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Sample records for analysis identifies magnaporthe

  1. Confirming and Identifying New Loci for Rice Blast Disease Resistance using Magnaporthe oryzae Field Isolates in the US

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    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) in rice play important roles in controlling rice blast disease. In the present study, 10 field isolates of the races IA1, IB1, IB17, and IC1 of U.S. rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae collected in 1996 and 2009 were used to identify blast resistance QTL with a recombi...

  2. Comparative Analysis of the Korean Population of Magnaporthe oryzae by Multilocus Microsatellite Typing

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    Jaehyuk Choi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, inflicts serious damage to global rice production. Due to high variability of this fungal pathogen, resistance of newly-released rice cultivars is easily broken down. To understand the population structure of M. oryzae, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the Korean population using multilocus microsatellite typing. Eleven microsatellite markers were applied to the population of 190 rice isolates which had been collected in Korea for two decades since the 1980’s. Average values of gene diversity and allele frequency were 0.412 and 6.5, respectively. Comparative analysis of the digitized allele information revealed that the Korean population exhibited a similar level of allele diversity to the integrated diversity of the world populations, suggesting a particularly high diversity of the Korean population. Therefore, these microsatellite markers and the comprehensive collection of field isolates will be useful genetic resources to identify the genetic diversity of M. oryzae population.

  3. Cloning, sequencing and expression analysis of the NAR promoter activated during hyphal stage of Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The promoter of N4R gene in Magnaporthe grisea was isolated and sequenced. The promoter sequences contained the "TATA" box, the "CAAT" box, and binding sites for fungal regulatory proteins. Programs that predict promoter sequences indicated that promoter sequence lies between locations 430 and 857 of the NAR promoter fragment. GFP expression under the NAR promoter and NAR transcript analysis revealed that this promoter is activated primarily at the mycelial stage in the rice blast fungus and could be used to express native or extrinsic genes in the mycelia of the rice blast fungus.

  4. Genome analysis of rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae field isolates from southern India

    OpenAIRE

    Malali Gowda; Meghana D. Shirke; Mahesh, H. B.; Pinal Chandarana; Anantharamanan Rajamani; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2015-01-01

    The Indian subcontinent is the center of origin and diversity for rice (Oryza sativa L.). The O. sativa ssp. indica is a major food crop grown in India, which occupies the first and second position in area and production, respectively. Blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is a major constraint to rice production. Here, we report the analysis of genome architecture and sequence variation of two field isolates, B157 and MG01, of the blast fungus from southern India. The 40 Mb genome of B1...

  5. Genome analysis of rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae field isolates from southern India

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    Malali Gowda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Indian subcontinent is the center of origin and diversity for rice (Oryza sativa L.. The O. sativa ssp. indica is a major food crop grown in India, which occupies the first and second position in area and production, respectively. Blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is a major constraint to rice production. Here, we report the analysis of genome architecture and sequence variation of two field isolates, B157 and MG01, of the blast fungus from southern India. The 40 Mb genome of B157 and 43 Mb genome of MG01 contained 11,344 and 11,733 predicted genes, respectively. Genomic comparisons unveiled a large set of SNPs and several isolate specific genes in the Indian blast isolates. Avr genes were analyzed in several sequenced Magnaporthe strains; this analysis revealed the presence of Avr-Pizt and Avr-Ace1 genes in all the sequenced isolates. Availability of whole genomes of field isolates from India will contribute to global efforts to understand genetic diversity of M. oryzae population and to track the emergence of virulent pathotypes.

  6. Screening of a synthetic peptide combinatorial library to identify inhibitors of the appressorium formation in Magnaporthe oryzae.

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    Rebollar, Aarón; Marcos, Jose F; López-García, Belén

    2014-11-01

    The rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating diseases of cultivated rice. One of the most important stages in the infective cycle of M. oryzae is the formation of the dome-shaped structure called appressorium. The purpose of the present study was to identify novel peptides to control the rice blast disease by blocking the appressorium formation through screening of a synthetic peptide combinatorial library. As result of the screening, a set of 29 putative bioactive peptides were identified, synthesized and assayed in comparison with the previously identified peptide PAF104. The peptides MgAPI24, MgAPI40 and MgAPI47 showed improved inhibitory activity on the M. oryzae appressorium formation. Our data show that these peptides have a differential effect on two developmental structures: appressoria and appressorium-like structures. Antimicrobial assays against M. oryzae and other non-target microorganisms showed a weak or no toxicity of these peptides, demonstrating their specific activity blocking the appressorium formation. Therefore, the outcome of this research would be useful in the development of novel target-oriented peptides to use in plant protection.

  7. Diversity analysis for Magnaporthe grisea by Pot2_based PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@CO39, its near_isogenic lines, having single blast resistance gene, C101LAC, C101A51, C104PKT, and C101PKT, and its resistance gene pyramid lines BL121, BL241, and A57_119, grew in the blast nursery at IRRI. The seeds were sown in four batches with two weeks interval between batches, using IR50 and IR72 as spread rows and susceptible controls. For moist leaf, spraying water was proceeded every two hours from 8:30 am in sunny days. Blast disease was scored and pathogen was isolated every two weeks. DNA samples of 310 isolates were used for diversity analysis by Pot 2_based PCR (Pot 2, a dispersed retrotransposon of the fungus).

  8. In silico Analysis of the Potential Infection Mechanisms of Magnaporthe grisea from Horizontal Gene Transfer Hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyang Li; Ying Wang; Hao Peng; Hejiao Bian; Mingwei Min; Longfei Chen; Qian Liu; Jinku Bao

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer(HGT)has long been considered as a principal force for an organism to gain novel genes in genome evolution. Homology search, phylogenetic analysis and nucleotide composition analysis are three major objective approaches to arguably determine the occurrence and directionality of HGT. Here, 21 genes that possess the potential to horizontal transfer were acquired from the whole genome of Magnaporthe grisea according to annotation, among which three can-didate genes(corresponding protein accession numbers are EAA55123, EAA47200 and EAA52136)were selected for further analysis. According to BLAST homology results, we subsequently conducted phylogenetic analysis of the three candidate HGT genes. Moreover, nucleotide composition analysis was conducted to further validate these HGTs. In addition, the functions of the three candidate genes were searched in COG database. Consequently, we conclude that the gene encoding protein EAA55123 is transferred from Clostridium perfringens. Another HGT event is between EAA52136 and a certain metazoan's corresponding gene, but the direction remains uncertain. Yet, EAA47200 is not a transferred gene.

  9. Identification and Analysis of Physiological Races of Magnaporthe oryzae in Heilongjiang Province

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    Liu Hua-zhao; Liu Yan; Liu Hua-long; Chen Wen-fu

    2012-01-01

    A totatl of 116 isolates of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, were collected from 45 samples in different counties of Heilongjiang Province, and 20 Chinese physiological races belonging to seven groups were identified by using seven standard Chinese rice blast identifying varieties. Results showed that the dominant groups could be ranked as ZA, ZD, and ZB, with the occurrence frequencies of 47.41%, 22.41% and 15.52%, respectively. The race ZA49 was the dominant race with the occurrence frequency of 26.72%. The occurrence frequencies of the races ZD5 and ZD1 were 10.34% and 8.62%, respectively. The rising occurrence frequencies of these three dominant species were the most important reasons that causing Kongyu-131 more sensitive to rice blast. The results of virulence frequency indicated that the race harboring Pi-k, Pi-i, Pi-a gene were more susceptible to rice blast in Heilongjiang Province, and they should not be large-scale cultivated.

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Early Responsive Genes in Rice during Magnaporthe oryzae Infection

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    Yiming Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most serious diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L. in most rice-growing regions of the world. In order to investigate early response genes in rice, we utilized the transcriptome analysis approach using a 300 K tilling microarray to rice leaves infected with compatible and incompatible M. oryzae strains. Prior to the microarray experiment, total RNA was validated by measuring the differential expression of rice defense-related marker genes (chitinase 2, barwin, PBZ1, and PR-10 by RT-PCR, and phytoalexins (sakuranetin and momilactone A with HPLC. Microarray analysis revealed that 231 genes were up-regulated (>2 fold change, p < 0.05 in the incompatible interaction compared to the compatible one. Highly expressed genes were functionally characterized into metabolic processes and oxidation-reduction categories. The oxidative stress response was induced in both early and later infection stages. Biotic stress overview from MapMan analysis revealed that the phytohormone ethylene as well as signaling molecules jasmonic acid and salicylic acid is important for defense gene regulation. WRKY and Myb transcription factors were also involved in signal transduction processes. Additionally, receptor-like kinases were more likely associated with the defense response, and their expression patterns were validated by RT-PCR. Our results suggest that candidate genes, including receptor-like protein kinases, may play a key role in disease resistance against M. oryzae attack.

  11. Development of microsatellite markers for the genetic analysis of Magnaporthe grisea

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    Brondani Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An AG microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library was constructed for Magnaporthe grisea (anamorph Pyricularia grisea, the causal agent of rice blast. Seventy-two DNA clones containing microsatellite repeats were isolated and sequenced in order to develop a series of new PCR-based molecular markers to be used in genetic studies of the fungus. Twenty-four of these clones were selected to design primer pairs for the PCR amplification of microsatellite alleles. Single spore cultures of M. grisea isolated from rice and wheat in Brazil, Colombia and China were genotyped at three microsatellite loci. Isolates from southern Brazil were predominantly monomorphic at the tested SSR loci, indicating a low level of genetic variability in these samples. However, seven alleles were observed at the MGM-1 locus in isolates from Central Brazil and at least nine alleles were detected at the same locus in a sample of Colombian isolates. Polymorphism analysis at SSR loci is a simple and direct approach for estimating the genetic diversity of M. grisea isolates and a powerful tool for studying M. grisea genetics.

  12. Analysis of in planta Expressed Orphan Genes in the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

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    Abu Sadat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomes contain a large number of unique genes which have not been found in other species. Although the origin of such “orphan” genes remains unclear, they are thought to be involved in species-specific adaptive processes. Here, we analyzed seven orphan genes (MoSPC1 to MoSPC7 prioritized based on in planta expressed sequence tag data in the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. Expression analysis using qRT-PCR confirmed the expression of four genes (MoSPC1, MoSPC2, MoSPC3 and MoSPC7 during plant infection. However, individual deletion mutants of these four genes did not differ from the wild-type strain for all phenotypes examined, including pathogenicity. The length, GC contents, codon adaptation index and expression during mycelial growth of the four genes suggest that these genes formed during the evolutionary history of M. oryzae. Synteny analyses using closely related fungal species corroborated the notion that these genes evolved de novo in the M. oryzae genome. In this report, we discuss our inability to detect phenotypic changes in the four deletion mutants. Based on these results, the four orphan genes may be products of de novo gene birth processes, and their adaptive potential is in the course of being tested for retention or extinction through natural selection.

  13. Comparative analysis of the genomes of two field isolates of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

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    Minfeng Xue

    Full Text Available Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive diseases of rice worldwide. The fungal pathogen is notorious for its ability to overcome host resistance. To better understand its genetic variation in nature, we sequenced the genomes of two field isolates, Y34 and P131. In comparison with the previously sequenced laboratory strain 70-15, both field isolates had a similar genome size but slightly more genes. Sequences from the field isolates were used to improve genome assembly and gene prediction of 70-15. Although the overall genome structure is similar, a number of gene families that are likely involved in plant-fungal interactions are expanded in the field isolates. Genome-wide analysis on asynonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitution rates revealed that many infection-related genes underwent diversifying selection. The field isolates also have hundreds of isolate-specific genes and a number of isolate-specific gene duplication events. Functional characterization of randomly selected isolate-specific genes revealed that they play diverse roles, some of which affect virulence. Furthermore, each genome contains thousands of loci of transposon-like elements, but less than 30% of them are conserved among different isolates, suggesting active transposition events in M. oryzae. A total of approximately 200 genes were disrupted in these three strains by transposable elements. Interestingly, transposon-like elements tend to be associated with isolate-specific or duplicated sequences. Overall, our results indicate that gain or loss of unique genes, DNA duplication, gene family expansion, and frequent translocation of transposon-like elements are important factors in genome variation of the rice blast fungus.

  14. Data set from the phosphoproteomic analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae-responsive proteins in susceptible and resistant rice cultivars

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    Yunfeng Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is the most destructive disease of rice and causes tremendous losses of rice yield worldwide. To explore the molecular mechanisms involved in the rice–M. oryzae interaction, we conducted a time-course phosphoproteomic analysis of leaf samples from resistant and susceptible rice cultivars infected with M. oryzae. This data article contains additional results and analysis of M. oryzae-regulated phosphoproteins in rice leaves [1]. We report the analysis of M. oryzae-regulated phosphoproteins at all time points, including Venn diagram analysis, close-up views, relative intensities, and functional category, and the MS spectra of representative phosphoprotein and representative phosphorylated peptides.

  15. Sequence analysis and expression pattern of MGTA1 gene in rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiao-yu; LIU Xiao-hong; LU Jian-ping; LIN Fu-cheng

    2005-01-01

    MGTA1, a putative fungal Zn(Ⅱ)2Cys6 transcriptional activator-encoding gene, was isolated from rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, which is homologous to CLTA1 from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum with 51% identity at protein level.MGTA1 cassette contains a 2370 bp open reading frame, consisting of 6 exons, coding a 790 amino acid peptide. MGTA1 gene exists as a single copy in genomes of 7 strains of M. grisea, and is expressed in tip hyphae, conidia, and mature appressoria of strain Guy 11.

  16. Analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae Genome Reveals a Fungal Effector, Which Is Able to Induce Resistance Response in Transgenic Rice Line Containing Resistance Gene, Pi54.

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    Ray, Soham; Singh, Pankaj K; Gupta, Deepak K; Mahato, Ajay K; Sarkar, Chiranjib; Rathour, Rajeev; Singh, Nagendra K; Sharma, Tilak R

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most important diseases of rice. Pi54, a rice gene that imparts resistance to M. oryzae isolates prevalent in India, was already cloned but its avirulent counterpart in the pathogen was not known. After decoding the whole genome of an avirulent isolate of M. oryzae, we predicted 11440 protein coding genes and then identified four candidate effector proteins which are exclusively expressed in the infectious structure, appresoria. In silico protein modeling followed by interaction analysis between Pi54 protein model and selected four candidate effector proteins models revealed that Mo-01947_9 protein model encoded by a gene located at chromosome 4 of M. oryzae, interacted best at the Leucine Rich Repeat domain of Pi54 protein model. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis showed that Mo-01947_9 protein physically interacts with Pi54 protein. Nicotiana benthamiana leaf infiltration assay confirmed induction of hypersensitive response in the presence of Pi54 gene in a heterologous system. Genetic complementation test also proved that Mo-01947_9 protein induces avirulence response in the pathogen in presence of Pi54 gene. Here, we report identification and cloning of a new fungal effector gene which interacts with blast resistance gene Pi54 in rice. PMID:27551285

  17. Comparative analysis of pathogenicity and phylogenetic relationship in Magnaporthe grisea species complex.

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    Jaehyuk Choi

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of rice blast have been a threat to the global production of rice. Members of the Magnaporthe grisea species complex cause blast disease on a wide range of gramineous hosts, including cultivated rice and other grass species. Recently, based on phylogenetic analyses and mating tests, isolates from crabgrass were separated from the species complex and named M. grisea. Then other isolates from grasses including rice were named as M. oryzae. Here, we collected 103 isolates from 11 different species of grasses in Korea and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships and pathogenicity. Phylogenetic analyses of multilocus sequences and DNA fingerprinting revealed that the haplotypes of most isolates were associated with their hosts. However, six isolates had different haplotypes from the expectation, suggesting potential host shift in nature. Results of pathogenicity tests demonstrated that 42 isolates from crabgrass and 19 isolates from rice and other grasses showed cross-infectivity on rice and crabgrass, respectively. Interestingly, we also found that the isolates from rice had a distinct deletion in the calmodulin that can be used as a probe.

  18. Validation of Reference Genes for Robust qRT-PCR Gene Expression Analysis in the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

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    Che Omar, Sarena; Bentley, Michael A; Morieri, Giulia; Preston, Gail M; Gurr, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    The rice blast fungus causes significant annual harvest losses. It also serves as a genetically-tractable model to study fungal ingress. Whilst pathogenicity determinants have been unmasked and changes in global gene expression described, we know little about Magnaporthe oryzae cell wall remodelling. Our interests, in wall remodelling genes expressed during infection, vegetative growth and under exogenous wall stress, demand robust choice of reference genes for quantitative Real Time-PCR (qRT-PCR) data normalisation. We describe the expression stability of nine candidate reference genes profiled by qRT-PCR with cDNAs derived during asexual germling development, from sexual stage perithecia and from vegetative mycelium grown under various exogenous stressors. Our Minimum Information for Publication of qRT-PCR Experiments (MIQE) compliant analysis reveals a set of robust reference genes used to track changes in the expression of the cell wall remodelling gene MGG_Crh2 (MGG_00592). We ranked nine candidate reference genes by their expression stability (M) and report the best gene combination needed for reliable gene expression normalisation, when assayed in three tissue groups (Infective, Vegetative, and Global) frequently used in M. oryzae expression studies. We found that MGG_Actin (MGG_03982) and the 40S 27a ribosomal subunit MGG_40s (MGG_02872) proved to be robust reference genes for the Infection group and MGG_40s and MGG_Ef1 (Elongation Factor1-α) for both Vegetative and Global groups. Using the above validated reference genes, M. oryzae MGG_Crh2 expression was found to be significantly (p<0.05) elevated three-fold during vegetative growth as compared with dormant spores and two fold higher under cell wall stress (Congo Red) compared to growth under optimal conditions. We recommend the combinatorial use of two reference genes, belonging to the cytoskeleton and ribosomal synthesis functional groups, MGG_Actin, MGG_40s, MGG_S8 (Ribosomal subunit 40S S8) or MGG

  19. Telomere hypervariability in Magnaporthe oryzae.

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    Farman, Mark L; Kim, Yun-Sik

    2005-05-01

    SUMMARY The gray leaf spot disease of perennial ryegrass and tall fescue is caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph = Pyricularia oryzae). A collection of single-copy and repetitive DNA markers was used to investigate genetic diversity among 22 isolates of the gray leaf spot pathogen. The single-copy DNA markers revealed only three polymorphisms among 95 restriction fragments spanning approximately 0.6% of the genome. In addition, Southern hybridization analysis and mating tests revealed that all isolates possessed the MAT1-2 mating-type allele. Fingerprinting of repetitive DNA loci using the Pot2 and MGR583 probes also revealed a high degree of genetic similarity (> 85%) among isolates. These data are consistent with the gray leaf spot pathogens having a recent evolutionary origin. In contrast to the results obtained with probes for internal chromosome loci, a telomere probe revealed that the chromosome ends of the very same isolates are highly divergent, with most isolates sharing less than 20% fingerprint similarity with any other isolate. Telomere mutations arise extremely frequently and changes in telomere fingerprint profiles were readily observed during vegetative growth and among cultures derived from single spores isolated from agar medium and from lesions on perennial ryegrass leaves. PMID:20565657

  20. Gene Ontology annotation of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae

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    Deng Jixin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of blast disease of rice, is the most destructive disease of rice worldwide. The genome of this fungal pathogen has been sequenced and an automated annotation has recently been updated to Version 6 http://www.broad.mit.edu/annotation/genome/magnaporthe_grisea/MultiDownloads.html. However, a comprehensive manual curation remains to be performed. Gene Ontology (GO annotation is a valuable means of assigning functional information using standardized vocabulary. We report an overview of the GO annotation for Version 5 of M. oryzae genome assembly. Methods A similarity-based (i.e., computational GO annotation with manual review was conducted, which was then integrated with a literature-based GO annotation with computational assistance. For similarity-based GO annotation a stringent reciprocal best hits method was used to identify similarity between predicted proteins of M. oryzae and GO proteins from multiple organisms with published associations to GO terms. Significant alignment pairs were manually reviewed. Functional assignments were further cross-validated with manually reviewed data, conserved domains, or data determined by wet lab experiments. Additionally, biological appropriateness of the functional assignments was manually checked. Results In total, 6,286 proteins received GO term assignment via the homology-based annotation, including 2,870 hypothetical proteins. Literature-based experimental evidence, such as microarray, MPSS, T-DNA insertion mutation, or gene knockout mutation, resulted in 2,810 proteins being annotated with GO terms. Of these, 1,673 proteins were annotated with new terms developed for Plant-Associated Microbe Gene Ontology (PAMGO. In addition, 67 experiment-determined secreted proteins were annotated with PAMGO terms. Integration of the two data sets resulted in 7,412 proteins (57% being annotated with 1,957 distinct and specific GO terms. Unannotated proteins

  1. Morphological and molecular characterization of Magnaporthe oryzae (fungus) from infected rice leaf samples

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    Muni, Nurulhidayah Mat; Nadarajah, Kalaivani

    2014-09-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a plant-pathogenic fungus that causes a serious disease affecting rice called rice blast. Outbreaks of rice blast have been a threat to the global production of rice. This fungal disease is estimated to cause production losses of US55 million each year in South and Southeast Asia. It has been used as a primary model for elucidating various aspects of the host-pathogen interaction with its host. We have isolated five isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae from diseased leaf samples obtained from the field at Kompleks Latihan MADA, Kedah, Malaysia. We have identified the isolates using morphological and microscopic studies on the fungal spores and the lesions on the diseased leaves. Amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) was carried out with universal primers ITS1 and ITS4. The sequence of each isolates showed at least 99% nucleotide identity with the corresponding sequence in GenBank for Magnaporthe oryzae.

  2. Representative appressorium stage eDNA library of Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jian-ping; LIU Tong-bao; YU Xiao-yun; LIN Fu-cheng

    2005-01-01

    A mature appressorium cDNA library of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea, was constructed in a ?TriplEx2 vector by SMARTTM cDNA library containing 2.37?106 independent clones about 100% of which harbor foreign cDNA inserts with average size of 660 bp. Of 9 randomly selected clones, 2 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequences did not have homologous EST sequences of M. grisea in GenBank. The appressorium cDNA library is suitable for gene expression analysis and function analysis of the late stages of appressorium formation and the early stages of penetration of M. grisea.

  3. First report of wheat blast caused by magnaporthe oryzae pathotype triticum in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat blast or ‘brusone’, caused by the ascomycetous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae B.C. Couch (synonym Pyricularia oryzae Cavara), was first identified in 1985 in Brazil. M. oryzae is composed of a range of morphologically identical but genetically different host-specific pathotypes that are specialized...

  4. Fluorescent co-localization of PTS1 and PTS2 and its application in analysis of the gene function and the peroxisomal dynamic in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao-yu WANG; Fu-cheng LIN; Guo-chang SUN; Xiao-yan WU; Zhen ZHANG; Xin-fa DU; Rong-yao CHAI; Xiao-hong LIU; Xue-qin MAO; Hai-ping QIU; Yan-li WANG

    2008-01-01

    The peroxisomal matrix proteins involved in many important biological metabolism pathways in eukaryotic cells are encoded by nucleal genes, synthesized in the cytoplasm and then transported into the organelles. Targeting and import of these proteins depend on their two peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS1 and PTS2) in sequence as we have known so far. The vectors of the fluorescent fusions with PTS, i.e., green fluorescence protein (GFP)-PTSI, GFP-PTS2 and red fluorescence protein (RFP)-PTS1, were constructed and introduced into Magnaporthe oryzae Guy11 cells. Transformants containing these fusions emitted fluorescence in a punctate pattern, and the locations of the red and green fluorescence overlapped exactly in RFP-PTS1 and GFP-PTS2 co-transformed strains. These data indicated that both PTS 1 and PTS2 fusions were imported into peroxisomes. A probable higher efficiency of PTSI machinery was revealed by comparing the fluorescence backgrounds in GFP-PTS1 and GFP-PTS2 transformants. By introducing both RFP-PTS1 and GFP-PTS2 into △mgpex6 mutants, the involvement of MGPEX6 gene in both PTS1 and PTS2 pathways was proved. In addition, using these transformants, the inducement of peroxisomes and the dynamic of peroxisomal number during the pre-penetration processes were investigated as well. In summary, by the localization and co-localization of PTSI and PTS2, we provided a useful tool to evaluate the biological roles of the peroxisomes and the related genes.

  5. A Pid3 allele from rice cultivar Gumei2 confers resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae

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    Jie Chen; Yongfeng Shi; Wenzheng Liu; Rongyao Chai; Yaping Fu; Jieyun Zhuang; Jianli Wu

    2011-01-01

    Rice blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases. Using map-based strategy and in silico approach we isolated a new rice (Oryza sativa L.) blast resistance allele of Pid3, designated Pi25, from a stable blast resistance cultivar Gumei2. Overexpression analysis and complementation test showed that Pi25 conferred blast resistance to M. oryzae isolate js001-20. Sequence analysis showed that Pi25 was an intronless gene of 2772 nucleotides with single nucleotide substitution in comparison to Pid3 at the nucleotide position 459 and predicatively encoded a typical coiled coil-nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (CC--NBS--LRR) protein of 924 amino acid residuals with 100% identity to Pid3 putative protein. The susceptible allele pi25 in Nipponbare contained a nonsense mutation at the nucleotide position 2209 resulting in a truncated protein with 736 amino acid residuals. In addition, 14 nucleotide substitutions resulting in 10 amino acid substitutions were identified between Pi25 and pi25 upstream the premature stop codon in the susceptible allele. Although the mechanism of Pi25/Pid3-mediated resistance needs to be further investigated, the isolation of the allele would facilitate the utilization of Pi25/Pid3 in rice blast resistance breeding program via transgenic approach and marker assisted selection.

  6. Genome-Wide Comparison of Magnaporthe Species Reveals a Host-Specific Pattern of Secretory Proteins and Transposable Elements

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    Gowda, Malali

    2016-01-01

    Blast disease caused by the Magnaporthe species is a major factor affecting the productivity of rice, wheat and millets. This study was aimed at generating genomic information for rice and non-rice Magnaporthe isolates to understand the extent of genetic variation. We have sequenced the whole genome of the Magnaporthe isolates, infecting rice (leaf and neck), finger millet (leaf and neck), foxtail millet (leaf) and buffel grass (leaf). Rice and finger millet isolates infecting both leaf and neck tissues were sequenced, since the damage and yield loss caused due to neck blast is much higher as compared to leaf blast. The genome-wide comparison was carried out to study the variability in gene content, candidate effectors, repeat element distribution, genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and SNPs. The analysis of repeat element footprints revealed some genes such as naringenin, 2-oxoglutarate 3-dioxygenase being targeted by Pot2 and Occan, in isolates from different host species. Some repeat insertions were host-specific while other insertions were randomly shared between isolates. The distributions of repeat elements, secretory proteins, CAZymes and SNPs showed significant variation across host-specific lineages of Magnaporthe indicating an independent genome evolution orchestrated by multiple genomic factors. PMID:27658241

  7. The role of snx41-based pexophagy in magnaporthe development.

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    Yizhen Deng

    Full Text Available Pexophagy, the degradation of peroxisomes via selective autophagy, depends on Atg20/Snx42 function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Besides its role in selective autophagy, Atg20/Snx42 is also involved in an autophagy-independent endosomal retrieval trafficking, in cooperation with two other sorting nexins, Snx41 and Snx4. Recently, we reported that the sorting nexin MoSnx41, which showed high sequence similarity to yeast Snx41 and Snx42/Atg20 proteins, regulates the gamma-glutamyl cycle and GSH production and is essential for conidiation and pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae. Pexophagy was also found to be defective in Mosnx41Δ mutant. These findings indicate that MoSnx41 likely serves combined functions of Snx42/Atg20 and Snx41 in M. oryzae.. In this study, we performed complementation analyses and demonstrate that MoSnx41 alone serves the dual function of protein sorting (ScSnx41 and pexophagy (ScSnx42/Atg20. To study the potential biological function of pexophagy in fungal pathogenic life cycle, we created deletion mutants of potential pexophagy-specific genes, and characterized them in terms of pexophagy, conidiation and pathogenesis. We identified Pex14 as an essential protein for pexophagy in M. oryzae. Overall, our results show that pexophagy per se is not essential for asexual development or virulence in M. oryzae.

  8. Factor analysis identifies subgroups of constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philip G Dinning; Mike Jones; Linda Hunt; Sergio E Fuentealba; Jamshid Kalanter; Denis W King; David Z Lubowski; Nicholas J Talley; Ian J Cook

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether distinct symptom groupings exist in a constipated population and whether such grouping might correlate with quantifiable pathophysiological measures of colonic dysfunction. METHODS: One hundred and ninety-one patients presenting to a Gastroenterology clinic with constipation and 32 constipated patients responding to a newspaper advertisement completed a 53-item, wide-ranging selfreport questionnaire. One hundred of these patients had colonic transit measured scintigraphically. Factor analysis determined whether constipation-related symptoms grouped into distinct aspects of symptomatology. Cluster analysis was used to determine whether individual patients naturally group into distinct subtypes. RESULTS: Cluster analysis yielded a 4 cluster solution with the presence or absence of pain and laxative unresponsiveness providing the main descriptors. Amongst all clusters there was a considerable proportion of patients with demonstrable delayed colon transit, irritable bowel syndrome positive criteria and regular stool frequency. The majority of patients with these characteristics also reported regular laxative use. CONCLUSION: Factor analysis identified four constipation subgroups, based on severity and laxative unresponsiveness, in a constipated population. However, clear stratification into clinically identifiable groups remains imprecise.

  9. Race Specificity of Major Rice Blast Resistance Genes to Magnaporthe grisea Isolates Collected from indica Rice in Guangdong, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian-yuan; CHEN Shen; ZENG Lie-xian; LI Yi-long; CHEN Zhen; LI Chuan-ying; ZHO Xiao-yuan

    2008-01-01

    Race-specific resistance and field resistance of 30 rice blast resistance monogenic lines dedved from different resources were evaluated. The spectra of resistance to 163 Magnaporthe grisea isolates collected from indica rice in Guangdong Province, China ranged from 0.6% to 89.6%. Most of the monogenic lines showed a narrow resistance spectrum and high susceptibility in rice blast area, whereas the lines with Pikh and Pi1(t) had the broad resistance spectra of 89.6% and 82.2% respectively, showing a high and stable blast resistance in fields. According to the cluster analysis of specific resistance to 163 blast isolates tested, the 30 monogenic lines were divided into 15 groups, and based on the principal factor analysis, nine kinds of race-specific resistance were identified. Pik, Piz5, Pi9 and Pish can be used as candidate resistance genes for rice breeding since their specific resistance differed from those of the backbone parents in Guangdong, China. Gene pyramiding of Pikh [or Pi1(t)], Pi9 (or Piz5) and Pish (or Pita2) will be effective to obtain broad-spectrum blast resistance in rice breeding program in Guangdong, China. The strategies for studying and application of rice blast resistance genes were discussed.

  10. Roles of Forkhead-box Transcription Factors in Controlling Development, Pathogenicity, and Stress Response in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaejin Park

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although multiple transcription factors (TFs have been characterized via mutagenesis to understand their roles in controlling pathogenicity and infection-related development in Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast, if and how forkhead-box (FOX TFs contribute to these processes remain to be characterized. Four putative FOX TF genes were identified in the genome of M. oryzae, and phylogenetic analysis suggested that two of them (MoFKH1 and MoHCM1 correspond to Ascomycota-specific members of the FOX TF family while the others (MoFOX1 and MoFOX2 are Pezizomycotina-specific members. Deletion of MoFKH1 (ΔMofkh1 resulted in reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination, abnormal septation and stress response, and reduced virulence. Similarly, ΔMohcm1 exhibited reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination. Conidia of ΔMofkh1 and ΔMohcm1 were more sensitive to one or both of the cell cycle inhibitors hydroxyurea and benomyl, suggesting their role in cell cycle control. On the other hand, loss of MoFOX1 (ΔMofox1 did not show any noticeable changes in development, pathogenicity, and stress response. Deletion of MoFOX2 was not successful even after repeated attempts. Taken together, these results suggested that MoFKH1 and Mo-HCM1 are important in fungal development and that MoFKH1 is further implicated in pathogenicity and stress response in M. oryzae.

  11. MoMyb1 is required for asexual development and tissue-specific infection in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yanhan; Zhao, Qian; Liu, Xinyu; Zhang, Xiaofang; Qi, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2015-01-01

    Background The Myb super-family of proteins contain a group of functionally diverse transcriptional activators found in plant, animal and fungus. Myb proteins are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and have crucial roles in telomeres. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biological function of Myb1 protein in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Results We identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae BAS1 homolog MYB1 in M. oryzae, named MoMyb1. MoMyb1...

  12. Identifiable Data Files - Medicare Provider Analysis and ...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR) File contains data from claims for services provided to beneficiaries admitted to Medicare certified inpatient...

  13. Gene Expression Proifling Related to Hyphal Growth in a Temperature- Sensitive Mutant ofMagnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-song; XU Fei; WANG Hong-kai; and LIN Fu-cheng

    2013-01-01

    The rice blast, caused by fungusMagnaporthe oryzae, is a major constraint to the world food security. Hyphal growth is the foundation of fungal development and proliferation of fungi. To investigate genes involved in hyphal growth of this fungus, digital gene expression tag proifling was used to compare a previously generated temperature-sensitive mutant which defect at hyphae growth and reduction on pathogenicity, with its related wildtype strain. 416 genes were detected as differential expression, 178 of which were speciifcally expressed in Guy-11 but down-regulated expression in the mutant. Functional classiifcation analysis revealed the phenotype mutation may be mainly caused by a defection in translational and vacuole-related processes. The results and the protocol used will improve our knowledge on morphogenesis and promote the further study onM. oryzae pathogenesis.

  14. Coevolutionary Dynamics of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pi-ta and Magnaporthe oryzae Avirulence Gene AVR-Pita 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yulin; Zhou, Erxun; Lee, Seonghee; Bianco, Tracy

    2016-07-01

    The Pi-ta gene in rice is effective in preventing infections by Magnaporthe oryzae strains that contain the corresponding avirulence gene, AVR-Pita1. Diverse haplotypes of AVR-Pita1 have been identified from isolates of M. oryzae from rice production areas in the United States and worldwide. DNA sequencing and mapping studies have revealed that AVR-Pita1 is highly unstable, while expression analysis and quantitative resistance loci mapping of the Pi-ta locus revealed complex evolutionary mechanisms of Pi-ta-mediated resistance. Among these studies, several Pi-ta transcripts were identified, most of which are probably derived from alternative splicing and exon skipping, which could produce functional resistance proteins that support a new concept of coevolution of Pi-ta and AVR-Pita1. User-friendly DNA markers for Pi-ta have been developed to support marker-assisted selection, and development of new rice varieties with the Pi-ta markers. Genome-wide association studies revealed a link between Pi-ta-mediated resistance and yield components suggesting that rice has evolved a complicated defense mechanism against the blast fungus. In this review, we detail the current understanding of Pi-ta allelic variation, its linkage with rice productivity, AVR-Pita allelic variation, and the coevolution of Pi-ta and AVR-Pita in Oryza species and M. oryzae populations, respectively. We also review the genetic and molecular basis of Pi-ta and AVR-Pita interaction, and its value in marker-assisted selection and engineering resistance. PMID:27070427

  15. Identifying MMORPG Bots: A Traffic Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chin Chen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs have become extremely popular among network gamers. Despite their success, one of MMORPG's greatest challenges is the increasing use of game bots, that is, autoplaying game clients. The use of game bots is considered unsportsmanlike and is therefore forbidden. To keep games in order, game police, played by actual human players, often patrol game zones and question suspicious players. This practice, however, is labor-intensive and ineffective. To address this problem, we analyze the traffic generated by human players versus game bots and propose general solutions to identify game bots. Taking Ragnarok Online as our subject, we study the traffic generated by human players and game bots. We find that their traffic is distinguishable by 1 the regularity in the release time of client commands, 2 the trend and magnitude of traffic burstiness in multiple time scales, and 3 the sensitivity to different network conditions. Based on these findings, we propose four strategies and two ensemble schemes to identify bots. Finally, we discuss the robustness of the proposed methods against countermeasures of bot developers, and consider a number of possible ways to manage the increasingly serious bot problem.

  16. Identifying MMORPG Bots: A Traffic Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Ta; Jiang, Jhih-Wei; Huang, Polly; Chu, Hao-Hua; Lei, Chin-Laung; Chen, Wen-Chin

    2008-12-01

    Massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs) have become extremely popular among network gamers. Despite their success, one of MMORPG's greatest challenges is the increasing use of game bots, that is, autoplaying game clients. The use of game bots is considered unsportsmanlike and is therefore forbidden. To keep games in order, game police, played by actual human players, often patrol game zones and question suspicious players. This practice, however, is labor-intensive and ineffective. To address this problem, we analyze the traffic generated by human players versus game bots and propose general solutions to identify game bots. Taking Ragnarok Online as our subject, we study the traffic generated by human players and game bots. We find that their traffic is distinguishable by 1) the regularity in the release time of client commands, 2) the trend and magnitude of traffic burstiness in multiple time scales, and 3) the sensitivity to different network conditions. Based on these findings, we propose four strategies and two ensemble schemes to identify bots. Finally, we discuss the robustness of the proposed methods against countermeasures of bot developers, and consider a number of possible ways to manage the increasingly serious bot problem.

  17. MoFLP1, encoding a novel fungal fasciclin-like protein, is involved in conidiation and pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong-bao LIU; Guo-qing CHEN; Hang MIN; Fuc-heng LIN

    2009-01-01

    Fasciclin family proteins have been identified as cell adhesion molecules in various organisms. In this study, a novel Magnaporthe oryzae fasciclin-like protein encoding gene, named MoFLP1, was isolated from a subtractive suppressive cDNA library and functionally analyzed. Sequence analysis showed that the MoFLP1 gene contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1050 nucleotides encoding 349 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 35.85 kDa and a pl of 7.76. The deduced MoFLP1 protein contains a 17-amino acid secretion signal sequence and an 18-amino acid sequence with the characteristics of a glycosylphosphotidylinositol (GPI) anchor additional signal at its N- and C-terminuses, respectively. Potential N-glycosylation sites and domains involving cell adhesion were also identified in MoFLP1. Sequence analysis and subcellular localization by the expression of MoFLP1-GFP fusion construct in M. oryzae indicated that the MoFLP1 protein is probably localized on the vacuole membrane. Two MoFLP1 null mutants generated by targeted gene disruption exhibited marked reduction ofconidiation, conidiai adhesion, appressorium turgot, and pathogenicity. Our results indicate that fasciclin proteins play important roles in fungal development and pathogenicity in M. oryzae.

  18. Induced resistance in rice plants by Trichoderma harzianum PI and its efficiency to Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Rice blast (Magnaporthe grisea) is the most severe rice disease. Using resistance varieties could be an effective way to control the disease although the resistance sometime is not durable and the genetic diversity of the fungus is very complicated.

  19. Dissection of the genetic architecture of rice resistance to the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Houxiang; Wang, Yue; Peng, Shasha; Zhang, Yanli; Xiao, Yinghui; Wang, Dan; Qu, Shaohong; Li, Zhiqiang; Yan, Shuangyong; Wang, Zhilong; Liu, Wende; Ning, Yuese; Korniliev, Pavel; Leung, Hei; Mezey, Jason; McCouch, Susan R; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Resistance in rice cultivars to the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is complex and is controlled by both major genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs). We undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using the rice diversity panel 1 (RDP1) that was genotyped using a high-density (700 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms) array and inoculated with five diverse M. oryzae isolates. We identified 97 loci associated with blast resistance (LABRs). Among them, 82 were new regions and 15 co-localized with known blast resistance loci. The top 72 LABRs explained up to 98% of the phenotypic variation. The candidate genes in the LABRs encode nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) resistance proteins, receptor-like protein kinases, transcription factors and defence-related proteins. Among them, LABR_64 was strongly associated with resistance to all five isolates. We analysed the function of candidate genes underlying LABR_64 using RNA interference (RNAi) technology and identified two new resistance alleles at the Pi5 locus. We demonstrate an efficient strategy for rapid allele discovery using the power of GWAS, coupled with RNAi technology, for the dissection of complex blast resistance in rice. PMID:26574735

  20. Genetic studies of fertility and pathogenicity in Magnaporthe grisea (Pyricularia oryzae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valent, B.; Crawford, M.S.; Weaver, C.G.; Chumley, F.G.

    1984-01-01

    Crosses between field isolates of Magnaporthe grisea (anamorph, Pyricularia oryzae Cav. and Pyricularia grisea) have led to the development of fertile laboratory strains that infect goosegrass and/or weeping lovegrass. These strains may now be utilized in a rigorous genetic analysis of host species specificity and general pathogenicity. Attempts to improve the fertility of rice pathogens for the goal of undertaking a genetic analysis of host cultivar specificity have so far been unsuccessful. Crosses between M. grisea strains that infect rice, goosegrass or weeping lovegrass demonstrate that host species specificity differences between field isolates of this fungus in some cases have a complete genetic basis, and in other cases have a simple genetic basis. Crosses between a field isolate of the pathogen that infects weeping lovegrass and a field isolate that infects goosegrass have resulted in the identification of a single gene difference that determines pathogenicity toward weeping lovegrass and a second unlinked single gene difference that determines pathogenicity toward goosegrass. 35 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Isolation, identification, and optimal cultivation of a marine bacterium antagonistic to Magnaporthe grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W J; Guo, P; Liu, M; Yang, B L; Wang, J H; Jiang, J

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a plate confrontation method was used to isolate bacteria antagonistic to the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea from samples collected from China's Dalian Bay. The antagonist strain LM-031 was obtained. We studied this strain's morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics and analyzed its 16S rDNA sequence. We compared the effects of different culture conditions (type of media, carbon and nitrogen source, incubation temperature and time, and initial pH value) on the inhibitory effect against M. grisea. Strain LM-031 was preliminarily identified as Bacillus pumilus and was found to strongly inhibit M. grisea, especially when grown on BPY medium at an initial pH 7 for 72 h at 30°C. The optimum carbon and nitrogen sources for growth were lactose and peptone, respectively. The most suitable carbon and nitrogen sources for production of active substances were glucose and NH4Cl, respectively. Our results show that development and utilization of B. pumilus LM-031 has great potential for biological control of M. grisea. PMID:27323038

  2. Autophagy-associated alpha-arrestin signaling is required for conidiogenous cell development in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bo; Xu, Xiaojin; Chen, Guoqing; Zhang, Dandan; Tang, Mingzhi; Xu, Fei; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Hua; Zhou, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Conidiation patterning is evolutionarily complex and mechanism concerning conidiogenous cell differentiation remains largely unknown. Magnaporthe oryzae conidiates in a sympodial way and uses its conidia to infect host and disseminate blast disease. Arrestins are multifunctional proteins that modulate receptor down-regulation and scaffold components of intracellular trafficking routes. We here report an alpha-arrestin that regulates patterns of conidiation and contributes to pathogenicity in M. oryzae. We show that disruption of ARRDC1 generates mutants which produce conidia in an acropetal array and ARRDC1 significantly affects expression profile of CCA1, a virulence-related transcription factor required for conidiogenous cell differentiation. Although germ tubes normally develop appressoria, penetration peg formation is dramatically impaired and Δarrdc1 mutants are mostly nonpathogenic. Fluorescent analysis indicates that EGFP-ARRDC1 puncta are well colocalized with DsRed2-Atg8, and this distribution profile could not be altered in Δatg9 mutants, suggesting ARRDC1 enters into autophagic flux before autophagosome maturation. We propose that M. oryzae employs ARRDC1 to regulate specific receptors in response to conidiation-related signals for conidiogenous cell differentiation and utilize autophagosomes for desensitization of conidiogenous receptor, which transmits extracellular signal to the downstream elements of transcription factors. Our investigation extends novel significance of autophagy-associated alpha-arrestin signaling to fungal parasites. PMID:27498554

  3. Toward understanding of rice innate immunity against Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, P; Rafii, M Y; Abdullah, S N A; Nejat, N; Maziah, M; Hanafi, M M; Latif, M A; Sahebi, M

    2016-01-01

    The blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, causes serious disease on a wide variety of grasses including rice, wheat and barley. The recognition of pathogens is an amazing ability of plants including strategies for displacing virulence effectors through the adaption of both conserved and variable pathogen elicitors. The pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) were reported as two main innate immune responses in plants, where PTI gives basal resistance and ETI confers durable resistance. The PTI consists of extracellular surface receptors that are able to recognize PAMPs. PAMPs detect microbial features such as fungal chitin that complete a vital function during the organism's life. In contrast, ETI is mediated by intracellular receptor molecules containing nucleotide-binding (NB) and leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains that specifically recognize effector proteins produced by the pathogen. To enhance crop resistance, understanding the host resistance mechanisms against pathogen infection strategies and having a deeper knowledge of innate immunity system are essential. This review summarizes the recent advances on the molecular mechanism of innate immunity systems of rice against M. oryzae. The discussion will be centered on the latest success reported in plant-pathogen interactions and integrated defense responses in rice.

  4. Pathogenicity of Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae on Brachypodium distachyon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiao-yu; WANG Xiao-yan; LI Ling; ZHANG Xin; WANG Yan-li; CHAI Rong-yao; SUN Guo-chang

    2012-01-01

    Inoculation methods for rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae to Brachypodium distachyon were developed to investigate the infection process and symptom development in comparison with those on rice (Oryza sativa) and barley (Hordeum vulgare).M.oryzae could infect leaves,sheathes,stems and panicles of B.distachyon and cause blast disease.Spraying conidial suspension on either intact seedlings or leaf segments induced typical symptoms on B distachyon.During the intact seedling inoculation,the symptom developed on B.distachyon leaves closely resembled that on rice; but the lesions on B.distachyon had better uniformity in shapes and sizes than those on rice or barley.In the leaf segments inoculation,only initial and low-developed lesions could be found on rice,while normal symptoms on B.distachyon and barley.Inoculated with low-virulent mutants of M.oryzae,B.distachyon produced low-level symptoms.The symptom level of each mutant on B.distachyon corresponded well to that on rice.In addition,typical infection processes presented on B.distachyon leaves:forming melanized appressoria,penetrating into host epidermis and then forming hyphae in epidermal cells.According to these results,B.distachyon can be used as a candidate for studying fungus-plant interactions and as a probable source of disease resistance.

  5. High-resolution mapping, cloning and molecular characterization of the Pi-k ( h ) gene of rice, which confers resistance to Magnaporthe grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, T R; Madhav, M S; Singh, B K; Shanker, P; Jana, T K; Dalal, V; Pandit, A; Singh, A; Gaikwad, K; Upreti, H C; Singh, N K

    2005-12-01

    In order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the gene-for-gene type of pathogen resistance, high-resolution genetic and physical mapping of resistance loci is required to facilitate map-based cloning of resistance genes. Here, we report the molecular mapping and cloning of a dominant gene (Pi-k ( h )) present in the rice line Tetep, which is associated with resistance to rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe grisea. This gene is effective against M. grisea populations prevalent in the Northwestern Himalayan region of India. Using 178 sequence tagged microsatellite, sequence-tagged site, expressed sequence tag and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to genotype a population of 208 F(2) individuals, we mapped the Pi-k ( h ) gene between two SSR markers (TRS26 and TRS33) which are 0.7 and 0.5 cM away, respectively, and can be used in marker-assisted-selection for blast-resistant rice cultivars. We used the markers to identify the homologous region in the genomic sequence of Oryza sativa cv. Nipponbare, and a physical map consisting of two overlapping bacterial artificial chromosome and P1 artificial chromosome clones was assembled, spanning a region of 143,537 bp on the long arm of chromosome 11. Using bioinformatic analyses, we then identified a candidate blast-resistance gene in the region, and cloned the homologous sequence from Tetep. The putative Pi-k ( h ) gene cloned from Tetep is 1.5 kbp long with a single ORF, and belongs to the nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat class of disease resistance genes. Structural and expression analysis of the Pi-k ( h ) gene revealed that its expression is pathogen inducible. PMID:16228246

  6. BIOELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE VECTOR ANALYSIS IDENTIFIES SARCOPENIA IN NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss of muscle mass and water shifts between body compartments are contributing factors to frailty in the elderly. The body composition changes are especially pronounced in institutionalized elderly. We investigated the ability of single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) to identify b...

  7. Use of Photogrammetry and Biomechanical Gait analysis to Identify Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Kastmand; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Lynnerup, Niels

    found. Especially the variables located in the frontal plane are interesting due to large inter-individual differences in time course patterns. The variables with high recognition rates seem preferable for use in forensic gait analysis and as input variables to waveform analysis techniques...... such as principal component analysis resulting in marginal scores, which are difficult to interpret individually. Finally, a new gait model is presented based on functional principal component analysis with potentials for detecting individual gait patterns where time course patterns can be marginally interpreted......Photogrammetry and recognition of gait patterns are valuable tools to help identify perpetrators based on surveillance recordings. We have found that stature but only few other measures have a satisfying reproducibility for use in forensics. Several gait variables with high recognition rates were...

  8. Hyphal fusion in Magnaporthe grisea and the pathogenic variation of its progeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENYing; ZHAOXinhua; YUANXiaoping; WANGYanli; LIChengyun; LUOCaoxi

    1997-01-01

    Many fungi have hyphal fusion ability, including rice blast fungus [ Magnaporthe grisea( Hebert ) Barr nov. Comb, ( Anamorph Pyricularia oryzae Cavara)], and which is one of the major causes to pathogenic variation.Santo H has obserced the phenomenon of hyphal fusion in rice plant under electron rnieroscope and isolated some races which were different from parental ones.

  9. Regulation of plant polysaccharide utilisation in Magnaporthe oryzae and other ascomycetous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaubauf, S.

    2015-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a fungal plant pathogen of many grasses including rice. Since arabinoxylan is one of the major components of the plant cell wall of grasses, M. oryzae is likely to degrade this polysaccharide for supporting its growth in infected leaves. D-xylose is released from arabinoxylan b

  10. Characterization of field isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae with mating type, DNA fingerprinting, and pathogenicity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the harmful nature of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, it is beneficial to characterize field isolates to help aid in the deployment of resistance (R) genes in rice. In the present study, 190 field isolates of M. oryzae, collected from rice fields of Yunnan province in China, were a...

  11. Latent cluster analysis of ALS phenotypes identifies prognostically differing groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeban Ganesalingam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a degenerative disease predominantly affecting motor neurons and manifesting as several different phenotypes. Whether these phenotypes correspond to different underlying disease processes is unknown. We used latent cluster analysis to identify groupings of clinical variables in an objective and unbiased way to improve phenotyping for clinical and research purposes. METHODS: Latent class cluster analysis was applied to a large database consisting of 1467 records of people with ALS, using discrete variables which can be readily determined at the first clinic appointment. The model was tested for clinical relevance by survival analysis of the phenotypic groupings using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: The best model generated five distinct phenotypic classes that strongly predicted survival (p<0.0001. Eight variables were used for the latent class analysis, but a good estimate of the classification could be obtained using just two variables: site of first symptoms (bulbar or limb and time from symptom onset to diagnosis (p<0.00001. CONCLUSION: The five phenotypic classes identified using latent cluster analysis can predict prognosis. They could be used to stratify patients recruited into clinical trials and generating more homogeneous disease groups for genetic, proteomic and risk factor research.

  12. Parameter Trajectory Analysis to Identify Treatment Effects of Pharmacological Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Tiemann, Christian A.; Vanlier, Joep; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Albert K Groen; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; Natal A W van Riel

    2013-01-01

    The field of medical systems biology aims to advance understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive disease progression and to translate this knowledge into therapies to effectively treat diseases. A challenging task is the investigation of long-term effects of a (pharmacological) treatment, to establish its applicability and to identify potential side effects. We present a new modeling approach, called Analysis of Dynamic Adaptations in Parameter Trajectories (ADAPT), to analyze the long-t...

  13. Isolamento e regeneração de protoplastos de Magnaporthe grisea Isolation and regeneration of Magnaporthe grisea protoplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Marchi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Protoplastos são ferramentas biológicas importantes para pesquisas em fungos filamentosos, sendo empregados intensamente em transformação genética. O isolamento de protoplastos de Magnaporthe grisea foi facilitado com Novozym 234, contudo, este complexo enzimático encontra-se indisponível no mercado. Assim, objetivou-se comparar a eficiência de enzimas líticas disponíveis comercialmente na obtenção de protoplastos de M. grisea. Paralelamente, analisaram-se estabilizadores osmóticos, tempos de digestão e freqüência de regeneração. Maior produção de protoplastos foi obtida com o uso simultâneo de Lysing Enzymes e Cellulase Onozuka R-10. O uso de 10 ou 15 mg de cada complexo enzimático, em 3 mL de estabilizador osmótico, resultou em maior liberação de protoplastos. O melhor estabilizador osmótico foi MgSO4 1,2 M / NaH2PO4 0,01 M, pH 5,8, seguido por MgSO4 0,8 M / NaH2PO4 0,01 M, pH 5,8. O isolamento de protoplastos foi monitorado a cada 60 minutos, atingindo o máximo após incubação por 3 a 6 horas. No entanto, maior freqüência de regeneração (19,4% foi registrada para protoplastos obtidos após 3 horas de hidrólise enzimática.Protoplasts are important biological tools in filamentous fungi research. Fungal protoplasts have been extensively used in experiments with genetic transformation. Protoplastization of Magnaporthe grisea was accomplished with Novozym 234, however, this enzymatic complex is no commercially available for purchase. Thus, the efficiency of several other commercial enzymes in M. grisea protoplasts preparation was investigated. At the same time, osmotic buffer, digestion time and regeneration rate were also analyzed. The highest protoplasts production was obtained with Lysing Enzymes plus Cellulase Onozuka R-10. The use of 10 or 15 mg of each enzymatic complex in 3 mL of osmotic buffer was most effective for the protoplasts yields. The best osmotic buffer was MgSO4 1.2 M / NaH2PO4 0.01 M, pH 5

  14. Identifying Organizational Inefficiencies with Pictorial Process Analysis (PPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David John Patrishkoff

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pictorial Process Analysis (PPA was created by the author in 2004. PPA is a unique methodology which offers ten layers of additional analysis when compared to standard process mapping techniques.  The goal of PPA is to identify and eliminate waste, inefficiencies and risk in manufacturing or transactional business processes at 5 levels in an organization. The highest level being assessed is the process management, followed by the process work environment, detailed work habits, process performance metrics and general attitudes towards the process. This detailed process assessment and analysis is carried out during process improvement brainstorming efforts and Kaizen events. PPA creates a detailed visual efficiency rating for each step of the process under review.  A selection of 54 pictorial Inefficiency Icons (cards are available for use to highlight major inefficiencies and risks that are present in the business process under review. These inefficiency icons were identified during the author's independent research on the topic of why things go wrong in business. This paper will highlight how PPA was developed and show the steps required to conduct Pictorial Process Analysis on a sample manufacturing process. The author has successfully used PPA to dramatically improve business processes in over 55 different industries since 2004.  

  15. Multiple rice microRNAs are involved in immunity against the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Lu, Yuan-Gen; Shi, Yi; Wu, Liang; Xu, Yong-Ju; Huang, Fu; Guo, Xiao-Yi; Zhang, Yong; Fan, Jing; Zhao, Ji-Qun; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Zhou, Jian-Min; Wu, Xian-Jun; Wang, Ping-Rong; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are indispensable regulators for development and defense in eukaryotes. However, the miRNA species have not been explored for rice (Oryza sativa) immunity against the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the most devastating fungal pathogen in rice production worldwide. Here, by deep sequencing small RNA libraries from susceptible and resistant lines in normal conditions and upon M. oryzae infection, we identified a group of known rice miRNAs that were differentially expressed upon M. oryzae infection. They were further classified into three classes based on their expression patterns in the susceptible japonica line Lijiangxin Tuan Hegu and in the resistant line International Rice Blast Line Pyricularia-Kanto51-m-Tsuyuake that contains a single resistance gene locus, Pyricularia-Kanto 51-m (Pikm), within the Lijiangxin Tuan Hegu background. RNA-blot assay of nine of them confirmed sequencing results. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay showed that the expression of some target genes was negatively correlated with the expression of miRNAs. Moreover, transgenic rice plants overexpressing miR160a and miR398b displayed enhanced resistance to M. oryzae, as demonstrated by decreased fungal growth, increased hydrogen peroxide accumulation at the infection site, and up-regulated expression of defense-related genes. Taken together, our data indicate that miRNAs are involved in rice immunity against M. oryzae and that overexpression of miR160a or miR398b can enhance rice resistance to the disease. PMID:24335508

  16. Crystal Structure of Manganese Lipoxygenase of the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennman, Anneli; Oliw, Ernst H; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Chen, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOX) are non-heme metal enzymes, which oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids to hydroperoxides. All LOX belong to the same gene family, and they are widely distributed. LOX of animals, plants, and prokaryotes contain iron as the catalytic metal, whereas fungi express LOX with iron or with manganese. Little is known about metal selection by LOX and the adjustment of the redox potentials of their protein-bound catalytic metals. Thirteen three-dimensional structures of animal, plant, and prokaryotic FeLOX are available, but none of MnLOX. The MnLOX of the most important plant pathogen, the rice blast fungusMagnaporthe oryzae(Mo), was expressed inPichia pastoris.Mo-MnLOX was deglycosylated, purified to homogeneity, and subjected to crystal screening and x-ray diffraction. The structure was solved by sulfur and manganese single wavelength anomalous dispersion to a resolution of 2.0 Å. The manganese coordinating sphere is similar to iron ligands of coral 8R-LOX and soybean LOX-1 but is not overlapping. The Asn-473 is positioned on a short loop (Asn-Gln-Gly-Glu-Pro) instead of an α-helix and forms hydrogen bonds with Gln-281. Comparison with FeLOX suggests that Phe-332 and Phe-525 might contribute to the unique suprafacial hydrogen abstraction and oxygenation mechanism of Mo-MnLOX by controlling oxygen access to the pentadiene radical. Modeling suggests that Arg-525 is positioned close to Arg-182 of 8R-LOX, and both residues likely tether the carboxylate group of the substrate. An oxygen channel could not be identified. We conclude that Mo-MnLOX illustrates a partly unique variation of the structural theme of FeLOX. PMID:26783260

  17. Genomic organization and sequence dynamics of the AvrPiz-t locus in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping LI; Bin BAI; Hong-yan ZHANG; Heng ZHOU; Bo ZHOU

    2012-01-01

    Plants utilize multiple layers of defense mechanisms to fight against the invasion of diverse pathogens.The R gene mediates resistance,in most cases,dependent on the co-existence of its cognate pathogen-derived avirulence (Avr) gene.The rice blast R gene Piz-t corresponds in gene-for-gene fashion to the Magnaporthe oryzae Avrgene AvrPiz-t.In this study,we determined and compared the genomic sequences surrounding the AvrPiz-t gene in both avirulent and virulent isolates,designating as AvrPiz-t-ZB15 and avrPiz-t-70-15 regions,respectively.The sequence of the AvrPiz-t-ZB15 region is 120966 bp whereas avrPiz-t-70-15 is 146292 bp in length.The extreme sequence similarity and good synteny in gene order and content along with the absence of two predicted genes in the avrPiz-t-70-15 region were observed in the predicted protein-coding regions in the AvrPiz-t locus.Nevertheless,frequent presence/absence and highly dynamic organization of transposable elements (TEs) were identified,representing the major variation of the AvrPiz-t locus between different isolates.Moreover,TEs constitute 27.3% and 43.2%of the genomic contents of the AvrPiz-t-ZB15 and avrPiz-t-70-15 regions,respectively,indicating that TEs contribute largely to the organization and evolution of AvrPiz-t locus.The findings of this study suggest that M.oryzae could benefit in an evolutionary sense from the presence of active TEs in genes conferring avirulence and provide an ability to rapidly change and thus to overcome host R genes.

  18. Rice Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Possible Herbicide Quinclorac Detoxification Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying eXu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide, and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world’s rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed and hormone interactions affect quinclorac signaling. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and environmental health problems.In this study, we used 57K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array to identify quinclorac signaling response genes to study the molecular mechanisms of action and detoxification of quinclorac in rice plants. Overall, 637 probe sets were identified with differential expression levels under either 6 or 24 h of quinclorac treatment. Auxin-related genes such as GH3 and OsIAAs responded to quinclorac treatment. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes of detoxification-related family genes were significantly enriched, including cytochrome P450, GST, UGT, and ABC and drug transporter genes. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that top candidate P450 families such as CYP81, CYP709C and CYP72A genes were universally induced by different herbicides. Some Arabidopsis genes for the same P450 family were up-regulated under quinclorac treatment.We conduct rice whole-genome GeneChip analysis and the first global identification of quinclorac response genes. This work may provide potential markers for detoxification of quinclorac and biomonitors of environmental chemical pollution.

  19. Proteogenomic Analysis Identifies a Novel Human SHANK3 Isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Benthani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the SHANK3 gene have been associated with autism spectrum disorder. Individuals harboring different SHANK3 mutations display considerable heterogeneity in their cognitive impairment, likely due to the high SHANK3 transcriptional diversity. In this study, we report a novel interaction between the Mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC protein and a newly identified SHANK3 protein isoform in human colon cancer cells and mouse brain tissue. Hence, our proteogenomic analysis identifies a new human long isoform of the key synaptic protein SHANK3 that was not predicted by the human reference genome. Taken together, our findings describe a potential new role for MCC in neurons, a new human SHANK3 long isoform and, importantly, highlight the use of proteomic data towards the re-annotation of GC-rich genomic regions.

  20. Parameter trajectory analysis to identify treatment effects of pharmacological interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Tiemann

    Full Text Available The field of medical systems biology aims to advance understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive disease progression and to translate this knowledge into therapies to effectively treat diseases. A challenging task is the investigation of long-term effects of a (pharmacological treatment, to establish its applicability and to identify potential side effects. We present a new modeling approach, called Analysis of Dynamic Adaptations in Parameter Trajectories (ADAPT, to analyze the long-term effects of a pharmacological intervention. A concept of time-dependent evolution of model parameters is introduced to study the dynamics of molecular adaptations. The progression of these adaptations is predicted by identifying necessary dynamic changes in the model parameters to describe the transition between experimental data obtained during different stages of the treatment. The trajectories provide insight in the affected underlying biological systems and identify the molecular events that should be studied in more detail to unravel the mechanistic basis of treatment outcome. Modulating effects caused by interactions with the proteome and transcriptome levels, which are often less well understood, can be captured by the time-dependent descriptions of the parameters. ADAPT was employed to identify metabolic adaptations induced upon pharmacological activation of the liver X receptor (LXR, a potential drug target to treat or prevent atherosclerosis. The trajectories were investigated to study the cascade of adaptations. This provided a counter-intuitive insight concerning the function of scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1, a receptor that facilitates the hepatic uptake of cholesterol. Although activation of LXR promotes cholesterol efflux and -excretion, our computational analysis showed that the hepatic capacity to clear cholesterol was reduced upon prolonged treatment. This prediction was confirmed experimentally by immunoblotting measurements of SR-B1

  1. Identifying clinical course patterns in SMS data using cluster analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recently, there has been interest in using the short message service (SMS or text messaging), to gather frequent information on the clinical course of individual patients. One possible role for identifying clinical course patterns is to assist in exploring clinically important...... clinically interpretable and different from those of the whole group. Similar patterns were obtained when the number of SMS time points was reduced to monthly. The advantages and disadvantages of this method were contrasted to that of first transforming SMS data by spline analysis. CONCLUSIONS: This study...

  2. Lidar point density analysis: implications for identifying water bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worstell, Bruce B.; Poppenga, Sandra; Evans, Gayla A.; Prince, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Most airborne topographic light detection and ranging (lidar) systems operate within the near-infrared spectrum. Laser pulses from these systems frequently are absorbed by water and therefore do not generate reflected returns on water bodies in the resulting void regions within the lidar point cloud. Thus, an analysis of lidar voids has implications for identifying water bodies. Data analysis techniques to detect reduced lidar return densities were evaluated for test sites in Blackhawk County, Iowa, and Beltrami County, Minnesota, to delineate contiguous areas that have few or no lidar returns. Results from this study indicated a 5-meter radius moving window with fewer than 23 returns (28 percent of the moving window) was sufficient for delineating void regions. Techniques to provide elevation values for void regions to flatten water features and to force channel flow in the downstream direction also are presented.

  3. Cluster analysis of clinical data identifies fibromyalgia subgroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Docampo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Fibromyalgia (FM is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. RESULTS: VARIABLES CLUSTERED INTO THREE INDEPENDENT DIMENSIONS: "symptomatology", "comorbidities" and "clinical scales". Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1, high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2, and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3, showing differences in measures of disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment.

  4. Use of discriminant analysis to identify propensity for purchasing properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Floriani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Properties usually represent a milestone for people and families due to the high added-value when compared with family income. The objective of this study is the proposition of a discrimination model, by a discriminant analysis of people with characteristics (according to independent variables classified as potential buyers of properties, as well as to identify the interest in the use of such property, if it will be assigned to housing or leisure activities such as a cottage or beach house, and/or for investment. Thus, the following research question is proposed: What are the characteristics that better describe the profile of people which intend to acquire properties? The study justifies itself by its economic relevance in the real estate industry, as well as to the players of the real estate Market that may develop products based on the profile of potential customers. As a statistical technique, discriminant analysis was applied to the data gathered by questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. Three hundred and thirty four responses were gathered. Based on this study, it was observed that it is possible to identify the intention for acquired properties, as well the purpose for acquiring it, for housing or investments.

  5. Longitudinal Metagenomic Analysis of Hospital Air Identifies Clinically Relevant Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paula; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Conrad, Douglas; Taplitz, Randy; Torriani, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We describe the sampling of sixty-three uncultured hospital air samples collected over a six-month period and analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our primary goals were to determine the longitudinal metagenomic variability of this environment, identify and characterize genomes of potential pathogens and determine whether they are atypical to the hospital airborne metagenome. Air samples were collected from eight locations which included patient wards, the main lobby and outside. The resulting DNA libraries produced 972 million sequences representing 51 gigabases. Hierarchical clustering of samples by the most abundant 50 microbial orders generated three major nodes which primarily clustered by type of location. Because the indoor locations were longitudinally consistent, episodic relative increases in microbial genomic signatures related to the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus, Penicillium and Stenotrophomonas were identified as outliers at specific locations. Further analysis of microbial reads specific for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia indicated homology to a sequenced multi-drug resistant clinical strain and we observed broad sequence coverage of resistance genes. We demonstrate that a shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach can be used to characterize the resistance determinants of pathogen genomes that are uncharacteristic for an otherwise consistent hospital air microbial metagenomic profile. PMID:27482891

  6. A Critical Analysis of Anesthesiology Podcasts: Identifying Determinants of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devin; Matava, Clyde

    2016-01-01

    Background Audio and video podcasts have gained popularity in recent years. Increasingly, podcasts are being used in the field of medicine as a tool to disseminate information. This format has multiple advantages including highly accessible creation tools, low distribution costs, and portability for the user. However, despite its ongoing use in medical education, there are no data describing factors associated with the success or quality of podcasts. Objective The goal of the study was to assess the landscape of anesthesia podcasts in Canada and develop a methodology for evaluating the quality of the podcast. To achieve our objective, we identified the scope of podcasts in anesthesia specifically, constructed an algorithmic model for measuring success, and identified factors linked to both successful podcasts and a peer-review process. Methods Independent reviewers performed a systematic search of anesthesia-related podcasts on iTunes Canada. Data and metrics recorded for each podcast included podcast’s authorship, number posted, podcast series duration, target audience, topics, and social media presence. Descriptive statistics summarized mined data, and univariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with podcast success and a peer-review process. Results Twenty-two podcasts related to anesthesia were included in the final analysis. Less than a third (6/22=27%) were still active. The median longevity of the podcasts’ series was just 13 months (interquartile range: 1-39 months). Anesthesiologists were the target audience for 77% of podcast series with clinical topics being most commonly addressed. We defined a novel algorithm for measuring success: Podcast Success Index. Factors associated with a high Podcast Success Index included podcasts targeting fellows (Spearman R=0.434; P=.04), inclusion of professional topics (Spearman R=0.456-0.603; P=.01-.03), and the use of Twitter as a means of social media (Spearman R=0.453;P=.03). In addition, more

  7. Analysis of an Image Secret Sharing Scheme to Identify Cheaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-San LEe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Secret image sharing mechanisms have been widely applied to the military, e-commerce, and communications fields. Zhao et al. introduced the concept of cheater detection into image sharing schemes recently. This functionality enables the image owner and authorized members to identify the cheater in reconstructing the secret image. Here, we provide an analysis of Zhao et al.¡¦s method: an authorized participant is able to restore the secret image by him/herself. This contradicts the requirement of secret image sharing schemes. The authorized participant utilizes an exhaustive search to achieve the attempt, though, simulation results show that it can be done within a reasonable time period.

  8. Identifying avian sources of faecal contamination using sterol analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devane, Megan L; Wood, David; Chappell, Andrew; Robson, Beth; Webster-Brown, Jenny; Gilpin, Brent J

    2015-10-01

    Discrimination of the source of faecal pollution in water bodies is an important step in the assessment and mitigation of public health risk. One tool for faecal source tracking is the analysis of faecal sterols which are present in faeces of animals in a range of distinctive ratios. Published ratios are able to discriminate between human and herbivore mammal faecal inputs but are of less value for identifying pollution from wildfowl, which can be a common cause of elevated bacterial indicators in rivers and streams. In this study, the sterol profiles of 50 avian-derived faecal specimens (seagulls, ducks and chickens) were examined alongside those of 57 ruminant faeces and previously published sterol profiles of human wastewater, chicken effluent and animal meatwork effluent. Two novel sterol ratios were identified as specific to avian faecal scats, which, when incorporated into a decision tree with human and herbivore mammal indicative ratios, were able to identify sterols from avian-polluted waterways. For samples where the sterol profile was not consistent with herbivore mammal or human pollution, avian pollution is indicated when the ratio of 24-ethylcholestanol/(24-ethylcholestanol + 24-ethylcoprostanol + 24-ethylepicoprostanol) is ≥0.4 (avian ratio 1) and the ratio of cholestanol/(cholestanol + coprostanol + epicoprostanol) is ≥0.5 (avian ratio 2). When avian pollution is indicated, further confirmation by targeted PCR specific markers can be employed if greater confidence in the pollution source is required. A 66% concordance between sterol ratios and current avian PCR markers was achieved when 56 water samples from polluted waterways were analysed.

  9. Social network analysis in identifying influential webloggers: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasmuni, Noraini; Sulaiman, Nor Intan Saniah; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, second generation of internet-based services such as weblog has become an effective communication tool to publish information on the Web. Weblogs have unique characteristics that deserve users' attention. Some of webloggers have seen weblogs as appropriate medium to initiate and expand business. These webloggers or also known as direct profit-oriented webloggers (DPOWs) communicate and share knowledge with each other through social interaction. However, survivability is the main issue among DPOW. Frequent communication with influential webloggers is one of the way to keep survive as DPOW. This paper aims to understand the network structure and identify influential webloggers within the network. Proper understanding of the network structure can assist us in knowing how the information is exchanged among members and enhance survivability among DPOW. 30 DPOW were involved in this study. Degree centrality and betweenness centrality measurement in Social Network Analysis (SNA) were used to examine the strength relation and identify influential webloggers within the network. Thus, webloggers with the highest value of these measurements are considered as the most influential webloggers in the network.

  10. Recovery and Biological Properties of Nitrate Non-utilizing Mutants of Rice Blast, Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chuan-qing; ZHOU Ming-guo

    2004-01-01

    Eleven nitrate non-utilizing (nit) mutants were recovered from six isolates of Magnaporthe grisea cultured on MM media amended with 60 g/L potassium chlorate, with a frequency of 1.42 %. Some biological properties, such as growth rate, growth biomass, cultural characters, conidial production, sexual reproduction ability, and pathogenicity were compared between nit mutants and their parent isolates. Results showed that all the nit mutants were resistant to chlorate. Some important biological properties such as the growth rate on YPSA, conidial production ability on TPSA, pathogenicity, had no significant differences between nit mutants and their parent isolates. Mating type didn't change, but perithecia production ability of fertile isolates changed significantly as compared with that of their parent isolates. Therefore, the nit can be used as a genetic marker to study the genetics such as pathogenicity, fungicide resistance in Magnaporthe grisea.

  11. Multiple upstream signals converge on the adaptor protein Mst50 in Magnaporthe grisea

    OpenAIRE

    G. Park; Xue, C.; X. Zhao; Kim, Y.; Orbach, M.; Xu, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Rice blast fungus ( Magnaporthe grisea) forms a highly specialized infection structure for plant penetration, the appressorium, the formation and growth of which are regulated by the Mst11- Mst7- Pmk1 mitogen- activated protein kinase cascade. We characterized the MST50 gene that directly interacts with both MST11 and MST7. Similar to the mst11 mutant, the mst50 mutant was defective in appressorium formation, sens...

  12. Physical Map and Organization of Chromosome 7 in the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe grisea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Heng; Blackmon, Barbara P.; Sasinowski, Maciek; Dean, Ralph A.

    1999-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea is a highly destructive plant pathogen and one of the most important for studying various aspects of host-plant interactions. It has been widely adopted as a model organism because it is ideally suited for genetic and biological studies. To facilitate map-based cloning, chromosome walking, and genome organization studies of M. grisea, a complete physical map of chromosome 7 was constructed using a large-insert (130 kb) bacterial artificial chromosome (...

  13. Directional reflectance analysis for identifying counterfeit drugs: Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Koprowski, Robert; Błońska-Fajfrowska, Barbara

    2016-05-30

    The WHO estimates that up to 10% of drugs on the market may be counterfeit. In order to prevent intensification of the phenomenon of drug counterfeiting, the methods for distinguishing genuine medicines from fake ones need to be developed. The aim of this study was to try to develop simple, reproducible and inexpensive method for distinguishing between original and counterfeit medicines based on the measurement of directional reflectance. The directional reflectance of 6 original Viagra(®) tablets (Pfizer) and 24 (4 different batches) counterfeit tablets (imitating Viagra(®)) was examined in six spectral bands: from 0.9 to 1.1 μm, from 1.9 to 2.6 μm, from 3.0 to 4.0 μm, from 3.0 to 5.0 μm, from 4.0 to 5.0 μm, from 8.0 to 12.0 μm, and for two angles of incidence, 20° and 60°. Directional hemispherical reflectometer was applied to measure directional reflectance. Significant statistical differences between the directional reflectance of the original Viagra(®) and counterfeit tablets were registered. Any difference in the value of directional reflectance for any spectral band or angle of incidence identifies the drug as a fake one. The proposed method of directional reflectance analysis enables to differentiate between the real Viagra(®) and fake tablets. Directional reflectance analysis is a fast (measurement time under 5s), cheap and reproducible method which does not require expensive equipment or specialized laboratory staff. It also seems to be an effective method, however, the effectiveness will be assessed after the extension of research. PMID:26977587

  14. A Sensitivity Analysis Approach to Identify Key Environmental Performance Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Life cycle assessment (LCA is widely used in design phase to reduce the product’s environmental impacts through the whole product life cycle (PLC during the last two decades. The traditional LCA is restricted to assessing the environmental impacts of a product and the results cannot reflect the effects of changes within the life cycle. In order to improve the quality of ecodesign, it is a growing need to develop an approach which can reflect the changes between the design parameters and product’s environmental impacts. A sensitivity analysis approach based on LCA and ecodesign is proposed in this paper. The key environmental performance factors which have significant influence on the products’ environmental impacts can be identified by analyzing the relationship between environmental impacts and the design parameters. Users without much environmental knowledge can use this approach to determine which design parameter should be first considered when (redesigning a product. A printed circuit board (PCB case study is conducted; eight design parameters are chosen to be analyzed by our approach. The result shows that the carbon dioxide emission during the PCB manufacture is highly sensitive to the area of PCB panel.

  15. Global secretome analysis identifies novel mediators of bone metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Andres Blanco; Gary LeRoy; Zia Khan; Ma(s)a Ale(c)kovi(c); Barry M Zee; Benjamin A Garcia; Yibin Kang

    2012-01-01

    Bone is the one of the most common sites of distant metastasis of solid tumors.Secreted proteins are known to influence pathological interactions between metastatic cancer cells and the bone stroma.To comprehensively profile secreted proteins associated with bone metastasis,we used quantitative and non-quantitative mass spectrometry to globally analyze the secretomes of nine cell lines of varying bone metastatic ability from multiple species and cancer types.By comparing the secretomes of parental cells and their bone metastatic derivatives,we identified the secreted proteins that were uniquely associated with bone metastasis in these cell lines.We then incorporated bioinformatic analyses of large clinical metastasis datasets to obtain a list of candidate novel bone metastasis proteins of several functional classes that were strongly associated with both clinical and experimental bone metastasis.Functional validation of selected proteins indicated that in vivo bone metastasis can be promoted by high expression of (1) the salivary cystatins CST1,CST2,and CST4; (2) the plasminogen activators PLAT and PLAU; or (3) the collagen functionality proteins PLOD2 and COL6A1.Overall,our study has uncovered several new secreted mediators of bone metastasis and therefore demonstrated that secretome analysis is a powerful method for identification of novel biomarkers and candidate therapeutic targets.

  16. Performance Analysis: Work Control Events Identified January - August 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Grange, C E; Freeman, J W; Kerr, C E; Holman, G; Marsh, K; Beach, R

    2011-01-14

    This performance analysis evaluated 24 events that occurred at LLNL from January through August 2010. The analysis identified areas of potential work control process and/or implementation weaknesses and several common underlying causes. Human performance improvement and safety culture factors were part of the causal analysis of each event and were analyzed. The collective significance of all events in 2010, as measured by the occurrence reporting significance category and by the proportion of events that have been reported to the DOE ORPS under the ''management concerns'' reporting criteria, does not appear to have increased in 2010. The frequency of reporting in each of the significance categories has not changed in 2010 compared to the previous four years. There is no change indicating a trend in the significance category and there has been no increase in the proportion of occurrences reported in the higher significance category. Also, the frequency of events, 42 events reported through August 2010, is not greater than in previous years and is below the average of 63 occurrences per year at LLNL since 2006. Over the previous four years, an average of 43% of the LLNL's reported occurrences have been reported as either ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' In 2010, 29% of the occurrences have been reported as ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' This rate indicates that LLNL is now reporting fewer ''management concern'' and ''near miss'' occurrences compared to the previous four years. From 2008 to the present, LLNL senior management has undertaken a series of initiatives to strengthen the work planning and control system with the primary objective to improve worker safety. In 2008, the LLNL Deputy Director established the Work Control Integrated Project Team to develop the core requirements and graded

  17. Lysimachia foenum-graecum Herba Extract, a Novel Biopesticide, Inhibits ABC Transporter Genes and Mycelial Growth of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin

    2016-02-01

    To identify a novel biopesticide controlling rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, 700 plant extracts were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on mycelial growth of M. oryzae. The L. foenum-graecum Herba extract showed the lowest inhibition concentration (IC50) of 39.28 μg/ml, which is lower than the IC50 of blasticidin S (63.06 μg/ml), a conventional fungicide for rice blast disease. When treatments were combined, the IC50 of blasticidin S was dramatically reduced to 10.67 μg/ml. Since ABC transporter genes are involved in fungicide resistance of many organisms, we performed RT-PCR to investigate the transcriptional changes of 40 ABC transporter family genes of M. oryzae treated with the plant extract, blasticidin S, and tetrandrine, a recognized ABC transporter inhibitor. Four ABC transporter genes were prominently activated by blasticidin S treatment, but were suppressed by combinational treatment of blasticidin S with the plant extract, or with tetrandrine that didn't show cellular toxicity by itself in this study. Mycelial death was detected via confocal microscopy at 24 h after plant extract treatment. Finally, subsequent rice field study revealed that the plant extract had high control efficacy of 63.3% and should be considered a biopesticide for rice blast disease. These results showed that extract of L. foenum graecum Herba suppresses M. oryzae ABC transporter genes inducing mycelial death and therefore may be a potent novel biopesticide. PMID:26889110

  18. Lysimachia foenum-graecum Herba Extract, a Novel Biopesticide, Inhibits ABC Transporter Genes and Mycelial Growth of Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjin Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To identify a novel biopesticide controlling rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, 700 plant extracts were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on mycelial growth of M. oryzae. The L. foenum-graecum Herba extract showed the lowest inhibition concentration (IC₅₀ of 39.28 μg/ml, which is lower than the IC₅₀ of blasticidin S (63.06 μg/ml, a conventional fungicide for rice blast disease. When treatments were combined, the IC₅₀ of blasticidin S was dramatically reduced to 10.67 μg/ml. Since ABC transporter genes are involved in fungicide resistance of many organisms, we performed RT-PCR to investigate the transcriptional changes of 40 ABC transporter family genes of M. oryzae treated with the plant extract, blasticidin S, and tetrandrine, a recognized ABC transporter inhibitor. Four ABC transporter genes were prominently activated by blasticidin S treatment, but were suppressed by combinational treatment of blasticidin S with the plant extract, or with tetrandrine that didn’t show cellular toxicity by itself in this study. Mycelial death was detected via confocal microscopy at 24 h after plant extract treatment. Finally, subsequent rice field study revealed that the plant extract had high control efficacy of 63.3% and should be considered a biopesticide for rice blast disease. These results showed that extract of L. foenum graecum Herba suppresses M. oryzae ABC transporter genes inducing mycelial death and therefore may be a potent novel biopesticide.

  19. An expedited method for isolation of DNA for PCR from Magnaporthe oryzae stored on filter paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Jia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of a wide range of cereal diseases. For long-term preservation, the fungus is grown and stored desiccated on filter papers at –20 °C. Inoculated filter papers are cut into pieces of 0.5–1.0 cm diameter prior to storage. In the present study, a fast (11 min and simple method of preparing DNA suitable for amplifying avirulence genes of M. oryzae by polymerase chain reaction (PCR was developed. A piece of filter paper containing the fungus was removed from a glass bottle and placed in a 0.2 mL Eppendorf tube containing 100 μL 10 × TE. The suspension was heated for 10 min at 95 °C in a PCR machine. The tube was then centrifuged for 1 min at 3000 r min− 1. One μL of 10 × TE solution containing DNA was used for PCR. A total of 28 samples were PCR tested. As a positive control, fungal DNA was extracted using a conventional DNA preparation method. DNA samples obtained from both methods were stored at 4 °C. PCR was performed with DNA on the preparation day and after 4, 8, 10, and 18 days of refrigerated storage. In four samples, samples 12, 13, 14, and 28, AVR-Pi9 failed to be amplified. These four samples were tested with a different set of primers for AVR-Pi9, and for AVR-Pita1, confirming that the quality of the samples was insufficient for PCR. Overall, for nearly 90% (24/28 of the samples, the quality of the DNA prepared directly from the fungus on filter paper appeared suitable for a rapid survey of genetic identity of the rice blast fungus by PCR. This method will be useful and effective for reducing cost and time and could readily be adopted worldwide for analysis of M. oryzae and possibly other fungi.

  20. Virulence Types of Magnaporthe oryzae to Hybrid Rice in Sichuan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-lian; ZHANG Xue-mei; FENG Hui; JI Hong-li; HUANG Yun; PENG Yun-liang

    2012-01-01

    A total of 638 isolates of rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae) were isolated in 2002-2009 from different rice varieties in different regions of Sichuan,China and inoculated onto seven rice varieties (Lijiangxintuanheigu,IR24,Minghui 63,Duohui 1,Chenghui 448,Neihui 99-14 and RHR-1) to differentiate the virulence types of the fungus and trace the changes.The virulence to the seven varieties was respectively scored at 1,2,4,8,16,32 and 64.The total scores of individual M.grisea isolates which were the sum of scores infecting differential varieties could,in turn,be used for the nomenclature of the virulence types due to their accordance to the special virulence patterns.The 638 tested isolates were then differentiated into 56 different virulence types.Type 15 virulent to Lijiangxintuanheigu,IR24 and Minghui 63,and Type 127 virulent to all of the seven varieties were the most dominant virulence types respectively with the occurrence frequencies of 15.99% and 15.83%.Type 19 and other seven virulence types were not monitored during 2002-2009.Type 15 was the predominant virulence type in 2002,2003,2004 and 2007,whereas Type 127 had been the most dominant virulence type after 2005 except for the year 2007 when the province underwent severe drought.Five hundred and seven out of the 638 tested isolates were virulent to Minghui 63,and 89.58% of the 384 isolates virulent to either Duohui 1,Chenghui 448 or Neihui 99-14 were virulent to Minghui 63,which indicated the impact of the extensive plantation of hybrid rice Minghui 63 as the restorer line on the virulence evolution of M.oryzae in Sichuan.The virulence pattern of the dominant virulence types suggested that the acquiring of virulence to all the major resistant restorer lines was the main routes of the evolution in virulence of M.oryzae to hybrid rice in Sichuan.The virulence frequencies of the 638 tested isolates to IR24,Minghui 63,Duohui 1,Chenghui 448,Neihui 99-14 and RHR-1 were respectively 74.6%,79.5%,73.8%,37

  1. An expedited method for isolation of DNA for PCR from Magnaporthe oryzae stored on filter paper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulin; Jia; Yeshi; A.; Wamishe; Bo; Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of a wide range of cereal diseases. For long-term preservation, the fungus is grown and stored desiccated on filter papers at –20 °C.Inoculated filter papers are cut into pieces of 0.5–1.0 cm diameter prior to storage. In the present study, a fast(11 min) and simple method of preparing DNA suitable for amplifying avirulence genes of M. oryzae by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) was developed. A piece of filter paper containing the fungus was removed from a glass bottle and placed in a 0.2 mL Eppendorf tube containing 100 μL 10 × TE. The suspension was heated for 10 min at 95 °C in a PCR machine. The tube was then centrifuged for 1 min at 3000 r min-1. One μL of 10 × TE solution containing DNA was used for PCR. A total of 28 samples were PCR tested. As a positive control, fungal DNA was extracted using a conventional DNA preparation method. DNA samples obtained from both methods were stored at 4 °C. PCR was performed with DNA on the preparation day and after 4, 8,10, and 18 days of refrigerated storage. In four samples, samples 12, 13, 14, and 28, AVR-Pi9 failed to be amplified. These four samples were tested with a different set of primers for AVR-Pi9, and for AVR-Pita1, confirming that the quality of the samples was insufficient for PCR. Overall, for nearly 90%(24/28) of the samples, the quality of the DNA prepared directly from the fungus on filter paper appeared suitable for a rapid survey of genetic identity of the rice blast fungus by PCR.This method will be useful and effective for reducing cost and time and could readily be adopted worldwide for analysis of M. oryzae and possibly other fungi.

  2. Integrating subpathway analysis to identify candidate agents for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiye; Li, Mi; Wang, Yun; Liu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common cause of cancer-associated death worldwide, characterized by a high invasiveness and resistance to normal anticancer treatments. The need to develop new therapeutic agents for HCC is urgent. Here, we developed a bioinformatics method to identify potential novel drugs for HCC by integrating HCC-related and drug-affected subpathways. By using the RNA-seq data from the TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) database, we first identified 1,763 differentially expressed genes between HCC and normal samples. Next, we identified 104 significant HCC-related subpathways. We also identified the subpathways associated with small molecular drugs in the CMap database. Finally, by integrating HCC-related and drug-affected subpathways, we identified 40 novel small molecular drugs capable of targeting these HCC-involved subpathways. In addition to previously reported agents (ie, calmidazolium), our method also identified potentially novel agents for targeting HCC. We experimentally verified that one of these novel agents, prenylamine, induced HCC cell apoptosis using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, an acridine orange/ethidium bromide stain, and electron microscopy. In addition, we found that prenylamine not only affected several classic apoptosis-related proteins, including Bax, Bcl-2, and cytochrome c, but also increased caspase-3 activity. These candidate small molecular drugs identified by us may provide insights into novel therapeutic approaches for HCC. PMID:27022281

  3. Experimental evolution reveals genome-wide spectrum and dynamics of mutations in the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyun Jeon

    Full Text Available Knowledge on mutation processes is central to interpreting genetic analysis data as well as understanding the underlying nature of almost all evolutionary phenomena. However, studies on genome-wide mutational spectrum and dynamics in fungal pathogens are scarce, hindering our understanding of their evolution and biology. Here, we explored changes in the phenotypes and genome sequences of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae during the forced in vitro evolution by weekly transfer of cultures on artificial media. Through combination of experimental evolution with high throughput sequencing technology, we found that mutations accumulate rapidly prior to visible phenotypic changes and that both genetic drift and selection seem to contribute to shaping mutational landscape, suggesting the buffering capacity of fungal genome against mutations. Inference of mutational effects on phenotypes through the use of T-DNA insertion mutants suggested that at least some of the DNA sequence mutations are likely associated with the observed phenotypic changes. Furthermore, our data suggest oxidative damages and UV as major sources of mutation during subcultures. Taken together, our work revealed important properties of original source of variation in the genome of the rice blast fungus. We believe that these results provide not only insights into stability of pathogenicity and genome evolution in plant pathogenic fungi but also a model in which evolution of fungal pathogens in natura can be comparatively investigated.

  4. Induction of avirulence by AVR-Pita1 in virulent U.S. field isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae’

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuntao; Dai; Eugenia; Winston; James; C.Correll; Yulin; Jia

    2014-01-01

    The AVR-Pita1 gene,from the Chinese isolate O-137 of Magnaporthe oryzae,is an effector that determines the efficacy of the Pi-ta rice blast resistance gene.In the present study,the avirulence function of AVR-Pita1 was induced by transformation of field isolates(TM2,ZN19,B2 and B8)that originally were collected from the U.S.and are virulent on Pi-ta-carrying rice cultivars.The presence of AVR-Pita1 from O-137 in independent transformants was detected by PCR using AVR-Pita1 specific primers and verified by DNA sequencing and Southern blot analysis using the AVR-Pita1 coding region as a probe.The results of pathogenicity assays showed that the AVR-Pita1-transformed isolates were not able to infect rice cultivars Katy and Drew carrying Pi-ta.Control isolates that were transformed with inserts lacking the AVR-Pita1gene remained virulent.Our findings demonstrate that AVR-Pita1 can be used to induce novel gene-specific blast resistance in nature.

  5. Market Analysis Identifies Community and School Education Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindle, Jane C.

    1989-01-01

    Principals must realize the positive effects that marketing can have on improving schools and building support for them. Market analysis forces clarification of the competing needs and interests present in the community. The four marketing phases are needs assessment, analysis, goal setting, and public relations and advertising. (MLH)

  6. Rice transcriptome analysis to identify possible herbicide quinclorac detoxification genes

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Wenying; Di, Chao; Zhou, Shaoxia; Liu, Jia; LI Li; Liu, Fengxia; Yang, Xinling; Ling, Yun; Su, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world's rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed, and hormone interactions affecting quinclorac signaling has been identified. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and other environmental health problems. In thi...

  7. Identifiability analysis of the CSTR river water quality model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Deng, Y

    2006-01-01

    Conceptual river water quality models are widely known to lack identifiability. The causes for that can be due to model structure errors, observational errors and less frequent samplings. Although significant efforts have been directed towards better identification of river water quality models, it is not clear whether a given model is structurally identifiable. Information is also limited regarding the contribution of different unidentifiability sources. Taking the widely applied CSTR river water quality model as an example, this paper presents a theoretical proof that the CSTR model is indeed structurally identifiable. Its uncertainty is thus dominantly from observational errors and less frequent samplings. Given the current monitoring accuracy and sampling frequency, the unidentifiability from sampling frequency is found to be more significant than that from observational errors. It is also noted that there is a crucial sampling frequency between 0.1 and 1 day, over which the simulated river system could be represented by different illusions and the model application could be far less reliable.

  8. Association analysis identifies ZNF750 regulatory variants in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birnbaum Ramon Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the ZNF750 promoter and coding regions have been previously associated with Mendelian forms of psoriasis and psoriasiform dermatitis. ZNF750 encodes a putative zinc finger transcription factor that is highly expressed in keratinocytes and represents a candidate psoriasis gene. Methods We examined whether ZNF750 variants were associated with psoriasis in a large case-control population. We sequenced the promoter and exon regions of ZNF750 in 716 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 397 Caucasian controls. Results We identified a total of 47 variants, including 38 rare variants of which 35 were novel. Association testing identified two ZNF750 haplotypes associated with psoriasis (p ZNF750 promoter and 5' UTR variants displayed a 35-55% reduction of ZNF750 promoter activity, consistent with the promoter activity reduction seen in a Mendelian psoriasis family with a ZNF750 promoter variant. However, the rare promoter and 5' UTR variants identified in this study did not strictly segregate with the psoriasis phenotype within families. Conclusions Two haplotypes of ZNF750 and rare 5' regulatory variants of ZNF750 were found to be associated with psoriasis. These rare 5' regulatory variants, though not causal, might serve as a genetic modifier of psoriasis.

  9. Resistance Evaluation of Some Chinese Leading Rice Maintainer, Restorer lines and Their Hybrids to Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xu-dong; SHEN Ying; Henri ADREIT; Julien FROUIN; Didier HARREAU

    2004-01-01

    Six isolates of Magnaporthe grisea were selected to inoculate on 10 Chinese leading maintainer lines (B-lines), 14 restorer lines (R-lines) and their F1 hybrid plants. In the tested rice materials, R-lines were proved to be more resistant to blast than B-lines.The resistance frequency of about 25% F1 hybrid plants was less than their parents. In addition, 26 isolates of M. grisea collected from different rice growing areas of China were inoculated on 13 new improved hybrid rice combinations. The resistance frequencies of 5 improved hybrids were better than those of the controls and leading varieties in rice production of China.

  10. Histidine kinases mediate differentiation, stress response, and pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Stefan; Foster, Andrew J.; Yemelin, Alexander; Thines, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is a functional characterization of 10 putative histidine kinases (HIKs)-encoding genes in the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Two HIKs were found to be required for pathogenicity in the fungus. It was found that the mutant strains ΔMohik5 and ΔMohik8 show abnormal conidial morphology and furthermore ΔMohik5 is unable to form appressoria. Both HIKs MoHik5p and MoHik8p appear to be essential for pathogenicity since the mutants fail to infect rice plants. MoSln1...

  11. Investigation of the biological roles of autophagy in appressorium morphogenesis in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hong LIU; Fu-cheng LIN

    2008-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae has been used as a primary model organism for investigating fungus-plant interaction. Many researches focused on molecular mechanisms of appressorium formation to restrain this fungal pathogen. Autophagy is a very high conserved process in eukaryotic cells. Recently, autophagy has been considered as a key process in development and differentiation in M. oryzae. In this report, we present and discuss the current state of our knowledge on gene expression in appressorium formation and the progress in autophagy of rice blast fungi.

  12. Using Rasch Analysis to Identify Uncharacteristic Responses to Undergraduate Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Antony; Alcock, Lara

    2010-01-01

    Rasch Analysis is a statistical technique that is commonly used to analyse both test data and Likert survey data, to construct and evaluate question item banks, and to evaluate change in longitudinal studies. In this article, we introduce the dichotomous Rasch model, briefly discussing its assumptions. Then, using data collected in an…

  13. Evaluation of energy system analysis techniques for identifying underground facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; Portante, E.C. [and others

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the results of a study to determine the feasibility and potential usefulness of applying energy system analysis techniques to help detect and characterize underground facilities that could be used for clandestine activities. Four off-the-shelf energy system modeling tools were considered: (1) ENPEP (Energy and Power Evaluation Program) - a total energy system supply/demand model, (2) ICARUS (Investigation of Costs and Reliability in Utility Systems) - an electric utility system dispatching (or production cost and reliability) model, (3) SMN (Spot Market Network) - an aggregate electric power transmission network model, and (4) PECO/LF (Philadelphia Electric Company/Load Flow) - a detailed electricity load flow model. For the purposes of most of this work, underground facilities were assumed to consume about 500 kW to 3 MW of electricity. For some of the work, facilities as large as 10-20 MW were considered. The analysis of each model was conducted in three stages: data evaluation, base-case analysis, and comparative case analysis. For ENPEP and ICARUS, open source data from Pakistan were used for the evaluations. For SMN and PECO/LF, the country data were not readily available, so data for the state of Arizona were used to test the general concept.

  14. Identifying Colluvial Slopes by Airborne LiDAR Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, M.; Marutani, T.; Yoshida, H.

    2015-12-01

    Colluvial slopes are one of major sources of landslides. Identifying the locations of the slopes will help reduce the risk of disasters, by avoiding building infrastructure and properties nearby, or if they are already there, by applying appropriate counter measures before it suddenly moves. In this study, airborne LiDAR data was analyzed to find their geomorphic characteristics to use for extracting their locations. The study site was set in the suburb of Sapporo City, Hokkaido in Japan. The area is underlain by Andesite and Tuff and prone to landslides. Slope angle and surface roughness were calculated from 5 m resolution DEM. These filters were chosen because colluvial materials deposit at around the angle of repose and accumulation of loose materials was considered to form a peculiar surface texture differentiable from other slope types. Field survey conducted together suggested that colluvial slopes could be identified by the filters with a probability of 80 percent. Repeat LiDAR monitoring of the site by an unmanned helicopter indicated that those slopes detected as colluviums appeared to be moving at a slow rate. In comparison with a similar study from the crushed zone in Japan, the range of slope angle indicative of colluviums agreed with the Sapporo site, while the texture was rougher due to larger debris composing the slopes.

  15. Temperature-based Instanton Analysis: Identifying Vulnerability in Transmission Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersulis, Jonas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hiskens, Ian [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bienstock, Daniel [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-04-08

    A time-coupled instanton method for characterizing transmission network vulnerability to wind generation fluctuation is presented. To extend prior instanton work to multiple-time-step analysis, line constraints are specified in terms of temperature rather than current. An optimization formulation is developed to express the minimum wind forecast deviation such that at least one line is driven to its thermal limit. Results are shown for an IEEE RTS-96 system with several wind-farms.

  16. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata;

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gene...... expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  17. Predicting missing links and identifying spurious links via likelihood analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Liming; Zhou, Tao; Lü, Linyuan; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-03-01

    Real network data is often incomplete and noisy, where link prediction algorithms and spurious link identification algorithms can be applied. Thus far, it lacks a general method to transform network organizing mechanisms to link prediction algorithms. Here we use an algorithmic framework where a network’s probability is calculated according to a predefined structural Hamiltonian that takes into account the network organizing principles, and a non-observed link is scored by the conditional probability of adding the link to the observed network. Extensive numerical simulations show that the proposed algorithm has remarkably higher accuracy than the state-of-the-art methods in uncovering missing links and identifying spurious links in many complex biological and social networks. Such method also finds applications in exploring the underlying network evolutionary mechanisms.

  18. Fungal virulence and development is regulated by alternative pre-mRNA 3'end processing in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Franceschetti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins play a central role in post-transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression. Identification of novel RNA-binding proteins in fungi is essential to unravel post-transcriptional networks and cellular processes that confer identity to the fungal kingdom. Here, we carried out the functional characterisation of the filamentous fungus-specific RNA-binding protein RBP35 required for full virulence and development in the rice blast fungus. RBP35 contains an N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM and six Arg-Gly-Gly tripeptide repeats. Immunoblots identified two RBP35 protein isoforms that show a steady-state nuclear localisation and bind RNA in vitro. RBP35 coimmunoprecipitates in vivo with Cleavage Factor I (CFI 25 kDa, a highly conserved protein involved in polyA site recognition and cleavage of pre-mRNAs. Several targets of RBP35 have been identified using transcriptomics including 14-3-3 pre-mRNA, an important integrator of environmental signals. In Magnaporthe oryzae, RBP35 is not essential for viability but regulates the length of 3'UTRs of transcripts with developmental and virulence-associated functions. The Δrbp35 mutant is affected in the TOR (target of rapamycin signaling pathway showing significant changes in nitrogen metabolism and protein secretion. The lack of clear RBP35 orthologues in yeast, plants and animals indicates that RBP35 is a novel auxiliary protein of the polyadenylation machinery of filamentous fungi. Our data demonstrate that RBP35 is the fungal equivalent of metazoan CFI 68 kDa and suggest the existence of 3'end processing mechanisms exclusive to the fungal kingdom.

  19. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease. PMID:25605006

  20. Population structure and pathotype diversity of the wheat blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae 25 years after its emergence in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes Maciel, J.L.; Ceresini, P.; Castroagudin, V.L.; Zala, M.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Since its first report in Brazil in 1985, wheat blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph: Pyricularia oryzae), has become increasingly important in South America, where the disease is still spreading. We used 11 microsatellite loci to elucidate the population structure of the wheat blast pathog

  1. Sequence variation and recognition specificity of the avirulence gene AvrPiz-t in Magnaporthe oryzae field populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast pathogen, causes significant annual yield loss of rice worldwide. Currently, the most effective disease control approach is deployment of host resistance through introduction of resistance (R) genes into elite cultivars. The function of each R gene relies on the sp...

  2. Characterization of resistance genes to rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in a “Green Revolution” rice variety

    Science.gov (United States)

    The indica rice variety Dee Geo Woo Gen (DGWG) was the source of the semi-dwarf gene (SD1) which played an important role in the Green Revolution. In the present study, resistance (R) genes to the U.S. race (isolate) IB54 of Magnaporthe oryzae, causal agent of rice blast disease, was investigated. T...

  3. Network stratification analysis for identifying function-specific network layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanchao; Wang, Jiguang; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Juan; Xu, Dong; Chen, Luonan

    2016-04-22

    A major challenge of systems biology is to capture the rewiring of biological functions (e.g. signaling pathways) in a molecular network. To address this problem, we proposed a novel computational framework, namely network stratification analysis (NetSA), to stratify the whole biological network into various function-specific network layers corresponding to particular functions (e.g. KEGG pathways), which transform the network analysis from the gene level to the functional level by integrating expression data, the gene/protein network and gene ontology information altogether. The application of NetSA in yeast and its comparison with a traditional network-partition both suggest that NetSA can more effectively reveal functional implications of network rewiring and extract significant phenotype-related biological processes. Furthermore, for time-series or stage-wise data, the function-specific network layer obtained by NetSA is also shown to be able to characterize the disease progression in a dynamic manner. In particular, when applying NetSA to hepatocellular carcinoma and type 1 diabetes, we can derive functional spectra regarding the progression of the disease, and capture active biological functions (i.e. active pathways) in different disease stages. The additional comparison between NetSA and SPIA illustrates again that NetSA could discover more complete biological functions during disease progression. Overall, NetSA provides a general framework to stratify a network into various layers of function-specific sub-networks, which can not only analyze a biological network on the functional level but also investigate gene rewiring patterns in biological processes. PMID:26879865

  4. Identifying a preservation zone using multi–criteria decision analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farashi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Zoning of a protected area is an approach to partition landscape into various land use units. The management of these landscape units can reduce conflicts caused by human activities. Tandoreh National Park is one of the most biologically diverse, protected areas in Iran. Although the area is generally designed to protect biodiversity, there are many conflicts between biodiversity conservation and human activities. For instance, the area is highly controversial and has been considered as an impediment to local economic development, such as tourism, grazing, road construction, and cultivation. In order to reduce human conflicts with biodiversity conservation in Tandoreh National Park, safe zones need to be established and human activities need to be moved out of the zones. In this study we used a systematic methodology to integrate a participatory process with Geographic Information Systems (GIS using a multi–criteria decision analysis (MCDA technique to guide a zoning scheme for the Tandoreh National Park, Iran. Our results show that the northern and eastern parts of the Tandoreh National Park that were close to rural areas and farmlands returned less desirability for selection as a preservation area. Rocky Mountains were the most important and most destructed areas and abandoned plains were the least important criteria for preservation in the area. Furthermore, the results reveal that the land properties were considered to be important for protection based on the obtaine

  5. Meconium microbiome analysis identifies bacteria correlated with premature birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria N Ardissone

    Full Text Available Preterm birth is the second leading cause of death in children under the age of five years worldwide, but the etiology of many cases remains enigmatic. The dogma that the fetus resides in a sterile environment is being challenged by recent findings and the question has arisen whether microbes that colonize the fetus may be related to preterm birth. It has been posited that meconium reflects the in-utero microbial environment. In this study, correlations between fetal intestinal bacteria from meconium and gestational age were examined in order to suggest underlying mechanisms that may contribute to preterm birth.Meconium from 52 infants ranging in gestational age from 23 to 41 weeks was collected, the DNA extracted, and 16S rRNA analysis performed. Resulting taxa of microbes were correlated to clinical variables and also compared to previous studies of amniotic fluid and other human microbiome niches.Increased detection of bacterial 16S rRNA in meconium of infants of <33 weeks gestational age was observed. Approximately 61·1% of reads sequenced were classified to genera that have been reported in amniotic fluid. Gestational age had the largest influence on microbial community structure (R = 0·161; p = 0·029, while mode of delivery (C-section versus vaginal delivery had an effect as well (R = 0·100; p = 0·044. Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Photorhabdus, and Tannerella, were negatively correlated with gestational age and have been reported to incite inflammatory responses, suggesting a causative role in premature birth.This provides the first evidence to support the hypothesis that the fetal intestinal microbiome derived from swallowed amniotic fluid may be involved in the inflammatory response that leads to premature birth.

  6. Homeobox transcription factors are required for conidiation and appressorium development in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seryun Kim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate development of conidia and appressoria is critical in the disease cycle of many fungal pathogens, including Magnaporthe oryzae. A total of eight genes (MoHOX1 to MoHOX8 encoding putative homeobox transcription factors (TFs were identified from the M. oryzae genome. Knockout mutants for each MoHOX gene were obtained via homology-dependent gene replacement. Two mutants, DeltaMohox3 and DeltaMohox5, exhibited no difference to wild-type in growth, conidiation, conidium size, conidial germination, appressorium formation, and pathogenicity. However, the DeltaMohox1 showed a dramatic reduction in hyphal growth and increase in melanin pigmentation, compared to those in wild-type. DeltaMohox4 and DeltaMohox6 showed significantly reduced conidium size and hyphal growth, respectively. DeltaMohox8 formed normal appressoria, but failed in pathogenicity, probably due to defects in the development of penetration peg and invasive growth. It is most notable that asexual reproduction was completely abolished in DeltaMohox2, in which no conidia formed. DeltaMohox2 was still pathogenic through hypha-driven appressoria in a manner similar to that of the wild-type. However, DeltaMohox7 was unable to form appressoria either on conidial germ tubes, or at hyphal tips, being non-pathogenic. These factors indicate that M. oryzae is able to cause foliar disease via hyphal appressorium-mediated penetration, and MoHOX7 is mutually required to drive appressorium formation from hyphae and germ tubes. Transcriptional analyses suggest that the functioning of M. oryzae homeobox TFs is mediated through the regulation of gene expression and is affected by cAMP and Ca(2+ signaling and/or MAPK pathways. The divergent roles of this gene set may help reveal how the genome and regulatory pathways evolved within the rice blast pathogen and close relatives.

  7. Purification and characterization of a novel hypersensitive response-inducing elicitor from Magnaporthe oryzae that triggers defense response in rice.

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    Mingjia Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus, might secrete certain proteins related to plant-fungal pathogen interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we report the purification, characterization, and gene cloning of a novel hypersensitive response-inducing protein elicitor (MoHrip1 secreted by M. oryzae. The protein fraction was purified and identified by de novo sequencing, and the sequence matched the genomic sequence of a putative protein from M. oryzae strain 70-15 (GenBank accession No. XP_366602.1. The elicitor-encoding gene mohrip1 was isolated; it consisted of a 429 bp cDNA, which encodes a polypeptide of 142 amino acids with a molecular weight of 14.322 kDa and a pI of 4.53. The deduced protein, MoHrip1, was expressed in E. coli. And the expression protein collected from bacterium also forms necrotic lesions in tobacco. MoHrip1 could induce the early events of the defense response, including hydrogen peroxide production, callose deposition, and alkalization of the extracellular medium, in tobacco. Moreover, MoHrip1-treated rice seedlings possessed significantly enhanced systemic resistance to M. oryzae compared to the control seedlings. The real-time PCR results indicated that the expression of some pathogenesis-related genes and genes involved in signal transduction could also be induced by MoHrip1. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that MoHrip1 triggers defense responses in rice and could be used for controlling rice blast disease.

  8. Hot spots for diversity of Magnaporthe oryzae physiological races in irrigated rice fields in Brazil Alta diversidade de raças fisiológicas de Magnaporthe oryzae em áreas de arroz irrigado em Tocantins, Brasil

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    Justino José Dias Neto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the Magnaporthe oryzae pathotype diversity in new commercial irrigated rice fields in the Araguaia River Valley, state of Tocantins, Brazil. The causal agent of rice blast has heavily affected rice production in the region. Despite the efforts of breeding programs, blast resistance breakdown has been recorded shortly after the release of new resistant cultivars developed for the region. Among the causes of resistance breakage is the capacity of the fungus to rapidly develop new pathotypes. A sample of 479 M. oryzae monosporic isolates was obtained and tested using the international rice blast differential set. Isolate collections were made in small areas designed as trap nurseries and in scattered sites in their vicinity. Analysis of 250 M. oryzae isolates from three trap nurseries indicated the presence of 45 international M. oryzae races belonging to seven pathotype groups (IA-IG. In the isolates tested, 61 M. oryzae pathotypes belonging to all but the IH group were detected. The new areas of irrigated rice in the Araguaia River Valley have the highest diversity of M. oryzae pathotypes reported so far in Brazil.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a diversidade de patótipos de Magnaporthe oryzae em novas áreas comerciais de arroz irrigado instaladas no Vale do Rio Araguaia, Estado do Tocantins, Brasil. A produção de arroz nessa região vem sendo significativamente afetada pelo agente causal da brusone do arroz. Apesar dos esforços de programas de melhoramento genético, a ocorrência de quebra de resistência tem sido registrada logo após o lançamento de novas cultivares desenvolvidas para a região. Entre as causas de quebra de resistência está incluída a capacidade do fungo de desenvolver novos patótipos rapidamente. Uma amostra de 479 isolados monospóricos de M. oryzae foi obtida e testada no conjunto internacional de cultivares diferenciadoras de raças de brusone. As coletas de

  9. Peroxisomal alanine: glyoxylate aminotransferase AGT1 is indispensable for appressorium function of the rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae.

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    Vijai Bhadauria

    Full Text Available The role of β-oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle in fungal pathogenesis is well documented. However, an ambiguity still remains over their interaction in peroxisomes to facilitate fungal pathogenicity and virulence. In this report, we characterize a gene encoding an alanine, glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1 in Magnaporthe oryzae, the causative agent of rice blast disease, and demonstrate that AGT1 is required for pathogenicity of M. oryzae. Targeted deletion of AGT1 resulted in the failure of penetration via appressoria; therefore, mutants lacking the gene were unable to induce blast symptoms on the hosts rice and barley. This penetration failure may be associated with a disruption in lipid mobilization during conidial germination as turgor generation in the appressorium requires mobilization of lipid reserves from the conidium. Analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein expression using the transcriptional and translational fusion with the AGT1 promoter and open reading frame, respectively, revealed that AGT1 expressed constitutively in all in vitro grown cell types and during in planta colonization, and localized in peroxisomes. Peroxisomal localization was further confirmed by colocalization with red fluorescent protein fused with the peroxisomal targeting signal 1. Surprisingly, conidia produced by the Δagt1 mutant were unable to form appressoria on artificial inductive surfaces, even after prolonged incubation. When supplemented with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(++pyruvate, appressorium formation was restored on an artificial inductive surface. Taken together, our data indicate that AGT1-dependent pyruvate formation by transferring an amino group of alanine to glyoxylate, an intermediate of the glyoxylate cycle is required for lipid mobilization and utilization. This pyruvate can be converted to non-fermentable carbon sources, which may require reoxidation of NADH generated by the β-oxidation of fatty acids to NAD(+ in

  10. Infection-associated nuclear degeneration in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae requires non-selective macro-autophagy.

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    Min He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae elaborates a specialized infection structure called an appressorium to breach the rice leaf surface and gain access to plant tissue. Appressorium development is controlled by cell cycle progression, and a single round of nuclear division occurs prior to appressorium formation. Mitosis is always followed by programmed cell death of the spore from which the appressorium develops. Nuclear degeneration in the spore is known to be essential for plant infection, but the precise mechanism by which it occurs is not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In yeast, nuclear breakdown requires a specific form of autophagy, known as piecemeal microautophagy of the nucleus (PMN, and we therefore investigated whether this process occurs in the rice blast fungus. Here, we report that M. oryzae possesses two conserved components of a putative PMN pathway, MoVac8 and MoTsc13, but that both are dispensable for nuclear breakdown during plant infection. MoVAC8 encodes a vacuolar membrane protein and MoTSC13 a peri-nuclear and peripheral ER protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that MoVAC8 is necessary for caffeine resistance, but dispensable for pathogenicity of M. oryzae, while MoTSC13 is involved in cell wall stress responses and is an important virulence determinant. By functional analysis of ΔMoatg1 and ΔMoatg4 mutants, we demonstrate that infection-associated nuclear degeneration in M. oryzae instead occurs by non-selective macroautophagy, which is necessary for rice blast disease.

  11. Analysis of Maize Crop Leaf using Multivariate Image Analysis for Identifying Soil Deficiency

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    S. Sridevy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Image processing analysis for the soil deficiency identification has become an active area of research in this study. The changes in the color of the leaves are used to analyze and identify the deficiency of soil nutrients such as Nitrogen (N, Phosphorus (P and potassium (K by digital color image analysis. This research study focuses on the image analysis of the maize crop leaf using multivariate image analysis. In this proposed novel approach, initially, a color transformation for the input RGB image is formed and this RGB is converted to HSV because RGB is ideal for color generation but HSV is very suitable for color perception. Then green pixels are masked and removed using specific threshold value by applying histogram equalization. This masking approach is done through specific customized filtering approach which exclusively filters the green color of the leaf. After the filtering step, only the deficiency part of the leaf is taken for consideration. Then, a histogram generation is carried out for the deficiency part of the leaf. Then, Multivariate Image Analysis approach using Independent Component Analysis (ICA is carried out to extract a reference eigenspace from a matrix built by unfolding color data from the deficiency part. Test images are also unfolded and projected onto the reference eigenspace and the result is a score matrix which is used to compute nutrient deficiency based on the T2 statistic. In addition, a multi-resolution scheme by scaling down process is carried out to speed up the process. Finally, based on the training samples, the soil deficiency is identified based on the color of the maize crop leaf.

  12. Construction of an electronic physical map of Magnaporthe oryzae using genomic position-ready SSR markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a model for plant pathogenic filamentous fungi. We have assembled a simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based physical map of the species, using in silico sequence data. A set of 120 SSR markers was developed from the genomic sequence of the reference isolate 70-15. These markers were readily amplified from the genomic DNA of other isolates, and high levels of allelic variation characterised the parental isolates of the two crosses tested. All the markers were locatable to one of the seven M. oryzae chromosomes. An SSR-based physical in silico map was constructed, and pre-existing SSR and RFLP loci were integrated into the map, along with 23 Avr (avirulence) genes and two other genes of importance to the plant/pathogen interaction. This map provides a platform for population genetics and functional genomics studies in the model pathogen, and even in other evolutionally related pathogens.

  13. Expression of Dm-AMP1 in rice confers resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sanjay; Tank, Harsukh G; Prasad, Bishun Deo; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2009-02-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani, are among the most important pathogens of rice, severely limiting its productivity. Dm-AMP1, an antifungal plant defensin from Dahlia merckii, was expressed in rice (Oryza sativa L. sp. indica cv. Pusa basmati 1) using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Expression levels of Dm-AMP1 ranged from 0.43% to 0.57% of total soluble protein in transgenic plants. It was observed that constitutive expression of Dm-AMP1 suppresses the growth of M. oryzae and R. solani by 84% and 72%, respectively. Transgenic expression of Dm-AMP1 was not accompanied by an induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression, indicating that the expression of DmAMP1 directly inhibits the pathogen. The results of in vitro, in planta and microscopic analyses suggest that Dm-AMP1 expression has the potential to provide broad-spectrum disease resistance in rice. PMID:18618285

  14. Biological Control of Rice Blast (Magnaporthe oryzae by use of Streptomyces sindeneusis isolate 263 in Greenhouse

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    M. E. Zarandi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil Actinomycetes particularly Streptomyces spp. have antagonistic activity against wide range of plant pathogens. In the recent decades they have attracted high interests as biocontrol agents. In search for finding such principles, in vitro suppression of Magnaporthe oryzae the causal agent of rice blast disease was studied by use of Streptomyces sindeneusis isolate 263 in greenhouse. Spray of rice seedling-leaves with of mixed spore suspension of the pathogen and S. sindeneusis isolate 263 resulted in strong inhibition of the pathogen and suppression of leaf symptoms. Propagation of the antagonist crude sap was performed in aqueous cultures and bioactivity was monitored in shaked cultures. Ongoing goals of this research include isolation, characterization and identification of the active metabolites and future goals include identification of active genes for use in development of recombinant DNAs in transgenic rice varieties bearing elevated resistance to infections by M. oryzae.

  15. Geographic distribution of mating type and female fertile isolates in Magnaporthe grisea of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Population studies of Magnaporthe grisea have brought new insight on old controversies. This species include pathogens of rice, causing the rice blast, and of other grass hosts. It has been demonstrated that isolates collected from rice are pathogenic to rice and to a limited number of grass hosts. The genetic structure of the M. Grisea populations showed that a sexual reproduction was predominant in most rice growing areas. Being a hermaphroditic heterothallic ascomycete, sexual reproduction of M. Grisea required isolates of both mating types. Moreover, it also required the existence of female fertile isolates. Thus, the first step to find sexual reproduction in the field was to look for the presence of strains of both mating types and of female fertile ones. Female fertile isolates collected from rice was very rare. Thus, further investigation was made for testing the hypothesis of sexual reproduction by population genetics studies.

  16. Variation in virulence in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea in São Paulo State

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    Urashima Alfredo Seiiti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistant varieties have been the preferred means to control Magnaporthe grisea, the causal organism of the rice blast disease. The objective of this study was to examine the degree of diversity of the pathogen in different rice growing regions of São Paulo State, Brazil. Blast samples collected from rice varieties in three different regions (Tremembé, Mococa and José Bonifácio were analyzed for race structure employing the Japanese rice differentials. The highest degree of virulence diversity was observed in Tremembé with 22 different races in three different varieties. Furthermore, no resistance gene in the Japanese differentials was effective to all isolates of M. grisea from São Paulo State.

  17. Mitotic stopwatch for the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae during invasion of rice cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kiersun; Jenkinson, Cory B; Borges Araújo, Maíra; Zhu, Jie; Kim, Rebecca Y; Kim, Dong Won; Khang, Chang Hyun

    2016-08-01

    To study nuclear dynamics of Magnaporthe oryzae, we developed a novel mitotic reporter strain with GFP-NLS (localized in nuclei during interphase but in the cytoplasm during mitosis) and H1-tdTomato (localized in nuclei throughout the cell cycle). Time-lapse confocal microscopy of the reporter strain during host cell invasion provided several new insights into nuclear division and migration in M. oryzae: (i) mitosis lasts about 5min; (ii) mitosis is semi-closed; (iii) septal pores are closed during mitosis; and (iv) a nucleus exhibits extreme constriction (approximately from 2μm to 0.5μm), elongation (over 5μm), and long migration (over 16μm). Our observations raise new questions about mechanisms controlling the mitotic dynamics, and the answers to these questions may result in new means to prevent fungal proliferation without negatively affecting the host cell cycle. PMID:27321562

  18. Investigating the biology of plant infection by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Urdiroz, Magdalena; Oses-Ruiz, Miriam; Ryder, Lauren S; Talbot, Nicholas J

    2016-05-01

    The rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, is responsible for the most serious disease of rice and is a continuing threat to ensuring global food security. The fungus has also, however, emerged as a model experimental organism for understanding plant infection processes by pathogenic fungi. This is largely due to its amenability to both classical and molecular genetics, coupled with the efforts of a very large international research community. This review, which is based on a plenary presentation at the 28th Fungal Genetics Conference in Asilomar, California in March 2015, describes recent progress in understanding how M. oryzae uses specialised cell called appressoria to bring about plant infection and the underlying biology of this developmental process. We also review how the fungus is then able to proliferate within rice tissue, deploying effector proteins to facilitate its spread by suppressing plant immunity and promoting growth and development of the fungus.

  19. Distribution of Magnaporthe grisea Population and Virulence of Predominant Race in Jiangsu Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-feng; CHEN Zhi-yi; HU Ming; LI Lian; LIU You-zhou

    2004-01-01

    Three hundred and forty-two mono-conidial isolates were obtained from rice blast specimens collected from five typical areas in Jiangsu Province during 2000-2002. The isolates could be classified into seven groups, thirty races when assessed with seven Chinese differential rice cultivars. The race ZG1 was predominant one of Magnaporthe grisea with a frequency of 65.00% in 2000, 56.90% in 2001 and 60.38% in 2002; the races ZB and ZC groups were also important in Jiangsu Province. By inoculating 130 ZG1 race isolates on thirteen Japanese cultivars with known resistance genes, forty-two pathotypes were found. Among them,30.77% of ZG1 race isolates had virulence to rice cultivars Shin 2(Pita-ks, Pi-eh), K1 (Pi-ta), Pi 4(Pi-ta2, Pi-sh), being the predominant pathotype, indicating the resistances of cultivars Shin 2 (Pita-ks, Pi-sh), K1 (Pi-ta), Pi 4(Pi-ta2, Pi-sh) had lost the resistance in Jiangsu Province. Rice cultivar K3(Pi-kh) was highly resistant to Magnaporthe grisea with 100% resistance frequency, and resistant to the two single isolates, 2003-184(ZC5) and 2003-14-1(ZG1), however, it was infected by a mixture of the two isolates. It was suggested that the change in virulence stemmed from the interaction of different pathotype isolates was one of the reasons that made variety lose its resistance.

  20. Identifying At-Risk Students in General Chemistry via Cluster Analysis of Affective Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify academically at-risk students in first-semester general chemistry using affective characteristics via cluster analysis. Through the clustering of six preselected affective variables, three distinct affective groups were identified: low (at-risk), medium, and high. Students in the low affective group…

  1. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation provides insights into epigenetic regulation of fungal development in a plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Junhyun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Gir-Won; Park, Sook-Young; Huh, Aram; Dean, Ralph A; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-02-24

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates development of plants and mammals. To investigate the roles of DNA methylation in fungal development, we profiled genome-wide methylation patterns at single-nucleotide resolution during vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, and infection-related morphogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. We found that DNA methylation occurs in and around genes as well as transposable elements and undergoes global reprogramming during fungal development. Such reprogramming of DNA methylation suggests that it may have acquired new roles other than controlling the proliferation of TEs. Genetic analysis of DNA methyltransferase deletion mutants also indicated that proper reprogramming in methylomes is required for asexual reproduction in the fungus. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis showed that DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional silencing of transposable elements and transcript abundance of genes in context-dependent manner, reinforcing the role of DNA methylation as a genome defense mechanism. This comprehensive approach suggests that DNA methylation in fungi can be a dynamic epigenetic entity contributing to fungal development and genome defense. Furthermore, our DNA methylomes provide a foundation for future studies exploring this key epigenetic modification in fungal development and pathogenesis.

  2. Assessing Reliability of Cellulose Hydrolysis Models to Support Biofuel Process Design – Identifiability and Uncertainty Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Gürkan; Meyer, Anne S.; Gernaey, Krist

    2010-01-01

    The reliability of cellulose hydrolysis models is studied using the NREL model. An identifiability analysis revealed that only 6 out of 26 parameters are identifiable from the available data (typical hydrolysis experiments). Attempting to identify a higher number of parameters (as done in the ori...... to analyze the uncertainty of model predictions. This allows judging the fitness of the model to the purpose under uncertainty. Hence we recommend uncertainty analysis as a proactive solution when faced with model uncertainty, which is the case for biofuel process development research....

  3. A Numerical Procedure for Model Identifiability Analysis Applied to Enzyme Kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daele, Timothy, Van; Van Hoey, Stijn; Gernaey, Krist;

    2015-01-01

    structure evaluation by assessing the local identifiability characteristics of the parameters. Moreover, such a procedure should be generic to make sure it can be applied independent from the structure of the model. We hereby apply a numerical identifiability approach which is based on the work of Walter...... and Pronzato (1997) and which can be easily set up for any type of model. In this paper the proposed approach is applied to the forward reaction rate of the enzyme kinetics proposed by Shin and Kim(1998). Structural identifiability analysis showed that no local structural model problems were occurring....... In contrast, the practical identifiability analysis revealed that high values of the forward rate parameter Vf led to identifiability problems. These problems were even more pronounced athigher substrate concentrations, which illustrates the importance of a proper experimental designto avoid...

  4. Consolidating metabolite identifiers to enable contextual and multi-platform metabolomics data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Kazuki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of data from high-throughput experiments depends on the availability of well-structured data that describe the assayed biomolecules. Procedures for obtaining and organizing such meta-data on genes, transcripts and proteins have been streamlined in many data analysis packages, but are still lacking for metabolites. Chemical identifiers are notoriously incoherent, encompassing a wide range of different referencing schemes with varying scope and coverage. Online chemical databases use multiple types of identifiers in parallel but lack a common primary key for reliable database consolidation. Connecting identifiers of analytes found in experimental data with the identifiers of their parent metabolites in public databases can therefore be very laborious. Results Here we present a strategy and a software tool for integrating metabolite identifiers from local reference libraries and public databases that do not depend on a single common primary identifier. The program constructs groups of interconnected identifiers of analytes and metabolites to obtain a local metabolite-centric SQLite database. The created database can be used to map in-house identifiers and synonyms to external resources such as the KEGG database. New identifiers can be imported and directly integrated with existing data. Queries can be performed in a flexible way, both from the command line and from the statistical programming environment R, to obtain data set tailored identifier mappings. Conclusions Efficient cross-referencing of metabolite identifiers is a key technology for metabolomics data analysis. We provide a practical and flexible solution to this task and an open-source program, the metabolite masking tool (MetMask, available at http://metmask.sourceforge.net, that implements our ideas.

  5. Isolation, Crystal Structure and Inhibitory Activity against Magnaporthe Grisea of (2R,3R)-3,5,7-trihydroxyflavanone 3-Acetate from Myoporum Bontioides A. Gray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Li-Lan; LI Jie-Wen; NI Chun-Lin; GU Wen-Xiang; LI Chun-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The title compound, (2R,3R)-3,5,7-trihydroxyflavanone 3-acetate, is a flavanonol derivative which was first isolated from Myoporum bontioides A. Gray and characterized by MS, NMR and CD spectra. In addition, the structure was determined by X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis. It crystallizes in the triclinic lattice, space group P21 with a = 10.686(3), b = 6.862(2), c = 11.267(3) , β = 107.46(1), V = 788.3(4) 3, Z = 2, C17H16O7, Mr = 332.30, Dc = 1.400 g/cm3, μ(MoKα) = 0.110 mm-1, F(000) = 348, the final R = 0.0283 and wR = 0.0826 for 3428 independent reflections (Rint = 0.017) and 1500 observed ones (I 2σ(I)). The structure consists of one flavone and one water molecule. The flavone molecules form a 1D column by the p…π stacking interactions and C–H…O hydrogen bonds. The weak intermolecular/intermolecular O–H…O hydrogen bonds observed in the crystal give further rise to a complicated network structure. Primary bioassay showed that the title compound has high inhibitory activity against Magnaporthe grisea with the EC50 values of 199.41 μg/mL.

  6. Sensitivity Detection Technique and Resistance Risk Assessment of Magnaporthe grisea to Tricyclazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In vitro detection method for the sensitivity of Magnaporthe grisea to tricyclazole was studied, and the potential resistance risk of blast disease to tricyclazole was assessed. Both EC50 of hyphal melanization (EC50-H) and minimum inhibitive concentration of melanization in appressorial (MIC-A) by inhibitortricyclazole showed positive correlation to the EC50 of tricyclazole against blast disease tested in vivo, with relative co-efficiency (R2) of 0.8995 and 0.8244, respectively. However, stability and reproducibility of EC50-H were better than those of MIC-A, suggesting that it could be used to detect the sensitivity of M. grisea to tricyclazole in vitro. Tricyclazole sensitivity of the progenies derived from single spores of the most sensitive isolate DY2 and the least sensitive isolate GY6 detected in sensitivity monitoring in 2000 was not stable, with mean EC50 values of 4.4968 μg/mL and 5.4010 μg/mL, respectively, indicating that the difference in EC50 between DY2 and GY6 was not caused probably by resistance variation. EC50 of GY6 did not increase significantly when continuously selected for twenty generations under the selection pressure of tricyclazole in vivo. However, the sensitivity of DY2 was decreased by 10-fold after selected for twenty generations.The results suggested that tricyclazole was still low resistance risk for M. grisea in China.

  7. Vegetative Compatibility and Asexual Recombination in Magnaporthe grisea from Jiangsu Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-li; ZHANG Zheng-guang; ZHENG Xiao-bo

    2003-01-01

    Vegetative compatibility among isolates of different races in Magnaporthe grisea collectedfrom Jiangsu Province and asexual recombination among compatible isolates by anastomosis were tested.Twenty isolates involving seven races from diseased rice plants were paired on polished rice rose bengal mediumand incubated at 25℃ in darkness for 18 days. Among 173 pairings tested, solid hyphai fusion lines formed byanastomosis between 124 pairings, indicated that these isolates were vegetative compatible with each other.The result showed that most M. grisea isolates were vegetative compatible. Furthermore, 17 vegetative com-patible pairings between monoconidial isolates with MBCsIPTr marker and isolates with MBCrIPTs markerwere selected to detect the asexual recombination between the compatible isolates of different races. The asexu-al recombinants with MBCrIPTr marker were detected in single hyphal fragment progenies in thirteen of theseventeen pairings. The percentage of recombinants was about 0.6 - 11.3%. Results showed that vegetative com-patibility was prevailing among isolates of M. grisea in Jiangsu Province in vitro. These results also suggested thatasexual recombination may be an important mechanism for M. grisea to maintain genetic diversity in nature.

  8. Septin-Dependent Assembly of the Exocyst Is Essential for Plant Infection by Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Yogesh K; Dagdas, Yasin F; Martinez-Rocha, Ana-Lilia; Kershaw, Michael J; Littlejohn, George R; Ryder, Lauren S; Sklenar, Jan; Menke, Frank; Talbot, Nicholas J

    2015-11-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease, the most devastating disease of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) and a continuing threat to global food security. To cause disease, the fungus elaborates a specialized infection cell called an appressorium, which breaches the cuticle of the rice leaf, allowing the fungus entry to plant tissue. Here, we show that the exocyst complex localizes to the tips of growing hyphae during vegetative growth, ahead of the Spitzenkörper, and is required for polarized exocytosis. However, during infection-related development, the exocyst specifically assembles in the appressorium at the point of plant infection. The exocyst components Sec3, Sec5, Sec6, Sec8, and Sec15, and exocyst complex proteins Exo70 and Exo84 localize specifically in a ring formation at the appressorium pore. Targeted gene deletion, or conditional mutation, of genes encoding exocyst components leads to impaired plant infection. We demonstrate that organization of the exocyst complex at the appressorium pore is a septin-dependent process, which also requires regulated synthesis of reactive oxygen species by the NoxR-dependent Nox2 NADPH oxidase complex. We conclude that septin-mediated assembly of the exocyst is necessary for appressorium repolarization and host cell invasion. PMID:26566920

  9. Magnaporthe oryzae-Secreted Protein MSP1 Induces Cell Death and Elicits Defense Responses in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Tsuda, Kenichi; Gupta, Ravi; Park, Sook-Young; Kim, Sun Tae; Kang, Kyu Young

    2016-04-01

    The Magnaporthe oryzae snodprot1 homolog (MSP1), secreted by M. oryzae, is a cerato-platanin family protein. msp1-knockout mutants have reduced virulence on barley leaves, indicating that MSP1 is required for the pathogenicity of rice blast fungus. To investigate the functional roles of MSP1 and its downstream signaling in rice, recombinant MSP1 was produced in Escherichia coli and was assayed for its functionality. Application of MSP1 triggered cell death and elicited defense responses in rice. MSP1 also induced H2O2 production and autophagic cell death in both suspension-cultured cells and rice leaves. One or more protein kinases triggered cell death, jasmonic acid and abscisic acid enhanced cell death, while salicylic acid suppressed it. We demonstrated that the secretion of MSP1 into the apoplast is a prerequisite for triggering cell death and activating defense-related gene expression. Furthermore, pretreatment of rice with a sublethal MSP1 concentration potentiated resistance to the pathogen. Taken together, our results showed that MSP1 induces a high degree of cell death in plants, which might be essential for its virulence. Moreover, rice can recognize MSP1, resulting in the induction of pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. PMID:26780420

  10. Expression of a Magnaporthe grisea Elicitor and Its Biological Function in Activating Resistance in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The expression of a protein elicitor from Magnaporthe griesea and its biological function in activating resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L) were reported. The gene of elicitor was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and produced a His6-fusion protein with 42 kD apparent molecular weight on SDS-PAGE. The purified protein could induce the resistance to blast disease, with the control efficiency of 46.47% and 36.41% at the 14th day and the 21st day after blast inoculation, respectively.After treatment with the expressed protein, the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and peroxidase (POD) activities were promoted in rice plants, meanwhile, the transcription levels of STKM, FAD, PBZ1 and PR1 genes were increased in rice plants. Moreover, after comparing the profile of total rice leaf proteins on two-dimensional eiectrophoresis gel, about 14proteins were found to be increased in expression level after the expressed protein treatment. All the results indicated that the expressed protein could act as an elicitor to trigger the resistance in rice.

  11. Physiological Macro-lesions Enhanced Resistance to Blast (Magnaporthe grisea) in Rice Near-isogenic Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shi-wen; LU Ji-ying; LUO Kun; ZHANG Xiu-fu; QIAN Qian

    2005-01-01

    Roll-leaf-1 (rl-1) and spot-leaf-1 (spl-1) were two near-isogenic lines, which were obtained after 3 to 4 backcrosses withearly season indica rice Zhefu 802 as recurrent parent. Henna macro-lesions, referred as physiological or morphological markers,began to appear on leaves at 4.5- to 6.0-leaf stage. The rice seedlings were inoculated at 3.5-, 5.0- and 7.0-leaf stages with highpathogenic races Zhong A1 and Zhong B1 of Magnaporthe grisea, respectively. The resistance of rl-1, spl-1 and Zhefu 802 againstblast was significantly different. The seedlings of Zhefu 802 at 3.5- to 7.0-leaf stage were susceptible to races Zhong A1 and ZhongB1 of M. grisea, whereas those of rl-1 and spl-1 at 3.5-, 5.0- and 7.0-leaf stages were susceptible, moderately resistant andresistant, respectively. These results suggested that the enhanced resistance of ri-1 and spl-1 related to the appearance of theirmorphological marker lesions. The experiment provided a basis for studying lesion mimic and hypersensitive response inassociation with disease resistance.

  12. Structure and Expression of Several Putative Cdc42-Interacting Proteins in Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Wu; CHEN Ji-sheng; ZHENG Shi-qin; LU Guo-dong; WANG Zong-hua

    2006-01-01

    MgCdc42 (Cdc42 in Magnaporthe grisea), with high homology to ScCdc42 (Cdc42 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae), has been demonstrated to involve in the morphogenesis and infection process. To further understand the signaling network,the putative MgCdc42-interacting proteins were analyzed. ScCdc42-interacting protein sequences were first used to BLAST against the M. grisea genome database to retrieve their corresponding analogs. Subsequently, conserved domains of these proteins were compared and expression patterns of their encoding genes in different MgCdc42 mutation states were analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. All retrieved analogs of ScCdc42-interacting proteins from the M.grisea database have conserved domains as those in S. cerevisiae. Expression of their encoding genes increased in MgCdc42CA mutant and decreased in MgCdc42KO mutant. However, MgBem1, Chm1, and MgGic1 in MgCdc42DN mutant had the same expression level as that in the wild type, although MgBem4, MgBoi2, MgCdc24, MgGic2, MgRga1,and Mst20 had decreased expression level, as expected. Overall, it is concluded that there may exist a similar Cdc42 signal pathway in M. grisea as in S. cerevisiae and MgCdc42 plays a key role in the pathway.

  13. Detection of Sensitivity and Resistance Variation of Magnaporthe grisea to Kitazin P,Carbendazim and Tricyclazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chuan-qing; ZHOU Ming-guo; SHAO Zhen-run; LIANG Gui-mei

    2004-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine isolates of Magnaporthe grisea from Guangdong, Guangxi, Anhui and Jiangsu provinces of China were tested for resistance frequency to kitazin P and carbendazim, respectively by the distinctive concentration method.The resistance frequency of the isolates to kitazin P which had not been used in practice for about ten years was as high as 79.1%,and only one carbendazim-resistant isolate was detected in Gaoyao, Guangdong Province (with a frequency of 0.78%). Meanwhile,the minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of hyphal melanization was adopted to detect the sensitivity of M. grisea to tricyclazole.There existed several different degrees of sensitivity to tricyclazole in the melanin biosynthesis of M. grisea, but no relationship was found between these MIC values completely inhibiting melanization in hyphae and the EC50 values of tricyclazole against rice blast tested in vivo. After the isolates were induced by chemical taming or UV irradiation in laboratory, kitazin P-resistant and carbendazim-resistant mutants were recovered by both the methods, but none of tricyclazole-resistant mutant was obtained.

  14. Antifungal Effect of Streptomyces 702 Antifungal Monomer Component DZP8 on Rhizoctonia solani and Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro antifungal effects of antifungal monomer component DZP8 isolated from Streptomyces 702 on the mycelium growth, sclerotium formation and germination of Rhizoctonia solani and on the mycelium growth, conidial formation, germination, appressorium formation of Magnaporthe grisea. The results showed that the antifungal monomer component DZP8 has strong antifungal effect on both the R. solani and M. grisea. The EC50 and EC90 of DZP8 were 1.81 and 3.35 μg/ml on Ft. solani respectively, and 37.01 and 136.21 μg/ml on M. grisea respectively. Under the treatment of 48.01 μg/ml DZP8, the sclerotium formation rate of R. solani was just 39.21%, the formation time delayed by 216 h and the dry weight decreased by 81.37% in comparison the con- trol; and 33.51 μg/ml DZP8 significantly inhibited the sclerotium germination. In the presence of 160.08 μg/ml DZP8, the sporulation of M. grisea was just 9.29% of control sample; 20.14 μg/ml DZP8 inhibited the conidial germination suppression rate by 95.16%, and the appressorium formation by 100%.

  15. The 2NS Translocation from Aegilops ventricosa Confers Resistance to the Triticum Pathotype of Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, C.D.; Peterson, G.L.; Bockus, W.W.; Kankanala, P.; Dubcovsky, J.; Jordan, K.W.; Akhunov, E.; Chumley, F.; Baldelomar, F.D.; Valent, B.

    2016-01-01

    Wheat blast is a serious disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (Triticum pathotype) (MoT). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the 2NS translocation from Aegilops ventricosa (Zhuk.) Chennav on wheat head and leaf blast resistance. Disease phenotyping experiments were conducted in growth chamber, greenhouse, and field environments. Among 418 cultivars of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), those with 2NS had 50.4 to 72.3% less head blast than those without 2NS when inoculated with an older MoT isolate under growth chamber conditions. When inoculated with recently collected isolates, cultivars with 2NS had 64.0 to 80.5% less head blast. Under greenhouse conditions when lines were inoculated with an older MoT isolate, those with 2NS had a significant head blast reduction. With newer isolates, not all lines with 2NS showed a significant reduction in head blast, suggesting that the genetic background and/or environment may influence the expression of any resistance conferred by 2NS. However, when near-isogenic lines (NILs) with and without 2NS were planted in the field, there was strong evidence that 2NS conferred resistance to head blast. Results from foliar inoculations suggest that the resistance to head infection that is imparted by the 2NS translocation does not confer resistance to foliar disease. In conclusion, the 2NS translocation was associated with significant reductions in head blast in both spring and winter wheat.

  16. MST12 regulates infectious growth but not appressorium formation in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gyungsoon; Xue, Chaoyang; Zheng, Li; Lam, Stephen; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2002-03-01

    In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene, PMK1, is known to regulate appressorium formation and infectious hyphae growth. Since PMK1 is homologous to the FUS3 and KSS1 genes that regulate the transcription factor STE12 in yeast, we functionally characterized the STE12 homologue in M. grisea (MST12). A polymerase chain reaction-based approach was used to isolate the MST12 gene that is homologous to yeast STE12. Four mst12 deletion mutants were isolated by gene replacement. No obvious defect in vegetative growth, conidiation, or conidia germination was observed in mst12 mutants. However, mst12 mutants were nonpathogenic on rice and barley leaves. In contrast to pmk1 mutants that did not form appressoria, mst12 mutants produced typical dome-shaped and melanized appressoria. However, the appressoria formed by mst12 mutants failed to penetrate onion epidermal cells. When inoculated through wound sites, mst12 mutants failed to cause spreading lesions and appeared to be defective in infectious growth. These data indicate that MST12 may function downstream of PMK1 to regulate genes involved in infectious hyphae growth. A transcription factor or factors other than MST12 must exist in M. grisea and function downstream from PMK1 for appressorium formation. PMID:11952120

  17. Comparative analysis of Salmonella genomes identifies a metabolic network for escalating growth in the inflamed gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-03-18

    The Salmonella genus comprises a group of pathogens associated with illnesses ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. We performed an in silico analysis of comparatively reannotated Salmonella genomes to identify genomic signatures indicative of disease potential. By removing numerous annotation inconsistencies and inaccuracies, the process of reannotation identified a network of 469 genes involved in central anaerobic metabolism, which was intact in genomes of gastrointestinal pathogens but degrading in genomes of extraintestinal pathogens. This large network contained pathways that enable gastrointestinal pathogens to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients as well as many of the biochemical reactions used for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars. Thus, comparative genome analysis identifies a metabolic network that provides clues about the strategies for nutrient acquisition and utilization that are characteristic of gastrointestinal pathogens. IMPORTANCE While some Salmonella serovars cause infections that remain localized to the gut, others disseminate throughout the body. Here, we compared Salmonella genomes to identify characteristics that distinguish gastrointestinal from extraintestinal pathogens. We identified a large metabolic network that is functional in gastrointestinal pathogens but decaying in extraintestinal pathogens. While taxonomists have used traits from this network empirically for many decades for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars, our findings suggest that it is part of a "business plan" for growth in the inflamed gastrointestinal tract. By identifying a large metabolic network characteristic of Salmonella serovars associated with gastroenteritis, our in silico analysis provides a blueprint for potential strategies to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients and edge out competing gut microbes.

  18. Identifying Innovative Interventions to Promote Healthy Eating Using Consumption-Oriented Food Supply Chain Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Corinna, ed.

    2009-01-01

    The mapping and analysis of supply chains is a technique increasingly used to address problems in the food system. Yet such supply chain management has not yet been applied as a means of encouraging healthier diets. Moreover, most policies recommended to promote healthy eating focus on the consumer end of the chain. This article proposes a consumption-oriented food supply chain analysis to identify the changes needed in the food supply chain to create a healthier food environment, measured in...

  19. Identifying Effective Spelling Interventions Using a Brief Experimental Analysis and Extended Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, Merilee; Clure, Lynne F.; Bleck, Amanda A.; Schmitz, Stephanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Spelling is an important skill that is crucial to effective written communication. In this study, brief experimental analysis procedures were used to examine spelling instruction strategies (e.g., whole word correction; word study strategy; positive practice; and cover, copy, and compare) for four students. In addition, an extended analysis was…

  20. Identifying Skill Requirements for GIS Positions: A Content Analysis of Job Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jung Eun

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies the skill requirements for geographic information system (GIS) positions, including GIS analysts, programmers/developers/engineers, specialists, and technicians, through a content analysis of 946 GIS job advertisements from 2007-2014. The results indicated that GIS job applicants need to possess high levels of GIS analysis…

  1. Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.F. Voight (Benjamin); L.J. Scott (Laura); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C. Dina (Christian); R.P. Welch (Ryan); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); C. Huth (Cornelia); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); L.J. McCulloch (Laura); T. Ferreira (Teresa); H. Grallert (Harald); N. Amin (Najaf); G. Wu (Guanming); C.J. Willer (Cristen); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); S.A. McCarroll (Steven); C. Langenberg (Claudia); O.M. Hofmann (Oliver); J. Dupuis (Josée); L. Qi (Lu); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); M. van Hoek (Mandy); P. Navarro (Pau); K.G. Ardlie (Kristin); B. Balkau (Beverley); R. Benediktsson (Rafn); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R. Blagieva (Roza); E. Boerwinkle (Eric); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); K.B. Boström (Kristina Bengtsson); B. Bravenboer (Bert); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); N.P. Burtt (Noël); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); P.S. Chines (Peter); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David); G. Crawford (Gabe); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); K.S. Elliott (Katherine); M.R. Erdos (Michael); C.S. Fox (Caroline); C.S. Franklin (Christopher); M. Ganser (Martha); C. Gieger (Christian); N. Grarup (Niels); T. Green (Todd); S. Griffin (Simon); C.J. Groves (Christopher); C. Guiducci (Candace); S. Hadjadj (Samy); N. Hassanali (Neelam); C. Herder (Christian); B. Isomaa (Bo); A.U. Jackson (Anne); P.R.V. Johnson (Paul); T. Jørgensen (Torben); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); N. Klopp (Norman); A. Kong (Augustine); P. Kraft (Peter); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); T. Lauritzen (Torsten); M. Li (Man); A. Lieverse (Aloysius); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); M. Marre (Michel); T. Meitinger (Thomas); K. Midthjell (Kristian); M.A. Morken (Mario); N. Narisu (Narisu); P. Nilsson (Peter); K.R. Owen (Katharine); F. Payne (Felicity); J.R.B. Perry (John); A.K. Petersen; C. Platou (Carl); C. Proença (Christine); I. Prokopenko (Inga); W. Rathmann (Wolfgang); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); N.R. Robertson (Neil); G. Rocheleau (Ghislain); M. Roden (Michael); M.J. Sampson (Michael); R. Saxena (Richa); B.M. Shields (Beverley); P. Shrader (Peter); G. Sigurdsson (Gunnar); T. Sparsø (Thomas); K. Strassburger (Klaus); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Q. Sun (Qi); A.J. Swift (Amy); B. Thorand (Barbara); J. Tichet (Jean); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); R.M. van Dam (Rob); T.W. van Haeften (Timon); T.W. van Herpt (Thijs); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); G.B. Walters (Bragi); M.N. Weedon (Michael); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S. Cauchi (Stephane); F.S. Collins (Francis); A.L. Gloyn (Anna); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); T. Hansen (Torben); W.A. Hide (Winston); G.A. Hitman (Graham); A. Hofman (Albert); D. Hunter (David); K. Hveem (Kristian); M. Laakso (Markku); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); I. Rudan (Igor); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); L.D. Stein (Lincoln); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Walker (Mark); N.J. Wareham (Nick); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); H. Campbell (Harry); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); J.B. Meigs (James); J.S. Pankow (James); O. Pedersen (Oluf); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); I. Barroso (Inês); J.C. Florez (Jose); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); R. Sladek (Rob); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.F. Wilson (James); T. Illig (Thomas); P. Froguel (Philippe); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); D. Altshuler (David); M. Boehnke (Michael); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); R.M. Watanabe (Richard)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBy combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals w

  2. Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voight, Benjamin F.; Scott, Laura J.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Morris, Andrew P.; Dina, Christian; Welch, Ryan P.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Huth, Cornelia; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; McCulloch, Laura J.; Ferreira, Teresa; Grallert, Harald; Amin, Najaf; Wu, Guanming; Willer, Cristen J.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; McCarroll, Steve A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Dupuis, Josee; Qi, Lu; Segre, Ayellet V.; van Hoek, Mandy; Navarro, Pau; Ardlie, Kristin; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J.; Blagieva, Roza; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bostrom, Kristina Bengtsson; Bravenboer, Bert; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Burtt, Noisel P.; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Couper, David J.; Crawford, Gabe; Doney, Alex S. F.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Elliott, Amanda L.; Erdos, Michael R.; Fox, Caroline S.; Franklin, Christopher S.; Ganser, Martha; Gieger, Christian; Grarup, Niels; Green, Todd; Griffin, Simon; Groves, Christopher J.; Guiducci, Candace; Hadjadj, Samy; Hassanali, Neelam; Herder, Christian; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Paul R. V.; Jorgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen H. L.; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kraft, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Man; Lieverse, Aloysius; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Midthjell, Kristian; Morken, Mario A.; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R.; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John R. B.; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Platou, Carl; Proenca, Christine; Prokopenko, Inga; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, N. William; Robertson, Neil R.; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Roden, Michael; Sampson, Michael J.; Saxena, Richa; Shields, Beverley M.; Shrader, Peter; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sparso, Thomas; Strassburger, Klaus; Stringham, Heather M.; Sun, Qi; Swift, Amy J.; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Dam, Rob M.; van Haeften, Timon W.; van Herpt, Thijs; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Walters, G. Bragi; Weedon, Michael N.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bergman, Richard N.; Cauchi, Stephane; Collins, Francis S.; Gloyn, Anna L.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hansen, Torben; Hide, Winston A.; Hitman, Graham A.; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Laakso, Markku; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rudan, Igor; Sijbrands, Eric; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watanabe, Richard M.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Campbell, Harry; Daly, Mark J.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hu, Frank B.; Meigs, James B.; Pankow, James S.; Pedersen, Oluf; Wichmann, H-Erich; Barroso, Ines; Florez, Jose C.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Groop, Leif; Sladek, Rob; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Wilson, James F.; Illig, Thomas; Froguel, Philippe; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Stefansson, Kari; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2010-01-01

    By combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals with combined

  3. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, Eli A.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Barton, Anne; Bowes, John; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Burtt, Noel P.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Coblyn, Jonathan; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Costenbader, Karen H.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Cui, Jing; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; De Jager, Philip L.; Ding, Bo; Emery, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Harrison, Pille; Hocking, Lynne J.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Ke, Xiayi; Lee, Annette T.; Liu, Xiangdong; Martin, Paul; Morgan, Ann W.; Padyukov, Leonid; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Reid, David M.; Seielstad, Mark; Seldin, Michael F.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Steer, Sophia; Tak, Paul P.; Thomson, Wendy; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Wordsworth, B. Paul; Wijmenga, Cisca; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Toes, Rene E. M.; de Vries, Niek; Begovich, Ann B.; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; Plenge, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    To identify new genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis, we conducted a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody-positive individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 rheum

  4. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Nielsen, Sofie V; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten;

    2016-01-01

    conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology...

  5. Clinical Trial Registries Are of Minimal Use for Identifying Selective Outcome and Analysis Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Susan L.; Holmer, Haley K.; Fu, Rongwei; Ogden, Lauren A.; Viswanathan, Meera S.; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine selective outcome reporting (SOR) and selective analysis reporting (SAR) in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to explore the usefulness of trial registries for identifying SOR and SAR. Study Design and Setting: We selected one "index outcome" for each of three comparative effectiveness reviews…

  6. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); I.M. Heid (Iris); J.C. Randall (Joshua); C. Lamina (Claudia); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); L. Qi (Lu); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); C.J. Willer (Cristen); B.M. Herrera (Blanca); A.U. Jackson (Anne); N. Lim (Noha); P. Scheet (Paul); N. Soranzo (Nicole); N. Amin (Najaf); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); J.C. Chambers (John); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Luan; H.N. Lyon (Helen); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); S. Sanna (Serena); N. Timpson (Nicholas); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); H.Z. Jing; P. Almgren (Peter); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R.N. Bergman (Richard); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L. Cherkas (Lynn); P.S. Chines (Peter); L. Coin (Lachlan); C. Cooper (Charles); G. Crawford (Gabe); A. Doering (Angela); A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); P. Elliott (Paul); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G. Fischer (Guido); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C. Gieger (Christian); H. Grallert (Harald); C.J. Groves (Christopher); S.M. Grundy (Scott); C. Guiducci (Candace); D. Hadley (David); A. Hamsten (Anders); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); J.W. Holloway (John); T. Illig (Thomas); B. Isomaa (Bo); L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); K. Jameson (Karen); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); T. Meitinger (Thomas); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.P. Morris (Andrew); P. Munroe (Patricia); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Nordström (Anna); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); F. Payne (Felicity); J. Peden (John); I. Prokopenko (Inga); F. Renström (Frida); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); L.J. Scott (Laura); A. Scuteri (Angelo); K. Silander (Kaisa); K. Song (Kijoung); X. Yuan (Xin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); A.J. Swift (Amy); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); M. Uda (Manuela); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); C. Wallace (Chris); G.B. Walters (Bragi); M.N. Weedon (Michael); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Zhang (Cuilin); M. Caulfield (Mark); F.S. Collins (Francis); G.D. Smith; I.N.M. Day (Ian); P.W. Franks (Paul); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); M.R. Jarvelin; A. Kong (Augustine); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); M. Laakso (Markku); E. Lakatta (Edward); V. Mooser (Vincent); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.D. Spector (Timothy); D.P. Strachan (David); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); D. Waterworth (Dawn); M. Boehnke (Michael); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); L. Groop (Leif); D.J. Hunter (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); D. Schlessinger (David); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); I. Barroso (Inês); M.I. McCarthy (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evid

  7. Using Latent Class Analysis to Identify Academic and Behavioral Risk Status in Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kathleen R.; Lembke, Erica S.; Reinke, Wendy M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying classes of children on the basis of academic and behavior risk may have important implications for the allocation of intervention resources within Response to Intervention (RTI) and Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) models. Latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted with a sample of 517 third grade students. Fall screening scores in…

  8. Identifying Barriers in Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review: A Grounded Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to identify the typical barriers encountered by faculty and administrators when implementing outcomes-based assessment program review. An analysis of interviews with faculty and administrators at nine institutions revealed a theory that faculty and administrators' promotion, tenure (if applicable),…

  9. Identifying sustainability issues using participatory SWOT analysis - A case study of egg production in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollenhorst, H.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to demonstrate how participatory strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis can be used to identify relevant economic, ecological and societal (EES) issues for the assessment of sustainable development. This is illustrated by the case of egg production

  10. Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voight, Benjamin F; Scott, Laura J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur;

    2010-01-01

    By combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals with combi...

  11. Identifying Contingency Requirements using Obstacle Analysis on an Unpiloted Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Robyn R.; Nelson, Stacy; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Frost, Chad R.; Tal, Doron

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes experience using Obstacle Analysis to identify contingency requirements on an unpiloted aerial vehicle. A contingency is an operational anomaly, and may or may not involve component failure. The challenges to this effort were: ( I ) rapid evolution of the system while operational, (2) incremental autonomy as capabilities were transferred from ground control to software control and (3) the eventual safety-criticality of such systems as they begin to fly over populated areas. The results reported here are preliminary but show that Obstacle Analysis helped (1) identify new contingencies that appeared as autonomy increased; (2) identify new alternatives for handling both previously known and new contingencies; and (3) investigate the continued validity of existing software requirements for contingency handling. Since many mobile, intelligent systems are built using a development process that poses the same challenges, the results appear to have applicability to other similar systems.

  12. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1......Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated......-4 consecutive cytogenetic bands identified regions with increased expression for chromosome 5q12-14, and a very large region of chromosome 7 with the strongest signal at 7p15-13 among tumors from short-living patients. Reduced gene expression was identified at 4q26-32, 6p12-q15, 9p21-q32, and 11p14-11. We...

  13. Metabolites production improvement by identifying minimal genomes and essential genes using flux balance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Abdul Hakim Mohamed; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Deris, Safaai; Illias, Rosli Md

    2015-01-01

    With the advancement in metabolic engineering technologies, reconstruction of the genome of host organisms to achieve desired phenotypes can be made. However, due to the complexity and size of the genome scale metabolic network, significant components tend to be invisible. We proposed an approach to improve metabolite production that consists of two steps. First, we find the essential genes and identify the minimal genome by a single gene deletion process using Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and second by identifying the significant pathway for the metabolite production using gene expression data. A genome scale model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of vanillin and acetate is used to test this approach. The result has shown the reliability of this approach to find essential genes, reduce genome size and identify production pathway that can further optimise the production yield. The identified genes and pathways can be extendable to other applications especially in strain optimisation. PMID:26489144

  14. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. We have analyzed 8 publicly available gene expression data sets. A global approach, 'gene set enrichment analysis' as well as an approach focusing on a subset of significantly differently regulated genes, GenMAPP, has been applied to rank pathway gene sets according to differential regulation in metastasizing tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. The major findings are up-regulation of cell cycle pathways and a metabolic shift towards glucose metabolism reflected in several pathways in metastasizing tumors. Growth factor pathways seem to play dual roles; EGF and PDGF pathways are decreased, while VEGF and sex-hormone pathways are increased in tumors that metastasize. Furthermore, migration, proteasome, immune system, angiogenesis, DNA repair and several signal transduction pathways are associated to metastasis. Finally several transcription factors e.g. E2F, NFY, and YY1 are identified as being involved in metastasis. By pathway meta-analysis many biological mechanisms beyond major characteristics such as proliferation are identified. Transcription factor analysis identifies a number of key factors that support central pathways. Several previously proposed treatment targets are identified and several new pathways that may

  15. Methionine biosynthesis is essential for infection in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Macary, Marie Emmanuelle; Barbisan, Crystel; Gagey, Marie Josèphe; Frelin, Océane; Beffa, Roland; Lebrun, Marc Henri; Droux, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Methionine is a sulfur amino acid standing at the crossroads of several biosynthetic pathways. In fungi, the last step of methionine biosynthesis is catalyzed by a cobalamine-independent methionine synthase (Met6, EC 2.1.1.14). In the present work, we studied the role of Met6 in the infection process of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. To this end MET6 null mutants were obtained by targeted gene replacement. On minimum medium, MET6 null mutants were auxotrophic for methionine. Even when grown in presence of excess methionine, these mutants displayed developmental defects, such as reduced mycelium pigmentation, aerial hypha formation and sporulation. They also displayed characteristic metabolic signatures such as increased levels of cysteine, cystathionine, homocysteine, S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine while methionine and glutathione levels remained unchanged. These metabolic perturbations were associated with the over-expression of MgCBS1 involved in the reversed transsulfuration pathway that metabolizes homocysteine into cysteine and MgSAM1 and MgSAHH1 involved in the methyl cycle. This suggests a physiological adaptation of M. oryzae to metabolic defects induced by the loss of Met6, in particular an increase in homocysteine levels. Pathogenicity assays showed that MET6 null mutants were non-pathogenic on both barley and rice leaves. These mutants were defective in appressorium-mediated penetration and invasive infectious growth. These pathogenicity defects were rescued by addition of exogenous methionine and S-methylmethionine. These results show that M. oryzae cannot assimilate sufficient methionine from plant tissues and must synthesize this amino acid de novo to fulfill its sulfur amino acid requirement during infection.

  16. Crucial roles of abscisic acid biogenesis in virulence of rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eSpence

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice suffers dramatic yield losses due to blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105, a bacterium that was isolated from the rice rhizosphere, inhibits M. oryzae. It was shown previously that pre-treatment of rice with EA105 reduced the size of blast lesions through JA- and ETH-mediated ISR. ABA acts antagonistically towards SA, JA, and ETH signaling, to impede plant defense responses. EA105 may be reducing the virulence of M. oryzae by preventing the pathogen from up-regulating the key ABA biosynthetic gene NCED3 in rice roots, as well as a β-glucosidase likely involved in activating conjugated inactive forms of ABA. However, changes in total ABA concentrations were not apparent, provoking the question of whether ABA concentration is an indicator of ABA signaling and response. In the rice-M. oryzae interaction, ABA plays a dual role in disease severity by increasing plant susceptibility and accelerating pathogenesis in the fungus itself. ABA is biosynthesized by M. oryzae. Further, exogenous ABA increased spore germination and appressoria formation, distinct from other plant growth regulators. EA105, which inhibits appressoria formation, counteracted the virulence-promoting effects of ABA on M. oryzae. The role of endogenous fungal ABA in blast disease was confirmed through the inability of a knockout mutant impaired in ABA biosynthesis to form lesions on rice. Therefore, it appears that EA105 is invoking multiple strategies in its protection of rice from blast including direct mechanisms as well as those mediated through plant signaling. ABA is a molecule that is likely implicated in both tactics.

  17. Chitosan Mediates Germling Adhesion in Magnaporthe oryzae and Is Required for Surface Sensing and Germling Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivey A Geoghegan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The fungal cell wall not only plays a critical role in maintaining cellular integrity, but also forms the interface between fungi and their environment. The composition of the cell wall can therefore influence the interactions of fungi with their physical and biological environments. Chitin, one of the main polysaccharide components of the wall, can be chemically modified by deacetylation. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as chitin deacetylases (CDAs, and results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-glucosamine. Chitosan has previously been shown to accumulate in the cell wall of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, it has long been hypothesized to act as a 'stealth' molecule, necessary for full pathogenesis. In this study, we used the crop pathogen and model organism Magnaporthe oryzae to test this hypothesis. We first confirmed that chitosan localizes to the germ tube and appressorium, then deleted CDA genes on the basis of their elevated transcript levels during appressorium differentiation. Germlings of the deletion strains showed loss of chitin deacetylation, and were compromised in their ability to adhere and form appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces. Surprisingly, the addition of exogenous chitosan fully restored germling adhesion and appressorium development. Despite the lack of appressorium development on artificial surfaces, pathogenicity was unaffected in the mutant strains. Further analyses demonstrated that cuticular waxes are sufficient to over-ride the requirement for chitosan during appressorium development on the plant surface. Thus, chitosan does not have a role as a 'stealth' molecule, but instead mediates the adhesion of germlings to surfaces, thereby allowing the perception of the physical stimuli necessary to promote appressorium development. This study thus reveals a novel role for chitosan in phytopathogenic fungi, and gives further insight into the mechanisms

  18. Two PAK kinase genes, CHM1 and MST20, have distinct functions in Magnaporthe grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Xue, Chaoyang; Bruno, Kenneth; Nishimura, Marie; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2004-05-01

    In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, the Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is essential for appressorium formation and infectious growth. PMK1 is homologous to yeast Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases that are known to be regulated by the Ste20 PAK kinase for activating the pheromone response and filamentation pathways. In this study, we isolated and characterized two PAK genes, CHM1 and MST20, in M. grisea. Mutants disrupted in MST20 were reduced in aerial hyphae growth and conidiation, but normal in growth rate, appressorium formation, penetration, and plant infection. In chm1 deletion mutants, growth, conidiation, and appressorium formation were reduced significantly. Even though appressoria formed by chm1 mutants were defective in penetration, chm1 mutants were able to grow invasively on rice leaves and colonize through wounds. The chm1 mutants were altered in conidiogenesis and produced conidia with abnormal morphology. Hyphae of chm1 mutants had normal septation, but the length of hyphal compartments was reduced. On nutritionally poor oatmeal agar, chm1 mutants were unstable and produced sectors that differed from original chm1 mutants in growth rate, conidiation, or colony morphology. However, none of the monoconidial cultures derived from these spontaneous sectors were normal in appressorial penetration and fungal pathogenesis. These data suggest that MST20 is dispensable for plant infection in M. grisea, but CHM1 plays a critical role in appressorium formation and penetration. Both mst20 and chm1 deletion mutants were phenotypically different from the pmk1 mutant that is defective in appressorium formation and infectious hyphae growth. It is likely that MST20 and CHM1 individually play no critical role in activating the PMK1 MAP kinase pathway during appressorium formation and infectious hyphae growth. However, CHM1 appears to be essential for appressorial penetration and CHM1 and MST20 may have redundant functions in M. grisea. PMID:15141959

  19. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, David G; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  20. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Ashbrook

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium’s bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis.We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1 and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum.

  1. Cluster analysis of spontaneous preterm birth phenotypes identifies potential associations among preterm birth mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplin, M Sean; Manuck, Tracy A.; Varner, Michael W.; Christensen, Bryce; Biggio, Joseph; Bukowski, Radek; Parry, Samuel; Zhang, Heping; Huang, Hao; Andrews, William; Saade, George; Sadovsky, Yoel; Reddy, Uma M.; Ilekis, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to employ an innovative tool based on common biological pathways to identify specific phenotypes among women with spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB), in order to enhance investigators' ability to identify to highlight common mechanisms and underlying genetic factors responsible for SPTB. Study Design A secondary analysis of a prospective case-control multicenter study of SPTB. All cases delivered a preterm singleton at SPTB ≤34.0 weeks gestation. Each woman was assessed for the presence of underlying SPTB etiologies. A hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify groups of women with homogeneous phenotypic profiles. One of the phenotypic clusters was selected for candidate gene association analysis using VEGAS software. Results 1028 women with SPTB were assigned phenotypes. Hierarchical clustering of the phenotypes revealed five major clusters. Cluster 1 (N=445) was characterized by maternal stress, cluster 2 (N=294) by premature membrane rupture, cluster 3 (N=120) by familial factors, and cluster 4 (N=63) by maternal comorbidities. Cluster 5 (N=106) was multifactorial, characterized by infection (INF), decidual hemorrhage (DH) and placental dysfunction (PD). These three phenotypes were highly correlated by Chi-square analysis [PD and DH (p<2.2e-6); PD and INF (p=6.2e-10); INF and DH (p=0.0036)]. Gene-based testing identified the INS (insulin) gene as significantly associated with cluster 3 of SPTB. Conclusion We identified 5 major clusters of SPTB based on a phenotype tool and hierarchal clustering. There was significant correlation between several of the phenotypes. The INS gene was associated with familial factors underlying SPTB. PMID:26070700

  2. Probabilistic approach to identify sensitive parameter distributions in multimedia pathway analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, S.; Gnanapragasam, E.; LePoire, D.; Biwer, B. M.; Cheng, J.; Arnish, J.; Yu, C.; Chen, S. Y.; Mo, T.; Abu-Eid, R.; Thaggard, M.; Environmental Assessment; NRC

    2002-01-01

    Sensitive parameter distributions were identified with the use of probabilistic analysis in the RESRAD computer code. RESRAD is a multimedia pathway analysis code designed to evaluate radiological exposures resulting from radiological contamination in soil. The dose distribution was obtained by using a set of default parameter distribution/values. Most of the variations in the output dose distribution could be attributed to uncertainty in a small set of input parameters that could be considered as sensitive parameter distributions. The identification of the sensitive parameters is a first step in the prioritization of future research and information gathering. When site-specific parameter distribution/values are available for an actual site, the same process should be used with these site-specific data. Regression analysis used to identify sensitive parameters indicated that the dominant pathways depended on the radionuclide and source configurations. However, two parameter distributions were sensitive for many radionuclides: the external shielding factor when external exposure was the dominant pathway and the plant transfer factor when plant ingestion was the dominant pathway. No single correlation or regression coefficient can be used alone to identify sensitive parameters in all the cases. The coefficients are useful guides, but they have to be used in conjunction with other aids, such as scatter plots, and should undergo further analysis.

  3. Meta-Analysis of Placental Transcriptome Data Identifies a Novel Molecular Pathway Related to Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uitert, Miranda; Moerland, Perry D; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Laivuori, Hannele; van der Post, Joris A M; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; Afink, Gijs B

    2015-01-01

    Studies using the placental transcriptome to identify key molecules relevant for preeclampsia are hampered by a relatively small sample size. In addition, they use a variety of bioinformatics and statistical methods, making comparison of findings challenging. To generate a more robust preeclampsia gene expression signature, we performed a meta-analysis on the original data of 11 placenta RNA microarray experiments, representing 139 normotensive and 116 preeclamptic pregnancies. Microarray data were pre-processed and analyzed using standardized bioinformatics and statistical procedures and the effect sizes were combined using an inverse-variance random-effects model. Interactions between genes in the resulting gene expression signature were identified by pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, Graphite) and protein-protein associations (STRING). This approach has resulted in a comprehensive list of differentially expressed genes that led to a 388-gene meta-signature of preeclamptic placenta. Pathway analysis highlights the involvement of the previously identified hypoxia/HIF1A pathway in the establishment of the preeclamptic gene expression profile, while analysis of protein interaction networks indicates CREBBP/EP300 as a novel element central to the preeclamptic placental transcriptome. In addition, there is an apparent high incidence of preeclampsia in women carrying a child with a mutation in CREBBP/EP300 (Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome). The 388-gene preeclampsia meta-signature offers a vital starting point for further studies into the relevance of these genes (in particular CREBBP/EP300) and their concomitant pathways as biomarkers or functional molecules in preeclampsia. This will result in a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and opens up the opportunity to develop rational therapies targeting the placental dysfunction causal to preeclampsia. PMID:26171964

  4. A method for identifying compromised clients based on DNS traffic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevanovic, Matija; Pedersen, Jens Myrup; D’Alconzo, Alessandro;

    2016-01-01

    based on DNS traffic analysis. The proposed method identifies suspicious agile DNS mappings, i.e., mappings characterized by fast changing domain names or/and IP addresses, often used by malicious services. The approach discovers clients that have queried domains contained within identified suspicious...... domain-to-IP mappings, thus assisting in pinpointing potentially compromised clients within the network. The proposed approach targets compromised clients in large-scale operational networks. We have evaluated the proposed approach using an extensive set of DNS traffic traces from different operational......DNS is widely abused by Internet criminals in order to provide reliable communication within malicious network infrastructure as well as flexible and resilient hosting of malicious content. This paper presents a novel detection method that can be used for identifying potentially compromised clients...

  5. Genome-wide interaction-based association analysis identified multiple new susceptibility Loci for common diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide interaction-based association (GWIBA analysis has the potential to identify novel susceptibility loci. These interaction effects could be missed with the prevailing approaches in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, no convincing loci have been discovered exclusively from GWIBA methods, and the intensive computation involved is a major barrier for application. Here, we developed a fast, multi-thread/parallel program named "pair-wise interaction-based association mapping" (PIAM for exhaustive two-locus searches. With this program, we performed a complete GWIBA analysis on seven diseases with stringent control for false positives, and we validated the results for three of these diseases. We identified one pair-wise interaction between a previously identified locus, C1orf106, and one new locus, TEC, that was specific for Crohn's disease, with a Bonferroni corrected P < 0.05 (P = 0.039. This interaction was replicated with a pair of proxy linked loci (P = 0.013 on an independent dataset. Five other interactions had corrected P < 0.5. We identified the allelic effect of a locus close to SLC7A13 for coronary artery disease. This was replicated with a linked locus on an independent dataset (P = 1.09 × 10⁻⁷. Through a local validation analysis that evaluated association signals, rather than locus-based associations, we found that several other regions showed association/interaction signals with nominal P < 0.05. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the GWIBA approach was successful for identifying novel loci, and the results provide new insights into the genetic architecture of common diseases. In addition, our PIAM program was capable of handling very large GWAS datasets that are likely to be produced in the future.

  6. Patent Network Analysis and Quadratic Assignment Procedures to Identify the Convergence of Robot Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Lee, Won Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Because of the remarkable developments in robotics in recent years, technological convergence has been active in this area. We focused on finding patterns of convergence within robot technology using network analysis of patents in both the USPTO and KIPO. To identify the variables that affect convergence, we used quadratic assignment procedures (QAP). From our analysis, we observed the patent network ecology related to convergence and found technologies that have great potential to converge with other robotics technologies. The results of our study are expected to contribute to setting up convergence based R&D policies for robotics, which can lead new innovation. PMID:27764196

  7. Identifying barriers to patient acceptance of active surveillance: content analysis of online patient communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark V Mishra

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Qualitative research aimed at identifying patient acceptance of active surveillance (AS has been identified as a public health research priority. The primary objective of this study was to determine if analysis of a large-sample of anonymous internet conversations (ICs could be utilized to identify unmet public needs regarding AS. METHODS: English-language ICs regarding prostate cancer (PC treatment with AS from 2002-12 were identified using a novel internet search methodology. Web spiders were developed to mine, aggregate, and analyze content from the world-wide-web for ICs centered on AS. Collection of ICs was not restricted to any specific geographic region of origin. NLP was used to evaluate content and perform a sentiment analysis. Conversations were scored as positive, negative, or neutral. A sentiment index (SI was subsequently calculated according to the following formula to compare temporal trends in public sentiment towards AS: [(# Positive IC/#Total IC-(#Negative IC/#Total IC x 100]. RESULTS: A total of 464 ICs were identified. Sentiment increased from -13 to +2 over the study period. The increase sentiment has been driven by increased patient emphasis on quality-of-life factors and endorsement of AS by national medical organizations. Unmet needs identified in these ICs include: a gap between quantitative data regarding long-term outcomes with AS vs. conventional treatments, desire for treatment information from an unbiased specialist, and absence of public role models managed with AS. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the potential utility of online patient communications to provide insight into patient preferences and decision-making. Based on our findings, we recommend that multidisciplinary clinics consider including an unbiased specialist to present treatment options and that future decision tools for AS include quantitative data regarding outcomes after AS.

  8. Emergent team roles in organizational meetings: Identifying communication patterns via cluster analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Beck, S.J.; Kauffeld, S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous team role taxonomies have largely relied on self-report data, focused on functional roles, and described individual predispositions or personality traits. Instead, this study takes a communicative approach and proposes that team roles are produced, shaped, and sustained in communicative behaviors. To identify team roles communicatively, 59 regular organizational meetings were videotaped and analyzed. Cluster analysis revealed five emergent roles: the solution seeker, the problem anal...

  9. Electroretinogram analysis of relative spectral sensitivity in genetically identified dichromatic macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Hanazawa, Akitoshi; Mikami, Akichika; Angelika, Puti Sulistyo; Takenaka, Osamu; Goto, Shunji; Onishi, Akishi; Koike, Satoshi; Yamamori, Tetsuo; Kato, Keichiro; Kondo, Aya; Suryobroto, Bambang; Farajallah, Achmad; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2001-01-01

    The retinas of macaque monkeys usually contain three types of photopigment, providing them with trichromatic color vision homologous to that of humans. However, we recently used molecular genetic analysis to identify several macaques with a dichromatic genotype. The affected X chromosome of these animals contains a hybrid gene of long-wavelength-sensitive (L) and middle-wavelength-sensitive (M) photopigments instead of separate genes encoding L and M photopigments. The product of the hybrid g...

  10. Network analysis identifies protein clusters of functional importance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Adam; Meyer, Stefan; Hanson, Daniel; Clayton, Peter; Donn, Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our objective was to utilise network analysis to identify protein clusters of greatest potential functional relevance in the pathogenesis of oligoarticular and rheumatoid factor negative (RF-ve) polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods JIA genetic association data were used to build an interactome network model in BioGRID 3.2.99. The top 10% of this protein:protein JIA Interactome was used to generate a minimal essential network (MEN). Reactome FI Cytoscape 2.83...

  11. Identifying Gender-Preferred Communication Styles within Online Cancer Communities: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Durant, Kathleen T.; McCray, Alexa T.; Charles Safran

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The goal of this research is to determine if different gender-preferred social styles can be observed within the user interactions at an online cancer community. To achieve this goal, we identify and measure variables that pertain to each gender-specific social style. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We perform social network and statistical analysis on the communication flow of 8,388 members at six different cancer forums over eight years. Kruskal-Wallis tests were conducted to measure the ...

  12. Identifying patterns in treatment response profiles in acute bipolar mania: a cluster analysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Houston John P; Lipkovich Ilya A; Ahl Jonna

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients with acute mania respond differentially to treatment and, in many cases, fail to obtain or sustain symptom remission. The objective of this exploratory analysis was to characterize response in bipolar disorder by identifying groups of patients with similar manic symptom response profiles. Methods Patients (n = 222) were selected from a randomized, double-blind study of treatment with olanzapine or divalproex in bipolar I disorder, manic or mixed episode, with or w...

  13. Hot spot analysis applied to identify ecosystem services potential in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Depellegrin, Daniel; Misiune, Ieva

    2016-04-01

    Hot spot analysis are very useful to identify areas with similar characteristics. This is important for a sustainable use of the territory, since we can identify areas that need to be protected, or restored. This is a great advantage in terms of land use planning and management, since we can allocate resources, reduce the economical costs and do a better intervention in the landscape. Ecosystem services (ES) are different according land use. Since landscape is very heterogeneous, it is of major importance understand their spatial pattern and where are located the areas that provide better ES and the others that provide less services. The objective of this work is to use hot-spot analysis to identify areas with the most valuable ES in Lithuania. CORINE land-cover (CLC) of 2006 was used as the main spatial information. This classification uses a grid of 100 m resolution and extracted a total of 31 land use types. ES ranking was carried out based on expert knowledge. They were asked to evaluate the ES potential of each different CLC from 0 (no potential) to 5 (very high potential). Hot spot analysis were evaluated using the Getis-ord test, which identifies cluster analysis available in ArcGIS toolbox. This tool identifies areas with significantly high low values and significant high values at a p level of 0.05. In this work we used hot spot analysis to assess the distribution of providing, regulating cultural and total (sum of the previous 3) ES. The Z value calculated from Getis-ord was used to statistical analysis to access the clusters of providing, regulating cultural and total ES. ES with high Z value show that they have a high number of cluster areas with high potential of ES. The results showed that the Z-score was significantly different among services (Kruskal Wallis ANOVA =834. 607, pareas that showed high and low significant regulating and cultural ES clusters are similar. The spatial distribution of these clusters is very high, which may be attributed to

  14. Genetic and physical mapping of AvrPi7, a novel avirulence gene of Magnaporthe oryzae using physical position-ready markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG ShuJie; WANG Ling; MA JunHong; LIN Fei; PAN QingHua

    2007-01-01

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating crop diseases worldwide. The avirulence gene corresponding to rice blast resistance gene Pi7 in field isolate CHL346 was inherited as a single gene, designated AvrPi7, in a segregating population consisting of 189 ascospore progenies derived from a cross between field isolates CHL346 and CHL42. In order to determine the chromosomal location of the AvrPi7 locus, a total of 121 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed based on the whole-genome sequence of reference isolate 70-15 of M. oryzae.Linkage analysis of the locus with these SSR markers showed that eight SSR markers on chromosome1 were linked to the locus, among which the closest flanking markers MS1-9 and MS1-15 were 3.2 and 16.4 cM from the locus, respectively. For fine mapping, additional PCR-based makers including eight SSR markers and three candidate avirulence gene (CAG) markers were developed in the region flanking both markers. The AvrPi7 locus was genetically delimited within a 1.6-cM region flanked by markers MS1-21 and MS1-22, and co-segregated with the marker CAG2. To construct a physical map of the AvrPi7 locus, molecular markers linked to the Avr gene were mapped on the supercontigs of the reference isolate 70-15 through bioinformation analysis (BIA). Consequently, the AvrPi7 locus was delimited to a 75-kb interval flanked by markers MS1-21 and MS1-22 based on the reference sequence.Merodiploids observed in this study are also discussed.

  15. Rice RING protein OSBBI1 with E3 ligase activity confers broad-spectrum resistance against Magnaporthe oryzae by modifying the cell wall defence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Zuhua He; Sihui Zhong; Guojun Li; Qun Li; Bizeng Mao; Yiwen Deng; Huijuan Zhang; Longjun Zeng; Fengming Song

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that E3 ligases play critical roles in diverse biological processes, including innate immune responses in plants. However, the mechanism of the E3 ligase involvement in plant innate immunity is unclear.We report that a rice gene, OsBBI1, encoding a RING finger protein with E3 ligase activity, mediates broad-spectrum disease resistance. The expression of OSBBI1 was induced by rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, as well as chemical inducers, benzothiadiazole and salicylic acid. Biochemical analysis revealed that OsBBI1 protein possesses E3ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro. Genetic analysis revealed that the loss of OsBBI1 function in a Tos17-insertion line increased susceptibility, while the overexpression of OsBBI1 in transgenic plants conferred enhanced resistance to multiple races of M.oryzae. This indicates that OsBBI1 modulates broad-spectrum resistance against the blast fungus. The OsBBII-overexpressing plants showed higher levels of H,O, accumulation in cells and higher levels of phenolic compounds and cross-linking of proteins in cell walls at infection sites by M. Oryzae compared with wild-type(WT)plants. The cell walls were thicker in the OsBB11-overexpressing plants and thinner in the mutant plants than in the WT plants. Our results suggest that OsBBH modulates broad-spectrum resistance to blast fungus by modifying cell wall defence responses. The functional characterization of OsBBI1 provides insight into the E3 ligase-mediated innate immunity, and a practical tool for constructing broad-spectrum resistance against the most destructive disease in rice.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum membrane-bound MoSec62 is involved in the suppression of rice immunity and is essential for the pathogenicity of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuangzhi; Pang, Zhiqian; Li, Guihua; Lin, Chunhua; Wang, Jing; Lv, Qiming; He, Chaozu; Zhu, Lihuang

    2016-10-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) constitutes the first line of plant inducible immunity. As an important step of plant colonization, phytopathogens have to suppress PTI, and secreted effectors are therefore co-evolved and deployed. In this study, we characterized the function of MoSec62 of Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of the destructive rice blast. MoSec62 encodes a homologue of Sec62p, a yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane transporter for precursors of secretory proteins. We showed that a T-DNA insertion into the promoter region of MoSec62, causing a disturbance to the up-regulation of MoSec62 expression during blast invasion, resulted in a complete loss of blast virulence of the mutant, M1575. Both 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining of the infected rice leaves and expression analysis revealed that the infectious attempt by the mutant led to strong defence responses of rice. Consistently, in transcriptomic analysis of rice leaves subject to blast inoculation, a battery of defence responses was found to be induced exclusively on M1575 challenge. For further exploration, we tested the pathogenicity on a highly susceptible rice variety and detected the accumulation of Slp1, a known PTI suppressor. Both results suggested that the mutant most likely failed to overcome rice PTI. In addition, we showed that MoSec62 was able to rescue the thermosensitivity of a yeast Δsec62, and the MoSec62-GFP fusion was co-localized to the ER membrane, both suggesting the conservation of Sec62 homologues. In conclusion, our data indicate that MoSec62, probably as an ER membrane transporter, plays an essential role in antagonizing rice defence at the early stages of blast invasion.

  17. Identifying Innovative Interventions to Promote Healthy Eating Using Consumption-Oriented Food Supply Chain Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Corinna

    2009-07-01

    The mapping and analysis of supply chains is a technique increasingly used to address problems in the food system. Yet such supply chain management has not yet been applied as a means of encouraging healthier diets. Moreover, most policies recommended to promote healthy eating focus on the consumer end of the chain. This article proposes a consumption-oriented food supply chain analysis to identify the changes needed in the food supply chain to create a healthier food environment, measured in terms of food availability, prices, and marketing. Along with established forms of supply chain analysis, the method is informed by a historical overview of how food supply chains have changed over time. The method posits that the actors and actions in the chain are affected by organizational, financial, technological, and policy incentives and disincentives, which can in turn be levered for change. It presents a preliminary example of the supply of Coca-Cola beverages into school vending machines and identifies further potential applications. These include fruit and vegetable supply chains, local food chains, supply chains for health-promoting versions of food products, and identifying financial incentives in supply chains for healthier eating. PMID:23144674

  18. Combination of meta-analysis and graph clustering to identify prognostic markers of ESCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyun Gao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is one of the most malignant gastrointestinal cancers and occurs at a high frequency rate in China and other Asian countries. Recently, several molecular markers were identified for predicting ESCC. Notwithstanding, additional prognostic markers, with a clear understanding of their underlying roles, are still required. Through bioinformatics, a graph-clustering method by DPClus was used to detect co-expressed modules. The aim was to identify a set of discriminating genes that could be used for predicting ESCC through graph-clustering and GO-term analysis. The results showed that CXCL12, CYP2C9, TGM3, MAL, S100A9, EMP-1 and SPRR3 were highly associated with ESCC development. In our study, all their predicted roles were in line with previous reports, whereby the assumption that a combination of meta-analysis, graph-clustering and GO-term analysis is effective for both identifying differentially expressed genes, and reflecting on their functions in ESCC.

  19. Combination of meta-analysis and graph clustering to identify prognostic markers of ESCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongyun; Wang, Lishan; Cui, Shitao; Wang, Mingsong

    2012-04-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most malignant gastrointestinal cancers and occurs at a high frequency rate in China and other Asian countries. Recently, several molecular markers were identified for predicting ESCC. Notwithstanding, additional prognostic markers, with a clear understanding of their underlying roles, are still required. Through bioinformatics, a graph-clustering method by DPClus was used to detect co-expressed modules. The aim was to identify a set of discriminating genes that could be used for predicting ESCC through graph-clustering and GO-term analysis. The results showed that CXCL12, CYP2C9, TGM3, MAL, S100A9, EMP-1 and SPRR3 were highly associated with ESCC development. In our study, all their predicted roles were in line with previous reports, whereby the assumption that a combination of meta-analysis, graph-clustering and GO-term analysis is effective for both identifying differentially expressed genes, and reflecting on their functions in ESCC.

  20. MoVam7, a conserved SNARE involved in vacuole assembly, is required for growth, endocytosis, ROS accumulation, and pathogenesis of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianying Dou

    Full Text Available Soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE proteins play a central role in membrane fusion and vesicle transport of eukaryotic organisms including fungi. We previously identified MoSce22 as a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNARE protein Sec22 to be involved in growth, stress resistance, and pathogenicity of Magnaporthe oryzae. Here, we provide evidences that MoVam7, an ortholog of S. cerevisiae SNARE protein Vam7, exerts conserved functions in vacuolar morphogenesis and functions in pathogenicity of M. oryzae. Staining with neutral red and FM4-64 revealed the presence of abnormal fragmented vacuoles and an absence of the Spitzenkörper body in the ΔMovam7 mutant. The ΔMovam7 mutant also exhibited reduced vegetative growth, poor conidiation, and failure to produce the infection structure appressorium. Additionally, treatments with cell wall perturbing agents indicated weakened cell walls and altered distributions of the cell wall component chitin. Furthermore, the ΔMovam7 mutant showed a reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the hyphal apex and failed to cause diseases on the rice plant. In summary, our studies indicate that MoVam7, like MoSec22, is a component of the SNARE complex whose functions in vacuole assembly also underlies the growth, conidiation, appressorium formation, and pathogenicity of M. oryzae. Further studies of MoVam7, MoSec22, and additional members of the SNARE complex are likely to reveal critical mechanisms in vacuole formation and membrane trafficking that is linked to fungal pathogenicity.

  1. Effective Boolean dynamics analysis to identify functionally important genes in large-scale signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Hung-Cuong; Kwon, Yung-Keun

    2015-11-01

    Efficiently identifying functionally important genes in order to understand the minimal requirements of normal cellular development is challenging. To this end, a variety of structural measures have been proposed and their effectiveness has been investigated in recent literature; however, few studies have shown the effectiveness of dynamics-based measures. This led us to investigate a dynamic measure to identify functionally important genes, and the effectiveness of which was verified through application on two large-scale human signaling networks. We specifically consider Boolean sensitivity-based dynamics against an update-rule perturbation (BSU) as a dynamic measure. Through investigations on two large-scale human signaling networks, we found that genes with relatively high BSU values show slower evolutionary rate and higher proportions of essential genes and drug targets than other genes. Gene-ontology analysis showed clear differences between the former and latter groups of genes. Furthermore, we compare the identification accuracies of essential genes and drug targets via BSU and five well-known structural measures. Although BSU did not always show the best performance, it effectively identified the putative set of genes, which is significantly different from the results obtained via the structural measures. Most interestingly, BSU showed the highest synergy effect in identifying the functionally important genes in conjunction with other measures. Our results imply that Boolean-sensitive dynamics can be used as a measure to effectively identify functionally important genes in signaling networks.

  2. Efficient behavior of photosynthetic organelles via Pareto optimality, identifiability, and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapezza, Giovanni; Umeton, Renato; Costanza, Jole; Angione, Claudio; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Papini, Alessio; Lió, Pietro; Nicosia, Giuseppe

    2013-05-17

    In this work, we develop methodologies for analyzing and cross comparing metabolic models. We investigate three important metabolic networks to discuss the complexity of biological organization of organisms, modeling, and system properties. In particular, we analyze these metabolic networks because of their biotechnological and basic science importance: the photosynthetic carbon metabolism in a general leaf, the Rhodobacter spheroides bacterium, and the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii alga. We adopt single- and multi-objective optimization algorithms to maximize the CO 2 uptake rate and the production of metabolites of industrial interest or for ecological purposes. We focus both on the level of genes (e.g., finding genetic manipulations to increase the production of one or more metabolites) and on finding concentration enzymes for improving the CO 2 consumption. We find that R. spheroides is able to absorb an amount of CO 2 until 57.452 mmol h (-1) gDW (-1) , while C. reinhardtii obtains a maximum of 6.7331. We report that the Pareto front analysis proves extremely useful to compare different organisms, as well as providing the possibility to investigate them with the same framework. By using the sensitivity and robustness analysis, our framework identifies the most sensitive and fragile components of the biological systems we take into account, allowing us to compare their models. We adopt the identifiability analysis to detect functional relations among enzymes; we observe that RuBisCO, GAPDH, and FBPase belong to the same functional group, as suggested also by the sensitivity analysis.

  3. Gene expression signature analysis identifies vorinostat as a candidate therapy for gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Claerhout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastric cancer continues to be one of the deadliest cancers in the world and therefore identification of new drugs targeting this type of cancer is thus of significant importance. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate a therapeutic agent which might improve the outcomes for gastric cancer patients in the future. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using microarray technology, we generated a gene expression profile of human gastric cancer-specific genes from human gastric cancer tissue samples. We used this profile in the Broad Institute's Connectivity Map analysis to identify candidate therapeutic compounds for gastric cancer. We found the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat as the lead compound and thus a potential therapeutic drug for gastric cancer. Vorinostat induced both apoptosis and autophagy in gastric cancer cell lines. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy however, increased the therapeutic efficacy of vorinostat, indicating that a combination of vorinostat with autophagy inhibitors may therapeutically be more beneficial. Moreover, gene expression analysis of gastric cancer identified a collection of genes (ITGB5, TYMS, MYB, APOC1, CBX5, PLA2G2A, and KIF20A whose expression was elevated in gastric tumor tissue and downregulated more than 2-fold by vorinostat treatment in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, SCGB2A1, TCN1, CFD, APLP1, and NQO1 manifested a reversed pattern. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that analysis of gene expression signature may represent an emerging approach to discover therapeutic agents for gastric cancer, such as vorinostat. The observation of altered gene expression after vorinostat treatment may provide the clue to identify the molecular mechanism of vorinostat and those patients likely to benefit from vorinostat treatment.

  4. Protein functional links in Trypanosoma brucei, identified by gene fusion analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trimpalis Philip

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domain or gene fusion analysis is a bioinformatics method for detecting gene fusions in one organism by comparing its genome to that of other organisms. The occurrence of gene fusions suggests that the two original genes that participated in the fusion are functionally linked, i.e. their gene products interact either as part of a multi-subunit protein complex, or in a metabolic pathway. Gene fusion analysis has been used to identify protein functional links in prokaryotes as well as in eukaryotic model organisms, such as yeast and Drosophila. Results In this study we have extended this approach to include a number of recently sequenced protists, four of which are pathogenic, to identify fusion linked proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. We have also examined the evolution of the gene fusion events identified, to determine whether they can be attributed to fusion or fission, by looking at the conservation of the fused genes and of the individual component genes across the major eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages. We find relatively limited occurrence of gene fusions/fissions within the protist lineages examined. Our results point to two trypanosome-specific gene fissions, which have recently been experimentally confirmed, one fusion involving proteins involved in the same metabolic pathway, as well as two novel putative functional links between fusion-linked protein pairs. Conclusions This is the first study of protein functional links in T. brucei identified by gene fusion analysis. We have used strict thresholds and only discuss results which are highly likely to be genuine and which either have already been or can be experimentally verified. We discuss the possible impact of the identification of these novel putative protein-protein interactions, to the development of new trypanosome therapeutic drugs.

  5. Shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J R Managbanag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of genes that modulate longevity is a major focus of aging-related research and an area of intense public interest. In addition to facilitating an improved understanding of the basic mechanisms of aging, such genes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in multiple age-associated diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. To date, however, targeted efforts at identifying longevity-associated genes have been limited by a lack of predictive power, and useful algorithms for candidate gene-identification have also been lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have utilized a shortest-path network analysis to identify novel genes that modulate longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on a set of previously reported genes associated with increased life span, we applied a shortest-path network algorithm to a pre-existing protein-protein interaction dataset in order to construct a shortest-path longevity network. To validate this network, the replicative aging potential of 88 single-gene deletion strains corresponding to predicted components of the shortest-path longevity network was determined. Here we report that the single-gene deletion strains identified by our shortest-path longevity analysis are significantly enriched for mutations conferring either increased or decreased replicative life span, relative to a randomly selected set of 564 single-gene deletion strains or to the current data set available for the entire haploid deletion collection. Further, we report the identification of previously unknown longevity genes, several of which function in a conserved longevity pathway believed to mediate life span extension in response to dietary restriction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates that shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity and represents the first application of

  6. Messina: a novel analysis tool to identify biologically relevant molecules in disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pinese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Morphologically similar cancers display heterogeneous patterns of molecular aberrations and follow substantially different clinical courses. This diversity has become the basis for the definition of molecular phenotypes, with significant implications for therapy. Microarray or proteomic expression profiling is conventionally employed to identify disease-associated genes, however, traditional approaches for the analysis of profiling experiments may miss molecular aberrations which define biologically relevant subtypes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present Messina, a method that can identify those genes that only sometimes show aberrant expression in cancer. We demonstrate with simulated data that Messina is highly sensitive and specific when used to identify genes which are aberrantly expressed in only a proportion of cancers, and compare Messina to contemporary analysis techniques. We illustrate Messina by using it to detect the aberrant expression of a gene that may play an important role in pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Messina allows the detection of genes with profiles typical of markers of molecular subtype, and complements existing methods to assist the identification of such markers. Messina is applicable to any global expression profiling data, and to allow its easy application has been packaged into a freely-available stand-alone software package.

  7. Space-Time Analysis to Identify Areas at Risk of Mortality from Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliany C. O. Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying areas that were at risk of mortality due to cardiovascular disease in residents aged 45 years or older of the cities of Cuiabá and Várzea Grande between 2009 and 2011. We conducted an ecological study of mortality rates related to cardiovascular disease. Mortality rates were calculated for each census tract by the Local Empirical Bayes estimator. High- and low-risk clusters were identified by retrospective space-time scans for each year using the Poisson probability model. We defined the year and month as the temporal analysis unit and the census tracts as the spatial analysis units adjusted by age and sex. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the socioeconomic and environmental variables by risk classification. High-risk clusters showed higher income ratios than low-risk clusters, as did temperature range and atmospheric particulate matter. Low-risk clusters showed higher humidity than high-risk clusters. The Eastern region of Várzea Grande and the central region of Cuiabá were identified as areas at risk of mortality due to cardiovascular disease in individuals aged 45 years or older. High mortality risk was associated with socioeconomic and environmental factors. More high-risk clusters were observed at the end of the dry season.

  8. Design Analysis Rules to Identify Proper Noun from Bengali Sentence for Universal Networking language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Syeful Islam

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Now-a-days hundreds of millions of people of almost all levels of education and attitudes from different country communicate with each other for different purposes and perform their jobs on internet or other communication medium using various languages. Not all people know all language; therefore it is very difficult to communicate or works on various languages. In this situation the computer scientist introduce various inter language translation program (Machine translation. UNL is such kind of inter language translation program. One of the major problem of UNL is identified a name from a sentence, which is relatively simple in English language, because such entities start with a capital letter. In Bangla we do not have concept of small or capital letters. Thus we find difficulties in understanding whether a word is a proper noun or not. Here we have proposed analysis rules to identify proper noun from a sentence and established post converter which translate the name entity from Bangla to UNL. The goal is to make possible Bangla sentence conversion to UNL and vice versa. UNL system prove that the theoretical analysis of our proposed system able to identify proper noun from Bangla sentence and produce relative Universal word for UNL.

  9. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo E; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke J; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer A; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Wang, Jie Jin; Auer, Paul L; Attia, John R; Yanek, Lisa R; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Lahti, Jari; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Bielak, Lawrence F; Joshi, Peter K; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Riess, Helene; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Goel, Anuj; Yang, Qiong; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Willemsen, Gonneke; Rumley, Ann; Fiorillo, Edoardo; de Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Scott, Robert; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Yao, Jie; Kifley, Annette; Kooperberg, Charles; Qayyum, Rehan; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Räikkönen, Katri; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Peyser, Patricia A; Wild, Sarah; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wright, Alan F; Marten, Jonathan; Zemunik, Tatijana; Morrison, Alanna C; Sennblad, Bengt; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; de Geus, Eco J C; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Binder, Harald; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Mcknight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Jenny, Nancy S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Qi, Lihong; Mcevoy, Mark G; Becker, Diane M; Starr, John M; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Jhun, Min A; Campbell, Harry; Hamsten, Anders; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Mcardle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Koenig, Wolfgang; Psaty, Bruce M; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Jingmin; Palotie, Aarno; Uitterlinden, André G; Stott, David J; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Wilson, James F; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Eriksson, Johan G; Hansen, Torben; Deary, Ian J; Becker, Lewis C; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; März, Winfried; Wareham, Nick J; Peters, Annette; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Jukema, J Wouter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hayward, Caroline; Cucca, Francesco; Tracy, Russell; Watkins, Hugh; Reiner, Alex P; Folsom, Aaron R; Ridker, Paul M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration.

  10. The systematic functional analysis of plasmodium protein kinases identifies essential regulators of mosquito transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Tewari, Rita

    2010-10-21

    Although eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) contribute to many cellular processes, only three Plasmodium falciparum ePKs have thus far been identified as essential for parasite asexual blood stage development. To identify pathways essential for parasite transmission between their mammalian host and mosquito vector, we undertook a systematic functional analysis of ePKs in the genetically tractable rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei. Modeling domain signatures of conventional ePKs identified 66 putative Plasmodium ePKs. Kinomes are highly conserved between Plasmodium species. Using reverse genetics, we show that 23 ePKs are redundant for asexual erythrocytic parasite development in mice. Phenotyping mutants at four life cycle stages in Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes revealed functional clusters of kinases required for sexual development and sporogony. Roles for a putative SR protein kinase (SRPK) in microgamete formation, a conserved regulator of clathrin uncoating (GAK) in ookinete formation, and a likely regulator of energy metabolism (SNF1/KIN) in sporozoite development were identified. 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Integrating Stakeholder Preferences and GIS-Based Multicriteria Analysis to Identify Forest Landscape Restoration Priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Uribe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A pressing question that arises during the planning of an ecological restoration process is: where to restore first? Answering this question is a complex task; it requires a multidimensional approach to consider economic constrains and the preferences of stakeholders. Being the problem of spatial nature, it may be explored effectively through Multicriteria Decision Analysis (MCDA performed in a Geographical Information System (GIS environment. The proposed approach is based on the definition and weighting of multiple criteria for evaluating land suitability. An MCDA-based methodology was used to identify priority areas for Forest Landscape Restoration in the Upper Mixtec region, Oaxaca (Mexico, one of the most degraded areas of Latin America. Socioeconomic and environmental criteria were selected and evaluated. The opinions of four different stakeholder groups were considered: general public, academic, Non-governmental organizations (NGOs and governmental officers. The preferences of these groups were spatially modeled to identify their priorities. The final result was a map that identifies the most preferable sites for restoration, where resources and efforts should be concentrated. MCDA proved to be a very useful tool in collective planning, when alternative sites have to be identified and prioritized to guide the restoration work.

  12. Unscented Kalman filter with parameter identifiability analysis for the estimation of multiple parameters in kinetic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Syed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In systems biology, experimentally measured parameters are not always available, necessitating the use of computationally based parameter estimation. In order to rely on estimated parameters, it is critical to first determine which parameters can be estimated for a given model and measurement set. This is done with parameter identifiability analysis. A kinetic model of the sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm tissue developed by Rohwer et al. was taken as a test case model. What differentiates this approach is the integration of an orthogonal-based local identifiability method into the unscented Kalman filter (UKF, rather than using the more common observability-based method which has inherent limitations. It also introduces a variable step size based on the system uncertainty of the UKF during the sensitivity calculation. This method identified 10 out of 12 parameters as identifiable. These ten parameters were estimated using the UKF, which was run 97 times. Throughout the repetitions the UKF proved to be more consistent than the estimation algorithms used for comparison.

  13. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo E; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke J; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer A; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Wang, Jie Jin; Auer, Paul L; Attia, John R; Yanek, Lisa R; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Lahti, Jari; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Bielak, Lawrence F; Joshi, Peter K; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Riess, Helene; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Goel, Anuj; Yang, Qiong; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Willemsen, Gonneke; Rumley, Ann; Fiorillo, Edoardo; de Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Scott, Robert; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Yao, Jie; Kifley, Annette; Kooperberg, Charles; Qayyum, Rehan; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Räikkönen, Katri; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Peyser, Patricia A; Wild, Sarah; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wright, Alan F; Marten, Jonathan; Zemunik, Tatijana; Morrison, Alanna C; Sennblad, Bengt; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; de Geus, Eco J C; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Binder, Harald; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Mcknight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Jenny, Nancy S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Qi, Lihong; Mcevoy, Mark G; Becker, Diane M; Starr, John M; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Jhun, Min A; Campbell, Harry; Hamsten, Anders; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Mcardle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Koenig, Wolfgang; Psaty, Bruce M; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Jingmin; Palotie, Aarno; Uitterlinden, André G; Stott, David J; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Wilson, James F; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Eriksson, Johan G; Hansen, Torben; Deary, Ian J; Becker, Lewis C; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; März, Winfried; Wareham, Nick J; Peters, Annette; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Jukema, J Wouter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hayward, Caroline; Cucca, Francesco; Tracy, Russell; Watkins, Hugh; Reiner, Alex P; Folsom, Aaron R; Ridker, Paul M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration. PMID:26561523

  14. Identifying E-Business Model:A Value Chain-Based Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Qingfeng; HUANG Lihua

    2004-01-01

    E-business will change the ways that all companies do business, and most traditional businesses will evolve from their current business model to a combination of place and space via e-business model To choose the proper e-business model becomes the important strategic concern for company to succeed The main objective of this paper is to investigate the analysis framework for identifying e-business model Based on the e-business process, from the value chain to the value net perspective. This paper provides a theoretical framework for identifying e-business models, and results in 11 e-business models. The strategic intend of every e-business model is discussed in the end of this paper. An enterprise e-business model design and implementation can be specified by the combination of one or more among 11 e-business models.

  15. Proteomic analysis of cell lines to identify the irinotecan resistance proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xing-Chen Peng; Feng-Ming Gong; Meng Wei; X I Chen; Y E Chen; K E Cheng; Feng Gao; Feng Xu; FENG Bi; Ji-Yan Liu

    2010-12-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug resistance is a frequent cause of treatment failure in colon cancer patients. Several mechanisms have been implicated in drug resistance. However, they are not sufficient to exhaustively account for this resistance emergence. In this study, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and the PDQuest software analysis were applied to compare the differential expression of irinotecan-resistance-associated protein in human colon adenocarcinoma LoVo cells and irinotecan-resistant LoVo cells (LoVo/irinotecan). The differential protein dots were excised and analysed by ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Fifteen proteins were identified, including eight proteins with decreased expression and seven proteins with increased expression. The identified known proteins included those that function in diverse biological processes such as cellular transcription, cell apoptosis, electron transport/redox regulation, cell proliferation/differentiation and retinol metabolism pathways. Identification of such proteins could allow improved understanding of the mechanisms leading to the acquisition of chemoresistance.

  16. Finite Element Creep-Fatigue Analysis of a Welded Furnace Roll for Identifying Failure Root Cause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. P.; Mohr, W. C.

    2015-11-01

    Creep-fatigue induced failures are often observed in engineering components operating under high temperature and cyclic loading. Understanding the creep-fatigue damage process and identifying failure root cause are very important for preventing such failures and improving the lifetime of engineering components. Finite element analyses including a heat transfer analysis and a creep-fatigue analysis were conducted to model the cyclic thermal and mechanical process of a furnace roll in a continuous hot-dip coating line. Typically, the roll has a short life, heat transfer analysis was conducted to predict the temperature history of the roll by modeling heat convection from hot air inside the furnace. The creep-fatigue analysis was performed by inputting the predicted temperature history and applying mechanical loads. The analysis results showed that the failure was resulted from a creep-fatigue mechanism rather than a creep mechanism. The difference of material properties between the filler metal and the base metal is the root cause for the roll failure, which induces higher creep strain and stress in the interface between the weld and the HAZ.

  17. Gene-network analysis identifies susceptibility genes related to glycobiology in autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert van der Zwaag

    Full Text Available The recent identification of copy-number variation in the human genome has opened up new avenues for the discovery of positional candidate genes underlying complex genetic disorders, especially in the field of psychiatric disease. One major challenge that remains is pinpointing the susceptibility genes in the multitude of disease-associated loci. This challenge may be tackled by reconstruction of functional gene-networks from the genes residing in these loci. We applied this approach to autism spectrum disorder (ASD, and identified the copy-number changes in the DNA of 105 ASD patients and 267 healthy individuals with Illumina Humanhap300 Beadchips. Subsequently, we used a human reconstructed gene-network, Prioritizer, to rank candidate genes in the segmental gains and losses in our autism cohort. This analysis highlighted several candidate genes already known to be mutated in cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders, including RAI1, BRD1, and LARGE. In addition, the LARGE gene was part of a sub-network of seven genes functioning in glycobiology, present in seven copy-number changes specifically identified in autism patients with limited co-morbidity. Three of these seven copy-number changes were de novo in the patients. In autism patients with a complex phenotype and healthy controls no such sub-network was identified. An independent systematic analysis of 13 published autism susceptibility loci supports the involvement of genes related to glycobiology as we also identified the same or similar genes from those loci. Our findings suggest that the occurrence of genomic gains and losses of genes associated with glycobiology are important contributors to the development of ASD.

  18. Systematic enrichment analysis of gene expression profiling studies identifies consensus pathways implicated in colorectal cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Lascorz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of gene expression profiling (GEP studies on colorectal carcinogenesis have been performed but no reliable gene signature has been identified so far due to the lack of reproducibility in the reported genes. There is growing evidence that functionally related genes, rather than individual genes, contribute to the etiology of complex traits. We used, as a novel approach, pathway enrichment tools to define functionally related genes that are consistently up- or down-regulated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods: We started the analysis with 242 unique annotated genes that had been reported by any of three recent meta-analyses covering GEP studies on genes differentially expressed in carcinoma vs normal mucosa. Most of these genes (218, 91.9% had been reported in at least three GEP studies. These 242 genes were submitted to bioinformatic analysis using a total of nine tools to detect enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO categories or Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. As a final consistency criterion the pathway categories had to be enriched by several tools to be taken into consideration. Results: Our pathway-based enrichment analysis identified the categories of ribosomal protein constituents, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, carbonic anhydrase isozymes, and a general category related to inflammation and cellular response as significantly and consistently overrepresented entities. Conclusions: We triaged the genes covered by the published GEP literature on colorectal carcinogenesis and subjected them to multiple enrichment tools in order to identify the consistently enriched gene categories. These turned out to have known functional relationships to cancer development and thus deserve further investigation.

  19. A sequence-based approach to identify reference genes for gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chari Raj

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important consideration when analyzing both microarray and quantitative PCR expression data is the selection of appropriate genes as endogenous controls or reference genes. This step is especially critical when identifying genes differentially expressed between datasets. Moreover, reference genes suitable in one context (e.g. lung cancer may not be suitable in another (e.g. breast cancer. Currently, the main approach to identify reference genes involves the mining of expression microarray data for highly expressed and relatively constant transcripts across a sample set. A caveat here is the requirement for transcript normalization prior to analysis, and measurements obtained are relative, not absolute. Alternatively, as sequencing-based technologies provide digital quantitative output, absolute quantification ensues, and reference gene identification becomes more accurate. Methods Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE profiles of non-malignant and malignant lung samples were compared using a permutation test to identify the most stably expressed genes across all samples. Subsequently, the specificity of the reference genes was evaluated across multiple tissue types, their constancy of expression was assessed using quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR, and their impact on differential expression analysis of microarray data was evaluated. Results We show that (i conventional references genes such as ACTB and GAPDH are highly variable between cancerous and non-cancerous samples, (ii reference genes identified for lung cancer do not perform well for other cancer types (breast and brain, (iii reference genes identified through SAGE show low variability using qPCR in a different cohort of samples, and (iv normalization of a lung cancer gene expression microarray dataset with or without our reference genes, yields different results for differential gene expression and subsequent analyses. Specifically, key established pathways in lung

  20. Large-scale gene-centric meta-analysis across 32 studies identifies multiple lipid loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselbergs, Folkert W; Guo, Yiran; van Iperen, Erik P A; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Tragante, Vinicius; Lanktree, Matthew B; Lange, Leslie A; Almoguera, Berta; Appelman, Yolande E; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Beitelshees, Amber L; Bhangale, Tushar R; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Gaunt, Tom R; Gong, Yan; Hopewell, Jemma C; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E; Langaee, Taimour Y; Li, Mingyao; Li, Yun R; Liu, Kiang; McDonough, Caitrin W; Meijs, Matthijs F L; Middelberg, Rita P S; Musunuru, Kiran; Nelson, Christopher P; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankow, James S; Pankratz, Nathan; Rafelt, Suzanne; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Romaine, Simon P R; Schork, Nicholas J; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shen, Haiqing; Smith, Erin N; Tischfield, Sam E; van der Most, Peter J; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Verweij, Niek; Volcik, Kelly A; Zhang, Li; Bailey, Kent R; Bailey, Kristian M; Bauer, Florianne; Boer, Jolanda M A; Braund, Peter S; Burt, Amber; Burton, Paul R; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Chen, Wei; Cooper-Dehoff, Rhonda M; Cupples, L Adrienne; deJong, Jonas S; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Fornage, Myriam; Furlong, Clement E; Glazer, Nicole; Gums, John G; Hastie, Claire; Holmes, Michael V; Illig, Thomas; Kirkland, Susan A; Kivimaki, Mika; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E; Kooperberg, Charles; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kumari, Meena; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Mallela, Laya; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Ordovas, Jose; Ouwehand, Willem H; Post, Wendy S; Saxena, Richa; Scharnagl, Hubert; Schreiner, Pamela J; Shah, Tina; Shields, Denis C; Shimbo, Daichi; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Stolk, Ronald P; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Taylor, Herman A; Topol, Eric J; Toskala, Elina; van Pelt, Joost L; van Setten, Jessica; Yusuf, Salim; Whittaker, John C; Zwinderman, A H; Anand, Sonia S; Balmforth, Anthony J; Berenson, Gerald S; Bezzina, Connie R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P; Caulfield, Mark J; Clarke, Robert; Connell, John M; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Davidson, Karina W; Day, Ian N M; de Bakker, Paul I W; Doevendans, Pieter A; Dominiczak, Anna F; Hall, Alistair S; Hartman, Catharina A; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hillege, Hans L; Hofker, Marten H; Humphries, Steve E; Jarvik, Gail P; Johnson, Julie A; Kaess, Bernhard M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lawlor, Debbie A; März, Winfried; Melander, Olle; Mitchell, Braxton D; Montgomery, Grant W; Munroe, Patricia B; Murray, Sarah S; Newhouse, Stephen J; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce; Redline, Susan; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Schunkert, Heribert; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Silverstein, Roy L; Stanton, Alice; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D; Tsai, Michael Y; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, Ellen; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Watkins, Hugh; Wilde, Arthur A M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Whitfield, John B; Hovingh, G Kees; Ballantyne, Christie M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Reilly, Muredach P; Martin, Nicholas G; Wilson, James G; Rader, Daniel J; Samani, Nilesh J; Reiner, Alex P; Hegele, Robert A; Kastelein, John J P; Hingorani, Aroon D; Talmud, Philippa J; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elbers, Clara C; Keating, Brendan J; Drenos, Fotios

    2012-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many SNPs underlying variations in plasma-lipid levels. We explore whether additional loci associated with plasma-lipid phenotypes, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), and triglycerides (TGs), can be identified by a dense gene-centric approach. Our meta-analysis of 32 studies in 66,240 individuals of European ancestry was based on the custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) covering ∼2,000 candidate genes. SNP-lipid associations were replicated either in a cohort comprising an additional 24,736 samples or within the Global Lipid Genetic Consortium. We identified four, six, ten, and four unreported SNPs in established lipid genes for HDL-C, LDL-C, TC, and TGs, respectively. We also identified several lipid-related SNPs in previously unreported genes: DGAT2, HCAR2, GPIHBP1, PPARG, and FTO for HDL-C; SOCS3, APOH, SPTY2D1, BRCA2, and VLDLR for LDL-C; SOCS3, UGT1A1, BRCA2, UBE3B, FCGR2A, CHUK, and INSIG2 for TC; and SERPINF2, C4B, GCK, GATA4, INSR, and LPAL2 for TGs. The proportion of explained phenotypic variance in the subset of studies providing individual-level data was 9.9% for HDL-C, 9.5% for LDL-C, 10.3% for TC, and 8.0% for TGs. This large meta-analysis of lipid phenotypes with the use of a dense gene-centric approach identified multiple SNPs not previously described in established lipid genes and several previously unknown loci. The explained phenotypic variance from this approach was comparable to that from a meta-analysis of GWAS data, suggesting that a focused genotyping approach can further increase the understanding of heritability of plasma lipids. PMID:23063622

  1. Cluster analysis for identifying sub-groups and selecting potential discriminatory variables in human encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowcroft Natasha S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitis is an acute clinical syndrome of the central nervous system (CNS, often associated with fatal outcome or permanent damage, including cognitive and behavioural impairment, affective disorders and epileptic seizures. Infection of the central nervous system is considered to be a major cause of encephalitis and more than 100 different pathogens have been recognized as causative agents. However, a large proportion of cases have unknown disease etiology. Methods We perform hierarchical cluster analysis on a multicenter England encephalitis data set with the aim of identifying sub-groups in human encephalitis. We use the simple matching similarity measure which is appropriate for binary data sets and performed variable selection using cluster heatmaps. We also use heatmaps to visually assess underlying patterns in the data, identify the main clinical and laboratory features and identify potential risk factors associated with encephalitis. Results Our results identified fever, personality and behavioural change, headache and lethargy as the main characteristics of encephalitis. Diagnostic variables such as brain scan and measurements from cerebrospinal fluids are also identified as main indicators of encephalitis. Our analysis revealed six major clusters in the England encephalitis data set. However, marked within-cluster heterogeneity is observed in some of the big clusters indicating possible sub-groups. Overall, the results show that patients are clustered according to symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents. Exposure variables such as recent infection, sick person contact and animal contact have been identified as potential risk factors. Conclusions It is in general assumed and is a common practice to group encephalitis cases according to disease etiology. However, our results indicate that patients are clustered with respect to mainly symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents

  2. Use of Antibiotic Resistance Analysis To Identify Nonpoint Sources of Fecal Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Wiggins, B A; Andrews, R. W.; Conway, R. A.; Corr, C. L.; Dobratz, E. J.; Dougherty, D. P.; Eppard, J. R.; Knupp, S. R.; Limjoco, M. C.; Mettenburg, J. M.; Rinehardt, J. M.; Sonsino, J.; Torrijos, R. L.; Zimmerman, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the reliability and repeatability of antibiotic resistance analysis as a method of identifying the sources of fecal pollution in surface water and groundwater. Four large sets of isolates of fecal streptococci (from 2,635 to 5,990 isolates per set) were obtained from 236 samples of human sewage and septage, cattle and poultry feces, and pristine waters. The patterns of resistance of the isolates to each of four concentrations of up to nine antibiotics were a...

  3. Differentially expressed genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified through serial analysis of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hustinx, Steven R; Cao, Dengfeng; Maitra, Anirban;

    2004-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool for the discovery of novel tumor markers. The publicly available online SAGE libraries of normal and neoplastic tissues (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/SAGE/) have recently been expanded; in addition, a more complete annotation of the human...... of this program. Novel differentially expressed genes in a cancer type can be identified by revisiting updated and expanded SAGE databases. TAGmapper should prove to be a powerful tool for the discovery of novel tumor markers through assignment of uncharacterized SAGE tags....

  4. Identifying Chemistry Prospective Teachers' Difficulties Encountered in Practice of The Subject Area Textbook Analysis Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Bak Kibar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Prospective teachers should already be aware of possible mistakes in the textbooks and have knowledge of textbooks selection procedure and criteria. These knowledge is tried to being gained to prospective teachers at the Subject Area Textbook Analysis Course. It is important to identify the difficulties they encountered and the skills they gained from the point of implementing effectively this lesson. To research these problems, a case study was realized with 38 student teachers from Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education Chemistry Teaching Program at the Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Fatih Education. Results suggest that prospective teachers gained the knowledge of research, teaching life, writing report, and analyzing textbook. Also, it was determined that they had difficulties in group working, literature reviewing, report writing, analyzing textbook, and critical analysis.

  5. Towards a typology of business process management professionals: identifying patterns of competences through latent semantic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Oliver; Schmiedel, Theresa; Gorbacheva, Elena; vom Brocke, Jan

    2016-01-01

    While researchers have analysed the organisational competences that are required for successful Business Process Management (BPM) initiatives, individual BPM competences have not yet been studied in detail. In this study, latent semantic analysis is used to examine a collection of 1507 BPM-related job advertisements in order to develop a typology of BPM professionals. This empirical analysis reveals distinct ideal types and profiles of BPM professionals on several levels of abstraction. A closer look at these ideal types and profiles confirms that BPM is a boundary-spanning field that requires interdisciplinary sets of competence that range from technical competences to business and systems competences. Based on the study's findings, it is posited that individual and organisational alignment with the identified ideal types and profiles is likely to result in high employability and organisational BPM success.

  6. Whole Genome Analysis of Injectional Anthrax Identifies Two Disease Clusters Spanning More Than 13 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Keim

    2015-11-01

    Lay Person Interpretation: Injectional anthrax has been plaguing heroin drug users across Europe for more than 10 years. In order to better understand this outbreak, we assessed genomic relationships of all available injectional anthrax strains from four countries spanning a >12 year period. Very few differences were identified using genome-based analysis, but these differentiated the isolates into two distinct clusters. This strongly supports a hypothesis of at least two separate anthrax spore contamination events perhaps during the drug production processes. Identification of two events would not have been possible from standard epidemiological analysis. These comprehensive data will be invaluable for classifying future injectional anthrax isolates and for future geographic attribution.

  7. Quantitative assessment of in-solution digestion efficiency identifies optimal protocols for unbiased protein analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leon, Ileana R; Schwämmle, Veit; Jensen, Ole N;

    2013-01-01

    fractions. We evaluated nine trypsin-based digestion protocols, based on standard in-solution or on spin filter-aided digestion, including new optimized protocols. We investigated various reagents for protein solubilization and denaturation (dodecyl sulfate, deoxycholate, urea), several trypsin digestion...... conditions (buffer, RapiGest, deoxycholate, urea), and two methods for removal of detergents prior to analysis of peptides (acid precipitation or phase separation with ethyl acetate). Our data-independent quantitative LC-MS/MS workflow quantified over 3700 distinct peptides with 96% completeness between all...... protocols and replicates, with an average 40% protein sequence coverage and an average of 11 peptides identified per protein. Systematic quantitative and statistical analysis of physicochemical parameters demonstrated that deoxycholate-assisted in-solution digestion combined with phase transfer allows...

  8. Independent component analysis of high-resolution imaging data identifies distinct functional domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reidl, Juergen; Starke, Jens; Omer, David;

    2007-01-01

    . Here we demonstrate that principal component analysis (PCA) followed by spatial independent component analysis (sICA), can be exploited to reduce the dimensionality of data sets recorded in the olfactory bulb and the somatosensory cortex of mice as well as the visual cortex of monkeys, without loosing...... the stimulus specific responses. Different neuronal populations are separated based on their stimulus specific time courses of activation. Both, spatial and temporal response characteristics can be objectively obtained, simultaneously. In the olfactory bulb, groups of glomeruli with different response...... latencies can be identified. This is shown for recordings of olfactory receptor neuron input measured with a calcium sensitive axon tracer and for network dynamics measured with the voltage sensitive dye RH 1838. In the somatosensory cortex, barrels responding to the stimulation of single whiskers can...

  9. Hot spot analysis applied to identify ecosystem services potential in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Depellegrin, Daniel; Misiune, Ieva

    2016-04-01

    Hot spot analysis are very useful to identify areas with similar characteristics. This is important for a sustainable use of the territory, since we can identify areas that need to be protected, or restored. This is a great advantage in terms of land use planning and management, since we can allocate resources, reduce the economical costs and do a better intervention in the landscape. Ecosystem services (ES) are different according land use. Since landscape is very heterogeneous, it is of major importance understand their spatial pattern and where are located the areas that provide better ES and the others that provide less services. The objective of this work is to use hot-spot analysis to identify areas with the most valuable ES in Lithuania. CORINE land-cover (CLC) of 2006 was used as the main spatial information. This classification uses a grid of 100 m resolution and extracted a total of 31 land use types. ES ranking was carried out based on expert knowledge. They were asked to evaluate the ES potential of each different CLC from 0 (no potential) to 5 (very high potential). Hot spot analysis were evaluated using the Getis-ord test, which identifies cluster analysis available in ArcGIS toolbox. This tool identifies areas with significantly high low values and significant high values at a p level of 0.05. In this work we used hot spot analysis to assess the distribution of providing, regulating cultural and total (sum of the previous 3) ES. The Z value calculated from Getis-ord was used to statistical analysis to access the clusters of providing, regulating cultural and total ES. ES with high Z value show that they have a high number of cluster areas with high potential of ES. The results showed that the Z-score was significantly different among services (Kruskal Wallis ANOVA =834. 607, p<0.001). The Z score of providing services (0.096±2.239) were significantly higher than the total (0.093±2.045), cultural (0.080±1.979) and regulating (0.076±1.961). These

  10. Identifying Talent in Youth Sport: A Novel Methodology Using Higher-Dimensional Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Till

    Full Text Available Prediction of adult performance from early age talent identification in sport remains difficult. Talent identification research has generally been performed using univariate analysis, which ignores multivariate relationships. To address this issue, this study used a novel higher-dimensional model to orthogonalize multivariate anthropometric and fitness data from junior rugby league players, with the aim of differentiating future career attainment. Anthropometric and fitness data from 257 Under-15 rugby league players was collected. Players were grouped retrospectively according to their future career attainment (i.e., amateur, academy, professional. Players were blindly and randomly divided into an exploratory (n = 165 and validation dataset (n = 92. The exploratory dataset was used to develop and optimize a novel higher-dimensional model, which combined singular value decomposition (SVD with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Once optimized, the model was tested using the validation dataset. SVD analysis revealed 60 m sprint and agility 505 performance were the most influential characteristics in distinguishing future professional players from amateur and academy players. The exploratory dataset model was able to distinguish between future amateur and professional players with a high degree of accuracy (sensitivity = 85.7%, specificity = 71.1%; p<0.001, although it could not distinguish between future professional and academy players. The validation dataset model was able to distinguish future professionals from the rest with reasonable accuracy (sensitivity = 83.3%, specificity = 63.8%; p = 0.003. Through the use of SVD analysis it was possible to objectively identify criteria to distinguish future career attainment with a sensitivity over 80% using anthropometric and fitness data alone. As such, this suggests that SVD analysis may be a useful analysis tool for research and practice within talent identification.

  11. Identifying Talent in Youth Sport: A Novel Methodology Using Higher-Dimensional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Kevin; Jones, Ben L; Cobley, Stephen; Morley, David; O'Hara, John; Chapman, Chris; Cooke, Carlton; Beggs, Clive B

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of adult performance from early age talent identification in sport remains difficult. Talent identification research has generally been performed using univariate analysis, which ignores multivariate relationships. To address this issue, this study used a novel higher-dimensional model to orthogonalize multivariate anthropometric and fitness data from junior rugby league players, with the aim of differentiating future career attainment. Anthropometric and fitness data from 257 Under-15 rugby league players was collected. Players were grouped retrospectively according to their future career attainment (i.e., amateur, academy, professional). Players were blindly and randomly divided into an exploratory (n = 165) and validation dataset (n = 92). The exploratory dataset was used to develop and optimize a novel higher-dimensional model, which combined singular value decomposition (SVD) with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Once optimized, the model was tested using the validation dataset. SVD analysis revealed 60 m sprint and agility 505 performance were the most influential characteristics in distinguishing future professional players from amateur and academy players. The exploratory dataset model was able to distinguish between future amateur and professional players with a high degree of accuracy (sensitivity = 85.7%, specificity = 71.1%; p<0.001), although it could not distinguish between future professional and academy players. The validation dataset model was able to distinguish future professionals from the rest with reasonable accuracy (sensitivity = 83.3%, specificity = 63.8%; p = 0.003). Through the use of SVD analysis it was possible to objectively identify criteria to distinguish future career attainment with a sensitivity over 80% using anthropometric and fitness data alone. As such, this suggests that SVD analysis may be a useful analysis tool for research and practice within talent identification. PMID:27224653

  12. Identifying the oil price-macroeconomy relationship: An empirical mode decomposition analysis of US data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper employs the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method to filter cyclical components of US quarterly gross domestic product (GDP) and quarterly average oil price (West Texas Intermediate-WTI). The method is adaptive and applicable to non-linear and non-stationary data. A correlation analysis of the resulting components is performed and examined for insights into the relationship between oil and the economy. Several components of this relationship are identified. However, the principal one is that the medium-run component of the oil price has a negative relationship with the main cyclical component of the GDP. In addition, weak correlations suggesting a lagging, demand-driven component and a long-run component of the relationship were also identified. Comparisons of these findings with significant oil supply disruption and recession dates were supportive. The study identifies a number of lessons applicable to recent oil market events, including the eventuality of persistent oil price and economic decline following a long oil price run-up. In addition, it was found that oil market related exogenous events are associated with short- to medium-run price implications regardless of whether they lead to actual supply losses.

  13. Identifying the oil price-macroeconomy relationship. An empirical mode decomposition analysis of US data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper employs the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method to filter cyclical components of US quarterly gross domestic product (GDP) and quarterly average oil price (West Texas Intermediate - WTI). The method is adaptive and applicable to non-linear and non-stationary data. A correlation analysis of the resulting components is performed and examined for insights into the relationship between oil and the economy. Several components of this relationship are identified. However, the principal one is that the medium-run component of the oil price has a negative relationship with the main cyclical component of the GDP. In addition, weak correlations suggesting a lagging, demand-driven component and a long-run component of the relationship were also identified. Comparisons of these findings with significant oil supply disruption and recession dates were supportive. The study identifies a number of lessons applicable to recent oil market events, including the eventuality of persistent oil price and economic decline following a long oil price run-up. In addition, it was found that oil market related exogenous events are associated with short- to medium-run price implications regardless of whether they lead to actual supply losses. (author)

  14. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three Loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia M Lindgren

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580 informative for adult waist circumference (WC and waist-hip ratio (WHR. We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9x10(-11 and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9x10(-9. A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6x10(-8. The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity.

  15. Computational EST database analysis identifies a novel member of the neuropoietic cytokine family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Wang, W; Yourey, P A; Gohari, S; Zukauskas, D; Zhang, J; Ruben, S; Alderson, R F

    1999-08-19

    A novel member of the neuropoietic cytokine family has been cloned and the protein expressed and characterized. In an effort to identify novel secreted proteins, an algorithm incorporating neural network algorithms was applied to a large EST database. A full-length clone was identified that is 1710 bp in length and has a single open reading frame of 225 amino acids. This new cytokine is most homologous to cardiotrophin-1, having a similarity and an identity of 46 and 29%, respectively, and therefore we have named it cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Northern hybridization analysis identified a 1.4-kb messenger RNA that is highly expressed in spleen and peripheral leukocytes. Purified recombinant CLC induced the activation of NFkappaB and SRE reporter constructs in the TF-1, U937, and M1 cell lines. Furthermore, the signal transduction pathway for CLC was characterized in the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-MC and found to involve tyrosine phosphorylation of gp130 and STAT-1. PMID:10448081

  16. Magnaporthe oryzae MTP1 gene encodes a type Ⅲ transmembrane protein involved in conidiation and conidial germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin LU; Jian-ping LU; Xiao-dong LI; Xiao-hong LIU; Hang MIN; Fu-cheng LIN

    2008-01-01

    In this study the MTP1 gene, encoding a type Ⅲ integral transmembrane protein, was isolated fi'om the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The Mtpl protein is 520 amino acids long and is comparable to the Ytpl protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with 46% sequence similarity. Prediction programs and MTP1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion expression results indicate that Mtpl is a protein located at several membranes in the cytoplasm. The functions of the MTP1 gene in the growth and development of the fungus were studied using an MTP1 gene knockout mutant. The MTP1 gene was primarily ex-pressed at the hyphal and conidial stages and is necessary for conidiation and conidial germination, but is not required for patho-genicity. The △mtpl mutant grew more efficiently than the wild type strain on non-fermentable carbon sources, implying that the MTP1 gene has a unique role in respiratory growth and carbon source use.

  17. In-vitro evaluation of fungicides, plant extracts and bio-control agents against rice blast pathogen magnaporthe oryzae couch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among 5 fungicides viz., Thiophanate-methyl, Carbendazim, Fosetyl-aluminium, Mancozeb and Copper oxychloride, used against the Magnaporthe oryzae, only Mancozeb appeared as the highly effective fungicide that completely inhibited the mycelial growth of the fungus. All other fungicides showed little effect at higher concentrations. The extracts of garlic (Allium sativum L.), neem (Azadirachta indica L.) and calatropis (Calotropis procera L.) when used against M. oryzae by food poisoning method, only higher dose of garlic completely inhibited the mycelial growth of the test fungus. Six bio-control agents viz., Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma polysporum, Trichoderma pseudokoningii, Gliocladium virens, Paecilomyces variotii and Paecilomyces lilacinus were used. Maximum mycelial inhibition of M. oryzae was provided by P. lilacinus followed by Trichoderma spp. (author)

  18. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Eli A.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Barton, Anne; Bowes, John; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Burtt, Noel P.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Coblyn, Jonathan; Coenen, Marieke JH; Costenbader, Karen H.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Cui, Jing; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; De Jager, Phillip L.; Ding, Bo; Emery, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Harrison, Pille; Hocking, Lynne J.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Ke, Xiayi; Lee, Annette T.; Liu, Xiangdong; Martin, Paul; Morgan, Ann W.; Padyukov, Leonid; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Radstake, Timothy RDJ; Reid, David M.; Seielstad, Mark; Seldin, Michael F.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Steer, Sophia; Tak, Paul P.; Thomson, Wendy; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van Riel, Piet LCM; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Wordsworth, Paul; Wijmenga, Cisca; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Toes, Rene E. M.; de Vries, Niek; Begovich, Ann B.; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    To identify novel genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody positive RA cases and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 RA cases and 8,806 controls. Of 34 SNPs selected for replication, 7 novel RA risk alleles were identified at genome-wide significance (P<5×10−8) in analysis of all 41,282 samples. The associated SNPs are near genes of known immune function, including IL6ST, SPRED2, RBPJ, CCR6, IRF5, and PXK. We also refined the risk alleles at two established RA risk loci (IL2RA and CCL21) and confirmed the association at AFF3. These new associations bring the total number of confirmed RA risk loci to 31 among individuals of European ancestry. An additional 11 SNPs replicated at P<0.05, many of which are validated autoimmune risk alleles, suggesting that most represent bona fide RA risk alleles. PMID:20453842

  19. Using FAME Analysis to Compare, Differentiate, and Identify Multiple Nematode Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekora, Nicholas S.; Agudelo, Paula; van Santen, Edzard; McInroy, John A.

    2009-01-01

    We have adapted the Sherlock® Microbial Identification system for identification of plant parasitic nematodes based on their fatty acid profiles. Fatty acid profiles of 12 separate plant parasitic nematode species have been determined using this system. Additionally, separate profiles have been developed for Rotylenchulus reniformis and Meloidogyne incognita based on their host plant, four species and three races within the Meloidogyne genus, and three life stages of Heterodera glycines. Statistically, 85% of these profiles can be delimited from one another; the specific comparisons between the cyst and vermiform stages of H. glycines, M. hapla and M. arenaria, and M. arenaria and M. javanica cannot be segregated using canonical analysis. By incorporating each of these fatty acid profiles into the Sherlock® Analysis Software, 20 library entries were created. While there was some similarity among profiles, all entries correctly identified the proper organism to genus, species, race, life stage, and host at greater than 86% accuracy. The remaining 14% were correctly identified to genus, although species and race may not be correct due to the underlying variables of host or life stage. These results are promising and indicate that this library could be used for diagnostics labs to increase response time. PMID:22736811

  20. Root Source Analysis/ValuStream[Trade Mark] - A Methodology for Identifying and Managing Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard Lee

    2008-01-01

    Root Source Analysis (RoSA) is a systems engineering methodology that has been developed at NASA over the past five years. It is designed to reduce costs, schedule, and technical risks by systematically examining critical assumptions and the state of the knowledge needed to bring to fruition the products that satisfy mission-driven requirements, as defined for each element of the Work (or Product) Breakdown Structure (WBS or PBS). This methodology is sometimes referred to as the ValuStream method, as inherent in the process is the linking and prioritizing of uncertainties arising from knowledge shortfalls directly to the customer's mission driven requirements. RoSA and ValuStream are synonymous terms. RoSA is not simply an alternate or improved method for identifying risks. It represents a paradigm shift. The emphasis is placed on identifying very specific knowledge shortfalls and assumptions that are the root sources of the risk (the why), rather than on assessing the WBS product(s) themselves (the what). In so doing RoSA looks forward to anticipate, identify, and prioritize knowledge shortfalls and assumptions that are likely to create significant uncertainties/ risks (as compared to Root Cause Analysis, which is most often used to look back to discover what was not known, or was assumed, that caused the failure). Experience indicates that RoSA, with its primary focus on assumptions and the state of the underlying knowledge needed to define, design, build, verify, and operate the products, can identify critical risks that historically have been missed by the usual approaches (i.e., design review process and classical risk identification methods). Further, the methodology answers four critical questions for decision makers and risk managers: 1. What s been included? 2. What's been left out? 3. How has it been validated? 4. Has the real source of the uncertainty/ risk been identified, i.e., is the perceived problem the real problem? Users of the RoSA methodology

  1. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Peter G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2 and flotillin-1 (FLOT1, were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle. Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary h

  2. Methylation Linear Discriminant Analysis (MLDA for identifying differentially methylated CpG islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vass J Keith

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands is strongly correlated to transcriptional gene silencing and epigenetic maintenance of the silenced state. As well as its role in tumor development, CpG island methylation contributes to the acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy. Differential Methylation Hybridisation (DMH is one technique used for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. The study of such microarray data sets should ideally account for the specific biological features of DNA methylation and the non-symmetrical distribution of the ratios of unmethylated and methylated sequences hybridised on the array. We have therefore developed a novel algorithm tailored to this type of data, Methylation Linear Discriminant Analysis (MLDA. Results MLDA was programmed in R (version 2.7.0 and the package is available at CRAN 1. This approach utilizes linear regression models of non-normalised hybridisation data to define methylation status. Log-transformed signal intensities of unmethylated controls on the microarray are used as a reference. The signal intensities of DNA samples digested with methylation sensitive restriction enzymes and mock digested are then transformed to the likelihood of a locus being methylated using this reference. We tested the ability of MLDA to identify loci differentially methylated as analysed by DMH between cisplatin sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. MLDA identified 115 differentially methylated loci and 23 out of 26 of these loci have been independently validated by Methylation Specific PCR and/or bisulphite pyrosequencing. Conclusion MLDA has advantages for analyzing methylation data from CpG island microarrays, since there is a clear rational for the definition of methylation status, it uses DMH data without between-group normalisation and is less influenced by cross-hybridisation of loci. The MLDA algorithm successfully identified differentially methylated loci between two classes of

  3. Using EMMA and MIX analysis to assess mixing ratios and to identify hydrochemical reactions in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubau, Isabel; Vàzquez-Suñé, Enric; Jurado, Anna; Carrera, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    This study presents a methodology using an end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) and MIX to compute mixing ratios and to identify hydrochemical reactions in groundwater. The methodology consists of (1) identifying the potential sources of recharge, (2) characterising recharge sources and mixed water samples using hydrogeochemistry, (3) selecting chemical species to be used in the analysis and (4) calculating mixing ratios and identification of hydrochemical reactions in groundwater. This approach has been applied in the Besòs River Delta area, where we have collected 51 groundwater samples and a long data register of the hydrogeochemistry of the Besòs River created by the Catalan Water Agency is also available. The EMMA performed in the Besòs River suggests that 3 end-members are required to explain its temporal variability, accounting for the species chloride, sulphate, sodium, bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, potassium, ammonium, total nitrogen, and electrical conductivity. One river end-member is from the wet periods (W1), and two are from dry periods (D1 and D2). These end-members have been used to compute mixing ratios in groundwater samples because the Besòs River is considered the main recharge source for the aquifer. Overall, dry season end-members dominated over the wet season end-member, in a proportion of 4:1. Moreover, when departures from the mixing line exist, geochemical processes might be identified. Redox processes, carbonate dissolution/precipitation and ion exchange processes may occur in Besòs Delta aquifer. PMID:24246935

  4. Platelet-Related Variants Identified by Exomechip Meta-analysis in 157,293 Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, John D; Chami, Nathalie; Kacprowski, Tim; Nomura, Akihiro; Chen, Ming-Huei; Yanek, Lisa R; Tajuddin, Salman M; Schick, Ursula M; Slater, Andrew J; Pankratz, Nathan; Polfus, Linda; Schurmann, Claudia; Giri, Ayush; Brody, Jennifer A; Lange, Leslie A; Manichaikul, Ani; Hill, W David; Pazoki, Raha; Elliot, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Gao, He; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Mathias, Rasika A; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Burt, Amber; Crosslin, David R; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nikus, Kjell; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Kähönen, Mika; Raitoharju, Emma; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Cushman, Mary; Zakai, Neil A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Raffield, Laura M; Quarells, Rakale; Willer, Cristen J; Peloso, Gina M; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Liu, Dajiang J; Deloukas, Panos; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fornage, Myriam; Richard, Melissa; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Rioux, John D; Dube, Marie-Pierre; de Denus, Simon; Lu, Yingchang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Smith, Albert Vernon; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Torstenson, Eric S; Liu, Yongmei; Tracy, Russell P; Rotter, Jerome I; Rich, Stephen S; Highland, Heather M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Li, Jin; Lange, Ethan; Wilson, James G; Mihailov, Evelin; Mägi, Reedik; Hirschhorn, Joel; Metspalu, Andres; Esko, Tõnu; Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Nalls, Mike A; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Engström, Gunnar; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey D; Floyd, James S; Bartz, Traci M; Rice, Kenneth M; Psaty, Bruce M; Starr, J M; Liewald, David C M; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Greinacher, Andreas; Völker, Uwe; Thiele, Thomas; Völzke, Henry; van Rooij, Frank J A; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Ganesh, Santhi K; Kathiresan, Sekar; Faraday, Nauder; Auer, Paul L; Reiner, Alex P; Lettre, Guillaume; Johnson, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Platelet production, maintenance, and clearance are tightly controlled processes indicative of platelets' important roles in hemostasis and thrombosis. Platelets are common targets for primary and secondary prevention of several conditions. They are monitored clinically by complete blood counts, specifically with measurements of platelet count (PLT) and mean platelet volume (MPV). Identifying genetic effects on PLT and MPV can provide mechanistic insights into platelet biology and their role in disease. Therefore, we formed the Blood Cell Consortium (BCX) to perform a large-scale meta-analysis of Exomechip association results for PLT and MPV in 157,293 and 57,617 individuals, respectively. Using the low-frequency/rare coding variant-enriched Exomechip genotyping array, we sought to identify genetic variants associated with PLT and MPV. In addition to confirming 47 known PLT and 20 known MPV associations, we identified 32 PLT and 18 MPV associations not previously observed in the literature across the allele frequency spectrum, including rare large effect (FCER1A), low-frequency (IQGAP2, MAP1A, LY75), and common (ZMIZ2, SMG6, PEAR1, ARFGAP3/PACSIN2) variants. Several variants associated with PLT/MPV (PEAR1, MRVI1, PTGES3) were also associated with platelet reactivity. In concurrent BCX analyses, there was overlap of platelet-associated variants with red (MAP1A, TMPRSS6, ZMIZ2) and white (PEAR1, ZMIZ2, LY75) blood cell traits, suggesting common regulatory pathways with shared genetic architecture among these hematopoietic lineages. Our large-scale Exomechip analyses identified previously undocumented associations with platelet traits and further indicate that several complex quantitative hematological, lipid, and cardiovascular traits share genetic factors.

  5. Real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tatsuhiro; Tamura, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Since social media started getting more attention from users on the Internet, social media has been one of the most important information source in the world. Especially, with the increasing popularity of social media, data posted on social media sites are rapidly becoming collective intelligence, which is a term used to refer to new media that is displacing traditional media. In this paper, we focus on geotagged tweets on the Twitter site. These geotagged tweets are referred to as georeferenced documents because they include not only a short text message, but also the documents' posting time and location. Many researchers have been tackling the development of new data mining techniques for georeferenced documents to identify and analyze emergency topics, such as natural disasters, weather, diseases, and other incidents. In particular, the utilization of geotagged tweets to identify and analyze natural disasters has received much attention from administrative agencies recently because some case studies have achieved compelling results. In this paper, we propose a novel real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics. The aim of our new application is to provide new platforms that can identify and analyze the localities of emergency topics. The proposed application is composed of three core computational intelligence techniques: the Naive Bayes classifier technique, the spatiotemporal clustering technique, and the burst detection technique. Moreover, we have implemented two types of application interface: a Web application interface and an android application interface. To evaluate the proposed application, we have implemented a real-time weather observation system embedded the proposed application. we used actual crawling geotagged tweets posted on the Twitter site. The weather observation system successfully detected bursty local areas related to observed emergency weather topics. PMID:25918679

  6. Transcriptomic analysis using olive varieties and breeding progenies identify candidate genes involved in plant architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José eGonzález Plaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2,252 differentially expressed genes associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  7. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  8. Co-expression Analysis Identifies CRC and AP1 the Regulator of Arabidopsis Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinxin Han; Linlin Yin; Hongwei Xue

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) play crucial rules in signal transduction and plant development,however,the regulation of FA metabolism is still poorly understood.To study the relevant regulatory network,fifty-eight FA biosynthesis genes including de novo synthases,desaturases and elongases were selected as "guide genes" to construct the co-expression network.Calculation of the correlation between all Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) genes with each guide gene by Arabidopsis co-expression dating mining tools (ACT)identifies 797 candidate FA-correlated genes.Gene ontology (GO) analysis of these co-expressed genes showed they are tightly correlated to photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism,and function in many processes.Interestingly,63 transcription factors (TFs) were identified as candidate FA biosynthesis regulators and 8 TF families are enriched.Two TF genes,CRC and AP1,both correlating with 8 FA guide genes,were further characterized.Analyses of the ap1 and crc mutant showed the altered total FA composition of mature seeds.The contents of palmitoleic acid,stearic acid,arachidic acid and eicosadienoic acid are decreased,whereas that of oleic acid is increased in ap1 and crc seeds,which is consistent with the qRT-PCR analysis revealing the suppressed expression of the corresponding guide genes.In addition,yeast one-hybrid analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that CRC can bind to the promoter regions of KCS7 and KCS15,indicating that CRC may directly regulate FA biosynthesis.

  9. Identifying sleep apnea syndrome using heart rate and breathing effort variation analysis based on ballistocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichao Zhao; Hongbo Ni; Xingshe Zhou; Yalong Song; Tianben Wang

    2015-08-01

    Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) is regarded as one of the most common sleep-related breathing disorders, which can severely affect sleep quality. Since SAS is usually accompanied with the cyclical heart rate variation (HRV), many studies have been conducted on heart rate (HR) to identify it at an earlier stage. While most related work mainly based on clinical devices or signals (e.g., polysomnography (PSG), electrocardiography (ECG)), in this paper we focus on the ballistocardiographic (BCG) signal which is obtained in a non-invasive way. Moreover, as the precision and reliability of BCG signal are not so good as PSG or ECG, we propose a fine-grained feature extraction and analysis approach in SAS recognition. Our analysis takes both the basic HRV features and the breathing effort variation into consideration during different sleep stages rather than the whole night. The breathing effort refers to the mechanical interaction between respiration and BCG signal when SAS events occur, which is independent from autonomous nervous system (ANS) modulations. Specifically, a novel method named STC-Min is presented to extract the breathing effort variation feature. The basic HRV features depict the ANS modulations on HR and Sample Entropy and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis are applied for the evaluations. All the extracted features along with personal factors are fed into the knowledge-based support vector machine (KSVM) classification model, and the prior knowledge is based on dataset distribution and domain knowledge. Experimental results on 42 subjects in 3 nights validate the effectiveness of the methods and features in identifying SAS (90.46% precision rate and 88.89% recall rate). PMID:26737303

  10. Genome-wide analysis of over 106 000 individuals identifies 9 neuroticism-associated loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D J; Escott-Price, V; Davies, G; Bailey, M E S; Colodro-Conde, L; Ward, J; Vedernikov, A; Marioni, R; Cullen, B; Lyall, D; Hagenaars, S P; Liewald, D C M; Luciano, M; Gale, C R; Ritchie, S J; Hayward, C; Nicholl, B; Bulik-Sullivan, B; Adams, M; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Graham, N; Mackay, D; Evans, J; Smith, B H; Porteous, D J; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Holmans, P; McIntosh, A M; Pell, J P; Deary, I J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-06-01

    Neuroticism is a personality trait of fundamental importance for psychological well-being and public health. It is strongly associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and several other psychiatric conditions. Although neuroticism is heritable, attempts to identify the alleles involved in previous studies have been limited by relatively small sample sizes. Here we report a combined meta-analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS) of neuroticism that includes 91 370 participants from the UK Biobank cohort, 6659 participants from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) and 8687 participants from a QIMR (Queensland Institute of Medical Research) Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR) cohort. All participants were assessed using the same neuroticism instrument, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R-S) Short Form's Neuroticism scale. We found a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability estimate for neuroticism of ∼15% (s.e.=0.7%). Meta-analysis identified nine novel loci associated with neuroticism. The strongest evidence for association was at a locus on chromosome 8 (P=1.5 × 10(-15)) spanning 4 Mb and containing at least 36 genes. Other associated loci included interesting candidate genes on chromosome 1 (GRIK3 (glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 3)), chromosome 4 (KLHL2 (Kelch-like protein 2)), chromosome 17 (CRHR1 (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein Tau)) and on chromosome 18 (CELF4 (CUGBP elav-like family member 4)). We found no evidence for genetic differences in the common allelic architecture of neuroticism by sex. By comparing our findings with those of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortia, we identified a strong genetic correlation between neuroticism and MDD and a less strong but significant genetic correlation with schizophrenia, although not with bipolar disorder. Polygenic risk scores derived from the primary UK Biobank sample captured

  11. Identifying typical patterns of vulnerability: A 5-step approach based on cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sietz, Diana; Lüdeke, Matthias; Kok, Marcel; Lucas, Paul; Carsten, Walther; Janssen, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Specific processes that shape the vulnerability of socio-ecological systems to climate, market and other stresses derive from diverse background conditions. Within the multitude of vulnerability-creating mechanisms, distinct processes recur in various regions inspiring research on typical patterns of vulnerability. The vulnerability patterns display typical combinations of the natural and socio-economic properties that shape a systems' vulnerability to particular stresses. Based on the identification of a limited number of vulnerability patterns, pattern analysis provides an efficient approach to improving our understanding of vulnerability and decision-making for vulnerability reduction. However, current pattern analyses often miss explicit descriptions of their methods and pay insufficient attention to the validity of their groupings. Therefore, the question arises as to how do we identify typical vulnerability patterns in order to enhance our understanding of a systems' vulnerability to stresses? A cluster-based pattern recognition applied at global and local levels is scrutinised with a focus on an applicable methodology and practicable insights. Taking the example of drylands, this presentation demonstrates the conditions necessary to identify typical vulnerability patterns. They are summarised in five methodological steps comprising the elicitation of relevant cause-effect hypotheses and the quantitative indication of mechanisms as well as an evaluation of robustness, a validation and a ranking of the identified patterns. Reflecting scale-dependent opportunities, a global study is able to support decision-making with insights into the up-scaling of interventions when available funds are limited. In contrast, local investigations encourage an outcome-based validation. This constitutes a crucial step in establishing the credibility of the patterns and hence their suitability for informing extension services and individual decisions. In this respect, working at

  12. VIBRATION ANALYSIS ON A COMPOSITE BEAM TO IDENTIFY DAMAGE AND DAMAGE SEVERITY USING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V.V.Ramanamurthy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to develop a damage detection method in a composite cantilever beam with an edge crack has been studied using finite element method. A number of analytical, numerical andexperimental techniques are available for the study of damage identification in beams. Studies were carried out for three different types of analysis on a composite cantilever beam with an edge crack as damage. The material used in this analysis is glass-epoxy composite material. The finite element formulation was carried out in the analysis section of the package, known as ANSYS. The types of vibration analysis studied on a composite beam are Modal, Harmonic andTransient analysis. The crack is modeled such that the cantilever beam is replaced with two intact beams with the crack as additional boundary condition. Damage algorithms are used to identify and locate the damage. Damage index method is also used to find the severity of the damage. The results obtained from modal analysis were compared with the transient analysis results.The vibration-based damage detection methods are based on the fact that changes of physical properties (stiffness, mass and damping due to damage will manifest themselves as changes in the structural modal parameters (natural frequencies, mode shapes and modal damping. The task is then to monitor the selected indicators derived from modal parameters to distinguish between undamaged and damaged states. However, the quantitative changes of global modal parameters are not sufficiently sensitive to a local damage. The proposed approach, on the other hand, interprets the dynamic changes caused by damage in a different way. Although the basis for vibration-based damage detection appears intuitive, the implementation in real structures may encounter many significant challenges. The most fundamental issue is the fact that damage typically is a local phenomenon and may not dramatically influence the global dynamic response of a

  13. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  14. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn's disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn's disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  15. Shared Genetic Etiology between Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease Identified by Bioinformatics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Cui, Zhen; Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are two major health issues, and increasing evidence in recent years supports the close connection between these two diseases. The present study aimed to explore the shared genetic etiology underlying T2D and AD based on the available genome wide association studies (GWAS) data collected through August 2014. We performed bioinformatics analyses based on GWAS data of T2D and AD on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), gene, and pathway levels, respectively. Six SNPs (rs111789331, rs12721046, rs12721051, rs4420638, rs56131196, and rs66626994) were identified for the first time to be shared genetic factors between T2D and AD. Further functional enrichment analysis found lipid metabolism related pathways to be common between these two disorders. The findings may have important implications for future mechanistic and interventional studies for T2D and AD. PMID:26639962

  16. Identifying time measurement tampering in the traversal time and hop count analysis (TTHCA) wormhole detection algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jonny; Dooley, Laurence S; Pulkkis, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Traversal time and hop count analysis (TTHCA) is a recent wormhole detection algorithm for mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) which provides enhanced detection performance against all wormhole attack variants and network types. TTHCA involves each node measuring the processing time of routing packets during the route discovery process and then delivering the measurements to the source node. In a participation mode (PM) wormhole where malicious nodes appear in the routing tables as legitimate nodes, the time measurements can potentially be altered so preventing TTHCA from successfully detecting the wormhole. This paper analyses the prevailing conditions for time tampering attacks to succeed for PM wormholes, before introducing an extension to the TTHCA detection algorithm called ∆T Vector which is designed to identify time tampering, while preserving low false positive rates. Simulation results confirm that the ∆T Vector extension is able to effectively detect time tampering attacks, thereby providing an important security enhancement to the TTHCA algorithm. PMID:23686143

  17. Identifying Time Measurement Tampering in the Traversal Time and Hop Count Analysis (TTHCA Wormhole Detection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Karlsson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traversal time and hop count analysis (TTHCA is a recent wormhole detection algorithm for mobile ad hoc networks (MANET which provides enhanced detection performance against all wormhole attack variants and network types. TTHCA involves each node measuring the processing time of routing packets during the route discovery process and then delivering the measurements to the source node. In a participation mode (PM wormhole where malicious nodes appear in the routing tables as legitimate nodes, the time measurements can potentially be altered so preventing TTHCA from successfully detecting the wormhole. This paper analyses the prevailing conditions for time tampering attacks to succeed for PM wormholes, before introducing an extension to the TTHCA detection algorithm called ∆T Vector which is designed to identify time tampering, while preserving low false positive rates. Simulation results confirm that the ∆T Vector extension is able to effectively detect time tampering attacks, thereby providing an important security enhancement to the TTHCA algorithm.

  18. Confocal Raman data analysis enables identifying apoptosis of MCF-7 cells caused by anticancer drug paclitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Middendorp, Elodie; Panayotov, Ivan; Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves Collard; Vegh, Attila-Gergely; Ramakrishnan, Sathish; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frederic

    2013-05-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy is a noninvasive, label-free imaging technique used to study apoptosis of live MCF-7 cells. The images are based on Raman spectra of cells components, and their apoptosis is monitored through diffusion of cytochrome c in cytoplasm. K-mean clustering is used to identify mitochondria in cells, and correlation analysis provides the cytochrome c distribution inside the cells. Our results demonstrate that incubation of cells for 3 h with 10 μM of paclitaxel does not induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. On the contrary, incubation for 30 min at a higher concentration (100 μM) of paclitaxel induces gradual release of the cytochrome c into the cytoplasm, indicating cell apoptosis via a caspase independent pathway.

  19. Identifying and Analysis of Scene Mining Methods Beased on Scenes Extracted Features

    CERN Document Server

    Jabari, Ashraf Sadat

    2012-01-01

    Scene mining is a subset of image mining in which scenes are classified to a distinct set of classes based on analysis of their content. In other word in scene mining, a label is given to visual content of scene, for example, mountain, beach. Scene mining is used in applications such as medicine, movie, information retrieval, computer vision, recognition of traffic scene. Reviewing of represented methods shows there are various methods in scene mining. Scene mining applications extension and existence of various scenes, make comparison of methods hard. Scene mining can be followed by identifying scene mining components and representing a framework to analyzing and evaluating methods. In this paper, at first, components of scene mining are introduced, then a framework based on extracted features of scene is represented to classify scene mining methods. Finally, these methods are analyzed and evaluated via a proposal framework.

  20. Differential analysis of ovarian and endometrial cancers identifies a methylator phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L Kolbe

    Full Text Available Despite improved outcomes in the past 30 years, less than half of all women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer live five years beyond their diagnosis. Although typically treated as a single disease, epithelial ovarian cancer includes several distinct histological subtypes, such as papillary serous and endometrioid carcinomas. To address whether the morphological differences seen in these carcinomas represent distinct characteristics at the molecular level we analyzed DNA methylation patterns in 11 papillary serous tumors, 9 endometrioid ovarian tumors, 4 normal fallopian tube samples and 6 normal endometrial tissues, plus 8 normal fallopian tube and 4 serous samples from TCGA. For comparison within the endometrioid subtype we added 6 primary uterine endometrioid tumors and 5 endometrioid metastases from uterus to ovary. Data was obtained from 27,578 CpG dinucleotides occurring in or near promoter regions of 14,495 genes. We identified 36 locations with significant increases or decreases in methylation in comparisons of serous tumors and normal fallopian tube samples. Moreover, unsupervised clustering techniques applied to all samples showed three major profiles comprising mostly normal samples, serous tumors, and endometrioid tumors including ovarian, uterine and metastatic origins. The clustering analysis identified 60 differentially methylated sites between the serous group and the normal group. An unrelated set of 25 serous tumors validated the reproducibility of the methylation patterns. In contrast, >1,000 genes were differentially methylated between endometrioid tumors and normal samples. This finding is consistent with a generalized regulatory disruption caused by a methylator phenotype. Through DNA methylation analyses we have identified genes with known roles in ovarian carcinoma etiology, whereas pathway analyses provided biological insight to the role of novel genes. Our finding of differences between serous and endometrioid

  1. Using Principal Component Analysis to Identify Priority Neighbourhoods for Health Services Delivery by Ranking Socioeconomic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Christine Elizabeth; Seliske, Patrick; Papadopoulos, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Socioeconomic status (SES) is a comprehensive indicator of health status and is useful in area-level health research and informing public health resource allocation. Principal component analysis (PCA) is a useful tool for developing SES indices to identify area-level disparities in SES within communities. While SES research in Canada has relied on census data, the voluntary nature of the 2011 National Household Survey challenges the validity of its data, especially income variables. This study sought to determine the appropriateness of replacing census income information with tax filer data in neighbourhood SES index development. Methods. Census and taxfiler data for Guelph, Ontario were retrieved for the years 2005, 2006, and 2011. Data were extracted for eleven income and non-income SES variables. PCA was employed to identify significant principal components from each dataset and weights of each contributing variable. Variable-specific factor scores were applied to standardized census and taxfiler data values to produce SES scores. Results. The substitution of taxfiler income variables for census income variables yielded SES score distributions and neighbourhood SES classifications that were similar to SES scores calculated using entirely census variables. Combining taxfiler income variables with census non-income variables also produced clearer SES level distinctions. Internal validation procedures indicated that utilizing multiple principal components produced clearer SES level distinctions than using only the first principal component. Conclusion. Identifying socioeconomic disparities between neighbourhoods is an important step in assessing the level of disadvantage of communities. The ability to replace census income information with taxfiler data to develop SES indices expands the versatility of public health research and planning in Canada, as more data sources can be explored. The apparent usefulness of PCA also contributes to the improvement

  2. Identifying the potential loss of monitoring wells using an uncertainty analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Vicky L; Waichler, Scott R; Cole, Charles R; Vermeul, Vince R; Bergeron, Marcel P

    2005-01-01

    From the mid-1940s through the 1980s, large volumes of waste water were discharged at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, causing a large-scale rise (>20 m) in the water table. When waste water discharges ceased in 1988, ground water mounds began to dissipate. This caused a large number of wells to go dry and has made it difficult to monitor contaminant plume migration. To identify monitoring wells that will need replacement, a methodology has been developed using a first-order uncertainty analysis with UCODE, a nonlinear parameter estimation code. Using a three-dimensional, finite-element ground water flow code, key parameters were identified by calibrating to historical hydraulic head data. Results from the calibration period were then used to check model predictions by comparing monitoring wells' wet/dry status with field data. This status was analyzed using a methodology that incorporated the 0.3 cumulative probability derived from the confidence and prediction intervals. For comparison, a nonphysically based trend model was also used as a predictor of wells' wet/dry status. Although the numerical model outperformed the trend model, for both models, the central value of the intervals was a better predictor of a wet well status. The prediction interval, however, was more successful at identifying dry wells. Predictions made through the year 2048 indicated that 46% of the wells in the monitoring well network are likely to go dry in areas near the river and where the ground water mound is dissipating. PMID:16324012

  3. Predictors of Extubation Failure in Neurocritical Patients Identified by a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kaibin; Lin, Zhenzhou; Qiao, Weiguang; Pan, Suyue

    2014-01-01

    Background Prediction of extubation failure, particularly in neurocritical patients, is unique and controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify the risk factors for extubation failure in these patients. Methods A literature search of databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science) was performed up to August of 2013 to identify trials that evaluated extubation failure predictors. Included trials were either prospective or retrospective cohort studies. Results Nine studies involving 928 participants were included. The systematic review and meta-analysis revealed that the following were predictive for extubation failure: pneumonia, atelectasis, mechanical ventilation of >24 h, a low Glasgow Coma Scale score (7–9T) (OR = 4.96, 95% CI = 1.61–15.26, P = 0.005), the inability to follow commands (OR = 2.07, 95% CI = 1.15–3.71, P = 0.02), especially the command to close the eyes, thick secretion, and no intact gag reflex. Meanwhile, the following were not predictive for extubation failure: sex, secretion volume, coughing upon suctioning, and the inability to follow one command among showing two fingers, wiggling the toes, or coughing on command. Additionally, some traditional weaning parameters were shown to poorly predict extubation failure in neurocritical patients. Conclusions Besides pneumonia, atelectasis, and the duration of mechanical ventilation, other factors that should be taken into consideration in the prediction of extubation failure when neurocritical patients are weaned from tracheal intubation include neurologic abilities (Glasgow Coma Scale score and following commands), the secretion texture, and the presence of a gag reflex. PMID:25486091

  4. Deep Proteome Analysis Identifies Age-Related Processes in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Vikram; Ly, Tony; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Murillo, Alejandro Brenes; Gartner, Anton; Lamond, Angus I; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2016-08-01

    Effective network analysis of protein data requires high-quality proteomic datasets. Here, we report a near doubling in coverage of the C. elegans adult proteome, identifying >11,000 proteins in total with ∼9,400 proteins reproducibly detected in three biological replicates. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identify proteins whose abundances vary with age, revealing a concerted downregulation of proteins involved in specific metabolic pathways and upregulation of cellular stress responses with advancing age. Among these are ∼30 peroxisomal proteins, including the PRX-5/PEX5 import protein. Functional experiments confirm that protein import into the peroxisome is compromised in vivo in old animals. We also studied the behavior of the set of age-variant proteins in chronologically age-matched, long-lived daf-2 insulin/IGF-1-pathway mutants. Unexpectedly, the levels of many of these age-variant proteins did not scale with extended lifespan. This indicates that, despite their youthful appearance and extended lifespans, not all aspects of aging are reset in these long-lived mutants. PMID:27453442

  5. Principal components analysis based methodology to identify differentially expressed genes in time-course microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Rajagopalan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time-course microarray experiments are being increasingly used to characterize dynamic biological processes. In these experiments, the goal is to identify genes differentially expressed in time-course data, measured between different biological conditions. These differentially expressed genes can reveal the changes in biological process due to the change in condition which is essential to understand differences in dynamics. Results In this paper, we propose a novel method for finding differentially expressed genes in time-course data and across biological conditions (say C1 and C2. We model the expression at C1 using Principal Component Analysis and represent the expression profile of each gene as a linear combination of the dominant Principal Components (PCs. Then the expression data from C2 is projected on the developed PCA model and scores are extracted. The difference between the scores is evaluated using a hypothesis test to quantify the significance of differential expression. We evaluate the proposed method to understand differences in two case studies (1 the heat shock response of wild-type and HSF1 knockout mice, and (2 cell-cycle between wild-type and Fkh1/Fkh2 knockout Yeast strains. Conclusion In both cases, the proposed method identified biologically significant genes.

  6. Analysis of Pigeon (Columba Ovary Transcriptomes to Identify Genes Involved in Blue Light Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available Monochromatic light is widely applied to promote poultry reproductive performance, yet little is currently known regarding the mechanism by which light wavelengths affect pigeon reproduction. Recently, high-throughput sequencing technologies have been used to provide genomic information for solving this problem. In this study, we employed Illumina Hiseq 2000 to identify differentially expressed genes in ovary tissue from pigeons under blue and white light conditions and de novo transcriptome assembly to construct a comprehensive sequence database containing information on the mechanisms of follicle development. A total of 157,774 unigenes (mean length: 790 bp were obtained by the Trinity program, and 35.83% of these unigenes were matched to genes in a non-redundant protein database. Gene description, gene ontology, and the clustering of orthologous group terms were performed to annotate the transcriptome assembly. Differentially expressed genes between blue and white light conditions included those related to oocyte maturation, hormone biosynthesis, and circadian rhythm. Furthermore, 17,574 SSRs and 533,887 potential SNPs were identified in this transcriptome assembly. This work is the first transcriptome analysis of the Columba ovary using Illumina technology, and the resulting transcriptome and differentially expressed gene data can facilitate further investigations into the molecular mechanism of the effect of blue light on follicle development and reproduction in pigeons and other bird species.

  7. Epigenome-Wide Association Analysis Identified Nine Skin DNA Methylation Loci for Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fusheng; Wang, Wenjun; Shen, Changbing; Li, Hui; Zuo, Xianbo; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yue, Min; Zhang, Cuicui; Yu, Liang; Chen, Mengyun; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Tang, Mingjun; Li, Yongjiang; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zaixing; Liu, Shengxiu; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Fengyu; Zhang, Weijia; Li, Caihua; Yang, Sen; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative and inflammatory skin disease caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. DNA methylation has been linked to psoriasis, but the manner in which this process contributes to the disease is not fully understood. In this study, we carried out a three-stage epigenome-wide association study to identify disease-associated differentially methylated sites using a combination of 262 skin and 48 peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. We not only revealed genome-wide methylation patterns for psoriasis but also identified strong associations between the skin-specific DNA methylation of nine disease-associated differentially methylated sites and psoriasis (Wilcoxon ranked PBonferroni 0.10). Further analysis revealed that these nine disease-associated differentially methylated sites were not significantly affected by genetic variations, supporting their remarkable contributions to disease status. The expression of CYP2S1, ECE1, EIF2C2, MAN1C1, and DLGAP4 was negatively correlated with DNA methylation. These findings will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism of psoriasis. PMID:26743604

  8. Epigenome-Wide Association Analysis Identified Nine Skin DNA Methylation Loci for Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fusheng; Wang, Wenjun; Shen, Changbing; Li, Hui; Zuo, Xianbo; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yue, Min; Zhang, Cuicui; Yu, Liang; Chen, Mengyun; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Tang, Mingjun; Li, Yongjiang; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zaixing; Liu, Shengxiu; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Fengyu; Zhang, Weijia; Li, Caihua; Yang, Sen; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative and inflammatory skin disease caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. DNA methylation has been linked to psoriasis, but the manner in which this process contributes to the disease is not fully understood. In this study, we carried out a three-stage epigenome-wide association study to identify disease-associated differentially methylated sites using a combination of 262 skin and 48 peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. We not only revealed genome-wide methylation patterns for psoriasis but also identified strong associations between the skin-specific DNA methylation of nine disease-associated differentially methylated sites and psoriasis (Wilcoxon ranked PBonferroni 0.10). Further analysis revealed that these nine disease-associated differentially methylated sites were not significantly affected by genetic variations, supporting their remarkable contributions to disease status. The expression of CYP2S1, ECE1, EIF2C2, MAN1C1, and DLGAP4 was negatively correlated with DNA methylation. These findings will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism of psoriasis.

  9. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharoah, Paul D P; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J; Phelan, Catherine M; Goode, Ellen L; Lawrenson, Kate; Buckley, Melissa; Fridley, Brooke L; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Shen, Howard; Weber, Rachel; Karevan, Rod; Larson, Melissa C; Song, Honglin; Tessier, Daniel C; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie M; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Aben, Katja K; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Armasu, Sebastian M; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Birrer, Michael J; Bloom, Greg; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brenton, James D; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brown, Robert; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian; Carney, Michael E; Carvalho, Renato S; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y Anne; Chen, Zhihua; Chow, Wong-Ho; Cicek, Mine S; Coetzee, Gerhard; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Despierre, Evelyn; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fenstermacher, David; Flanagan, James; Gao, Yu-Tang; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Gore, Martin; Gronwald, Jacek; Guo, Qi; Halle, Mari K; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hillemanns, Peter; Hoatlin, Maureen; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Kalli, Kimberly R; Karlan, Beth Y; Kelemen, Linda E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Konecny, Gottfried E; Krakstad, Camilla; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Nathan; Lee, Janet; Leminen, Arto; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubiński, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Nakanishi, Toru; Narod, Steven A; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stefan; Noushmehr, Houtan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara; Orlow, Irene; Paul, James; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Qu, Xiaotao; Risch, Harvey A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schwaab, Ira; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hui; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Southey, Melissa C; Spellman, Paul; Tajima, Kazuo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; van den Berg, David; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Vitonis, Allison F; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wik, Elisabeth; Winterhoff, Boris; Woo, Yin Ling; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah P; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zulkifli, Famida; Goodman, Marc T; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Iversen, Edwin; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Sellers, Thomas A

    2013-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), with another two suggestive loci reaching near genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the UK. We selected the top 24,551 SNPs for inclusion on the iCOGS custom genotyping array. We performed follow-up genotyping in 18,174 individuals with EOC (cases) and 26,134 controls from 43 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We validated the two loci at 3q25 and 17q21 that were previously found to have associations close to genome-wide significance and identified three loci newly associated with risk: two loci associated with all EOC subtypes at 8q21 (rs11782652, P = 5.5 × 10(-9)) and 10p12 (rs1243180, P = 1.8 × 10(-8)) and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210, P = 8.1 × 10(-10)). An integrated molecular analysis of genes and regulatory regions at these loci provided evidence for functional mechanisms underlying susceptibility and implicated CHMP4C in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. PMID:23535730

  10. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Lawrenson, Kate; Price, Melissa; Fridley, Brooke L.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Shen, Howard; Weber, Rachel; Karevan, Rod; Larson, Melissa C.; Song, Honglin; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie M.; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Aben, Katja K.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Birrer, Michael J.; Bloom, Greg; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brenton, James D.; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brown, Robert; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian; Carney, Michael E; Carvalho, Renato S.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Anne; Chen, Zhihua; Chow, Wong-Ho; Cicek, Mine S.; Coetzee, Gerhard; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Despierre, Evelyn; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fenstermacher, David; Flanagan, James; Gao, Yu-Tang; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Gore, Martin; Gronwald, Jacek; Guo, Qi; Halle, Mari K; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hillemanns, Peter; Hoatlin, Maureen; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K.; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Nathan; Lee, Janet; Leminen, Arto; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubiński, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nakanishi, Toru; Narod, Steven A.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stefan; Noushmehr, Houtan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara; Orlow, Irene; Paul, James; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Qu, Xiaotao; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schwaab, Ira; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hui; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Southey, Melissa C.; Spellman, Paul; Tajima, Kazuo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Berg, David Van Den; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wik, Elisabeth; Winterhoff, Boris; Woo, Yin Ling; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah P.; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zulkifli, Famida; Goodman, Marc T.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Iversen, Edwin; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with another two loci being close to genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the United Kingdom. We selected the top 24,551 SNPs for inclusion on the iCOGS custom genotyping array. Follow-up genotyping was carried out in 18,174 cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We validated the two loci at 3q25 and 17q21 previously near genome-wide significance and identified three novel loci associated with risk; two loci associated with all EOC subtypes, at 8q21 (rs11782652, P=5.5×10-9) and 10p12 (rs1243180; P=1.8×10-8), and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210; P=8.1×10-10). An integrated molecular analysis of genes and regulatory regions at these loci provided evidence for functional mechanisms underlying susceptibility that implicates CHMP4C in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. PMID:23535730

  11. Perturbation-expression analysis identifies RUNX1 as a regulator of human mammary stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan S Sokol

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for genes that regulate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation has been hindered by a paucity of markers that uniquely label stem cells and early progenitors. To circumvent this difficulty we have developed a method that identifies cell-state regulators without requiring any markers of differentiation, termed Perturbation-Expression Analysis of Cell States (PEACS. We have applied this marker-free approach to screen for transcription factors that regulate mammary stem cell differentiation in a 3D model of tissue morphogenesis and identified RUNX1 as a stem cell regulator. Inhibition of RUNX1 expanded bipotent stem cells and blocked their differentiation into ductal and lobular tissue rudiments. Reactivation of RUNX1 allowed exit from the bipotent state and subsequent differentiation and mammary morphogenesis. Collectively, our findings show that RUNX1 is required for mammary stem cells to exit a bipotent state, and provide a new method for discovering cell-state regulators when markers are not available.

  12. Comparative analysis of methods for identifying recurrent copy number alterations in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiguo Yuan

    Full Text Available Recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs play an important role in cancer genesis. While a number of computational methods have been proposed for identifying such CNAs, their relative merits remain largely unknown in practice since very few efforts have been focused on comparative analysis of the methods. To facilitate studies of recurrent CNA identification in cancer genome, it is imperative to conduct a comprehensive comparison of performance and limitations among existing methods. In this paper, six representative methods proposed in the latest six years are compared. These include one-stage and two-stage approaches, working with raw intensity ratio data and discretized data respectively. They are based on various techniques such as kernel regression, correlation matrix diagonal segmentation, semi-parametric permutation and cyclic permutation schemes. We explore multiple criteria including type I error rate, detection power, Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC curve and the area under curve (AUC, and computational complexity, to evaluate performance of the methods under multiple simulation scenarios. We also characterize their abilities on applications to two real datasets obtained from cancers with lung adenocarcinoma and glioblastoma. This comparison study reveals general characteristics of the existing methods for identifying recurrent CNAs, and further provides new insights into their strengths and weaknesses. It is believed helpful to accelerate the development of novel and improved methods.

  13. Etude du rôle des cytokinines végétales et fongiques dans l'interaction riz-Magnaporthe oryzae

    OpenAIRE

    Chanclud, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    The blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating diseases on rice leading to important yield loss. Plant hormones, like salicylic acid, play a central role in plant resistance establishment. Among these hormones, cytokinins (CKs) are adenine derivatives well described to modulate root/shoot growth and differentiation, cell viability and nutrient distribution. Previous studies have shown that these hormonal compounds can also affect plant host resistance in differe...

  14. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifies CCDC80 as a Novel Gene Associated with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasagawa, Shota; Nishimura, Yuhei; Sawada, Hirofumi; Zhang, Erquan; Okabe, Shiko; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Mitani, Yoshihide; Maruyama, Kazuo; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous disorder associated with a progressive increase in pulmonary artery resistance and pressure. Although various therapies have been developed, the 5-year survival rate of PAH patients remains low. There is thus an important need to identify novel genes that are commonly dysregulated in PAH of various etiologies and could be used as biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis of five mammalian PAH datasets downloaded from a public database. We identified 228 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from a rat PAH model caused by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor under hypoxic conditions, 379 DEGs from a mouse PAH model associated with systemic sclerosis, 850 DEGs from a mouse PAH model associated with schistosomiasis, 1598 DEGs from one cohort of human PAH patients, and 4260 DEGs from a second cohort of human PAH patients. Gene-by-gene comparison identified four genes that were differentially upregulated or downregulated in parallel in all five sets of DEGs. Expression of coiled-coil domain containing 80 (CCDC80) and anterior gradient two genes was significantly increased in the five datasets, whereas expression of SMAD family member six and granzyme A was significantly decreased. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis revealed a connection between CCDC80 and collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1A1) expression. To validate the function of CCDC80 in vivo, we knocked out ccdc80 in zebrafish using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system. In vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent protein in endothelial cells showed that ccdc80 deletion significantly increased the diameter of the ventral artery, a vessel supplying blood to the gills. We also demonstrated that expression of col1a1 and endothelin-1 mRNA was significantly decreased in the ccdc80-knockout zebrafish. Finally, we examined Ccdc

  15. Identifying patterns in treatment response profiles in acute bipolar mania: a cluster analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houston John P

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with acute mania respond differentially to treatment and, in many cases, fail to obtain or sustain symptom remission. The objective of this exploratory analysis was to characterize response in bipolar disorder by identifying groups of patients with similar manic symptom response profiles. Methods Patients (n = 222 were selected from a randomized, double-blind study of treatment with olanzapine or divalproex in bipolar I disorder, manic or mixed episode, with or without psychotic features. Hierarchical clustering based on Ward's distance was used to identify groups of patients based on Young-Mania Rating Scale (YMRS total scores at each of 5 assessments over 7 weeks. Logistic regression was used to identify baseline predictors for clusters of interest. Results Four distinct clusters of patients were identified: Cluster 1 (n = 64: patients did not maintain a response (YMRS total scores ≤ 12; Cluster 2 (n = 92: patients responded rapidly (within less than a week and response was maintained; Cluster 3 (n = 36: patients responded rapidly but relapsed soon afterwards (YMRS ≥ 15; Cluster 4 (n = 30: patients responded slowly (≥ 2 weeks and response was maintained. Predictive models using baseline variables found YMRS Item 10 (Appearance, and psychosis to be significant predictors for Clusters 1 and 4 vs. Clusters 2 and 3, but none of the baseline characteristics allowed discriminating between Clusters 1 vs. 4. Experiencing a mixed episode at baseline predicted membership in Clusters 2 and 3 vs. Clusters 1 and 4. Treatment with divalproex, larger number of previous manic episodes, lack of disruptive-aggressive behavior, and more prominent depressive symptoms at baseline were predictors for Cluster 3 vs. 2. Conclusion Distinct treatment response profiles can be predicted by clinical features at baseline. The presence of these features as potential risk factors for relapse in patients who have responded to treatment

  16. Dietary separation of sympatric carnivores identified by molecular analysis of scats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, L E; Roman, J; Sunquist, M E

    2000-10-01

    We studied the diets of four sympatric carnivores in the flooding savannas of western Venezuela by analysing predator DNA and prey remains in faeces. DNA was isolated and a portion of the cytochrome b gene of the mitochondrial genome amplified and sequenced from 20 of 34 scats. Species were diagnosed by comparing the resulting sequences to reference sequences generated from the blood of puma (Puma concolor), jaguar (Panthera onca), ocelot (Leopardus pardalus) and crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous). Scat size has previously been used to identify predators, but DNA data show that puma and jaguar scats overlap in size, as do those of puma, ocelot and fox. Prey-content analysis suggests minimal prey partitioning between pumas and jaguars. In field testing this technique for large carnivores, two potential limitations emerged: locating intact faecal samples and recovering DNA sequences from samples obtained in the wet season. Nonetheless, this study illustrates the tremendous potential of DNA faecal studies. The presence of domestic dog (Canis familiaris) in one puma scat and of wild pig (Sus scrofa), set as bait, in one jaguar sample exemplifies the forensic possibilities of this noninvasive analysis. In addition to defining the dietary habits of similar size sympatric mammals, DNA identifications from faeces allow wildlife managers to detect the presence of endangered taxa and manage prey for their conservation. PMID:11050553

  17. Network Analysis Identifies Mitochondrial Regulation of Epidermal Differentiation by MPZL3 and FDXR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Aparna; Ungewickell, Alexander; Boxer, Lisa D; Lopez-Pajares, Vanessa; Zarnegar, Brian J; Khavari, Paul A

    2015-11-23

    Current gene expression network approaches commonly focus on transcription factors (TFs), biasing network-based discovery efforts away from potentially important non-TF proteins. We developed proximity analysis, a network reconstruction method that uses topological constraints of scale-free, small-world biological networks to reconstruct relationships in eukaryotic systems, independent of subcellular localization. Proximity analysis identified MPZL3 as a highly connected hub that is strongly induced during epidermal differentiation. MPZL3 was essential for normal differentiation, acting downstream of p63, ZNF750, KLF4, and RCOR1, each of which bound near the MPZL3 gene and controlled its expression. MPZL3 protein localized to mitochondria, where it interacted with FDXR, which was itself also found to be essential for differentiation. Together, MPZL3 and FDXR increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) to drive epidermal differentiation. ROS-induced differentiation is dependent upon promotion of FDXR enzymatic activity by MPZL3. ROS induction by the MPZL3 and FDXR mitochondrial proteins is therefore essential for epidermal differentiation.

  18. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies multiple novel associations and ethnic heterogeneity of psoriasis susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xianyong; Low, Hui Qi; Wang, Ling; Li, Yonghong; Ellinghaus, Eva; Han, Jiali; Estivill, Xavier; Sun, Liangdan; Zuo, Xianbo; Shen, Changbing; Zhu, Caihong; Zhang, Anping; Sanchez, Fabio; Padyukov, Leonid; Catanese, Joseph J; Krueger, Gerald G; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Mucha, Sören; Weichenthal, Michael; Weidinger, Stephan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Foo, Jia Nee; Li, Yi; Sim, Karseng; Liany, Herty; Irwan, Ishak; Teo, Yikying; Theng, Colin T S; Gupta, Rashmi; Bowcock, Anne; De Jager, Philip L; Qureshi, Abrar A; de Bakker, Paul I W; Seielstad, Mark; Liao, Wilson; Ståhle, Mona; Franke, Andre; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-04-23

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with complex genetics and different degrees of prevalence across ethnic populations. Here we present the largest trans-ethnic genome-wide meta-analysis (GWMA) of psoriasis in 15,369 cases and 19,517 controls of Caucasian and Chinese ancestries. We identify four novel associations at LOC144817, COG6, RUNX1 and TP63, as well as three novel secondary associations within IFIH1 and IL12B. Fine-mapping analysis of MHC region demonstrates an important role for all three HLA class I genes and a complex and heterogeneous pattern of HLA associations between Caucasian and Chinese populations. Further, trans-ethnic comparison suggests population-specific effect or allelic heterogeneity for 11 loci. These population-specific effects contribute significantly to the ethnic diversity of psoriasis prevalence. This study not only provides novel biological insights into the involvement of immune and keratinocyte development mechanism, but also demonstrates a complex and heterogeneous genetic architecture of psoriasis susceptibility across ethnic populations.

  19. Transcriptome bioinformatic analysis identifies potential therapeutic mechanism of pentylenetetrazole in down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Abhay

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ has recently been found to ameliorate cognitive impairment in rodent models of Down syndrome (DS. The mechanism underlying PTZ's therapeutic effect in DS is however not clear. Microarray profiling has previously reported differential expression, both up- and down-regulation, of genes in DS. Given this, transcriptomic data related to PTZ treatment, if available, could be used to understand the drug's therapeutic mechanism in DS. No such mammalian data however exists. Nevertheless, a Drosophila model inspired by PTZ induced kindling plasticity in rodents has recently been described. Microarray profiling has shown PTZ's downregulatory effect on gene expression in the fly heads. Methods In a comparative transcriptomics approach, I have analyzed the available microarray data in order to identify potential therapeutic mechanism of PTZ in DS. In the analysis, summary data of up- and down-regulated genes reported in human DS studies and of down-regulated genes reported in the Drosophila model has been used. Results I find that transcriptomic correlate of chronic PTZ in Drosophila counteracts that of DS. Genes downregulated by PTZ significantly over-represent genes upregulated in DS and under-represent genes downregulated in DS. Further, the genes which are common in the downregulated and upregulated DS set show enrichment for MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion My analysis suggests that downregulation of MAP kinase pathway may mediate therapeutic effect of PTZ in DS. Existing evidence implicating MAP kinase pathway in DS supports this observation.

  20. Identifying differences in the experience of (in)authenticity: a latent class analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Alison P; Slabu, Letitia; Bruder, Martin; Sedikides, Constantine

    2014-01-01

    Generally, psychologists consider state authenticity - that is, the subjective sense of being one's true self - to be a unitary and unidimensional construct, such that (a) the phenomenological experience of authenticity is thought to be similar no matter its trigger, and (b) inauthenticity is thought to be simply the opposing pole (on the same underlying construct) of authenticity. Using latent class analysis, we put this conceptualization to a test. In order to avoid over-reliance on a Western conceptualization of authenticity, we used a cross-cultural sample (N = 543), comprising participants from Western, South-Asian, East-Asian, and South-East Asian cultures. Participants provided either a narrative in which the described when they felt most like being themselves or one in which they described when they felt least like being themselves. The analysis identified six distinct classes of experiences: two authenticity classes ("everyday" and "extraordinary"), three inauthenticity classes ("self-conscious," "deflated," and "extraordinary"), and a class representing convergence between authenticity and inauthenticity. The classes were phenomenologically distinct, especially with respect to negative affect, private and public self-consciousness, and self-esteem. Furthermore, relatively more interdependent cultures were less likely to report experiences of extraordinary (in)authenticity than relatively more independent cultures. Understanding the many facets of (in)authenticity may enable researchers to connect different findings and explain why the attainment of authenticity can be difficult.

  1. Functional analysis of TPM domain containing Rv2345 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies its phosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Avni; Eniyan, Kandasamy; Sinha, Swati; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Bajpai, Urmi

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the causal agent of tuberculosis, the second largest infectious disease. With the rise of multi-drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis, serious challenge lies ahead of us in treating the disease. The availability of complete genome sequence of Mtb has improved the scope for identifying new proteins that would not only further our understanding of biology of the organism but could also serve to discover new drug targets. In this study, Rv2345, a hypothetical membrane protein of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, which is reported to be a putative ortholog of ZipA cell division protein has been assigned function through functional annotation using bioinformatics tools followed by experimental validation. Sequence analysis showed Rv2345 to have a TPM domain at its N-terminal region and predicted it to have phosphatase activity. The TPM domain containing region of Rv2345 was cloned and expressed using pET28a vector in Escherichia coli and purified by Nickel affinity chromatography. The purified TPM domain was tested in vitro and our results confirmed it to have phosphatase activity. The enzyme activity was first checked and optimized with pNPP as substrate, followed by using ATP, which was also found to be used as substrate by the purified protein. Hence sequence analysis followed by in vitro studies characterizes TPM domain of Rv2345 to contain phosphatase activity.

  2. Five endometrial cancer risk loci identified through genome-wide association analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah J; O'Mara, Tracy A; Painter, Jodie N; Glubb, Dylan M; Flach, Susanne; Lewis, Annabelle; French, Juliet D; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Church, David; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Webb, Penelope M; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Dennis, Joe; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Zhao, Hui; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Njølstad, Tormund S; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Li, Mulin Jun; Yip, Shun H; Wang, Junwen; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Palles, Claire; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Cunningham, Julie M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Easton, Douglas F; Tomlinson, Ian; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of three endometrial cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and two follow-up phases totaling 7,737 endometrial cancer cases and 37,144 controls of European ancestry. Genome-wide imputation and meta-analysis identified five new risk loci of genome-wide significance at likely regulatory regions on chromosomes 13q22.1 (rs11841589, near KLF5), 6q22.31 (rs13328298, in LOC643623 and near HEY2 and NCOA7), 8q24.21 (rs4733613, telomeric to MYC), 15q15.1 (rs937213, in EIF2AK4, near BMF) and 14q32.33 (rs2498796, in AKT1, near SIVA1). We also found a second independent 8q24.21 signal (rs17232730). Functional studies of the 13q22.1 locus showed that rs9600103 (pairwise r(2) = 0.98 with rs11841589) is located in a region of active chromatin that interacts with the KLF5 promoter region. The rs9600103[T] allele that is protective in endometrial cancer suppressed gene expression in vitro, suggesting that regulation of the expression of KLF5, a gene linked to uterine development, is implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings provide enhanced insight into the genetic and biological basis of endometrial cancer. PMID:27135401

  3. Multi-tissue microarray analysis identifies a molecular signature of regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Mercer

    Full Text Available The inability to functionally repair tissues that are lost as a consequence of disease or injury remains a significant challenge for regenerative medicine. The molecular and cellular processes involved in complete restoration of tissue architecture and function are expected to be complex and remain largely unknown. Unlike humans, certain salamanders can completely regenerate injured tissues and lost appendages without scar formation. A parsimonious hypothesis would predict that all of these regenerative activities are regulated, at least in part, by a common set of genes. To test this hypothesis and identify genes that might control conserved regenerative processes, we performed a comprehensive microarray analysis of the early regenerative response in five regeneration-competent tissues from the newt Notophthalmus viridescens. Consistent with this hypothesis, we established a molecular signature for regeneration that consists of common genes or gene family members that exhibit dynamic differential regulation during regeneration in multiple tissue types. These genes include members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and its regulators, extracellular matrix components, genes involved in controlling cytoskeleton dynamics, and a variety of immune response factors. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis validated and supported their functional activities in conserved regenerative processes. Surprisingly, dendrogram clustering and RadViz classification also revealed that each regenerative tissue had its own unique temporal expression profile, pointing to an inherent tissue-specific regenerative gene program. These new findings demand a reconsideration of how we conceptualize regenerative processes and how we devise new strategies for regenerative medicine.

  4. A meta-analysis to identify animal and management factors influencing gestating sow efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, S L; Szyszka, O; Stoddart, K; Edwards, S A; Kyriazakis, I

    2014-12-01

    A meta-analysis on the effects of management and animal-based factors on the reproductive efficiency of gestating sows can provide information on single-factor and interaction effects that may not have been detected in individual studies. This study analyzed the effects of such factors on the number of piglets born alive per litter (BA), piglet birth weight (BiW) and weaning weight (WW), and number of piglets born alive per kilogram of sow feed intake during gestation (BA/FI). A total of 51 papers and 7 data sources were identified for the meta-analysis, out of which 23 papers and 5 sets of production data were useable (a total of 121 treatments). The information gathered included the dependent variables as well as information regarding animal, management, and feed characteristics. While a number of factors were individually significant, the multivariate models identified significant effects only of 1) floor type (P=0.003), sow BW at the end of gestation (P=0.002), and housing (stalls vs. loose; P=0.004) on BA; as floor type and housing were confounded, they were included in 2 separate models. The BA was higher on solid (12.1) in comparison to partly slatted (11.4) and fully slatted floors (10.2); 2) sow gestation environment (P=0.017) and gestation feed allowance (P=0.046) on BiW, with BiW of pigs higher for sows kept outdoors rather than indoors (1.75 versus 1.49 kg); 3) parity number (P=0.003) and feed intake during gestation (P=0.017) on WW; in addition there was an interaction between parity number×feed ME and parity number×feed CP content of feed during gestation on WW, with the positive effects of feed ME and CP contents seen during early rather than later parities; and 4) floor type (P=0.019) and feed crude fiber (P=0.003) for BA/FI with a greater number for those kept on solid floors (5.11) versus partially and fully slatted floors (4.07 and 4.05). The meta-analysis confirmed the significant effect of several well-known factors on the efficiency of

  5. Potential biomarkers of fatigue identified by plasma metabolome analysis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Satoshi; Yamato, Masanori; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Jin, Guanghua; Nakano, Masayuki; Miyashige, Yukiharu; Eguchi, Asami; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Goda, Nobuhito; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Emi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, prior to the establishment of a method for the clinical diagnosis of chronic fatigue in humans, we validated the utility of plasma metabolomic analysis in a rat model of fatigue using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS). In order to obtain a fatigued animal group, rats were placed in a cage filled with water to a height of 2.2 cm for 5 days. A food-restricted group, in which rats were limited to 10 g/d of food (around 50% of the control group), was also assessed. The food-restricted group exhibited weight reduction similar to that of the fatigued group. CE-MS measurements were performed to evaluate the profile of food intake-dependent metabolic changes, as well as the profile in fatigue loading, resulting in the identification of 48 metabolites in plasma. Multivariate analyses using hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that the plasma metabolome in the fatigued group showed clear differences from those in the control and food-restricted groups. In the fatigued group, we found distinctive changes in metabolites related to branched-chain amino acid metabolism, urea cycle, and proline metabolism. Specifically, the fatigued group exhibited significant increases in valine, leucine, isoleucine, and 2-oxoisopentanoate, and significant decreases in citrulline and hydroxyproline compared with the control and food-restricted groups. Plasma levels of total nitric oxide were increased in the fatigued group, indicating systemic oxidative stress. Further, plasma metabolites involved in the citrate cycle, such as cis-aconitate and isocitrate, were reduced in the fatigued group. The levels of ATP were significantly decreased in the liver and skeletal muscle, indicative of a deterioration in energy metabolism in these organs. Thus, this comprehensive metabolic analysis furthered our understanding of the pathophysiology of fatigue, and identified potential diagnostic biomarkers based on fatigue pathophysiology.

  6. Reproducibility and validity of dietary patterns identified using factor analysis among Chinese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Ye, Qing; Wang, Zhiyong; Yang, Huafeng; Chen, Xupeng; Zhou, Hairong; Wang, Chenchen; Chu, Wenjie; Lai, Yichao; Sun, Liuyuan; Wang, Youfa; Xu, Fei

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the reproducibility and validity of dietary patterns among Chinese adult populations. A random subsample of 203 participants (aged 31-80 years) from a community-based nutrition and health survey was enrolled. An eighty-seven-item FFQ was administered twice (FFQ1 and FFQ2) 1 year apart; four 3 consecutive day, 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDR, as a reference method) were performed between the administrations of the two FFQ every 3 months. Dietary patterns from three separate dietary sources were derived using factor analysis based on twenty-eight predefined food groups. Comparisons between dietary pattern scores were made by using Pearson's or intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), cross-classification analysis, weighted κ statistic and Bland-Altman plots; the four major dietary patterns identified from FFQ1, FFQ2 and 24-HDR were similar. Regarding reproducibility, ICC for z-scores between FFQ1 and FFQ2 were all >0·6 for dietary patterns. The 'animal and plant protein' pattern had the highest ICC of 0·870. For validity, the adjusted Pearson's correlation coefficients for dietary pattern z-scores between two FFQ and the mean of four 3 consecutive day 24-HDR ranged from 0·387 for the 'Chinese traditional' pattern to 0·838 for the 'animal and plant protein' pattern. More than 75 % of the participants were classified into the same or adjacent quartile, and <5 % were misclassified into opposite quartiles. The weighted κ ranged from 0·259 to 0·680. Bland-Altman plots indicated that no significant deviation was found between two dietary assessment methods. Our findings indicate a good reasonable reproducibility and a reasonable validity of dietary patterns derived by factor analysis in China. PMID:27405825

  7. Potential biomarkers of fatigue identified by plasma metabolome analysis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kume

    Full Text Available In the present study, prior to the establishment of a method for the clinical diagnosis of chronic fatigue in humans, we validated the utility of plasma metabolomic analysis in a rat model of fatigue using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS. In order to obtain a fatigued animal group, rats were placed in a cage filled with water to a height of 2.2 cm for 5 days. A food-restricted group, in which rats were limited to 10 g/d of food (around 50% of the control group, was also assessed. The food-restricted group exhibited weight reduction similar to that of the fatigued group. CE-MS measurements were performed to evaluate the profile of food intake-dependent metabolic changes, as well as the profile in fatigue loading, resulting in the identification of 48 metabolites in plasma. Multivariate analyses using hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that the plasma metabolome in the fatigued group showed clear differences from those in the control and food-restricted groups. In the fatigued group, we found distinctive changes in metabolites related to branched-chain amino acid metabolism, urea cycle, and proline metabolism. Specifically, the fatigued group exhibited significant increases in valine, leucine, isoleucine, and 2-oxoisopentanoate, and significant decreases in citrulline and hydroxyproline compared with the control and food-restricted groups. Plasma levels of total nitric oxide were increased in the fatigued group, indicating systemic oxidative stress. Further, plasma metabolites involved in the citrate cycle, such as cis-aconitate and isocitrate, were reduced in the fatigued group. The levels of ATP were significantly decreased in the liver and skeletal muscle, indicative of a deterioration in energy metabolism in these organs. Thus, this comprehensive metabolic analysis furthered our understanding of the pathophysiology of fatigue, and identified potential diagnostic biomarkers based on fatigue

  8. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation.

  9. Nonlinear analysis using Lyapunov exponents in breast thermograms to identify abnormal lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    EtehadTavakol, M.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Lucas, C.; Sadri, S.; Ataei, M.

    2012-07-01

    Breast diseases are one of the major issues in women's health today. Early detection of breast cancer plays a significant role in reducing the mortality rate. Breast thermography is a potential early detection method which is non-invasive, non-radiating, passive, fast, painless, low cost, risk free with no contact with the body. By identifying and removing malignant tumors in early stages before they metastasize and spread to neighboring regions, cancer threats can be minimized. Cancer is often characterized as a chaotic, poorly regulated growth. Cancerous cells, tumors, and vasculature defy have irregular shapes which have potential to be described by a nonlinear dynamical system. Chaotic time series can provide the tools necessary to generate the procedures to evaluate the nonlinear system. Computing Lyapunov exponents is thus a powerful means of quantifying the degree of the chaos. In this paper, we present a novel approach using nonlinear chaotic dynamical system theory for estimating Lyapunov exponents in establishing possible difference between malignant and benign patterns. In order to develop the algorithm, the first hottest regions of breast thermal images are identified first, and then one dimensional scalar time series is obtained in terms of the distance between each subsequent boundary contour points and the center of the mass of the first hottest region. In the next step, the embedding dimension is estimated, and by time delay embedding method, the phase space is reconstructed. In the last step, the Lyapunov exponents are computed to analyze normality or abnormality of the lesions. Positive Lyapunov exponents indicates abnormality while negative Lyapunov exponents represent normality. The normalized errors show the algorithm is satisfactorily, and provide a measure of chaos. It is shown that nonlinear analysis of breast thermograms using Lyapunov exponents may potentially capable of improving reliability of thermography in breast tumor detection as

  10. Integrative Analysis of Genomics and Transcriptome Data to Identify Potential Functional Genes of BMDs in Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Cheng; Guo, Yan-Fang; He, Hao; Lin, Xu; Wang, Xia-Fang; Zhou, Rou; Li, Wen-Ting; Pan, Dao-Yan; Shen, Jie; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2016-05-01

    Osteoporosis is known to be highly heritable. However, to date, the findings from more than 20 genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have explained less than 6% of genetic risks. Studies suggest that the missing heritability data may be because of joint effects among genes. To identify novel heritability for osteoporosis, we performed a system-level study on bone mineral density (BMD) by weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA), using the largest GWAS data set for BMD in the field, Genetic Factors for Osteoporosis Consortium (GEFOS-2), and a transcriptomic gene expression data set generated from transiliac bone biopsies in women. A weighted gene coexpression network was generated for 1574 genes with GWAS nominal evidence of association (p ≤ 0.05) based on dissimilarity measurement on the expression data. Twelve distinct gene modules were identified, and four modules showed nominally significant associations with BMD (p ≤ 0.05), but only one module, the yellow module, demonstrated a good correlation between module membership (MM) and gene significance (GS), suggesting that the yellow module serves an important biological role in bone regulation. Interestingly, through characterization of module content and topology, the yellow module was found to be significantly enriched with contractile fiber part (GO:044449), which is widely recognized as having a close relationship between muscle and bone. Furthermore, detailed submodule analyses of important candidate genes (HOMER1, SPTBN1) by all edges within the yellow module implied significant enrichment of functional connections between bone and cytoskeletal protein binding. Our study yielded novel information from system genetics analyses of GWAS data jointly with transcriptomic data. The findings highlighted a module and several genes in the model as playing important roles in the regulation of bone mass in females, which may yield novel insights into the genetic basis of osteoporosis. © 2016

  11. Large scale association analysis identifies three susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Saade

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS and their replications that have associated DNA variants with myocardial infarction (MI and/or coronary artery disease (CAD are predominantly based on populations of European or Eastern Asian descent. Replication of the most significantly associated polymorphisms in multiple populations with distinctive genetic backgrounds and lifestyles is crucial to the understanding of the pathophysiology of a multifactorial disease like CAD. We have used our Lebanese cohort to perform a replication study of nine previously identified CAD/MI susceptibility loci (LTA, CDKN2A-CDKN2B, CELSR2-PSRC1-SORT1, CXCL12, MTHFD1L, WDR12, PCSK9, SH2B3, and SLC22A3, and 88 genes in related phenotypes. The study was conducted on 2,002 patients with detailed demographic, clinical characteristics, and cardiac catheterization results. One marker, rs6922269, in MTHFD1L was significantly protective against MI (OR=0.68, p=0.0035, while the variant rs4977574 in CDKN2A-CDKN2B was significantly associated with MI (OR=1.33, p=0.0086. Associations were detected after adjustment for family history of CAD, gender, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and smoking. The parallel study of 88 previously published genes in related phenotypes encompassed 20,225 markers, three quarters of which with imputed genotypes The study was based on our genome-wide genotype data set, with imputation across the whole genome to HapMap II release 22 using HapMap CEU population as a reference. Analysis was conducted on both the genotyped and imputed variants in the 88 regions covering selected genes. This approach replicated HNRNPA3P1-CXCL12 association with CAD and identified new significant associations of CDKAL1, ST6GAL1, and PTPRD with CAD. Our study provides evidence for the importance of the multifactorial aspect of CAD/MI and describes genes predisposing to their etiology.

  12. Using End-Member Mixing Analysis to Identify Transport Pathways in Agricultural Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, H.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations of naturally occurring solutes were monitored in six agricultural watersheds as part of the Agricultural Chemical Sources, Transport and Fate study of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. The watersheds, located in Indiana (IN), Iowa (IA), Maryland (MD), Nebraska (NE), Mississippi (MS) and Washington (WA), ranged in size from 5 to 1300 square kilometers, and agricultural land use accounted for 60 - 98% of the watershed area. Concentrations of chloride, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, fluoride, sulfate and silica in stream water were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA) to identify the dominant processes controlling stream water chemistry. Concentrations measured in wells, streambed piezometers, unsaturated zone lysimeters, overland flow, and tile drains were then used to project the chemistry of these flow compartments/components onto the stream chemistry PCA transformation. This facilitated the identification of end members explaining observed stream chemistry, and the source of the water for these end members. The majority of the variance in stream chemistry could be explained by the mixing of three end-members: 94% for Leary Weber Ditch, IN; 84% for South Fork Iowa River, IA; 91% for Morgan Creek, MD; 81% for Maple Creek, NE; 92% for Tommie Bayou, MS; and, 97% for DR2, WA. The chemistry of overland flow and tile drainage was also contained within the end member concentrations. The end members were generally represented by two groundwater components and a very low solute concentration component (precipitation or irrigation water) that diluted the groundwater signal. Generally, one groundwater component represented recently recharged water that resembled the concentration of water in the deepest unsaturated zone lysimeters, and the other groundwater component was representative of regional groundwater conditions. Compared to regional groundwater, the recent groundwater component had lower

  13. Network analysis of translocated Takahe populations to identify disease surveillance targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Zoë L; VAN Andel, Mary; French, Nigel P; Gartrell, Brett D

    2014-04-01

    Social network analysis is being increasingly used in epidemiology and disease modeling in humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. We investigated this tool in describing a translocation network (area that allows movement of animals between geographically isolated locations) used for the conservation of an endangered flightless rail, the Takahe (Porphyrio hochstetteri). We collated records of Takahe translocations within New Zealand and used social network principles to describe the connectivity of the translocation network. That is, networks were constructed and analyzed using adjacency matrices with values based on the tie weights between nodes. Five annual network matrices were created using the Takahe data set, each incremental year included records of previous years. Weights of movements between connected locations were assigned by the number of Takahe moved. We calculated the number of nodes (i(total)) and the number of ties (t(total)) between the nodes. To quantify the small-world character of the networks, we compared the real networks to random graphs of the equivalent size, weighting, and node strength. Descriptive analysis of cumulative annual Takahe movement networks involved determination of node-level characteristics, including centrality descriptors of relevance to disease modeling such as weighted measures of in degree (k(i)(in)), out degree (k(i)(out)), and betweenness (B(i)). Key players were assigned according to the highest node measure of k(i)(in), k(i)(out), and B(i) per network. Networks increased in size throughout the time frame considered. The network had some degree small-world characteristics. Nodes with the highest cumulative tie weights connecting them were the captive breeding center, the Murchison Mountains and 2 offshore islands. The key player fluctuated between the captive breeding center and the Murchison Mountains. The cumulative networks identified the captive breeding center every year as the hub of the network until the final

  14. Automated Source Code Analysis to Identify and Remove Software Security Vulnerabilities: Case Studies on Java Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Meghanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-level contribution of this paper is to illustrate the development of generic solution strategies to remove software security vulnerabilities that could be identified using automated tools for source code analysis on software programs (developed in Java. We use the Source Code Analyzer and Audit Workbench automated tools, developed by HP Fortify Inc., for our testing purposes. We present case studies involving a file writer program embedded with features for password validation, and connection-oriented server socket programs to discover, analyze the impact and remove the following software security vulnerabilities: (i Hardcoded Password, (ii Empty Password Initialization, (iii Denial of Service, (iv System Information Leak, (v Unreleased Resource, (vi Path Manipulation, and (vii Resource Injection vulnerabilities. For each of these vulnerabilities, we describe the potential risks associated with leaving them unattended in a software program, and provide the solutions (including the code snippets in Java that can be incorporated to remove these vulnerabilities. The proposed solutions are very generic in nature, and can be suitably modified to correct any such vulnerabilities in software developed in any other programming language.

  15. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies the Dysregulation of Ultraviolet Target Genes in Human Skin Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao; Kim, Arianna L.; Du, Rong; Liu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a major risk factor for both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. In addition to its mutagenic effect, UVR can also induce substantial transcriptional instability in skin cells affecting thousands of genes, including many cancer genes, suggesting that transcriptional instability may be another important etiological factor in skin photocarcinogenesis. In this study, we performed detailed transcriptomic profiling studies to characterize the kinetic changes in global gene expression in human keratinocytes exposed to different UVR conditions. We identified a subset of UV-responsive genes as UV signature genes (UVSGs) based on 1) conserved UV-responsiveness of this subset of genes among different keratinocyte lines; and 2) UV-induced persistent changes in their mRNA levels long after exposure. Interestingly, 11 of the UVSGs were shown to be critical to skin cancer cell proliferation and survival. Through computational Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we demonstrated that a significant portion of the UVSGs were dysregulated in human skin squamous cell carcinomas, but not in other human malignancies. This highlights the potential and specificity of the UVSGs in clinical diagnosis of UV damage and stratification of skin cancer risk. PMID:27643989

  16. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Allium cepa L. (Onion Bulb to Identify Allergens and Epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Rajkumar

    Full Text Available Allium cepa (onion is a diploid plant with one of the largest nuclear genomes among all diploids. Onion is an example of an under-researched crop which has a complex heterozygous genome. There are no allergenic proteins and genomic data available for onions. This study was conducted to establish a transcriptome catalogue of onion bulb that will enable us to study onion related genes involved in medicinal use and allergies. Transcriptome dataset generated from onion bulb using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 technology showed a total of 99,074,309 high quality raw reads (~20 Gb. Based on sequence homology onion genes were categorized into 49 different functional groups. Most of the genes however, were classified under 'unknown' in all three gene ontology categories. Of the categorized genes, 61.2% showed metabolic functions followed by cellular components such as binding, cellular processes; catalytic activity and cell part. With BLASTx top hit analysis, a total of 2,511 homologous allergenic sequences were found, which had 37-100% similarity with 46 different types of allergens existing in the database. From the 46 contigs or allergens, 521 B-cell linear epitopes were identified using BepiPred linear epitope prediction tool. This is the first comprehensive insight into the transcriptome of onion bulb tissue using the NGS technology, which can be used to map IgE epitopes and prediction of structures and functions of various proteins.

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility among clinical Nocardia species identified by multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTaggart, Lisa R; Doucet, Jennifer; Witkowska, Maria; Richardson, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 112 clinical isolates, 28 type strains, and 9 reference strains of Nocardia were determined using the Sensititre Rapmyco microdilution panel (Thermo Fisher, Inc.). Isolates were identified by highly discriminatory multilocus sequence analysis and were chosen to represent the diversity of species recovered from clinical specimens in Ontario, Canada. Susceptibility to the most commonly used drug, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, was observed in 97% of isolates. Linezolid and amikacin were also highly effective; 100% and 99% of all isolates demonstrated a susceptible phenotype. For the remaining antimicrobials, resistance was species specific with isolates of Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, N. brasiliensis, N. abscessus complex, N. nova complex, N. transvalensis complex, N. farcinica, and N. cyriacigeorgica displaying the traditional characteristic drug pattern types. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of a variety of rarely encountered species isolated from clinical specimens are reported for the first time and were categorized into four additional drug pattern types. Finally, MICs for the control strains N. nova ATCC BAA-2227, N. asteroides ATCC 19247(T), and N. farcinica ATCC 23826 were robustly determined to demonstrate method reproducibility and suitability of the commercial Sensititre Rapmyco panel for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Nocardia spp. isolated from clinical specimens. The reported values will facilitate quality control and standardization among laboratories. PMID:25348540

  18. RCAUSE – A ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS MODEL TO IDENTIFY THE ROOT CAUSES OF SOFTWARE REENGINEERING PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er. Anand Rajavat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizations that wish to modernize their legacy systems, must adopt a financial viable evolution strategy to gratify the needs of modern business environment. There are various options available to modernize legacy system in to more contemporary system. Over the last few years’ legacy system reengineering has emerged as a popular system modernization technique. The reengineering generally focuses on the increased productivity and quality of the system. However many of these efforts are often less than successful because they only concentrate on symptoms of software reengineering risk without targeting root causes of those risk. A subjective assessment (diagnosis of software reengineering risk from different domain of legacy system is required to identify the root causes of those risks. The goal of this paper is to highlight root causes of software reengineering risk. We proposed a root cause analysis model RCause that classify root causes of software reengineering risk in to three distinctive but connected areas of interest i.e. system domain, managerial domain and technical domain. .

  19. Differentially expressed genes identified by microarray analysis following leptin treatment of hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Li-hua; CHENG Jun; ZHU Li-ying

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is the process through which numerous chronic liver diseases develop into liver cirrhosis. Leptin can activate hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and play an important role in the formation of liver fibrosis. However, the process by which leptin activates HSCs is complicated, and research on this process is limited. The aim of this study was to explore the related changes in gene expression and the control mechanisms involved in leptin activated HSCs to understand the overall mechanism of liver fibrosis development. Methods We cultivate rat HSCs, with and without stimulation by leptin, and extracted mRNA. Differentially expressed genes were detected by microarray analysis. Results The differentially expressed genes identified included six upregulated genes and six downregulated genes. The representative upregulated genes included short chain dehydrogenase (CY5/CY3=2.265) and pulmonary surfactant protein A1 (CY5/CY3=2.036). The significant downregulated gene encoded hepatic stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD-1) (CY5/CY3=0.351).Conclusion Leptin might mediate the molecular biological mechanisms of liver fibrosis.

  20. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P psoriasis susceptibility. PMID:26743605

  1. LC-MS based Metabolomics Analysis to Identify Potential Allelochemicals in Wedelia trilobata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalrul Azlan Azizan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wedelia trilobata is a noxious invasive weed that has been widely cultivated as a decorative and groundcover plant. The plant has been reported to contain diverse bioactive compounds with a broad spectrum of biological activities including allelochemicals. Allelochemicals contribute to allelopathy interactions that suppress the growth and development of nearby plants. Several studies have reported the allelopathic potential of W. trilobata and its negative effects to crop plants. However, relatively little is known about the allelochemicals’ composition and how allelochemicals contribute to the allelopathic behavior of this plant. In order to prove allelopathy, the identification of the causative allelochemicals is required. The identification of potential allelochemicals that serve as biomarkers could be useful for assessing allelopathy interactions. In this study, a liquid chromatography (LC based metabolomics approach was applied to find biomarkers with allelopathic effects from W. trilobata. Ethanol and water were used to extract metabolites from the leaves of W. trilobata and analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole high-resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS. Using multivariate statistical analysis (MVA, we identified eight Rt-m/z pairs as candidate marker compounds for assessing allelopathy interactions of W. trilobata. The results highlight the application of metabolomics for understanding of the role of allelochemicals in allelopathy interactions of W. trilobata .

  2. Urine metabolomic analysis identifies potential biomarkers and pathogenic pathways in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L; Ganti, Sheila; Guo, Lining; Osier, Michael V; Weiss, Robert H

    2011-05-01

    Kidney cancer is the seventh most common cancer in the Western world, its incidence is increasing, and it is frequently metastatic at presentation, at which stage patient survival statistics are grim. In addition, there are no useful biofluid markers for this disease, such that diagnosis is dependent on imaging techniques that are not generally used for screening. In the present study, we use metabolomics techniques to identify metabolites in kidney cancer patients' urine, which appear at different levels (when normalized to account for urine volume and concentration) from the same metabolites in nonkidney cancer patients. We found that quinolinate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, and gentisate are differentially expressed at a false discovery rate of 0.26, and these metabolites are involved in common pathways of specific amino acid and energetic metabolism, consistent with high tumor protein breakdown and utilization, and the Warburg effect. When added to four different (three kidney cancer-derived and one "normal") cell lines, several of the significantly altered metabolites, quinolinate, α-ketoglutarate, and gentisate, showed increased or unchanged cell proliferation that was cell line-dependent. Further evaluation of the global metabolomics analysis, as well as confirmation of the specific potential biomarkers using a larger sample size, will lead to new avenues of kidney cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:21348635

  3. Acute toxicity tests and meta-analysis identify gaps in tropical ecotoxicology for amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sonia L; Donnelly, Maureen A; Kerby, Jacob; Whitfield, Steven M

    2014-09-01

    Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, particularly in tropical regions where amphibian diversity is highest. Pollutants, including agricultural pesticides, have been identified as a potential contributor to decline, yet toxicological studies of tropical amphibians are very rare. The present study assesses toxic effects on amphibians of 10 commonly used commercial pesticides in tropical agriculture using 2 approaches. First, the authors conducted 8-d toxicity assays with formulations of each pesticide using individually reared red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) tadpoles. Second, they conducted a review of available data for the lethal concentration to kill 50% of test animals from the US Environmental Protection Agency's ECOTOX database to allow comparison with their findings. Lethal concentration estimates from the assays ranged over several orders of magnitude. The nematicides terbufos and ethoprophos and the fungicide chlorothalonil were very highly toxic, with evident effects within an order of magnitude of environmental concentrations. Acute toxicity assays and meta-analysis show that nematicides and fungicides are generally more toxic than herbicides yet receive far less research attention than less toxic herbicides. Given that the tropics have a high diversity of amphibians, the findings emphasize the need for research into the effects of commonly used pesticides in tropical countries and should help guide future ecotoxicological research in tropical regions.

  4. Patent analysis to identify shale gas development in China and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shale gas has become an increasingly important form of hydrocarbon energy, and related technologies reflect the geographical characteristics of the countries where the gas is extracted and stored. The United States (U.S.) produces most of the world’s shale gas, while China has the world’s largest shale gas reserves. In this research, we focused on identifying the trends in shale-gas related technologies registered to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and to the State Intellectual Property Office of the People’s Republic of China (SIPO) respectively. To cluster shale-gas related technologies, we text-mined the abstracts of patent specifications. It was found that in the U.S., the key advanced technologies were related to hydraulic fracturing, horizontal drilling, and slick water areas, whereas China had a focus on proppants. The results of our study are expected to assist energy experts in designing energy policies related to technology importation. - Highlights: • We analyzed shale gas-related patent applications in the USPTO and SIPO. • We clustered shale gas patents by text mining patent abstract. • Differences were observed in shale gas technologies developed in the U.S. and China. • We proposed the policies of shale gas exploration and development based on patent analysis

  5. Systematic analysis of the PTEN 5' leader identifies a major AUU initiated proteoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzani, Ioanna; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Andreev, Dmitri E; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Dean, Kellie A; Baranov, Pavel V; Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Abundant evidence for translation within the 5' leaders of many human genes is rapidly emerging, especially, because of the advent of ribosome profiling. In most cases, it is believed that the act of translation rather than the encoded peptide is important. However, the wealth of available sequencing data in recent years allows phylogenetic detection of sequences within 5' leaders that have emerged under coding constraint and therefore allow for the prediction of functional 5' leader translation. Using this approach, we previously predicted a CUG-initiated, 173 amino acid N-terminal extension to the human tumour suppressor PTEN. Here, a systematic experimental analysis of translation events in the PTEN 5' leader identifies at least two additional non-AUG-initiated PTEN proteoforms that are expressed in most human cell lines tested. The most abundant extended PTEN proteoform initiates at a conserved AUU codon and extends the canonical AUG-initiated PTEN by 146 amino acids. All N-terminally extended PTEN proteoforms tested retain the ability to downregulate the PI3K pathway. We also provide evidence for the translation of two conserved AUG-initiated upstream open reading frames within the PTEN 5' leader that control the ratio of PTEN proteoforms.

  6. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P psoriasis susceptibility.

  7. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies the Dysregulation of Ultraviolet Target Genes in Human Skin Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao; Kim, Arianna L; Du, Rong; Liu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a major risk factor for both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. In addition to its mutagenic effect, UVR can also induce substantial transcriptional instability in skin cells affecting thousands of genes, including many cancer genes, suggesting that transcriptional instability may be another important etiological factor in skin photocarcinogenesis. In this study, we performed detailed transcriptomic profiling studies to characterize the kinetic changes in global gene expression in human keratinocytes exposed to different UVR conditions. We identified a subset of UV-responsive genes as UV signature genes (UVSGs) based on 1) conserved UV-responsiveness of this subset of genes among different keratinocyte lines; and 2) UV-induced persistent changes in their mRNA levels long after exposure. Interestingly, 11 of the UVSGs were shown to be critical to skin cancer cell proliferation and survival. Through computational Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we demonstrated that a significant portion of the UVSGs were dysregulated in human skin squamous cell carcinomas, but not in other human malignancies. This highlights the potential and specificity of the UVSGs in clinical diagnosis of UV damage and stratification of skin cancer risk. PMID:27643989

  8. Expression Data Analysis to Identify Biomarkers Associated with Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is characterized by recurrent episodes of wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing. It is usually caused by a combination of complex and incompletely understood environmental and genetic interactions. We obtained gene expression data with high-throughput screening and identified biomarkers of children's asthma using bioinformatics tools. Next, we explained the pathogenesis of children's asthma from the perspective of gene regulatory networks: DAVID was applied to perform Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enriching analysis for the top 3000 pairs of relationships in differentially regulatory network. Finally, we found that HAND1, PTK1, NFKB1, ZIC3, STAT6, E2F1, PELP1, USF2, and CBFB may play important roles in children's asthma initiation. On account of regulatory impact factor (RIF score, HAND1, PTK7, and ZIC3 were the potential asthma-related factors. Our study provided some foundations of a strategy for biomarker discovery despite a poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying children's asthma.

  9. Whole exome analysis identifies frequent CNGA1 mutations in Japanese population with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Katagiri

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate frequent disease-causing gene mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP in the Japanese population. METHODS: In total, 99 Japanese patients with non-syndromic and unrelated arRP or sporadic RP (spRP were recruited in this study and ophthalmic examinations were conducted for the diagnosis of RP. Among these patients, whole exome sequencing analysis of 30 RP patients and direct sequencing screening of all CNGA1 exons of the other 69 RP patients were performed. RESULTS: Whole exome sequencing of 30 arRP/spRP patients identified disease-causing gene mutations of CNGA1 (four patients, EYS (three patients and SAG (one patient in eight patients and potential disease-causing gene variants of USH2A (two patients, EYS (one patient, TULP1 (one patient and C2orf71 (one patient in five patients. Screening of an additional 69 arRP/spRP patients for the CNGA1 gene mutation revealed one patient with a homozygous mutation. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first identification of CNGA1 mutations in arRP Japanese patients. The frequency of CNGA1 gene mutation was 5.1% (5/99 patients. CNGA1 mutations are one of the most frequent arRP-causing mutations in Japanese patients.

  10. Correlational analysis for identifying genes whose regulation contributes to chronic neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesenfeld-Hallin Zsuzsanna

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nerve injury-triggered hyperexcitability in primary sensory neurons is considered a major source of chronic neuropathic pain. The hyperexcitability, in turn, is thought to be related to transcriptional switching in afferent cell somata. Analysis using expression microarrays has revealed that many genes are regulated in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG following axotomy. But which contribute to pain phenotype versus other nerve injury-evoked processes such as nerve regeneration? Using the L5 spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathy we examined differential changes in gene expression in the L5 (and L4 DRGs in five mouse strains with contrasting susceptibility to neuropathic pain. We sought genes for which the degree of regulation correlates with strain-specific pain phenotype. Results In an initial experiment six candidate genes previously identified as important in pain physiology were selected for in situ hybridization to DRG sections. Among these, regulation of the Na+ channel α subunit Scn11a correlated with levels of spontaneous pain behavior, and regulation of the cool receptor Trpm8 correlated with heat hypersensibility. In a larger scale experiment, mRNA extracted from individual mouse DRGs was processed on Affymetrix whole-genome expression microarrays. Overall, 2552 ± 477 transcripts were significantly regulated in the axotomized L5DRG 3 days postoperatively. However, in only a small fraction of these was the degree of regulation correlated with pain behavior across strains. Very few genes in the "uninjured" L4DRG showed altered expression (24 ± 28. Conclusion Correlational analysis based on in situ hybridization provided evidence that differential regulation of Scn11a and Trpm8 contributes to across-strain variability in pain phenotype. This does not, of course, constitute evidence that the others are unrelated to pain. Correlational analysis based on microarray data yielded a larger "look-up table" of genes whose

  11. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y; Abdullah, Siti N A; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Maziah, M; Sahebi, Mahbod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima; Jahromi, Mohammad F

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is susceptible to the blast fungus pathotype P7.2. Thus, a full DNA and coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the Pikh gene, 3172 bp, and 1206 bp in length, were obtained through amplifying the gDNA and cDNA template from a PH9-resistant rice variety using a specific primer. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology was also used to introduce the Pikh gene into the MR219 callus. Subsequently, transgenic plants were evaluated from the DNA to protein stages using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Transgenic plants were also compared with a control using a real-time quantification technique (to quantify the pathogen population), and transgenic and control plants were challenged with the local most virulent M. oryzae pathotype, P7.2. Based on the results, the Pikh gene encodes a hydrophilic protein with 18 sheets, 4 helixes, and 21 coils. This protein contains 401 amino acids, among which the amino acid sequence from 1 to 376 is a non-cytoplasmic region, that from 377 to 397 is a transmembrane region, and that from 398 to 401 is a cytoplasmic region with no identified disordered regions. The Pikh gene was up-regulated in the transgenic plants compared with the control plants. The quantity of the amino acid leucine in the transgenic rice plants increased significantly from 17.131 in the wild-type to 47.865 mg g(-1) in transgenic plants. The M. oryzae population was constant at 31, 48

  12. Differential expression and prognostic significance of SOX genes in pediatric medulloblastoma and ependymoma identified by microarray analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. de Bont (Judith Maria); J.M. Kros (Johan); M.M. Passier (Monique); R.E. Reddingius (Roel); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); T.M. Luider (Theo); M.L. den Boer (Monique); R. Pieters (Rob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this study was to identify differentially expressed and prognostically important genes in pediatric medulloblastoma and pediatric ependymoma by Affymetrix microarray analysis. Among the most discriminative genes, three members of the SOX transcription factor family were

  13. Genome wide transcriptome analysis of dendritic cells identifies genes with altered expression in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kata Filkor

    Full Text Available Activation of dendritic cells by different pathogens induces the secretion of proinflammatory mediators resulting in local inflammation. Importantly, innate immunity must be properly controlled, as its continuous activation leads to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS or peptidoglycan (PGN induced tolerance, a phenomenon of transient unresponsiveness of cells to repeated or prolonged stimulation, proved valuable model for the study of chronic inflammation. Thus, the aim of this study was the identification of the transcriptional diversity of primary human immature dendritic cells (iDCs upon PGN induced tolerance. Using SAGE-Seq approach, a tag-based transcriptome sequencing method, we investigated gene expression changes of primary human iDCs upon stimulation or restimulation with Staphylococcus aureus derived PGN, a widely used TLR2 ligand. Based on the expression pattern of the altered genes, we identified non-tolerizeable and tolerizeable genes. Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (Kegg analysis showed marked enrichment of immune-, cell cycle- and apoptosis related genes. In parallel to the marked induction of proinflammatory mediators, negative feedback regulators of innate immunity, such as TNFAIP3, TNFAIP8, Tyro3 and Mer are markedly downregulated in tolerant cells. We also demonstrate, that the expression pattern of TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP8 is altered in both lesional, and non-lesional skin of psoriatic patients. Finally, we show that pretreatment of immature dendritic cells with anti-TNF-α inhibits the expression of IL-6 and CCL1 in tolerant iDCs and partially releases the suppression of TNFAIP8. Our findings suggest that after PGN stimulation/restimulation the host cell utilizes different mechanisms in order to maintain critical balance between inflammation and tolerance. Importantly, the transcriptome sequencing of stimulated/restimulated iDCs identified

  14. Identifying Gender-Preferred Communication Styles within Online Cancer Communities: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Kathleen T.; McCray, Alexa T.; Safran, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of this research is to determine if different gender-preferred social styles can be observed within the user interactions at an online cancer community. To achieve this goal, we identify and measure variables that pertain to each gender-specific social style. Methods and Findings We perform social network and statistical analysis on the communication flow of 8,388 members at six different cancer forums over eight years. Kruskal-Wallis tests were conducted to measure the difference between the number of intimate (and highly intimate) dyads, relationship length, and number of communications. We determine that two patients are more likely to form an intimate bond on a gender-specific cancer forum (ovarian P = <0.0001, breast P = 0.0089, prostate P = 0.0021). Two female patients are more likely to form a highly intimate bond on a female-specific cancer forum (Ovarian P<0.0001, Breast P<0.01). Typically a male patient communicates with more members than a female patient (Ovarian forum P = 0.0406, Breast forum P = 0.0013). A relationship between two patients is longer on the gender-specific cancer forums than a connection between two members not identified as patients (ovarian forum P = 0.00406, breast forum P = 0.00013, prostate forum P = .0.0003). Conclusion The high level of interconnectedness among the prostate patients supports the hypothesis that men prefer to socialize in large, interconnected, less-intimate groups. A female patient is more likely to form a highly intimate connection with another female patient; this finding is consistent with the hypothesis that woman prefer fewer, more intimate connections. The relationships of same-gender cancer patients last longer than other relationships; this finding demonstrates homophily within these online communities. Our findings regarding online communication preferences are in agreement with research findings from person-to-person communication preference studies

  15. Identifying gender-preferred communication styles within online cancer communities: a retrospective, longitudinal analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen T Durant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The goal of this research is to determine if different gender-preferred social styles can be observed within the user interactions at an online cancer community. To achieve this goal, we identify and measure variables that pertain to each gender-specific social style. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We perform social network and statistical analysis on the communication flow of 8,388 members at six different cancer forums over eight years. Kruskal-Wallis tests were conducted to measure the difference between the number of intimate (and highly intimate dyads, relationship length, and number of communications. We determine that two patients are more likely to form an intimate bond on a gender-specific cancer forum (ovarian P = <0.0001, breast P = 0.0089, prostate P = 0.0021. Two female patients are more likely to form a highly intimate bond on a female-specific cancer forum (Ovarian P<0.0001, Breast P<0.01. Typically a male patient communicates with more members than a female patient (Ovarian forum P = 0.0406, Breast forum P = 0.0013. A relationship between two patients is longer on the gender-specific cancer forums than a connection between two members not identified as patients (ovarian forum P = 0.00406, breast forum P = 0.00013, prostate forum P = .0.0003. CONCLUSION: The high level of interconnectedness among the prostate patients supports the hypothesis that men prefer to socialize in large, interconnected, less-intimate groups. A female patient is more likely to form a highly intimate connection with another female patient; this finding is consistent with the hypothesis that woman prefer fewer, more intimate connections. The relationships of same-gender cancer patients last longer than other relationships; this finding demonstrates homophily within these online communities. Our findings regarding online communication preferences are in agreement with research findings from person-to-person communication

  16. A cohort analysis to identify eligible patients for intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the results from the randomized TARGIT A trial were published, intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is used more often. IORT can be provided as accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or as a boost. The definition of suitable patients for IORT as APBI differs between different national societies (e.g. ESTRO and ASTRO) and different inclusion criteria of trials and so does the eligibility of patients. This analysis identifies eligible patients for IORT according to available consensus statements and inclusion criteria of the ongoing TARGIT trials. Between 01/03 – 12/09, 1505 breast cancer cases were treated at the breast cancer center at the University Medical Center Mannheim. Complete data sets for age, stage (T, N, and M), histology and hormone receptor status were available in 1108 cases. Parameters to identify eligible patients are as follows: ESTRO: >50 years, invasive ductal carcinoma/other favorable histology (IDC), T1-2 (≤3 cm), N0, any hormone receptor status, M0; ASTRO: ≥60 years, IDC, T1, N0, positive estrogen hormone receptor status, M0; TARGIT E “elderly”, risk adapted radiotherapy with IORT followed by external beam radiotherapy in case of risk factors in final histopathology, phase II: ≥70 years, IDC, T1, N0, any hormone receptor status, M0; TARGIT C “consolidation”, risk adapted radiotherapy, phase IV: ≥50 years, IDC, T1, N0, positive hormone receptor status, M0; TARGIT BQR “boost quality registry”: every age, every histology, T1-2 (max. 3.5 cm), any hormone receptor status, N0/+, M0/+. Out of the 1108 cases, 379 cases (34.2%) were suitable for IORT as APBI regarding the ESTRO and 175 (15.8%) regarding the ASTRO consensus statements. 82 (7.4%) patients were eligible for the TARGIT E trial, 258 (23.3%) for the TARGIT C trial and 671 (60.6%) for the TARGIT BQR registry. According to the consensus statements of ASTRO (45.1%) and ESTRO (41.4%) about half of the eligible patients were treated with IORT as APBI. From the

  17. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel variants associated with osteoarthritis of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Kerkhof, Hanneke J; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur;

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects.......Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects....

  18. Integrated analysis of DNA methylation profiles and gene expression profiles to identify genes associated with pilocytic astrocytomas

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ruigang; MAN, YIGANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study performed an integral analysis of the gene expression and DNA methylation profile of pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs). Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was also performed to examine and identify the genes correlated to PAs, to identify candidate therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAs. The DNA methylation profile and gene expression profile were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Following screening of the differentially expressed gene...

  19. Evaluation of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for Identifying Overweight Individuals at Increased Cardiometabolic Risk: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, Maxine J. E.; Byrne, Christopher D.; Wilson, James F; Wild, Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether bioelectrical impedance analysis could be used to identify overweight individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk, defined as the presence of metabolic syndrome and/or diabetes.DESIGN AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study of a Scottish population including 1210 women and 788 men. The diagnostic performance of thresholds of percentage body fat measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis to identify people at increased cardiometabolic risk was assessed using re...

  20. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara;

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748...

  1. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J. Beesley (Jonathan); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); S. Canisius (Sander); J. Dennis (Joe); M. Lush (Michael); M. Maranian (Melanie); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); M. Shah (Mitul); B. Perkins (Barbara); K. Czene (Kamila); M. Eriksson (Mikael); H. Darabi (Hatef); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); H. Flyger (Henrik); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); O. Fletcher (Olivia); J. Peto (Julian); L.J. Gibson (Lorna); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Rudolph (Anja); U. Eilber (Ursula); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); S. Khan (Sofia); K. Aaltonen (Kirsimari); H. Ahsan (Habibul); M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); A.S. Whittemore (Alice S.); E.M. John (Esther M.); K.E. Malone (Kathleen E.); M.D. Gammon (Marilie); R.M. Santella (Regina M.); G. Ursin (Giske); E. Makalic (Enes); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); G. Casey (Graham); D.J. Hunter (David J.); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); W.R. Diver (Ryan); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); B.E. Henderson (Brian); L. Le Marchand (Loic); C.D. Berg (Christine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); R.N. Hoover (Robert N.); D. Lambrechts (Diether); P. Neven (Patrick); H. Wildiers (Hans); E. van Limbergen (Erik); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; S. Cornelissen (Sten); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); B. Hallberg (Boubou); C. Vachon (Celine); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); M.A. Adank (Muriel); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); D. Kang (Daehee); J.-Y. Choi (Ji-Yeob); S.K. Park (Sue K.); K.Y. Yoo; K. Matsuo (Keitaro); H. Ito (Hidemi); H. Iwata (Hiroji); K. Tajima (Kazuo); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); C. Mulot (Claire); M. Sanchez (Marie); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); H. Surowy (Harald); C. Sohn (Christof); A.H. Wu (Anna H); C.-C. Tseng (Chiu-chen); D. Van Den Berg (David); D.O. Stram (Daniel O.); A. González-Neira (Anna); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); W. Lu (Wei); Y. Gao; H. Cai (Hui); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); S.H. Teo (Soo Hwang); C.H. Yip (Cheng Har); N.A.M. Taib (Nur Aishah Mohd); G.-H. Tan (Gie-Hooi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John); J. Margriet Collée; W.J. Blot (William); L.B. Signorello (Lisa B.); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); J. Hopper (John); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); M.-F. Hou (Ming-Feng); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Silje); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe Grenaker); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); F. Canzian (Federico); D. Trichopoulos (Dimitrios); P.H.M. Peeters; E. Lund (Eiliv); R. Sund (Reijo); K.T. Khaw; M.J. Gunter (Marc J.); D. Palli (Domenico); L.M. Mortensen (Lotte Maxild); L. Dossus (Laure); J.-M. Huerta (Jose-Maria); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); K. Muir (Kenneth); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); S. Stewart-Brown (Sarah); P. Siriwanarangsan (Pornthep); J.M. Hartman (Joost); X. Miao; K.S. Chia (Kee Seng); C.W. Chan (Ching Wan); P.A. Fasching (Peter); R. Hein (Rebecca); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias W.); L. Haeberle (Lothar); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); L.A. Brinton (Louise); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); M. Shrubsole (Martha); J. Long (Jirong); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); U. Hamann (Ute); T. Brüning (Thomas); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Bernard (Loris); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprisi

  2. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I;

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of > 10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer...

  3. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerosolimo Germano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system. Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 with both the Huh-7 parental cells and the 21-5 cured (21-5c cells. In these latter, the HCV RNA has been eliminated by IFN-α treatment. To confirm data, we also analyzed microarray results from both the 21-5 and two other HCV replicon clones, 22-6 and 21-7, compared to the Huh-7 cells. The study was carried out by using the Applied Biosystems (AB Human Genome Survey Microarray v1.0 which provides 31,700 probes that correspond to 27,868 human genes. Microarray analysis revealed a specific transcriptional program induced by HCV in replicon cells respect to both IFN-α-cured and Huh-7 cells. From the original datasets of differentially expressed genes, we selected by Venn diagrams a final list of 38 genes modulated by HCV in all clones. Most of the 38 genes have never been described before and showed high fold-change associated with significant p-value, strongly supporting data reliability. Classification of the 38 genes by Panther System identified functional categories that were significantly enriched in this gene set, such as histones and ribosomal proteins as well as extracellular matrix and intracellular protein traffic. The dataset also included new genes involved in lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal network, which may be critical for HCV replication and pathogenesis. Conclusion Our data provide a comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression induced by HCV replication and reveal modulation of new genes potentially useful

  4. Potential Coastal Pumped Hydroelectric Energy Storage Locations Identified using GIS-based Topographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, R.; Barnhart, C. J.; Benson, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale electrical energy storage could accommodate variable, weather dependent energy resources such as wind and solar. Pumped hydroelectric energy storage (PHS) and compressed energy storage area (CAES) have life cycle energy and financial costs that are an order of magnitude lower than conventional electrochemical storage technologies. However PHS and CAES storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Conventional PHS requires an upper and lower reservoir separated by at least 100 m of head, but no more than 10 km in horizontal distance. Conventional PHS also impacts fresh water supplies, riparian ecosystems, and hydrologic environments. A PHS facility that uses the ocean as the lower reservoir benefits from a smaller footprint, minimal freshwater impact, and the potential to be located near off shore wind resources and population centers. Although technologically nascent, today one coastal PHS facility exists. The storage potential for coastal PHS is unknown. Can coastal PHS play a significant role in augmenting future power grids with a high faction of renewable energy supply? In this study we employ GIS-based topographic analysis to quantify the coastal PHS potential of several geographic locations, including California, Chile and Peru. We developed automated techniques that seek local topographic minima in 90 m spatial resolution shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) digital elevation models (DEM) that satisfy the following criteria conducive to PHS: within 10 km from the sea; minimum elevation 150 m; maximum elevation 1000 m. Preliminary results suggest the global potential for coastal PHS could be very significant. For example, in northern Chile we have identified over 60 locations that satisfy the above criteria. Two of these locations could store over 10 million cubic meters of water or several GWh of energy. We plan to report a global database of candidate coastal PHS locations and to estimate their energy storage capacity.

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of Syringa oblata Lindl. Inflorescence Identifies Genes Associated with Pigment Biosynthesis and Scent Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zheng

    Full Text Available Syringa oblata Lindl. is a woody ornamental plant with high economic value and characteristics that include early flowering, multiple flower colors, and strong fragrance. Despite a long history of cultivation, the genetics and molecular biology of S. oblata are poorly understood. Transcriptome and expression profiling data are needed to identify genes and to better understand the biological mechanisms of floral pigments and scents in this species. Nine cDNA libraries were obtained from three replicates of three developmental stages: inflorescence with enlarged flower buds not protruded, inflorescence with corolla lobes not displayed, and inflorescence with flowers fully opened and emitting strong fragrance. Using the Illumina RNA-Seq technique, 319,425,972 clean reads were obtained and were assembled into 104,691 final unigenes (average length of 853 bp, 41.75% of which were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Among the annotated unigenes, 36,967 were assigned to gene ontology categories and 19,956 were assigned to eukaryoticorthologous groups. Using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database, 12,388 unigenes were sorted into 286 pathways. Based on these transcriptomic data, we obtained a large number of candidate genes that were differentially expressed at different flower stages and that were related to floral pigment biosynthesis and fragrance metabolism. This comprehensive transcriptomic analysis provides fundamental information on the genes and pathways involved in flower secondary metabolism and development in S. oblata, providing a useful database for further research on S. oblata and other plants of genus Syringa.

  6. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ashbrook, David G.; Robert W Williams; Lu eLu; Reinmar eHager

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for beha...

  7. Rmg7, a New Gene for Resistance to Triticum Isolates of Pyricularia oryzae Identified in Tetraploid Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Analiza Grubanzo; Chuma, Izumi; Tosa, Yukio

    2015-04-01

    A single gene for resistance, designated Rmg7 (Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea 7), was identified in a tetraploid wheat accession, St24 (Triticum dicoccum, KU120), against Br48, a Triticum isolate of Pyricularia oryzae. Two other wheat accessions, St17 (T. dicoccum, KU112) and St25 (T. dicoccum, KU122), were also resistant against Br48 and showed a similar disease reaction pattern to St24. Crosses between these resistant accessions yielded no susceptible F2 seedlings, suggesting that St24, St17, and St25 carry the same resistance gene. Furthermore, a single avirulence gene corresponding to Rmg7 was detected in a segregation analysis of random F1 progenies between Br48 and MZ5-1-6, an Eleusine isolate virulent to St24 at a higher temperature. This avirulence gene was recognized not only by St24, but also by St17 and St25, thus supporting the preceding results indicating that all three accessions carry Rmg7. This resistance gene may have potential in future wheat breeding programs. PMID:25870924

  8. GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ANALYSIS IDENTIFIES LOCI FOR PRODUCTIVE TRAITS IN JERSEY BREED

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major objective of genomic research in dairy cattle at present is to identify, map, and characterize individual quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affects production traits. A genome scan was conducted in the US Jersey population to identify QTL affecting milk, fat and protein production. Data use...

  9. The Use of Descriptive Analysis to Identify and Manipulate Schedules of Reinforcement in the Treatment of Food Refusal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Sean D.; Cooper-Brown, Linda J.; Wacker, David P.; Rankin, Barbara E.

    2006-01-01

    The feeding behaviors of a child diagnosed with failure to thrive were assessed using descriptive analysis methodology to identify the schedules of reinforcement provided by the child's parents. This analysis revealed that the child's appropriate feeding behaviors (i.e., bite acceptance, self-feeding) were on a lean schedule of positive…

  10. Mating Type Alleles,Female Fertility and Genetic Diversity of Magnaporthe grisea Populations Pathogenic to Rice from Some Asian Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ying; Joelle Milazzo; YUAN Xiao-ping; Henry Adreit; WANG Yan-li; Jean Loup Notteghem; Didier Tharreau

    2003-01-01

    Five hundred and twenty-two isolates of Magnaporthe grisea isolated from rice in 5 Asian countries were characterized for their mating type by crossing them with 4 hermaphroditic isolates (KA3 and TH2: MAT1.1; Guy11 and TH-16: MAT1.2). Among them, 41% were MAT1.1 and 25% were MAT1.2.The remaining 34% did not produce perithecia with any of the 4 hermaphroditic testers. In Bangladesh, India,Nepal, Vietnam and in most provinces of China, both mating types were present. Only one mating type was found in 3 provinces and 1 city of China. Almost all the isolates had very low fertility, as they were in general female sterile and sometimes also male sterile. Hermaphroditic isolates were recovered from the 5 countries. In these countries, they represented between 13% and 75% of the isolates. In Zhejiang, Guizhou, Guangdong,Hunan, Yunnan and H-ubei provinces of China, hermaphroditic isolates represented between 6% and 67%.The genetic diversity of 143 isolates from these countries and provinces, where hermaphroditic isolates had been collected, was analyzed using SCAR markers. Genetic diversity was high and population structure did not resemble classical clonal structure described in most rice growing regions. The existence of sexual reproduction in the field, localization of a center of diversity in China, and migration between countries were discussed in this paper.

  11. OsSERK1 regulates rice development but not immunity to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae or Magnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shimin Zuo; and Pamela C Ronald; Xiaogang Zhou; Mawsheng Chen; Shilu Zhang; Benjamin Schwessinger; Deling Ruan; Can Yuan; Jing Wang; Xuewei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase (SERK) proteins play pivotal roles in regulation of plant development and immunity. The rice genome contains two SERK genes, OsSerk1 and OsSerk2. We previously demonstrated that OsSerk2 is required for rice Xa21‐mediated resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and for normal development. Here we report the molecular characterization of OsSerk1. Overexpres-sion of OsSerk1 results in a semi‐dwarf phenotype whereas silencing of OsSerk1 results in a reduced angle of the lamina joint. OsSerk1 is not required for rice resistance to Xoo or Magnaporthe oryzae. Overexpression of OsSerk1 in OsSerk2‐silenced lines complements phenotypes associated with brassinosteroid (BR) signaling defects, but not the disease resistance phenotype mediated by Xa21. In yeast, OsSERK1 interacts with itself forming homodimers, and also interacts with the kinase domains of OsSERK2 and BRI1, respectively. OsSERK1 is a functional protein kinase capable of auto‐phosphorylation in vitro. We conclude that, whereas OsSERK2 regulates both rice development and immunity, OsSERK1 functions in rice development but not immunity to Xoo and M. oryzae.

  12. Population structure and pathotype diversity of the wheat blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae 25 years after its emergence in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, João L Nunes; Ceresini, Paulo C; Castroagudin, Vanina L; Zala, Marcelo; Kema, Gerrit H J; McDonald, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Since its first report in Brazil in 1985, wheat blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph: Pyricularia oryzae), has become increasingly important in South America, where the disease is still spreading. We used 11 microsatellite loci to elucidate the population structure of the wheat blast pathogen in wheat fields in central-western, southeastern, and southern Brazil. No subdivision was found among the wheat-infecting populations, consistent with high levels of gene flow across a large spatial scale. Although the clonal fraction was relatively high and the two mating type idiomorphs (MAT1-1 and MAT1-2) were not at similar frequencies, the clone-corrected populations from Distrito Federal and Goiás, Minas Triangle, and São Paulo were in gametic equilibrium. Based on these findings, we propose that populations of the wheat blast pathogen exhibit a mixed reproductive system in which sexual reproduction is followed by the local dispersal of clones. Seedling virulence assays with local wheat cultivars differentiated 14 pathotypes in the current population. Detached head virulence assays differentiated eight virulence groups on the same wheat cultivars. There was no correlation between seedling and head reactions. PMID:23901831

  13. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase MoPyr5 is involved in uridine 5'-phosphate synthesis and pathogenesis of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhongqiang; Liu, Muxing; Dong, Yanhan; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-04-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase) plays an important role in de novo and salvage pathways of nucleotide synthesis and is widely used as a screening marker in genetic transformation. However, the function of OPRTase in plant pathogens remains unclear. In this study, we characterized an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ura5, the OPRTase MoPyr5, from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Targeted gene disruption revealed that MoPyr5 is required for mycelial growth, appressorial turgor pressure and penetration into plant tissues, invasive hyphal growth, and pathogenicity. Interestingly, the ∆Mopyr5 mutant is also involved in mycelial surface hydrophobicity. Exogenous uridine 5'-phosphate (UMP) restored vegetative growth and rescued the defect in pathogenicity on detached barley and rice leaf sheath. Collectively, our results show that MoPyr5 is an OPRTase for UMP biosynthesis in M. oryzae and indicate that UTP biosynthesis is closely linked with vegetative growth, cell wall integrity, and pathogenicity of fungus. Our results also suggest that UMP biosynthesis would be a good target for the development of novel fungicides against M. oryzae. PMID:26810198

  14. Suppression of Magnaporthe oryzae and interaction between Bacillus subtilis and rice plants in the control of rice blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yuexia; Wang, Qi; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae, the causative pathogen of rice blast, has caused extensive losses to rice cultivation worldwide. Strains of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis have been used as biocontrol agents against rice blast. However, little has been reported about the interaction between B. subtilis and the rice plant and its mechanism of action. Here, the colonization process and induced disease resistance by B. subtilis SYX04 and SYX20 in rice plants was examined. Strains of B. subtilis labeled with green fluorescent protein reached population of more than 5 × 10(6) CFU/g after 20 days on mature rice leaves and were detected after 3 days on newly grown leaves. Results showed that SYX04 and SYX20 not only inhibited spore germination, germ tube length, and appressorial formation but also caused a series of alterations in the structures of hyphae and conidia. The cell walls and membrane structures of the fungus showed ultrastructural abnormalities, which became severely degraded as observed through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The mixture of both B. subtilis and M. oryzae resulted in enhanced activity of peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase while there was significantly more superoxide dismutase activity in plants that had been sprayed with B. subtilis alone. The present study suggests that colonized SYX04 and SYX20 strains protected rice plants and exhibited antifungal activity and induced systemic resistance, thus indicating their potential biological control agents. PMID:27536521

  15. Differential Gene Expression Reflects Morphological Characteristics and Physiological Processes in Rice Immunity against Blast Pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y; Mahmood, Maziah; Abdullah, Siti N A; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Nejat, Naghmeh; Latif, Muhammad A; Sahebi, Mahbod

    2015-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious pathogen that jeopardises the world's most important food-security crop. Ten common Malaysian rice varieties were examined for their morphological, physiological and genomic responses to this rice blast pathogen. qPCR quantification was used to assess the growth of the pathogen population in resistant and susceptible rice varieties. The chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were also measured to further understand the disruptive effects that M. oryzae has on infected plants of these varieties. Real-time PCR was used to explore the differential expression of eight blast resistance genes among the ten local varieties. Blast disease has destructive effects on the growth of rice, and the findings of our study provide evidence that the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes are involved in defence responses in the leaves of Malaysian rice at 31 h after inoculation with M. oryzae pathotype P7.2. Both the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were reduced, but the levels of Pikh gene expression remained constant in susceptible varieties, with a developed pathogen population and mild or severe symptoms. The Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes, however, were simultaneously upregulated in infected rice plants. Therefore, the presence of the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes in the germplasm is useful for improving the resistance of rice varieties. PMID:26001124

  16. Development of a novel strategy for fungal transformation based on a mutant locus conferring carboxin-resistance in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Zhu, Xiaolei; Li, Hongxia; Tan, Leyong; Pan, Yuemin

    2016-12-01

    The accurate manipulation of genomic integration of mutant alleles or fluorescent fusion-protein constructs is necessary for understanding of pathogenic mechanism of Magnaporthe oryzae. Recently, this can be achieved by integrating of exogenous DNA randomly into genome of this pathogen, but ectopic integration may result in alteration of gene expression or gene disruption due to unpredictable position effects and/or disruption of protein-coding regions. In this study, we establish a novel strategy for locus-specific integration of exogenous DNA via carboxin-resistance reconstitution by a point-mutation (H245L) on succinate dehydrogenase subunit Mosdi1. Independent transformants derived from the same reconstitution construct showed consistent fluorescent signal and undiversified phenotypes, including hyphae growth, conidiation and pathogenicity, in M. oryzae. Meanwhile, 96 % of all transformants integrate correctly into the Mosdi1 locus as a single copy. Furthermore, we provide a vector carrying yeast recombination cassette and thus allow assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by yeast in vivo recombination for gene complementation and protein localization assay. PMID:27558019

  17. A Clustering Analysis for Identifying Areas of Collision Risk in Restricted Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Xiang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of areas of collision risk in restricted waters could play an important role in VTS services. Based on the concept of ship domain, this paper introduces a model for identifying collision risk between vessels in restricted waters, then puts forward an improved DBSCAN clustering algorithm for identifying areas of high collision risk, finally, the visualization algorithm is presented. The experimental results in this paper show the algorithm is capable of identifying and rendering areas of collision risk in restricted waters.

  18. Local identifiability and sensitivity analysis of neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M M; Lemos, J M; Coito, A; Costa, B A; Wigren, T; Mendonça, T

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the local identifiability and sensitivity properties of two classes of Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and depth of hypnosis, when drug dose profiles like the ones commonly administered in the clinical practice are used as model inputs. The local parameter identifiability was assessed based on the singular value decomposition of the normalized sensitivity matrix. For the given input signal excitation, the results show an over-parameterization of the standard pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models. The same identifiability assessment was performed on recently proposed minimally parameterized parsimonious models for both the neuromuscular blockade and the depth of hypnosis. The results show that the majority of the model parameters are identifiable from the available input-output data. This indicates that any identification strategy based on the minimally parameterized parsimonious Wiener models for the neuromuscular blockade and for the depth of hypnosis is likely to be more successful than if standard models are used.

  19. Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beecham, Ashley H; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Xifara, Dionysia K;

    2013-01-01

    Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analyzed 14,498 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (P...

  20. A retrospective analysis to identify predictors of COPD-related rehospitalization

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Melissa H; Clerisme-Beaty, Emmanuelle; Kozma, Chris M; Paris, Andrew; Slaton, Terra; Mapel, Douglas W

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with recurrent hospitalizations. This study aimed to identify factors related to COPD rehospitalization. Methods A national US claims database was used to identify patients, aged ≥40 years, hospitalized for COPD. Their first COPD-related hospital admission date in 2009 was set as the index date, with post-discharge COPD-related rehospitalization assessed for 180 days post-index date. Data were analyzed for: 1) all eli...

  1. Mexiletine Therapy for Chronic Pain: Survival Analysis Identifies Factors Predicting Clinical Success

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Ian R; Kaplan, Kimberly M.; Mackey, Sean C.

    2008-01-01

    Mexiletine, a sodium channel blocker, treats neuropathic pain but its clinical value has been questioned due to its significant side effects and limited efficacy. We hypothesized that ongoing therapy with mexiletine would have limited patient acceptance, but that an analgesic response to intravenous (IV) lidocaine (a pharmacologically similar drug) would identify patients most likely to choose ongoing therapy with mexiletine. We identified a cohort of 37 patients with neuropathic pain who und...

  2. An efficient record linkage scheme using graphical analysis for identifier error detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peto Tim EA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integration of information on individuals (record linkage is a key problem in healthcare delivery, epidemiology, and "business intelligence" applications. It is now common to be required to link very large numbers of records, often containing various combinations of theoretically unique identifiers, such as NHS numbers, which are both incomplete and error-prone. Methods We describe a two-step record linkage algorithm in which identifiers with high cardinality are identified or generated, and used to perform an initial exact match based linkage. Subsequently, the resulting clusters are studied and, if appropriate, partitioned using a graph based algorithm detecting erroneous identifiers. Results The system was used to cluster over 250 million health records from five data sources within a large UK hospital group. Linkage, which was completed in about 30 minutes, yielded 3.6 million clusters of which about 99.8% contain, with high likelihood, records from one patient. Although computationally efficient, the algorithm's requirement for exact matching of at least one identifier of each record to another for cluster formation may be a limitation in some databases containing records of low identifier quality. Conclusions The technique described offers a simple, fast and highly efficient two-step method for large scale initial linkage for records commonly found in the UK's National Health Service.

  3. Integrated analysis of DNA methylation profiles and gene expression profiles to identify genes associated with pilocytic astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruigang; Man, Yigang

    2016-04-01

    The present study performed an integral analysis of the gene expression and DNA methylation profile of pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs). Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was also performed to examine and identify the genes correlated to PAs, to identify candidate therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAs. The DNA methylation profile and gene expression profile were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Following screening of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially methylated regions (DMRs), respectively, integrated analysis of the DEGs and DMRs was performed to detect their correlation. Subsequently, the WGCNA algorithm was applied to identify the significant modules and construct the co‑expression network associated with PAs. Furthermore, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the associated genes was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. A total number of 2,259 DEGs and 235 DMRs were screened out. Integrated analysis revealed that 30 DEGs were DMRs with prominent negative correlation (cor=‑0.82; P=0.02). Based on the DEGs, the gene co‑expression network was constructed, and nine network modules associated with PAs were identified. The functional analysis results showed that genes relevant to PAs were closely associated with cell differentiation modulation. The screened PA-associated genes were significantly different at the expression and methylation levels. These genes may be used as reliable candidate target genes for the treatment of PAs. PMID:26934913

  4. Gene-set analysis based on the pharmacological profiles of drugs to identify repurposing opportunities in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Simone; Vidler, Lewis R; Mokrab, Younes; Collier, David A; Breen, Gerome

    2016-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of novel genetic associations for complex genetic disorders, leading to the identification of potential pharmacological targets for novel drug development. In schizophrenia, 108 conservatively defined loci that meet genome-wide significance have been identified and hundreds of additional sub-threshold associations harbour information on the genetic aetiology of the disorder. In the present study, we used gene-set analysis based on the known binding targets of chemical compounds to identify the 'drug pathways' most strongly associated with schizophrenia-associated genes, with the aim of identifying potential drug repositioning opportunities and clues for novel treatment paradigms, especially in multi-target drug development. We compiled 9389 gene sets (2496 with unique gene content) and interrogated gene-based p-values from the PGC2-SCZ analysis. Although no single drug exceeded experiment wide significance (corrected pdrugs and molecules that show polypharmacy. PMID:27302942

  5. Identifying disease candidate genes via large-scale gene network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haseong; Park, Taesung; Gelenbe, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) provide systematic views of complex living systems, offering reliable and large-scale GRNs to identify disease candidate genes. A reverse engineering technique, Bayesian Model Averaging-based Networks (BMAnet), which ensembles all appropriate linear models to tackle uncertainty in model selection that integrates heterogeneous biological data sets is introduced. Using network evaluation metrics, we compare the networks that are thus identified. The metric 'Random walk with restart (Rwr)' is utilised to search for disease genes. In a simulation our method shows better performance than elastic-net and Gaussian graphical models, but topological quantities vary among the three methods. Using real-data, brain tumour gene expression samples consisting of non-tumour, grade III and grade IV are analysed to estimate networks with a total of 4422 genes. Based on these networks, 169 brain tumour-related candidate genes were identified and some were found to relate to 'wound', 'apoptosis', and 'cell death' processes. PMID:25796737

  6. Alternative splicing in colon, bladder, and prostate cancer identified by exon-array analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Kasper; Sørensen, Karina D.; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie;

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing enhances proteome diversity and modulates cancer-associated proteins. To identify tissue- and tumor-specific alternative splicing, we used the GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array to measure whole-genome exon expression in 102 normal and cancer tissue samples of different stages......, and 18 candidate tumor-specific splicing alterations in colon, bladder, and prostate, respectively, were selected for RT-PCR validation on an independent set of 81 normal and tumor tissue samples. In total, seven genes with tumor-specific splice variants were identified (ACTN1, CALD1, COL6A3, LRRFIP2...... from colon, urinary bladder, and prostate. We identified 2069 candidate alternative splicing events between normal tissue samples from colon, bladder, and prostate and selected 15 splicing events for RT-PCR validation, 10 of which were successfully validated by RT-PCR and sequencing. Furthermore 23, 19...

  7. Co-expression network analysis to identify pluripotency biomarkers in bovine and porcine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzoni, Gianluca; Freude, Karla Kristine; Hall, Vanessa Jane;

    stable culture of pluripotent cells in pig and cattle. Methods After quality control reads were pre-processed and mapped with STAR aligner. Post-mapping quality was checked with Qualimap. Finally the expression levels were estimated using HTSeq. Gene co-expression will be analyzed using a weighted...... network based method to identify highly co-expressed genes (module) and hub genes. Modules with a potential role in pluripotency will be identified with enrichment procedure and regulator genes identified with LemonTree algorithm. Differential wiring of modules among species will be evaluated. Expected...... results We expect to find out candidate pluripotency factors in porcine and bovine embryo. Acknowledgements We thank for the financial support from the EU project PluriSys, HEALTH-2007-B-223485....

  8. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elks, Cathy E; Perry, John R B; Sulem, Patrick;

    2010-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10⁻⁶⁰) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10⁻³³), we identified 30 new menarc...

  9. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Elks (Cathy); J.R.B. Perry (John); P. Sulem (Patrick); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); N. Franceschini (Nora); C. He (Chunyan); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); J.A. Visser (Jenny); E.M. Byrne (Enda); D.L. Cousminer (Diana); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); T. Esko (Tõnu); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); D.L. Koller (Daniel); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); P. Lin (Peng); M. Mangino (Massimo); M. Marongiu (Mara); P.F. McArdle (Patrick); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); L. Stolk (Lisette); S. van Wingerden (Sophie); J.H. Zhao; E. Albrecht (Eva); T. Corre (Tanguy); E. Ingelsson (Erik); C. Hayward (Caroline); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); S. Ulivi (Shelia); N. Warrington (Nicole); L. Zgaga (Lina); H. Alavere (Helene); N. Amin (Najaf); T. Aspelund (Thor); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); I. Barroso (Inês); G. Berenson (Gerald); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); H. Blackburn (Hannah); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J.E. Buring (Julie); F. Busonero; H. Campbell (Harry); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); W. Chen (Wei); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David); A.D. Coviello (Andrea); P. D'Adamo (Pio); U. de Faire (Ulf); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Döring (Angela); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); V. Emilsson (Valur); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); T. Foroud (Tatiana); M. Garcia (Melissa); P. Gasparini (Paolo); F. Geller (Frank); C. Gieger (Christian); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A.S. Hall (Alistair); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); L. Ferreli (Liana); A.C. Heath (Andrew); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Hofman (Albert); F.B. Hu (Frank); T. Illig (Thomas); M.R. Järvelin; A.D. Johnson (Andrew); D. Karasik (David); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); D.P. Kiel (Douglas); T.O. Kilpelänen (Tuomas); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Kraft (Peter); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); S. Li (Shengxu); J. Liu (Jianjun); D. Levy (Daniel); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. Melbye (Mads); V. Mooser (Vincent); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); M.A. Nalls (Michael); P. Navarro (Pau); M. Nelis (Mari); A.R. Ness (Andrew); K. Northstone (Kate); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Peacock (Munro); C. Palmer (Cameron); A. Palotie (Aarno); G. Paré (Guillaume); A.N. Parker (Alex); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); O. Polasek (Ozren); A.S. Plump (Andrew); A. Pouta (Anneli); E. Porcu (Eleonora); T. Rafnar (Thorunn); J.P. Rice (John); S.M. Ring (Susan); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Sala (Cinzia); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S. Sanna (Serena); D. Schlessinger; N.J. Schork (Nicholas); A. Scuteri (Angelo); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); U. Sovio (Ulla); S.R. Srinivasan (Sathanur); D.P. Strachan (David); M.L. Tammesoo; E. Tikkanen (Emmi); D. Toniolo (Daniela); K. Tsui (Kim); L. Tryggvadottir (Laufey); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M. Uda (Manuela); R.M. van Dam (Rob); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); N.J. Wareham (Nick); D. Waterworth (Dawn); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J.F. Wilson (James); A.F. Wright (Alan); L. Young (Lauren); G. Zhai (Guangju); W.V. Zhuang; L.J. Bierut (Laura); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H.A. Boyd (Heather); L. Crisponi (Laura); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); M.J. Econs (Michael); T.B. Harris (Tamara); D. Hunter (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); A. Metspalu (Andres); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); P.M. Ridker (Paul); T.D. Spector (Tim); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); K. Stefansson (Kari); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); E. Widen (Elisabeth); J. Murabito (Joanne); K. Ong (Ken); M.N. Weedon (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTo identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10 -60) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10 -33), we identified 30

  10. Asaia bogorensis peritonitis identified by 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis in a patient receiving peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Richard W; Ruhe, Jorg; Kobrin, Sidney; Wasserstein, Alan; Doline, Christa; Nachamkin, Irving; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2004-08-01

    Here the authors report a case of refractory peritonitis leading to multiple hospitalizations and the loss of peritoneal dialysis access in a patient on automated peritoneal dialysis, caused by Asaia bogorensis, a bacterium not previously described as a human pathogen. This organism was identified by sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Unusual microbial agents may cause peritonitis, and molecular microbiological techniques are important tools for identifying these agents.

  11. Gene-set analysis based on the pharmacological profiles of drugs to identify repurposing opportunities in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, Simone; Vidler, Lewis; Mokrab, Younes; Collier, David A; Breen, Gerome Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of novel genetic associations for complex genetic disorders, leading to the identification of potential pharmacological targets for novel drug development. In schizophrenia, 108 conservatively defined loci that meet genome-wide significance have been identified and hundreds of additional sub-threshold associations harbor information on the genetic aetiology of the disorder. In the present study, we used gene-set analysis based o...

  12. Identifying airline cost economies: An econometric analysis of the factors affecting aircraft opeerating costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Zuidberg

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides the results of an econometric analysis of the influences of airline characteristics on the average operating costs per aircraft movement. The analysis combines a comprehensive selection of airline-output variables, airline-fleet variables, and airline-market variables. The result

  13. Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schunkert (Heribert); I.R. König (Inke); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); H. Holm (Hilma); M. Preuss (Michael); A.F.R. Stewart (Alexandre); M. Barbalic (maja); C. Gieger (Christian); D. Absher (Devin); Z. Aherrahrou (Zouhair); H. Allayee (Hooman); D. Altshuler (David); S.S. Anand (Sonia); K. Andersen (Karl); J.L. Anderson (Jeffrey); D. Ardissino (Diego); S.G. Ball (Stephen); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); T.A. Barnes (Timothy); D.M. Becker (Diane); K. Berger (Klaus); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S.M. Boekholdt (Matthijs); E. Boerwinkle (Eric); P.S. Braund (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M.S. Burnett; I. Buysschaert (Ian); J.F. Carlquist (John); L. Chen (Li); S. Cichon (Sven); V. Codd (Veryan); R.W. Davies (Robert); G.V. Dedoussis (George); A. Dehghan (Abbas); S. Demissie (Serkalem); J. Devaney (Joseph); P. Diemert (Patrick); R. Do (Ron); A. Doering (Angela); S. Eifert (Sandra); N.E.E. Mokhtari; S.G. Ellis (Stephen); R. Elosua (Roberto); J.C. Engert (James); S.E. Epstein (Stephen); U. de Faire (Ulf); M. Fischer (Marcus); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); J. Freyer (Jennifer); B. Gigante (Bruna); D. Girelli (Domenico); S. Gretarsdottir (Solveig); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.R. Gulcher (Jeffrey); E. Halperin (Eran); N. Hammond (Naomi); S.L. Hazen (Stanley); A. Hofman (Albert); B.D. Horne (Benjamin); T. Illig (Thomas); C. Iribarren (Carlos); G.T. Jones (Gregory); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M.A. Kaiser (Michael); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); J.W. Knowles (Joshua); G. Kolovou (Genovefa); A. Kong (Augustine); R. Laaksonen (Reijo); D. Lambrechts (Diether); K. Leander (Karin); G. Lettre (Guillaume); X. Li (Xiaohui); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Loley (Christina); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); P.M. Mannucci (Pier); S. Maouche (Seraya); N. Martinelli (Nicola); P.P. McKeown (Pascal); C. Meisinger (Christa); T. Meitinger (Thomas); O. Melander (Olle); P.A. Merlini; V. Mooser (Vincent); T. Morgan (Thomas); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); J.B. Muhlestein (Joseph); T. Münzel (Thomas); K. Musunuru (Kiran); J. Nahrstaedt (Janja); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); O. Olivieri (Oliviero); R.S. Patel (Riyaz); C.C. Patterson (Chris); A. Peters (Annette); F. Peyvandi (Flora); L. Qu (Liming); A.A. Quyyumi (Arshed); D.J. Rader (Daniel); L.S. Rallidis (Loukianos); C. Rice (Catherine); F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); D. Rubin (Diana); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.L. Sampietro (Maria Lourdes); M.S. Sandhu (Manj); E.E. Schadt (Eric); A. Scḧsignfer (Arne); A. Schillert (Arne); S. Schreiber (Stefan); J. Schrezenmeir (Jürgen); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); D.S. Siscovick (David); M. Sivananthan (Mohan); S. Sivapalaratnam (Suthesh); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); J.D. Snoep (Jaapjan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); J.A. Spertus (John); K. Stark (Klaus); K. Stirrups (Kathy); M. Stoll (Monika); W.H.W. Tang (Wilson); S. Tennstedt (Stephanie); G. Thorgeirsson (Gudmundur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); M. Tomaszewski; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A.M. van Rij (Andre); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); N.J. Wareham (Nick); G.A. Wells (George); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); P.S. Wild (Philipp); C. Willenborg (Christina); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.J. Wright (Benjamin); S. Ye (Shu); T. Zeller (Tanja); A. Ziegler; F. Cambien (François); A.H. Goodall (Alison); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); T. Quertermous (Thomas); W. Mäsignrz (Winfried); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); S. Blankenberg (Stefan); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); A.S. Hall (Alistair); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J.R. Thompson (John); K. Stefansson (Kari); R. Roberts (Robert); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); R. McPherson (Ruth); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); N.J. Samani (Nilesh)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis ide

  14. Identifying Research Fields within Business and Management: A Journal Cross-Citation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mingers, John; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2014-01-01

    A discipline such as business and management (B&M) is very broad and has many fields within it, ranging from fairly scientific ones such as management science or economics to softer ones such as information systems. There are at least three reasons why it is important to identify these sub-fields accurately. Firstly, to give insight into the structure of the subject area and identify perhaps unrecognised commonalities; second for the purpose of normalizing citation data as it is well known th...

  15. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki;

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ∼8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in ...

  16. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghoussaini, M.; Fletcher, O.; Michailidou, K.; Turnbull, C.; Schmidt, M.K.; Dicks, E.; Dennis, J.; Wang, Q.; Humphreys, M.K.; Luccarini, C.; Baynes, C.; Conroy, D.; Maranian, M.; Ahmed, S.; Driver, K.; Johnson, N.; Orr, N.; dos Santos Silva, I.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rivadeneira, F.; Hall, P.; Czene, K.; Irwanto, A.; Liu, J.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Blomqvist, C.; Meindl, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Muller-Myhsok, B.; Lichtner, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Hein, R.; Nickels, S.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Tsimiklis, H.; Makalic, E.; Schmidt, D.; Bui, M.; Hopper, J.L.; Apicella, C.; Park, D.J.; Southey, M.; Hunter, D.J.; Chanock, S.J.; Broeks, A.; Verhoef, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Lux, M.P.; Beckmann, M.W.; Ekici, A.B.; Sawyer, E.; Tomlinson, I.; Kerin, M.; Marme, F.; Schneeweiss, A.; Sohn, C.; Burwinkel, B.; Guenel, P.; Truong, T.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Menegaux, F.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Nielsen, S.F.; Flyger, H.; Milne, R.L.; Alonso, M.R.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Benitez, J.; Anton-Culver, H.; Ziogas, A.; Bernstein, L.; Dur, C.C.; Brenner, H.; Muller, H.; Arndt, V.; Stegmaier, C.; Justenhoven, C.; Brauch, H.; Bruning, T.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Eilber, U.; Dork, T.; Schurmann, P.; Bremer, M.; Hillemanns, P.; Bogdanova, N.V.; Antonenkova, N.N.; Rogov, Y.I.; Karstens, J.H.; Bermisheva, M.; Prokofieva, D.; Ligtenberg, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for approximately 8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies

  17. Combined Analysis of SNP Array Data Identifies Novel CNV Candidates and Pathways in Ependymoma and Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Wajnberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variation is a class of structural genomic modifications that includes the gain and loss of a specific genomic region, which may include an entire gene. Many studies have used low-resolution techniques to identify regions that are frequently lost or amplified in cancer. Usually, researchers choose to use proprietary or non-open-source software to detect these regions because the graphical interface tends to be easier to use. In this study, we combined two different open-source packages into an innovative strategy to identify novel copy number variations and pathways associated with cancer. We used a mesothelioma and ependymoma published datasets to assess our tool. We detected previously described and novel copy number variations that are associated with cancer chemotherapy resistance. We also identified altered pathways associated with these diseases, like cell adhesion in patients with mesothelioma and negative regulation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in ependymoma patients. In conclusion, we present a novel strategy using open-source software to identify copy number variations and altered pathways associated with cancer.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Analysis to Identify Loci for Milk Yield in Gyr Breed

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genome scan was conducted to identify QTL affecting milk yield in a Brazilian Gyr population of progeny test bulls (N=319). Data used in this study was derived from traditional genetic evaluation records computed by the Embrapa Dairy Cattleand released in May/2009 (http://www.cnpgl.embrapa.br/nova...

  19. Many novel mammalian microRNA candidates identified by extensive cloning and RAKE analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berezikov, Eugene; van Tetering, Geert; Verheul, Mark; van de Belt, Jose; van Laake, Linda; Vos, Joost; Verloop, Robert; van de Wetering, Marc; Guryev, Victor; Takada, Shuji; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Mano, Hiroyuki; Plasterk, Ronald; Cuppen, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs are 20- to 23-nucleotide RNA molecules that can regulate gene expression. Currently > 400 microRNAs have been experimentally identified in mammalian genomes, whereas estimates go up to 1000 and beyond. Here we show that many more mammalian microRNAs exist. We discovered novel microRNA cand

  20. Exome analysis of a family with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome identifies a novel disease locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Neil E; Jou, Chuanchau J; Arrington, Cammon B; Kennedy, Brett J; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L; Etheridge, Susan P; Saarel, Elizabeth V; Bleyl, Steven B; Yost, H Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene.

  1. Identifying Professional Teaching Standards Using Rasch Model Analysis: The Case of Northern Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibaba Erden, Hale; Özer, Bekir

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: The Teacher's-Act defined for the state-school teachers of North Cyprus shows that teachers are not selected according to any specific standards. In North Cyprus, apart from the exam topics defined at the teacher's exam regulations, there is not any kind of identified standard for teachers. Training qualified teachers based upon…

  2. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. W...

  3. Identifying research fields within business and management: a journal cross-citation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Mingers; L. Leydesdorff

    2015-01-01

    A discipline such as business and management (B&M) is very broad and has many fields within it, ranging from fairly scientific ones such as management science or economics to softer ones such as information systems. There are at least three reasons why it is important to identify these sub-fields ac

  4. Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecham, Ashley H; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Xifara, Dionysia K; Davis, Mary F; Kemppinen, Anu; Cotsapas, Chris; Shahi, Tejas S; Spencer, Chris; Booth, David; Goris, An; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Fontaine, Bertrand; Hemmer, Bernhard; Martin, Claes; Zipp, Frauke; D’alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Taylor, Bruce; Harbo, Hanne F; Kockum, Ingrid; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Ban, Maria; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hintzen, Rogier; Barcellos, Lisa F; Agliardi, Cristina; Alfredsson, Lars; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Anderson, Carl; Andrews, Robert; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Baker, Amie; Band, Gavin; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barizzone, Nadia; Barrett, Jeffrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Berthele, Achim; Biberacher, Viola; Binder, Thomas M C; Blackburn, Hannah; Bomfim, Izaura L; Brambilla, Paola; Broadley, Simon; Brochet, Bruno; Brundin, Lou; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Caillier, Stacy J; Camu, William; Carpentier, Wassila; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G; Coman, Irène; Comi, Giancarlo; Corrado, Lucia; Cosemans, Leentje; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cree, Bruce A C; Cusi, Daniele; Damotte, Vincent; Defer, Gilles; Delgado, Silvia R; Deloukas, Panos; di Sapio, Alessia; Dilthey, Alexander T; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Duddy, Martin; Edkins, Sarah; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Evangelou, Nikos; Fiddes, Barnaby; Field, Judith; Franke, Andre; Freeman, Colin; Frohlich, Irene Y; Galimberti, Daniela; Gieger, Christian; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Graham, Andrew; Grummel, Verena; Guaschino, Clara; Hadjixenofontos, Athena; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfpenny, Christopher; Hall, Gillian; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Harley, James; Harrower, Timothy; Hawkins, Clive; Hellenthal, Garrett; Hillier, Charles; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muni; Hunt, Sarah E; Jagodic, Maja; Jelčić, Ilijas; Jochim, Angela; Kendall, Brian; Kermode, Allan; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Koivisto, Keijo; Konidari, Ioanna; Korn, Thomas; Kronsbein, Helena; Langford, Cordelia; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Lee, Michelle H; Leone, Maurizio A; Leppä, Virpi; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Lie, Benedicte A; Lill, Christina M; Lindén, Magdalena; Link, Jenny; Luessi, Felix; Lycke, Jan; Macciardi, Fabio; Männistö, Satu; Manrique, Clara P; Martin, Roland; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; Mazibrada, Gordon; McCabe, Cristin; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mescheriakova, Julia; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Nagels, Guy; Nicholas, Richard; Nilsson, Petra; Piehl, Fredrik; Pirinen, Matti; Price, Siân E; Quach, Hong; Reunanen, Mauri; Robberecht, Wim; Robertson, Neil P; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Rog, David; Salvetti, Marco; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie C; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selter, Rebecca C; Schaefer, Catherine; Shaunak, Sandip; Shen, Ling; Shields, Simon; Siffrin, Volker; Slee, Mark; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Sorosina, Melissa; Sospedra, Mireia; Spurkland, Anne; Strange, Amy; Sundqvist, Emilie; Thijs, Vincent; Thorpe, John; Ticca, Anna; Tienari, Pentti; van Duijn, Cornelia; Visser, Elizabeth M; Vucic, Steve; Westerlind, Helga; Wiley, James S; Wilkins, Alastair; Wilson, James F; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zajicek, John; Zindler, Eva; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David; Hauser, Stephen L; Compston, Alastair; McVean, Gil; De Jager, Philip; Sawcer, Stephen; McCauley, Jacob L

    2013-01-01

    Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analysed 14,498 multiple sclerosis subjects and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (p-value < 1.0 × 10-4). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 multiple sclerosis subjects and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (p-value < 5.0 × 10-8); three found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants in 103 discrete loci outside of the Major Histocompatibility Complex. With high resolution Bayesian fine-mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalogue of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine-mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals. PMID:24076602

  5. Contingency Space Analysis: An Alternative Method for Identifying Contingent Relations from Observational Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Brian K.; DiGennaro, Florence D.; Reed, Derek D.; Szczech, Frances M.; Rosenthal, Blair D.

    2008-01-01

    Descriptive assessment methods have been used in applied settings to identify consequences for problem behavior, thereby aiding in the design of effective treatment programs. Consensus has not been reached, however, regarding the types of data or analytic strategies that are most useful for describing behavior-consequence relations. One promising…

  6. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. de Vries (Paul); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M. Sabater-Lleal (Maria); M.-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer E.); M. Steri (Maristella); W. Tang (Weihong); A. Teumer (Alexander); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); V. Grossmann (Vera); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); S. Trompet (Stella); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); J. Brody (Jennifer); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); X. Guo (Xiuqing); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); P. Auer (Paul); J. Attia (John); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); J. Lahti (Jari); C. Venturini (Cristina); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); L.F. Bielak (Lawrence F.); P.K. Joshi (Peter); A. Rocanin-Arjo (Ares); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Navarro (Pau); L.M. Rose (Lynda); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); H. Riess (Helene); J. Mazur (Johanna); S. Basu (Saonli); A. Goel (Anuj); Q. Yang (Qiong); M. Ghanbari (Mohsen); Gonnekewillemsen; A. Rumley (Ann); E. Fiorillo (Edoardo); A.J. de Craen (Anton); A. Grotevendt (Anne); R.A. Scott (Robert); K.D. Taylor (Kent D.); G.E. Delgado (Graciela E.); J. Yao (Jie); A. Kifley (Annette); C. Kooperberg (Charles); Q. Qayyum (Rehan); L. Lopez (Lornam); T.L. Berentzen (Tina L.); K. Räikkönen (Katri); Massimomangino; S. Bandinelli (Stefania); P.A. Peyser (Patricia A.); S. Wild (Sarah); D.-A. Tregouet (David-Alexandre); A.F. Wright (Alan); J. Marten (Jonathan); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); B. Sennblad (Bengt); G.H. Tofler (Geoffrey); M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); G.D. Lowe (Gordon D.); M. Zoledziewska (Magdalena); N. Sattar (Naveed); H. Binder (Harald); U. Völker (Uwe); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); K.-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); B. McKnight (Barbara); J. Huang (Jian); N.S. Jenny (Nancy); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); L. Qi (Lihong); M.G. Mcevoy (Mark G.); D.M. Becker (Diane); J.M. Starr (John); A.-P. Sarin; P.G. Hysi (Pirro); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); M.A. Jhun (Min A.); H. Campbell (Harry); A. Hamsten (Anders); F. Sarin (Fernando); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); P. Eline Slagboom; T. Zeller (Tanja); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); B. Psaty (Brucem); T. Haritunians (Talin); J. Liu (Jingmin); A. Palotie (Aarno); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); D.J. Stott (David J.); A. Hofman (Albert); O.H. Franco (Oscar); O. Polasek (Ozren); I. Rudan (Igor); P.-E. Morange (P.); J.F. Wilson (James F.); S.L. Kardia (Sharon L.r); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); T. Hansen (Torben); I.J. Deary (Ian); L.C. Becker (Lewis); R.J. Scott (Rodney); P. Mitchell (Paul); W. März (Winfried); N.J. Wareham (Nick J.); A. Peters (Annette); A. Greinacher (Andreas); P.S. Wild (Philipp S.); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret I.); C. Hayward (Caroline); F. Cucca (Francesco); R.P. Tracy (Russell); H. Watkins (Hugh); A.P. Reiner (Alex P.); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); P.M. Ridker (Paul); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher J.); N.L. Smith (Nicholas L.); D.P. Strachan (David P.); A. Dehghan (Abbas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes

  7. Analysis and Use of a Task for Identifying Conceptions of Teaching Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Peter W.; Hewson, Mariana G.

    The thoughts that teachers have about the content and students they are to teach influences the way in which they will teach. The purpose of this paper was the development of an instrument to identify teachers' conceptions of teaching science and to review literature concerning this topic. The instrument described was designed to be sensitive to…

  8. Selection signature analysis in Holstein cattle identified genes known to affect reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using direct comparison of 45,878 SNPs between a group of Holstein cattle unselected since 1964 and contemporary Holsteins that on average take 30 days longer for successful conception than the 1964 Holsteins, we conducted selection signature analyses to identify genomic regions associated with dair...

  9. Integrative transcriptome analysis identifies deregulated microRNA-transcription factor networks in lung adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cinegaglia, Naiara C; Andrade, Sonia Cristina S; Tokar, Tomas;

    2016-01-01

    of miR-21 expression were associated with lower patient survival (p = 0.042). We identified a regulatory network including miR-15b and miR-155, and transcription factors with prognostic value in lung cancer. Our findings may contribute to the development of treatment strategies in lung adenocarcinoma....

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies multiple loci related to resting heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijgelsheim, Mark; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Sotoodehnia, Nona; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Mueller, Martina; Morrison, Alanna C.; Smith, Albert V.; Isaacs, Aaron; Sanna, Serena; Doerr, Marcus; Navarro, Pau; Fuchsberger, Christian; Nolte, Ilja M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Estrada, Karol; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Bis, Joshua C.; Rueckert, Ina-Maria; Alonso, Alvaro; Launer, Lenore J.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Perz, Siegfried; Arking, Dan E.; Spector, Tim D.; Kors, Jan A.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Homuth, Georg; Wild, Sarah H.; Marroni, Fabio; Gieger, Christian; Licht, Carmilla M.; Prineas, Ronald J.; Hofman, Albert; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Ernst, Florian; Najjar, Samer S.; Wright, Alan F.; Peters, Annette; Fox, Ervin R.; Oostra, Ben A.; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Couper, David; Voelzke, Henry; Campbell, Harry; Meitinger, Thomas; Uda, Manuela; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Harris, Tamara B.; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Siscovick, David S.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Larson, Martin G.; Wilson, James F.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Felix, Stephan B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Pfeufer, Arne; Heckbert, Susan R.; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch.; Boerwinkle, Eric; O'Donnell, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Higher resting heart rate is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Though heritable factors play a substantial role in population variation, little is known about specific genetic determinants. This knowledge can impact clinical care by identifying novel factors that i

  11. Genome-wide association analysis identifies multiple loci related to resting heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); M. Müller (Martina); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); S. Sanna (Serena); M. Dörr (Marcus); P. Navarro (Pau); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); S.J. Hwang; J.C. Bis (Joshua); I.M. Rückert; A. Alonso (Alvaro); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); P.A. Noseworthy (Peter); K. Rice (Kenneth); S. Perz (Siegfried); D.E. Arking (Dan); T.D. Spector (Tim); J.A. Kors (Jan); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); K.V. Tarasov (Kirill); G. Homuth (Georg); S.H. Wild (Sarah); F. Marroni (Fabio); C. Gieger (Christian); C.M. Licht (Carmilla); R.J. Prineas (Ronald); A. Hofman (Albert); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); S.S. Najjar (Samer); A.F. Wright (Alan); A. Peters (Annette); E.R. Fox (Ervin); B.A. Oostra (Ben); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); D.J. Couper (David); H. Völzke (Henry); H. Campbell (Harry); T. Meitinger (Thomas); M. Uda (Manuela); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); T.B. Harris (Tamara); S. Kääb (Stefan); D.S. Siscovick (David); Y. Jamshidi (Yalda); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); M.G. Larson (Martin); J.F. Wilson (James); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); H. Snieder (Harold); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); E. Lakatta (Edward); S.B. Felix (Stephan); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Pfeufer (Arne); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHigher resting heart rate is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Though heritable factors play a substantial role in population variation, little is known about specific genetic determinants. This knowledge can impact clinical care by identifying novel fa

  12. Detection bias in microarray and sequencing transcriptomic analysis identified by housekeeping genes

    OpenAIRE

    Yijuan Zhang; Oluwafemi S. Akintola; Liu, Ken J.A.; Bingyun Sun

    2015-01-01

    This work includes the original data used to discover the gene ontology bias in transcriptomic analysis conducted by microarray and high throughput sequencing (Zhang et al., 2015) [1]. In the analysis, housekeeping genes were used to examine the differential detection ability by microarray and sequencing because these genes are probably the most reliably detected. The genes included here were compiled from 15 human housekeeping gene studies. The provided tables here comprise of detailed chrom...

  13. Integrated genomic analysis identifies the mitotic checkpoint kinase WEE1 as a novel therapeutic target in medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Peter S; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Alimova, Irina; Birks, Diane K; Balakrishnan, Ilango; Cristiano, Brian; Donson, Andrew M; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Taylor, Michael D.; Foreman, Nicholas K.; Reigan, Philip; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common type of malignant brain tumor that afflicts children. Although recent advances in chemotherapy and radiation have improved outcomes, high-risk patients do poorly with significant morbidity. Methods To identify new molecular targets, we performed an integrated genomic analysis using structural and functional methods. Gene expression profiling in 16 medulloblastoma patient samples and subsequent gene set enrichment analysis indicated that cell cycle...

  14. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies eight new loci for type 2 diabetes in east Asians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Yoon Shin; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Hu, Cheng;

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a three-stage genetic study to identify susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in east Asian populations. We followed our stage 1 meta-analysis of eight T2D genome-wide association studies (6,952 cases with T2D and 11,865 controls) with a stage 2 in silico replication analysis...... in the pancreas. These findings, derived from an east Asian population, provide new perspectives on the etiology of T2D....

  15. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis identifies specific modules and hub genes related to coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jing; Jing, Ling; Tu, Xilin

    2016-01-01

    Background The analysis of the potential molecule targets of coronary artery disease (CAD) is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms of disease. However, studies of global microarray gene co-expression analysis of CAD still remain limited. Methods Microarray data of CAD (GSE23561) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, including peripheral blood samples from CAD patients (n = 6) and controls (n = 9). Limma package in R was used to identify the differentially expressed gene...

  16. Automatic derivation of domain terms and concept location based on the analysis of the identifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Vaclavik, Peter; Mezei, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Developers express the meaning of the domain ideas in specifically selected identifiers and comments that form the target implemented code. Software maintenance requires knowledge and understanding of the encoded ideas. This paper presents a way how to create automatically domain vocabulary. Knowledge of domain vocabulary supports the comprehension of a specific domain for later code maintenance or evolution. We present experiments conducted in two selected domains: application servers and web frameworks. Knowledge of domain terms enables easy localization of chunks of code that belong to a certain term. We consider these chunks of code as "concepts" and their placement in the code as "concept location". Application developers may also benefit from the obtained domain terms. These terms are parts of speech that characterize a certain concept. Concepts are encoded in "classes" (OO paradigm) and the obtained vocabulary of terms supports the selection and the comprehension of the class' appropriate identifiers. ...

  17. Forensic Application of Microbiological Culture Analysis To Identify Mail Intentionally Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Spores†

    OpenAIRE

    Beecher, Douglas J.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of a letter intentionally filled with dried Bacillus anthracis spores in the office of a United States senator prompted the collection and quarantine of all mail in congressional buildings. This mail was subsequently searched for additional intentionally contaminated letters. A microbiological sampling strategy was used to locate heavy contamination within the 642 separate plastic bags containing the mail. Swab sampling identified 20 bags for manual and visual examination. Air s...

  18. Systematic enrichment analysis of gene expression profiling studies identifies consensus pathways implicated in colorectal cancer development

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Lascorz; Kari Hemminki; Asta Försti

    2011-01-01

    Background: A large number of gene expression profiling (GEP) studies on colorectal carcinogenesis have been performed but no reliable gene signature has been identified so far due to the lack of reproducibility in the reported genes. There is growing evidence that functionally related genes, rather than individual genes, contribute to the etiology of complex traits. We used, as a novel approach, pathway enrichment tools to define functionally related genes that are consistently up- or down-r...

  19. Expression Data Analysis to Identify Biomarkers Associated with Asthma in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Xu

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by recurrent episodes of wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing. It is usually caused by a combination of complex and incompletely understood environmental and genetic interactions. We obtained gene expression data with high-throughput screening and identified biomarkers of children's asthma using bioinformatics tools. Next, we explained the pathogenesis of children's asthma from the perspective of gene regulatory networks: DAVID was applied to pe...

  20. Gene co-expression network analysis identifies porcine genes associated with variation in Salmonella shedding

    OpenAIRE

    Kommadath, Arun; Bao, Hua; Arantes, Adriano S; Plastow, Graham S.; Christopher K Tuggle; Bearson, Shawn MD; Luo Guan, Le; Stothard, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a gram-negative bacterium that can colonise the gut of humans and several species of food producing farm animals to cause enteric or septicaemic salmonellosis. While many studies have looked into the host genetic response to Salmonella infection, relatively few have used correlation of shedding traits with gene expression patterns to identify genes whose variable expression among different individuals may be associated with differences in ...

  1. Genome-wide gene expression analysis identifies K-ras as a regulator of alcohol intake

    OpenAIRE

    Repunte-Canonigo, Vez; van der Stap, Lena D.; Chen, Jihuan; Sabino, Valentina; Wagner, Ulrich; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Schumann, Gunter; Roberts, Amanda J.; Sanna, Pietro Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Adaptations in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) have been implicated in alcohol and drug addiction. To identify genes that may contribute to excessive drinking, here we performed microarray analyses in laser microdissected rat ACC after a single or repeated administration of an intoxicating dose of alcohol (3g/kg). Expression of the small G protein K-ras was reduced following both single and repeated alcohol administration. We also observed that voluntary alcohol intake in K-ras heterozygo...

  2. A Modified Delphi to Identify the Significant Works Pertaining to the Understanding of Reading Comprehension and Content Analysis of the Identified Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunker, Norma D.; Pearce, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this study explored the significant works pertaining to the understanding of reading comprehension using a Modified Delphi Method. A panel of reading comprehension experts identified 19 works they considered to be significant to the understanding of reading comprehension. The panel of experts identified the reasons they…

  3. A new displacement back analysis to identify mechanical geo-material parameters based on hybrid intelligent methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xia-Ting; Zhao, Hongbo; Li, Shaojun

    2004-09-01

    Displacement back analysis is a common method to identify mechanical geo-material parameters using the monitored displacement. How to obtain a global optimum solution in large space search of highly non-linear multimodal is a key point of optimum back analysis. The paper presents a new back analysis that is an integration of evolutionary support vector machines (SVMs), numerical analysis and genetic algorithm. The non-linear relationship between the mechanical geo-material parameters to be identified and the corresponding displacement values of key points is learned and represented by evolutionary SVMs in global optimum. Numerical analysis is used to create training and testing samples for recognition of SVMs. Then, performing a global optimum search on the obtained SVMs using genetic algorithm can identify the mechanical geo-material parameters. The proposed algorithm is tested by back analysis of an elastic plate and an elastic-plastic plate and used to recognize mechanical parameters of subclay, strongly weathered tuff and weakly weathered tuff of Bachimen slope, Funing expressway, Fujian, China. The results indicate that applicability of the proposed algorithm with enough accuracy. Copyright

  4. Identifying homogenous subgroups for individual patient meta-analysis based on Rough Set Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Herrera, Eleazar; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Kumar, Ambuj; Mhaskar, Rahul; Miladinovic, Branko; Yalcin, Ali; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Failure to detect and manage heterogeneity between clinical trials included in meta-analysis may lead to misinterpretation of summary effect estimates. This may ultimately compromise the validity of the results of the meta-analysis. Typically, when heterogeneity between trials is detected, researchers use sensitivity or subgroup analysis to manage it. However, both methods fail to explain why heterogeneity existed in the first place. Here we propose a novel methodology that relies on Rough Set Theory (RST) to detect, explain, and manage the sources of heterogeneity applicable to meta-analysis performed on individual patient data (IPD). The method exploits the RST relations of discernibility and indiscernibility to create homogeneous groups of patients. We applied our methodology on a dataset of 1,111 patients enrolled in 9 randomized controlled trials studying the effect of two transplantation procedures in the management of hematologic malignancies. Our method was able to create three subgroups of patients with remarkably low statistical heterogeneity values (16.8%, 0% and 0% respectively). The proposed methodology has the potential to automatize and standardize the process of detecting and managing heterogeneity in IPD meta-analysis. Future work involves investigating the applications of the proposed methodology in analyzing treatment effects in patients belonging to different risk groups, which will ultimately assist in personalized healthcare decision making.

  5. A COMPARISON BETWEEN SINGLE LINKAGE AND COMPLETE LINKAGE IN AGGLOMERATIVE HIERARCHICAL CLUSTER ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING TOURISTS SEGMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Rashidah Rashid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cluster Analysis is a multivariate method in statistics. Agglomerative Hierarchical Cluster Analysis is one of approaches in Cluster Analysis. There are two linkage methods in Agglomerative Hierarchical Cluster Analysis which are Single Linkage and Complete Linkage. The purpose of this study is to compare between Single Linkage and Complete Linkage in Agglomerative Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. The comparison of performances between these linkage methods was shown by using Kruskal-Wallis test. The result of the comparison used for segmenting tourists of Kapas Island. The statistical software SPSS has been applied to analyze data of this research. The result from Kruskal-Wallis test shows Complete Linkage is more useful in identifying tourists segments. Keywords : Agglomerative Hierarchical Cluster Analysis, Single Linkage, Complete Linkage, Kruskal-Wallis test, tourists

  6. Extending hierarchical task analysis to identify cognitive demands and information design requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Denham L; Meakin, George H; Beatty, Paul C W

    2011-07-01

    While hierarchical task analysis (HTA) is well established as a general task analysis method, there appears a need to make more explicit both the cognitive elements of a task and design requirements that arise from an analysis. One way of achieving this is to make use of extensions to the standard HTA. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the use of two such extensions--the sub-goal template (SGT) and the skills-rules-knowledge (SRK) framework--to analyse the cognitive activity that takes place during the planning and delivery of anaesthesia. In quantitative terms, the two methods were found to have relatively poor inter-rater reliability; however, qualitative evidence suggests that the two methods were nevertheless of value in generating insights about anaesthetists' information handling and cognitive performance. Implications for the use of an extended HTA to analyse work systems are discussed.

  7. Meta-analysis identifies 29 additional ulcerative colitis risk loci, increasing the number of confirmed associations to 47

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Carl A; Boucher, Gabrielle; Lees, Charlie W;

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies in ulcerative colitis have identified 18 susceptibility loci. We conducted a meta-analysis of six ulcerative colitis genome-wide association study datasets, comprising 6,687 cases and 19,718 controls, and followed up the top association s...

  8. A meta-analysis identifies new loci associated with body mass index in individuals of African ancestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monda, Keri L.; Chen, Gary K.; Taylor, Kira C.; Palmer, Cameron; Edwards, Todd L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Allison, Matthew A.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Chen, Guanjie; Graff, Mariaelisa; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Rhie, Suhn K.; Li, Guo; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Youfang; Lu, Yingchang; Nalls, Michael A.; Sun, Yan V.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ademola, Adeyinka; Amos, Christopher I.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Britton, Angela; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cai, Quiyin; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carlson, Chris S.; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Fang; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Demerath, Ellen; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L.; Driver, Ryan W.; Dubbert, Patricia; Feitosa, Mary F.; Feng, Ye; Freedman, Barry I.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Xiuqing; Haritunians, Talin; Harris, Tamara; Harris, Curtis C.; Hennis, Anselm J. M.; Hernandez, Dena G.; McNeill, Lorna H.; Howard, Timothy D.; Howard, Barbara V.; Howard, Virginia J.; Johnson, Karen C.; Kang, Sun J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Kuller, Lewis H.; Kutlar, Abdullah; Langefeld, Carl D.; Lettre, Guillaume; Lohman, Kurt; Lotay, Vaneet; Lyon, Helen; Manson, Joann E.; Maixner, William; Meng, Yan A.; Monroe, Kristine R.; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Murphy, Adam B.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Nayak, Uma; N'Diaye, Amidou; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M. Cristina; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Neuhouser, Marian; Nyante, Sarah; Ochs-Balcom, Heather; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Ogundiran, Temidayo O.; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Palmer, Julie R.; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Press, Michael F.; Rampersaud, Evandine; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Salako, Babatunde; Schadt, Eric E.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Shriner, Daniel A.; Siscovick, David; Smith, Shad B.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Sucheston, Lara; Taylor, Herman; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Edwards, Digna R. Velez; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Witte, John S.; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, James J.; Levin, Albert M.; Young, Taylor R.; Zakai, Neil A.; Cushman, Mary; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Yonglan; Zhou, Jie; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Hunt, Kelly J.; Spruill, Ida J.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ambs, Stefan; Arnett, Donna K.; Atwood, Larry; Becker, Diane M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bowden, Donald W.; Burke, Gregory; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cooper, Richard S.; Ding, Jingzhong; Duggan, David; Evans, Michele K.; Fox, Caroline; Garvey, W. Timothy; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hsing, Ann; Chu, Lisa; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huo, Dezheng; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kittles, Rick A.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liu, Simin; McKnight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert C.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Williams, L. Keoki; Patel, Sanjay R.; Peters, Ulrike; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Redline, Susan; Rotimi, Charles N.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Sale, Michele M.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Stanford, Janet L.; Strom, Sara S.; Thun, Michael J.; Vitolins, Mara; Zheng, Wei; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.; Ketkar, Shamika; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zonderman, Alan B.; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Reiner, Alex P.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; North, Kari E.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry and followed up t

  9. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identifies Variants Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease That Have Distinct Effects on Metabolic Traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Wu, Jun; Hernaez, Ruben; Kim, Lauren J.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Garcia, Melissa E.; Launer, Lenore J.; Nalls, Michael A.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Butler, Johannah L.; Tomas, Marta; Hoffmann, Udo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Massaro, Joseph M.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric E.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Feitosa, Mary F.; Harris, Tamara B.; Fox, Caroline S.; Smith, Albert V.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic st

  10. Chaperone proteins identified from synthetic proteasome inhibitor-induced inclusions in PC12 cells by proteomic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing'an Li; Yinjiu Zhang; Yihong Hu; Ming Chang; Tao Liu; Danping Wang; Yu Zhang; Lei Zhang; Linsen Hu

    2008-01-01

    Chaperone proteins are significant in Lewy bodies, but the profile of chaperone proteins is incompletely unraveled.Protcomic analysis is used to determine protein candidates for further study. Here, to identify potential chaperone proteins from agent-induced inclusions, we carried out proteomic analysis of artificially synthetic proteasome inhibitor (PSI)-induced inclusions formed in PC12 cells exposed to 10 μM PSI for 48 h. Using biochemical fractionation, 2-D electrophoresis, and identification through peptide mass fingerprints searched against multiple protein databases, we repeatedly identified eight reproducible chaperone proteins from the PSI-induced inclusions. Of these, 58 kDa glucose regulated protein, 75 kDa glucose regulated protein, and caldum-binding protein I were newly identified. The other five had been reported to be consistent components of Lewy bodies. These findings suggested that the three potential chaperone proteins might be recruited to PSI-induced inclusions in PC12 cells under proteasome inhibition.

  11. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Li; Qiong Xia; Hongping Kou; Dan Wang; Xiuyun Lin; Ying Wu; Chunming Xu; Shaochen Xing

    2011-01-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily.Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions,but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea,thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen.It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question.We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied.Surprisingly,induced expression of Pib by M.grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation,and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wildtype plants.Accordingly,the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5’-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type.In contrast,the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5’-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene,ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance.Taken together,our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M.grisea infection,and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  12. Pathotype Structure of Magnaporthe grisea in the Fields of Chongyang and Yuan'an in Hubei Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-lin; ZHANG Shu; LU Liang; CHANG Xiang-qian; YUAN Bing; YU Da-zhao

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to explore the pathotype structure of Magnaporthe grisea in Chongyang and Yuan'an in Hubei Province,China.[Method] From the rice-growing fields of Chongyang and Yuan'an in Hubei Province where rice blast occurs frequently,60 isolates which were pathotyped against two sets of host differentials:Chinese host differentials and CO39 NILs,were obtained.Then,20 pathotypes with the six indica host differentials(CO39 NILs) were observed,while 13 pathotypes in four race groups were observed out of the same single spore isolates with Chinese host differentials which consists of three indica cultivars and four japonica cultivars.The diversity of the pathotypes of M.grisea populations tested by CO39 NILs was 2.54 and the pathotype 137.1 occurred at predominantly high frequency(21.67%).The diversity of physiological races of M.grisea populations tested by Chinese host differentials was 1.22 and the race group ZA occurred at predominantly high frequency(73.33%).The diversity of physiological races of M.grisea in Chongyang and Yuan'an were also calculated.Overall,the diversity of pathotypes of M.grisea in Yuan'an was higher than that in Chongyang with the two sets of the host differentials.[Conclusion] This study provided current information on the pathotype spectrum of M.grisea populations in the rice fields of Hubei Province to allow the formulation of viable strategies for blast resistance breeding programs in Hubei Province.

  13. Two novel transcriptional regulators are essential for infection-related morphogenesis and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A signaling pathway plays a major role in regulating plant infection by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Here, we report the identification of two novel genes, MoSOM1 and MoCDTF1, which were discovered in an insertional mutagenesis screen for non-pathogenic mutants of M. oryzae. MoSOM1 or MoCDTF1 are both necessary for development of spores and appressoria by M. oryzae and play roles in cell wall differentiation, regulating melanin pigmentation and cell surface hydrophobicity during spore formation. MoSom1 strongly interacts with MoStu1 (Mstu1, an APSES transcription factor protein, and with MoCdtf1, while also interacting more weakly with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (CpkA in yeast two hybrid assays. Furthermore, the expression levels of MoSOM1 and MoCDTF1 were significantly reduced in both Δmac1 and ΔcpkA mutants, consistent with regulation by the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. MoSom1-GFP and MoCdtf1-GFP fusion proteins localized to the nucleus of fungal cells. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that nuclear localization signal sequences in MoSom1 and MoCdtf1 are essential for their sub-cellular localization and biological functions. Transcriptional profiling revealed major changes in gene expression associated with loss of MoSOM1 during infection-related development. We conclude that MoSom1 and MoCdtf1 functions downstream of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and are novel transcriptional regulators associated with cellular differentiation during plant infection by the rice blast fungus.

  14. GATA-Dependent Glutaminolysis Drives Appressorium Formation in Magnaporthe oryzae by Suppressing TOR Inhibition of cAMP/PKA Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Wilson, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Fungal plant pathogens are persistent and global food security threats. To invade their hosts they often form highly specialized infection structures, known as appressoria. The cAMP/ PKA- and MAP kinase-signaling cascades have been functionally delineated as positive-acting pathways required for appressorium development. Negative-acting regulatory pathways that block appressorial development are not known. Here, we present the first detailed evidence that the conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway is a powerful inhibitor of appressorium formation by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. We determined TOR signaling was activated in an M. oryzae mutant strain lacking a functional copy of the GATA transcription factor-encoding gene ASD4. Δasd4 mutant strains could not form appressoria and expressed GLN1, a glutamine synthetase-encoding orthologue silenced in wild type. Inappropriate expression of GLN1 increased the intracellular steady-state levels of glutamine in Δasd4 mutant strains during axenic growth when compared to wild type. Deleting GLN1 lowered glutamine levels and promoted appressorium formation by Δasd4 strains. Furthermore, glutamine is an agonist of TOR. Treating Δasd4 mutant strains with the specific TOR kinase inhibitor rapamycin restored appressorium development. Rapamycin was also shown to induce appressorium formation by wild type and Δcpka mutant strains on non-inductive hydrophilic surfaces but had no effect on the MAP kinase mutant Δpmk1. When taken together, we implicate Asd4 in regulating intracellular glutamine levels in order to modulate TOR inhibition of appressorium formation downstream of cPKA. This study thus provides novel insight into the metabolic mechanisms that underpin the highly regulated process of appressorium development.

  15. GATA-Dependent Glutaminolysis Drives Appressorium Formation in Magnaporthe oryzae by Suppressing TOR Inhibition of cAMP/PKA Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Marroquin-Guzman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungal plant pathogens are persistent and global food security threats. To invade their hosts they often form highly specialized infection structures, known as appressoria. The cAMP/ PKA- and MAP kinase-signaling cascades have been functionally delineated as positive-acting pathways required for appressorium development. Negative-acting regulatory pathways that block appressorial development are not known. Here, we present the first detailed evidence that the conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR signaling pathway is a powerful inhibitor of appressorium formation by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. We determined TOR signaling was activated in an M. oryzae mutant strain lacking a functional copy of the GATA transcription factor-encoding gene ASD4. Δasd4 mutant strains could not form appressoria and expressed GLN1, a glutamine synthetase-encoding orthologue silenced in wild type. Inappropriate expression of GLN1 increased the intracellular steady-state levels of glutamine in Δasd4 mutant strains during axenic growth when compared to wild type. Deleting GLN1 lowered glutamine levels and promoted appressorium formation by Δasd4 strains. Furthermore, glutamine is an agonist of TOR. Treating Δasd4 mutant strains with the specific TOR kinase inhibitor rapamycin restored appressorium development. Rapamycin was also shown to induce appressorium formation by wild type and Δcpka mutant strains on non-inductive hydrophilic surfaces but had no effect on the MAP kinase mutant Δpmk1. When taken together, we implicate Asd4 in regulating intracellular glutamine levels in order to modulate TOR inhibition of appressorium formation downstream of cPKA. This study thus provides novel insight into the metabolic mechanisms that underpin the highly regulated process of appressorium development.

  16. Evidence for a transketolase-mediated metabolic checkpoint governing biotrophic growth in rice cells by the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Fernandez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae threatens global food security through the widespread destruction of cultivated rice. Foliar infection requires a specialized cell called an appressorium that generates turgor to force a thin penetration hypha through the rice cuticle and into the underlying epidermal cells, where the fungus grows for the first days of infection as a symptomless biotroph. Understanding what controls biotrophic growth could open new avenues for developing sustainable blast intervention programs. Here, using molecular genetics and live-cell imaging, we dismantled M. oryzae glucose-metabolizing pathways to reveal that the transketolase enzyme, encoded by TKL1, plays an essential role in facilitating host colonization during rice blast disease. In the absence of transketolase, Δtkl1 mutant strains formed functional appressoria that penetrated rice cuticles successfully and developed invasive hyphae (IH in rice cells from primary hyphae. However, Δtkl1 could not undertake sustained biotrophic growth or cell-to-cell movement. Transcript data and observations using fluorescently labeled histone H1:RFP fusion proteins indicated Δtkl1 mutant strains were alive in host cells but were delayed in mitosis. Mitotic delay could be reversed and IH growth restored by the addition of exogenous ATP, a metabolite depleted in Δtkl1 mutant strains. We show that ATP might act via the TOR signaling pathway, and TOR is likely a downstream target of activation for TKL1. TKL1 is also involved in controlling the migration of appressorial nuclei into primary hyphae in host cells. When taken together, our results indicate transketolase has a novel role in mediating--via ATP and TOR signaling--an in planta-specific metabolic checkpoint that controls nuclear migration from appressoria into primary hyphae, prevents mitotic delay in early IH and promotes biotrophic growth. This work thus provides new information about the metabolic strategies employed by M

  17. GATA-Dependent Glutaminolysis Drives Appressorium Formation in Magnaporthe oryzae by Suppressing TOR Inhibition of cAMP/PKA Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Wilson, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Fungal plant pathogens are persistent and global food security threats. To invade their hosts they often form highly specialized infection structures, known as appressoria. The cAMP/ PKA- and MAP kinase-signaling cascades have been functionally delineated as positive-acting pathways required for appressorium development. Negative-acting regulatory pathways that block appressorial development are not known. Here, we present the first detailed evidence that the conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway is a powerful inhibitor of appressorium formation by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. We determined TOR signaling was activated in an M. oryzae mutant strain lacking a functional copy of the GATA transcription factor-encoding gene ASD4. Δasd4 mutant strains could not form appressoria and expressed GLN1, a glutamine synthetase-encoding orthologue silenced in wild type. Inappropriate expression of GLN1 increased the intracellular steady-state levels of glutamine in Δasd4 mutant strains during axenic growth when compared to wild type. Deleting GLN1 lowered glutamine levels and promoted appressorium formation by Δasd4 strains. Furthermore, glutamine is an agonist of TOR. Treating Δasd4 mutant strains with the specific TOR kinase inhibitor rapamycin restored appressorium development. Rapamycin was also shown to induce appressorium formation by wild type and Δcpka mutant strains on non-inductive hydrophilic surfaces but had no effect on the MAP kinase mutant Δpmk1. When taken together, we implicate Asd4 in regulating intracellular glutamine levels in order to modulate TOR inhibition of appressorium formation downstream of cPKA. This study thus provides novel insight into the metabolic mechanisms that underpin the highly regulated process of appressorium development. PMID:25901357

  18. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuk-Kit; Zhang, Huoming; Liu, Pei; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Lung, Maria Li; Mak, Nai-Ki; Ngok-Shun Wong, Ricky; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick

    2015-10-15

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1 and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future.

  19. Large-Scale Analysis of Kinase Signaling in Yeast Pseudohyphal Development Identifies Regulation of Ribonucleoprotein Granules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Shively

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yeast pseudohyphal filamentation is a stress-responsive growth transition relevant to processes required for virulence in pathogenic fungi. Pseudohyphal growth is controlled through a regulatory network encompassing conserved MAPK (Ste20p, Ste11p, Ste7p, Kss1p, and Fus3p, protein kinase A (Tpk2p, Elm1p, and Snf1p kinase pathways; however, the scope of these pathways is not fully understood. Here, we implemented quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify each of these signaling networks, generating a kinase-dead mutant in filamentous S. cerevisiae and surveying for differential phosphorylation. By this approach, we identified 439 phosphoproteins dependent upon pseudohyphal growth kinases. We report novel phosphorylation sites in 543 peptides, including phosphorylated residues in Ras2p and Flo8p required for wild-type filamentous growth. Phosphoproteins in these kinase signaling networks were enriched for ribonucleoprotein (RNP granule components, and we observe co-localization of Kss1p, Fus3p, Ste20p, and Tpk2p with the RNP component Igo1p. These kinases localize in puncta with GFP-visualized mRNA, and KSS1 is required for wild-type levels of mRNA localization in RNPs. Kss1p pathway activity is reduced in lsm1Δ/Δ and pat1Δ/Δ strains, and these genes encoding P-body proteins are epistatic to STE7. The P-body protein Dhh1p is also required for hyphal development in Candida albicans. Collectively, this study presents a wealth of data identifying the yeast phosphoproteome in pseudohyphal growth and regulatory interrelationships between pseudohyphal growth kinases and RNPs.

  20. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrative transcriptome analysis identifies deregulated microRNA-transcription factor networks in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinegaglia, Naiara C; Andrade, Sonia Cristina S; Tokar, Tomas; Pinheiro, Maísa; Severino, Fábio E; Oliveira, Rogério A; Hasimoto, Erica N; Cataneo, Daniele C; Cataneo, Antônio J M; Defaveri, Júlio; Souza, Cristiano P; Marques, Márcia M C; Carvalho, Robson F; Coutinho, Luiz L; Gross, Jefferson L; Rogatto, Silvia R; Lam, Wan L; Jurisica, Igor; Reis, Patricia P

    2016-05-17

    Herein, we aimed at identifying global transcriptome microRNA (miRNA) changes and miRNA target genes in lung adenocarcinoma. Samples were selected as training (N = 24) and independent validation (N = 34) sets. Tissues were microdissected to obtain >90% tumor or normal lung cells, subjected to miRNA transcriptome sequencing and TaqMan quantitative PCR validation. We further integrated our data with published miRNA and mRNA expression datasets across 1,491 lung adenocarcinoma and 455 normal lung samples. We identified known and novel, significantly over- and under-expressed (p ≤ 0.01 and FDR≤0.1) miRNAs in lung adenocarcinoma compared to normal lung tissue: let-7a, miR-10a, miR-15b, miR-23b, miR-26a, miR-26b, miR-29a, miR-30e, miR-99a, miR-146b, miR-181b, miR-181c, miR-421, miR-181a, miR-574 and miR-1247. Validated miRNAs included let-7a-2, let-7a-3, miR-15b, miR-21, miR-155 and miR-200b; higher levels of miR-21 expression were associated with lower patient survival (p = 0.042). We identified a regulatory network including miR-15b and miR-155, and transcription factors with prognostic value in lung cancer. Our findings may contribute to the development of treatment strategies in lung adenocarcinoma.

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Gormley, Padhraig;

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) an...

  3. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S.; Gormley, Padhraig; Kurth, Tobias; Bettella, Francesco; McMahon, George; Kallela, Mikko; Malik, Rainer; de Vries, Boukje; Terwindt, Gisela; Medland, Sarah E.; Todt, Unda; McArdle, Wendy L.; Quaye, Lydia; Koiranen, Markku; Ikram, M. Arfan; Lehtimaki, Terho; Stam, Anine H.; Ligthart, Lannie; Wedenoja, Juho; Dunham, Ian; Neale, Benjamin M.; Palta, Priit; Hamalainen, Eija; Schuerks, Markus; Rose, Lynda M.; Buring, Julie E.; Ridker, Paul M.; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Jakobsson, Finnbogi; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Evans, David M.; Ring, Susan M.; Farkkila, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Freilinger, Tobias; Schoenen, Jean; Frants, Rune R.; Pelzer, Nadine; Weller, Claudia M.; Zielman, Ronald; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Borck, Guntram; Goebel, Hartmut; Heinze, Axel; Heinze-Kuhn, Katja; Williams, Frances M. K.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; van den Ende, Joyce; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Heikkila, Kauko; Alexander, Michael; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, Heinz Erich; Aromaa, Arpo; Eriksson, Johan G.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Jacobs, Suzanne B. R.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Birney, Ewan; Kaprio, Jaakko; Penninx, Brenda W.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Raitakari, Olli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Zwart, John-Anker; Cherkas, Lynn; Strachan, David P.; Kubisch, Christian; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Daly, Mark J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Palotie, Aarno

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and 9

  4. Identifying blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) stock structure in the Northeast Atlantic by otolith shape analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahe, Kélig; Oudard, Clémence; Mille, Tiphaine;

    2016-01-01

    Information on stock identification and spatial stock structure provide a basis for understanding fish population dynamics and improving fisheries management. In this study, otolith shape analysis was used to study the stock structure of blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) in the northeast At...

  5. The Conflict Analysis Framework (CAF) : Identifying Conflict-Related Obstacles to Development

    OpenAIRE

    Shardesai, Shonali; Wam, Per

    2002-01-01

    The Conflict Analysis Framework (CAF), developed by the CPR Unit, aims to integrate sensitivity to conflict in Bank assistance, and to help Bank teams consider factors affecting both conflict and poverty when formulating development strategies, policies, and programs. Conflict sensitive approaches that take account of problem areas and potential sources of conflict may help to prevent the onset, ...

  6. Large-scale gene-centric analysis identifies novel variants for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butterworth, A.S.; Braund, P.S.; Hardwick, R.J.; Saleheen, D.; Peden, J.F.; Soranzo, N.; Chambers, J.C.; Kleber, M.E.; Keating, B.; Qasim, A.; Klopp, N.; Erdmann, J.; Basart, H.; Baumert, J.H.; Bezzina, C.R.; Boehm, B.O.; Brocheton, J.; Bugert, P.; Cambien, F.; Collins, R.; Couper, D.; Jong, J.S. de; Diemert, P.; Ejebe, K.; Elbers, C.C.; Elliott, P.; Fornage, M.; Frossard, P.; Garner, S.; Hunt, S.E.; Kastelein, J.J.; Klungel, O.H.; Kluter, H.; Koch, K.; Konig, I.R.; Kooner, A.S.; Liu, K.; McPherson, R.; Musameh, M.D.; Musani, S.; Papanicolaou, G.; Peters, A.; Peters, B.J.; Potter, S.; Psaty, B.M.; Rasheed, A.; Scott, J.; Seedorf, U.; Sehmi, J.S.; Sotoodehnia, N.; Stark, K.; Stephens, J.; Schoot, C.E. van der; Schouw, Y.T. van der; Harst, P. van der; Vasan, R.S.; Wilde, A.A.; Willenborg, C.; Winkelmann, B.R.; Zaidi, M.; Zhang, W.; Ziegler, A.; Koenig, W.; Matz, W.; Trip, M.D.; Reilly, M.P.; Kathiresan, S.; Schunkert, H.; Hamsten, A.; Hall, A.S.; Kooner, J.S.; Thompson, S.G.; Thompson, J.R.; Watkins, H.; Danesh, J.; Barnes, T.; Rafelt, S.; Codd, V.; Bruinsma, N.; Dekker, L.R.; Henriques, J.P.; Koch, K.T.; Winter, R.J. de; Alings, M.; Allaart, C.F.; Gorgels, A.P.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Mueller, M.; Meisinger, C.; DerOhannessian, S.; Mehta, N.N.; Ferguson, J.; Hakonarson, H.; Matthai, W.; Wilensky, R.; Hopewell, J.C.; Parish, S.; Linksted, P.; Notman, J.; Gonzalez, H.; Young, A.; Ostley, T.; Munday, A.; Goodwin, N.; Verdon, V.; Shah, S.; Edwards, C.; Mathews, C.; Gunter, R.; Benham, J.; Davies, C.; Cobb, M.; Cobb, L.; Crowther, J.; Richards, A.; Silver, M.; Tochlin, S.; Mozley, S.; Clark, S.; Radley, M.; Kourellias, K.; Olsson, P.; Barlera, S.; Tognoni, G.; Rust, S.; Assmann, G.; Heath, S.; Zelenika, D.; Gut, I.; Green, F.; Farrall, M.; Peden, J.; Goel, A.; Ongen, H.; Franzosi, M.G.; Lathrop, M.; Clarke, R.; Aly, A.; Anner, K.; Bjorklund, K.; Blomgren, G.; Cederschiold, B.; Danell-Toverud, K.; Eriksson, P.; Grundstedt, U.; Heinonen, M.; Hellenius, M.L.; Hooft, F. van 't; Husman, K.; Lagercrantz, J.; Larsson, A.; Larsson, M.; Mossfeldt, M.; Malarstig, A.; Olsson, G.; Sabater-Lleal, M.; Sennblad, B.; Silveira, A.; Strawbridge, R.; Soderholm, B.; Ohrvik, J.; Zaman, K.S.; Mallick, N.H.; Azhar, M.; Samad, A.; Ishaq, M.; Shah, N.; Samuel, M.; Kathiresan, S.C.; Reilly, M.; Assimes, T.L.; Holm, H.; Preuss, M.; Stewart, A.F.; Barbalic, M.; Gieger, C.; Absher, D.; Aherrahrou, Z.; Allayee, H.; Altshuler, D.; Anand, S.; Andersen, K.; Anderson, J.L.; Ardissino, D.; Ball, S.G.; Balmforth, A.J.; Barnes, T.A.; Becker, L.C.; Becker, D.M.; Berger, K.; Bis, J.C.; Boekholdt, S.M.; Boerwinkle, E.; Brown, M.J.; Burnett, M.S.; Buysschaert, I.; Carlquist, J.F.; Chen, L.; Davies, R.W.; Dedoussis, G.; Dehghan, A.; Demissie, S.; Devaney, J.; Do, R.; Doering, A.; El Mokhtari, N.E.; Ellis, S.G.; Elosua, R.; Engert, J.C.; Epstein, S.; Faire, U. de; Fischer, M.; Folsom, A.R.; Freyer, J.; Gigante, B.; Girelli, D.; Gretarsdottir, S.; Gudnason, V.; Gulcher, J.R.; Tennstedt, S.; Halperin, E.; Hammond, N.; Hazen, S.L.; Hofman, A.; Horne, B.D.; Illig, T.; Iribarren, C.; Jones, G.T.; Jukema, J.W.; Kaiser, M.A.; Kaplan, L.M.; Khaw, K.T.; Knowles, J.W.; Kolovou, G.; Kong, A.; Laaksonen, R.; Lambrechts, D.; Leander, K.; Li, M.; Lieb, W.; Lettre, G.; Loley, C.; Lotery, A.J.; Mannucci, P.M.; Martinelli, N.; McKeown, P.P.; Meitinger, T.; Melander, O.; Merlini, P.A.; Mooser, V.; Morgan, T.; Muhleisen T.W., .; Muhlestein, J.B.; Musunuru, K.; Nahrstaedt, J.; Nothen, M.M.; Olivieri, O.; Peyvandi, F.; Patel, R.S.; Patterson, C.C.; Qu, L.; Quyyumi, A.A.; Rader, D.J.; Rallidis, L.S.; Rice, C.; Roosendaal, F.R.; Rubin, D.; Salomaa, V.; Sampietro, M.L.; Sandhu, M.S.; Schadt, E.; Schafer, A.; Schillert, A.; Schreiber, S.; Schrezenmeir, J.; Schwartz, S.M.; Siscovick, D.S.; Sivananthan, M.; Sivapalaratnam, S.; Smith, A.V.; Smith, T.B.; Snoep, J.D.; Spertus, J.A.; Stefansson, K.; Stirrups, K.; Stoll, M.; Tang, W.H.; Thorgeirsson, G.; Thorleifsson, G.; Tomaszewski, M.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rij, A.M. van; Voight, B.F.; Wareham, N.J.; AWells, G.; Wichmann, H.E.; Witteman, J.C.; Wright, B.J.; Ye, S.; Cupples, L.A.; Quertermous, T.; Marz, W.; Blankenberg, S.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Roberts, R.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Onland-Moret, N.C.; Setten, J. van; Bakker, P.I. de; Verschuren, W.M.; Boer, J.M.; Wijmenga, C.; Hofker, M.H.; Maitland-van der Zee, A.H.; Boer, A. de; Grobbee, D.E.; Attwood, T.; Belz, S.; Cooper, J.; Crisp-Hihn, A.; Deloukas, P.; Foad, N.; Goodall, A.H.; Gracey, J.; Gray, E.; Gwilliams, R.; Heimerl, S.; Hengstenberg, C.; Jolley, J.; Krishnan, U.; Lloyd-Jones, H.; Lugauer, I.; Lundmark, P.; Maouche, S.; Moore, J.S.; Muir, D.; Murray, E.; Nelson, C.P.; Neudert, J.; Niblett, D.; O'Leary, K.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Pollard, H.; Rankin, A.; Rice, C.M.; Sager, H.; Samani, N.J.; Sambrook, J.; Schmitz, G.; Scholz, M.; Schroeder, L.; Syvannen, A.C.; Wallace, C.

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a significant genetic contribution that is incompletely characterized. To complement genome-wide association (GWA) studies, we conducted a large and systematic candidate gene study of CAD susceptibility, including analysis of many uncommon and functional variants. W

  7. Identifying Students with Learning Disabilities: Composite Profile Analysis Using the Cognitive Assessment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Leesa V.; Bardos, Achilles N.; D'Amato, Rik Carl

    2010-01-01

    The detection of cognitive patterns in children with learning disabilities (LD) has been a priority in the identification process. Subtest profile analysis from traditional cognitive assessment has drawn sharp criticism for inaccurate identification and weak connections to educational planning. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to use a new…

  8. Social Learning Network Analysis Model to Identify Learning Patterns Using Ontology Clustering Techniques and Meaningful Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdausiah Mansur, Andi Besse; Yusof, Norazah

    2013-01-01

    Clustering on Social Learning Network still not explored widely, especially when the network focuses on e-learning system. Any conventional methods are not really suitable for the e-learning data. SNA requires content analysis, which involves human intervention and need to be carried out manually. Some of the previous clustering techniques need…

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, M. C.; Byrne, E. M.; Esko, T.; Nalls, M. A.; Ganna, A.; Paynter, N.; Monda, K. L.; Amin, N.; Fischer, K.; Renstrom, F.; Ngwa, J. S.; Huikari, V.; Cavadino, A.; Nolte, I. M.; Teumer, A.; Yu, K.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Rawal, R.; Manichaikul, A.; Wojczynski, M. K.; Vink, J. M.; Zhao, J. H.; Burlutsky, G.; Lahti, J.; Mikkila, V.; Lemaitre, R. N.; Eriksson, J.; Musani, S. K.; Tanaka, T.; Geller, F.; Luan, J.; Hui, J.; Maegi, R.; Dimitriou, M.; Garcia, M. E.; Ho, W-K; Wright, M. J.; Rose, L. M.; Magnusson, P. K. E.; Pedersen, N. L.; Couper, D.; Oostra, B. A.; Hofman, A.; Ikram, M. A.; Tiemeier, H. W.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; van Rooij, F. J. A.; Barroso, I.; Johansson, I.; Xue, L.; Kaakinen, M.; Milani, L.; Power, C.; Snieder, H.; Stolk, R. P.; Baumeister, S. E.; Biffar, R.; Gu, F.; Bastardot, F.; Kutalik, Z.; Jacobs, D. R.; Forouhi, N. G.; Mihailov, E.; Lind, L.; Lindgren, C.; Michaelsson, K.; Morris, A.; Jensen, M.; Khaw, K-T; Luben, R. N.; Wang, J. J.; Mannisto, S.; Perala, M-M; Kahonen, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Viikari, J.; Mozaffarian, D.; Mukamal, K.; Psaty, B. M.; Doering, A.; Heath, A. C.; Montgomery, G. W.; Dahmen, N.; Carithers, T.; Tucker, K. L.; Ferrucci, L.; Boyd, H. A.; Melbye, M.; Treur, J. L.; Mellstrom, D.; Hottenga, J. J.; Prokopenko, I.; Toenjes, A.; Deloukas, P.; Kanoni, S.; Lorentzon, M.; Houston, D. K.; Liu, Y.; Danesh, J.; Rasheed, A.; Mason, M. A.; Zonderman, A. B.; Franke, L.; Kristal, B. S.; Karjalainen, J.; Reed, D. R.; Westra, H-J; Evans, M. K.; Saleheen, D.; Harris, T. B.; Dedoussis, G.; Curhan, G.; Stumvoll, M.; Beilby, J.; Pasquale, L. R.; Feenstra, B.; Bandinelli, S.; Ordovas, J. M.; Chan, A. T.; Peters, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Gieger, C.; Martin, N. G.; Waldenberger, M.; Siscovick, D. S.; Raitakari, O.; Eriksson, J. G.; Mitchell, P.; Hunter, D. J.; Kraft, P.; Rimm, E. B.; Boomsma, D. I.; Borecki, I. B.; Loos, R. J. F.; Wareham, N. J.; Vollenweider, P.; Caporaso, N.; Grabe, H. J.; Neuhouser, M. L.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Hu, F. B.; Hyppoenen, E.; Jarvelin, M-R; Cupples, L. A.; Franks, P. W.; Ridker, P. M.; van Duijn, C. M.; Heiss, G.; Metspalu, A.; North, K. E.; Ingelsson, E.; Nettleton, J. A.; van Dam, R. M.; Chasman, D. I.

    2015-01-01

    Coffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day) among up to

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W. Loth (Daan); M.S. Artigas; S.A. Gharib (Sina); L.V. Wain (Louise); N. Franceschini (Nora); B. Koch (Beate); T.D. Pottinger (Tess); G.D. Smith; Q. Duan (Qing); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); M.K. Lee (Mi Kyeong); D.P. Strachan (David); A.L. James (Alan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); V. Vitart (Veronique); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); N.J. Wareham (Nick); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); X.-Q. Wang (Xin-Qun); H. Trochet (Holly); M. Kähönen (Mika); C. Flexeder (Claudia); E. Albrecht (Eva); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); B. Thyagarajan (Bharat); A.C. Alves (Alexessander Couto); S. Enroth (Stefan); E. Omenaas (Ernst); P.K. Joshi (Peter); M. Fall (Magnus); A. Viñuela (Ana); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L.R. Loehr (Laura); M. Fornage (Myriam); G. Li (Guo); J.B. Wilk (Jemma); W. Tang (Wenbo); A. Manichaikul (Ani); L. Lahousse (Lies); T.B. Harris (Tamara); K.E. North (Kari); A.R. Rudnicka (Alicja); J. Hui (Jennie); X. Gu (Xiangjun); T. Lumley (Thomas); A.F. Wright (Alan); N. Hastie (Nick); S. Campbell (Susan); R. Kumar (Rajesh); I. Pin (Isabelle); R.A. Scott (Robert); K.H. Pietilainen (Kirsi Hannele); I. Surakka (Ida); Y. Liu (Yongmei); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); H. Schulz (Holger); J. Heinrich (Joachim); G. Davies (Gail); J.M. Vonk (Judith); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Pouta (Anneli); A. Johansson (Åsa); S.H. Wild (Sarah); E. Ingelsson (Erik); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); H. Völzke (Henry); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); W. Gao (Wei); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); W.B. White (Wendy); S.S. Rich (Stephen); A. Hofman (Albert); T. Aspelund (Thor); D. Couper (David); L.J. Smith (Lewis); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); K. Lohman (Kurt); E.G. Burchard (Esteban); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Garcia (Melissa); B.R. Joubert (Bonnie); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A.W. Musk (Arthur); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); L. Zgaga (Lina); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Navarro (Pau); I. Rudan (Igor); Y.-M. Oh (Yeon-Mok); S. Redline (Susan); D.L. Jarvis (Deborah); J.H. Zhao (Jing); T. Rantanen (Taina); G.T. O'Connor (George); S. Ripatti (Samuli); R.J. Scott (Rodney); S. Karrasch (Stefan); H. Grallert (Harald); N.C. Gaddis (Nathan); J.M. Starr (John); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); R.L. Minster (Ryan); C.W. Lederer (Carsten); J. Pekkanen (Juha); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); H. Campbell (Harry); A.P. Morris (Andrew); S. Gläser (Sven); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); K.M. Burkart (Kristin); J.P. Beilby (John); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); D.B. Hancock (Dana); O.D. Williams (Dale); O. Polasek (Ozren); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M.F. Petrini (Marcy); K.T. de Jong (Kim); M. Wjst (Matthias); W.H. Kim (Woo); D.J. Porteous (David J.); G. Scotland (Generation); B.H. Smith (Blair); A. Viljanen (Anne); M. Heliovaara (Markku); J. Attia (John); I. Sayers (Ian); R. Hampel (Regina); C. Gieger (Christian); I.J. Deary (Ian); H.M. Boezen (H. Marike); A.B. Newman (Anne); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Lind (Lars); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); A. Teumer (Alexander); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E. Melén (Erik); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); L.A. Lange (Leslie); R.G. Barr (Graham); K.R. Bracke (Ken); F.M. Verhamme (Fien); J. Sung (Joohon); P.S. Hiemstra (Pieter); P.A. Cassano (Patricia); A. Sood (Akshay); C. Hayward (Caroline); J. Dupuis (Josée); I.P. Hall (Ian); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); M.D. Tobin (Martin); S.J. London (Stephanie)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractForced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in

  11. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kaonen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Vinuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wik, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Voezke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbe, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Glaeser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gucinason, Vilrnundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Villanen, Anne; Heliovaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, Hendrika; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melen, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josee; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 addit

  12. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradfield, Jonathan P; Taal, H Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J;

    2012-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made in establishing genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American, Australian and European collaborative meta-analysis o...

  13. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire;

    2016-01-01

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We...

  14. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Taal, H. Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Scherag, Andre; Lecoeur, Cecile; Warrington, Nicole M.; Hypponen, Elina; Holst, Claus; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Thiering, Elisabeth; Salem, Rany M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Zhao, Jianhua; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Jarick, Ivonne; Pennell, Craig E.; Evans, David M.; St Pourcain, Beate; Berry, Diane J.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van der Valk, Ralf J. P.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gauderman, W. James; Hassanein, Mohamed T.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Magi, Reedik; Boreham, Colin A. G.; Neville, Charlotte E.; Moreno, Luis A.; Elliott, Paul; Pouta, Anneli; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Li, Mingyao; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimaki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; Deloukas, Panos; McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M.; Kemp, John P.; Buxton, Jessica L.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Bustamante, Mariona; Guxens, Monica; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Gilliland, Frank D.; Heinrich, Joachim; Wheeler, Eleanor; Barroso, Ines; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Power, Chris; Palmer, Lyle J.; Hinney, Anke; Widen, Elisabeth; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; McCarthy, Mark I.; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Hebebrand, Johannes; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Smith, George Davey; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made in establishing genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American, Australian and European collaborative meta-analysis of 1

  15. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Cornelis (Marilyn); E.M. Byrne; T. Esko (Tõnu); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Ganna (Andrea); N.P. Paynter (Nina); K.L. Monda (Keri); N. Amin; K. Fischer (Krista); F. Renström (Frida); J.S. Ngwa; V. Huikari (Ville); A. Cavadino (Alana); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); A. Teumer (Alexander); K. Yu; P. Marques-Vidal; R. Rawal; A. Manichaikul (Ani); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); J.M. Vink; J.H. Zhao; G. Burlutsky (George); J. Lahti (Jari); V. Mikkilä (Vera); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); J. Eriksson; S. Musani (Solomon); T. Tanaka; F. Geller (Frank); J. Luan; J. Hui; R. Mägi (Reedik); M. Dimitriou (Maria); M. Garcia (Melissa); W.-K. Ho; M.J. Wright (Margaret); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); P.K.E. Magnusson (Patrik K. E.); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); D.J. Couper (David); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Hofman (Albert); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); I. Barroso; I. Johansson (Ingegerd); L. Xue (Luting); M. Kaakinen (Marika); L. Milani (Lili); C. Power (Christine); H. Snieder (Harold); R.P. Stolk; S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); R. Biffar; F. Gu; F. Bastardot (Francois); Z. Kutalik; D.R. Jacobs (David); N.G. Forouhi (Nita G.); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Lind (Lars); C. Lindgren; K. Michaëlsson; A.P. Morris (Andrew); M.K. Jensen (Majken K.); K.T. Khaw; R.N. Luben (Robert); J.J. Wang; S. Männistö (Satu); M.-M. Perälä; M. Kähönen (Mika); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J. Viikari (Jorma); D. Mozaffarian; K. Mukamal (Kenneth); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A. Döring; A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); G.W. Montgomery (Grant W.); N. Dahmen (N.); T. Carithers; K.L. Tucker; L. Ferrucci (Luigi); H.A. Boyd; M. Melbye (Mads); J.L. Treur; D. Mellström (Dan); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); I. Prokopenko (Inga); A. Tönjes (Anke); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); D.K. Houston; Y. Liu; J. Danesh (John); A. Rasheed; M.A. Mason; A.B. Zonderman; L. Franke (Lude); B.S. Kristal; J. Karjalainen (Juha); D.R. Reed; H.-J. Westra; M.K. Evans; D. Saleheen; T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); G.V. Dedoussis (George V.); G.C. Curhan (Gary); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J. Beilby (John); L.R. Pasquale; B. Feenstra; S. Bandinelli; J.M. Ordovas; A.T. Chan; U. Peters (Ulrike); C. Ohlsson (Claes); C. Gieger (Christian); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); D.S. Siscovick (David); O. Raitakari (Olli); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); P. Mitchell (Paul); D. Hunter (David); P. Kraft (Peter); E.B. Rimm (Eric B.); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth J.F.); N.J. Wareham (Nick); P.K. Vollenweider (Peter K.); N. Caporaso; H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); M.L. Neuhouser (Marian L.); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce H. R.); F.B. Hu (Frank); E. Hypponen (Elina); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); P.W. Franks; P.M. Ridker (Paul); C.M. Van Duijn (Cornelia M.); G. Heiss (Gerardo); A. Metspalu (Andres); K.E. North (Kari); E. Ingelsson (Erik); J.A. Nettleton; R.M. van Dam (Rob); D.I. Chasman (Daniel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCoffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day)

  16. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Analysis Identifies Novel Variants for Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butterworth, Adam S.; Braund, Peter S.; Farrall, Martin; Hardwick, Robert J.; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Soranzo, Nicole; Chambers, John C.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Kleber, Marcus E.; Keating, Brendan; Qasim, Atif; Klopp, Norman; Erdmann, Jeanette; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Timothy A.; Basart, Hanneke; Baumert, Jens; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Brocheton, Jessy; Bugert, Peter; Cambien, Francois; Clarke, Robert; Codd, Veryan; Collins, Rory; Couper, David; Cupples, L. Adrienne; de Jong, Jonas S.; Diemert, Patrick; Ejebe, Kenechi; Elbers, Clara C.; Elliott, Paul; Fornage, Myriam; Franzosi, Maria-Grazia; Frossard, Philippe; Garner, Stephen; Goel, Anuj; Goodall, Alison H.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Klueter, Harald; Koch, Kerstin; Koenig, Inke R.; Kooner, Angad S.; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Liu, Kiang; McPherson, Ruth; Musameh, Muntaser D.; Musani, Solomon; Nelson, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ongen, Halit; Papanicolaou, George; Peters, Annette; Peters, Bas J. M.; Potter, Simon; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qu, Liming; Rader, Daniel J.; Rasheed, Asif; Rice, Catherine; Scott, James; Seedorf, Udo; Sehmi, Joban S.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tomaszewski, Maciej; van der Harst, Pim; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Willenborg, Christina; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Zaidi, Moazzam; Zhang, Weihua; Ziegler, Andreas; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Maerz, Winfried; Trip, Mieke D.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Schunkert, Heribert; Hamsten, Anders; Hall, Alistair S.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Thompson, Simon G.; Thompson, John R.; Deloukas, Panos; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Watkins, Hugh; Danesh, John; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a significant genetic contribution that is incompletely characterized. To complement genome-wide association (GWA) studies, we conducted a large and systematic candidate gene study of CAD susceptibility, including analysis of many uncommon and functional variants. W

  17. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. James (Sally); J. Fox (James); F. Afsari (Farinaz); J. Lee (Jennifer); S. Clough (Sally); C. Knight (Charlotte); J. Ashmore (James); P. Ashton (Peter); O. Preham (Olivier); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); R.D.A.R. Ponzoni (Raquel De Almeida Rocha); Y. Hancock; M. Coles (Mark); P.G. Genever (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis

  18. Exploratory Data Analysis to Identify Factors Influencing Spatial Distributions of Weed Seed Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparing distributions of different species in multiple fields will help us understand the spatial dynamics of weed seed banks, but analyzing observational data requires non-traditional statistical methods. We used classification and regression tree analysis (CART) to investigate factors that influ...

  19. Genome-wide association analysis in primary sclerosing cholangitis identifies two non-HLA susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Melum; A. Franke; C. Schramm; T.J. Weismüller; D.N. Gotthardt; F.A. Offner; B.D. Juran; J.K. Laerdahl; V. Labi; E. Björnsson; R.K. Weersma; L. Henckaerts; A. Teufel; C. Rust; E. Ellinghaus; T. Balschun; K.M. Boberg; D. Ellinghaus; A. Bergquist; P. Sauer; E. Ryu; J.R. Hov; J. Wedemeyer; B. Lindkvist; M. Wittig; R.J. Porte; K. Holm; C. Gieger; H.E. Wichmann; P. Stokkers; C.Y. Ponsioen; H. Runz; A. Stiehl; C. Wijmenga; M. Sterneck; S. Vermeire; U. Beuers; A. Villunger; E. Schrumpf; K.N. Lazaridis; M.P. Manns; S. Schreiber; T.H. Karlsen

    2011-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic bile duct disease affecting 2.4-7.5% of individuals with inflammatory bowel disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis of 2,466,182 SNPs in 715 individuals with PSC and 2,962 controls, followed by replication in 1,025 PSC cases and 2,17

  20. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Felix (Janine); J.P. Bradfield (Jonathan); C. Monnereau; R.J.P. van der Valk (Ralf); E. Stergiakouli (Evie); A. Chesi (Alessandra); R. Gaillard (Romy); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); E. Thiering (Elisabeth); E. Kreiner-Møller (Eskil); A. Mahajan (Anubha); Niina Pitkänen; R. Joro (Raimo); A. Cavadino (Alana); V. Huikari (Ville); S. Franks (Steve); M. Groen-Blokhuis (Maria); D.L. Cousminer (Diana); J.A. Marsh (Julie); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J.A. Curtin (John); J. Vioque (Jesus); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); R. Myhre (Ronny); T.S. Price (Thomas); Natalia Vilor-Tejedor; L. Yengo (Loic); N. Grarup (Niels); I. Ntalla (Ioanna); W.Q. Ang (Wei); M. Atalay (Mustafa); H. Bisgaard (Hans); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); L. Carstensen (Lisbeth); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); C. Flexeder (Claudia); L. Franke (Lude); F. Geller (Frank); M. Geserick (Mandy); A.L. Hartikainen; C.M.A. Haworth (Claire M.); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel N.); A. Hofman (Albert); J.-C. Holm (Jens-Christian); M. Horikoshi (Momoko); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J. Huang (Jian); H.N. Kadarmideen (Haja N.); M. Kähönen (Mika); W. Kiess (Wieland); T.A. Lakka (Timo); T.A. Lakka (Timo); A. Lewin (Alex); L. Liang (Liming); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); B. Ma (Baoshan); P. Magnus (Per); S.E. McCormack (Shana E.); G. Mcmahon (George); F.D. Mentch (Frank); C.M. Middeldorp (Christel); C.S. Murray (Clare S.); K. Pahkala (Katja); T.H. Pers (Tune); R. Pfäffle (Roland); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); C. Power (Christine); A. Simpson (Angela); V. Sengpiel (Verena); C. Tiesler (Carla); M. Torrent (Maties); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); R. Vinding (Rebecca); J. Waage (Johannes); J. Wardle (Jane); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); B.S. Zemel (Babette S.); G.V. Dedoussis (George); O. Pedersen (Oluf); P. Froguel (Philippe); J. Sunyer (Jordi); R. Plomin (Robert); B. Jacobsson (Bo); T. Hansen (Torben); J.R. Gonzalez (Juan R.); A. Custovic; O.T. Raitakari (Olli T.); C.E. Pennell (Craig); Elisabeth Widén; D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); S. Sebert (Sylvain); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); E. Hypponen (Elina); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); V. Lindi (Virpi); N. Harri (Niinikoski); A. Körner (Antje); K. Bønnelykke (Klaus); J. Heinrich (Joachim); M. Melbye (Mads); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); S.M. Ring (Susan); G.D. Smith; T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild I.A.); N. Timpson (Nicholas); S.F. Grant; V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent W. V.); H.J. Kalkwarf (Heidi J.); J.M. Lappe (Joan M.); V. Gilsanz (Vicente); S.E. Oberfield (Sharon E.); J.A. Shepherd (John A.); A. Kelly (Andrea)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractA large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown.We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation sc

  1. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire; van der Valk, Ralf J P; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Pitkänen, Niina; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville; Franks, Steve; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Cousminer, Diana L; Marsh, Julie A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Curtin, John A; Vioque, Jesus; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Myhre, Ronny; Price, Thomas S; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Yengo, Loïc; Grarup, Niels; Ntalla, Ioanna; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; Bisgaard, Hans; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Bonnefond, Amelie; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Johan; Flexeder, Claudia; Franke, Lude; Geller, Frank; Geserick, Mandy; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Haworth, Claire M A; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Holm, Jens-Christian; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Kähönen, Mika; Kiess, Wieland; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A; Lewin, Alexandra M; Liang, Liming; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Ma, Baoshan; Magnus, Per; McCormack, Shana E; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D; Middeldorp, Christel M; Murray, Clare S; Pahkala, Katja; Pers, Tune H; Pfäffle, Roland; Postma, Dirkje S; Power, Christine; Simpson, Angela; Sengpiel, Verena; Tiesler, Carla M T; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G; van Meurs, Joyce B; Vinding, Rebecca; Waage, Johannes; Wardle, Jane; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zemel, Babette S; Dedoussis, George V; Pedersen, Oluf; Froguel, Philippe; Sunyer, Jordi; Plomin, Robert; Jacobsson, Bo; Hansen, Torben; Gonzalez, Juan R; Custovic, Adnan; Raitakari, Olli T; Pennell, Craig E; Widén, Elisabeth; Boomsma, Dorret I; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sebert, Sylvain; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hyppönen, Elina; McCarthy, Mark I; Lindi, Virpi; Harri, Niinikoski; Körner, Antje; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Heinrich, Joachim; Melbye, Mads; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ring, Susan M; Smith, George Davey; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Grant, Struan F A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2015-01-01

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We in

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies multiple novel associations and ethnic heterogeneity of psoriasis susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Xianyong; Low, Hui Qi; Wang, Ling; Li, Yonghong; Ellinghaus, Eva; Han, Jiali; Estivill, Xavier; Sun, Liangdan; Zuo, Xianbo; Shen, Changbing; Zhu, Caihong; Zhang, Anping; Sanchez, Fabio; Padyukov, Leonid; Catanese, Joseph J; Krueger, Gerald G; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Mucha, Sören; Weichenthal, Michael; Weidinger, Stephan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Foo, Jia Nee; Li, Yi; Sim, Karseng; Liany, Herty; Irwan, Ishak; Teo, Yikying; Theng, Colin T S; Gupta, Rashmi; Bowcock, Anne; De Jager, Philip L; Qureshi, Abrar A; de Bakker, Paul I W; Seielstad, Mark; Liao, Wilson; Ståhle, Mona; Franke, Andre; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with complex genetics and different degrees of prevalence across ethnic populations. Here we present the largest trans-ethnic genome-wide meta-analysis (GWMA) of psoriasis in 15,369 cases and 19,517 controls of Caucasian and Chinese ancestries. We iden

  3. Architectural measures of the cancellous bone of the mandibular condyle identified by principal components analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giesen, EB; Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M;

    2003-01-01

    As several morphological parameters of cancellous bone express more or less the same architectural measure, we applied principal components analysis to group these measures and correlated these to the mechanical properties. Cylindrical specimens (n = 24) were obtained in different orientations fr...

  4. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Brian John; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam;

    2011-01-01

    a comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein...... involving six long hairpins in the 3'-UTR of MAT2A, a key metabolic gene that produces the primary human methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine; the other involving a tRNA-like structure in the intron of the tRNA maturation gene POP1. We experimentally validate the predicted MAT2A structures. Finally, we...

  5. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel variants associated with osteoarthritis of the hip

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Kerkhof, Hanneke J.; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Bos, Steffan D.; Esko, Tonu; Evans, Daniel S.; Metrustry, Sarah; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Ramos, Yolande F M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; ,; Arden, Nigel; Aslam, Nadim

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects. Methods We performed a two-stage meta-analysis on more than 78 000 participants. In stage 1, we synthesised data from eight GWAS whereas data from 10 centres were used for ‘in silico’ or ‘de novo’ replication. Besides the main analysis, a stratified by sex a...

  6. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel variants associated with osteoarthritis of the hip.

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Kerkhof, Hanneke; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Ntzani, Evangelia; Bos, Steffan; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, Daniel; Metrustry, Sarah; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Ramos, Yolande; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tsilidis, Konstantinos; Arden, Nigel; Aslam, Nadim; Bellamy, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects. Methods We performed a two-stage meta-analysis on more than 78 000 participants. In stage 1, we synthesised data from eight GWAS whereas data from 10 centres were used for 'in silico' or 'de novo' replication. Besides the main analysis, a str...

  7. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  8. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  9. H-1 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomics Analysis Identifies Novel Urinary Biomarkers for Lung Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airflow limitation, is a serious and growing public health concern. The major environmental risk factor for COPD is tobacco smoking, but the biological mechanisms underlying COPD are not well understood. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy to identify and quantify metabolites associated with lung function in COPD. Plasma and urine were collected from 197 adults with COPD and from 195 adults without COPD. Samples were assayed using a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer, and the resulting spectra were analyzed against quantitative spirometric measures of lung function. After correcting for false discoveries and adjusting for covariates (sex, age, smoking) several spectral regions in urine were found to be significantly associated with baseline lung function. These regions correspond to the metabolites trigonelline, hippurate and formate. Concentrations of each metabolite, standardized to urinary creatinine, were associated with baseline lung function (minimum p-value = 0.0002 for trigonelline). No significant associations were found with plasma metabolites. Two of the three urinary metabolites positively associated with baseline lung function, i.e. hippurate and formate, are often related to gut microflora. This suggests that the microbiome composition is variable between individuals with different lung function. Alternatively, the nature and origins of all three associated metabolites may reflect lifestyle differences affecting overall health. Our results will require replication and validation, but demonstrate the utility of NMR metabolomics as a screening tool for identifying novel biomarkers of lung disease or disease risk.

  10. Exome analysis of two limb-girdle muscular dystrophy families: mutations identified and challenges encountered.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin K McDonald

    Full Text Available The molecular diagnosis of muscle disorders is challenging: genetic heterogeneity (>100 causal genes for skeletal and cardiac muscle disease precludes exhaustive clinical testing, prioritizing sequencing of specific genes is difficult due to the similarity of clinical presentation, and the number of variants returned through exome sequencing can make the identification of the disease-causing variant difficult. We have filtered variants found through exome sequencing by prioritizing variants in genes known to be involved in muscle disease while examining the quality and depth of coverage of those genes. We ascertained two families with autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy of unknown etiology. To identify the causal mutations in these families, we performed exome sequencing on five affected individuals using the Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon 50 Mb kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 (2×100 bp. We identified causative mutations in desmin (IVS3+3A>G and filamin C (p.W2710X, and augmented the phenotype data for individuals with muscular dystrophy due to these mutations. We also discuss challenges encountered due to depth of coverage variability at specific sites and the annotation of a functionally proven splice site variant as an intronic variant.

  11. H-1 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomics Analysis Identifies Novel Urinary Biomarkers for Lung Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCClay, Joseph L.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Isern, Nancy G.; O' Connell, Thomas M.; Wooten, Jan B.; Zedler, Barbara K.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Webb, B. T.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Murrelle, Edward L.; Leppert, Mark F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2010-06-04

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airflow limitation, is a serious and growing public health concern. The major environmental risk factor for COPD is tobacco smoking, but the biological mechanisms underlying COPD are not well understood. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy to identify and quantify metabolites associated with lung function in COPD. Plasma and urine were collected from 197 adults with COPD and from 195 adults without COPD. Samples were assayed using a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer, and the resulting spectra were analyzed against quantitative spirometric measures of lung function. After correcting for false discoveries and adjusting for covariates (sex, age, smoking) several spectral regions in urine were found to be significantly associated with baseline lung function. These regions correspond to the metabolites trigonelline, hippurate and formate. Concentrations of each metabolite, standardized to urinary creatinine, were associated with baseline lung function (minimum p-value = 0.0002 for trigonelline). No significant associations were found with plasma metabolites. Two of the three urinary metabolites positively associated with baseline lung function, i.e. hippurate and formate, are often related to gut microflora. This suggests that the microbiome composition is variable between individuals with different lung function. Alternatively, the nature and origins of all three associated metabolites may reflect lifestyle differences affecting overall health. Our results will require replication and validation, but demonstrate the utility of NMR metabolomics as a screening tool for identifying novel biomarkers of lung disease or disease risk.

  12. Mutational analysis of βCOP (Sec26p identifies an appendage domain critical for function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerione Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appendage domain of the γCOP subunit of the COPI vesicle coat bears a striking structural resemblance to adaptin-family appendages despite limited primary sequence homology. Both the γCOP appendage domain and an equivalent region on βCOP contain the FxxxW motif; the conservation of this motif suggested the existence of a functional appendage domain in βCOP. Results Sequence comparisons in combination with structural prediction tools show that the fold of the COOH-terminus of Sec26p is strongly predicted to closely mimic that of adaptin-family appendages. Deletion of the appendage domain of Sec26p results in inviability in yeast, over-expression of the deletion construct is dominant negative and mutagenesis of this region identifies residues critical for function. The ArfGAP Glo3p was identified via suppression screening as a potential downstream modulator of Sec26p in a manner that is independent of the GAP activity of Glo3p but requires the presence of the COOH-terminal ISS motifs. Conclusion Together, these results indicate an essential function for the predicted βCOP appendage and suggest that both COPI appendages perform a biologically active regulatory role with a structure related to adaptin-family appendage domains.

  13. Identifying and quantifying heterogeneity in high content analysis: application of heterogeneity indices to drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H Gough

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in biomedical research, drug discovery and diagnostics is understanding how seemingly identical cells can respond differently to perturbagens including drugs for disease treatment. Although heterogeneity has become an accepted characteristic of a population of cells, in drug discovery it is not routinely evaluated or reported. The standard practice for cell-based, high content assays has been to assume a normal distribution and to report a well-to-well average value with a standard deviation. To address this important issue we sought to define a method that could be readily implemented to identify, quantify and characterize heterogeneity in cellular and small organism assays to guide decisions during drug discovery and experimental cell/tissue profiling. Our study revealed that heterogeneity can be effectively identified and quantified with three indices that indicate diversity, non-normality and percent outliers. The indices were evaluated using the induction and inhibition of STAT3 activation in five cell lines where the systems response including sample preparation and instrument performance were well characterized and controlled. These heterogeneity indices provide a standardized method that can easily be integrated into small and large scale screening or profiling projects to guide interpretation of the biology, as well as the development of therapeutics and diagnostics. Understanding the heterogeneity in the response to perturbagens will become a critical factor in designing strategies for the development of therapeutics including targeted polypharmacology.

  14. Behavior Analysis in a learning Environment to Identify the Suitable Learning Style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz . K. Hamada

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Personalized adaptive systems rely heavily on the learning style and the learner's behavior.Due to traditional teaching methods and high learner/teacher ratios, a teacher faces great obstacles inthe classroom. In these methods, teachers deliver the content and learners just receive it. Moreover,teachers can’t cope with the individual differences among learners. This weakness may be attributed tovarious reasons such as the high number of learners accommodated in each classroom and the lowteaching skills of the teacher himself/herself, Therefore, identifying learning styles is a critical step inunderstanding how to improve the learning process.This paper presented an automatic tool for identifying learning styles based on the Felder-Silvermanlearning style model in a learning environment using a social book marking website such aswww.tagme1.com .The proposed tool used the learners’ behaviour while they are browsing / exploring their favorite webpages in order to gather hints about their learning styles. Then the learning styles were calculated basedon the gathered indications from the learners' database.The results showed that the proposed tool recognition accuracy was 72% when we applied it on 25learners with low number of links per learner. Recognition accuracy increased to 86.66% when weapplied it on 15 learners with high number of links per learner.

  15. Network analysis identifies SOD2 mRNA as a potential biomarker for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Santiago

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that Parkinson's disease (PD and type 2 diabetes (T2DM share dysregulated molecular networks. We identified 84 genes shared between PD and T2DM from curated disease-gene databases. Nitric oxide biosynthesis, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, insulin secretion and inflammation were identified as common dysregulated pathways. A network prioritization approach was implemented to rank genes according to their distance to seed genes and their involvement in common biological pathways. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that a highly ranked gene, superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2, is upregulated in PD patients compared to healthy controls in 192 whole blood samples from two independent clinical trials, the Harvard Biomarker Study (HBS and the Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (PROBE. The results from this study reinforce the idea that shared molecular networks between PD and T2DM provides an additional source of biologically meaningful biomarkers. Evaluation of this biomarker in de novo PD patients and in a larger prospective longitudinal study is warranted.

  16. Regulators of genetic risk of breast cancer identified by integrative network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mauro A A; de Santiago, Ines; Campbell, Thomas M; Vaughn, Courtney; Hickey, Theresa E; Ross, Edith; Tilley, Wayne D; Markowetz, Florian; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B

    2016-01-01

    Genetic risk for breast cancer is conferred by a combination of multiple variants of small effect. To better understand how risk loci might combine, we examined whether risk-associated genes share regulatory mechanisms. We created a breast cancer gene regulatory network comprising transcription factors and groups of putative target genes (regulons) and asked whether specific regulons are enriched for genes associated with risk loci via expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We identified 36 overlapping regulons that were enriched for risk loci and formed a distinct cluster within the network, suggesting shared biology. The risk transcription factors driving these regulons are frequently mutated in cancer and lie in two opposing subgroups, which relate to estrogen receptor (ER)(+) luminal A or luminal B and ER(-) basal-like cancers and to different luminal epithelial cell populations in the adult mammary gland. Our network approach provides a foundation for determining the regulatory circuits governing breast cancer, to identify targets for intervention, and is transferable to other disease settings.

  17. Genome-wide Analysis Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Ovarian Cancer Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Kar, Siddhartha;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chemotherapy resistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of ovarian cancer. We hypothesize that germline polymorphisms might be associated with clinical outcome. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We analyzed approximately 2.8 million genotyped and imputed SNPs from the iCOGS experiment...... at standard doses. We evaluated the top SNPs in 4,434 EOC patients, including patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas. In addition, we conducted pathway analysis of all intragenic SNPs and tested their association with PFS and OS using gene set enrichment analysis. RESULTS: Five SNPs were significantly...... for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in 2,901 European epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients who underwent first-line treatment of cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy regardless of regimen, and in a subset of 1,098 patients treated with ≥ 4 cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin...

  18. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben

    2008-01-01

    studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. METHODS: We have...... tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. RESULTS: The major findings are upregulation of cell cycle pathways......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent...

  19. Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) to identify core profiles from the WMS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Craig L; Kim, Se-Kang

    2008-03-01

    Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is a procedure for extracting latent core profiles in a multitest data set. The PAMS procedure offers several advantages compared with other profile analysis procedures. Most notably, PAMS estimates individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed profile approximates the shape and scatter of latent core profiles. The PAMS procedure was applied to index scores of nonreplicated participants from the standardization sample (N = 1,033) for the Wechsler Memory Scale--Third Edition (D. Tulsky, J. Zhu, & M. F. Ledbetter, 2002). PAMS extracted discrepant visual memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the complete 16- to 89-year-old sample and discrepant working memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the 75- to 89-year-old cohort. Implications for use of PAMS in future research are discussed.

  20. 3D AVO Analysis for Identifying Thin Continental Sandstone Interbeds and Deep Volcanic Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fulei; WangJianmin; CuiFenglin; XuJianjun; ZhangXiangjun; KongXiangbo

    2005-01-01

    AVO characteristics were ambiguous in thin-layer interbed sandstones and mudstones of terrestrial facies of Daqing area. Described in this paper is the 3D AVO analysis and real examples in the Songzhan region in the north of the Songliao basin. The AVO responses of the Fuyu sandstone reservoir, obtained through special AVO processing and interpretation as well as the AVO forwardmod eling under the constraints of logging data, were evident in the Sheng-81 well. It was concluded that the Fuyu sandstone reservoir presented an AVO anomaly of “amplitudes increasing with offsets”.At the same time, the deep volcanic reservoirs were ascertained and the channels of volcanic eruption were delineated at the intersections of faults in Sanzhao area, through a 3D AVO analysis, which coincided with the theory of geodynamics and tectonophysics.

  1. Identifying time measurement tampering in the traversal time and hop count analysis (TTHCA) wormhole detection algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Jonny Karlsson; Dooley, Laurence S.; Göran Pulkkis

    2013-01-01

    Traversal time and hop count analysis (TTHCA) is a recent wormhole detection algorithm for mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) which provides enhanced detection performance against all wormhole attack variants and network types. TTHCA involves each node measuring the processing time of routing packets during the route discovery process and then delivering the measurements to the source node. In a participation mode (PM) wormhole where malicious nodes appear in the routing tables as legitimate node...

  2. Identifying differences in the experience of (in)authenticity: a latent class analysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Alison P. Lenton; Slabu, Letitia; Bruder, Martin; Sedikides, Constantine

    2014-01-01

    Generally, psychologists consider state authenticity – that is, the subjective sense of being one’s true self – to be a unitary and unidimensional construct, such that (a) the phenomenological experience of authenticity is thought to be similar no matter its trigger, and (b) inauthenticity is thought to be simply the opposing pole (on the same underlying construct) of authenticity. Using latent class analysis, we put this conceptualization to a test. In order to avoid over-reliance on a Weste...

  3. To Identify the Important Soil Properties Affecting Dinoseb Adsorption with Statistical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqing Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the influences of soil characteristic factors on dinoseb adsorption parameter with different statistical methods would be valuable to explicitly figure out the extent of these influences. The correlation coefficients and the direct, indirect effects of soil characteristic factors on dinoseb adsorption parameter were analyzed through bivariate correlation analysis, and path analysis. With stepwise regression analysis the factors which had little influence on the adsorption parameter were excluded. Results indicate that pH and CEC had moderate relationship and lower direct effect on dinoseb adsorption parameter due to the multicollinearity with other soil factors, and organic carbon and clay contents were found to be the most significant soil factors which affect the dinoseb adsorption process. A regression is thereby set up to explore the relationship between the dinoseb adsorption parameter and the two soil factors: the soil organic carbon and clay contents. A 92% of the variation of dinoseb sorption coefficient could be attributed to the variation of the soil organic carbon and clay contents.

  4. Host response to respiratory bacterial pathogens as identified by integrated analysis of human gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B Smith

    Full Text Available Respiratory bacterial pathogens are one of the leading causes of infectious death in the world and a major health concern complicated by the rise of multi-antibiotic resistant strains. Therapeutics that modulate host genes essential for pathogen infectivity could potentially avoid multi-drug resistance and provide a wider scope of treatment options. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of published human gene expression data generated under challenges from the gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae, respectively. We applied a previously described differential gene and pathway enrichment analysis pipeline to publicly available host mRNA GEO datasets resulting from exposure to bacterial infection. We found 72 canonical human pathways common between four GEO datasets, representing P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae. Although the majority of these pathways are known to be involved with immune response, we found several interesting new interactions such as the SUMO1 pathway that might have a role in bacterial infections. Furthermore, 36 host-bacterial pathways were also shared with our previous results for respiratory virus host gene expression. Based on our pathway analysis we propose several drug-repurposing opportunities supported by the literature.

  5. Sequence Analysis of Hypothetical Proteins from Helicobacter pylori 26695 to Identify Potential Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Anjum, Farah; Khan, Faez Iqbal; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria that is responsible for gastritis in human. Its spiral flagellated body helps in locomotion and colonization in the host environment. It is capable of living in the highly acidic environment of the stomach with the help of acid adaptive genes. The genome of H. pylori 26695 strain contains 1,555 coding genes that encode 1,445 proteins. Out of these, 340 proteins are characterized as hypothetical proteins (HP). This study involves extensive analysis of the HPs using an established pipeline which comprises various bioinformatics tools and databases to find out probable functions of the HPs and identification of virulence factors. After extensive analysis of all the 340 HPs, we found that 104 HPs are showing characteristic similarities with the proteins with known functions. Thus, on the basis of such similarities, we assigned probable functions to 104 HPs with high confidence and precision. All the predicted HPs contain representative members of diverse functional classes of proteins such as enzymes, transporters, binding proteins, regulatory proteins, proteins involved in cellular processes and other proteins with miscellaneous functions. Therefore, we classified 104 HPs into aforementioned functional groups. During the virulence factors analysis of the HPs, we found 11 HPs are showing significant virulence. The identification of virulence proteins with the help their predicted functions may pave the way for drug target estimation and development of effective drug to counter the activity of that protein. PMID:27729842

  6. Analysis of 589,306 genomes identifies individuals resilient to severe Mendelian childhood diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Shi, Lisong; Hakenberg, Jörg; Naughton, Brian; Sklar, Pamela; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhou, Hanlin; Tian, Lifeng; Prakash, Om; Lemire, Mathieu; Sleiman, Patrick; Cheng, Wei-Yi; Chen, Wanting; Shah, Hardik; Shen, Yulan; Fromer, Menachem; Omberg, Larsson; Deardorff, Matthew A; Zackai, Elaine; Bobe, Jason R; Levin, Elissa; Hudson, Thomas J; Groop, Leif; Wang, Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Wojcicki, Anne; Diaz, George A; Edelmann, Lisa; Schadt, Eric E; Friend, Stephen H

    2016-05-01

    Genetic studies of human disease have traditionally focused on the detection of disease-causing mutations in afflicted individuals. Here we describe a complementary approach that seeks to identify healthy individuals resilient to highly penetrant forms of genetic childhood disorders. A comprehensive screen of 874 genes in 589,306 genomes led to the identification of 13 adults harboring mutations for 8 severe Mendelian conditions, with no reported clinical manifestation of the indicated disease. Our findings demonstrate the promise of broadening genetic studies to systematically search for well individuals who are buffering the effects of rare, highly penetrant, deleterious mutations. They also indicate that incomplete penetrance for Mendelian diseases is likely more common than previously believed. The identification of resilient individuals may provide a first step toward uncovering protective genetic variants that could help elucidate the mechanisms of Mendelian diseases and new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27065010

  7. Analysis of CHAMP scalar magnetic data to identify ocean circulation signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoj, C.; Maus, S.; Kuvshinov, Alexei;

    Unlike tidal ocean signals, the magnetic signal of ocean circulation has not yet been identified in satellite magnetic data. In particular, the steady signal of mean ocean flow is indistinguishable from time invariant crustal signals. One option, therefore, is to predict the seasonal and annual...... signals at satellite altitude. We predict annual variation amplitudes in the scalar anomaly of the order of 0.3 nT. We compare these predictions with the particularly quiet CHAMP night-time scalar data, subtracting core, mantle, crustal, ocean tidal, and magnetospheric contributions to the field...... variations in the ocean flow signal from ocean circulation models and compare them with the corresponding variations in satellite magnetic residuals. We used the 11 year ECCO-1 simulation data to derive the ocean transport. A 3D EM induction code in its low frequency limit, was used to simulate the magnetic...

  8. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pharoah, Paul D P; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J;

    2013-01-01

    ,551 SNPs for inclusion on the iCOGS custom genotyping array. We performed follow-up genotyping in 18,174 individuals with EOC (cases) and 26,134 controls from 43 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We validated the two loci at 3q25 and 17q21 that were previously found to have...... associations close to genome-wide significance and identified three loci newly associated with risk: two loci associated with all EOC subtypes at 8q21 (rs11782652, P = 5.5 × 10−9) and 10p12 (rs1243180, P = 1.8 × 10−8) and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210, P = 8.1 × 10...

  9. Higher-order Lie symmetries in identifiability and predictability analysis of dynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkt, Benjamin; Timmer, Jens; Kaschek, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Parameter estimation in ordinary differential equations (ODEs) has manifold applications not only in physics but also in the life sciences. When estimating the ODE parameters from experimentally observed data, the modeler is frequently concerned with the question of parameter identifiability. The source of parameter nonidentifiability is tightly related to Lie group symmetries. In the present work, we establish a direct search algorithm for the determination of admitted Lie group symmetries. We clarify the relationship between admitted symmetries and parameter nonidentifiability. The proposed algorithm is applied to illustrative toy models as well as a data-based ODE model of the NFκB signaling pathway. We find that besides translations and scaling transformations also higher-order transformations play a role. Enabled by the knowledge about the explicit underlying symmetry transformations, we show how models with nonidentifiable parameters can still be employed to make reliable predictions.

  10. Selection of outputs for distributed parameter systems by identifiability analysis in the time-scale domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teergele, Jane; Danai, Kourosh

    2015-12-01

    A method of sensor location selection is introduced for distributed parameter systems. In this method, the sensitivities of spatial outputs to model parameters are computed by a model and transformed via continuous wavelet transforms into the time-scale domain to characterise the shape attributes of output sensitivities and accentuate their differences. Regions are then sought in the time-scale plane wherein the wavelet coefficient of an output sensitivity surpasses all the others' as indication of the output sensitivity's distinctness. This yields a comprehensive account of identifiability each output provides to the model parameters as the basis of output selection. The proposed output selection strategy is demonstrated for a numerical case of pollutant dispersion by advection and diffusion in a two-dimensional area.

  11. Supervised accelerometry analysis can identify prey capture by penguins at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Gemma; Slip, David; Jonsen, Ian; Harcourt, Rob

    2014-12-15

    Determining where, when and how much animals eat is fundamental to understanding their ecology. We developed a technique to identify a prey capture signature for little penguins from accelerometry, in order to quantify food intake remotely. We categorised behaviour of captive penguins from HD video and matched this to time-series data from back-mounted accelerometers. We then trained a support vector machine (SVM) to classify the penguins' behaviour at 0.3 s intervals as either 'prey handling' or 'swimming'. We applied this model to accelerometer data collected from foraging wild penguins to identify prey capture events. We compared prey capture and non-prey capture dives to test the model predictions against foraging theory. The SVM had an accuracy of 84.95±0.26% (mean ± s.e.) and a false positive rate of 9.82±0.24% when tested on unseen captive data. For wild data, we defined three independent, consecutive prey handling observations as representing true prey capture, with a false positive rate of 0.09%. Dives with prey captures had longer duration and bottom times, were deeper, had faster ascent rates, and had more 'wiggles' and 'dashes' (proxies for prey encounter used in other studies). The mean (±s.e.) number of prey captures per foraging trip was 446.6±66.28. By recording the behaviour of captive animals on HD video and using a supervised machine learning approach, we show that accelerometry signatures can classify the behaviour of wild animals at unprecedentedly fine scales.

  12. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arehart Eric

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fidelity of DNA replication serves as the nidus for both genetic evolution and genomic instability fostering disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs constitute greater than 80% of the genetic variation between individuals. A new theory regarding DNA replication fidelity has emerged in which selectivity is governed by base-pair geometry through interactions between the selected nucleotide, the complementary strand, and the polymerase active site. We hypothesize that specific nucleotide combinations in the flanking regions of SNP fragments are associated with mutation. Results We modeled the relationship between DNA sequence and observed polymorphisms using the novel multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR approach. MDR was originally developed to detect synergistic interactions between multiple SNPs that are predictive of disease susceptibility. We initially assembled data from the Broad Institute as a pilot test for the hypothesis that flanking region patterns associate with mutagenesis (n = 2194. We then confirmed and expanded our inquiry with human SNPs within coding regions and their flanking sequences collected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database (n = 29967 and a control set of sequences (coding region not associated with SNP sites randomly selected from the NCBI database (n = 29967. We discovered seven flanking region pattern associations in the Broad dataset which reached a minimum significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Significant models (p Conclusion The present study represents the first use of this computational methodology for modeling nonlinear patterns in molecular genetics. MDR was able to identify distinct nucleotide patterning around sites of mutations dependent upon the observed nucleotide change. We discovered one flanking region set that included five nucleotides clustered around a specific type of SNP site. Based on the strongly associated patterns identified in

  13. HPLC-DAD-MS analysis of dyes identified in textiles from Mount Athos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzouris, Dimitrios; Karapanagiotis, Ioannis; Valianou, Lemonia; Panayiotou, Costas

    2011-03-01

    Organic colorants contained in 30 textiles (16th to early 20th century) from the monastery of Simonos Petra (Mount Athos) have been investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with diode-array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS). The components of natural dyes identified in samples treated by the standard HCl dyestuff extraction method were: alizarin, apigenin, butein, carminic acid, chrysoeriol, dcII, dcIV, dcVII, ellagic acid, emodin, fisetin, flavokermesic acid, fustin, genistein, haematein derivative (Hae'), indigotin, indirubin, isoliquiritigenin, isorhamnetin, kaempferide, kaempferol, kermesic acid, luteolin, naringenin, purpurin, quercetin, rhamnazin, rhamnetin, sulfuretin, and type B and type C compounds (last two are markers for Caesalpinia trees). Early, semi-synthetic dyes, for example indigo carmine, fuchsin components, and rhodamine B were identified in objects dated late 19th to early 20th century. A dyestuff extraction method which involves use of TFA, instead of HCl, was applied to selected historical samples, showing that the mild method enables efficient extraction of weld (Reseda luteola L.) and dyer's broom (Genista tinctoria L.) glycosides. The marker compound (Hae') for logwood (Haematoxylum campechianum L.) identification after treatment with HCl was investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in negative electrospray ionization (LC-MS-ESI(-)) mode. LC-MS in negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LC-MS-APCI(-)) mode was used, probably for the first time, to investigate cochineal (Dactylopius coccus Costa) samples. Positive electrospray ionization (LC-MS-ESI(+)) mode was used for identification of fuchsin components. Detailed HPLC-DAD studies were performed on young fustic (Cotinus coggygria Scop.) and Persian berries (Rhamnus trees). PMID:21271239

  14. RNA-seq analysis to identify novel roles of scleraxis during embryonic mouse heart valve remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien N Barnette

    Full Text Available Heart valve disease affects up to 30% of the population and has been shown to have origins during embryonic development. Valvulogenesis begins with formation of endocardial cushions in the atrioventricular canal and outflow tract regions. Subsequently, endocardial cushions remodel, elongate and progressively form mature valve structures composed of a highly organized connective tissue that provides the necessary biomechanical function throughout life. While endocardial cushion formation has been well studied, the processes required for valve remodeling are less well understood. The transcription factor Scleraxis (Scx is detected in mouse valves from E15.5 during initial stages of remodeling, and expression remains high until birth when formation of the highly organized mature structure is complete. Heart valves from Scx-/- mice are abnormally thick and develop fibrotic phenotypes similar to human disease by juvenile stages. These phenotypes begin around E15.5 and are associated with defects in connective tissue organization and valve interstitial cell differentiation. In order to understand the etiology of this phenotype, we analyzed the transcriptome of remodeling valves isolated from E15.5 Scx-/- embryos using RNA-seq. From this, we have identified a profile of protein and non-protein mRNAs that are dependent on Scx function and using bioinformatics we can predict the molecular functions and biological processes affected by these genes. These include processes and functions associated with gene regulation (methyltransferase activity, DNA binding, Notch signaling, vitamin A metabolism (retinoic acid biosynthesis and cellular development (cell morphology, cell assembly and organization. In addition, several mRNAs are affected by alternative splicing events in the absence of Scx, suggesting additional roles in post-transcriptional modification. In summary, our findings have identified transcriptome profiles from abnormal heart valves isolated

  15. Determination of resistance spectra of the Pi-ta and Pi-k genes to US races of Magnaporthe oryzae causing rice blast in a recombinant inbred line population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance (R) genes to ten common races of Magnaporthe oryzae were mapped using an F10 recombinant inbred line population of a cross of a tropical japonica cultivar Katy with a breeding line RU9101001. Katy was found to confer resistance to all common races IA-45, IB-1, IB-45, IB-49, IB-54, IC-17,...

  16. Genome-wide association analysis in primary sclerosing cholangitis identifies two non-HLA susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melum, Espen; Franke, Andre; Schramm, Christoph; Weismüller, Tobias J; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Offner, Felix A; Juran, Brian D; Laerdahl, Jon K; Labi, Verena; Björnsson, Einar; Weersma, Rinse K; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Teufel, Andreas; Rust, Christian; Ellinghaus, Eva; Balschun, Tobias; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Ellinghaus, David; Bergquist, Annika; Sauer, Peter; Ryu, Euijung; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Wedemeyer, Jochen; Lindkvist, Björn; Wittig, Michael; Porte, Robert J; Holm, Kristian; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Stokkers, Pieter; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Runz, Heiko; Stiehl, Adolf; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sterneck, Martina; Vermeire, Severine; Beuers, Ulrich; Villunger, Andreas; Schrumpf, Erik; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Manns, Michael P; Schreiber, Stefan; Karlsen, Tom H

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic bile duct disease affecting 2.4–7.5% of individuals with inflammatory bowel disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis of 2,466,182 SNPs in 715 individuals with PSC and 2,962 controls, followed by replication in 1,025 PSC cases and 2,174 controls. We detected non-HLA associations at rs3197999 in MST1 and rs6720394 near BCL2L11 (combined P = 1.1 × 10−16 and P = 4.1 × 10−8, respectively). PMID:21151127

  17. Genome-wide association analysis identifies 13 new risk loci for schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ripke, Stephan; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L; Kähler, Anna K.; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah E.; Collins, Ann L.; Crowley, James J.; Fromer, Menachem; Kim, Yunjung; Lee, Sang Hong; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Sanchez, Nick; Stahl, Eli A

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is an idiopathic mental disorder with a heritable component and a substantial public health impact. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) for schizophrenia beginning with a Swedish national sample (5,001 cases and 6,243 controls) followed by meta-analysis with previous schizophrenia GWAS (8,832 cases and 12,067 controls) and finally by replication of SNPs in 168 genomic regions in independent samples (7,413 cases, 19,762 controls and 581 parent-offsprin...

  18. Genome-wide association analysis identifies 13 new risk loci for schizophrenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Ripke, Stephan; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L; Kähler, Anna K.; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah E.; Collins, Ann L.; Crowley, James J.; Fromer, Menachem; Kim, Yunjung; Bender, Stephan; Collier, David; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Hall, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is an idiopathic mental disorder with a heritable component and a substantial public health impact. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) for schizophrenia beginning with a Swedish national sample (5,001 cases and 6,243 controls) followed by meta-analysis with previous schizophrenia GWAS (8,832 cases and 12,067 controls) and finally by replication of SNPs in 168 genomic regions in independent samples (7,413 cases, 19,762 controls and 581 parent-offsprin...

  19. A Meta-Analysis Identifies New Loci Associated with Body Mass index in Individuals of African Ancestry

    OpenAIRE

    Keri L Monda; Chen, Gary K.; Taylor, Kira C.; Palmer, Cameron; Edwards, Todd L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Allison, Matthew A.; Bielak, Lawrence F; Chen, Guanji; Graff, Mariaelisa; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Rhie, Suhn K.; Li, Guo

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry, and followed up the most significant associations in an additional 32,268 individuals of African ancestry. We identified one novel locus at 5q33 (GALNT10, rs7708584, p=3.4×10−11) and another at 7p15 when combined ...

  20. High-throughput mathematical analysis identifies Turing networks for patterning with equally diffusing signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Luciano; Diego, Xavier; Sharpe, James; Müller, Patrick

    2016-04-08

    The Turing reaction-diffusion model explains how identical cells can self-organize to form spatial patterns. It has been suggested that extracellular signaling molecules with different diffusion coefficients underlie this model, but the contribution of cell-autonomous signaling components is largely unknown. We developed an automated mathematical analysis to derive a catalog of realistic Turing networks. This analysis reveals that in the presence of cell-autonomous factors, networks can form a pattern with equally diffusing signals and even for any combination of diffusion coefficients. We provide a software (available at http://www.RDNets.com) to explore these networks and to constrain topologies with qualitative and quantitative experimental data. We use the software to examine the self-organizing networks that control embryonic axis specification and digit patterning. Finally, we demonstrate how existing synthetic circuits can be extended with additional feedbacks to form Turing reaction-diffusion systems. Our study offers a new theoretical framework to understand multicellular pattern formation and enables the wide-spread use of mathematical biology to engineer synthetic patterning systems.

  1. SMARTbot: A Behavioral Analysis Framework Augmented with Machine Learning to Identify Mobile Botnet Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Ahmad; Salleh, Rosli; Khan, Muhammad Khurram

    2016-01-01

    Botnet phenomenon in smartphones is evolving with the proliferation in mobile phone technologies after leaving imperative impact on personal computers. It refers to the network of computers, laptops, mobile devices or tablets which is remotely controlled by the cybercriminals to initiate various distributed coordinated attacks including spam emails, ad-click fraud, Bitcoin mining, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS), disseminating other malwares and much more. Likewise traditional PC based botnet, Mobile botnets have the same operational impact except the target audience is particular to smartphone users. Therefore, it is import to uncover this security issue prior to its widespread adaptation. We propose SMARTbot, a novel dynamic analysis framework augmented with machine learning techniques to automatically detect botnet binaries from malicious corpus. SMARTbot is a component based off-device behavioral analysis framework which can generate mobile botnet learning model by inducing Artificial Neural Networks' back-propagation method. Moreover, this framework can detect mobile botnet binaries with remarkable accuracy even in case of obfuscated program code. The results conclude that, a classifier model based on simple logistic regression outperform other machine learning classifier for botnet apps' detection, i.e 99.49% accuracy is achieved. Further, from manual inspection of botnet dataset we have extracted interesting trends in those applications. As an outcome of this research, a mobile botnet dataset is devised which will become the benchmark for future studies.

  2. Identifying Flood-Related Infectious Diseases in Anhui Province, China: A Spatial and Temporal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lu; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Guoyong; Liu, Qiyong; Jiang, Baofa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore infectious diseases related to the 2007 Huai River flood in Anhui Province, China. The study was based on the notified incidences of infectious diseases between June 29 and July 25 from 2004 to 2011. Daily incidences of notified diseases in 2007 were compared with the corresponding daily incidences during the same period in the other years (from 2004 to 2011, except 2007) by Poisson regression analysis. Spatial autocorrelation analysis was used to test the distribution pattern of the diseases. Spatial regression models were then performed to examine the association between the incidence of each disease and flood, considering lag effects and other confounders. After controlling the other meteorological and socioeconomic factors, malaria (odds ratio [OR] = 3.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.77-7.61), diarrhea (OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.24-3.78), and hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection (OR = 6.11, 95% CI = 1.04-35.84) were significantly related to the 2007 Huai River flood both from the spatial and temporal analyses. Special attention should be given to develop public health preparation and interventions with a focus on malaria, diarrhea, and HAV infection, in the study region. PMID:26903612

  3. Sequence Analysis of SSR-Flanking Regions Identifies Genome Affinities between Pasture Grass Fungal Endophyte Taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline van Zijll de Jong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species of the Neotyphodium and Epichloë genera are endophytes of pasture grasses showing complex differences of life-cycle and genetic architecture. Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers have been developed from endophyte-derived expressed sequence tag (EST collections. Although SSR array size polymorphisms are appropriate for phenetic analysis to distinguish between taxa, the capacity to resolve phylogenetic relationships is limited by both homoplasy and heteroploidy effects. In contrast, nonrepetitive sequence regions that flank SSRs have been effectively implemented in this study to demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of grass fungal endophytes. Consistent patterns of relationships between specific taxa were apparent across multiple target loci, confirming previous studies of genome evolution based on variation of individual genes. Evidence was obtained for the definition of endophyte taxa not only through genomic affinities but also by relative gene content. Results were compatible with the current view that some asexual Neotyphodium species arose following interspecific hybridisation between sexual Epichloë ancestors. Phylogenetic analysis of SSR-flanking regions, in combination with the results of previous studies with other EST-derived SSR markers, further permitted characterisation of Neotyphodium isolates that could not be assigned to known taxa on the basis of morphological characteristics.

  4. SMARTbot: A Behavioral Analysis Framework Augmented with Machine Learning to Identify Mobile Botnet Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Karim

    Full Text Available Botnet phenomenon in smartphones is evolving with the proliferation in mobile phone technologies after leaving imperative impact on personal computers. It refers to the network of computers, laptops, mobile devices or tablets which is remotely controlled by the cybercriminals to initiate various distributed coordinated attacks including spam emails, ad-click fraud, Bitcoin mining, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS, disseminating other malwares and much more. Likewise traditional PC based botnet, Mobile botnets have the same operational impact except the target audience is particular to smartphone users. Therefore, it is import to uncover this security issue prior to its widespread adaptation. We propose SMARTbot, a novel dynamic analysis framework augmented with machine learning techniques to automatically detect botnet binaries from malicious corpus. SMARTbot is a component based off-device behavioral analysis framework which can generate mobile botnet learning model by inducing Artificial Neural Networks' back-propagation method. Moreover, this framework can detect mobile botnet binaries with remarkable accuracy even in case of obfuscated program code. The results conclude that, a classifier model based on simple logistic regression outperform other machine learning classifier for botnet apps' detection, i.e 99.49% accuracy is achieved. Further, from manual inspection of botnet dataset we have extracted interesting trends in those applications. As an outcome of this research, a mobile botnet dataset is devised which will become the benchmark for future studies.

  5. Analysis of genetic diversity identified by amplified fragment length polymorphism marker in hybrid wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, M; Qidi, Z; Gaisheng, Z; Na, N; Huiyan, Z; Qunzhu, W

    2015-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism markers were used to assess genetic diversity in 10 male sterile wheat crop lines (hetero-cytoplasm with the same nucleus) in relation to a restorer wheat line. These male sterile lines were evaluated using 64 amplified fragment length polymorphism primer combinations, and 13 primers produced polymorphic bands, generating a total 682 fragments. Of the 682 fragments, 113 were polymorphic. The polymorphic information content and marker index values demonstrated the utility of the primer combinations used in the present study. Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean and principal coordinate analysis of the genotypic data revealed clustering of accessions based on genetic relationships, and accessions were separated into 2 groups with their restorer line. Jaccard's similarity coefficient values suggested good variability among the male sterile lines, indicating their utility in breeding programs. The fallouts of analysis of molecular variance showed large within-group population variation, accounting for 77% of variation, while among-group comparison accounted for 23% of the total molecular variation, which was statistically significant. The molecular diversity observed in this study will be useful for selecting appropriate accessions for plant improvement and hybridization through molecular-breeding approaches and for developing suitable conservation strategies. PMID:26345825

  6. High-throughput mathematical analysis identifies Turing networks for patterning with equally diffusing signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Luciano; Diego, Xavier; Sharpe, James; Müller, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The Turing reaction-diffusion model explains how identical cells can self-organize to form spatial patterns. It has been suggested that extracellular signaling molecules with different diffusion coefficients underlie this model, but the contribution of cell-autonomous signaling components is largely unknown. We developed an automated mathematical analysis to derive a catalog of realistic Turing networks. This analysis reveals that in the presence of cell-autonomous factors, networks can form a pattern with equally diffusing signals and even for any combination of diffusion coefficients. We provide a software (available at http://www.RDNets.com) to explore these networks and to constrain topologies with qualitative and quantitative experimental data. We use the software to examine the self-organizing networks that control embryonic axis specification and digit patterning. Finally, we demonstrate how existing synthetic circuits can be extended with additional feedbacks to form Turing reaction-diffusion systems. Our study offers a new theoretical framework to understand multicellular pattern formation and enables the wide-spread use of mathematical biology to engineer synthetic patterning systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14022.001 PMID:27058171

  7. SMARTbot: A Behavioral Analysis Framework Augmented with Machine Learning to Identify Mobile Botnet Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Ahmad; Salleh, Rosli; Khan, Muhammad Khurram

    2016-01-01

    Botnet phenomenon in smartphones is evolving with the proliferation in mobile phone technologies after leaving imperative impact on personal computers. It refers to the network of computers, laptops, mobile devices or tablets which is remotely controlled by the cybercriminals to initiate various distributed coordinated attacks including spam emails, ad-click fraud, Bitcoin mining, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS), disseminating other malwares and much more. Likewise traditional PC based botnet, Mobile botnets have the same operational impact except the target audience is particular to smartphone users. Therefore, it is import to uncover this security issue prior to its widespread adaptation. We propose SMARTbot, a novel dynamic analysis framework augmented with machine learning techniques to automatically detect botnet binaries from malicious corpus. SMARTbot is a component based off-device behavioral analysis framework which can generate mobile botnet learning model by inducing Artificial Neural Networks' back-propagation method. Moreover, this framework can detect mobile botnet binaries with remarkable accuracy even in case of obfuscated program code. The results conclude that, a classifier model based on simple logistic regression outperform other machine learning classifier for botnet apps' detection, i.e 99.49% accuracy is achieved. Further, from manual inspection of botnet dataset we have extracted interesting trends in those applications. As an outcome of this research, a mobile botnet dataset is devised which will become the benchmark for future studies. PMID:26978523

  8. High-throughput mathematical analysis identifies Turing networks for patterning with equally diffusing signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Luciano; Diego, Xavier; Sharpe, James; Müller, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The Turing reaction-diffusion model explains how identical cells can self-organize to form spatial patterns. It has been suggested that extracellular signaling molecules with different diffusion coefficients underlie this model, but the contribution of cell-autonomous signaling components is largely unknown. We developed an automated mathematical analysis to derive a catalog of realistic Turing networks. This analysis reveals that in the presence of cell-autonomous factors, networks can form a pattern with equally diffusing signals and even for any combination of diffusion coefficients. We provide a software (available at http://www.RDNets.com) to explore these networks and to constrain topologies with qualitative and quantitative experimental data. We use the software to examine the self-organizing networks that control embryonic axis specification and digit patterning. Finally, we demonstrate how existing synthetic circuits can be extended with additional feedbacks to form Turing reaction-diffusion systems. Our study offers a new theoretical framework to understand multicellular pattern formation and enables the wide-spread use of mathematical biology to engineer synthetic patterning systems. PMID:27058171

  9. Application of Nonlinear Analysis Methods for Identifying Relationships Between Microbial Community Structure and Groundwater Geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryver, Jack C.; Brandt, Craig C.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Palumbo, A V.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-02-01

    The relationship between groundwater geochemistry and microbial community structure can be complex and difficult to assess. We applied nonlinear and generalized linear data analysis methods to relate microbial biomarkers (phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA) to groundwater geochemical characteristics at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings disposal site that is primarily contaminated by uranium, sulfate, and nitrate. First, predictive models were constructed using feedforward artificial neural networks (NN) to predict PLFA classes from geochemistry. To reduce the danger of overfitting, parsimonious NN architectures were selected based on pruning of hidden nodes and elimination of redundant predictor (geochemical) variables. The resulting NN models greatly outperformed the generalized linear models. Sensitivity analysis indicated that tritium, which was indicative of riverine influences, and uranium were important in predicting the distributions of the PLFA classes. In contrast, nitrate concentration and inorganic carbon were least important, and total ionic strength was of intermediate importance. Second, nonlinear principal components (NPC) were extracted from the PLFA data using a variant of the feedforward NN. The NPC grouped the samples according to similar geochemistry. PLFA indicators of Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes were associated with the groups of wells with lower levels of contamination. The more contaminated samples contained microbial communities that were predominated by terminally branched saturates and branched monounsaturates that are indicative of metal reducers, actinomycetes, and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicate that the microbial community at the site is coupled to the geochemistry and knowledge of the geochemistry allows prediction of the community composition.

  10. Comparative survival analysis of breast cancer microarray studies identifies important prognostic genetic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Song

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated 12% of females in the United States will develop breast cancer in their lifetime. Although, there are advances in treatment options including surgery and chemotherapy, breast cancer is still the second most lethal cancer in women. Thus, there is a clear need for better methods to predict prognosis for each breast cancer patient. With the advent of large genetic databases and the reduction in cost for the experiments, researchers are faced with choosing from a large pool of potential prognostic markers from numerous breast cancer gene expression profile studies. Methods Five microarray datasets related to breast cancer were examined using gene set analysis and the cancers were categorized into different subtypes using a scoring system based on genetic pathway activity. Results We have observed that significant genes in the individual studies show little reproducibility across the datasets. From our comparative analysis, using gene pathways with clinical variables is more reliable across studies and shows promise in assessing a patient's prognosis. Conclusions This study concludes that, in light of clinical variables, there are significant gene pathways in common across the datasets. Specifically, several pathways can further significantly stratify patients for survival. These candidate pathways should help to develop a panel of significant biomarkers for the prognosis of breast cancer patients in a clinical setting.

  11. Phylogeographical analysis of the dominant multidrug-resistant H58 clade of Salmonella Typhi identifies inter- and intracontinental transmission events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa K; Baker, Stephen; Pickard, Derek J; Parkhill, Julian; Page, Andrew J; Feasey, Nicholas A; Kingsley, Robert A; Thomson, Nicholas R; Keane, Jacqueline A; Weill, François-Xavier; Edwards, David J; Hawkey, Jane; Harris, Simon R; Mather, Alison E; Cain, Amy K; Hadfield, James; Hart, Peter J; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Klemm, Elizabeth J; Glinos, Dafni A; Breiman, Robert F; Watson, Conall H; Kariuki, Samuel; Gordon, Melita A; Heyderman, Robert S; Okoro, Chinyere; Jacobs, Jan; Lunguya, Octavie; Edmunds, W John; Msefula, Chisomo; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Kama, Mike; Jenkins, Kylie; Dutta, Shanta; Marks, Florian; Campos, Josefina; Thompson, Corinne; Obaro, Stephen; MacLennan, Calman A; Dolecek, Christiane; Keddy, Karen H; Smith, Anthony M; Parry, Christopher M; Karkey, Abhilasha; Mulholland, E Kim; Campbell, James I; Dongol, Sabina; Basnyat, Buddha; Dufour, Muriel; Bandaranayake, Don; Naseri, Take Toleafoa; Singh, Shalini Pravin; Hatta, Mochammad; Newton, Paul; Onsare, Robert S; Isaia, Lupeoletalalei; Dance, David; Davong, Viengmon; Thwaites, Guy; Wijedoru, Lalith; Crump, John A; De Pinna, Elizabeth; Nair, Satheesh; Nilles, Eric J; Thanh, Duy Pham; Turner, Paul; Soeng, Sona; Valcanis, Mary; Powling, Joan; Dimovski, Karolina; Hogg, Geoff; Farrar, Jeremy; Holt, Kathryn E; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) typhoid is a major global health threat affecting many countries where the disease is endemic. Here whole-genome sequence analysis of 1,832 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) identifies a single dominant MDR lineage, H58, that has emerged and spread throughout Asia and Africa over the last 30 years. Our analysis identifies numerous transmissions of H58, including multiple transfers from Asia to Africa and an ongoing, unrecognized MDR epidemic within Africa itself. Notably, our analysis indicates that H58 lineages are displacing antibiotic-sensitive isolates, transforming the global population structure of this pathogen. H58 isolates can harbor a complex MDR element residing either on transmissible IncHI1 plasmids or within multiple chromosomal integration sites. We also identify new mutations that define the H58 lineage. This phylogeographical analysis provides a framework to facilitate global management of MDR typhoid and is applicable to similar MDR lineages emerging in other bacterial species. PMID:25961941

  12. Analysis of bathymetric surveys to identify coastal vulnerabilities at Cape Canaveral, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Hansen, Mark E.

    2015-10-07

    Cape Canaveral, Florida, is a prominent feature along the Southeast U.S. coastline. The region includes Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, and a large portion of Canaveral National Seashore. The actual promontory of the modern Cape falls within the jurisdictional boundaries of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Erosion hazards result from winter and tropical storms, changes in sand resources, sediment budgets, and sea-level rise. Previous work by the USGS has focused on the vulnerability of the dunes to storms, where updated bathymetry and topography have been used for modeling efforts. Existing research indicates that submerged shoals, ridges, and sandbars affect patterns of wave refraction and height, coastal currents, and control sediment transport. These seabed anomalies indicate the availability and movement of sand within the nearshore environment, which may be directly related to the stability of the Cape Canaveral shoreline. Understanding the complex dynamics of the offshore bathymetry and associated sediment pathways can help identify current and future erosion vulnerabilities due to short-term (for example, hurricane and other extreme storms) and long-term (for example, sea-level rise) hazards.

  13. Integrative Genome-Scale Analysis Identifies Epigenetic Mechanisms of Transcriptional Deregulation in Unfavorable Neuroblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Bender, Sebastian; Saadati, Maral; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Shao, Chunxuan; Herrmann, Carl; Wiesenfarth, Manuel; Parzonka, Martha; Wehrmann, Lea; Fischer, Matthias; Duffy, David J; Bell, Emma; Torkov, Alica; Schmezer, Peter; Plass, Christoph; Höfer, Thomas; Benner, Axel; Pfister, Stefan M; Westermann, Frank

    2016-09-15

    The broad clinical spectrum of neuroblastoma ranges from spontaneous regression to rapid progression despite intensive multimodal therapy. This diversity is not fully explained by known genetic aberrations, suggesting the possibility of epigenetic involvement in pathogenesis. In pursuit of this hypothesis, we took an integrative approach to analyze the methylomes, transcriptomes, and copy number variations in 105 cases of neuroblastoma, complemented by primary tumor- and cell line-derived global histone modification analyses and epigenetic drug treatment in vitro We found that DNA methylation patterns identify divergent patient subgroups with respect to survival and clinicobiologic variables, including amplified MYCN Transcriptome integration and histone modification-based definition of enhancer elements revealed intragenic enhancer methylation as a mechanism for high-risk-associated transcriptional deregulation. Furthermore, in high-risk neuroblastomas, we obtained evidence for cooperation between PRC2 activity and DNA methylation in blocking tumor-suppressive differentiation programs. Notably, these programs could be re-activated by combination treatments, which targeted both PRC2 and DNA methylation. Overall, our results illuminate how epigenetic deregulation contributes to neuroblastoma pathogenesis, with novel implications for its diagnosis and therapy. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5523-37. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27635046

  14. Altered lipid metabolism in the aging kidney identified by three layered omic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Fabian; Rinschen, Markus M; Bartels, Valerie; Frommolt, Peter; Habermann, Bianca; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Schumacher, Björn; Dollé, Martijn E T; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Kurschat, Christine E

    2016-03-01

    Aging-associated diseases and their comorbidities affect the life of a constantly growing proportion of the population in developed countries. At the center of these comorbidities are changes of kidney structure and function as age-related chronic kidney disease predisposes to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure. To detect molecular mechanisms involved in kidney aging, we analyzed gene expression profiles of kidneys from adult and aged wild-type mice by transcriptomic, proteomic and targeted lipidomic methodologies. Interestingly, transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed differential expression of genes primarily involved in lipid metabolism and immune response. Additional lipidomic analyses uncovered significant age-related differences in the total amount of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins as well as in subspecies of phosphatidylserines and ceramides with age. By integration of these datasets we identified Aldh1a1, a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism specifically expressed in the medullary ascending limb, as one of the most prominent upregulated proteins in old kidneys. Moreover, ceramidase Asah1 was highly expressed in aged kidneys, consistent with a decrease in ceramide C16. In summary, our data suggest that changes in lipid metabolism are involved in the process of kidney aging and in the development of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26886165

  15. Ethical issues in rehabilitation: a qualitative analysis of dilemmas identified by occupational therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foye, Sarah Jajesnica; Kirschner, Kristi L; Brady Wagner, Lynne C; Stocking, Carol; Siegler, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Little available research exists to address the range of ethical issues encountered by occupational therapists (OTs) in their daily clinical work. The few articles in the literature have tended to be case-based or anecdotal or have focused on professional issues rather than clinical issues. To characterize the array of clinical ethical issues in occupational therapy, we asked OTs in a free-standing academic rehabilitation hospital to describe in some detail up to three scenarios or situations from their clinical practice that raised morally troubling questions. A coding system was developed to preserve the richness of the detail but to allow for some categorization of the topics. A second section of the survey asked the therapists to rate whether various traditional ethics topics were of high, medium, or low interest to them. A third section asked that they identify the formats that would be most appealing to them for future educational interventions. Of the 56 therapists surveyed, 38 (or 68%) responded. The three self-generated topics mentioned most frequently by the therapists were (in decreasing order of frequency): reimbursement pressures, conflicts around goal setting, and patient/family refusal of team recommendations. The respondents were particularly interested in knowing more about patient-centered ethics topics, such as conflict resolution between teams and patients and the patient's role in decision making. Furthermore, they indicated a strong preference for interdisciplinary and interactive educational formats. PMID:14523711

  16. Analysis of micronuclei and microtubule arrangement to identify aneuploidy-inducing agents in cultured mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degrassi, F.; Pisano, C. [Centre di Genetica Evoluzionistica, Rome (Italy); Tanzarella, C.; Antoccia, A.; Battistoni, A. [Universita La Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

    1993-12-31

    The development of in vitro test methods to detect environmental agents that might induce aneuploidy is of crucial importance in genotoxicity testing. Chromosome numerical changes may arise from damage to various cell structures and activities such as spindle components or kinetochore proteins as well as from damage to the chromosomes. Therefore, the development of effective assays to identify chromosome misdistribution in mammalian cell cultures requires the contribution of different research areas such as cytogenetics, molecular biology and cell biology. Recently, we have been working at the development of an in vitro test for aneuploidy-inducing agents combining the micronucleus assay with the immunofluorescent staining of kinetochores in micronuclei (MN). The assay has been standardized by analyzing the induction of MN containing kinetochores (CREST-positive MN) after a number of agents with different mechanism of action. Subsequently, the optimization of the assay has been carried out by introducing cytochalasin-B (cyt-B) in the test protocol in order to score MN in cells that have undergone one cell cycle. Finally, with the aim of providing an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the production of CREST-positive MN we have analyzed the cellular structures involved in mitotic division by using specific antibodies in immunofluorescence studies.

  17. Analysis of the features of 45 identified CRISPR loci in 32 Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Siyu; Liu, Jing; Shao, Fuye; Wang, Pengfei; Duan, Guangcai; Yang, Haiyan

    2015-08-28

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a common pathogen that can cause serious infections, even death. Because of the horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes, the drug resistant condition is becoming increasingly prevalent. Recently, an adaptive immunity system, named clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), was discovered and demonstrated to confer a defense against foreign invading elements that may carry the antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we reveal the features of 45 identified CRISPR loci and the CRISPR associated gene (Cas) in 32 S. aureus strains from CRISPR database. Five spacers of S. aureus 08BA02176 and MSHR1132 were homologous with foreign genetic sequences from phages or plasmids, even containing a spacer sequence identical to part of some phages' genomes containing lukPV gene that encodes the PVL toxin. Many S. aureus strains with the same CRISPR type shared the same MLST type. CRISPR loci that had 3 or more similar protein loci mostly belonged to the same CRISPR type. We came to the conclusion that the CRISPR/Cas of strains 08BA02176 and MSHR1132 were inherited from a common ancestor or recombined from Staphylococcus lugdunensis. CRISPR loci can be mobilized and can transfer among different but closely related species, and the same types of MLST strains exhibit a higher affinity to the same types of CRISPR loci. Bacteriophages may be the predominant challenge facing S. aureus. The CRISPR/Cas structure may limit the transmission of bacterial virulence among S. aureus.

  18. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Skin Color Differentiation in Red Tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Wang, Lanmei; Dong, Zaijie; Chen, Xingting; Song, Feibiao; Liu, Nian; Yang, Hui; Fu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Red tilapia is becoming more popular for aquaculture production in China in recent years. However, the pigmentation differentiation in genetic breeding is the main problem limiting its development of commercial red tilapia culture and the genetic basis of skin color variation is still unknown. In this study, we conducted Illumina sequencing of transcriptome on three color variety red tilapia. A total of 224,895,758 reads were generated, resulting in 160,762 assembled contigs that were used as reference contigs. The contigs of red tilapia transcriptome had hits in the range of 53.4% to 86.7% of the unique proteins of zebrafish, fugu, medaka, three-spined stickleback and tilapia. And 44,723 contigs containing 77,423 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, with 16,646 contigs containing more than one SSR. Three skin transcriptomes were compared pairwise and the results revealed that there were 148 common significantly differentially expressed unigenes and several key genes related to pigment synthesis, i.e. tyr, tyrp1, silv, sox10, slc24a5, cbs and slc7a11, were included. The results will facilitate understanding the molecular mechanisms of skin pigmentation differentiation in red tilapia and accelerate the molecular selection of the specific strain with consistent skin colors. PMID:27511178

  19. Comparing chemical analysis with literature studies to identify micropollutants in a catchment of Copenhagen (DK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Birch, Heidi; Eriksson, Eva;

    2011-01-01

    In the year 2000 the European Union implemented the European Water Framework Directive of which the overall aim is to maintain or obtain good ecological and chemical status of European near coastal waters, lakes, rivers, streams, groundwater as well as artificial water bodies as docks and canals...... (EU, 2000). It is also required to establish inventories of sources to pollution, to design and perform monitoring programs as well as to outline strategies to reduce emissions if the environmental quality standards are exceeded. The aim of this study was to compare chemical analysis performed...... on urban surface runoff originating from a well defined catchment of Copenhagen (Denmark) with an inventory of potential pollution sources for the same catchment. The selected catchment covers an area with roads, a shopping centre, a parking lot, office buildings, a gymnasium and some restaurants...

  20. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Gharib, Sina A; Wain, Louise V; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P; James, Alan L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K; Fall, Tove; Viñuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J; Loehr, Laura R; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B; North, Kari E; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F; Hastie, Nicholas D; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C; Rotter, Jerome I; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S; White, Wendy B; Rich, Stephen S; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J; Psaty, Bruce M; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G; Uitterlinden, André G; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R; McArdle, Wendy L; Musk, A Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C; Starr, John M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L; Lederer, David J; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J; Burkart, Kristin M; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B; Williams, O Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J; Boezen, H Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J; Lange, Leslie A; Barr, R Graham; Bracke, Ken R; Verhamme, Fien M; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cassano, Patricia A; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P; Brusselle, Guy G; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2014-07-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease.

  1. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Gharib, Sina A; Wain, Louise V; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P; James, Alan L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K; Fall, Tove; Viñuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J; Loehr, Laura R; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B; North, Kari E; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F; Hastie, Nicholas D; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C; Rotter, Jerome I; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S; White, Wendy B; Rich, Stephen S; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J; Psaty, Bruce M; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G; Uitterlinden, André G; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R; McArdle, Wendy L; Musk, A Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C; Starr, John M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L; Lederer, David J; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J; Burkart, Kristin M; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B; Williams, O Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J; Boezen, H Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J; Lange, Leslie A; Barr, R Graham; Bracke, Ken R; Verhamme, Fien M; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cassano, Patricia A; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P; Brusselle, Guy G; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2014-07-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease. PMID:24929828

  2. Cluster analysis application identifies muscle characteristics of importance for beef tenderness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chriki Sghaier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important controversy in the relationship between beef tenderness and muscle characteristics including biochemical traits exists among meat researchers. The aim of this study is to explain variability in meat tenderness using muscle characteristics and biochemical traits available in the Integrated and Functional Biology of Beef (BIF-Beef database. The BIF-Beef data warehouse contains characteristic measurements from animal, muscle, carcass, and meat quality derived from numerous experiments. We created three classes for tenderness (high, medium, and low based on trained taste panel tenderness scores of all meat samples consumed (4,366 observations from 40 different experiments. For each tenderness class, the corresponding means for the mechanical characteristics, muscle fibre type, collagen content, and biochemical traits which may influence tenderness of the muscles were calculated. Results Our results indicated that lower shear force values were associated with more tender meat. In addition, muscles in the highest tenderness cluster had the lowest total and insoluble collagen contents, the highest mitochondrial enzyme activity (isocitrate dehydrogenase, the highest proportion of slow oxidative muscle fibres, the lowest proportion of fast-glycolytic muscle fibres, and the lowest average muscle fibre cross-sectional area. Results were confirmed by correlation analyses, and differences between muscle types in terms of biochemical characteristics and tenderness score were evidenced by Principal Component Analysis (PCA. When the cluster analysis was repeated using only muscle samples from m. Longissimus thoracis (LT, the results were similar; only contrasting previous results by maintaining a relatively constant fibre-type composition between all three tenderness classes. Conclusion Our results show that increased meat tenderness is related to lower shear forces, lower insoluble collagen and total collagen content, lower

  3. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in adventitious branches formation of Gracilaria lichenoides in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenlei; Li, Huanqin; Lin, Xiangzhi; Yang, Shanjun; Wang, Zhaokai; Fang, Baishan

    2015-12-11

    Tissue culture could solve the problems associated with Gracilaria cultivation, including the consistent supply of high-quality seed stock, strain improvement, and efficient mass culture of high-yielding commercial strains. However, STC lags behind that of higher plants because of the paucity of genomic information. Transcriptome analysis and the identification of potential unigenes involved in the formation and regeneration of callus or direct induction of ABs are essential. Herein, the CK, EWAB and NPA G. lichenoides transcriptomes were analyzed using the Illumina sequencing platform in first time. A total of 17,922,453,300 nucleotide clean bases were generated and assembled into 21,294 unigenes, providing a total gene space of 400,912,038 nucleotides with an average length of 1,883 and N 50 of 5,055 nucleotides and a G + C content of 52.02%. BLAST analysis resulted in the assignment of 13,724 (97.5%), 3,740 (26.6%), 9,934 (70.6%), 10,611 (75.4%), 9,490 (67.4%), and 7,773 (55.2%) unigenes were annotated to the NR, NT, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, and GO databases, respectively, and the total of annotated unigenes was 14,070. A total of 17,099 transcripts were predicted to possess open reading frames, including 3,238 predicted and 13,861 blasted based on protein databases. In addition, 3,287 SSRs were detected in G.lichenoides, providing further support for genetic variation and marker-assisted selection in the future. Our results suggest that auxin polar transport, auxin signal transduction, crosstalk with other endogenous plant hormones and antioxidant systems, play important roles for ABs formation in G. lichenoides explants in vitro. The present findings will facilitate further studies on gene discovery and on the molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue culture of seaweed.

  4. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, M C; Byrne, E M; Esko, T; Nalls, M A; Ganna, A; Paynter, N; Monda, K L; Amin, N; Fischer, K; Renstrom, F; Ngwa, J S; Huikari, V; Cavadino, A; Nolte, I M; Teumer, A; Yu, K; Marques-Vidal, P; Rawal, R; Manichaikul, A; Wojczynski, M K; Vink, J M; Zhao, J H; Burlutsky, G; Lahti, J; Mikkilä, V; Lemaitre, R N; Eriksson, J; Musani, S K; Tanaka, T; Geller, F; Luan, J; Hui, J; Mägi, R; Dimitriou, M; Garcia, M E; Ho, W-K; Wright, M J; Rose, L M; Magnusson, P K E; Pedersen, N L; Couper, D; Oostra, B A; Hofman, A; Ikram, M A; Tiemeier, H W; Uitterlinden, A G; van Rooij, F J A; Barroso, I; Johansson, I; Xue, L; Kaakinen, M; Milani, L; Power, C; Snieder, H; Stolk, R P; Baumeister, S E; Biffar, R; Gu, F; Bastardot, F; Kutalik, Z; Jacobs, D R; Forouhi, N G; Mihailov, E; Lind, L; Lindgren, C; Michaëlsson, K; Morris, A; Jensen, M; Khaw, K-T; Luben, R N; Wang, J J; Männistö, S; Perälä, M-M; Kähönen, M; Lehtimäki, T; Viikari, J; Mozaffarian, D; Mukamal, K; Psaty, B M; Döring, A; Heath, A C; Montgomery, G W; Dahmen, N; Carithers, T; Tucker, K L; Ferrucci, L; Boyd, H A; Melbye, M; Treur, J L; Mellström, D; Hottenga, J J; Prokopenko, I; Tönjes, A; Deloukas, P; Kanoni, S; Lorentzon, M; Houston, D K; Liu, Y; Danesh, J; Rasheed, A; Mason, M A; Zonderman, A B; Franke, L; Kristal, B S; Karjalainen, J; Reed, D R; Westra, H-J; Evans, M K; Saleheen, D; Harris, T B; Dedoussis, G; Curhan, G; Stumvoll, M; Beilby, J; Pasquale, L R; Feenstra, B; Bandinelli, S; Ordovas, J M; Chan, A T; Peters, U; Ohlsson, C; Gieger, C; Martin, N G; Waldenberger, M; Siscovick, D S; Raitakari, O; Eriksson, J G; Mitchell, P; Hunter, D J; Kraft, P; Rimm, E B; Boomsma, D I; Borecki, I B; Loos, R J F; Wareham, N J; Vollenweider, P; Caporaso, N; Grabe, H J; Neuhouser, M L; Wolffenbuttel, B H R; Hu, F B; Hyppönen, E; Järvelin, M-R; Cupples, L A; Franks, P W; Ridker, P M; van Duijn, C M; Heiss, G; Metspalu, A; North, K E; Ingelsson, E; Nettleton, J A; van Dam, R M; Chasman, D I

    2015-05-01

    Coffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day) among up to 91,462 coffee consumers of European ancestry with top single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) followed-up in ~30 062 and 7964 coffee consumers of European and African-American ancestry, respectively. Studies from both stages were combined in a trans-ethnic meta-analysis. Confirmed loci were examined for putative functional and biological relevance. Eight loci, including six novel loci, met GW significance (log10Bayes factor (BF)>5.64) with per-allele effect sizes of 0.03-0.14 cups per day. Six are located in or near genes potentially involved in pharmacokinetics (ABCG2, AHR, POR and CYP1A2) and pharmacodynamics (BDNF and SLC6A4) of caffeine. Two map to GCKR and MLXIPL genes related to metabolic traits but lacking known roles in coffee consumption. Enhancer and promoter histone marks populate the regions of many confirmed loci and several potential regulatory SNPs are highly correlated with the lead SNP of each. SNP alleles near GCKR, MLXIPL, BDNF and CYP1A2 that were associated with higher coffee consumption have previously been associated with smoking initiation, higher adiposity and fasting insulin and glucose but lower blood pressure and favorable lipid, inflammatory and liver enzyme profiles (P<5 × 10(-8)).Our genetic findings among European and African-American adults reinforce the role of caffeine in mediating habitual coffee consumption and may point to molecular mechanisms underlying inter-individual variability in pharmacological and health effects of coffee. PMID:25288136

  5. Structural analysis of Golgi alpha-mannosidase II inhibitors identified from a focused glycosidase inhibitor screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Douglas A; Tarling, Chris A; Withers, Stephen G; Rose, David R

    2008-09-23

    The N-glycosylation pathway is a target for pharmaceutical intervention in a number of pathological conditions including cancer. Golgi alpha-mannosidase II (GMII) is the final glycoside hydrolase in the pathway and has been the target for a number of synthetic efforts aimed at providing more selective and effective inhibitors. Drosophila GMII (dGMII) has been extensively studied due to the ease of obtaining high resolution structural data, allowing the observation of substrate distortion upon binding and after formation of a trapped covalent reaction intermediate. However, attempts to find new inhibitor leads by high-throughput screening of large commercial libraries or through in silico docking were unsuccessful. In this paper we provide a kinetic and structural analysis of five inhibitors derived from a small glycosidase-focused library. Surprisingly, four of these were known inhibitors of beta-glucosidases. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the dGMII:inhibitor complexes highlights the ability of the zinc-containing GMII active site to deform compounds, even ones designed as conformationally restricted transition-state mimics of beta-glucosidases, into binding entities that have inhibitory activity. Although these deformed conformations do not appear to be on the expected conformational itinerary of the enzyme, and are thus not transition-state mimics of GMII, they allow positioning of the three vicinal hydroxyls of the bound gluco-inhibitors into similar locations to those found with mannose-containing substrates, underlining the importance of these hydrogen bonds for binding. Further, these studies show the utility of targeting the acid-base catalyst using appropriately positioned positively charged nitrogen atoms, as well as the challenges associated with aglycon substitutions.

  6. A Modified Delphi Study to Identify the Significant Works Pertaining to the Understanding of Reading Comprehension and Content Analysis of the Identified Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunker, Norma D.

    2009-01-01

    The first part of this study explored the significant works pertaining to the understanding of reading comprehension using a Modified Delphi Method. A panel of reading comprehension experts in the field of reading identified 20 works they considered to be significant to the understanding of reading comprehension. The panel of experts additionally…

  7. Hypothetical granulin-like molecule from Fasciola hepatica identified by bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicado, Claudia; Marcos, Luis A; Zimic, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is considered an emergent human pathogen, causing liver fibrosis or cirrhosis, conditions that are known to be direct causes of cancer. Some parasites have been categorized by WHO as carcinogenic agents such as Opisthorchis viverrini, a relative of F. hepatica. Although these two parasites are from the same class (Trematoda), the role of F. hepatica in carcinogenesis is unclear. We hypothesized that F. hepatica might share some features with O. viverrini and to be responsible to induce proliferation of host cells. We analyzed the recently released genome of F. hepatica looking for a gene coding a granulin-like growth factor, a protein secreted by O. viverrini (Ov-GRN-1), which is a potent stimulator of proliferation of host cells. Using computational biology tools, we identified a granulin-like molecule in F. hepatica, here termed FhGLM, which has high sequence identity level to Ov-GRN-1 and human progranulin. We found evidence of an upstream promoter compatible with the expression of FhGLM. The FhGLM architecture showed to have five granulin domains, one of them, the domain 3, was homologue to Ov-GRN-1 and human GRNC. The structure of the FhGLM granulin domain 3 resulted to have the overall folding of its homologue the human GRNC. Our findings show the presence of a homologue of a potent modulator of cell growth in F. hepatica that might have, as other granulins, a proliferative action on host cells during fascioliasis. Future experimental assays to demonstrate the presence of FhGLM in F. hepatica are needed to confirm our hypothesis. PMID:27386259

  8. Kinematic analysis quantifies gait abnormalities associated with lameness in broiler chickens and identifies evolutionary gait differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Caplen

    Full Text Available This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10 would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12 and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult. Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated

  9. Kinematic analysis quantifies gait abnormalities associated with lameness in broiler chickens and identifies evolutionary gait differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplen, Gina; Hothersall, Becky; Murrell, Joanna C; Nicol, Christine J; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E; Weeks, Claire A; Colborne, G Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat) chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10) would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12) and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult). Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy) and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers) presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity) presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated with

  10. Systems genetic and pharmacological analysis identifies candidate genes underlying mechanosensation in the von Frey test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E E; Bryant, C D; Lee, S E; Peng, X; Cook, B; Nair, H K; Dreher, K J; Zhang, X; Palmer, A A; Chung, J M; Mogil, J S; Chesler, E J; Lariviere, W R

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical sensitivity is commonly affected in chronic pain and other neurological disorders. To discover mechanisms of individual differences in punctate mechanosensation, we performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of the response to von Frey monofilament stimulation in BXD recombinant inbred (BXD) mice. Significant loci were detected on mouse chromosome (Chr) 5 and 15, indicating the location of underlying polymorphisms that cause heritable variation in von Frey response. Convergent evidence from public gene expression data implicates candidate genes within the loci: von Frey thresholds were strongly correlated with baseline expression of Cacna2d1, Ift27 and Csnk1e in multiple brain regions of BXD strains. Systemic gabapentin and PF-670462, which target the protein products of Cacna2d1 and Csnk1e, respectively, significantly increased von Frey thresholds in a genotype-dependent manner in progenitors and BXD strains. Real-time polymerase chain reaction confirmed differential expression of Cacna2d1 and Csnk1e in multiple brain regions in progenitors and showed differential expression of Cacna2d1 and Csnk1e in the dorsal root ganglia of the progenitors and BXD strains grouped by QTL genotype. Thus, linkage mapping, transcript covariance and pharmacological testing suggest that genetic variation affecting Cacna2d1 and Csnk1e may contribute to individual differences in von Frey filament response. This study implicates Cacna2d1 and Ift27 in basal mechanosensation in line with their previously suspected role in mechanical hypersensitivity. Csnk1e is implicated for von Frey response for the first time. Further investigation is warranted to identify the specific polymorphisms involved and assess the relevance of these findings to clinical conditions of disturbed mechanosensation. PMID:27231153

  11. Candidate Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Triterpenoid Saponins in Platycodon grandiflorum Identified by Transcriptome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chun-Hua; Gao, Zheng-Jie; Zhang, Jia-Jin; Zhang, Wei; Shao, Jian-Hui; Hai, Mei-Rong; Chen, Jun-Wen; Yang, Sheng-Chao; Zhang, Guang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Platycodon grandiflorum is the only species in the genus Platycodon of the family Campanulaceae, which has been traditionally used as a medicinal plant for its lung-heat-clearing, antitussive, and expectorant properties in China, Japanese, and Korean. Oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins were the main chemical components of P. grandiflorum and platycodin D was the abundant and main bioactive component, but little is known about their biosynthesis in plants. Hence, P. grandiflorum is an ideal medicinal plant for studying the biosynthesis of Oleanane-type saponins. In addition, the genomic information of this important herbal plant is unavailable. Principal findings: A total of 58,580,566 clean reads were obtained, which were assembled into 34,053 unigenes, with an average length of 936 bp and N50 of 1,661 bp by analyzing the transcriptome data of P. grandiflorum. Among these 34,053 unigenes, 22,409 unigenes (65.80%) were annotated based on the information available from public databases, including Nr, NCBI, Swiss-Prot, KOG, and KEGG. Furthermore, 21 candidate cytochrome P450 genes and 17 candidate UDP-glycosyltransferase genes most likely involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway were discovered from the transcriptome sequencing of P. grandiflorum. In addition, 10,626 SSRs were identified based on the transcriptome data, which would provide abundant candidates of molecular markers for genetic diversity and genetic map for this medicinal plant. Conclusion: The genomic data obtained from P. grandiflorum, especially the identification of putative genes involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway, will facilitate our understanding of the biosynthesis of triterpenoid saponins at molecular level. PMID:27242873

  12. Identifying glucose thresholds for incident diabetes by physiological analysis: a mathematical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrannini, Ele; Manca, Maria Laura

    2015-04-01

    Plasma glucose thresholds for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes are currently based on outcome data (risk of retinopathy), an inherently ill-conditioned approach. A radically different approach is to consider the mechanisms that control plasma glucose, rather than its relation to an outcome. We developed a constraint optimization algorithm to find the minimal glucose levels associated with the maximized combination of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, the two main mechanisms of glucose homeostasis. We used a training cohort of 1,474 subjects (22% prediabetic, 7.7% diabetic) in whom insulin sensitivity was measured by the clamp technique and β-cell function was determined by mathematical modeling of an oral glucose tolerance test. Optimized fasting glucose levels were ≤ 87 and ≤ 89 mg/dl in ≤ 45-yr-old women and men, respectively, and ≤ 92 and ≤ 95 mg/dl in >45-yr-old women and men, respectively; the corresponding optimized 2-h glucose levels were ≤ 96, ≤ 98, ≤ 103, and ≤ 105 mg/dl. These thresholds were validated in three prospective cohorts of nondiabetic subjects (Relationship Between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Study, Botnia Study, and Mexico City Diabetes Study) with baseline and follow-up oral glucose tolerance tests. Of 5,593 participants, 452 progressed to diabetes. Similarly, in the three cohorts, subjects with glucose levels above the estimated thresholds had an odds ratio of 3.74 (95% confidence interval = 2.64-5.48) of progressing, substantially higher than the risk carried by baseline conventionally defined prediabetes [odds ratio = 2.32 (95% confidence interval = 1.91-2.81)]. The concept that optimization of glucose concentrations by direct measures of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function identifies gender- and age-specific thresholds that bear on disease progression is proven in a physiologically sound, quantifiable manner.

  13. Metabolomics analysis identifies intestinal microbiota-derived biomarkers of colonization resistance in clindamycin-treated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L P Jump

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intestinal microbiota protect the host against enteric pathogens through a defense mechanism termed colonization resistance. Antibiotics excreted into the intestinal tract may disrupt colonization resistance and alter normal metabolic functions of the microbiota. We used a mouse model to test the hypothesis that alterations in levels of bacterial metabolites in fecal specimens could provide useful biomarkers indicating disrupted or intact colonization resistance after antibiotic treatment. METHODS: To assess in vivo colonization resistance, mice were challenged with oral vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus or Clostridium difficile spores at varying time points after treatment with the lincosamide antibiotic clindamycin. For concurrent groups of antibiotic-treated mice, stool samples were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to assess changes in the microbiota and using non-targeted metabolic profiling. To assess whether the findings were applicable to another antibiotic class that suppresses intestinal anaerobes, similar experiments were conducted with piperacillin/tazobactam. RESULTS: Colonization resistance began to recover within 5 days and was intact by 12 days after clindamycin treatment, coinciding with the recovery bacteria from the families Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, both part of the phylum Firmicutes. Clindamycin treatment caused marked changes in metabolites present in fecal specimens. Of 484 compounds analyzed, 146 (30% exhibited a significant increase or decrease in concentration during clindamycin treatment followed by recovery to baseline that coincided with restoration of in vivo colonization resistance. Identified as potential biomarkers of colonization resistance, these compounds included intermediates in carbohydrate or protein metabolism that increased (pentitols, gamma-glutamyl amino acids and inositol metabolites or decreased (pentoses, dipeptides with clindamycin treatment

  14. Integrative epigenetic profiling analysis identifies DNA methylation changes associated with chronic alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Lee, Chau-Shoun; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Cheng, Andrew T A

    2015-09-01

    Alcoholism has always been a major public health concern in Taiwan, especially in the aboriginal communities. Emerging evidence supports the association between DNA methylation and alcoholism, though very few studies have examined the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on the epignome. Since 1986, we have been following up on the mental health conditions of four major aboriginal peoples of Taiwan. The 993 aboriginal people who underwent the phase 1 (1986) clinical interviews were followed up through phase 2 (1990-1992), and phase 3 (2003-2009). Selected individuals for the current study included 10 males from the phase 1 normal cohort who remained normal at phase 2 and became dependent on alcohol by phase 3 and 10 control subjects who have not had any drinking problems throughout the study. We profiled the DNA methylation changes in the blood samples collected at phases 2 and 3. Enrichment analyses have identified several biological processes related to immune system responses and aging in the control group. In contrast, differentially methylated genes in the case group were mostly associated with susceptibility to infections, as well as pathways related to muscular contraction and neural degeneration. The methylation levels of six genes were found to correlate with alcohol consumption. These include genes involved in neurogenesis (NPDC1) and inflammation (HERC5), as well as alcoholism-associated genes ADCY9, CKM, and PHOX2A. Given the limited sample size, our approach uncovered genes and disease pathways associated with chronic alcohol consumption at the epigenetic level. The results offer a preliminary methylome map that enhances our understanding of alcohol-induced damages and offers new targets for alcohol injury research. PMID:25555412

  15. Candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis of triterpenoid saponins in Platycodon grandiflorum identified by transcriptome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua eMa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platycodon grandiflorum is the only species in the genus Platycodon of the family Campanulaceae, which has been traditionally used as a medicinal plant for its lung-heat-clearing, antitussive, and expectorant properties in China, Japanese and Korean. Oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins were the main chemical components of P. grandiflorum and platycodin D was the abundant and main bioactive component, but little is known about their biosynthesis in plants. Hence, P. grandiflorum is an ideal medicinal plant for studying the biosynthesis of Oleanane-type saponins. In addition, the genomic information of this important herbal plant is unavailable.Principal Findings:A total of 58,580,566 clean reads were obtained, which were assembled into 34,053 unigenes, with an average length of 936 bp and N50 of 1,661 bp by analyzing the transcriptome data of P. grandiflorum. Among these 34,053 unigenes, 22,409 unigenes (65.80% were annotated based on the information available from public databases, including Nr, NCBI, Swiss-Prot, KOG and KEGG. Furthermore, 21 candidate cytochrome P450 genes and 17 candidate UDP-glycosyltransferase genes most likely involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway were discovered from the transcriptome sequencing of P. grandiflorum. In addition, 10,626 SSRs were identified based on the transcriptome data, which would provide abundant candidates of molecular markers for genetic diversity and genetic map for this medicinal plant.Conclusion:The genomic data obtained from P. grandiflorum, especially the identification of putative genes involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway, will facilitate our understanding of the biosynthesis of triterpenoid saponins at molecular level.

  16. Hypothetical granulin-like molecule from Fasciola hepatica identified by bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicado, Claudia; Marcos, Luis A; Zimic, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is considered an emergent human pathogen, causing liver fibrosis or cirrhosis, conditions that are known to be direct causes of cancer. Some parasites have been categorized by WHO as carcinogenic agents such as Opisthorchis viverrini, a relative of F. hepatica. Although these two parasites are from the same class (Trematoda), the role of F. hepatica in carcinogenesis is unclear. We hypothesized that F. hepatica might share some features with O. viverrini and to be responsible to induce proliferation of host cells. We analyzed the recently released genome of F. hepatica looking for a gene coding a granulin-like growth factor, a protein secreted by O. viverrini (Ov-GRN-1), which is a potent stimulator of proliferation of host cells. Using computational biology tools, we identified a granulin-like molecule in F. hepatica, here termed FhGLM, which has high sequence identity level to Ov-GRN-1 and human progranulin. We found evidence of an upstream promoter compatible with the expression of FhGLM. The FhGLM architecture showed to have five granulin domains, one of them, the domain 3, was homologue to Ov-GRN-1 and human GRNC. The structure of the FhGLM granulin domain 3 resulted to have the overall folding of its homologue the human GRNC. Our findings show the presence of a homologue of a potent modulator of cell growth in F. hepatica that might have, as other granulins, a proliferative action on host cells during fascioliasis. Future experimental assays to demonstrate the presence of FhGLM in F. hepatica are needed to confirm our hypothesis.

  17. Identifying the occurrence time of mainshocks by means of Natural Time Analysis

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    Sarlis, Nicholas V.; Skordas, Efthimios S.; Lazaridou, Mary S.; Varotsos, Panayiotis A.

    2016-04-01

    By employing the new view of time, termed natural time [1], recent advances on the natural time analysis of a seismic catalogue [2] include: First, the fluctuations of the order parameter κ1 of seismicity exhibit a minimum almost simultaneous with the initiation of a Seismic Electric Signals (SES) activity [3,4]. This opens the window of a deeper understanding of the critical nature of preseismic process [5]. Second, a spatiotemporal study of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity leads to an estimate of the epicentral area of a major impending mainshock [6]. Third, by starting the natural time analysis of the seismicity in the candidate epicentral area at the initiation time of the SES activity, we find that the κ1 values converge to the critical value [7-9] κ_1=0.070 a few days to one week before a mainshock. Recent applications of this procedure are presented for mainshocks that occurred close to Athens [10] during the last few years. References [1] P. A. Varotsos, N. V. Sarlis and E. S. Skordas, Phys. Rev. E {66} (2002) 011902; Practica of Athens Academy {76} (2001) 294. [2] P.A.Varotsos, N.V. Sarlis, H.K. Tanaka and E.S. Skordas, Phys. Rev. E {72} (2005) 041103. [3] P. Varotsos and M. Lazaridou, Tectonophysics {188} (1991) 321. [4] P. A. Varotsos, N. V. Sarlis, E. S. Skordas, and M. S. Lazaridou, Tectonophysics {589} (2013) 116. [5] P. Varotsos, K. Alexopoulos and M. Lazaridou, Tectonophysics {224} (1993) 1. [6] N.V. Sarlis, E.S. Skordas, P.A. Varotsos, T. Nagao, M. Kamogawa, and S. Uyeda Proc Natl Acad Sci USA {112} (2015) 986. [7] P. Varotsos, N.V. Sarlis, E.S. Skordas, S. Uyeda, and M. Kamogawa, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA {108} (2011) 11361. [8] N.V. Sarlis, E.S. Skordas, P.A. Varotsos, T. Nagao, M. Kamogawa, H. Tanaka and S. Uyeda Proc Natl Acad Sci USA {110} (2013) 13734. [9] N.V. Sarlis, E.S. Skordas, M.S. Lazaridou, and P.A. Varotsos, Proc Japan Acad Ser. ? {84} (2008) 331. [10] P.A. Varotsos, N.V. Sarlis, E.S. Skordas, S.-R. G

  18. Identifying Plant Part Composition of Forest Logging Residue Using Infrared Spectral Data and Linear Discriminant Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquah, Gifty E.; Via, Brian K.; Billor, Nedret; Fasina, Oladiran O.; Eckhardt, Lori G.

    2016-01-01

    As new markets, technologies and economies evolve in the low carbon bioeconomy, forest logging residue, a largely untapped renewable resource will play a vital role. The feedstock can however be variable depending on plant species and plant part component. This heterogeneity can influence the physical, chemical and thermochemical properties of the material, and thus the final yield and quality of products. Although it is challenging to control compositional variability of a batch of feedstock, it is feasible to monitor this heterogeneity and make the necessary changes in process parameters. Such a system will be a first step towards optimization, quality assurance and cost-effectiveness of processes in the emerging biofuel/chemical industry. The objective of this study was therefore to qualitatively classify forest logging residue made up of different plant parts using both near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) together with linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Forest logging residue harvested from several Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) plantations in Alabama, USA, were classified into three plant part components: clean wood, wood and bark and slash (i.e., limbs and foliage). Five-fold cross-validated linear discriminant functions had classification accuracies of over 96% for both NIRS and FTIRS based models. An extra factor/principal component (PC) was however needed to achieve this in FTIRS modeling. Analysis of factor loadings of both NIR and FTIR spectra showed that, the statistically different amount of cellulose in the three plant part components of logging residue contributed to their initial separation. This study demonstrated that NIR or FTIR spectroscopy coupled with PCA and LDA has the potential to be used as a high throughput tool in classifying the plant part makeup of a batch of forest logging residue feedstock. Thus, NIR/FTIR could be employed as a tool to rapidly probe/monitor the variability of forest

  19. Essential Indicators Identifying Chronic Inorganic Mercury Intoxication: Pooled Analysis across Multiple Cross-Sectional Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background The continuous exposure to inorganic mercury vapour in artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) areas leads to chronic health problems. It is therefore essential to have a quick, but reliable risk assessing tool to diagnose chronic inorganic mercury intoxication. This study re-evaluates the state-of-the-art toolkit to diagnose chronic inorganic mercury intoxication by analysing data from multiple pooled cross-sectional studies. The primary research question aims to reduce the currently used set of indicators without affecting essentially the capability to diagnose chronic inorganic mercury intoxication. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed on established biomonitoring exposure limits for mercury in blood, hair, urine and urine adjusted by creatinine, where the biomonitoring exposure limits are compared to thresholds most associated with chronic inorganic mercury intoxication in artisanal small-scale gold mining. Methods Health data from miners and community members in Indonesia, Tanzania and Zimbabwe were obtained as part of the Global Mercury Project and pooled into one dataset together with their biomarkers mercury in urine, blood and hair. The individual prognostic impact of the indicators on the diagnosis of mercury intoxication is quantified using logistic regression models. The selection is performed by a stepwise forward/backward selection. Different models are compared based on the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) and Cohen`s kappa is used to evaluate the level of agreement between the diagnosis of mercury intoxication based on the currently used set of indicators and the result based on our reduced set of indicators. The sensitivity analysis of biomarker exposure limits of mercury is based on a sequence of chi square tests. Results The variable selection in logistic regression reduced the number of medical indicators from thirteen to ten in addition to the biomarkers. The estimated level of agreement using ten of thirteen medical

  20. Identifying Plant Part Composition of Forest Logging Residue Using Infrared Spectral Data and Linear Discriminant Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquah, Gifty E; Via, Brian K; Billor, Nedret; Fasina, Oladiran O; Eckhardt, Lori G

    2016-01-01

    As new markets, technologies and economies evolve in the low carbon bioeconomy, forest logging residue, a largely untapped renewable resource will play a vital role. The feedstock can however be variable depending on plant species and plant part component. This heterogeneity can influence the physical, chemical and thermochemical properties of the material, and thus the final yield and quality of products. Although it is challenging to control compositional variability of a batch of feedstock, it is feasible to monitor this heterogeneity and make the necessary changes in process parameters. Such a system will be a first step towards optimization, quality assurance and cost-effectiveness of processes in the emerging biofuel/chemical industry. The objective of this study was therefore to qualitatively classify forest logging residue made up of different plant parts using both near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) together with linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Forest logging residue harvested from several Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) plantations in Alabama, USA, were classified into three plant part components: clean wood, wood and bark and slash (i.e., limbs and foliage). Five-fold cross-validated linear discriminant functions had classification accuracies of over 96% for both NIRS and FTIRS based models. An extra factor/principal component (PC) was however needed to achieve this in FTIRS modeling. Analysis of factor loadings of both NIR and FTIR spectra showed that, the statistically different amount of cellulose in the three plant part components of logging residue contributed to their initial separation. This study demonstrated that NIR or FTIR spectroscopy coupled with PCA and LDA has the potential to be used as a high throughput tool in classifying the plant part makeup of a batch of forest logging residue feedstock. Thus, NIR/FTIR could be employed as a tool to rapidly probe/monitor the variability of forest