however, in constant light (LL resulting in random patterns of PAS-positive material in the UVD wall. Gel-separation of the UVD homogenates from LD moths followed by detection of carbohydrates on blots revealed daily rhythms in the abundance of specific glycoproteins in the wall and lumen of the UVD. Conclusion Secretory activity of the vas deferens epithelium is regulated by the circadian clock. Daily rhythms in accumulation and secretion of several glycoproteins are co-ordinated with periodic retention of sperm in the vas deferens lumen.

  14. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals similarities and dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains response to nitrogen availability.

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    Catarina Barbosa

    Full Text Available Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23, under low (67 mg/L and high nitrogen (670 mg/L regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12 h, 24 h and 96 h. Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12 h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this

  15. A Circadian and Cardiac Intraocular Pressure Sensor for Smart Implantable Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donida, Achille; Di Dato, Giuseppe; Cunzolo, Paolo; Sala, Marco; Piffaretti, Filippo; Orsatti, Paolo; Barrettino, Diego

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a new system to measure the Intraocular Pressure (IOP) with very high accuracy (0.036 mbar) used for monitoring glaucoma. The system not only monitors the daily variation of the IOP (circadian IOP), but also allows to perform an spectral analysis of the pressure signal generated by the heartbeat (cardiac IOP). The system comprises a piezoresistive pressure sensor, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to read out the sensor data and an external reader installed on customized glasses. The ASIC readout electronics combines chopping modulation with correlated double sampling (CDS) in order to eliminate both the amplifier offset and the chopper ripple at the sampling frequency. In addition, programmable current sources are used to compensate for the atmospheric pressure ( 800-1200 mbar ) and the circadian component (± 7 mbar) thus allowing to read out the very weak cardiac signals (± 1.6 mbar) with a maximum accuracy of 0.036 mbar.

  16. Zebrafish circadian clocks: cells that see light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, T K; Carr, A J; Whitmore, D

    2005-11-01

    In the classical view of circadian clock organization, the daily rhythms of most organisms were thought to be regulated by a central, 'master' pacemaker, usually located within neural structures of the animal. However, with the results of experiments performed in zebrafish, mammalian cell lines and, more recently, mammalian tissues, this view has changed to one where clock organization is now seen as being highly decentralized. It is clear that clocks exist in the peripheral tissues of animals as diverse as Drosophila, zebrafish and mammals. In the case of Drosophila and zebrafish, these tissues are also directly light-responsive. This light sensitivity and direct clock entrainability is also true for zebrafish cell lines and early-stage embryos. Using luminescent reporter cell lines containing clock gene promoters driving the expression of luciferase and single-cell imaging techniques, we have been able to show how each cell responds rapidly to a single light pulse by being shifted to a common phase, equivalent to the early day. This direct light sensitivity might be related to the requirement for light in these cells to activate the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair. It is also clear that the circadian clock in zebrafish regulates the timing of the cell cycle, demonstrating the wide impact that this light sensitivity and daily rhythmicity has on the biology of zebrafish.

  17. Drugs of Abuse Can Entrain Circadian Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E. K. Kosobud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms prepare organisms for predictable events during the Earth's 24-h day. These rhythms are entrained by a variety of stimuli. Light is the most ubiquitous and best known zeitgeber, but a number of others have been identified, including food, social cues, locomotor activity, and, most recently drugs of abuse. Given the diversity of zeitgebers, it is probably not surprising that genes capable of clock functions are located throughout almost all organs and tissues. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse can directly entrain some circadian rhythms. We have report here that entrainment by drugs of abuse is independent of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the light/dark cycle, is not dependent on direct locomotor stimulation, and is shared by a variety of classes of drugs of abuse. We suggest that drug-entrained rhythms reflect variations in underlying neurophysiological states. This could be the basis for known daily variations in drug metabolism, tolerance, and sensitivity to drug reward. These rhythms could also take the form of daily periods of increased motivation to seek and take drugs, and thus contribute to abuse, addiction and relapse.

  18. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiko eShiga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Bünning’s observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Based on molecular and neuronal studies in Drosophila melanogaster, photoperiodic changes have been reported for expression patterns of the circadian clock genes, subcellular distribution of clock proteins, fiber distribution, or the number of plausible clock neurons in different species. Photoperiod sets peaks of per or tim mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length.

  19. Sleep timing and circadian phase in delayed sleep phase syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anne-Marie; Reid, Kathryn J; Gourineni, Ramadevi; Zee, Phyllis C

    2009-08-01

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder in which the timing of the sleep episode occurs later than desired and is associated with difficulty falling asleep, problems awakening on time (e.g., to meet work or school obligations), and daytime sleepiness. The phase relationship between the timing of sleep and endogenous circadian rhythms is critical to the initiation and maintenance of sleep, and significant alteration leads to impairment of sleep quality and duration. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the phase relationship between sleep-wake times and physiological markers of circadian timing in clinic patients with DSPS. Objective and subjective measures of sleep timing and circadian phase markers (core body temperature and melatonin) were measured in patients with DSPS and compared with age-matched controls. As expected, significant delays in the timing of the major sleep episode and circadian phase of body temperature and melatonin rhythms were seen in the DSPS group when allowed to sleep at their own habitual schedules, but the phase relationship between sleep-wake times and circadian phase was similar between the 2 groups. These results suggest that the symptoms of insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness in DSPS patients living under entrained real-life conditions cannot be explained by an alteration in the phase relationship between sleep-wake patterns and other physiological circadian rhythms.

  20. Circadian Rhythm and Sleep Disruption: Causes, Metabolic Consequences, and Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skene, Debra J.; Arendt, Josephine; Cade, Janet E.; Grant, Peter J.; Hardie, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian (∼24-hour) timing systems pervade all kingdoms of life and temporally optimize behavior and physiology in humans. Relatively recent changes to our environments, such as the introduction of artificial lighting, can disorganize the circadian system, from the level of the molecular clocks that regulate the timing of cellular activities to the level of synchronization between our daily cycles of behavior and the solar day. Sleep/wake cycles are intertwined with the circadian system, and global trends indicate that these, too, are increasingly subject to disruption. A large proportion of the world's population is at increased risk of environmentally driven circadian rhythm and sleep disruption, and a minority of individuals are also genetically predisposed to circadian misalignment and sleep disorders. The consequences of disruption to the circadian system and sleep are profound and include myriad metabolic ramifications, some of which may be compounded by adverse effects on dietary choices. If not addressed, the deleterious effects of such disruption will continue to cause widespread health problems; therefore, implementation of the numerous behavioral and pharmaceutical interventions that can help restore circadian system alignment and enhance sleep will be important. PMID:27763782

  1. A circadian rhythm regulating hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Burton H; Burnham, A Michele; Dunkle, Larry D

    2010-01-01

    Many metabolic and developmental processes in fungi are controlled by biological rhythms. Circadian rhythms approximate a daily (24 h) cycle and have been thoroughly studied in the model fungus, Neurospora crassa. However relatively few examples of true circadian rhythms have been documented among other filamentous fungi. In this study we describe a circadian rhythm underlying hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii, an important pathogen of soybean. After growth in light or light : dark cycles, colonies transferred to darkness produced zonate bands of melanized hyphae interspersed with bands of hyaline hyphae. Rhythmic production of bands was remarkably persistent in the absence of external cues, lasting at least 7 d after transfer to darkness, and was compensated over a range of temperatures. As in N. crassa, blue light but not red light was sufficient to entrain the circadian rhythm in C. kikuchii, and a putative ortholog of white collar-1, one of the genes required for light responses in N. crassa, was identified in C. kikuchii. Circadian regulation of melanization is conserved in other members of the genus: Similar rhythms were identified in another field isolate of C. kikuchii as well as field isolates of C. beticola and C. sorghi, but not in wild-type strains of C. zeae-maydis or C. zeina. This report represents the first documented circadian rhythm among Dothideomycete fungi and provides a new opportunity to dissect the molecular basis of circadian rhythms among filamentous fungi.

  2. Interplay between the endocrine and circadian systems in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isorna, Esther; de Pedro, Nuria; Valenciano, Ana I; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L; Delgado, María J

    2017-03-01

    The circadian system is responsible for the temporal organisation of physiological functions which, in part, involves daily cycles of hormonal activity. In this review, we analyse the interplay between the circadian and endocrine systems in fishes. We first describe the current model of fish circadian system organisation and the basis of the molecular clockwork that enables different tissues to act as internal pacemakers. This system consists of a net of central and peripherally located oscillators and can be synchronised by the light-darkness and feeding-fasting cycles. We then focus on two central neuroendocrine transducers (melatonin and orexin) and three peripheral hormones (leptin, ghrelin and cortisol), which are involved in the synchronisation of the circadian system in mammals and/or energy status signalling. We review the role of each of these as overt rhythms (i.e. outputs of the circadian system) and, for the first time, as key internal temporal messengers that act as inputs for other endogenous oscillators. Based on acute changes in clock gene expression, we describe the currently accepted model of endogenous oscillator entrainment by the light-darkness cycle and propose a new model for non-photic (endocrine) entrainment, highlighting the importance of the bidirectional cross-talking between the endocrine and circadian systems in fishes. The flexibility of the fish circadian system combined with the absence of a master clock makes these vertebrates a very attractive model for studying communication among oscillators to drive functionally coordinated outputs.

  3. A New Perspective for Parkinson's Disease: Circadian Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siyue; Wang, Yali; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Circadian rhythm is manifested by the behavioral and physiological changes from day to night, which is controlled by the pacemaker and its regulator. The former is located at the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the anterior hypothalamus, while the latter is composed of clock genes present in all tissues. Circadian desynchronization influences normal patterns of day-night rhythms such as sleep and alertness cycles, rest and activity cycles. Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibits diurnal fluctuations. Circadian dysfunction has been observed in PD patients and animal models, which may result in negative consequences to the homeostasis and even exacerbate the disease progression. Therefore, circadian therapies, including light stimulation, physical activity, dietary and social schedules, may be helpful for PD patients. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the circadian dysfunction in PD remain elusive. Further research on circadian patterns is needed. This article summarizes the existing research on the circadian rhythms in PD, focusing on the clinical symptom variations, molecular changes, as well as the available treatment options.

  4. Circadian regulation of cortisol release in behaviorally split golden hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Travis R; Wotus, Cheryl; Taylor, Daniel; Lee, Jennifer M; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2012-02-01

    The master circadian clock located within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is necessary for the circadian rhythm of glucocorticoid (GC) release. The pathways by which the SCN sustains rhythmic GC release remain unclear. We studied the circadian regulation of cortisol release in the behaviorally split golden hamster, in which the single bout of circadian locomotor activity splits into two bouts approximately 12 h apart after exposing the animals to constant light conditions. We show that unsplit control hamsters present a single peak of cortisol release that is concomitant with a single peak of ACTH release. In contrast, split hamsters show two peaks of cortisol release that are approximately 12 h appart and are appropriately phased to each locomotor activity bout but surprisingly do not rely on rhythmic release of ACTH. Our results are consistent with a model in which the circadian pacemaker within the SCN regulates the circadian release of GC via input to the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and via a second regulatory pathway, which likely involves sympathetic innervation of the adrenal and can operate even in the absence of ACTH circadian rhythmic release. Furthermore, we show that although the overall 24-h cortisol output in split hamsters is lower than in unsplit controls, split hamsters release constant low levels of ACTH. This result suggests that the timing, rather than the absolute amount, of cortisol release is more critical for the induction of negative feedback effects that regulate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  5. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, Domenico F; Abuin, David S; Tauber, Gabriel A; Pham, Andrew T; Pearson, Chad G

    2015-12-23

    Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs.

  6. Pre-2014 mudslides at Oso revealed by InSAR and multi-source DEM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; QU, F.

    2014-12-01

    The landslide is a process that results in the downward and outward movement of slope-reshaping materials including rocks and soils and annually causes the loss of approximately $3.5 billion and tens of casualties in the United States. The 2014 Oso mudslide was an extreme event costing nearly 40 deaths and damaging civilian properties. Landslides are often unpredictable, but in many cases, catastrophic events are repetitive. Historic record in the Oso mudslide site indicates that there have been serial events in decades, though the extent of sliding events varied from time to time. In our study, the combination of multi-source DEMs, InSAR, and time-series InSAR analysis has enabled to characterize the Oso mudslide. InSAR results from ALOS PALSAR show that there was no significant deformation between mid-2006 and 2011. The combination of time-series InSAR analysis and old-dated DEM indicated revealed topographic changes associated the 2006 sliding event, which is confirmed by the difference of multiple LiDAR DEMs. Precipitation and discharge measurements before the 2006 and 2014 landslide events did not exhibit extremely anomalous records, suggesting the precipitation is not the controlling factor in determining the sliding events at Oso. The lack of surface deformation during 2006-2011 and weak correlation between the precipitation and the sliding event, suggest other factors (such as porosity) might play a critical role on the run-away events at this Oso and other similar landslides.

  7. Large-scale analysis by SAGE reveals new mechanisms of v-erbA oncogene action

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    Faure Claudine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The v-erbA oncogene, carried by the Avian Erythroblastosis Virus, derives from the c-erbAα proto-oncogene that encodes the nuclear receptor for triiodothyronine (T3R. v-ErbA transforms erythroid progenitors in vitro by blocking their differentiation, supposedly by interference with T3R and RAR (Retinoic Acid Receptor. However, v-ErbA target genes involved in its transforming activity still remain to be identified. Results: By using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, we identified 110 genes deregulated by v-ErbA and potentially implicated in the transformation process. Bioinformatic analysis of promoter sequence and transcriptional assays point out a potential role of c-Myb in the v-ErbA effect. Furthermore, grouping of newly identified target genes by function revealed both expected (chromatin/transcription and unexpected (protein metabolism functions potentially deregulated by v-ErbA. We then focused our study on 15 of the new v-ErbA target genes and demonstrated by real time PCR that in majority their expression was activated neither by T3, nor RA, nor during differentiation. This was unexpected based upon the previously known role of v-ErbA. Conclusion: This paper suggests the involvement of a wealth of new unanticipated mechanisms of v-ErbA action.

  8. Transcriptome analysis reveals dynamic changes in the gene expression of tobacco seedlings under low potassium stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Liming Lu; Yong Chen; Lin Lu; Yifei Lu; Liqin Li

    2015-09-01

    Potassium plays a key role in plant development and reproduction. In agricultural practice, potassium deficiency is common worldwide, and leads to crop growth inhibition and output reduction. In this study, we analysed the transcriptome of tobacco seedlings under low potassium stress. Tobacco seedlings with or without decreased potassium treatment were harvested after 0 (control), 6, 12, or 24 h and were submitted for microarray analysis. The results showed that up to 3790 genes were upregulated or downregulated more than 2-fold as a result of the decreased potassium treatment. Gene ontology analysis revealed significantly differentially expressed genes that were categorized as cation binding, transcription regulation, metabolic processes, transporter activity and enzyme regulation. Some potassium, nitrogen and phosphorus transporters; transcription factors; and plant signal molecules, such as CPKs were also significantly differentially expressed under potassium deficiency. Our results indicate that the expression profiles of a large number of genes involved in various plant physiological processes are significantly altered in response to potassium deficiency, which can result in physiological and morphological changes in tobacco plants.

  9. Bach Is the Father of Harmony: Revealed by a 1/f Fluctuation Analysis across Musical Genres.

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    Dan Wu

    Full Text Available Harmony is a fundamental attribute of music. Close connections exist between music and mathematics since both pursue harmony and unity. In music, the consonance of notes played simultaneously partly determines our perception of harmony; associates with aesthetic responses; and influences the emotion expression. The consonance could be considered as a window to understand and analyze harmony. Here for the first time we used a 1/f fluctuation analysis to investigate whether the consonance fluctuation structure in music with a wide range of composers and genres followed the scale free pattern that has been found for pitch, melody, rhythm, human body movements, brain activity, natural images and geographical features. We then used a network graph approach to investigate which composers were the most influential both within and across genres. Our results showed that patterns of consonance in music did follow scale-free characteristics, suggesting that this feature is a universally evolved one in both music and the living world. Furthermore, our network analysis revealed that Bach's harmony patterns were having the most influence on those used by other composers, followed closely by Mozart.

  10. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Different Silk Yields of Two Silkworm Strains.

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    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Cocoon and silk yields are the most important characteristics of sericulture. However, few studies have examined the genes that modulate these features. Further studies of these genes will be useful for improving the products of sericulture. JingSong (JS and Lan10 (L10 are two strains having significantly different cocoon and silk yields. In the current study, RNA-Seq and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR were performed on both strains in order to determine divergence of the silk gland, which controls silk biosynthesis in silkworms. Compared with L10, JS had 1375 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; 738 up-regulated genes and 673 down-regulated genes. Nine enriched gene ontology (GO terms were identified by GO enrichment analysis based on these DEGs. KEGG enrichment analysis results showed that the DEGs were enriched in three pathways, which were mainly associated with the processing and biosynthesis of proteins. The representative genes in the enrichment pathways and ten significant DEGs were further verified by qPCR, the results of which were consistent with the RNA-Seq data. Our study has revealed differences in silk glands between the two silkworm strains and provides a perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms determining silk yield.

  11. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Lactococcus garvieae Strains Isolated from Different Sources Reveals Candidate Virulence Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Miyauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus garvieae is a major pathogen for fish. Two complete (ATCC 49156 and Lg2 and three draft (UNIUD074, 8831, and 21881 genome sequences of L. garvieae have recently been released. We here present the results of a comparative genomic analysis of these fish and human isolates of L. garvieae. The pangenome comprised 1,542 core and 1,378 dispensable genes. The sequenced L. garvieae strains shared most of the possible virulence genes, but the capsule gene cluster was found only in fish-pathogenic strain Lg2. The absence of the capsule gene cluster in other nonpathogenic strains isolated from mastitis and vegetable was also confirmed by PCR. The fish and human isolates of L. garvieae contained the specific two and four adhesin genes, respectively, indicating that these adhesion proteins may be involved in the host specificity differences of L. garvieae. The discoveries revealed by the pangenomic analysis may provide significant insights into the biology of L. garvieae.

  12. Metagenomic analysis reveals that bacteriophages are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Jéssica; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis; Simonet, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    A metagenomics approach was applied to explore the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteriophages from hospital wastewater. Metagenomic analysis showed that most phage sequences affiliated to the order Caudovirales, comprising the tailed phage families Podoviridae, Siphoviridae and Myoviridae. Moreover, the relative abundance of ARGs in the phage DNA fraction (0.26%) was higher than in the bacterial DNA fraction (0.18%). These differences were particularly evident for genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) proteins, phosphotransferases, β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of assembled contigs also revealed that blaOXA-10, blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-24 genes belonging to class D β-lactamases as well as a novel blaTEM (98.9% sequence similarity to the blaTEM-1 gene) belonging to class A β-lactamases were detected in a higher proportion in phage DNA. Although preliminary, these findings corroborate the role of bacteriophages as reservoirs of resistance genes and thus highlight the necessity to include them in future studies on the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  13. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM1 characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines. PMID:25389185

  14. Glycoproteomic analysis of seven major allergenic proteins reveals novel post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L; Wandall, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM(1) characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines.

  15. Independent component analysis of DTI data reveals white matter covariances in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xin; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guo, Ting; Sun, Qiaoyue; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with the clinical symptom of the continuous deterioration of cognitive and memory functions. Multiple diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) can successfully explain the white matter damages in AD patients. However, most studies focused on the univariate measures (voxel-based analysis) to examine the differences between AD patients and normal controls (NCs). In this investigation, we applied a multivariate independent component analysis (ICA) to investigate the white matter covariances based on FA measurement from DTI data in 35 AD patients and 45 NCs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. We found that six independent components (ICs) showed significant FA reductions in white matter covariances in AD compared with NC, including the genu and splenium of corpus callosum (IC-1 and IC-2), middle temporal gyral of temporal lobe (IC-3), sub-gyral of frontal lobe (IC-4 and IC-5) and sub-gyral of parietal lobe (IC-6). Our findings revealed covariant white matter loss in AD patients and suggest that the unsupervised data-driven ICA method is effective to explore the changes of FA in AD. This study assists us in understanding the mechanism of white matter covariant reductions in the development of AD.

  16. Bach Is the Father of Harmony: Revealed by a 1/f Fluctuation Analysis across Musical Genres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Kendrick, Keith M; Levitin, Daniel J; Li, Chaoyi; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Harmony is a fundamental attribute of music. Close connections exist between music and mathematics since both pursue harmony and unity. In music, the consonance of notes played simultaneously partly determines our perception of harmony; associates with aesthetic responses; and influences the emotion expression. The consonance could be considered as a window to understand and analyze harmony. Here for the first time we used a 1/f fluctuation analysis to investigate whether the consonance fluctuation structure in music with a wide range of composers and genres followed the scale free pattern that has been found for pitch, melody, rhythm, human body movements, brain activity, natural images and geographical features. We then used a network graph approach to investigate which composers were the most influential both within and across genres. Our results showed that patterns of consonance in music did follow scale-free characteristics, suggesting that this feature is a universally evolved one in both music and the living world. Furthermore, our network analysis revealed that Bach's harmony patterns were having the most influence on those used by other composers, followed closely by Mozart.

  17. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  18. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-05-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  19. Comprehensive Proteomics Analysis of Laticifer Latex Reveals New Insights into Ethylene Stimulation of Natural Rubber Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuchu; Wang, Dan; Sun, Yong; Yang, Qian; Chang, Lili; Wang, Limin; Meng, Xueru; Huang, Qixing; Jin, Xiang; Tong, Zheng

    2015-09-08

    Ethylene is a stimulant to increase natural rubber latex. After ethylene application, both fresh yield and dry matter of latex are substantially improved. Moreover, we found that ethylene improves the generation of small rubber particles. However, most genes involved in rubber biosynthesis are inhibited by exogenous ethylene. Therefore, we conducted a proteomics analysis of ethylene-stimulated rubber latex, and identified 287 abundant proteins as well as 143 ethylene responsive latex proteins (ERLPs) with mass spectrometry from the 2-DE and DIGE gels, respectively. In addition, more than 1,600 proteins, including 404 ERLPs, were identified by iTRAQ. Functional classification of ERLPs revealed that enzymes involved in post-translational modification, carbohydrate metabolism, hydrolase activity, and kinase activity were overrepresented. Some enzymes for rubber particle aggregation were inhibited to prolong latex flow, and thus finally improved latex production. Phosphoproteomics analysis identified 59 differential phosphoproteins; notably, specific isoforms of rubber elongation factor and small rubber particle protein that were phosphorylated mainly at serine residues. This post-translational modification and isoform-specific phosphorylation might be important for ethylene-stimulated latex production. These results not only deepen our understanding of the rubber latex proteome but also provide new insights into the use of ethylene to stimulate rubber latex production.

  20. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  1. Structure analysis reveals the flexibility of the ADAMTS-5 active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Tomasselli, Alfredo G.; Mathis, Karl J.; Schnute, Mark E.; Woodard, Scott S.; Caspers, Nicole; Williams, Jennifer M.; Kiefer, James R.; Munie, Grace; Wittwer, Arthur; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Tortorella, Micky D. (Pfizer)

    2012-03-02

    A ((1S,2R)-2-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl) succinamide derivative (here referred to as Compound 12) shows significant activity toward many matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-13. Modeling studies had predicted that this compound would not bind to ADAMTS-5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5) due to its shallow S1' pocket. However, inhibition analysis revealed it to be a nanomolar inhibitor of both ADAMTS-4 and -5. The observed inconsistency was explained by analysis of crystallographic structures, which showed that Compound 12 in complex with the catalytic domain of ADAMTS-5 (cataTS5) exhibits an unusual conformation in the S1' pocket of the protein. This first demonstration that cataTS5 can undergo an induced conformational change in its active site pocket by a molecule like Compound 12 should enable the design of new aggrecanase inhibitors with better potency and selectivity profiles.

  2. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities.

  3. Comparative transcriptome and proteome analysis to reveal the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Manish; Krishnamurthy, Sneha; Shukla, Devesh; Kiiskila, Jeffrey; Jain, Ajay; Datta, Rupali; Sharma, Nilesh; Sahi, Shivendra V

    2016-02-23

    A large number of plants have been tested and exploited in search of a green chemistry approach for the fabrication of gold or other precious metal nanomaterials. Despite the potential of plant based methods, very little is known about the underlying biochemical reactions and genes involved in the biotransformation mechanism of AuCl4 into gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this research, we thus focused on studying the effect of Au on growth and nanoparticles formation by analyses of transcriptome, proteome and ionome shift in Arabidopsis. Au exposure favored the growth of Arabidopsis seedling and induced formation of nanoparticles in root and shoot, as indicated by optical and hyperspectral imaging. Root transcriptome analysis demonstrated the differential expression of the members of WRKY, MYB and BHLH gene families, which are involved in the Fe and other essential metals homeostasis. The proteome analysis revealed that Glutathione S-transferases were induced in the shoot and suggested its potential role in the biosynthesis AuNPs. This study also demonstrated the role of plant hormone auxin in determining the Au induced root system architecture. This is the first study using an integrated approach to understand the in planta biotransformation of KAuCl4 into AuNPs.

  4. Metagenomic analysis reveals symbiotic relationship among bacteria in Microcystis-dominated community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meili eXie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis bloom, a cyanobacterial mass occurrence often found in eutrophicated water bodies, is one of the most serious threats to freshwater ecosystems worldwide. In nature, Microcystis forms aggregates or colonies that contain heterotrophic bacteria. The Microcystis-bacteria colonies were persistent even when they were maintained in lab culture for a long period. The relationship between Microcystis and the associated bacteria was investigated by a metagenomic approach in this study. We developed a visualization-guided method of binning for genome assembly after total colony DNA sequencing. We found that the method was effective in grouping sequences and it did not require reference genome sequence. Individual genomes of the colony bacteria were obtained and they provided valuable insights into microbial community structures. Analysis of metabolic pathways based on these genomes revealed that while all heterotrophic bacteria were dependent upon Microcystis for carbon and energy, Vitamin B12 biosynthesis, which is required for growth by Microcystis, was accomplished in a cooperative fashion among the bacteria. Our analysis also suggests that individual bacteria in the colony community contributed a complete pathway for degradation of benzoate, which is inhibitory to the cyanobacterial growth, and its ecological implication for Microcystis bloom is discussed.

  5. Proteomic analysis of mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet reveals marker proteins associated with steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jin Lee

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the progression of simple steatosis to steatohepatitis are yet to be elucidated. To identify the proteins involved in the development of liver tissue inflammation, we performed comparative proteomic analysis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet (MCD developed hepatic steatosis characterized by increased free fatty acid (FFA and triglyceride levels as well as alpha-SMA. Two-dimensional proteomic analysis revealed that the change from the normal diet to the MCD diet affected the expressions of 50 proteins. The most-pronounced changes were observed in the expression of proteins involved in Met metabolism and oxidative stress, most of which were significantly downregulated in NASH model animals. Peroxiredoxin (Prx is the most interesting among the modulated proteins identified in this study. In particular, cross-regulated Prx1 and Prx6 are likely to participate in cellular defense against the development of hepatitis. Thus, these Prx isoforms may be a useful new marker for early stage steatohepatitis. Moreover, curcumin treatment results in alleviation of the severity of hepatic inflammation in steatohepatitis. Notably, curcumin administration in MCD-fed mice dramatically reduced CYP2E1 as well as Prx1 expression, while upregulating Prx6 expression. These findings suggest that curcumin may have a protective role against MCD fed-induced oxidative stress.

  6. Bioinformatic analysis of the neprilysin (M13 family of peptidases reveals complex evolutionary and functional relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinney John W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neprilysin (M13 family of endopeptidases are zinc-metalloenzymes, the majority of which are type II integral membrane proteins. The best characterised of this family is neprilysin, which has important roles in inactivating signalling peptides involved in modulating neuronal activity, blood pressure and the immune system. Other family members include the endothelin converting enzymes (ECE-1 and ECE-2, which are responsible for the final step in the synthesis of potent vasoconstrictor endothelins. The ECEs, as well as neprilysin, are considered valuable therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular disease. Other members of the M13 family have not been functionally characterised, but are also likely to have biological roles regulating peptide signalling. The recent sequencing of animal genomes has greatly increased the number of M13 family members in protein databases, information which can be used to reveal evolutionary relationships and to gain insight into conserved biological roles. Results The phylogenetic analysis successfully resolved vertebrate M13 peptidases into seven classes, one of which appears to be specific to mammals, and insect genes into five functional classes and a series of expansions, which may include inactive peptidases. Nematode genes primarily resolved into groups containing no other taxa, bar the two nematode genes associated with Drosophila DmeNEP1 and DmeNEP4. This analysis reconstructed only one relationship between chordate and invertebrate clusters, that of the ECE sub-group and the DmeNEP3 related genes. Analysis of amino acid utilisation in the active site of M13 peptidases reveals a basis for their biochemical properties. A relatively invariant S1' subsite gives the majority of M13 peptidases their strong preference for hydrophobic residues in P1' position. The greater variation in the S2' subsite may be instrumental in determining the specificity of M13 peptidases for their substrates

  7. Selective Distribution of Retinal Input to Mouse SCN Revealed in Analysis of Sagittal Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokshin, Maria; LeSauter, Joseph; Silver, Rae

    2015-06-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the locus of the master circadian clock, setting the daily rhythms in physiology and behavior and synchronizing these responses to the local environment. The most important of these phase-setting cues derive from the light-dark cycle and reach the SCN directly via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). The SCN contains anatomically and functionally heterogeneous populations of cells. Understanding how these neurons access information about the photic environment so as to set the phase of daily oscillation requires knowledge of SCN innervation by the RHT. While retinal innervation of the SCN has long been a topic of interest, the information is incomplete. In some instances, studies have focused on the caudal aspect of the nucleus, which contains the core region. In other instances, subregions of the nucleus have been delineated based on projections of where specific peptidergic cell types lie, rather than based on double or triple immunochemical staining of distinct populations of cells. Here, we examine the full extent of the mouse SCN using cholera toxin β (CTβ) as a tracer to analyze RHT innervation in triple-labeled sagittal sections. Using specific peptidergic markers to identify clusters of SCN cells, we find 3 distinct patterns. First is an area of dense RHT innervation to the core region, delineated by gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunoreactive cells. Second is an area of moderate RHT fiber clusters, bearing arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-positive cells that lie close to the core. Finally, the outermost, shell, and rostral AVP-containing regions of the SCN have few to no detectable retinal fibers. These results point to a diversity of inputs to individual SCN cell populations and suggest variation in the responses that underlie photic phase resetting.

  8. Circadian-independent cell mitosis in immortalized fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Mijung; Pendergast, Julie S; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-05-25

    Two prominent timekeeping systems, the cell cycle, which controls cell division, and the circadian system, which controls 24-h rhythms of physiology and behavior, are found in nearly all living organisms. A distinct feature of circadian rhythms is that they are temperature-compensated such that the period of the rhythm remains constant (approximately 24 h) at different ambient temperatures. Even though the speed of cell division, or growth rate, is highly temperature-dependent, the cell-mitosis rhythm is temperature-compensated. Twenty-four-hour fluctuations in cell division have also been observed in numerous species, suggesting that the circadian system is regulating the timing of cell division. We tested whether the cell-cycle rhythm was coupled to the circadian system in immortalized rat-1 fibroblasts by monitoring cell-cycle gene promoter-driven luciferase activity. We found that there was no consistent phase relationship between the circadian and cell cycles, and that the cell-cycle rhythm was not temperature-compensated in rat-1 fibroblasts. These data suggest that the circadian system does not regulate the cell-mitosis rhythm in rat-1 fibroblasts. These findings are inconsistent with numerous studies that suggest that cell mitosis is regulated by the circadian system in mammalian tissues in vivo. To account for this discrepancy, we propose two possibilities: (i) There is no direct coupling between the circadian rhythm and cell cycle but the timing of cell mitosis is synchronized with the rhythmic host environment, or (ii) coupling between the circadian rhythm and cell cycle exists in normal cells but it is disconnected in immortalized cells.

  9. Time series analysis of satellite data reveals continuous deforestation of New England since the 1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Pontus; Holden, Christopher E.; Bullock, Eric L.; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    2016-06-01

    Land cover and land change were monitored continuously between 1985 and 2011 at 30 m resolution across New England in the Northeastern United States in support of modeling the terrestrial carbon budget. It was found that the forest area has been decreasing throughout the study period in each state of the region since the 1980s. A total of 386 657 ± 98 137 ha (95% confidence interval) of forest has been converted to other land covers since 1985. Mainly driven by low density residential development, the deforestation accelerated in the mid-1990s until 2007 when it plateaued as a result of declining new residential construction and in turn, the financial crisis of 2007-08. The area of forest harvest, estimated at 226 519 ± 66 682 ha, was mapped separately and excluded from the deforestation estimate, while the area of forest expansion on non-forested lands was found to not be significantly different from zero. New England is often held as a principal example of a forest transition with historical widespread deforestation followed by recovery of forestlands as farming activities diminished, but the results of this study support the notion of a reversal of the forest transition as the region again is experiencing widespread deforestation. All available Landsat imagery acquired after 1985 for the study area were collected and used in the analysis. Areas of land cover and land change were estimated from a random sample of reference observations stratified by a twelve-class land change map encompassing the entire study area and period. The statistical analysis revealed that the net change in forest area and the associated modeled impact on the terrestrial carbon balance would have been considerably different if the results of the map were used without inferring the area of forest change by analysis of a reference sample.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of rod photoreceptor homeostasis revealed by in vivo NRL targetome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hao

    Full Text Available A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP-Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP-Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis.

  11. ALE meta-analysis reveals dissociable networks for affective and discriminative aspects of touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, India

    2016-04-01

    Emotionally-laden tactile stimulation-such as a caress on the skin or the feel of velvet-may represent a functionally distinct domain of touch, underpinned by specific cortical pathways. In order to determine whether, and to what extent, cortical functional neuroanatomy supports a distinction between affective and discriminative touch, an activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis was performed. This meta-analysis statistically mapped reported functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activations from 17 published affective touch studies in which tactile stimulation was associated with positive subjective evaluation (n = 291, 34 experimental contrasts). A separate ALE meta-