WorldWideScience

Sample records for analysis final progress

  1. Final Performance Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houldin, Joseph [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Saboor, Veronica [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    about assessing a company’s technical assets, broadening our view of the business to go beyond what they make or what NAICS code they have…to better understand their capacity, capability, and expertise, and to learn more about THEIR customers. Knowing more about the markets they serve can often provide insight into their level of technical knowledge and sophistication. Finally, in the spirit of realizing the intent of the Accelerator we strove to align and integrate the work and activities supported by the five funding agencies to leverage each effort. To that end, we include in the Integrated Work Plan a graphic that illustrates that integration. What follows is our summary report of the project, aggregated from prior reports.

  2. Final Progress Report for 'An Abstract Job Handling Grid Service for Dataset Analysis'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A Alexander

    2005-01-01

    For Phase I of the Job Handling project, Tech-X has built a Grid service for processing analysis requests, as well as a Graphical User Interface (GUI) client that uses the service. The service is designed to generically support High-Energy Physics (HEP) experimental analysis tasks. It has an extensible, flexible, open architecture and language. The service uses the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment as a working example. STAR is an experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). STAR and other experiments at BNL generate multiple Petabytes of HEP data. The raw data is captured as millions of input files stored in a distributed data catalog. Potentially using thousands of files as input, analysis requests are submitted to a processing environment containing thousands of nodes. The Grid service provides a standard interface to the processing farm. It enables researchers to run large-scale, massively parallel analysis tasks, regardless of the computational resources available in their location

  3. IRIS Final Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Carelli

    2003-11-03

    OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed

  4. Everolimus plus exemestane in postmenopausal patients with HR(+) breast cancer: BOLERO-2 final progression-free survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Denise A; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Pritchard, Kathleen I; Burris, Howard A; Baselga, José; Gnant, Michael; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Campone, Mario; Pistilli, Barbara; Piccart, Martine; Melichar, Bohuslav; Petrakova, Katarina; Arena, Francis P; Erdkamp, Frans; Harb, Wael A; Feng, Wentao; Cahana, Ayelet; Taran, Tetiana; Lebwohl, David; Rugo, Hope S

    2013-10-01

    Effective treatments for hormone-receptor-positive (HR(+)) breast cancer (BC) following relapse/progression on nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (NSAI) therapy are needed. Initial Breast Cancer Trials of OraL EveROlimus-2 (BOLERO-2) trial data demonstrated that everolimus and exemestane significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo plus exemestane alone in this patient population. BOLERO-2 is a phase 3, double-blind, randomized, international trial comparing everolimus (10 mg/day) plus exemestane (25 mg/day) versus placebo plus exemestane in postmenopausal women with HR(+) advanced BC with recurrence/progression during or after NSAIs. The primary endpoint was PFS by local investigator review, and was confirmed by independent central radiology review. Overall survival, response rate, and clinical benefit rate were secondary endpoints. Final study results with median 18-month follow-up show that median PFS remained significantly longer with everolimus plus exemestane versus placebo plus exemestane [investigator review: 7.8 versus 3.2 months, respectively; hazard ratio = 0.45 (95% confidence interval 0.38-0.54); log-rank P NSAIs. These results further support the use of everolimus plus exemestane in this patient population. ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00863655.

  5. PSI-Center Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, Thomas R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Shumlak, Uri [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Hansen, Chris [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Ji, Jeong-Young [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Nelson, Brian [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-04-20

    This is the Final Progress Report of the Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center) covering March 2014 through February 2017. The Center has accomplished a great deal during this period. The PSI-Center is organized into four groups: Edge and Dynamic Neutrals; Transport and Kinetic Effects; Equilibrium, Stability, and Kinetic Effects in 3D Topologies; and Interface for Validation. Each group has made good progress and the results from each group are given in detail.

  6. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  7. 23 CFR 140.609 - Progress and final vouchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Progress and final vouchers. 140.609 Section 140.609 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT Reimbursement for Bond Issue Projects § 140.609 Progress and final vouchers. (a) Progress vouchers may be...

  8. Stratospheric tritium sampling. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, A.S.; Oestlund, H.G.

    1985-09-01

    Stratospheric tritium sampling was part of Project Airstream (sponsored by the US Department of Energy) between 1975 and 1983. Data from the final deployment in November 1983 are reported here, and the results of the 9 years of effort are summarized. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Final/Progress Report for Instrumentation Grant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1997-01-01

    The major piece of equipment was a Furnace Model 1000 used during the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process to sinter the ceramic final product. NAC is a new technology to immobilize liquid radioactive waste simulants. The grant also funded related control and measuring equipment

  10. Hanford Site pollution prevention progress report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BETSCH, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Richland Operations Office (RL) and Office of River Protection (ORP) are pleased to issue the attached Pollution Prevention Progress Report. We have just met the most aggressive waste reduction and A recycling goals to date and are publishing this report to recognize A the site's progress, and to ensure it will sustain success beyond 1 Fiscal Year 2000. This report was designed to inform the been made by RL and ORP in Waste Minimization (WMin) and Pollution Prevention (P2). RL, ORP and their contractors are committed to protecting the environment, and we reiterate pollution prevention should continue to be at the forefront of the environmental cleanup and research efforts. As you read the attached report, we believe you will see a clear demonstration of RL and ORP's outstanding performance as it has been responsible and accountable to the nation, its employees, and the community in which we live and work. commitment that all employees have for environmental stewardship. The report provides useful information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) environmental policy and programs, and contains countless examples of waste minimization projects. This year was the first year our site received the White House Closing the Circle in the category of Affirmative Procurement. This Award recognizes our site for designing a comprehensive strategy for achieving 100 percent purchases of the U.S.Environmenta1 Protection Agency designated recycled items. DOE-Headquarters also acknowledged the site in 1999 for its public outreach efforts in communicating pollution prevention to Hanford Site employees and the community. Our site is truly a recognized leader in outreach as it has kept this title for two consecutive years. In previous years, we received the White House Closing the Circle Honorable Mention in Affirmative Procurement and several other National DOE Awards. Through partnership with the local community and stakeholders, the site and its contractors have a clear

  11. Studies in genetic discrimination. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    We have screened 1006 respondents in a study of genetic discrimination. Analysis of these responses has produced evidence of the range of institutions engaged in genetic discrimination and demonstrates the impact of this discrimination on the respondents to the study. We have found that both ignorance and policy underlie genetic discrimination and that anti-discrimination laws are being violated.

  12. Biorefinery Demonstration Project Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, David [University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-10-20

    In this project we focused on various aspects of biorefinery technology development including algal-biorefinery technology, thermochemical conversion of biomass to bio-oils and biochar; we tested characteristics and applications of biochars and evaluated nutrient cycling with wastewater treatment by the coupling of algal culture systems and anaerobic digestion. Key results include a method for reducing water content of bio-oil through atomized alcohol addition. The effect included increasing the pH and reducing the viscosity and cloud point of the bio-oil. Low input biochar production systems were evaluated via literature reviews and direct experimental work. Additionally, emissions were evaluated and three biochar systems were compared via a life cycle analysis. Attached growth systems for both algal cultivation and algal harvesting were found to be superior to suspended growth cultures. Nutrient requirements for algal cultivation could be obtained by the recycling of anaerobic digester effluents, thus experimentally showing that these two systems could be directly coupled. Twenty-two journal articles and six intellectual property applications resulted from the cumulative work that this project contributed to programmatically.

  13. Schedulability Analysis for Java Finalizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgholm, Thomas; Hansen, Rene Rydhof; Søndergaard, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Java finalizers perform clean-up and finalisation of objects at garbage collection time. In real-time Java profiles the use of finalizers is either discouraged (RTSJ, Ravenscar Java) or even disallowed (JSR-302), mainly because of the unpredictability of finalizers and in particular their impact...... on the schedulability analysis. In this paper we show that a controlled scoped memory model results in a structured and predictable execution of finalizers, more reminiscent of C++ destructors than Java finalizers. Furthermore, we incorporate finalizers into a (conservative) schedulability analysis for Predictable Java...... programs. Finally, we extend the SARTS tool for automated schedulability analysis of Java bytecode programs to handle finalizers in a fully automated way....

  14. Coordinated analysis of data. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mende, S.B.

    1974-01-01

    All Sky Cameras (ASCA) observations were made at the field line conjugate of the ATS-5 Satellite. The field of view of these cameras covered the region of the magnetosphere from L=5 to L=ll at the approximate longitude of the ATS field line conjugate. Definite statements are made concerning the correlation of the auroras observed by the ASCA's and the magnetospheric trapped fluxes. No auroras are observed at the field line conjugate, on quiet days when the hot plasma does not penetrate into the magnetosphere far enough to reach the ATS-5 orbit. On more disturbed days, when the ATS-5 enters the plasma sheet containing plasma clouds, an equatorward motion of the lowest latitude auroral arc is observed. Significant qualitative correlation between the ASCA data and the trapped fluxes is observed when a local plasma injection event occurs near ATS-5. The clearest signature of the injection event is magnetic and is most pronounced as a recovery of a negative bay at the ATS-5 magnetometer. The most significant correlations are observed with the intensification of the diffuse uniform glow which intensifies during the injection event

  15. Integrated sequence analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.; Pyy, P.

    1998-02-01

    The NKS/RAK subprojet 3 'integrated sequence analysis' (ISA) was formulated with the overall objective to develop and to test integrated methodologies in order to evaluate event sequences with significant human action contribution. The term 'methodology' denotes not only technical tools but also methods for integration of different scientific disciplines. In this report, we first discuss the background of ISA and the surveys made to map methods in different application fields, such as man machine system simulation software, human reliability analysis (HRA) and expert judgement. Specific event sequences were, after the surveys, selected for application and testing of a number of ISA methods. The event sequences discussed in the report were cold overpressure of BWR, shutdown LOCA of BWR, steam generator tube rupture of a PWR and BWR disturbed signal view in the control room after an external event. Different teams analysed these sequences by using different ISA and HRA methods. Two kinds of results were obtained from the ISA project: sequence specific and more general findings. The sequence specific results are discussed together with each sequence description. The general lessons are discussed under a separate chapter by using comparisons of different case studies. These lessons include areas ranging from plant safety management (design, procedures, instrumentation, operations, maintenance and safety practices) to methodological findings (ISA methodology, PSA,HRA, physical analyses, behavioural analyses and uncertainty assessment). Finally follows a discussion about the project and conclusions are presented. An interdisciplinary study of complex phenomena is a natural way to produce valuable and innovative results. This project came up with structured ways to perform ISA and managed to apply the in practice. The project also highlighted some areas where more work is needed. In the HRA work, development is required for the use of simulators and expert judgement as

  16. Final Progress Report: SPECT Assay of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    During the past project period, we proposed to collaborate closely with DOE's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab or JLab) to design a compact, ultra-high-resolution, high-sensitivity gamma camera for quantifying brain-tumor distributions of I-131. We also proposed to continue our on-going research in developing and evaluating pinhole collimation for quantitative ultra-high-resolution imaging of I-131-labeled MAbs. We have made excellent progress in accomplishing much of the research related to pinhole collimation. Many of the most significant results have been presented in peer-reviewed journal articles and conference proceedings. We have also made good progress in collaborating with JLab's Detector Group in developing a compact, ultra-high-resolution, gamma camera. A prototype I-131 imager was delivered to Duke on May 28, 2003. Our research results are summarized in the following sections. A. JLAB-DUKE DEDICATED BRAIN-TUMOR IMAGING SYSTEM A.1. Determination of Optimal Collimator Design During the current project period a prototype I-131 dedicated brain imager has been designed and built. Computer simulations and analysis of alternate designs were performed at Duke to determine an optimal collimator design. Collimator response was characterized by spatial resolution and sensitivity. Both geometric (non-penetrative) and penetrative sensitivities were considered in selecting an optimal collimator design. Based on these simulation results, two collimator designs were selected and built by external vendors. Initial imaging results were obtained using these collimators. B. INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF SPECT RECONSTRUCTION SOFTWARE FOR JLAB-DUKE CAMERA B.1. Modeling Thick Septa and Collimator Holes: Geometrical-Phantom Study A geometrical phantom was designed to illuminate spatial resolution effects. The phantom includes a uniformly attenuating medium that consists of all voxels within an elliptical cylinder that is centered on the axis of rotation

  17. Integrated sequence analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, K.; Pyy, P

    1998-02-01

    The NKS/RAK subprojet 3 `integrated sequence analysis` (ISA) was formulated with the overall objective to develop and to test integrated methodologies in order to evaluate event sequences with significant human action contribution. The term `methodology` denotes not only technical tools but also methods for integration of different scientific disciplines. In this report, we first discuss the background of ISA and the surveys made to map methods in different application fields, such as man machine system simulation software, human reliability analysis (HRA) and expert judgement. Specific event sequences were, after the surveys, selected for application and testing of a number of ISA methods. The event sequences discussed in the report were cold overpressure of BWR, shutdown LOCA of BWR, steam generator tube rupture of a PWR and BWR disturbed signal view in the control room after an external event. Different teams analysed these sequences by using different ISA and HRA methods. Two kinds of results were obtained from the ISA project: sequence specific and more general findings. The sequence specific results are discussed together with each sequence description. The general lessons are discussed under a separate chapter by using comparisons of different case studies. These lessons include areas ranging from plant safety management (design, procedures, instrumentation, operations, maintenance and safety practices) to methodological findings (ISA methodology, PSA,HRA, physical analyses, behavioural analyses and uncertainty assessment). Finally follows a discussion about the project and conclusions are presented. An interdisciplinary study of complex phenomena is a natural way to produce valuable and innovative results. This project came up with structured ways to perform ISA and managed to apply the in practice. The project also highlighted some areas where more work is needed. In the HRA work, development is required for the use of simulators and expert judgement as

  18. Nuclear research with the electromagnetic probe. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meziani, Z.E.

    1994-10-01

    This is the final report on the research carried at Stanford University under contract DE-FG03-88ER40439. All the work accomplished under this grant is reported in the publications listed as part of the Principal Investigator bibliography at the end of this report. In the last few years our research was directed at some of the forefront questions in nuclear physics. We investigated the nuclear medium effects on the intrinsic properties of bound nucleons, specifically the ectromagnetic form factors. For these studies we performed a number of specialized electron scattering experiments with specific sensitivity to nuclear medium effects. At the next level of structure, elementary constituents of matter are quarks and gluons. Defining the energy regime where the quark-gluon description of nuclear systems becomes more relevant than the nucleon-meson description is of great importance in thoroughly understanding the nuclear structure. To explore this transition region, we studied the scaling region in the disintegration of the deuteron, the simplest nuclear system with high energy photons. Finally we focused on the investigation of the nucleon internal spin structure along with the test of the Bjoerken sum rule a fundamental sum rule of QCD.

  19. Nuclear research with the electromagnetic probe. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meziani, Z.E.

    1994-10-01

    This is the final report on the research carried at Stanford University under contract DE-FG03-88ER40439. All the work accomplished under this grant is reported in the publications listed as part of the Principal Investigator bibliography at the end of this report. In the last few years our research was directed at some of the forefront questions in nuclear physics. We investigated the nuclear medium effects on the intrinsic properties of bound nucleons, specifically the ectromagnetic form factors. For these studies we performed a number of specialized electron scattering experiments with specific sensitivity to nuclear medium effects. At the next level of structure, elementary constituents of matter are quarks and gluons. Defining the energy regime where the quark-gluon description of nuclear systems becomes more relevant than the nucleon-meson description is of great importance in thoroughly understanding the nuclear structure. To explore this transition region, we studied the scaling region in the disintegration of the deuteron, the simplest nuclear system with high energy photons. Finally we focused on the investigation of the nucleon internal spin structure along with the test of the Bjoerken sum rule a fundamental sum rule of QCD

  20. IRIS International Reactor Innovative and Secure Final Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed in the first four

  1. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative University Fellowship Program. Final Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    2004-2011 Final Report for AFCI University Fellowship Program. The goal of this effort was to be supportive of university students and university programs - particularly those students and programs that will help to strengthen the development of nuclear-related fields. The program also supported the stability of the nuclear infrastructure and developed research partnerships that are helping to enlarge the national nuclear science technology base. In this fellowship program, the U.S. Department of Energy sought master's degree students in nuclear, mechanical, or chemical engineering, engineering/applied physics, physics, chemistry, radiochemistry, or fields of science and engineering applicable to the AFCI/Gen IV/GNEP missions in order to meet future U.S. nuclear program needs. The fellowship program identified candidates and selected full time students of high-caliber who were taking nuclear courses as part of their degree programs. The DOE Academic Program Managers encouraged fellows to pursue summer internships at national laboratories and supported the students with appropriate information so that both the fellows and the nation's nuclear energy objectives were successful.

  2. Hydrologic resources management program, FY 1998 progress report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, F.C.; Criss, R.E.; Davisson, M.L.; Eaton, G.F.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.M.; Rose, T.P.; Smith, D.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results from FY 1998 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), and supports DP operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through studies of radiochemistry and resource management related to the defense programs mission. Other participating organizations include the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Bechtel-Nevada (BN). The UGTA project is an Environmental Management (EM) activity of DOE/NV that supports a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. UGTA's primary function is to address the legacy release of hazardous constituents at the Nevada Test Site, the Tonopah Test Range, and off-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear testing areas. Participating contractors include LLNL (Earth and Environmental Sciences Directorate, Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division), LANL, DRI, USGS, BN, HSI-GeoTrans, and IT Corporation. The FY 1998 HRMP and UGTA annual progress report follows the organization and contents of our FY 1997 report (Smith et al., 1998), and includes our results from CY 1997-1998 technical studies of radionuclide migration and isotope hydrology at the Nevada Test Site. During FY 1998, LLNL continued its efforts under the HRMP to pursue a technical agenda relevant to the science-based stockpile stewardship program at DOE/NV. Support to UGTA in FY 1998 included efforts to quantitatively define the radionuclide source term residual from underground nuclear weapons testing and the derivative solution, or hydrologic source

  3. Final Report: Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian David [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Houchins, Cassidy [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Huya-Kouadio, Jennie Moton [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); DeSantis, Daniel A. [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) has identified hydrogen storage as a key enabling technology for advancing hydrogen and fuel cell power technologies in transportation, stationary, and portable applications. Consequently, FCTO has established targets to chart the progress of developing and demonstrating viable hydrogen storage technologies for transportation and stationary applications. This cost assessment project supports the overall FCTO goals by identifying the current technology system components, performance levels, and manufacturing/assembly techniques most likely to lead to the lowest system storage cost. Furthermore, the project forecasts the cost of these systems at a variety of annual manufacturing rates to allow comparison to the overall 2017 and “Ultimate” DOE cost targets. The cost breakdown of the system components and manufacturing steps can then be used to guide future research and development (R&D) decisions. The project was led by Strategic Analysis Inc. (SA) and aided by Rajesh Ahluwalia and Thanh Hua from Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Lin Simpson at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Since SA coordinated the project activities of all three organizations, this report includes a technical description of all project activity. This report represents a summary of contract activities and findings under SA’s five year contract to the US Department of Energy (Award No. DE-EE0005253) and constitutes the “Final Scientific Report” deliverable. Project publications and presentations are listed in the Appendix.

  4. Non-destructive determination of trace elements. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.L.; Gordon, G.E.; Zoller, W.H.; Walters, W.B.; Lindstrom, R.M.

    1984-05-01

    In the course of this project we have successfully designed, built, and tested the first neutron beam facility dedicated to routine multielement neutron capture prompt-γ activation analysis (PGAA). This technique is capable of accurately measuring concentrations of up to 20 elements in a number of sample types, and is an extremely valuable complement to instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and other analytical methods. We have found PGAA to have some major advantages over INAA: (1) the sample is subjected to neutron fluxes about five orders of magnitude less than in PGAA, with essentially no radiation or heating damage; (2) as the data are taken during sample irradiation, analyses can be performed immediately instead of waiting up to four weeks as in INAA; (3) it is capable of measuring all major elements, except oxygen, in many samples, including H, C, N, and Si, which cannot be done by INAA; and (4) it is especially sensitive for the trace elements B, Cd, Sm and Gd. In addition, we have characterized the overall capabilities of PGAA and the corrections necessary to make it an extremely accurate technique. We have applied PGAA in a number of studies in which it has proved to be extremely valuable and, at times, even providing crucial information that other techniques were incapable of supplying. 1 fig., 6 tabs

  5. Progress in realistic LOCA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.Y.; Bajorek, S.M.; Ohkawa, K.

    2004-01-01

    In 1988 the USNRC revised the ECCS rule contained in Appendix K and Section 50.46 of 10 CFR Part 50, which governs the analysis of the Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The revised regulation allows the use of realistic computer models to calculate the loss of coolant accident. In addition, the new regulation allows the use of high probability estimates of peak cladding temperature (PCT), rather than upper bound estimates. Prior to this modification, the regulations were a prescriptive set of rules which defined what assumptions must be made about the plant initial conditions and how various physical processes should be modeled. The resulting analyses were highly conservative in their prediction of the performance of the ECCS, and placed tight constraints on core power distributions, ECCS set points and functional requirements, and surveillance and testing. These restrictions, if relaxed, will allow for additional economy, flexibility, and in some cases, improved reliability and safety as well. For example, additional economy and operating flexibility can be achieved by implementing several available core and fuel rod designs to increase fuel discharge burnup and reduce neutron flux on the reactor vessel. The benefits of application of best estimate methods to LOCA analyses have typically been associated with reductions in fuel costs, resulting from optimized fuel designs, or increased revenue from power upratings. Fuel cost savings are relatively easy to quantify, and have been estimated at several millions of dollars per cycle for an individual plant. Best estimate methods are also likely to contribute significantly to reductions in O and M costs, although these reductions are more difficult to quantify. Examples of O and M cost reductions are: 1) Delaying equipment replacement. With best estimate methods, LOCA is no longer a factor in limiting power levels for plants with high tube plugging levels or degraded safety injection systems. If other requirements for

  6. Glaucoma Monitoring in a Clinical Setting Glaucoma Progression Analysis vs Nonparametric Progression Analysis in the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, Christiaan; Heeg, Govert P.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    Objective: To compare prospectively 2 perimetric progression detection algorithms for glaucoma, the Early Manifest Glaucoma Trial algorithm (glaucoma progression analysis [GPA]) and a nonparametric algorithm applied to the mean deviation (MD) (nonparametric progression analysis [NPA]). Methods:

  7. Progress of electromagnetic analysis for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, T.; Ruatto, P.; Boccaccini, L.V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the recent progress of electromagnetic analysis research for fusion reactors including methods, codes, verification tests and some applications. Due to the necessity of the research effort for the structural design of large tokamak devices since the 1970's with the help of the introduction of new numerical methods and the advancement of computer technologies, three-dimensional analysis methods have become as practical as shell approximation methods. The electromagnetic analysis is now applied to the structural design of new fusion reactors. Some more modeling and verification tests are necessary when the codes are applied to new materials with nonlinear material properties. (orig.)

  8. Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas B. Kirchner

    2002-01-01

    in diameter and approximately 22 cm long. A thin ''marker layer'' of white soil was added to the top of each column followed by a thin layer of soil that had been spiked with 137Cs, cerium and lanthanum was applied to the surface. Approximately 900 cm of water (the equivalent of about 30 years of rainfall) was then applied at a rate of 3.2 L d-1. All of the activity contained in the soil core appeared to be in the top few mm of soil, i.e. there was virtually no movement of the 134Cs labeled particles. Finally, a library of object-oriented model components was created using Visual Basic to support the construction of contaminant transport models. These components greatly simplify the task of building 1- to 3- dimensional simulation models for risk assessment. The model components created under this funding were subsequently applied to help answer questions regarding risks from irrigation associated with potential releases from the Yucca Mountain waste repository

  9. Evolutionary Game Theory Analysis of Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Sturm, James; Austin, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Evolutionary game theory applied to two interacting cell populations can yield quantitative prediction of the future densities of the two cell populations based on the initial interaction terms. We will discuss how in a complex ecology that evolutionary game theory successfully predicts the future densities of strains of stromal and cancer cells (multiple myeloma), and discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression. Supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute.

  10. Exploiting Novel Radiation-Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Exploiting Novel Radiation -Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report Distribution...assess the effects of ionizing radiation on at least three classes of electromagnetic materials. The proposed approach for radiation detection was...that was desired to be monitored remotely. Microwave or low millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation would be used to interrogate the device

  11. Nano-Aptasensing in Mycotoxin Analysis: Recent Updates and Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Rhouati

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed an overwhelming integration of nanomaterials in the fabrication of biosensors. Nanomaterials have been incorporated with the objective to achieve better analytical figures of merit in terms of limit of detection, linear range, assays stability, low production cost, etc. Nanomaterials can act as immobilization support, signal amplifier, mediator and artificial enzyme label in the construction of aptasensors. We aim in this work to review the recent progress in mycotoxin analysis. This review emphasizes on the function of the different nanomaterials in aptasensors architecture. We subsequently relate their features to the analytical performance of the given aptasensor towards mycotoxins monitoring. In the same context, a critically analysis and level of success for each nano-aptasensing design will be discussed. Finally, current challenges in nano-aptasensing design for mycotoxin analysis will be highlighted.

  12. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, Stanton W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gotham, Douglas J. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Luciani, Ralph L. [Navigant Consultant Inc., Suwanee, GA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  13. The Michigan high-level radioactive waste program: Final technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report comprises the state of Michigan's final technical report on the location of a proposed high-level radioactive waste disposal site. Included are a list of Michigan's efforts to review the DOE proposal and a detailed report on the application of geographic information systems analysis techniques to the review process

  14. Site safety progress review of spent fuel central interim storage facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurpinar, A.; Serva, L.; Giuliani

    1995-01-01

    Following the request of the Czech Power Board (CEZ) and within the scope of the Technical Cooperation Project CZR/9/003, a progress review of the site safety of the Spent Fuel Central Interim Storage Facility (SFCISF) was performed. The review involved the first two stages of the works comprising the regional survey and identification of candidate sites for the underground and surface storage options. Five sites have been identified as a result of the previous works. The following two stages will involved the identification of the preferred candidate sites for the two options and the final site qualification. The present review had the purpose of assessing the work already performed and making recommendations for the next two stages of works

  15. Nonlinear Progressive Collapse Analysis Including Distributed Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Osama Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the effect of incorporating distributed plasticity in nonlinear analytical models used to assess the potential for progressive collapse of steel framed regular building structures. Emphasis on this paper is on the deformation response under the notionally removed column, in a typical Alternate Path (AP method. The AP method employed in this paper is based on the provisions of the Unified Facilities Criteria – Design of Buildings to Resist Progressive Collapse, developed and updated by the U.S. Department of Defense [1]. The AP method is often used for to assess the potential for progressive collapse of building structures that fall under Occupancy Category III or IV. A case study steel building is used to examine the effect of incorporating distributed plasticity, where moment frames were used on perimeter as well as the interior of the three dimensional structural system. It is concluded that the use of moment resisting frames within the structural system will enhance resistance to progressive collapse through ductile deformation response and that it is conserative to ignore the effects of distributed plasticity in determining peak displacement response under the notionally removed column.

  16. Systems analysis department annual progress report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohnheit, P.E.; Larsen, H.; Vestergaard, N.K.

    1987-02-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1986. The activities may be classified as energy systems analysis and risk and reliability analysis. The report includes a list of staff members. (author)

  17. Visual Progression Analysis of Student Records Data

    OpenAIRE

    Raji, Mohammad; Duggan, John; DeCotes, Blaise; Huang, Jian; Zanden, Bradley Vander

    2017-01-01

    University curriculum, both on a campus level and on a per-major level, are affected in a complex way by many decisions of many administrators and faculty over time. As universities across the United States share an urgency to significantly improve student success and success retention, there is a pressing need to better understand how the student population is progressing through the curriculum, and how to provide better supporting infrastructure and refine the curriculum for the purpose of ...

  18. Risk Analysis Group annual progress report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The activities of the Risk Analysis Group at Risoe during 1984 are presented. These include descriptions in some detail of work on general development topics and risk analysis performed as contractor. (author)

  19. Systems Analysis Department annual progress report 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risø National Laboratory during 1998. The department undertakes research within Energy Systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, IndustrialSafety and Reliability, Man/Machine Interac....../Machine Interaction, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members....

  20. Systems Analysis Department annual progress report 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risø National Laboratory during 1999. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Safety,Realiability and Human Factors, and Technology...

  1. Systems Analysis Department. Annual Progress Report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Loevborg, Leif [eds.

    2000-03-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1999. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning-UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and lists of publications, committees and staff members. (au)

  2. Systems Analysis department. Annual progress report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Petersen, Kurt E

    1998-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997. The department is undertaking research within Energy systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Industrial Safety and Reliability and Man/Machine Interaction. The report includes lists of publications lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 110 refs.

  3. Systems Analysis Department annual progress report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Loevborg, Leif [eds.

    1999-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1998. The department undertakes research within Energy Systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Industrial Safety and Reliability, Man/Machine Interaction and Technology Scenarios. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 111 refs.

  4. Progress report on the AMT analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, B.

    1992-01-01

    ICF Resources Incorporated's analysis of the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) has examined its effect on the US oil and gas industry from several different perspectives, to estimate the effect of the three relief proposals and to better understand the source of the outcry about the AMTs ''inequities.'' This report is a brief summary of the methodology and results to date. The complexity of the accounting mechanisms that comprise the AMT and the disparity between this analytical conclusions and clauses made by the oil and gas industry (principally the IPAA) have led this analysis through several distinct phases of: Project-level analysis; firm-level analysis; and demographic analysis. These analyses are described in detail

  5. Value-impact analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, M.; Dracup, J.A.; Erdmann, R.C.; Hughes, E.; vonHerrmann, J.

    1979-11-01

    This document represents a first step in the process of developing comprehensive value-impact methodology for the nuclear industry. It describes the development of the methodology and includes a discussion of the uses of cost-benefit or value-impact by other industries. This background is provided as a guide to the development of the methodology for the specific problems confronted by the nuclear industry. The use of benefit-cost analysis, or value-impact analysis, within the nuclear power industry has grown in recent years and is relied upon by both the regulatory community and the regulated industry. This report summarizes the state of the art of value-impact analysis as it affects these users. Relevant past experience in such fields as water resource development, transportation, environmental concerns, and health and medicine is reviewed. A critique of the applicability of existing value-impact analysis methods to nuclear safety decision problems is presented

  6. Errors of DWPF frit analysis: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    Glass frit will be a major raw material for the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The frit will be controlled by certificate of conformance and a confirmatory analysis from a commercial analytical laboratory. The following effort provides additional quantitative information on the variability of frit chemical analyses at two commercial laboratories. Identical samples of IDMS Frit 202 were chemically analyzed at two commercial laboratories and at three different times over a period of four months. The SRL-ADS analyses, after correction with the reference standard and normalization, provided confirmatory information, but did not detect the low silica level in one of the frit samples. A methodology utilizing elliptical limits for confirming the certificate of conformance or confirmatory analysis was introduced and recommended for use when the analysis values are close but not within the specification limits. It was also suggested that the lithia specification limits might be reduced as long as CELS is used to confirm the analysis

  7. Progress in spatial analysis methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Páez, Antonio; Buliung, Ron N; Dall'erba, Sandy

    2010-01-01

    This book brings together developments in spatial analysis techniques, including spatial statistics, econometrics, and spatial visualization, and applications to fields such as regional studies, transportation and land use, population and health.

  8. Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seright, R.S.; Liang, J.T.; Schrader, R.; Hagstrom, J. II; Liu, J.; Wavrik, K.

    1998-10-01

    In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of salt water are produced each year during oilfield operations. A tremendous economic incentive exists to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. This three-year research project had three objectives. The first objective was to identify chemical blocking agents that will (a) during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and with screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and (b) at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resistant breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients. The second objective was to identify schemes that optimize placement of the above blocking agents. The third objective was to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that to another phase (e.g., oil or gas). The authors also wanted to identify conditions that maximize this phenomenon. This project consisted of three tasks, each of which addressed one of the above objectives. This report describes work performed during the third and final period of the project. During this three-year project, they: (1) Developed a procedure and software for sizing gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells; (2) Developed a method (based on interwell tracer results) to determine the potential for applying gel treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs; (3) Characterized gel properties during extrusion through fractures; (4) Developed a method to predict gel placement in naturally fractured reservoirs; (5) Made progress in elucidating the mechanism for why some gels can reduce permeability to water more than that to oil; (6) Demonstrated the limitations of using water/oil ratio diagnostic plots to distinguish between channeling and coning; and (7) Proposed a philosophy for diagnosing and attacking water

  9. Thermoeconomic analysis of power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsatsaronis, G.; Winhold, M.

    1984-08-01

    In this report, the concept of exergy and the general methodology of the exergetic analysis and the thermoeconomic (combined exergetic and economic) analysis of energy conversion systems are presented. The THESIS (THermodynamic and Economc SImulation System) computer program used for these analyses is briefly described. Detailed mass, energy, exergy and money balances for a reference steam power plant (Harry Allen Station) are shown. The effect of the most important process parameters on the overall efficiency is investigated. A year-by-year and a levelized revenue requirement analysis are presented. The costs of exergy losses are compared with the capital costs and other expenses due to owning and operating each particular plant component. The question whether it is profitable to reduce the exergy losses by increasing these costs and vice versa is investigated. A cost sensitivity analysis including the effect of coal price and average annual capacity factor is performed. The methodology applied in this report appears to be useful in analyzing and evaluating energy conversion systems. The analyses presented here allow identification and evaluation of the inefficiencies and the opportunities for improvement of an energy conversion process. Results indicate that modifications in certain process parameters can lead to a decrease in the cost of electricity produced by the reference plant.

  10. Systems Analysis Department. Annual progress report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H; Olsson, C; Petersen, K E [eds.

    1997-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1996. The department is undertaking research within Simulation and Optimisation of Energy Systems, Energy and Environment in Developing Countries - UNEP Centre, Integrated Environmental and Risk Management and Man/Machine Interaction. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 131 refs.

  11. Final Technical Progress Report: Development of Low-Cost Suspension Heliostat; December 7, 2011 - December 6, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, W.

    2013-01-01

    Final technical progress report of SunShot Incubator Solaflect Energy. The project succeeded in demonstrating that the Solaflect Suspension Heliostat design is viable for large-scale CSP installations. Canting accuracy is acceptable and is continually improving as Solaflect improves its understanding of this design. Cost reduction initiatives were successful, and there are still many opportunities for further development and further cost reduction.

  12. Manpower analysis in transportation safety. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C.S.; Bowden, H.M.; Colford, C.A.; DeFilipps, P.J.; Dennis, J.D.; Ehlert, A.K.; Popkin, H.A.; Schrader, G.F.; Smith, Q.N.

    1977-05-01

    The project described provides a manpower review of national, state and local needs for safety skills, and projects future manning levels for transportation safety personnel in both the public and private sectors. Survey information revealed that there are currently approximately 121,000 persons employed directly in transportation safety occupations within the air carrier, highway and traffic safety, motor carrier, pipeline, rail carrier, and marine carrier transportation industry groups. The projected need for 1980 is over 145,000 of which over 80 percent will be in highway safety. An analysis of transportation tasks is included, and shows ten general categories about which the majority of safety activities are focused. A skills analysis shows a generally high level of educational background and several years of experience are required for most transportation safety jobs. An overall review of safety programs in the transportation industry is included, together with chapters on the individual transportation modes.

  13. Final report on the Pathway Analysis Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.

    1993-04-01

    The Pathway Analysis Task constituted one of several multi-laboratory efforts to estimate radiation doses to people, considering all important pathways of exposure, from the testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The primary goal of the Pathway Analysis Task was to predict radionuclide ingestion by residents of Utah, Nevada, and portions of seven other adjoining western states following radioactive fallout deposition from individual events at the NTS. This report provides comprehensive documentation of the activities and accomplishments of Colorado State University's Pathway Analysis Task during the entire period of support (1979--91). The history of the project will be summarized, indicating the principal dates and milestones, personnel involved, subcontractors, and budget information. Accomplishments, both primary and auxiliary, will be summarized with general results rather than technical details being emphasized. This will also serve as a guide to the reports and open literature publications produced, where the methodological details and specific results are documented. Selected examples of results on internal dose estimates are provided in this report because the data have not been published elsewhere

  14. Final report on the Pathway Analysis Task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The Pathway Analysis Task constituted one of several multi-laboratory efforts to estimate radiation doses to people, considering all important pathways of exposure, from the testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The primary goal of the Pathway Analysis Task was to predict radionuclide ingestion by residents of Utah, Nevada, and portions of seven other adjoining western states following radioactive fallout deposition from individual events at the NTS. This report provides comprehensive documentation of the activities and accomplishments of Colorado State University`s Pathway Analysis Task during the entire period of support (1979--91). The history of the project will be summarized, indicating the principal dates and milestones, personnel involved, subcontractors, and budget information. Accomplishments, both primary and auxiliary, will be summarized with general results rather than technical details being emphasized. This will also serve as a guide to the reports and open literature publications produced, where the methodological details and specific results are documented. Selected examples of results on internal dose estimates are provided in this report because the data have not been published elsewhere.

  15. Dynamics and vibrations progress in nonlinear analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kachapi, Seyed Habibollah Hashemi

    2014-01-01

    Dynamical and vibratory systems are basically an application of mathematics and applied sciences to the solution of real world problems. Before being able to solve real world problems, it is necessary to carefully study dynamical and vibratory systems and solve all available problems in case of linear and nonlinear equations using analytical and numerical methods. It is of great importance to study nonlinearity in dynamics and vibration; because almost all applied processes act nonlinearly, and on the other hand, nonlinear analysis of complex systems is one of the most important and complicated tasks, especially in engineering and applied sciences problems. There are probably a handful of books on nonlinear dynamics and vibrations analysis. Some of these books are written at a fundamental level that may not meet ambitious engineering program requirements. Others are specialized in certain fields of oscillatory systems, including modeling and simulations. In this book, we attempt to strike a balance between th...

  16. Biologic considerations in anatomic imaging with radionuclides. Final progress report, July 1974--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potchen, E.J.

    1975-01-01

    An important task relating to anatomic imaging with radionuclides is the determination of factors which effect the use of imaging procedures. This is important to reduce radiation exposure in the population, to improve the efficacy of diagnostic imaging procedures and finally to provide a basis for evaluating the potential effects of proposed regulation of use rates. In this report we describe a methodology for obtaining clinical data relating to the use of the brain scan in an inner city teaching hospital. The development of a questionnaire suitable for use in a clinical setting and providing both prospective and retrospective data is presented. The results of the use of the questionnaire at the Johns Hopkins Hospital during a three month period in 1974 are shown and discussed. Some preliminary results from these data are given and a method for further analysis is indicated

  17. High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting. Final Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

    2005-01-01

    In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 (micro)m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of ∼ 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light emitting diodes, and packaging them to produce a white light

  18. Rankine bottoming cycle safety analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowski, G.A.

    1980-02-01

    Vector Engineering Inc. conducted a safety and hazards analysis of three Rankine Bottoming Cycle Systems in public utility applications: a Thermo Electron system using Fluorinal-85 (a mixture of 85 mole % trifluoroethanol and 15 mole % water) as the working fluid; a Sundstrand system using toluene as the working fluid; and a Mechanical Technology system using steam and Freon-II as the working fluids. The properties of the working fluids considered are flammability, toxicity, and degradation, and the risks to both plant workers and the community at large are analyzed.

  19. Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC's Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available

  20. Organic analysis progress report FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.; Hoopes, V.; Mong, G.M.; Steele, R.; Bellofatto, D.; Sharma, A.

    1998-04-01

    The Organic Analysis and Methods Development Task is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of the Organic Tank Waste Safety Project. The objective of the task is to apply developed analytical methods to identify and/or quantify the amount of particular organic species in tank wastes. In addition, this task provides analytical support for the Gas Generation Studies Task, Waste Aging, and Solubility Studies. This report presents the results from analyses of tank waste samples archived at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and received from the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC), which included samples associated with both the Flammable Gas and Organic Tank Waste Safety Programs. The data are discussed in Section 2.0. In addition, the results of analytical support for analyzing (1) simulated wastes for Waste Aging, (2) tank waste samples for Gas Generation, and (3) simulated wastes associated with solubility studies discussed in Sections 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0, respectively. The latter part of FY 1997 was devoted to documenting the analytical procedures, including derivation gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/FID for quantitation, ion-pair chromatography (IPC), IC, and the cation exchange procedure for reducing the radioactivity of samples. The documentation of analytical procedures is included here and discussed in Section 6.0 and Section 7.0 discusses other analytical procedures. The references are listed in Section 8.0 and future plans are discussed in Section 9.0. Appendix A is a preprint of a manuscript accepted for publication. Appendix B contains the cc mail messages and chain-of-custody forms for the samples received for analyses. Appendix C contains the test plan for analysis of tank waste samples.

  1. Organic analysis progress report FY 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.; Hoopes, V.; Mong, G.M.; Steele, R.; Bellofatto, D.; Sharma, A.

    1998-04-01

    The Organic Analysis and Methods Development Task is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of the Organic Tank Waste Safety Project. The objective of the task is to apply developed analytical methods to identify and/or quantify the amount of particular organic species in tank wastes. In addition, this task provides analytical support for the Gas Generation Studies Task, Waste Aging, and Solubility Studies. This report presents the results from analyses of tank waste samples archived at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and received from the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC), which included samples associated with both the Flammable Gas and Organic Tank Waste Safety Programs. The data are discussed in Section 2.0. In addition, the results of analytical support for analyzing (1) simulated wastes for Waste Aging, (2) tank waste samples for Gas Generation, and (3) simulated wastes associated with solubility studies discussed in Sections 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0, respectively. The latter part of FY 1997 was devoted to documenting the analytical procedures, including derivation gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/FID for quantitation, ion-pair chromatography (IPC), IC, and the cation exchange procedure for reducing the radioactivity of samples. The documentation of analytical procedures is included here and discussed in Section 6.0 and Section 7.0 discusses other analytical procedures. The references are listed in Section 8.0 and future plans are discussed in Section 9.0. Appendix A is a preprint of a manuscript accepted for publication. Appendix B contains the cc mail messages and chain-of-custody forms for the samples received for analyses. Appendix C contains the test plan for analysis of tank waste samples

  2. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Bounds, John Alan; Brumby, Steven P.; Prasad, Lakshman; Sullivan, John P.

    2012-01-01

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  3. Applied Behavior Analysis Is a Science And, Therefore, Progressive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla; Ross, Robert K.; Smith, Tristram; Weiss, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a science and, therefore, involves progressive approaches and outcomes. In this commentary we argue that the spirit and the method of science should be maintained in order to avoid reductionist procedures, stifled innovation, and rote, unresponsive protocols that become increasingly removed from meaningful…

  4. Interactive reliability analysis project. FY 80 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmuson, D.M.; Shepherd, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress to date in the interactive reliability analysis project. Purpose is to develop and demonstrate a reliability and safety technique that can be incorporated early in the design process. Details are illustrated in a simple example of a reactor safety system

  5. FINAL Progress Report DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER15587

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Charles Buddie [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-11-03

    Catalysis Program - Viviane Schwartz Program Manager This Final Report discusses several archival journal articles that have been published that present and discuss the results that were discovered through this DOE grant.

  6. Development of Career Progression Systems for Employees in the Foodservice Industry. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Restaurant Association, Chicago, IL.

    Firms representing four segments of the foodservice industry (institutional foodservice (9 jobs), commercial restaurants (19 jobs), hotel foodservice (100 jobs), and airline foodservice (10 jobs), participated in a career and training study to test the feasibility of designing and implementing career progression (c.p.) systems within these…

  7. Ultraviolet irradiation of nucleic acids and related compounds. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: photohydration of pyrimidine derivatives; thymine dimerization; uv-induced formation of pyrimidinyl radicals; formation of a coupled product by irradiation of 5-bromouracil derivatives; studies on pyrimidine adducts; molecular aggregates-puddle formation hypothesis of pyrimidine photodimerization; and topochemical studies of structures of dimers and of crystalline arrangements

  8. Analysis of the Correlation between GDP and the Final Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin ANGHELACHE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the researches performed by the author regarding the evolution of Gross Domestic Product. One of the main aspects of GDP analysis is the correlation with the final consumption, an important macroeconomic indicator. The evolution of the Gross Domestic Product is highly influenced by the evolution of the final consumption. To analyze the correlation, the paper proposes the use of the linear regression model, as one of the most appropriate instruments for such scientific approach. The regression model described in the article uses the GDP as resultant variable and the final consumption as factorial variable.

  9. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado, Final Progress Report 14 February 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinney, E.R.

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 The results and progress of research funded by DOE grant number DOE-FG03-95ER40913 at the University of Colorado at Boulder is described. Includes work performed at the HERMES experiment at DESY to study the quark structure of the nucleon and the hadronization process in nuclei, as well as hadronic reactions studied at LAMPF, KEK, and Fermilab

  10. Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC): Final progress report, March 1, 1986-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    During this time, BCTIC packaged and disseminated computing technology and honored all requests made before September 1, 1986. The final month of operation was devoted to completing code requests, returning submitted codes, and sending out notices of BCTIC's termination of services on September 30th. Final BCTIC library listings were distributed to members of the active mailing list. Also included in the library listing are names and addresses of program authors and contributors in order that users may have continued support of their programs. The BCTIC library list is attached

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Progress of Linear Collider Final Focus Design and ATF2 Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei; Zimmermann, Frank; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    In this brief overview we will reflect on the process of the design of the linear collider (LC) final focus (FF) optics, and will also describe the theoretical and experimental efforts on design and practical realisation of a prototype of the LC FF optics implemented in the ATF2 facility at KEK, Japan, presently being commissioned and operated.

  12. Experimental Program Final Technical Progress Report: 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Edward R. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

    2014-09-12

    This is the final technical report of the grant DE-FG02-04ER41301 to the University of Colorado at Boulder entitled "Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics" and describes the results of our funded activities during the period 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012. These activities were primarily carried out at Fermilab, RHIC, and the German lab DESY. Significant advances in these experiments were carried out by members of the Colorado group and are described in detail.

  13. Medium-energy nuclear physics research. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1971-November 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, H.B.

    1981-01-01

    Final results are summarized for this program with the primary emphasis on measurement of ten independent parameters for proton-proton elastic scattering at 800 MeV and four independent such parameters at 650 MeV. Inelastic proton-proton reactions have also been measured at 800 MeV. Proton-deuteron elastic scattering cross sections and polarization analyzing powers have been obtained at 800 MeV. Proton-nucleus total and total reaction cross sections were measured at 700 MeV for a number of nuclei. Major instrumentation was designed and constructed to carry out this program

  14. [Research progresses of anabolic steroids analysis in doping control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yuanyuan; Wang, Dingzhong; Li, Ke'an; Liu, Feng

    2008-07-01

    Anabolic steroids, a kind of physiological active substance, are widely abused to improve athletic performance in human sports. They have been forbidden in sports by the International Olympic Committee since 1983. Since then, many researchers have been focusing their attentions on the establishment of reliable detection methods. In this paper, we review the research progresses of different analytical methods for anabolic steroids since 2002, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, immunoassay, electrochemistry analysis and mass spectrometry. The developing prospect of anabolic steroids analysis is also discussed.

  15. Relativistic analysis of four-body final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.

    1977-01-01

    The constraints of unitarity and analyticity on four-body final states are studied. It is shown that unitarity alone forces the amplitudes to be coherent and have singular behaviour. The implementation of unitarity with total energy analyticity yields a set of relativistic linear integral equations for the four-body amplitude. This is the minimal set consistent with quantum mechanics and also is the full dynamical set of equations with two-body separable interactions. These equations will provide important ingredients for the phenomenological analysis of four-body final states using the isobar model. (Auth.)

  16. Fusion reactor systems studies. Progress report for the period November 1, 1996--October 31, 1997, and final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Blanchard, J.P.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1997-08-01

    During FY97, the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute personnel have participated in the ARIES-RS and the ARIES-ST projects. The main areas of effort are: (1) neutronics analysis; (2) shielding of components and personnel; (3) neutron wall loading distribution; (4) radiation damage to in-vessel components; (5) components lifetimes; (6) embrittled materials designs issues; (7) stress and structural analysis; (8) activation, LOCA, and safety analysis; (9) support and fabrication of components; (10) vacuum system; and (11) maintenance. Progress made in these areas are summarized

  17. Fusion reactor systems studies. Progress report for the period November 1, 1996--October 31, 1997, and final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Blanchard, J.P.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1997-08-01

    During FY97, the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute personnel have participated in the ARIES-RS and the ARIES-ST projects. The main areas of effort are: (1) neutronics analysis; (2) shielding of components and personnel; (3) neutron wall loading distribution; (4) radiation damage to in-vessel components; (5) components lifetimes; (6) embrittled materials designs issues; (7) stress and structural analysis; (8) activation, LOCA, and safety analysis; (9) support and fabrication of components; (10) vacuum system; and (11) maintenance. Progress made in these areas are summarized.

  18. Applied quantum chemistry advanced laser development. Final progress report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, M.; Stevens, W.J.; Julienne, P.S.; Mies, F.H.

    1979-11-01

    The included summaries are divided into three categories. First, the theoretical analyses of Raman processes in intense fields are described. Second, the electronic structure calculations are presented with a brief description of pseudopotential code development. Third, the analysis of absorption processes, both collision-induced and photoionization, and energy transfer processes is presented

  19. Theoretical studies in nuclear structure. Final progress report, June 1, 1991--July 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshalek, E.R.

    1997-01-01

    The general purview of the project is the theory of collective motion in atomic nuclei. The chief aim is to elucidate the phenomena of (1) anharmonic multiphonon excitations, and (2) collective tilted rotation, both of which are topics of considerable current interest. In the primary stage of an investigation it is often necessary to develop appropriate mathematical tools, as was the case here. In the next stage, the formalism must be tested on simple soluble models. The work described here is mainly concerned with these two stages. The final stage of realistic applications will require more time, manpower and, of course, the necessary funding. Some planning for this last stage has been carried out and anticipated problems axe briefly discussed. As it turns out, both of the above topics can be approached within the unified framework of a theorem that I developed, called the Cranking Bifurcation Theorem (CBT) to be described below. The CBT can be regarded as an outgrowth of the boson expansion method, which provides a general, and, in principal, exact formalism for treating collective excitations. We begin with a brief discussion of the CBT and then continue on to the applications

  20. Light scattering studies of lower dimensional colloidal particle and critical fluid systems. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, W.J.; Mockler, R.C.

    1985-08-01

    We have completed a program of small angle scattering Rayleigh linewidth measurements on thin films of a 2,6-lutidine + water mixture. No statistically significant departures from three dimensional dynamic response were seen, although the conditions set by the theory of Calvo and Ferrell were met. We have applied digital image processing to evaluate fractal scale invariance in two dimensional particle aggregates arising from the induced coagulation of colloidal particle monolayer crystals. Our system gives us the capability of calculating the pair correlation function for both small and very large (2 x 10 4 particles) particle clusters. We find evidence of an apparent crossover between kinetic clustering aggregation at small distances (about 20 particle diameters) to percolation or gel/sol transition-behavior at large distances. This is evident in both isolated clusters and in final state ''giant'' aggregates. We are carrying through a parallel program of computer calculations whose motivation is to assess the sensitivity of experimental measures of self similarity to cluster size and image resolution, and to generate efficient algorithms which can be applied to calculate fractal ''critical exponents'' other than the Hausdorff dimension. We have succeeded in measuring the surface tension of a water surface covered by a colloidal particle monolayer crystal, in both its repulsive-dipole and close-packed van der Waals phases

  1. Probabilistic Accident Progression Analysis with application to a LMFBR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamali, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method for probabilistic analysis of accident sequences in nuclear power plant systems referred to as ''Probabilistic Accident Progression Analysis'' (PAPA) is described. Distinctive features of PAPA include: (1) definition and analysis of initiator-dependent accident sequences on the component level; (2) a new fault-tree simplification technique; (3) a new technique for assessment of the effect of uncertainties in the failure probabilities in the probabilistic ranking of accident sequences; (4) techniques for quantification of dependent failures of similar components, including an iterative technique for high-population components. The methodology is applied to the Shutdown Heat Removal System (SHRS) of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant during its short-term (0 -2 . Major contributors to this probability are the initiators loss of main feedwater system, loss of offsite power, and normal shutdown

  2. Progressive reduction of the thermal wall system by modal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, A.; Meslem, A.; Bounif, A.; Kadi, L. [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie, Oran (Algeria)

    1993-12-31

    A reduction method of thermal systems called ``progress`` using the modal Analysis is presented. It allows to do, at each time of simulation, a synthesis information in the system evolution. Consequently, the limited number of descriptive and significant parameters (proper modes), can produce some extremely useful indication about dynamic evolution. However this method can eliminate proper modes of which the energetic contribution will be neglected or amortized. Some examples were studied, showing the efficiency of this method by reducing the computing time, as well as, having high precision on predicted dynamic response over time of simulation. (Authors). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, Thomas B.

    2002-01-01

    in diameter and approximately 22 cm long. A thin ''marker layer'' of white soil was added to the top of each column followed by a thin layer of soil that had been spiked with 137Cs, cerium and lanthanum was applied to the surface. Approximately 900 cm of water (the equivalent of about 30 years of rainfall) was then applied at a rate of 3.2 L d-1. All of the activity contained in the soil core appeared to be in the top few mm of soil, i.e. there was virtually no movement of the 134Cs labeled particles. Finally, a library of object-oriented model components was created using Visual Basic to support the construction of contaminant transport models. These components greatly simplify the task of building 1- to 3- dimensional simulation models for risk assessment. The model components created under this funding were subsequently applied to help answer questions regarding risks from irrigation associated with potential releases from the Yucca Mountain waste repository

  4. Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas B. Kirchner

    2002-03-22

    in diameter and approximately 22 cm long. A thin ''marker layer'' of white soil was added to the top of each column followed by a thin layer of soil that had been spiked with 137Cs, cerium and lanthanum was applied to the surface. Approximately 900 cm of water (the equivalent of about 30 years of rainfall) was then applied at a rate of 3.2 L d-1. All of the activity contained in the soil core appeared to be in the top few mm of soil, i.e. there was virtually no movement of the 134Cs labeled particles. Finally, a library of object-oriented model components was created using Visual Basic to support the construction of contaminant transport models. These components greatly simplify the task of building 1- to 3- dimensional simulation models for risk assessment. The model components created under this funding were subsequently applied to help answer questions regarding risks from irrigation associated with potential releases from the Yucca Mountain waste repository.

  5. Novel catalysts for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Final technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.T.; Savage, P.E.; Briggs, D.E.

    1995-03-31

    Research described in this report was aimed at synthesizing and evaluating supported Mo oxynitrides and oxycarbides for the selective removal of nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen from model and authentic coal-derived liquids. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported oxynitrides and oxycarbides were synthesized via the temperature programmed reaction of supported molybdenum oxides or hydrogen bronzes with NH{sub 3} or an equimolar mixture of CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}. Phase constituents and composition were determined by X-ray diffraction, CHN analysis, and neutron activation analysis. Oxygen chemisorption was used to probe the surface structure of the catalysts. The reaction rate data was collected using specially designed micro-batch reactors. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Mo oxynitrides and oxycarbides were competitively active for quinoline hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), benzothiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and benzofuran hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). In fact, the HDN and HDO specific reaction rates for several of the oxynitrides and oxycarbides were higher than those of a commercial Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hydrotreatment catalyst. Furthermore, the product distributions indicated that the oxynitrides and oxycarbides were more hydrogen efficient than the sulfide catalysts. For HDN and HDS the catalytic activity was a strong inverse function of the Mo loading. In contrast, the benzofuran hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) activities did not appear to be affected by the Mo loading but were affected by the heating rate employed during nitridation or carburization. This observation suggested that HDN and HDS occurred on the same active sites while HDO was catalyzed by a different type of site.

  6. Technical basis for the ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR) is the 4th major milestone, representing the progress made in the ITER Engineering Design Activities. With the approval of the Detailed Design Report (DDR), the design work was concentrated on the requirements of operation, with only relatively minor changes to design concepts of major components. The FDR is the culmination of almost 6 years collaborative design and supporting technical work by the ITER Joint Central Team and Home Teams under the terms of the ITER EDA Agreement. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. Technical basis for the ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR) is the 4th major milestone, representing the progress made in the ITER Engineering Design Activities. With the approval of the Detailed Design Report (DDR), the design work was concentrated on the requirements of operation, with only relatively minor changes to design concepts of major components. The FDR is the culmination of almost 6 years collaborative design and supporting technical work by the ITER Joint Central Team and Home Teams under the terms of the ITER EDA Agreement

  8. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage

  9. Molecularly imprinted polymers for sample preparation and biosensing in food analysis: Progress and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashley, Jon; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Kant, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are biomimetics which can selectively bind to analytes of interest. One of the most interesting areas where MIPs have shown the biggest potential is food analysis. MIPs have found use as sorbents in sample preparation attributed to the high selectivity and high...... the imprinting methods which are applicable for imprinting food templates, summarize the recent progress in using MIPs for preparing and analysing food samples, and discuss the current limitations in the commercialisation of MIPs technology. Finally, future perspectives will be given....

  10. Fulvestrant plus palbociclib versus fulvestrant plus placebo for treatment of hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer that progressed on previous endocrine therapy (PALOMA-3): final analysis of the multicentre, double-blind, phase 3 randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofanilli, Massimo; Turner, Nicholas C; Bondarenko, Igor; Ro, Jungsil; Im, Seock-Ah; Masuda, Norikazu; Colleoni, Marco; DeMichele, Angela; Loi, Sherene; Verma, Sunil; Iwata, Hiroji; Harbeck, Nadia; Zhang, Ke; Theall, Kathy Puyana; Jiang, Yuqiu; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Koehler, Maria; Slamon, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    In the PALOMA-3 study, the combination of the CDK4 and CDK6 inhibitor palbociclib and fulvestrant was associated with significant improvements in progression-free survival compared with fulvestrant plus placebo in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Identification of patients most suitable for the addition of palbociclib to endocrine therapy after tumour recurrence is crucial for treatment optimisation in metastatic breast cancer. We aimed to confirm our earlier findings with this extended follow-up and show our results for subgroup and biomarker analyses. In this multicentre, double-blind, randomised phase 3 study, women aged 18 years or older with hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer that had progressed on previous endocrine therapy were stratified by sensitivity to previous hormonal therapy, menopausal status, and presence of visceral metastasis at 144 centres in 17 countries. Eligible patients-ie, any menopausal status, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, measurable disease or bone disease only, and disease relapse or progression after previous endocrine therapy for advanced disease during treatment or within 12 months of completion of adjuvant therapy-were randomly assigned (2:1) via a centralised interactive web-based and voice-based randomisation system to receive oral palbociclib (125 mg daily for 3 weeks followed by a week off over 28-day cycles) plus 500 mg fulvestrant (intramuscular injection on days 1 and 15 of cycle 1; then on day 1 of subsequent 28-day cycles) or placebo plus fulvestrant. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival. Analysis was by intention to treat. We also assessed endocrine therapy resistance by clinical parameters, quantitative hormone-receptor expression, and tumour PIK3CA mutational status in circulating DNA at baseline. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01942135. Between Oct 7, 2013, and Aug 26, 2014, 521 patients were

  11. [Experimental research in high energy physics: Final technical progress report, 1986--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the closeout report for DOE supported research in high energy physics for the period 1986--1992, under contract award AT03-86ER40249 at the Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP) at U.C. Santa Cruz. The research during this period consisted primarily of the following: Data taking with the MARK II detector at the SLC at SLAC and construction of a silicon vertex detector for the MARK II. This effort included substantial work on commissioning of the SLC accelerator. Preparation of the SLD experiment for the SLC, and initial data taking with this experiment. Participation in the ALEPH physics program at LEP at CERN in Geneva, with an emphasis on its silicon vertex detector. Analysis of data collected with the MARK III experiment at the SPEAR accelerator at SLAC. Electronics development for the leading proton spectrometer for the ZEUS experiment at DESY in Hamburg. Design, testing and physics studies for a silicon tracker for the SSC. Theoretical physics program emphasizing phenomenology, Higgs physics, supersymmetry, and some issues in cosmology

  12. Trastuzumab beyond progression: overall survival analysis of the GBG 26/BIG 3-05 phase III study in HER2-positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Minckwitz, Gunter; Schwedler, Kathrin; Schmidt, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Continuation of trastuzumab plus capecitabine (XH) showed a significantly improved overall response rate and time to progression compared with capecitabine (X) alone in women with HER2-positive breast cancer progressing during trastuzumab treatment. Here, we report the final analysis on overall...

  13. Hydrological flow analysis at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This final report, prepared by Hydro Geo Chem staff for Los Alamos National Laboratory, summarizes work conducted by the company under Subcontract 52OHHOOI 5-3G, which was terminated by LANL effective 7 February 1995 for practical reasons, in that responsibilities for all tasks in the Statement of Work had been transitioned to LANL employees. The ultimate objective of this work is to characterize the movement of subsurface water in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Data produced under this contract is to be used by the U.S. Department of Energy in its Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) to help determine hydrologic flows that may affect the performance of a potential nuclear waste,, repository. The data may be used in the licensing proceedings, and certain quality assurance procedures have thus been required. The work has focused on measuring the distribution of environmental tracers- chlorine-36, chlorine, and bromine-and on evaluating the depth to which these conservative solutes have percolated in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. The period of performance for the original Subcontract was I October 1994 to 31 December 1996. Obviously, we have not completed, nor are we expected to complete, all of the scope of work in the Subcontract. The following discussion summarizes progress made on the tasks outlined in the Statement of Work for this Subcontract Details of this work and all data acquired by Hydro Geo Chem for this Subcontract have, been systematically organized in logbooks and - laboratory notebooks (Appendices A and B). These documents have been structured to make it easy to trace the analytical history of a sample, from time of receipt to the final analytical results. The current status of this work and its relevance for the Yucca Mountain Project are described in a LANL report co-authored by Hydro Geo Chem staff

  14. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blann, M.

    1978-01-01

    A summary is given of the main contributions made under the subject contract. A list of publications resulting therefrom, conference addresses, and contributed papers is appended. Titles of Ph.D. theses, M.S. theses, and the names of students doing the work are also summarized

  15. Final Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.Y. Hwang; R.C. Greenlund

    2002-12-31

    Michigan Technological University has demonstrated major inroads in establishing the viability of utilizing aluminum smelting by-product waste materials in lightweight concrete product applications. The research identified key elements of producing various forms of lightweight concrete products through utilizing various procedures and mixture components with the by-product materials. A process was developed through pilot plant testing that results in additional aluminum recovery at finer sizes, a clean returnable salt product through spray drying technology, and a low-salt-content oxide product with enough aluminum metal content that it can be used to form lightweight cementitious mixtures. Having three distinct products aids in generating favorable process economics. Revenue projections from aluminum recovery and salt recovery are enough to cover processing costs and create a cost-free oxide product to market for lightweight concrete applications. This supply side commercialization strategy offers aluminum by-product recyclers a potentially no cost product, which has been demonstrated through this project to create desirable and marketable lightweight concrete products of various forms. Environmental benefits to the public are tremendous. At best, all dross and salt cake materials have the potential to be completely recycled and utilized. At worst, disposal sites would see a reduced amount of material: a post processed oxide product with little salt and no hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gas generating capability, which, if isolated from high alkali conditions, would pose no reactivity concerns. The US aluminum industry has historically, along with the steel industry, been a leader in recycling metal. The findings from this project, increased metal recovery, improved salt recycling, and demonstrated end uses for oxide residues, will go a long way in helping the aluminum industry obtain 100% material utilization and zero discharge.

  16. Scenario development and analysis in JNC'S second progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeki, H.; Makino, H.; Miyahara, K.; Naito, M.

    2001-01-01

    Scenario development and analysis is an integral part of the performance assessment in the JNC's second progress report which will be issued by the end of November 1999. A systematic approach has been elaborated to ensure traceability and transparency in overall context of the scenario development and set up of calculation cases for assessment of the repository performance. In this approach, the hierarchical FEP matrix was designed to flexibly identify FEPs at different level of detail. The reasoned argument with clearly defined criteria was then applied for screening and grouping of FEPs to define scenarios in the form of influence diagrams. Scenarios and calculation cases were developed based on the expected safety functions of disposal system and relationships with potential detrimental/favorable factors and perturbation factors. The process to develop scenarios and calculation cases are recorded and managed in a computer system. (authors)

  17. Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for Building 332, Increment III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odell, B. N.; Toy, Jr., A. J.

    1977-08-31

    This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) supplements the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), dated January 18, 1974, for Building 332, Increment III of the Plutonium Materials Engineering Facility located at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). The FSAR, in conjunction with the PSAR, shows that the completed increment provides facilities for safely conducting the operations as described. These documents satisfy the requirements of ERDA Manual Appendix 6101, Annex C, dated April 8, 1971. The format and content of this FSAR complies with the basic requirements of the letter of request from ERDA San to LLL, dated March 10, 1972. Included as appendices in support of th FSAR are the Building 332 Operational Safety Procedure and the LLL Disaster Control Plan.

  18. Progressive Damage and Failure Analysis of Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Ashith P. K.

    Composite materials are widely used in various industries for making structural parts due to higher strength to weight ratio, better fatigue life, corrosion resistance and material property tailorability. To fully exploit the capability of composites, it is required to know the load carrying capacity of the parts made of them. Unlike metals, composites are orthotropic in nature and fails in a complex manner under various loading conditions which makes it a hard problem to analyze. Lack of reliable and efficient failure analysis tools for composites have led industries to rely more on coupon and component level testing to estimate the design space. Due to the complex failure mechanisms, composite materials require a very large number of coupon level tests to fully characterize the behavior. This makes the entire testing process very time consuming and costly. The alternative is to use virtual testing tools which can predict the complex failure mechanisms accurately. This reduces the cost only to it's associated computational expenses making significant savings. Some of the most desired features in a virtual testing tool are - (1) Accurate representation of failure mechanism: Failure progression predicted by the virtual tool must be same as those observed in experiments. A tool has to be assessed based on the mechanisms it can capture. (2) Computational efficiency: The greatest advantages of a virtual tools are the savings in time and money and hence computational efficiency is one of the most needed features. (3) Applicability to a wide range of problems: Structural parts are subjected to a variety of loading conditions including static, dynamic and fatigue conditions. A good virtual testing tool should be able to make good predictions for all these different loading conditions. The aim of this PhD thesis is to develop a computational tool which can model the progressive failure of composite laminates under different quasi-static loading conditions. The analysis

  19. EVNTRE, Code System for Event Progression Analysis for PRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: EVNTRE is a generalized event tree processor that was developed for use in probabilistic risk analysis of severe accident progressions for nuclear power plants. The general nature of EVNTRE makes it applicable to a wide variety of analyses that involve the investigation of a progression of events which lead to a large number of sets of conditions or scenarios. EVNTRE efficiently processes large, complex event trees. It can assign probabilities to event tree branch points in several different ways, classify pathways or outcomes into user-specified groupings, and sample input distributions of probabilities and parameters. PSTEVNT, a post-processor program used to sort and reclassify the 'binned' data output from EVNTRE and generate summary tables, is included. 2 - Methods: EVNTRE processes event trees that are cast in the form of questions or events, with multiple choice answers for each question. Split fractions (probabilities or frequencies that sum to unity) are either supplied or calculated for the branches of each question in a path-dependent manner. EVNTRE traverses the tree, enumerating the leaves of the tree and calculating their probabilities or frequencies based upon the initial probability or frequency and the split fractions for the branches taken along the corresponding path to an individual leaf. The questions in the event tree are usually grouped to address specific phases of time regimes in the progression of the scenario or severe accident. Grouping or binning of each path through the event tree in terms of a small number of characteristics or attributes is allowed. Boolean expressions of the branches taken are used to select the appropriate values of the characteristics of interest for the given path. Typically, the user specifies a cutoff tolerance for the frequency of a pathway to terminate further exploration. Multiple sets of input to an event tree can be processed by using Monte Carlo sampling to generate

  20. Final Test Analysis of Post Graduate Medical Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Arab

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Multiple choice questions are the most frequent test for medical students. It is important to analysis the overall response to individual  questions in the test.The aim of this study is to analyse questions of post graduate medical residency  tests.Methods: Final annual local (Ramadan medical school and national tests given to three Residency groups  including  17 Obstetrics  and gynecology testees,  7 pediatrics  and  12 internal  medicine  in 2004 were studied. In local tests residents answered to 148, 150 and 144 and in national  tests to ISO MCQS. Questions were  evaluated regarding cognitive domain level, Difficultly index and Discriminative index  and finally to evaluate  the optimal,  proper, acceptable and  ''must  omitted" questions.Results: Questions of local Obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics and internal medicine tests evaluated the "recall" level in 72%, 72% and 51% and in national  tests 71%,  35% and 19%,  respectively. Questions  with  Discriminative indices  of 0.7 or more (proper  were 3 and  5% in  Obstetrics  and gynecology, 3.5% and 1% in pediatrics and 1% in local and national tests. Proper difficulty indices (30-70  were shown in 53% and 54% in Obstetrics  and gynecology, 34% and 43% in pediatrics and 40% and  42% in internal  medicine.  Generally  evaluating,  "must  omitted" questions in local and national tests were 76% in Obstetrics and gynecology, 81% and 79% in pediatrics and 91% and 85% in internal medicine. The most common causes making the questions to be considered  "must omitted" in studied tests were negative, zero or less than 0.2 Discriminative indices.Conclusion: Test analysis  of final  annual  local  (Ramadan medical  school  and national  tests  of Obstetrics  and gynecology, Pediatrics and internal medicine residency  programs  in 2004 revealed that most of the questions  are planned  in  "recall" level, harbor  improper

  1. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  2. Using of BEPU methodology in a final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, Francine; Sabundjian, Gaiane; D'auria, Francesco; Madeira, Alzira A.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) has been established since the discovery of nuclear fission, and the occurrence of accidents in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide has contributed for its improvement. The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) must contain complete information concerning safety of the plant and plant site, and must be seen as a compendium of NRS. The FSAR integrates both the licensing requirements and the analytical techniques. The analytical techniques can be applied by using a realistic approach, addressing the uncertainties of the results. This work aims to show an overview of the main analytical techniques that can be applied with a Best Estimated Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) methodology, which is 'the best one can do', as well as the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle. Moreover, the paper intends to demonstrate the background of the licensing process through the main licensing requirements. (author)

  3. Analysis of sea water by difference chromatography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangelsdorf, P.C. Jr.

    1977-02-01

    During the final period of this research contract the principal results obtained were: (a) the development of anion analysis by difference chromatography to the extent that SO/sub 4//sup =//Cl/sup -/ can be determined to better than 0.1 percent using an 0.5 ml seawater sample, (b) the determination of the ion-exchange cation complements of a variety of sediments in river water and in seawater, and (c) the discovery of a simple technique for the qualitative removal of NH/sub 4//sup +/ from seawater samples without altering the ratios of the other cations. This method supersedes the use of Cu-Chelex which has proved impossible to sustain.

  4. Using of BEPU methodology in a final safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, Francine; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: fmenzel@ipen.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); D' auria, Francesco, E-mail: f.dauria@ing.unipi.it [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Gruppo di Ricerca Nucleare San Piero a Grado (GRNSPG), Pisa (Italy); Madeira, Alzira A., E-mail: alzira@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) has been established since the discovery of nuclear fission, and the occurrence of accidents in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide has contributed for its improvement. The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) must contain complete information concerning safety of the plant and plant site, and must be seen as a compendium of NRS. The FSAR integrates both the licensing requirements and the analytical techniques. The analytical techniques can be applied by using a realistic approach, addressing the uncertainties of the results. This work aims to show an overview of the main analytical techniques that can be applied with a Best Estimated Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) methodology, which is 'the best one can do', as well as the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle. Moreover, the paper intends to demonstrate the background of the licensing process through the main licensing requirements. (author)

  5. Final report on progress of grant ''Few-nucleon systems in the laboratory, supernovae, and the cosmos''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Daniel R.

    2006-01-01

    In the past year I have pursued work in three different areas within the scope of my Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator Award ''Few-nucleon systems in the laboratory, supernovae, and the cosmos''. The first, and main, focus of my research has been testing the usefulness of effective field theory (EFT) in describing Compton scattering for different targets: the proton, deuterium, and Helium-3. This has been where the bulk of my OJI effort has been dedicated in the past twelve months, and thus it is the longest section of this report. Secondly, I have been working on the application of EFT to the reaction π - d → γnn. Finally, I have also been involved in a non-EFT project: computing certain many-body effects which affect the neutrino cooling of neutron stars and supernovae. In what follows I first describe my work in each of these areas. I then discuss unexpended funds, and the students who have been supported under the aegis of this project, as well as listing publications, talks, etc. associated with this grant in 2004-05. This report describes progress made on research projects associated with my Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator grant

  6. Aquatic Toxic Analysis by Monitoring Fish Behavior Using Computer Vision: A Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlei Xia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Video tracking based biological early warning system achieved a great progress with advanced computer vision and machine learning methods. Ability of video tracking of multiple biological organisms has been largely improved in recent years. Video based behavioral monitoring has become a common tool for acquiring quantified behavioral data for aquatic risk assessment. Investigation of behavioral responses under chemical and environmental stress has been boosted by rapidly developed machine learning and artificial intelligence. In this paper, we introduce the fundamental of video tracking and present the pioneer works in precise tracking of a group of individuals in 2D and 3D space. Technical and practical issues suffered in video tracking are explained. Subsequently, the toxic analysis based on fish behavioral data is summarized. Frequently used computational methods and machine learning are explained with their applications in aquatic toxicity detection and abnormal pattern analysis. Finally, advantages of recent developed deep learning approach in toxic prediction are presented.

  7. Diffusion tensor analysis of corpus callosum in progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Shoichi; Makino, Takahiro; Shirai, Wakako; Hattori, Takamichi [Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disease featuring parkinsonism, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, dysphagia, and frontal lobe dysfunction. The corpus callosum which consists of many commissure fibers probably reflects cerebral cortical function. Several previous reports showed atrophy or diffusion abnormalities of anterior corpus callosum in PSP patients, but partitioning method used in these studies was based on data obtained in nonhuman primates. In this study, we performed a diffusion tensor analysis using a new partitioning method for the human corpus callosum. Seven consecutive patients with PSP were compared with 29 age-matched patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) and 19 age-matched healthy control subjects. All subjects underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and the corpus callosum was partitioned into five areas on the mid-sagittal plane according to a recently established topography of human corpus callosum (CC1-prefrontal area, CC2-premotor and supplementary motor area, CC3-motor area, CC4-sensory area, CC5-parietal, temporal, and occipital area). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured in each area and differences between groups were analyzed. In the PSP group, FA values were significantly decreased in CC1 and CC2, and ADC values were significantly increased in CC1 and CC2. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed excellent reliability of FA and ADC analyses of CC1 for differentiating PSP from PD. The anterior corpus callosum corresponding to the prefrontal, premotor, and supplementary motor cortices is affected in PSP patients. This analysis can be an additional test for further confirmation of the diagnosis of PSP.

  8. Diffusion tensor analysis of corpus callosum in progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shoichi; Makino, Takahiro; Shirai, Wakako; Hattori, Takamichi

    2008-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disease featuring parkinsonism, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, dysphagia, and frontal lobe dysfunction. The corpus callosum which consists of many commissure fibers probably reflects cerebral cortical function. Several previous reports showed atrophy or diffusion abnormalities of anterior corpus callosum in PSP patients, but partitioning method used in these studies was based on data obtained in nonhuman primates. In this study, we performed a diffusion tensor analysis using a new partitioning method for the human corpus callosum. Seven consecutive patients with PSP were compared with 29 age-matched patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) and 19 age-matched healthy control subjects. All subjects underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and the corpus callosum was partitioned into five areas on the mid-sagittal plane according to a recently established topography of human corpus callosum (CC1-prefrontal area, CC2-premotor and supplementary motor area, CC3-motor area, CC4-sensory area, CC5-parietal, temporal, and occipital area). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured in each area and differences between groups were analyzed. In the PSP group, FA values were significantly decreased in CC1 and CC2, and ADC values were significantly increased in CC1 and CC2. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed excellent reliability of FA and ADC analyses of CC1 for differentiating PSP from PD. The anterior corpus callosum corresponding to the prefrontal, premotor, and supplementary motor cortices is affected in PSP patients. This analysis can be an additional test for further confirmation of the diagnosis of PSP

  9. A Portfolio Analysis Tool for Measuring NASAs Aeronautics Research Progress toward Planned Strategic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Pearce, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Description of a tool for portfolio analysis of NASA's Aeronautics research progress toward planned community strategic Outcomes is presented. The strategic planning process for determining the community Outcomes is also briefly described. Stakeholder buy-in, partnership performance, progress of supporting Technical Challenges, and enablement forecast are used as the criteria for evaluating progress toward Outcomes. A few illustrative examples are also presented.

  10. 10 CFR 52.157 - Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; technical information in final safety analysis report. The application must contain a final safety analysis... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report. 52.157 Section 52.157 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES...

  11. M. V. Arctic midbody damage analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-03-01

    The Canadian Coast Guard vessel Arctic experienced several damages in the midbody area during the 1983 season. A complete survey of these damages was undertaken and showed that one of these damages was the most extensive and occurred in an ice strengthened area having 24 mm thick shell plating. This was considered to be representative of all other midbody damages and was therefore selected to be analysed in this study. The computer program ADINA was employed in order to carry out the non-linear analysis required into the plasticity and large deformation areas of behaviour. Two finite element models were developed and run. These two models representing an intermediate frame and web frame, were considered sufficient to predict the behaviour of the structure and the associated ice loads and pressures. The objectives of this study were to understand the progression of failure for the typical ice strengthened side shell structure of the ship (this would include a prediction of the first yield and a history of the deflections in the plastic range) and, using the data so determined, predict the most likely pressures and loads which caused the damage. It was concluded that the intermediate frames represent the weakest element of the midbody side structure. It yields first at its flange-web intersection at an ice pressure of 1.13 megapascals (MPa), reaches it fully plastic capacity at 1.75 MPa, and the corresponding shell plating then becomes fully plastic at about 2.25 MPa. The damage investigated corresponds to ice pressure of about 3.65 MPa over an area of 1.85 m/sup 2/. 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 72

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantt, D. A.

    1992-08-01

    This document provides the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 72 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) FSAR set. This amendment change incorporates Engineering Change Notices issued subsequent to Amendment 71 and approved for incorporation before June 24, 1992. These include changes in: Chapter 2, Site Characteristics; Chapter 3, Design Criteria Structures, Equipment, and Systems; Chapter 5B, Reactor Coolant System; Chapter 7, Instrumentation and Control Systems; Chapter 8, Electrical Systems - The description of the Class 1E, 125 Vdc systems is updated for the higher capacity of the newly installed, replacement batteries; Chapter 9, Auxiliary Systems - The description of the inert cell NASA systems is corrected to list the correct number of spare sample points; Chapter 11, Reactor Refueling System; Chapter 12, Radiation Protection and Waste Management; Chapter 13, Conduct of Operations; Chapter 16, Quality Assurance; Chapter 17, Technical Specifications; Chapter 19, FFTF Fire Specifications for Fire Detection, Alarm, and Protection Systems; Chapter 20, FFTF Criticality Specifications; and Appendix B, Primary Piping Integrity Evaluation.

  13. Analysis of Member State RED implementation. Final Report (Task 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, D.; Alberici, S.; Toop, G. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kretschmer, B. [Institute for European Environmental Policy IEEP, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    This report describes the way EU Member States have transposed the sustainability and chain of custody requirements for biofuels as laid down in the Renewable Energy Directive (RED) and Fuel Quality Directive (FQD). In the assessment of Member States' implementation, the report mainly focuses on effectiveness and administrative burden. Have Member States transposed the Directives in such a way that compliance with the sustainability criteria can be ensured as effectively as possible? To what extent does the Member States' implementation lead to unnecessary administrative burden for economic operators in the (bio)fuel supply chain? The report focuses specifically on the transposition of the sustainability and chain of custody requirements, not on the target for renewables on transport. This means that for example the double counting provision is not included as part of the scope of this report. This report starts with an introduction covering the implementation of the Renewable Energy (and Fuel Quality) Directive into national legislation, the methodology by which Member States were assessed against effectiveness and administrative burden and the categorisation of Member State's national systems for RED-implementation (Chapter 1). The report continues with a high level description of each Member State system assessed (Chapter 2). Following this, the report includes analysis of the Member States on the effectiveness and administrative burden of a number of key ('major') measures (Chapter 3). The final chapter presents the conclusions and recommendations (Chapter 4)

  14. Assessment of Intralaminar Progressive Damage and Failure Analysis Using an Efficient Evaluation Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Imran; Schaefer, Joseph; Justusson, Brian; Wanthal, Steve; Leone, Frank; Rose, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    Reducing the timeline for development and certification for composite structures has been a long standing objective of the aerospace industry. This timeline can be further exacerbated when attempting to integrate new fiber-reinforced composite materials due to the large number of testing required at every level of design. computational progressive damage and failure analysis (PDFA) attempts to mitigate this effect; however, new PDFA methods have been slow to be adopted in industry since material model evaluation techniques have not been fully defined. This study presents an efficient evaluation framework which uses a piecewise verification and validation (V&V) approach for PDFA methods. Specifically, the framework is applied to evaluate PDFA research codes within the context of intralaminar damage. Methods are incrementally taken through various V&V exercises specifically tailored to study PDFA intralaminar damage modeling capability. Finally, methods are evaluated against a defined set of success criteria to highlight successes and limitations.

  15. [Geothermal system temperature-depth database and model for data analysis]. 5. quarterly technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1998-04-25

    During this first quarter of the second year of the contract activity has involved several different tasks. The author has continued to work on three tasks most intensively during this quarter: the task of implementing the data base for geothermal system temperature-depth, the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and finally the development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. The author has completed the task of developing a data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth data that can be used in conjunction with the regional data base that he had already developed and is now implementing it. Progress is described.

  16. Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0080 TITLE: Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer . PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer . 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER GRANT11489...institutional, NIH-funded study of genetic and epigenetic alterations of pre-invasive DCIS that did or did not progress to invasive breast cancer , with an

  17. 10 CFR 52.79 - Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; technical information in final safety analysis report. (a) The application must contain a final safety... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report. 52.79 Section 52.79 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES...

  18. Analysis Of The Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite

  19. Analysis of the Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm- 243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite

  20. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 6F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.; Shine, G.

    2012-06-28

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite

  1. Analysis of the Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm- 243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite

  2. Analysis Of The Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

    2012-09-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.

    2012-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  4. Analysis Of The Tank 5F Final Characterization Samples-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2012-09-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  5. Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for recurrent or progressive glioblastoma. Final report of a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, M.; Diletto, B.; Chiesa, S.; D' Agostino, G.R.; Gambacorta, M.A.; Ferro, M.; Valentini, V. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rome (Italy); Colosimo, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Maira, G.; Anile, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    Evaluated in this study were the feasibility and the efficacy of concurrent low dose fractionated radiotherapy (LD-FRT) and chemotherapy as palliative treatment for recurrent/progressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Eligible patients had recurrent or progressive GBM, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, prior surgery, and standard radiochemotherapy treatment. Recurrence/progression disease during temozolomide (TMZ) received cisplatin (CDDP; 30 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, 15), fotemustine (FTM; 40 mg/m{sup 2} on days 2, 9, 16), and concurrent LD-FRT (0.3 Gy twice daily); recurrence/progression after 4 months from the end of adjuvant TMZ were treated by TMZ (150/200 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5) concomitant with LD-FRT (0.4 Gy twice daily). Primary endpoints were safety and toxicity. A total of 32 patients were enrolled. Hematologic toxicity G1-2 was observed in 18.7% of patients and G3-4 in 9.4%. One patient (3.1%) had complete response, 3 (9.4%) had partial response, 8 (25%) had stable disease for at least 8 weeks, while 20 patients (62.5%) experienced progressive disease. The clinical benefit was 37.5%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5 and 8 months, respectively. Survival rate at 12 months was of 27.8%. LD-FRT and chemotherapy for recurrent/progressive GBM have a good toxicity profile and clinical outcomes, even though further investigation of this novel palliative treatment approach is warranted. (orig.)

  6. Thermodynamic Activity-Based Progress Curve Analysis in Enzyme Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiss, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    Macrokinetic Michaelis-Menten models based on thermodynamic activity provide insights into enzyme kinetics because they separate substrate-enzyme from substrate-solvent interactions. Kinetic parameters are estimated from experimental progress curves of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Three pitfalls are discussed: deviations between thermodynamic and concentration-based models, product effects on the substrate activity coefficient, and product inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of interventional therapy for progressing stage gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mingde; Zhang Zijing; Ji Hongsheng; Ge Chenlin; Hao Gang; Wei Kongming; Yuan Yuhou; Zhao Xiuping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the interventional therapy and its curative effect for progressing stage gastric cancer. Methods: two hundred and twelve patients with progressing stage gastric cancer were treated with arterial perfusion and arterial embolization. Gastric cardia cancer was treated through the left gastric artery and the left inferior phrenic artery or splenic artery. Cancers of lesser and greater gastric curvature was treated either through the left and right gastric arteries or common hepatic artery or through gastroduodenal artery, right gastroomental artery or splenic artery. Gastric antrum cancers were perfused through gastroduodenal artery or after the middle segmental embolization of right gastroomental artery. Results: One hundred and ninety three cases undergone interventional management were followed up. The CR + PR of gastric cardia cancer was 53.13%; gastric body cancer 44.44%; gastric antrum cancer 10%; recurrent cancer and remnant gastric cancer 0. There was no significant difference in outcome between gastric cardia cancer and gastric body cancer (P>0.05) but significant differences were shown both between gastric cardia cancer and gastric antrum cancer, and between gastric body cancer and gastric antrum cancer (P<0.05), with 1 year and 2 years survival rates of 81% and 56% respectively. Conclusion: The interventional therapeutic effect of progressing stage gastric cancers is different due to the different sites of the lesions in the gastric tissue. The curative effect of gastric cardia cancer and gastric body cancer is better than that of gastric antrum cancer, recurrent cancer and remnant gastric cancer. (authors)

  8. Programs for Children with Specific Learning Disabilities. P.L. 91-230, Title VI-G Formal Final Evaluation. (Statistical Analysis of Data).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Philip J.

    The paper reports the final evaluation of a program for approximately 143 learning disabled (LD) students (grades 6-to-12) from six school districts. A number of test instruments were used to evaluate student progress during the program, including the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT), the Durrell Analysis of Reading Difficulty, and the…

  9. Final Technical Progress Report; Closeout Certifications; CSSV Newsletter Volume I; CSSV Newsletter Volume II; CSSV Activity Journal; CSSV Final Financial Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, Johnny L [PI; Geter, Kerry [Division of Business and Finance

    2013-08-23

    This Project?s third year of implementation in 2007-2008, the final year, as designated by Elizabeth City State University (ECSU), in cooperation with the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM) Inc., in an effort to promote research and research training programs in computational science ? scientific visualization (CSSV). A major goal of the Project was to attract the energetic and productive faculty, graduate and upper division undergraduate students of diverse ethnicities to a program that investigates science and computational science issues of long-term interest to the Department of Energy (DoE) and the nation. The breadth and depth of computational science?scientific visualization and the magnitude of resources available are enormous for permitting a variety of research activities. ECSU?s Computational Science-Science Visualization Center will serve as a conduit for directing users to these enormous resources.

  10. Progress on radiochemical analysis for nuclear waste management in decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Center for Nuclear Technologies (NuTech), Roskilde (Denmark))

    2012-01-15

    This report summarized the progress in the development and improvement of radioanalytical methods for decommissioning and waste management completed in the NKS-B RadWaste 2011 project. Based on the overview information of the analytical methods in Nordic laboratories and requirement from the nuclear industry provided in the first phase of the RadWaste project (2010), some methods were improved and developed. A method for efficiently separation of Nb from nuclear waste especially metals for measurement of long-lived 94Nb by gamma spectrometry was developed. By systematic investigation of behaviours of technetium in sample treatment and chromatographic separation process, an effective method was developed for the determination of low level 99Tc in waste samples. An AMS approachment was investigated to measure ultra low level 237Np using 242Pu for AMS normalization, the preliminary results show a high potential of this method. Some progress on characterization of waste for decommissioning of Danish DR3 is also presented. (Author)

  11. Progress on radiochemical analysis for nuclear waste management in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, X.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarized the progress in the development and improvement of radioanalytical methods for decommissioning and waste management completed in the NKS-B RadWaste 2011 project. Based on the overview information of the analytical methods in Nordic laboratories and requirement from the nuclear industry provided in the first phase of the RadWaste project (2010), some methods were improved and developed. A method for efficiently separation of Nb from nuclear waste especially metals for measurement of long-lived 94Nb by gamma spectrometry was developed. By systematic investigation of behaviours of technetium in sample treatment and chromatographic separation process, an effective method was developed for the determination of low level 99Tc in waste samples. An AMS approachment was investigated to measure ultra low level 237Np using 242Pu for AMS normalization, the preliminary results show a high potential of this method. Some progress on characterization of waste for decommissioning of Danish DR3 is also presented. (Author)

  12. Progress in the NNPDF global analysis and the impact of the legacy HERA combination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojo, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The H1 and ZEUS collaborations have recently presented their final results for the combination of inclusive cross-section measurements taken during Run I and Run II at the HERA collider. In this contribution, following an overview of recent progress in the NNPDF framework, we quantify the impact of

  13. Molecularly imprinted polymers for sample preparation and biosensing in food analysis: Progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Jon; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Kant, Krishna; Chidambara, Vinayaka Aaydha; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong; Sun, Yi

    2017-05-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are biomimetics which can selectively bind to analytes of interest. One of the most interesting areas where MIPs have shown the biggest potential is food analysis. MIPs have found use as sorbents in sample preparation attributed to the high selectivity and high loading capacity. MIPs have been intensively employed in classical solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction. More recently, MIPs have been combined with magnetic bead extraction, which greatly simplifies sample handling procedures. Studies have consistently shown that MIPs can effectively minimize complex food matrix effects, and improve recoveries and detection limits. In addition to sample preparation, MIPs have also been viewed as promising alternatives to bio-receptors due to the inherent molecular recognition abilities and the high stability in harsh chemical and physical conditions. MIPs have been utilized as receptors in biosensing platforms such as electrochemical, optical and mass biosensors to detect various analytes in food. In this review, we will discuss the current state-of-the-art of MIP synthesis and applications in the context of food analysis. We will highlight the imprinting methods which are applicable for imprinting food templates, summarize the recent progress in using MIPs for preparing and analysing food samples, and discuss the current limitations in the commercialisation of MIPs technology. Finally, future perspectives will be given. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutron activation analysis of final molasses from cuban sugar industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, J.; Gonzalez, E.; Rosenberg, R.J.; Diaz-Rizo, O.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and epithermal non-destructive activation analyses have been performed on samples of final molasses from 14 different sugar factories , covering the most important regions in Cuba. From the first measurement after irradiation at the Triga Mark reactor (VTT), the concentration of more than 15 elements is reported. The almost constant elemental composition shows that they can be used equally for different purposes as animal foodstuff and for the manufacture of biotechnological products. This work is part of a research project developed in order to establish a complete characterization of Cuban sugar molasses. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Hierarchical cluster analysis of progression patterns in open-angle glaucoma patients with medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyoung Won; Rho, Seungsoo; Lee, Hye Sun; Lee, Naeun; Hong, Samin; Seong, Gong Je; Sung, Kyung Rim; Kim, Chan Yun

    2014-04-29

    To classify medically treated open-angle glaucoma (OAG) by the pattern of progression using hierarchical cluster analysis, and to determine OAG progression characteristics by comparing clusters. Ninety-five eyes of 95 OAG patients who received medical treatment, and who had undergone visual field (VF) testing at least once per year for 5 or more years. OAG was classified into subgroups using hierarchical cluster analysis based on the following five variables: baseline mean deviation (MD), baseline visual field index (VFI), MD slope, VFI slope, and Glaucoma Progression Analysis (GPA) printout. After that, other parameters were compared between clusters. Two clusters were made after a hierarchical cluster analysis. Cluster 1 showed -4.06 ± 2.43 dB baseline MD, 92.58% ± 6.27% baseline VFI, -0.28 ± 0.38 dB per year MD slope, -0.52% ± 0.81% per year VFI slope, and all "no progression" cases in GPA printout, whereas cluster 2 showed -8.68 ± 3.81 baseline MD, 77.54 ± 12.98 baseline VFI, -0.72 ± 0.55 MD slope, -2.22 ± 1.89 VFI slope, and seven "possible" and four "likely" progression cases in GPA printout. There were no significant differences in age, sex, mean IOP, central corneal thickness, and axial length between clusters. However, cluster 2 included more high-tension glaucoma patients and used a greater number of antiglaucoma eye drops significantly compared with cluster 1. Hierarchical cluster analysis of progression patterns divided OAG into slow and fast progression groups, evidenced by assessing the parameters of glaucomatous progression in VF testing. In the fast progression group, the prevalence of high-tension glaucoma was greater and the number of antiglaucoma medications administered was increased versus the slow progression group. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  16. Gender-Based Analysis On-Line Dialogue. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    An online dialogue on gender-based analysis (GBA) was held from February 15 to March 7, 2001. Invitations and a background paper titled "Why Gender-Based Analysis?" were sent to 350 women's organizations and individuals throughout Canada. Efforts were made to ensure that aboriginal and Metis women, visible minority women, and women with…

  17. Final design and progress of WEAVE : the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott; Abrams, Don Carlos; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Middleton, Kevin; Benn, Chris; Dee, Kevin; Sayède, Frédéric; Lewis, Ian; Pragt, Johannes; Pico, Sergio; Walton, Nic; Rey, Jeurg; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Peñate, José; Lhome, Emilie; Agócs, Tibor; Alonso, José; Terrett, David; Brock, Matthew; Gilbert, James; Schallig, Ellen; Ridings, Andy; Guinouard, Isabelle; Verheijen, Marc; Tosh, Ian; Rogers, Kevin; Lee, Martin; Steele, Iain; Stuik, Remko; Tromp, Niels; Jaskó, Attila; Carrasco, Esperanza; Farcas, Szigfrid; Kragt, Jan; Lesman, Dirk; Kroes, Gabby; Mottram, Chris; Bates, Stuart; Rodriguez, Luis Fernando; Gribbin, Frank; Delgado, José Miguel; Herreros, José Miguel; Martin, Carlos; Cano, Diego; Navarro, Ramon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Jim; Gonzalez Solares, Eduardo; Murphy, David; Worley, Clare; Bassom, Richard; O'Mahoney, Neil; Bianco, Andrea; Zurita, Christina; ter Horst, Rik; Molinari, Emilio; Lodi, Marcello; Guerra, José; Martin, Adrian; Vallenari, Antonella; Salasnich, Bernardo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Jin, Shoko; Hill, Vanessa; Smith, Dan; Drew, Janet; Poggianti, Bianca; Pieri, Mat; Dominquez Palmero, Lillian; Farina, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    We present the Final Design of the WEAVE next-generation spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), together with a status update on the details of manufacturing, integration and the overall project schedule now that all the major fabrication contracts are in place. We also

  18. Final design and progress of WEAVE: the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott; Abrams, Don Carlos; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Middleton, Kevin; Benn, Chris; Dee, Kevin; Sayède, Frédéric; Lewis, Ian; Pragt, Johannes; Pico, Sergio; Walton, Nic; Rey, Jeurg; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Peñate, José; Lhome, Emilie; Agócs, Tibor; Alonso, José; Terrett, David; Brock, Matthew; Gilbert, James; Schallig, Ellen; Ridings, Andy; Guinouard, Isabelle; Verheijen, Marc; Tosh, Ian; Rogers, Kevin; Lee, Martin; Steele, Iain; Stuik, Remko; Tromp, Niels; Jaskó, Attila; Carrasco, Esperanza; Farcas, Szigfrid; Kragt, Jan; Lesman, Dirk; Kroes, Gabby; Mottram, Chris; Bates, Stuart; Rodriguez, Luis Fernando; Gribbin, Frank; Delgado, José Miguel; Herreros, José Miguel; Martin, Carlos; Cano, Diego; Navarro, Ramon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Jim; Gonzalez Solares, Eduardo; Murphy, David; Worley, Clare; Bassom, Richard; O'Mahoney, Neil; Bianco, Andrea; Zurita, Christina; ter Horst, Rik; Molinari, Emilio; Lodi, Marcello; Guerra, José; Martin, Adrian; Vallenari, Antonella; Salasnich, Bernardo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Jin, Shoko; Hill, Vanessa; Smith, Dan; Drew, Janet; Poggianti, Bianca; Pieri, Mat; Dominquez Palmero, Lillian; Farina, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    We present the Final Design of the WEAVE next-generation spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), together with a status update on the details of manufacturing, integration and the overall project schedule now that all the major fabrication contracts are in place. We also

  19. Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

    1978-07-01

    This appendix contains a brief summary of a detailed description of alternative future energy scenarios which provide an overall backdrop for the photovoltaic venture analysis. Also included is a summary of a photovoltaic market/demand workshop, a summary of a photovoltaic supply workshop which used cross-impact analysis, and a report on photovoltaic array and system prices in 1982 and 1986. The results of a sectorial demand analysis for photovoltaic power systems used in the residential sector (single family homes), the service, commercial, and institutional sector (schools), and in the central power sector are presented. An analysis of photovoltaics in the electric utility market is given, and a report on the industrialization of photovoltaic systems is included. A DOE information memorandum regarding ''A Strategy for a Multi-Year Procurement Initiative on Photovoltaics (ACTS No. ET-002)'' is also included. (WHK)

  20. A comparative policy analysis of seat belt laws : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-24

    This analysis examined data from a variety of sources to estimate the benefit of enhancing Iowas current law to require all : passengers to use seat belts. In addition to assessing Iowans opinions about changing the law, a literature review, a ...

  1. Electric vehicle life cycle cost analysis : final research project report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This project compared total life cycle costs of battery electric vehicles (BEV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), and vehicles with internal combustion engines (ICE). The analysis considered capital and operati...

  2. Systems Analysis of NASA Aviation Safety Program: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sharon M.; Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Evans, Joni K.; Barr, Lawrence; Leone, Karen

    2013-01-01

    A three-month study (February to April 2010) of the NASA Aviation Safety (AvSafe) program was conducted. This study comprised three components: (1) a statistical analysis of currently available civilian subsonic aircraft data from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS) system to identify any significant or overlooked aviation safety issues; (2) a high-level qualitative identification of future safety risks, with an assessment of the potential impact of the NASA AvSafe research on the National Airspace System (NAS) based on these risks; and (3) a detailed, top-down analysis of the NASA AvSafe program using an established and peer-reviewed systems analysis methodology. The statistical analysis identified the top aviation "tall poles" based on NTSB accident and FAA incident data from 1997 to 2006. A separate examination of medical helicopter accidents in the United States was also conducted. Multiple external sources were used to develop a compilation of ten "tall poles" in future safety issues/risks. The top-down analysis of the AvSafe was conducted by using a modification of the Gibson methodology. Of the 17 challenging safety issues that were identified, 11 were directly addressed by the AvSafe program research portfolio.

  3. HBV genome analysis in the progression of HBV related chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruksana Raihan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although HBV is a non-cytopathic virus, alteration of viral genome may also alter host immunity and may play a part in the pathogenesis LC and HCC. During the last decade, various studies have shown that mutations in the HBV genome may play a role in HCC pathogenesis. Here, we have analyzed HBV genome from patients with asymptomatic HBV carrier [ASC], chronic hepatitis B (CHB, cirrhosis of liver (LC, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC of Bangladeshi origin. A total of 225 patients tested positive for HBV with different stages of chronic HBV infection were enrolled in this study. The extent of liver damages were assayed by estimating serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, serum bilirubin and finally by abdominal ultrasonography and/or fine needle aspiration cytology. Wherever required, cancer marker like alpha fetoprotein (AFP was assessed. HBV genotype was evaluated by immunoassays and sequenced. A total of 25 patients were ASC, 135 were CHB and 65 were LC and HCC. Among ASC patients, 5, 7 and 13 belonged to HBV genotype A, C, and D, respectively. On the other hand, HBV genotype C was most prevalent in CHB patients (about 42%, followed by HBV genotype D (36%. About 69% patients with LC and HCC also had genotype C. Full genomic analysis of sera of patients with progressive liver damages (LC and HCC revealed mutations at HBeAg promoter regions in more than 80% patients. However, mutations in this region were mostly unseen in ASC and patients with less progressive liver diseases. HBV genotype was found quite different in Bangladeshi HBV patients which seem a mixture of Indian and Asia-Pacific region. This study also reveals that HBeAg promoter region mutation may have role in development of HBV related LC and HCC.

  4. Progress risk assessment of oral premalignant lesions with saliva miRNA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ya; Li, Yue-xiu; Yang, Xi; Jiang, Long; Zhou, Zuo-jun; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer develops through multi-stages: from normal to mild (low grade) dysplasia (LGD), moderate dysplasia, and severe (high grade) dysplasia (HGD), to carcinoma in situ (CIS) and finally invasive oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC). Clinical and histological assessments are not reliable in predicting which precursor lesions will progress. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of a noninvasive approach to assess progress risk of oral precancerous lesions. We first used microRNA microarray to profile progressing LGD oral premaligant lesions (OPLs) from non-progressing LGD OPLs in order to explore the possible microRNAs deregulated in low grade OPLs which later progressed to HGD or OSCC. We then used RT-qPCR to detect miRNA targets from the microarray results in saliva samples of these patients. We identified a specific miRNA signature that is aberrantly expressed in progressing oral LGD leukoplakias. Similar expression patterns were detected in saliva samples from these patients. These results show promise for using saliva miRNA signature for monitoring of cancer precursor lesions and early detection of disease progression

  5. Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

    1978-07-01

    A description of the integrating model for photovoltaic venture analysis is given; input assumptions for the model are described; and the integrating model program listing is given. The integrating model is an explicit representation of the interactions between photovoltaic markets and supply under alternative sets of assumptions. It provides a consistent way of assembling and integrating the various assumptions, data, and information that have been obtained on photovoltaic systems supply and demand factors. Secondly, it provides a mechanism for understanding the implications of all the interacting assumptions. By representing the assumptions in a common, explicit framework, much more complex interactions can be considered than are possible intuitively. The integrating model therefore provides a way of examining the relative importance of different assumptions, parameters, and inputs through sensitivity analysis. Also, detailed results of model sensitivity analysis and detailed market and systems information are presented. (WHK)

  6. Progress and challenges in the development and qualification of multi-level multi-physics coupled methodologies for reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.; Avramova, M.

    2007-01-01

    Current trends in nuclear power generation and regulation as well as the design of next generation reactor concepts along with the continuing computer technology progress stimulate the development, qualification and application of multi-physics multi-scale coupled code systems. The efforts have been focused on extending the analysis capabilities by coupling models, which simulate different phenomena or system components, as well as on refining the scale and level of detail of the coupling. This paper reviews the progress made in this area and outlines the remaining challenges. The discussion is illustrated with examples based on neutronics/thermohydraulics coupling in the reactor core modeling. In both fields recent advances and developments are towards more physics-based high-fidelity simulations, which require implementation of improved and flexible coupling methodologies. First, the progresses in coupling of different physics codes along with the advances in multi-level techniques for coupled code simulations are discussed. Second, the issues related to the consistent qualification of coupled multi-physics and multi-scale code systems for design and safety evaluation are presented. The increased importance of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are discussed along with approaches to propagate the uncertainty quantification between the codes. The incoming OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) benchmark is the first international activity to address this issue and it is described in the paper. Finally, the remaining challenges with multi-physics coupling are outlined. (authors)

  7. Progress and challenges in the development and qualification of multi-level multi-physics coupled methodologies for reactor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, K.; Avramova, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Current trends in nuclear power generation and regulation as well as the design of next generation reactor concepts along with the continuing computer technology progress stimulate the development, qualification and application of multi-physics multi-scale coupled code systems. The efforts have been focused on extending the analysis capabilities by coupling models, which simulate different phenomena or system components, as well as on refining the scale and level of detail of the coupling. This paper reviews the progress made in this area and outlines the remaining challenges. The discussion is illustrated with examples based on neutronics/thermohydraulics coupling in the reactor core modeling. In both fields recent advances and developments are towards more physics-based high-fidelity simulations, which require implementation of improved and flexible coupling methodologies. First, the progresses in coupling of different physics codes along with the advances in multi-level techniques for coupled code simulations are discussed. Second, the issues related to the consistent qualification of coupled multi-physics and multi-scale code systems for design and safety evaluation are presented. The increased importance of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are discussed along with approaches to propagate the uncertainty quantification between the codes. The incoming OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) benchmark is the first international activity to address this issue and it is described in the paper. Finally, the remaining challenges with multi-physics coupling are outlined. (authors)

  8. Final Progress Report for Collaborative Research: Aging of Black Carbon during Atmospheric Transport: Understanding Results from the DOE’s 2010 CARES and 2012 ClearfLo Campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzoleni, Claudio [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Subramanian, R. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Over the course of this project, we have analyzed data and samples from the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Clear air for London (ClearfLo) campaign, as well as conducted or participated in laboratory experiments designed to better understand black carbon mixing state and climate-relevant properties. The laboratory campaigns took place at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Carnegie Mellon University to study various climate-relevant aerosol properties of different sources of soot mixing with secondary organic aerosol precursors. Results from some of these activities were summarized in the previous progress report. This final report presents the manuscripts that have been published (many in the period since the last progress report), lists presentations at different conferences based on grant-related activities, and presents some results that are likely to be submitted for publication in the near future.

  9. Fast flux test facility final safety analysis report amendment 79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautel, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    This document is provided to replace, remove, or add applicable pages to the chapters on: Heat Transport System; Containment and Structures; Auxiliary Systems; Reactor Refueling System; Conduct of Operations; Safety Analysis; Quality Assurance; FFTF Criticality Specifications; and Appendix H's TRIGA Fuel Storage System

  10. GUIDELINES FOR TRAINING SITUATION ANALYSIS (TSA). FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHENZOFF, ANDREW P.; FOLLEY, JOHN D., JR.

    THESE GUIDELINES REPRESENT A TEXTBOOK FOR INSTRUCTION IN THREE PHASES OF TRAINING SITUATION ANALYSIS (TSA), A STANDARDIZED PROCEDURE DEVELOPED BY THE NAVAL TRAINING DEVICE CENTER FOR SYSTEMATICALLY GATHERING AND INTERPRETING THE INFORMATION RELEVANT TO THE PLANNING OF TRAINING AND TRAINING DEVICES. THREE PHASES OF TSA ARE DESCRIBED IN…

  11. Final Report: Hydrogen Production Pathways Cost Analysis (2013 – 2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian David [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); DeSantis, Daniel Allan [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This report summarizes work conducted under a three year Department of Energy (DOE) funded project to Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) to analyze multiple hydrogen (H2) production technologies and project their corresponding levelized production cost of H2. The analysis was conducted using the H2A Hydrogen Analysis Tool developed by the DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The project was led by SA but conducted in close collaboration with the NREL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In-depth techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five different H2 production methods was conducted. These TEAs developed projections for capital costs, fuel/feedstock usage, energy usage, indirect capital costs, land usage, labor requirements, and other parameters, for each H2 production pathway, and use the resulting cost and system parameters as inputs into the H2A discounted cash flow model to project the production cost of H2 ($/kgH2). Five technologies were analyzed as part of the project and are summarized in this report: Proton Exchange Membrane technology (PEM), High temperature solid oxide electrolysis cell technology (SOEC), Dark fermentation of biomass for H2 production, H2 production via Monolithic Piston-Type Reactors with rapid swing reforming and regeneration reactions, and Reformer-Electrolyzer-Purifier (REP) technology developed by Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. (FCE).

  12. Defect analysis program for LOFT. Progress report, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, R.E.; Scoonover, T.M.

    1978-03-01

    In order to alleviate problems encountered while performing previous defect analyses on components of the LOFT system, regions of LOFT most likely to require defect analysis have been identified. A review of available documentation has been conducted to identify shapes, sizes, materials, and welding procedures and to compile mechanical property data. The LOFT Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program has also been reviewed, and a survey of available literature describing existing techniques for conducting elastic-plastic defect analysis was initiated. While large amounts of mechanical property data were obtained from the available documentation and the literature, much information was not available, especially for weld heat-affected zones. Therefore, a program of mechanical property testing is recommended for FY-78 as well as continued literature search. It is also recommended that fatigue-crack growth-rate data be sought from the literature and that evaluation of the various techniques of elastic-plastic defect analysis be continued. Review of additional regions of the LOFT system in the context of potential defect analysis will be conducted as time permits

  13. Progress in structural analysis of glycosaminoglycans and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-06

    Mar 6, 2012 ... The rising interest in the application of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is ... in functional food, clinical medicine, cosmetics and biomaterial. .... labor leads to incomplete hydrolysis and lower results. In ... GAG are spectrum analysis combined with enzymolysis ... spectrometry (ESI-FTMS), and nuclear magnetic.

  14. Progress of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis (I) - reactor physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Jeong, Chang Joon; Roh, Gyu Hong; Rhee, Bo Wook; Park, Jee Won

    2003-12-01

    Since 1992, the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor fuel in CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) has been studied as an alternative to the once-through fuel cycle. The DUPIC fuel cycle study is focused on the technical feasibility analysis, the fabrication of DUPIC fuels for irradiation tests and the demonstration of the DUPIC fuel performance. The feasibility analysis was conducted for the compatibility of the DUPIC fuel with existing CANDU-6 reactors from the viewpoints of reactor physics, reactor safety, fuel cycle economics, etc. This study has summarized the intermediate results of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis, which includes the CANDU reactor physics design requirements, DUPIC fuel core physics design method, performance of the DUPIC fuel core, regional overpower trip setpoint, and the CANDU primary shielding. The physics analysis showed that the CANDU-6 reactor can accommodate the DUPIC fuel without deteriorating the physics design requirements by adjusting the fuel management scheme if the fissile content of the DUPIC fuel is tightly controlled.

  15. Progressive-Ratio Schedules and Applied Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Establishing appropriate relations between the basic and applied areas of behavior analysis has been of long and persistent interest to the author. In this article, the author illustrates that there is a direct relation between how hard an organism will work for access to an object or activity, as indexed by the largest ratio completed under a…

  16. Progress in fusion reactors blanket analysis and evaluation at CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, E.; Gervaise, F.; Carre, F.; Chevereau, G.; Doutriaux, D.

    1986-09-01

    In the frame of the recent CEA studies aiming at the development, evaluation and comparison of solid breeder blanket concepts in view of their adaptation to NET, the evaluation of specific questions related to the first wall design, the present paper examines first the performances of a helium cooled toroidal blanket design for NET, based on innovative Beryllium/Ceramics breeder rod elements. Neutronic and thermo-mechanical optimisation converges on a concept featured by a breeding capability in excess of 1.2, a reasonnable pumping power of 1% and a narrow breeder temperature range (470+-30 deg C of the breeder), the latter being largely independent of the power level. This design proves naturally adapted to ceramic breeder assigned to very strict working conditions, and provides for any change in the thermal and heat transfer characteristics over the blanket lifetime. The final section of the paper is devoted to the evaluation of the heat load poloidal distribution and to the irradiation effects on first wall structural materials

  17. Final report : Occupational gap analysis, volume 2 Wood Buffalo region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    The general economy of the Wood Buffalo region of Alberta has improved in recent years due to the expansion of the oil sand industry. Many of the oil sands projects are situated in the southern part of the region and are serviced out of Lac LaBiche. This paper examines the implications of this economic growth for the regional supply and demand of workers in key occupational categories. In particular, it projects employment opportunities that are directly attributed to the regional economic expansion, and assesses whether there will be an adequate supply of workers to meet the demand for new and replacement employees. The report includes: an overview of the regional economy; a population forecast for the region and the demand for workers in selected occupations; an analysis of whether or not the new labour force entrants will choose the selected occupations; and, a supply and demand analysis. 7 tabs., 2 figs., 5 appendices

  18. Calcium determination in bone by proton activation analysis. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.; Adelstein, S.

    1974-01-01

    The incidence of post-menopausal osteoporosis in almost epidemic proportions makes the early diagnosis and development of effective therapy a matter of considerable concern. Current status of the project is reviewed and new applications of calcium determination by in vivo proton activation analysis are discussed. The proton activation method promises to give precise and reproducible measurements of calcium content for a single vertebra or several vertebrae in vivo. By controlling the number and energy of protons incident on a vertebra and by accurately detecting the number of 2.17 MeV gamma rays emitted, one may determine the 40Ca content. The proton technique offers advantages by directly measuring calcium in a very well-defined region. On-going studies by the construction of a lead shield for in vivo counting and for the analysis of the results are also given

  19. Vertically integrated analysis of human DNA. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, M.

    1997-10-01

    This project has been oriented toward improving the vertical integration of the sequential steps associated with the large-scale analysis of human DNA. The central focus has been on an approach to the preparation of {open_quotes}sequence-ready{close_quotes} maps, which is referred to as multiple-complete-digest (MCD) mapping, primarily directed at cosmid clones. MCD mapping relies on simple experimental steps, supported by advanced image-analysis and map-assembly software, to produce extremely accurate restriction-site and clone-overlap maps. We believe that MCD mapping is one of the few high-resolution mapping systems that has the potential for high-level automation. Successful automation of this process would be a landmark event in genome analysis. Once other higher organisms, paving the way for cost-effective sequencing of these genomes. Critically, MCD mapping has the potential to provide built-in quality control for sequencing accuracy and to make possible a highly integrated end product even if there are large numbers of discontinuities in the actual sequence.

  20. Handbook of Basic Tables for Chemical Analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, T.J.; Svoronos, P.D.N.

    1988-04-01

    This work began as a slim booklet prepared by one of the authors (TJB) to accompany a course on chemical instrumentation presented at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder Laboratories. The booklet contained tables on chromatography, spectroscopy, and chemical (wet) methods, and was intended to provide the students with enough basic data to design their own analytical methods and procedures. Shortly thereafter, with the co-authorship of Prof. Paris D. N. Svoronos, it was expanded into a more-extensive compilation entitled Basic Tables for Chemical Analysis, published as National Bureau of Standards Technical Note 1096. That work has now been expanded and updated into the present body of tables. Although there have been considerable changes since the first version of these tables, the aim has remained essentially the same. The authors have tried to provide a single source of information for those practicing scientists and research students who must use various aspects of chemical analysis in their work. In this respect, it is geared less toward the researcher in analytical chemistry than to those practitioners in other chemical disciplines who must have routine use of chemical analysis

  1. Sensitivity analysis of the reactor safety study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, W.J.; Rasmussen, N.C.; Hinkle, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Study (RSS) or Wash 1400 developed a methodology estimating the public risk from light water nuclear reactors. In order to give further insights into this study, a sensitivity analysis has been performed to determine the significant contributors to risk for both the PWR and BWR. The sensitivity to variation of the point values of the failure probabilities reported in the RSS was determined for the safety systems identified therein, as well as for many of the generic classes from which individual failures contributed to system failures. Increasing as well as decreasing point values were considered. An analysis of the sensitivity to increasing uncertainty in system failure probabilities was also performed. The sensitivity parameters chosen were release category probabilities, core melt probability, and the risk parameters of early fatalities, latent cancers and total property damage. The latter three are adequate for describing all public risks identified in the RSS. The results indicate reductions of public risk by less than a factor of two for factor reductions in system or generic failure probabilities as high as one hundred. There also appears to be more benefit in monitoring the most sensitive systems to verify adherence to RSS failure rates than to backfitting present reactors. The sensitivity analysis results do indicate, however, possible benefits in reducing human error rates

  2. [Progress on Determination and Analysis of Zopiclone in Biological Samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, C X; Gong, D; Zhang, L P; Zhao, J X

    2017-12-01

    As a new hypnotic, zopiclone is widely used in clinical treatment. There are many methods for determination of zopiclone, including spectrophotometry, chromatography and chromatography mass spectrum, etc. Present paper reviews different kinds of biological samples associated with zopiclone, extraction and purification methods, and determination and analysis methods, which aims to provide references for the relevant research and practice. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine.

  3. PROGRESS IN SIFT-MS: BREATH ANALYSIS AND OTHER APPLICATIONS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 2 (2011), s. 236-267 ISSN 0277-7037 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA4/124; GA ČR GA202/09/0800; GA ČR GA203/09/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : SIFT-MS * breath analysis * ion flow tube Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 10.461, year: 2011

  4. Recent progress on HYSPEC, and its polarization analysis capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winn Barry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HYSPEC is a high-intensity, direct-geometry time-of-flight spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, optimized for measurement of excitations in small single-crystal specimens with optional polarization analysis capabilities. The incident neutron beam is monochromated using a Fermi chopper with short, straight blades, and is then vertically focused by Bragg scattering onto the sample position by either a highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (unpolarized or a Heusler (polarized crystal array. Neutrons are detected by a bank of 3He tubes that can be positioned over a wide range of scattering angles about the sample axis. HYSPEC entered the user program in February 2013 for unpolarized experiments, and is already experiencing a vibrant research program. Polarization analysis will be accomplished by using the Heusler crystal array to polarize the incident beam, and either a 3He spin filter or a supermirror wide-angle polarization analyser to analyse the scattered beam. The 3He spin filter employs the spin-exchange optical pumping technique. A 60∘ wide angle 3He cell that matches the detector coverage will be used for polarization analysis. The polarized gas in the post-sample wide angle cell is designed to be periodically and automatically refreshed with an adjustable pressure of polarized gas, optically pumped in a separate cell and then transferred to the wide angle cell. The supermirror analyser has 960 supermirror polarizers distributed over 60∘, and has been characterized at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source. The current status of the instrument and the development of its polarization analysis capabilities are presented.

  5. Scalable data management, analysis and visualization (SDAV) Institute. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States)

    2017-03-28

    The purpose of the SDAV institute is to provide tools and expertise in scientific data management, analysis, and visualization to DOE’s application scientists. Our goal is to actively work with application teams to assist them in achieving breakthrough science, and to provide technical solutions in the data management, analysis, and visualization regimes that are broadly used by the computational science community. Over the last 5 years members of our institute worked directly with application scientists and DOE leadership-class facilities to assist them by applying the best tools and technologies at our disposal. We also enhanced our tools based on input from scientists on their needs. Many of the applications we have been working with are based on connections with scientists established in previous years. However, we contacted additional scientists though our outreach activities, as well as engaging application teams running on leading DOE computing systems. Our approach is to employ an evolutionary development and deployment process: first considering the application of existing tools, followed by the customization necessary for each particular application, and then the deployment in real frameworks and infrastructures. The institute is organized into three areas, each with area leaders, who keep track of progress, engagement of application scientists, and results. The areas are: (1) Data Management, (2) Data Analysis, and (3) Visualization. Kitware has been involved in the Visualization area. This report covers Kitware’s contributions over the last 5 years (February 2012 – February 2017). For details on the work performed by the SDAV institute as a whole, please see the SDAV final report.

  6. Heavy-ion interactions of deformed nuclei. Progress report and final report, January 1, 1985-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.

    1985-09-01

    This Progress Report describes the main topics that were investigated during the reporting period: (1) a new microscopic approach (many-body theory with two-center shell model basis) to the calculation of heavy-ion interaction potentials, primarily for heavy systems; (2) dynamic alignment of deformed nuclei during heavy-ion collisions; (3) the role of shell effects, static deformation and dynamic alignment in heavy-ion fusion reactions; (4) giant nuclear quasimolecules and the positron problem. The proposed research has direct relevance to experimental programs supported by DOE, e.g. the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge, the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory, the Double MP Tandem at Brookhaven and some of the smaller University-based accelerators. A discussion of a review article on Coulomb fission is presented. 36 refs., 7 figs

  7. The AP600 advanced simplified nuclear power plant. Results of the test program and progress made toward final design approval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    At the 1994 Pacific Basin Conference, Mr. Bruschi presented a paper describing the AP600, Westinghouse's advanced light water reactor design with passive safety features. Since then, a rigorous test program was completed and AP600 became the most thoroughly tested advanced reactor system design in history. Westinghouse is now well on its way toward receiving Final Design Approval from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for AP600. In this paper, the results of the test program will be discussed and an update on prospects for building the plant will be covered. (author)

  8. The AP600 advanced simplified nuclear power plant. Results of the test program and progress made toward final design approval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruschi, H.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    At the 1994 Pacific Basin Conference, Mr. Bruschi presented a paper describing the AP600, Westinghouse`s advanced light water reactor design with passive safety features. Since then, a rigorous test program was completed and AP600 became the most thoroughly tested advanced reactor system design in history. Westinghouse is now well on its way toward receiving Final Design Approval from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for AP600. In this paper, the results of the test program will be discussed and an update on prospects for building the plant will be covered. (author)

  9. Upgrade Uranium Recovery Project No. 34110: final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The accident analysis of the upgrade uranium recovery system indicated three potential hazards: (1) criticality, (2) toxic fumes from nitric acid solutions, and (3) release of toxic uranyl nitrate solutions. Any of these are capable of causing the death of one or more employees; therefore, they form the basis for the residual risks identified below. The analysis found no hazardous energies or substances capable of causing irreversible injury to, or the death of, any members of the public. The following residual risks will be controlled administratively by procedural constraints: An operator or maintenance error will cause 235 U to be transferred into an unsafe container and cause a criticality. An operator or maintenance error will cause containers of 235 U bearing material to be improperly spaced and cause a criticality. Extensive corrosion will cause a hole to form in a calciner tube, the corrosion will go undetected, and a criticality will result, and a loss of system and/or building solution containment will occur concurrent with a drain being open resulting in a criticality and/or release of toxic material. Additional residual risks that have a small probability are that an earthquake or tornado will affect the building, alter the system geometry, and initiate a criticality; that the compressed-gas (nitrogen) cylinder valve will be sheared off, become airborne, and alter the system geometry; and that loss of system and/or building solution containment may occur concurrently with fire sprinkler system actuation causing a criticality and/or release of toxic material. The following residual risks will be addressed in the Safety Study of the existing X-705 Building: that a spill of raffinate highly contaminated with 99 Tc will occur due to operator error or incorrect lab analysis and that a gaseous or liquid effluent release of small amounts of transuranic elements will occur

  10. Methods of economic analysis applied to fusion research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this and previous efforts ECON has provided economic assessment of a fusion research program. This phase of study focused on two tasks, the first concerned with the economics of fusion in an economy that relies heavily upon synthetic fuels, and the second concerned with the overall economic effects of pursuing soft energy technologies instead of hard technologies. This report is organized in two parts, the first entitled An Economic Analysis of Coproduction of Fusion-Electric Energy and Other Products, and the second entitled Arguments Associated with the Choice of Potential Energy Futures

  11. Regulatory impact analysis of final effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the offshore oil and gas industry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    For all major rulemaking actions, Executive Order 12291 requires a Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA), in which benefits of the regulation are compared to costs imposed by the regulation. The report presents the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA, or the Agency) RIA of the final rule on the effluent limitations guidelines for the Offshore Subcategory of the Oil and Gas Extraction Industry. The principal requirement of the Executive Order is that the Agency perform an analysis comparing the benefits of the regulation to the costs that the regulation imposes. Three types of benefits are analyzed in this RIA: quantified and monetized benefits; quantified and non-monetized benefits; and non-quantified and non-monetized benefits

  12. Research on data analysis in the physical sciences. Final progress report, March 1973-November 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tukey, J.W.; Bloomfield, P.

    1979-11-01

    In its most general terms, the work carried out under the contract consists of the development of new data analytic methods and the improvement of existing methods, their implementation on computer, especially minicomputers, and the development of non-statistical, systems-level software to support these activities. The work reported or completed is reviewed. (GHT)

  13. Progress of the DUPIC Fuel Compatibility Analysis (IV) - Fuel Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ryu, Ho Jin; Roh, Gyu Hong; Jeong, Chang Joon; Park, Chang Je; Song, Kee Chan; Lee, Jung Won

    2005-10-01

    This study describes the mechanical compatibility of the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel, when it is loaded into a CANDU reactor. The mechanical compatibility can be assessed for the fuel management, primary heat transport system, fuel channel, and the fuel handling system in the reactor core by both the experimental and analytic methods. Because the physical dimensions of the DUPIC fuel bundle adopt the CANDU flexible (CANFLEX) fuel bundle design which has already been demonstrated for a commercial use in CANDU reactors, the experimental compatibility analyses focused on the generation of material property data and the irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel, which are used for the computational analysis. The intermediate results of the mechanical compatibility analysis have shown that the integrity of the DUPIC fuel is mostly maintained under the high power and high burnup conditions even though some material properties like the thermal conductivity is a little lower compared to the uranium fuel. However it is required to slightly change the current DUPIC fuel design to accommodate the high internal pressure of the fuel element. It is also strongly recommended to perform more irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel to accumulate a database for the demonstration of the DUPIC fuel performance in the CANDU reactor

  14. Progress of the DUPIC Fuel Compatibility Analysis (IV) - Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Ryu, Ho Jin; Roh, Gyu Hong; Jeong, Chang Joon; Park, Chang Je; Song, Kee Chan; Lee, Jung Won

    2005-10-15

    This study describes the mechanical compatibility of the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel, when it is loaded into a CANDU reactor. The mechanical compatibility can be assessed for the fuel management, primary heat transport system, fuel channel, and the fuel handling system in the reactor core by both the experimental and analytic methods. Because the physical dimensions of the DUPIC fuel bundle adopt the CANDU flexible (CANFLEX) fuel bundle design which has already been demonstrated for a commercial use in CANDU reactors, the experimental compatibility analyses focused on the generation of material property data and the irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel, which are used for the computational analysis. The intermediate results of the mechanical compatibility analysis have shown that the integrity of the DUPIC fuel is mostly maintained under the high power and high burnup conditions even though some material properties like the thermal conductivity is a little lower compared to the uranium fuel. However it is required to slightly change the current DUPIC fuel design to accommodate the high internal pressure of the fuel element. It is also strongly recommended to perform more irradiation tests of the DUPIC fuel to accumulate a database for the demonstration of the DUPIC fuel performance in the CANDU reactor.

  15. Progress on Radiochemical Analysis for Nuclear Waste Management in Decommissioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Qiao, Jixin; Shi, Keliang

    With the increaed numbers of nuclear facilities have been closed and are being or are going to be decommissioned, it is required to characterise the produced nuclear waste for its treatment by identification of the radionuclides and qualitatively determine them. Of the radionuclides related...... separation of radionuclides. In order to improve and maintain the Nodic competence in analysis of radionculides in waste samples, a NKS B project on this topic was launched in 2009. During the first phase of the NKS-B RadWaste project (2009-2010), a good achivement has been reached on establishment...... of collaboration, identifing the requirements from the Nordic nuclear industries and optimizing and development of some analytical methods (Hou et al. NKS-222, 2010). In the year 2011, this project (NKS-B RadWaste2011) continued. The major achievements of this project in 2011 include: (1) development of a method...

  16. Research progress and hotspot analysis of spatial interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Li-juan; Zheng, Xin-qi; Miao, Jin-li

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the literatures related to spatial interpolation between 1982 and 2017, which are included in the Web of Science core database, are used as data sources, and the visualization analysis is carried out according to the co-country network, co-category network, co-citation network, keywords co-occurrence network. It is found that spatial interpolation has experienced three stages: slow development, steady development and rapid development; The cross effect between 11 clustering groups, the main convergence of spatial interpolation theory research, the practical application and case study of spatial interpolation and research on the accuracy and efficiency of spatial interpolation. Finding the optimal spatial interpolation is the frontier and hot spot of the research. Spatial interpolation research has formed a theoretical basis and research system framework, interdisciplinary strong, is widely used in various fields.

  17. Image analysis software for following progression of peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epplin-Zapf, Thomas; Miller, Clayton; Larkin, Sean; Hermesmeyer, Eduardo; Macy, Jenny; Pellegrini, Marco; Luccarelli, Saverio; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Timothy

    2009-02-01

    A relationship has been reported by several research groups [1 - 4] between the density and shapes of nerve fibers in the cornea and the existence and severity of peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a complication of several prevalent diseases or conditions, which include diabetes, HIV, prolonged alcohol overconsumption and aging. A common clinical technique for confirming the condition is intramuscular electromyography (EMG), which is invasive, so a noninvasive technique like the one proposed here carries important potential advantages for the physician and patient. A software program that automatically detects the nerve fibers, counts them and measures their shapes is being developed and tested. Tests were carried out with a database of subjects with levels of severity of diabetic neuropathy as determined by EMG testing. Results from this testing, that include a linear regression analysis are shown.

  18. Occupational exposure to HDI: progress and challenges in biomarker analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, Sheila L; Ball, Louise M; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2010-10-01

    1,6-Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) is extensively used in the automotive repair industry and is a commonly reported cause of occupational asthma in industrialized populations. However, the exact pathological mechanism remains uncertain. Characterization and quantification of biomarkers resulting from HDI exposure can fill important knowledge gaps between exposure, susceptibility, and the rise of immunological reactions and sensitization leading to asthma. Here, we discuss existing challenges in HDI biomarker analysis including the quantification of N-acetyl-1,6-hexamethylene diamine (monoacetyl-HDA) and N,N'-diacetyl-1,6-hexamethylene diamine (diacetyl-HDA) in urine samples based on previously established methods for HDA analysis. In addition, we describe the optimization of reaction conditions for the synthesis of monoacetyl-HDA and diacetyl-HDA, and utilize these standards for the quantification of these metabolites in the urine of three occupationally exposed workers. Diacetyl-HDA was present in untreated urine at 0.015-0.060 μg/l. Using base hydrolysis, the concentration range of monoacetyl-HDA in urine was 0.19-2.2 μg/l, 60-fold higher than in the untreated samples on average. HDA was detected only in one sample after base hydrolysis (0.026 μg/l). In contrast, acid hydrolysis yielded HDA concentrations ranging from 0.36 to 10.1 μg/l in these three samples. These findings demonstrate HDI metabolism via N-acetylation metabolic pathway and protein adduct formation resulting from occupational exposure to HDI. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of Visual Field Progression in Glaucoma: Quasar Regression Program and Event Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Alemán, Valentín T; González-Hernández, Marta; Perera-Sanz, Daniel; Armas-Domínguez, Karintia

    2016-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity, specificity and agreement between the Quasar program, glaucoma progression analysis (GPA II) event analysis and expert opinion in the detection of glaucomatous progression. The Quasar program is based on linear regression analysis of both mean defect (MD) and pattern standard deviation (PSD). Each series of visual fields was evaluated by three methods; Quasar, GPA II and four experts. The sensitivity, specificity and agreement (kappa) for each method was calculated, using expert opinion as the reference standard. The study included 439 SITA Standard visual fields of 56 eyes of 42 patients, with a mean of 7.8 ± 0.8 visual fields per eye. When suspected cases of progression were considered stable, sensitivity and specificity of Quasar, GPA II and the experts were 86.6% and 70.7%, 26.6% and 95.1%, and 86.6% and 92.6% respectively. When suspected cases of progression were considered as progressing, sensitivity and specificity of Quasar, GPA II and the experts were 79.1% and 81.2%, 45.8% and 90.6%, and 85.4% and 90.6% respectively. The agreement between Quasar and GPA II when suspected cases were considered stable or progressing was 0.03 and 0.28 respectively. The degree of agreement between Quasar and the experts when suspected cases were considered stable or progressing was 0.472 and 0.507. The degree of agreement between GPA II and the experts when suspected cases were considered stable or progressing was 0.262 and 0.342. The combination of MD and PSD regression analysis in the Quasar program showed better agreement with the experts and higher sensitivity than GPA II.

  20. Positron tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Final progress report, April 15, 1989--October 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1997-02-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Enhancement of MAb tumor localization by hyperthermia also was proposed. Studies were to have been performed with both 18 F and 124 I; however, the lack of its availability (until quite recently) prevented experiments with 124 I. Instead, two additional lines of inquiry were initiated in which they utilized aspects of the radiofluorination chemistries originally developed for MAbs for labeling chemotactic peptides and meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) analogues with 18 F. This final report summarizes the original specific aims and the main research accomplishments in studies of mouse, dog and human models

  1. Positron tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Final progress report, April 15, 1989--October 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1997-02-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Enhancement of MAb tumor localization by hyperthermia also was proposed. Studies were to have been performed with both {sup 18}F and {sup 124}I; however, the lack of its availability (until quite recently) prevented experiments with {sup 124}I. Instead, two additional lines of inquiry were initiated in which they utilized aspects of the radiofluorination chemistries originally developed for MAbs for labeling chemotactic peptides and meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) analogues with {sup 18}F. This final report summarizes the original specific aims and the main research accomplishments in studies of mouse, dog and human models.

  2. Final safety analysis report for the atmospheric protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    An Atmospheric Protection System (APS) has been constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to minimize the release of radioactive particulate material to the atmosphere from nonroutine occurrences. Existing off-gas cleanup systems remove radioactive particulates to well below allowable limits for controlled areas before release to the plant stack. Previously all ventilation air from process cells was discharged to the stack without treatment. The APS provides continuous filtration of all ventilation air from process cells and backup filtration of all process off gases before they are released to the atmosphere. A safety analysis of the potential hazards associated with the APS has been completed. The review indicates that the system is capable of withstanding design basis natural phenomena including a flood, tornado, and earthquake without releasing unacceptable amounts of radioactive particulate from the filters to the environment. An in-cell explosion, fire, mechanical damage, and other postulated accident situations were investigated. From these, the design basis accident postulated for the facility is complete release of the maximum amount of radioactive particulate collected on the 104 ventilation air HEPA filters to the atmosphere via the 250-foot high stack. Even though the release of all the radioactive particulate contained on the filters is hardly credible, it would not present an unacceptable hazard to personnel on or offsite

  3. Recent progress in the analysis of iced airfoils and wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Tuncer; Chen, Hsun H.; Kaups, Kalle; Schimke, Sue

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on the analysis of iced airfoils and wings is described. Ice shapes for multielement airfoils and wings are computed using an extension of the LEWICE code that was developed for single airfoils. The aerodynamic properties of the iced wing are determined with an interactive scheme in which the solutions of the inviscid flow equations are obtained from a panel method and the solutions of the viscous flow equations are obtained from an inverse three-dimensional finite-difference boundary-layer method. A new interaction law is used to couple the inviscid and viscous flow solutions. The newly developed LEWICE multielement code is amplified to a high-lift configuration to calculate the ice shapes on the slat and on the main airfoil and on a four-element airfoil. The application of the LEWICE wing code to the calculation of ice shapes on a MS-317 swept wing shows good agreement with measurements. The interactive boundary-layer method is applied to a tapered iced wing in order to study the effect of icing on the aerodynamic properties of the wing at several angles of attack.

  4. Photosynthesis energy factory: analysis, synthesis, and demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    This quantitative assessment of the potential of a combined dry-land Energy Plantation, wood-fired power plant, and algae wastewater treatment system demonstrates the cost-effectiveness of recycling certain by-products and effluents from one subsystem to another. Designed to produce algae up to the limit of the amount of carbon in municipal wastewater, the algae pond provides a positive cash credit, resulting mainly from the wastewater treatment credit, which may be used to reduce the cost of the Photosynthesis Energy Factory (PEF)-generated electricity. The algae pond also produces fertilizer, which reduces the cost of the biomass produced on the Energy Plantation, and some gas. The cost of electricity was as low as 35 mills per kilowatt-hour for a typical municipally-owned PEF consisting of a 65-MWe power plant, a 144-acre algae pond, and a 33,000-acre Energy Plantation. Using only conventional or near-term technology, the most cost-effective algae pond for a PEF is the carbon-limited secondary treatment system. This system does not recycle CO/sub 2/ from the flue gas. Analysis of the Energy Plantation subsystem at 15 sites revealed that plantations of 24,000 to 36,000 acres produce biomass at the lowest cost per ton. The following sites are recommended for more detailed evaluation as potential demonstration sites: Pensacola, Florida; Jamestown, New York; Knoxville, Tennessee; Martinsville, Virginia, and Greenwood, South Carolina. A major possible extension of the PEF concept is to include the possibility for irrigation.

  5. Case study applications of venture analysis: fluidized bed. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosle, R.

    1978-05-01

    In order to appraise the case for government intervention in the case of atmospheric fluid-bed combustion, Energy Resources Company and Rotan Mosle have developed a methodology containing four key elements. The first is an economic and environmental characterization of the new technology; the second, a survey of its prospective users and vendors; the third, a cost-benefit analysis of its prospective social benefits; and the fourth, an analytical model of its market penetration and the effects thereon of a basket of government incentives. Three major technical obstacles exist to continued AFBC development: feeding coal and limestone reliably to the boiler, tube erosion and corrosion, and developing boiler turndown capability. The review of the economic, environmental and technical attributes of the new technology has suggested that the preliminary venture can be selected with confidence as a commercial prospect capable of detailed evaluation from both private and public perspectives. The venture choice can therefore be considered firm: it will be the equipment required for the combustion of coal in atmospheric fluid beds as applied to industrial process steam in boilers of at least 83 Kpph capacity. The most effective demonstration of the potential of AFBC in the eyes of prospective industrial users is that provided by a project conducted by the private sector with minimal government direction. Unlike the ''experimental'' style of existing mixed public-private demonstration projects, the pressure to achieve reliability in more commercial applications would serve rapidly to reveal more clearly the potential of AFBC. The marketplace can be allowed to decide its fate thereafter. Once AFBC has been successfully demonstrated, the relative merits of AFBC and coal-FGD are best left to prospective users to evaluate.

  6. Performance of confocal scanning laser tomograph Topographic Change Analysis (TCA) for assessing glaucomatous progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowd, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Weinreb, Robert N; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Alencar, Luciana M; O'Leary, Neil; Sample, Pamela A; Zangwill, Linda M

    2009-02-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope's Topographic Change Analysis (TCA; Heidelberg Retina Tomograph [HRT]; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) parameters for discriminating between progressing glaucomatous and stable healthy eyes. The 0.90, 0.95, and 0.99 specificity cutoffs for various (n=70) TCA parameters were developed by using 1000 permuted topographic series derived from HRT images of 18 healthy eyes from Moorfields Eye Hospital, imaged at least four times. The cutoffs were then applied to topographic series from 36 eyes with known glaucomatous progression (by optic disc stereophotograph assessment and/or standard automated perimetry guided progression analysis, [GPA]) and 21 healthy eyes from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study (DIGS), all imaged at least four times, to determine TCA sensitivity and specificity. Cutoffs also were applied to 210 DIGS patients' eyes imaged at least four times with no evidence of progression (nonprogressed) by stereophotography or GPA. The TCA parameter providing the best sensitivity/specificity tradeoff using the 0.90, 0.95, and 0.99 cutoffs was the largest clustered superpixel area within the optic disc margin (CAREA(disc) mm(2)). Sensitivities/specificities for classifying progressing (by stereophotography and/or GPA) and healthy eyes were 0.778/0.809, 0.639/0.857, and 0.611/1.00, respectively. In nonprogressing eyes, specificities were 0.464, 0.570, and 0.647 (i.e., lower than in the healthy eyes). In addition, TCA parameter measurements of nonprogressing eyes were similar to those of progressing eyes. TCA parameters can discriminate between progressing and longitudinally observed healthy eyes. Low specificity in apparently nonprogressing patients' eyes suggests early progression detection using TCA.

  7. Longitudinal analysis of progression in glaucoma using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Julia M; Horn, Folkert K; Tornow, Ralf P; Schmid, Matthias; Mardin, Christian Y; Kruse, Friedrich E; Juenemann, Anselm G; Laemmer, Robert

    2013-05-01

    To compare the longitudinal loss of RNFL thickness measurements by SD-OCT in healthy individuals and glaucoma patients with or without progression concerning optic disc morphology. A total of 62 eyes, comprising 38 glaucomatous eyes with open angle glaucoma and 24 healthy controls, were included in the study (Erlangen Glaucoma Registry, NTC00494923). All patients were investigated annually over a period of 3 years by Spectralis SD-OCT measuring peripapillary RNFL thickness. By masked comparative analysis of photographs, the eyes were classified into nonprogressive and progressive glaucoma cases. Longitudinal loss of RNFL thickness was compared with morphological changes of optic disc morphology. Mixed model analysis of annual OCT scans revealed an estimated annual decrease of the RNFL thickness by 2.12 μm in glaucoma eyes with progression, whereas glaucoma eyes without progression in optic disc morphology lost 1.18 μm per year in RNFL thickness (P = 0.002). The rate of change in healthy eyes was 0.60 μm and thereby also significantly lower than in glaucoma eyes with progression (P < 0.001). The intrasession variability of three successive measurements without head repositioning was 1.5 ± 0.7 μm. The loss of mean RNFL thickness exceeded the intrasession variability in 60% of nonprogressive eyes, and in 85% of progressive eyes after 3 years. LONGITUDINAL MEASUREMENTS OF RNFL THICKNESS USING SD-OCT SHOW A MORE PRONOUNCED REDUCTION OF RNFL THICKNESS IN PATIENTS WITH PROGRESSION COMPARED WITH PATIENTS WITHOUT PROGRESSION IN GLAUCOMATOUS OPTIC DISC CHANGES. (www.clinicaltrials.gov number, NTC00494923.).

  8. Joint application of AI techniques, PRA and disturbance analysis methodology to problems in the maintenance and design of nuclear power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okrent, D.

    1989-03-01

    This final report summarizes the accomplishments of a two year research project entitled ``Joint Application of Artificial Intelligence Techniques, Probabilistic Risk Analysis, and Disturbance Analysis Methodology to Problems in the Maintenance and Design of Nuclear Power Plants. The objective of this project is to develop and apply appropriate combinations of techniques from artificial intelligence, (AI), reliability and risk analysis and disturbance analysis to well-defined programmatic problems of nuclear power plants. Reactor operations issues were added to those of design and maintenance as the project progressed.

  9. Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M.; Medford, G.T.

    1990-06-01

    A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied

  10. Progression Analysis and Stage Discovery in Continuous Physiological Processes Using Image Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrucci Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an image computing-based method for quantitative analysis of continuous physiological processes that can be sensed by medical imaging and demonstrate its application to the analysis of morphological alterations of the bone structure, which correlate with the progression of osteoarthritis (OA. The purpose of the analysis is to quantitatively estimate OA progression in a fashion that can assist in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Ultimately, the texture analysis will be able to provide an alternative OA scoring method, which can potentially reflect the progression of the disease in a more direct fashion compared to the existing clinically utilized classification schemes based on radiology. This method can be useful not just for studying the nature of OA, but also for developing and testing the effect of drugs and treatments. While in this paper we demonstrate the application of the method to osteoarthritis, its generality makes it suitable for the analysis of other progressive clinical conditions that can be diagnosed and prognosed by using medical imaging.

  11. Analysis of severe core damage accident progression for the heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Lili; Yuan Kai; Yuan Jingtian; Cao Xuewu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the severe accident progression analysis of generic Canadian deuterium uranium reactor 6 was preliminarily provided using an integrated severe accident analysis code. The selected accident sequences were multiple steam generator tube rupture and large break loss-of-coolant accidents because these led to severe core damage with an assumed unavailability for several critical safety systems. The progressions of severe accident included a set of failed safety systems normally operated at full power, and initiative events led to primary heat transport system inventory blow-down or boil off. The core heat-up and melting, steam generator response,fuel channel and calandria vessel failure were analyzed. The results showed that the progression of a severe core damage accident induced by steam generator tube rupture or large break loss-of-coolant accidents in a CANDU reactor was slow due to heat sinks in the calandria vessel and vault. (authors)

  12. Missing data and censoring in the analysis of progression-free survival in oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denne, J S; Stone, A M; Bailey-Iacona, R; Chen, T-T

    2013-01-01

    Progression-free survival (PFS) is increasingly used as a primary endpoint in oncology clinical trials. However, trial conduct is often such that PFS data on some patients may be partially missing either due to incomplete follow-up for progression, or due to data that may be collected but confounded by patients stopping randomized therapy or starting alternative therapy prior to progression. Regulatory guidance on how to handle these patients in the analysis and whether to censor these patients differs between agencies. We present results of a reanalysis of 28 Phase III trials from 12 companies or institutions performed by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association-sponsored PFS Expert Team. We show that analyses not adhering to the intention-to-treat principle tend to give hazard ratio estimates further from unity and describe several factors associated with this shift. We present illustrative simulations to support these findings and provide recommendations for the analysis of PFS.

  13. Development and fabrication of a dragline training system. Technical progress report, No. 1 (phase 1 final report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, William J.

    1979-09-17

    As a result of the task analysis and revision to the plan of instruction, certain desirable characteristics were recommended to be added to the dragline trainer. These essentially would provide for a high quality feedback and hard copy record of the trainee's performance. It was recommended that the trainer be able to produce and/or sense and record: drag and hoist over-spooling, dragchain/cone contact, bucket shock, bucket stall, lateral boom stress, tight lining, excessive rapid braking and reaction times to internal/external alarms. In addition, data such as cycle time, bucket position, yardage moved and cycles completed should be recorded and records printed. With the exception of drag chain and cone contact indications, these characteristics can be implemented in the computer program. In some cases, such as bucket stall and external alarms it will require instructor initiative to activate specific trainer scenario and reaction time measurements. It should be noted that these additional features, however desirable, add significantly to the required computer capability. Both processor cycle time and memory availability could be restraints. A faster, and larger system could accommodate these added features but at an increase in cost for the computer system. A study is in process and specific recommendations will result.

  14. Progress Towards Improved Analysis of TES X-ray Data Using Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, S. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lee, S.-J.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The traditional method of applying a digital optimal filter to measure X-ray pulses from transition-edge sensor (TES) devices does not achieve the best energy resolution when the signals have a highly non-linear response to energy, or the noise is non-stationary during the pulse. We present an implementation of a method to analyze X-ray data from TESs, which is based upon principal component analysis (PCA). Our method separates the X-ray signal pulse into orthogonal components that have the largest variance. We typically recover pulse height, arrival time, differences in pulse shape, and the variation of pulse height with detector temperature. These components can then be combined to form a representation of pulse energy. An added value of this method is that by reporting information on more descriptive parameters (as opposed to a single number representing energy), we generate a much more complete picture of the pulse received. Here we report on progress in developing this technique for future implementation on X-ray telescopes. We used an 55Fe source to characterize Mo/Au TESs. On the same dataset, the PCA method recovers a spectral resolution that is better by a factor of two than achievable with digital optimal filters.

  15. Trabecular morphometry by fractal signature analysis is a novel marker of osteoarthritis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Virginia Byers; Feng, Sheng; Wang, ShengChu; White, Scott; Ainslie, Maureen; Brett, Alan; Holmes, Anthony; Charles, H Cecil

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of using subchondral bone texture observed on a radiograph taken at baseline to predict progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA) over a 3-year period. A total of 138 participants in the Prediction of Osteoarthritis Progression study were evaluated at baseline and after 3 years. Fractal signature analysis (FSA) of the medial subchondral tibial plateau was performed on fixed flexion radiographs of 248 nonreplaced knees, using a commercially available software tool. OA progression was defined as a change in joint space narrowing (JSN) or osteophyte formation of 1 grade according to a standardized knee atlas. Statistical analysis of fractal signatures was performed using a new model based on correlating the overall shape of a fractal dimension curve with radius. Fractal signature of the medial tibial plateau at baseline was predictive of medial knee JSN progression (area under the curve [AUC] 0.75, of a receiver operating characteristic curve) but was not predictive of osteophyte formation or progression of JSN in the lateral compartment. Traditional covariates (age, sex, body mass index, knee pain), general bone mineral content, and joint space width at baseline were no more effective than random variables for predicting OA progression (AUC 0.52-0.58). The predictive model with maximum effectiveness combined fractal signature at baseline, knee alignment, traditional covariates, and bone mineral content (AUC 0.79). We identified a prognostic marker of OA that is readily extracted from a plain radiograph using FSA. Although the method needs to be validated in a second cohort, our results indicate that the global shape approach to analyzing these data is a potentially efficient means of identifying individuals at risk of knee OA progression.

  16. Alcohol consumption and the neoplastic progression in Barrett's esophagus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifeng Lou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In the developed countries, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC is increasing over recent decades. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to arrive at quantitative conclusions about the contribution of alcohol intakes and the progression of Barrett's esophagus. METHODS: A comprehensive, systematic bibliographic search of medical literature published up to Oct 2013 was conducted to identify relevant studies. A meta-analysis was conducted for alcohol consumption on the Barrett's esophagus progression. RESULTS: A total of 882 cases in 6,867 individuals from 14 observational studies were indemnified in this meta-analysis. The result of this current meta-analysis, including 10 case-control and 4 cohort studies, indicated that alcohol consumption was not associated with the neoplastic progression in Barrett's esophagus (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.93-1.48. When stratified by the study designs, no significant association was detected in either high vs low group or ever vs never group. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol drinking is not associated with risk of neoplastic progression in Barrett's esophagus. Further well designed studies are needed in this area.

  17. Recent progress in safety-related applications of reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Jitsuya; Shinohara, Yoshikuni; Saito, Keiichi

    1982-01-01

    Recent progress in safety-related applications of reactor noise analysis is reviewed, mainly referring to various papers presented at the Third Specialists' Meeting on Reactor Noise (SMORN-III) held in Tokyo in 1981. Advances in application of autoregressive model, coherence analysis and pattern recognition technique are significant since SMORN-II in 1977. Development of reactor diagnosis systems based on noise analysis is in progress. Practical experiences in the safety-related applications to power plants are being accumulated. Advances in quantitative monitoring of vibration of internal structures in PWR and diagnosis of core stability and control system characteristics in BWR are notable. Acoustic methods are also improved to detect sodium boiling in LMFBR. The Reactor Noise Analysis Benchmark Test performed by Japan in connection with SMORN-III is successful so that it is possible to proceed to the second stage of the benchmark test. (author)

  18. 77 FR 47495 - Final Priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection, Analysis, and Reporting-National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... Priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection, Analysis, and Reporting--National IDEA Technical... 34 CFR Chapter III [CFDA Number 84.373Z] Final Priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection, Analysis, and Reporting--National IDEA Technical Assistance Center on Early Childhood...

  19. 1985. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This annual progress report of the CEA Protection and Nuclear Safety Institut outlines a description of the progress made in each sections of the Institut Research activities of the different departments include: reactor safety analysis, fuel cycle facilities analysis; and associated safety research programs (criticality, sites, transport ...), radioecology and environmental radioprotection techniques; data acquisition on radioactive waste storage sites; radiation effects on man, studies on radioprotection techniques; nuclear material security including security of facilities, security of nuclear material transport, and monitoring of nuclear material management; nuclear facility decommissioning; and finally the public information [fr

  20. A meta-analysis on progressive atrophy in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caciagli, Lorenzo; Bernasconi, Andrea; Wiebe, Samuel; Koepp, Matthias J.; Bernasconi, Neda

    2017-01-01

    Objective: It remains unclear whether drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is associated with cumulative brain damage, with no expert consensus and no quantitative syntheses of the available evidence. Methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of MRI studies on progressive atrophy, searching PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE databases for cross-sectional and longitudinal quantitative MRI studies on drug-resistant TLE. Results: We screened 2,976 records and assessed eligibility of 248 full-text articles. Forty-two articles met the inclusion criteria for quantitative evaluation. We observed a predominance of cross-sectional studies, use of different clinical indices of progression, and high heterogeneity in age-control procedures. Meta-analysis of 18/1 cross-sectional/longitudinal studies on hippocampal atrophy (n = 979 patients) yielded a pooled effect size of r = −0.42 for ipsilateral atrophy related to epilepsy duration (95% confidence interval [CI] −0.51 to −0.32; p 80% of articles reported duration-related progression in extratemporal cortical and subcortical regions. Detailed analysis of study design features yielded low to moderate levels of evidence for progressive atrophy across studies, mainly due to dominance of cross-sectional over longitudinal investigations, use of diverse measures of seizure estimates, and absence of consistent age control procedures. Conclusions: While the neuroimaging literature is overall suggestive of progressive atrophy in drug-resistant TLE, published studies have employed rather weak designs to directly demonstrate it. Longitudinal multicohort studies are needed to unequivocally differentiate aging from disease progression. PMID:28687722

  1. Organometallic Chemistry. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolczanski, Peter [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2003-07-14

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Organometallic Chemistry was held at Salve Regina, Newport, Rhode Island, 7/21-26/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  2. Final analysis of survival outcomes in the phase 3 FIRST trial of up-front treatment for multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facon, Thierry; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Dispenzieri, Angela; Catalano, John V; Belch, Andrew; Cavo, Michele; Pinto, Antonello; Weisel, Katja; Ludwig, Heinz; Bahlis, Nizar J; Banos, Anne; Tiab, Mourad; Delforge, Michel; Cavenagh, Jamie D; Geraldes, Catarina; Lee, Je-Jung; Chen, Christine; Oriol, Albert; De La Rubia, Javier; White, Darrell; Binder, Daniel; Lu, Jin; Anderson, Kenneth C; Moreau, Philippe; Attal, Michel; Perrot, Aurore; Arnulf, Bertrand; Qiu, Lugui; Roussel, Murielle; Boyle, Eileen; Manier, Salomon; Mohty, Mohamad; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Leleu, Xavier; Ervin-Haynes, Annette; Chen, Guang; Houck, Vanessa; Benboubker, Lotfi; Hulin, Cyrille

    2018-01-18

    This FIRST trial final analysis examined survival outcomes in patients with transplant-ineligible newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) treated with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone until disease progression (Rd continuous), Rd for 72 weeks (18 cycles; Rd18), or melphalan, prednisone, and thalidomide (MPT; 72 weeks). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS; primary comparison: Rd continuous vs MPT). Overall survival (OS) was a key secondary endpoint (final analysis prespecified ≥60 months' follow-up). Patients were randomized to Rd continuous (n = 535), Rd18 (n = 541), or MPT (n = 547). At a median follow-up of 67 months, PFS was significantly longer with Rd continuous vs MPT (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59-0.79; P < .00001) and was similarly extended vs Rd18. Median OS was 10 months longer with Rd continuous vs MPT (59.1 vs 49.1 months; HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.92; P = .0023), and similar with Rd18 (62.3 months). In patients achieving complete or very good partial responses, Rd continuous had an ≈30-month longer median time to next treatment vs Rd18 (69.5 vs 39.9 months). Over half of all patients who received second-line treatment were given a bortezomib-based therapy. Second-line outcomes were improved in patients receiving bortezomib after Rd continuous and Rd18 vs after MPT. No new safety concerns, including risk for secondary malignancies, were observed. Treatment with Rd continuous significantly improved survival outcomes vs MPT, supporting Rd continuous as a standard of care for patients with transplant-ineligible NDMM. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00689936 and EudraCT as 2007-004823-39. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Peak and ceiling effects in final-product analysis of mastoidectomy performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, N; Konge, L; Cayé-Thomasen, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality surgical simulation of mastoidectomy is a promising training tool for novices. Final-product analysis for assessing novice mastoidectomy performance could be limited by a peak or ceiling effect. These may be countered by simulator-integrated tutoring. METHODS: Twenty......-two participants completed a single session of self-directed practice of the mastoidectomy procedure in a virtual reality simulator. Participants were randomised for additional simulator-integrated tutoring. Performances were assessed at 10-minute intervals using final-product analysis. RESULTS: In all, 45.5 per...

  4. The Application of Structured Job Analysis Information Based on the Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ). Final Report No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Ernest J.

    The Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) is a job analysis instrument consisting of 187 job elements organized into six divisions. The PAQ was used in the eight studies summarized in this final report. The studies were: (1) ratings of the attribute requirements of PAQ job elements, (2) a series of principal components analyses of these attribute…

  5. Analysis of Muscle Fatigue Progression using Cyclostationary Property of Surface Electromyography Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, P A; Venugopal, G; Ramakrishnan, S

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of neuromuscular fatigue finds various applications ranging from clinical studies to biomechanics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals are widely used for these studies due to its non-invasiveness. During cyclic dynamic contractions, these signals are nonstationary and cyclostationary. In recent years, several nonstationary methods have been employed for the muscle fatigue analysis. However, cyclostationary based approach is not well established for the assessment of muscle fatigue. In this work, cyclostationarity associated with the biceps brachii muscle fatigue progression is analyzed using sEMG signals and Spectral Correlation Density (SCD) functions. Signals are recorded from fifty healthy adult volunteers during dynamic contractions under a prescribed protocol. These signals are preprocessed and are divided into three segments, namely, non-fatigue, first muscle discomfort and fatigue zones. Then SCD is estimated using fast Fourier transform accumulation method. Further, Cyclic Frequency Spectral Density (CFSD) is calculated from the SCD spectrum. Two features, namely, cyclic frequency spectral area (CFSA) and cyclic frequency spectral entropy (CFSE) are proposed to study the progression of muscle fatigue. Additionally, degree of cyclostationarity (DCS) is computed to quantify the amount of cyclostationarity present in the signals. Results show that there is a progressive increase in cyclostationary during the progression of muscle fatigue. CFSA shows an increasing trend in muscle fatiguing contraction. However, CFSE shows a decreasing trend. It is observed that when the muscle progresses from non-fatigue to fatigue condition, the mean DCS of fifty subjects increases from 0.016 to 0.99. All the extracted features found to be distinct and statistically significant in the three zones of muscle contraction (p < 0.05). It appears that these SCD features could be useful in the automated analysis of sEMG signals for different neuromuscular conditions.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of disease progression in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Ding, Ying; Liu, Yi; Sun, Tao; Fritsche, Lars G; Clemons, Traci; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Klein, Michael L; Cook, Richard J; Liu, Yu; Fan, Ruzong; Wei, Lai; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y; Weeks, Daniel E; Chen, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Family- and population-based genetic studies have successfully identified multiple disease-susceptibility loci for Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), one of the first batch and most successful examples of genome-wide association study. However, most genetic studies to date have focused on case-control studies of late AMD (choroidal neovascularization or geographic atrophy). The genetic influences on disease progression are largely unexplored. We assembled unique resources to perform a genome-wide bivariate time-to-event analysis to test for association of time-to-late-AMD with ∼9 million variants on 2721 Caucasians from a large multi-center randomized clinical trial, the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide association study of disease progression (bivariate survival outcome) in AMD genetic studies, thus providing novel insights to AMD genetics. We used a robust Cox proportional hazards model to appropriately account for between-eye correlation when analyzing the progression time in the two eyes of each participant. We identified four previously reported susceptibility loci showing genome-wide significant association with AMD progression: ARMS2-HTRA1 (P = 8.1 × 10-43), CFH (P = 3.5 × 10-37), C2-CFB-SKIV2L (P = 8.1 × 10-10) and C3 (P = 1.2 × 10-9). Furthermore, we detected association of rs58978565 near TNR (P = 2.3 × 10-8), rs28368872 near ATF7IP2 (P = 2.9 × 10-8) and rs142450006 near MMP9 (P = 0.0006) with progression to choroidal neovascularization but not geographic atrophy. Secondary analysis limited to 34 reported risk variants revealed that LIPC and CTRB2-CTRB1 were also associated with AMD progression (P < 0.0015). Our genome-wide analysis thus expands the genetics in both development and progression of AMD and should assist in early identification of high risk individuals.

  7. Rates of progression in diabetic retinopathy during different time periods: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Klein, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviews rates of progression of diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and/or severe visual loss (SVL) and temporal trends.......This meta-analysis reviews rates of progression of diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and/or severe visual loss (SVL) and temporal trends....

  8. Pregnancy and HIV disease progression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Clara; Ronsmans, Carine

    2015-02-01

    To assess whether pregnancy accelerates HIV disease progression. Studies comparing progression to HIV-related illness, low CD4 count, AIDS-defining illness, HIV-related death, or any death in HIV-infected pregnant and non-pregnant women were included. Relative risks (RR) for each outcome were combined using random effects meta-analysis and were stratified by antiretroviral therapy (ART) availability. 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pregnancy was not associated with progression to HIV-related illness [summary RR: 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-2.61], AIDS-defining illness (summary RR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.74-1.25) or mortality (summary RR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.62-1.53), but there was an association with low CD4 counts (summary RR: 1.41, 95% CI: 0.99-2.02) and HIV-related death (summary RR: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.06-2.57). In settings where ART was available, there was no evidence that pregnancy accelerated progress to HIV/AIDS-defining illnesses, death and drop in CD4 count. In settings without ART availability, effect estimates were consistent with pregnancy increasing the risk of progression to HIV/AIDS-defining illnesses and HIV-related or all-cause mortality, but there were too few studies to draw meaningful conclusions. In the absence of ART, pregnancy is associated with small but appreciable increases in the risk of several negative HIV outcomes, but the evidence is too weak to draw firm conclusions. When ART is available, the effects of pregnancy on HIV disease progression are attenuated and there is little reason to discourage healthy HIV-infected women who desire to become pregnant from doing so. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Nonlinear analysis of the progressive collapse of reinforced concrete plane frames using a multilayered beam formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. M. Oliveira

    Full Text Available This work investigates the response of two reinforced concrete (RC plane frames after the loss of a column and their potential resistance for progressive collapse. Nonlinear dynamic analysis is performed using a multilayered Euler/Bernoulli beam element, including elasto-viscoplastic effects. The material nonlinearity is represented using one-dimensional constitutive laws in the material layers, while geometrical nonlinearities are incorporated within a corotational beam formulation. The frames were designed in accordance with the minimum requirements proposed by the reinforced concrete design/building codes of Europe (fib [1-2], Eurocode 2 [3] and Brazil (NBR 6118 [4]. The load combinations considered for PC analysis follow the prescriptions of DoD [5]. The work verifies if the minimum requirements of the considered codes are sufficient for enforcing structural safety and robustness, and also points out the major differences in terms of progressive collapse potential of the corresponding designed structures.

  10. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillips, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes MHD equilibrium and stability studies carried out at Northrop Grumman`s Advanced Technology and Development Center during the period March 1 to December 31, 1995. Significant progress is reported in both ideal and resistive MHD modeling of TFTR plasmas. Specifically, attention is concentrated on analysis of Advanced Tokamak experiments at TFTR involving plasmas in which the q-profiles were non-monotonic.

  11. LDRD final report : robust analysis of large-scale combinatorial applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Robert D.; Morrison, Todd (University of Colorado, Denver, CO); Hart, William Eugene; Benavides, Nicolas L. (Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA); Greenberg, Harvey J. (University of Colorado, Denver, CO); Watson, Jean-Paul; Phillips, Cynthia Ann

    2007-09-01

    Discrete models of large, complex systems like national infrastructures and complex logistics frameworks naturally incorporate many modeling uncertainties. Consequently, there is a clear need for optimization techniques that can robustly account for risks associated with modeling uncertainties. This report summarizes the progress of the Late-Start LDRD 'Robust Analysis of Largescale Combinatorial Applications'. This project developed new heuristics for solving robust optimization models, and developed new robust optimization models for describing uncertainty scenarios.

  12. Clinical evaluation of a novel population-based regression analysis for detecting glaucomatous visual field progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalska, M P; Bürki, E; Schoetzau, A; Orguel, S F; Orguel, S; Grieshaber, M C

    2011-04-01

    The distinction of real progression from test variability in visual field (VF) series may be based on clinical judgment, on trend analysis based on follow-up of test parameters over time, or on identification of a significant change related to the mean of baseline exams (event analysis). The aim of this study was to compare a new population-based method (Octopus field analysis, OFA) with classic regression analyses and clinical judgment for detecting glaucomatous VF changes. 240 VF series of 240 patients with at least 9 consecutive examinations available were included into this study. They were independently classified by two experienced investigators. The results of such a classification served as a reference for comparison for the following statistical tests: (a) t-test global, (b) r-test global, (c) regression analysis of 10 VF clusters and (d) point-wise linear regression analysis. 32.5 % of the VF series were classified as progressive by the investigators. The sensitivity and specificity were 89.7 % and 92.0 % for r-test, and 73.1 % and 93.8 % for the t-test, respectively. In the point-wise linear regression analysis, the specificity was comparable (89.5 % versus 92 %), but the sensitivity was clearly lower than in the r-test (22.4 % versus 89.7 %) at a significance level of p = 0.01. A regression analysis for the 10 VF clusters showed a markedly higher sensitivity for the r-test (37.7 %) than the t-test (14.1 %) at a similar specificity (88.3 % versus 93.8 %) for a significant trend (p = 0.005). In regard to the cluster distribution, the paracentral clusters and the superior nasal hemifield progressed most frequently. The population-based regression analysis seems to be superior to the trend analysis in detecting VF progression in glaucoma, and may eliminate the drawbacks of the event analysis. Further, it may assist the clinician in the evaluation of VF series and may allow better visualization of the correlation between function and structure owing to VF

  13. Analysis of the progression of systolic blood pressure using imputation of missing phenotype values

    OpenAIRE

    Vaitsiakhovich, Tatsiana; Drichel, Dmitriy; Angisch, Marina; Becker, Tim; Herold, Christine; Lacour, André

    2014-01-01

    We present a genome-wide association study of a quantitative trait, "progression of systolic blood pressure in time," in which 142 unrelated individuals of the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 real genotype data were analyzed. Information on systolic blood pressure and other phenotypic covariates was missing at certain time points for a considerable part of the sample. We observed that the dropout process causing missingness is not independent of the initial systolic blood pressure; that is, the ...

  14. EG-13GENOME-WIDE METHYLATION ANALYSIS IDENTIFIES GENOMIC DNA DEMETHYLATION DURING MALIGNANT PROGRESSION OF GLIOMAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kuniaki; Mukasa, Akitake; Nagae, Genta; Aihara, Koki; Otani, Ryohei; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Omata, Mayu; Tanaka, Shota; Shibahara, Junji; Takahashi, Miwako; Momose, Toshimitsu; Shimamura, Teppei; Miyano, Satoru; Narita, Yoshitaka; Ueki, Keisuke; Nishikawa, Ryo; Nagane, Motoo; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade gliomas often undergo malignant progression, and these transformations are a leading cause of death in patients with low-grade gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying malignant tumor progression are still not well understood. Recent evidence indicates that epigenetic deregulation is an important cause of gliomagenesis; therefore, we examined the impact of epigenetic changes during malignant progression of low-grade gliomas. Specifically, we used the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation 450K BeadChip to perform genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of 120 gliomas and four normal brains. This study sample included 25 matched-pairs of initial low-grade gliomas and recurrent tumors (temporal heterogeneity) and 20 of the 25 recurring tumors recurred as malignant progressions, and one matched-pair of newly emerging malignant lesions and pre-existing lesions (spatial heterogeneity). Analyses of methylation profiles demonstrated that most low-grade gliomas in our sample (43/51; 84%) had a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP). Remarkably, approximately 50% of secondary glioblastomas that had progressed from low-grade tumors with the G-CIMP status exhibited a characteristic partial demethylation of genomic DNA during malignant progression, but other recurrent gliomas showed no apparent change in DNA methylation pattern. Interestingly, we found that most loci that were demethylated during malignant progression were located outside of CpG islands. The information of histone modifications patterns in normal human astrocytes and embryonal stem cells also showed that the ratio of active marks at the site corresponding to DNA demethylated loci in G-CIMP-demethylated tumors was significantly lower; this finding indicated that most demethylated loci in G-CIMP-demethylated tumors were likely transcriptionally inactive. A small number of the genes that were upregulated and had demethylated CpG islands were associated with cell cycle-related pathway. In

  15. HbA1C variability and the risk of renal status progression in Diabetes Mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Cheng

    Full Text Available To explore the association between glycated hemoglobin (A1C variability and renal disease progression in patients with diabetes mellitus.A comprehensive search was performed using the PubMed and Embase databases (up to April 26, 2014. The hazard ratio (HR was pooled per unit increase in the standard deviation of A1C (A1C-SD to evaluate the dose-response relationship between A1C-SD and the risk of nephropathy.Eight studies with a total of 17,758 subjects provided the HR for A1C-SD and were included in the final meta-analysis. The pooled HR results demonstrated that A1C-SD was significantly associated with the progression of renal status (HR for both T1DM and T2DM 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-1.64; HR for T1DM 1.70, 95%CI 1.41-2.05; HR for T2DM 1.20, 95%CI 1.12-1.28. A1C-SD was significantly correlated with new-onset microalbuminuria (HR for T1DM 1.63, 95%CI 1.28-2.07; HR for T2DM 1.23, 95%CI 1.08-1.39. These outcomes were also supported in subgroup analyses. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses demonstrated that the results were robust.A1C variability is independently associated with the development of microalbuminuria and the progression of renal status in both type 1 and 2 diabetes patients. A standard method for measuring A1C variability is essential for further and deeper analyses. In addition, future studies should assess the effect of reducing A1C variability on nephropathy complication.

  16. Who pays for healthcare in Bangladesh? An analysis of progressivity in health systems financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Azaher Ali; Chi, Chunhuei

    2017-09-06

    The relationship between payments towards healthcare and ability to pay is a measure of financial fairness. Analysis of progressivity is important from an equity perspective as well as for macroeconomic and political analysis of healthcare systems. Bangladesh health systems financing is characterized by high out-of-pocket payments (63.3%), which is increasing. Hence, we aimed to see who pays what part of this high out-of-pocket expenditure. To our knowledge, this was the first progressivity analysis of health systems financing in Bangladesh. We used data from Bangladesh Household Income and Expenditure Survey, 2010. This was a cross sectional and nationally representative sample of 12,240 households consisting of 55,580 individuals. For quantification of progressivity, we adopted the 'ability-to-pay' principle developed by O'Donnell, van Doorslaer, Wagstaff, and Lindelow (2008). We used the Kakwani index to measure the magnitude of progressivity. Health systems financing in Bangladesh is regressive. Inequality increases due to healthcare payments. The differences between the Gini coefficient and the Kakwani index for all sources of finance are negative, which indicates regressivity, and that financing is more concentrated among the poor. Income inequality increases due to high out-of-pocket payments. The increase in income inequality caused by out-of-pocket payments is 89% due to negative vertical effect and 11% due to horizontal inequity. Our findings add substantial evidence of health systems financing impact on inequitable financial burden of healthcare and income. The heavy reliance on out-of-pocket payments may affect household living standards. If the government and people of Bangladesh are concerned about equitable financing burden, our study suggests that Bangladesh needs to reform the health systems financing scheme.

  17. Progress in element analysis on a high-voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tivol, W.F.; Barnard, D.; Guha, T.

    1985-01-01

    X-Ray microprobe (XMA) and electron energy-loss (EELS) spectrometers have been installed on the high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM). The probe size has been measured and background reduction is in progress for XMA and EELS as are improvements in electron optics for EELS and sensitivity measurements. XMA is currently useful for qualitative analysis and has been used by several investigators from our laboratory and outside laboratories. However, EELS background levels are still too high for meaningful results to be obtained. Standards suitable for biological specimens are being measured, and a library for quantitative analysis is being compiled

  18. Progress in the RAMI analysis of a conceptual LHCD system for DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirizzi, F.

    2014-02-01

    Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability (RAMI) concepts and techniques, that acquired great importance during the first manned space missions, have been progressively extended to industrial, scientific and consumer equipments to assure them satisfactory performances and lifetimes. In the design of experimental facilities, like tokamaks, mainly aimed at demonstrating validity and feasibility of scientific theories, RAMI analysis has been often left aside. DEMO, the future prototype fusion reactors, will be instead designed for steadily delivering electrical energy to commercial grids, so that the RAMI aspects will assume an absolute relevance since their initial design phases. A preliminary RAMI analysis of the LHCD system for the conceptual EU DEMO reactor is given in the paper.

  19. Progress in the RAMI analysis of a conceptual LHCD system for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirizzi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability (RAMI) concepts and techniques, that acquired great importance during the first manned space missions, have been progressively extended to industrial, scientific and consumer equipments to assure them satisfactory performances and lifetimes. In the design of experimental facilities, like tokamaks, mainly aimed at demonstrating validity and feasibility of scientific theories, RAMI analysis has been often left aside. DEMO, the future prototype fusion reactors, will be instead designed for steadily delivering electrical energy to commercial grids, so that the RAMI aspects will assume an absolute relevance since their initial design phases. A preliminary RAMI analysis of the LHCD system for the conceptual EU DEMO reactor is given in the paper

  20. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation. Progress report, June 1991--February 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeling, M.

    1992-03-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  1. Efficiency analysis of orthokeratological correction in the treatment of progressive myopia in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgova Е.А.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of orthokeratological correction in the treatment of progressive myopia in children. Material and methods. A retrospective study correction of myopia orthokeratology lenses of 100 patients (178 eyes with an established diagnosis of myopia of an average degree, undergoing treatment at the Clinic of eye diseases of SSMU. Group I consisted of 50 patients who received OK-correction lenses "Emerald" by Euclid Systems Corporation (USA. The wear time is 2 years. Group II included 50 people (87 eyes, using spectacle correction during the same time. Patients underwent visual acuity testing, biomicroscopy, refractometry, determination of reserves of accommodation, ultrasonic biometry (IOL-Master, CarlZeiss is a measurement of the size of the front-sadayoshi eyeball, survey after 2 years of using the selected correction. Results. Comparative analysis showed that the use of OK lenses for patients with myopia of an average degree resulted in a significant reduction in the rate of progression of myopia. In the background wearing OK lenses for 2 years has been the increase PZO, PZO dynamics were 0.09±0.05 mm. For the correction of progressive myopia spectacle lens changes were more significant, the dynamics of early school leaving amounted to 0,36±0,11 mm. Conclusion. The identified inhibitory effect of OK-lenses on myopia progression, confirmed by the indices of refraction and ultrasound biometry within 2 years of the study. The data allow us to recommend OK-therapy, as an effective tool for progressive myopia.

  2. Agreement among graders on Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) topographic change analysis (TCA) glaucoma progression interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iester, Michele M; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A; Xu, Juan; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate agreement among experts of Heidelberg retina tomography's (HRT) topographic change analysis (TCA) printout interpretations of glaucoma progression and explore methods for improving agreement. 109 eyes of glaucoma, glaucoma suspect and healthy subjects with ≥5 visits and 2 good quality HRT scans acquired at each visit were enrolled. TCA printouts were graded as progression or non-progression. Each grader was presented with 2 sets of tests: a randomly selected single test from each visit and both tests from each visit. Furthermore, the TCA printouts were classified with grader's individual criteria and with predefined criteria (reproducible changes within the optic nerve head, disregarding changes along blood vessels or at steep rim locations and signs of image distortion). Agreement among graders was modelled using common latent factor measurement error structural equation models for ordinal data. Assessment of two scans per visit without using the predefined criteria reduced overall agreement, as indicated by a reduction in the slope, reflecting the correlation with the common factor, for all graders with no effect on reducing the range of the intercepts between the graders. Using the predefined criteria improved grader agreement, as indicated by the narrower range of intercepts among the graders compared with assessment using individual grader's criteria. A simple set of predefined common criteria improves agreement between graders in assessing TCA progression. The inclusion of additional scans from each visit does not improve the agreement. We, therefore, recommend setting standardised criteria for TCA progression evaluation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Retrospective analysis of factors affecting the progression of Chronic Renal Failure in Adult Polycystic Kidney Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.R.; Tashkandi, Muhammed A.; Nahrir, S.; Maulana, A.

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the commonest congenital cystic renal disease. Factors such as hypertension, urinary tract infection, hematuria and proteinuria may effect the progression to chronic renal failure in ADPKD patients. Therapeutic interventions, such as the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or diet modification, may impact the natural progression of the disease. We aim in this study to review a registry of ADPKD patients in order to compare the slow and fast progressors and identify possible predictors of progression and interventions that slow the progression of this disease. Sheffield Kidney Institute (SKI), one of the largest kidney institutes in Northern Europe, has registered a large number of ADPKD patients since 1981. SKI's computer network contains a wide range of information on these patients. We selected 94 adult polycystic patients from the SKI for retrospective analysis of factors affecting progression to chronic renal failure. Patients who doubled their s. creatinine in 3 6 months were considered fast progressors (FP), while those who doubled their s. creatinine in > 36 months were regarded as slow progressors (SP). There 70 patients in the FP group and 24 patients in the SP group. A third group of 137 patients consisted of non-progressors (NP) who ha d stable s. creatinine levels during the same period. We found that the incidence of hypertension, UTI, macroscopic and microscopic hematuria, and overt proteinuria in the FP group was higher than in SP and NP groups. Modification of some factors, such as hypertension and UTI, may decrease the rate of the deterioration of renal function. (author)

  4. Comparative analysis of station blackout accident progression in typical PWR, BWR, and PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo Young; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2012-01-01

    Since the crisis at the Fukushima plants, severe accident progression during a station blackout accident in nuclear power plants is recognized as a very important area for accident management and emergency planning. The purpose of this study is to investigate the comparative characteristics of anticipated severe accident progression among the three typical types of nuclear reactors. A station blackout scenario, where all off-site power is lost and the diesel generators fail, is simulated as an initiating event of a severe accident sequence. In this study a comparative analysis was performed for typical pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), and pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). The study includes the summarization of design differences that would impact severe accident progressions, thermal hydraulic/severe accident phenomenological analysis during a station blackout initiated-severe accident; and an investigation of the core damage process, both within the reactor vessel before it fails and in the containment afterwards, and the resultant impact on the containment.

  5. A joint frailty-copula model between tumour progression and death for meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emura, Takeshi; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Murotani, Kenta; Rondeau, Virginie

    2017-12-01

    Dependent censoring often arises in biomedical studies when time to tumour progression (e.g., relapse of cancer) is censored by an informative terminal event (e.g., death). For meta-analysis combining existing studies, a joint survival model between tumour progression and death has been considered under semicompeting risks, which induces dependence through the study-specific frailty. Our paper here utilizes copulas to generalize the joint frailty model by introducing additional source of dependence arising from intra-subject association between tumour progression and death. The practical value of the new model is particularly evident for meta-analyses in which only a few covariates are consistently measured across studies and hence there exist residual dependence. The covariate effects are formulated through the Cox proportional hazards model, and the baseline hazards are nonparametrically modeled on a basis of splines. The estimator is then obtained by maximizing a penalized log-likelihood function. We also show that the present methodologies are easily modified for the competing risks or recurrent event data, and are generalized to accommodate left-truncation. Simulations are performed to examine the performance of the proposed estimator. The method is applied to a meta-analysis for assessing a recently suggested biomarker CXCL12 for survival in ovarian cancer patients. We implement our proposed methods in R joint.Cox package.

  6. Jupiter data analysis program (JDAP) research grant on wave accessibility and attributes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvert, W.

    1987-01-01

    For more than thirty years the intense decametric radio emissions from Jupiter (DAM) and the corresponding auroral kilometric radiation from the Earth (AKR) have remained major radio science mysteries. Part of the problem, aside from their inherent complexity, has been the difficulty of measuring their source location and emission properties from limited observations. Progress has been made on this problem by locating the source directly, i.e., by analysis of the faraday rotation observed with Voyager as the wave path crossed the Io plasma torus, and indirectly by comparing the peak frequencies of the decametric emission with that at the foot of the Io flux tube. Progress was also made on the general question of how the emissions originate by finding properties of both the AKR and DAM which would imply emission by natural radio lasing

  7. Nuclear and radiochemical techniques in chemical analysis. Progress report, June 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finston, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1976-01-01

    There has been significant progress on the project to measure the neutron-capture cross sections of reactor produced radionuclides, in particular, centering on the problems with nuclides such as 22 Na which may have a resonance for thermal-neutron capture. The thermal capture cross section of less than 40 b has been verified for 54 Mn, and cadmium ratios have been determined for 184 Re in the V-11 and V-14 positions in the HFBR. Lutetium has been used as a neutron temperature monitor for the Brookhaven reactors. Preliminary results on the project to determine the effect of chemical state on the branching ratio in 58 Co are reported. Procedures for aerosol collection and analysis by proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are reported. A program to analyze aerosols for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons has been initiated. Progress is reported on the experimental verification of the proposed acid-base hypothesis

  8. Short analysis of a progressive distorsion problem (tension and cyclic torsion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Roland.

    1978-06-01

    Tests on ratcheting (or progressive distorsion) are in progress in Saclay. A thin tube is subjected to a constant tensile load and to a cyclic twist. The present paper is a short theoretial analysis of that case. A uniform strain and stress field is considered with a constant tensile stress P (primary stress) and a cyclic shearing strain. The shearing strain is known by the corresponding elastic equivalent stress intensity (TRESCA criterion). The cyclic range of the stress intensity is ΔQ (secondary stress range). Are examined the shake down condition and the incremental elongations with different constitutive equations of the material. Special attention is given to perfect plasticity and bilinear kinematic hardening results are presented, but it is believed that these materials mathematical models are simplistic and special experimental tests are proposed [fr

  9. Fused Silica Final Optics for Inertial Fusion Energy: Radiation Studies and System-Level Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latkowski, Jeffery F.; Kubota, Alison; Caturla, Maria J.; Dixit, Sham N.; Speth, Joel A.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2003-01-01

    The survivability of the final optic, which must sit in the line of sight of high-energy neutrons and gamma rays, is a key issue for any laser-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Previous work has concentrated on the use of reflective optics. Here, we introduce and analyze the use of a transmissive final optic for the IFE application. Our experimental work has been conducted at a range of doses and dose rates, including those comparable to the conditions at the IFE final optic. The experimental work, in conjunction with detailed analysis, suggests that a thin, fused silica Fresnel lens may be an attractive option when used at a wavelength of 351 nm. Our measurements and molecular dynamics simulations provide convincing evidence that the radiation damage, which leads to optical absorption, not only saturates but that a 'radiation annealing' effect is observed. A system-level description is provided, including Fresnel lens and phase plate designs

  10. Analysis of Final Energy Demand by Sector in Malaysia using MAED Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, M.; Muhammed Zulfakar Mohd Zolkaffly; Alawiah Musa

    2011-01-01

    Energy supply security is important in ensuring a long term supply to fulfill the growing energy demand. This paper presents the use of IAEA energy planning tool, Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED) to analyze, simulate and compare final energy demand by five different sectors in Malaysia under some assumptions, bounds and restrictions and the outcome can be used for planning of energy supply in future. (author)

  11. Final safety and hazards analysis for the Battelle LOCA simulation tests in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, D.J.; Martin, I.C.; McAuley, S.J.

    1981-04-01

    This is the final safety and hazards report for the proposed Battelle LOCA simulation tests in NRU. A brief description of equipment test design and operating procedure precedes a safety analysis and hazards review of the project. The hazards review addresses potential equipment failures as well as potential for a metal/water reaction and evaluates the consequences. The operation of the tests as proposed does not present an unacceptable risk to the NRU Reactor, CRNL personnel or members of the public. (author)

  12. Nuclear and radiochemical techniques in chemical analysis. Progress report, 1 June 1974--31 May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finston, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1975-01-01

    Progress on the project to determine the neutron-absorption cross section of 22 Na is described. Upper limits for the thermal-neutron cross sections of 88 Y and 139 Ce have been set at 100 barns. The experiment to search for a change in the ratio of electron capture to positron emission due to difference in chemical environment is underway. The mechanical aspects of the system for analysis by proton-induced x-ray emission are described. Recent results on solvent extraction of mercury by pure solvents and propylene carbonate are described. Recent measurements in a study of an acid-base hypothesis are described. (U.S.)

  13. International research progress of CFD application in analysis of nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linsen; Wang Kan; Song Xiaoming

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the latest international research progress of CFD application in nuclear reactor system analysis. CFD method has been applied to a few 3-D single phase transient simulations, including flow field modeling of the reactor cores, assemblies, and vessel plenums. On the other hand, CFD method applied to reactor system still needs further validation and benchmarking, meanwhile,the application of CFD also needs to be studied, including the setup of the Best Practice Guidelines (BPG). Furthermore, CFD codes are used to couple with thermal-hydraulic system codes or neutronic codes. Eventually, in two phase field and turbulence modeling, CFD codes are still being developed. (authors)

  14. Long Term Results of Visual Field Progression Analysis in Open Angle Glaucoma Patients Under Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocatürk, Tolga; Bekmez, Sinan; Katrancı, Merve; Çakmak, Harun; Dayanır, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate visual field progression with trend and event analysis in open angle glaucoma patients under treatment. Fifteen year follow-up results of 408 eyes of 217 glaucoma patients who were followed at Adnan Menderes University, Department of Ophthalmology between 1998 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Visual field data were collected for Mean Deviation (MD), Visual Field Index (VFI), and event occurrence. There were 146 primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), 123 pseudoexfoliative glaucoma (XFG) and 139 normal tension glaucoma (NTG) eyes. MD showed significant change in all diagnostic groups (pfield indices. We herein report our fifteen year follow-up results in open angle glaucoma.

  15. Glaucoma progression detection by retinal nerve fiber layer measurement using scanning laser polarimetry: event and trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byung Gil; Sung, Kyung Rim; Cho, Jung Woo; Kang, Sung Yong; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Na, Jung Hwa; Lee, Youngrok; Kook, Michael S

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the use of scanning laser polarimetry (SLP, GDx VCC) to measure the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in order to evaluate the progression of glaucoma. Test-retest measurement variability was determined in 47 glaucomatous eyes. One eye each from 152 glaucomatous patients with at least 4 years of follow-up was enrolled. Visual field (VF) loss progression was determined by both event analysis (EA, Humphrey guided progression analysis) and trend analysis (TA, linear regression analysis of the visual field index). SLP progression was defined as a reduction of RNFL exceeding the predetermined repeatability coefficient in three consecutive exams, as compared to the baseline measure (EA). The slope of RNFL thickness change over time was determined by linear regression analysis (TA). Twenty-two eyes (14.5%) progressed according to the VF EA, 16 (10.5%) by VF TA, 37 (24.3%) by SLP EA and 19 (12.5%) by SLP TA. Agreement between VF and SLP progression was poor in both EA and TA (VF EA vs. SLP EA, k = 0.110; VF TA vs. SLP TA, k = 0.129). The mean (±standard deviation) progression rate of RNFL thickness as measured by SLP TA did not significantly differ between VF EA progressors and non-progressors (-0.224 ± 0.148 µm/yr vs. -0.218 ± 0.151 µm/yr, p = 0.874). SLP TA and EA showed similar levels of sensitivity when VF progression was considered as the reference standard. RNFL thickness as measurement by SLP was shown to be capable of detecting glaucoma progression. Both EA and TA of SLP showed poor agreement with VF outcomes in detecting glaucoma progression.

  16. Progress of studies on traditional chinese medicine based on complex network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Ru Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is a distinct medical system that deals with the life–health–disease–environment relationship using holistic, dynamic, and dialectical thinking. However, reductionism has often restricted the conventional studies on TCM, and these studies did not investigate the central concepts of TCM theory about the multiple relationships among life, health, disease, and environment. Complex network analysis describes a wide variety of complex systems in the real world, and it has the potential to bridge the gap between TCM and modern science owing to the holism of TCM theory. This article summarizes the current research involving TCM network analysis and highlights the computational tools and analysis methods involved in this research. Finally, to inspire a new approach, the article discussed the potential problems underlying the application of TCM network analysis.

  17. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 Final Determination Quantitative Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2011-05-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. The final analysis considered each of the 44 addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007. All 44 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2007 from Standard 90.1-2004 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 15 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE’s final determination. However, out of the 44 addenda, 9 were preliminarily determined to have measureable and quantifiable impact.

  18. Progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanlei Liu

    Full Text Available A multiscale model based bridge theory is proposed for the progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading. The ablation model is adopted to calculate ablation temperature changing and ablation surface degradation. The polynomial strengthening model of matrix is used to improve bridging model for reducing parameter input. Stiffness degradation methods of bridging model are also improved in order to analyze the stress redistribution more accurately when the damage occurs. Thermal-mechanical analyses of the composite plate are performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit program with the developed model implemented in the VUMAT. The simulation results show that this model can be used to proclaim the mesoscale damage mechanism of composite laminates under coupled loading. Keywords: Laser irradiation, Multiscale analysis, Bridge model, Thermal-mechanical

  19. Research Progress on Pesticide Residue Analysis Techniques in Agro-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Ze-ying

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There are constant occurrences of acute pesticide poisoning among consumers and pesticide residue violations in agro-products import/export trading. Pesticide residue analysis is the important way to protect the food safety and the interest of import/export enterprises. There has been a rapid development in pesticide residue analysis techniques in recent years. In this review, the research progress in the past five years were discussed in the respects of samples preparation and instrument determination. The application, modification and development of the QuEChERS method in samples preparation and the application of tandem mass spectrometry and high resolution mass spectrometry were reviewed. And the implications for the future of the field were discussed.

  20. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwilsky, Klaus M.

    1979-05-01

    This report is the third in a series of Quarterly Technical Progress Reports on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) which is one element of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program, conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to Section II, Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DOE/ET-0032/2), of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program Plan so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1 and 2 report topics which are generic to all of the DAFS Program: DAFS Task Group Activities and Irradiation Test Facilities, respectively. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 report the work that is specific to each of the subtasks around which the program is structured: A) Environmental Characterization, B) Damage Production, and C) Damage Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Behavior.

  1. Meta-analysis of gene expression signatures defining the epithelial to mesenchymal transition during cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J Gröger

    Full Text Available The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT represents a crucial event during cancer progression and dissemination. EMT is the conversion of carcinoma cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype that associates with a higher cell motility as well as enhanced chemoresistance and cancer stemness. Notably, EMT has been increasingly recognized as an early event of metastasis. Numerous gene expression studies (GES have been conducted to obtain transcriptome signatures and marker genes to understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying EMT. Yet, no meta-analysis considering the multitude of GES of EMT has been performed to comprehensively elaborate the core genes in this process. Here we report the meta-analysis of 18 independent and published GES of EMT which focused on different cell types and treatment modalities. Computational analysis revealed clustering of GES according to the type of treatment rather than to cell type. GES of EMT induced via transforming growth factor-β and tumor necrosis factor-α treatment yielded uniformly defined clusters while GES of models with alternative EMT induction clustered in a more complex fashion. In addition, we identified those up- and downregulated genes which were shared between the multitude of GES. This core gene list includes well known EMT markers as well as novel genes so far not described in this process. Furthermore, several genes of the EMT-core gene list significantly correlated with impaired pathological complete response in breast cancer patients. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive survey of available EMT expression signatures and shows fundamental insights into the mechanisms that are governing carcinoma progression.

  2. The Analysis of Surrounding Structure Effect on the Core Degradation Progress with COMPASS Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jun Ho; Son, Dong Gun; Kim, Jong Tae; Park, Rae Jun; Kim, Dong Ha [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In line with the importance of severe accident analysis after Fukushima accident, the development of integrated severe accident code has been launched by the collaboration of three institutes in Korea. KAERI is responsible to develop modules related to the in-vessel phenomena, while other institutes are to the containment and severe accident mitigation facility, respectively. In the first phase, the individual severe accident module has been developed and the construction of integrated analysis code is planned to perform in the second phase. The basic strategy is to extend the design basis analysis codes of SPACE and CAP, which are being validated in Korea for the severe accident analysis. In the first phase, KAERI has targeted to develop the framework of severe accident code, COMPASS (COre Meltdown Progression Accident Simulation Software), covering the severe accident progression in a vessel from a core heat-up to a vessel failure as a stand-alone fashion. In order to analyze the effect of surrounding structure, the melt progression has been compared between the central zone and the most outer zone under the condition of constant radial power peaking factor. Figure 2 and 3 shows the fuel element temperature and the clad mass at the central zone, respectively. Due to the axial power peaking factor, the axial node No.3 has the highest temperature, while the top and bottom nodes have the lowest temperature. When the clad temperature reaches to the Zr melting temperature (2129.15K), the Zr starts to melt. The axial node No.2 reaches to the fuel melting temperature about 5000 sec and the molten fuel relocates to the node No.1, which results to the blockage of flow area in node No.1. The blocked flow area becomes to open about 6100 sec due to the molten ZrO{sub 2} mass relocation to core support plate. Figure 4 and 5 shows the fuel element temperature and the clad mass at the most outer zone, respectively. It is shown that the fuel temperature increase more slowly

  3. Rapid analysis of hay attributes using NIRS. Final report, Task II alfalfa supply system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-24

    This final report provides technical information on the development of a near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) system for the analysis of alfalfa hay. The purpose of the system is to provide consistent quality for processing alfalfa stems for fuel and alfalfa leaf meal products for livestock feed. Project tasks were to: (1) develop an NIRS driven analytical system for analysis of alfalfa hay and processed alfalfa products; (2) assist in hiring a qualified NIRS technician and recommend changes in testing equipment necessary to provide accurate analysis; (3) calibrate the NIRS instrument for accurate analyses; and (4) develop prototype equipment and sampling procedures as a first step towards development of a totally automated sampling system that would rapidly sample and record incoming feedstock and outbound product. An accurate hay testing program was developed, along with calibration equations for analyzing alfalfa hay and sun-cured alfalfa pellets. A preliminary leaf steam calibration protocol was also developed. 7 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. WEXA: exergy analysis for increasing the efficiency of air/water heat pumps - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasser, L.; Wellig, B.; Hilfiker, K.

    2008-04-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a study at the made by the Engineering and Architecture department at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts. The subject of the WEXA study (Waermepumpen-Exergie-Analyse - heat pump exergy analysis) is the analysis of the operation of air/water heat-pumps using exergy analysis methods. The basic thermodynamics of heating systems using heat-pumps is discussed. The exergy analyses and exergy balances for the various components and processes of an air/water heat-pump are presented and discussed. Comparisons are presented for heat-pumps with on/off and continuous control systems for their compressors and fans. The paper is concluded with a collection of appendices on the subject.

  5. Assessing Progress and Pitfalls of the Millennium Development Goals in Zimbabwe: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Mutangabende

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe adopted the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs at their inception in 2000 and it has trends of its progress in its attempt to attain these MDGs as indicated in progress reports since 2004, 2010, 2012 and 2015. In these reports optimistic trends are chiefly found in MDG2 on universal primary education which is Zimbabwe’s pride in Africa, MDG3 regarding gender parity in schools and MDG6 on HIV and AIDS. The country continues to face its biggest challenges in attaining MDG1 which is eliminating extreme poverty and hunger and MDG5 which is increase nurturing mortality, whereas all the objectives under these goals are dubious that would be attained at the cut-off date. It was unfortunate that, the inception of the MDGs coincided with the deepening of socioeconomic, political and environmental crisis in the country which made it very difficult for Zimbabwe to accomplish all of its MDGs. The focal motive of this study was to check the progress, policies, programmes and strategies which were in place to promote the attainment of the MDGs from 2000-2015 and other strategies or policies in place to attain the SDGs 2016-2030. This paper recommended that there is need for institutionalisation of SDGs that is aligning them with Zimbabwe Agenda for Sustainable Socioeconomic Transformation (Zim-Asset cluster; for instance, value accumulation and beneficiation, nourishment security, poverty extermination, social services and strengthening partnership with all stakeholders. The research uses intensive secondary data analysis from various sources including government gazette, journal articles, e-books, and government website, reports, published and unpublished books.

  6. Antioxidant agents for delaying diabetic kidney disease progression: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Bolignano

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a key player in the genesis and worsening of diabetic kidney disease (DKD. We aimed at collecting all available information on possible benefits of chronic antioxidant supplementations on DKD progression.Systematic review and meta-analysis.Adults with DKD (either secondary to type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus.Cochrane CENTRAL, Ovid-MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs or quasi-RCTs without language or follow-up restriction.Any antioxidant supplementation (including but not limited to vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, zinc, methionine or ubiquinone alone or in combination.Primary outcome was progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD. Secondary outcomes were change in albuminuria, proteinuria, serum creatinine and renal function.From 13519 potentially relevant citations retrieved, 15 articles referring to 14 full studies (4345 participants met the inclusion criteria. Antioxidant treatment significantly decreased albuminuria as compared to control (8 studies, 327 participants; SMD: -0.47; 95% CI -0.78, -0.16 but had apparently no tangible effects on renal function (GFR (3 studies, 85 participants; MD -0.12 ml/min/1.73m2; 95% CI -0.06, 0.01. Evidence of benefits on the other outcomes of interest was inconclusive or lacking.Small sample size and limited number of studies. Scarce information available on hard endpoints (ESKD. High heterogeneity among studies with respect to DKD severity, type and duration of antioxidant therapy.In DKD patients, antioxidants may improve early renal damage. Future studies targeting hard endpoints and with longer follow-up and larger sample size are needed to confirm the usefulness of these agents for retarding DKD progression.

  7. NMR-based lipidomic analysis of blood lipoproteins differentiates the progression of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostara, Christina E; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Cung, Manh Thong; Elisaf, Moses S; Goudevenos, John; Bairaktari, Eleni T

    2014-05-02

    Abnormal lipid composition and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD). A (1)H NMR-based lipidomic approach was used to investigate the correlation of coronary artery stenosis with the atherogenic (non-HDL) and atheroprotective (HDL) lipid profiles in 99 patients with CHD of various stages of disease and compared with 60 patients with normal coronary arteries (NCA), all documented in coronary angiography. The pattern recognition models created from lipid profiles predicted the presence of CHD with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 88% in the HDL model and with 90% and 89% in the non-HDL model, respectively. Patients with mild, moderate, and severe coronary artery stenosis were progressively differentiated from those with NCA in the non-HDL model with a statistically significant separation of severe stage from both mild and moderate. In the HDL model, the progressive differentiation of the disease stages was statistically significant only between patients with mild and severe coronary artery stenosis. The lipid constituents of lipoproteins that mainly characterized the initial stages and then the progression of the disease were the high levels of saturated fatty acids in lipids in both HDL and non-HDL particles, the low levels of HDL-phosphatidylcholine, HDL-sphingomyelin, and omega-3 fatty acids and linoleic acid in lipids in non-HDL particles. The conventional lipid marker, total cholesterol, found in low levels in HDL and in high levels in non-HDL, also contributed to the onset of the disease but with a much lower coefficient of significance. (1)H NMR-based lipidomic analysis of atherogenic and atheroprotective lipoproteins could contribute to the early evaluation of the onset of coronary artery disease and possibly to the establishment of an appropriate therapeutic option.

  8. A final report on stress analysis of seal disc of 500 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, D.S.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Kakodkar, A.; Sanatkumar, A.

    1989-01-01

    In Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) on-power refuelling is done by use of fuelling machine. Before refuelling, sealing plug assembly is removed from the end-fitting of the coolant channel and after refuelling the sealing plug is reinstalled back in to the end-fitting. The seal disc is a part of sealing plug assembly. Its function is to create sealing action for the heavy water inside the coolant channel. A systematic developmental work is done to arrive at a final configuration of the seal disc. This is done to minimise the stresses in the body of the seal disc and at the same time to obtain required seating reaction to avoid heavy water leakage. It is observed that stresses computed for the final configuration by linear elastic analysis are more than the allowable value as per ASME Section III, Division 1. This calls for elasto-plastic analysis to find out collapse load to satisfy ASME codal limits as per special provision of NB-3228.1 (1986). The elasto-plastic analysis showed that the seal disc meets ASME codal limits for all stages of loading. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  9. Analysis of collective defense in finals of 2012. Radivoj Korac Cup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine and analyze use, the way of organization and successfulness of collective defense, as well as effects of use of specific defense types. In this case of study, empirically non experimental method and monitoring technique which enables research of technically tactical activities in basketball were used. The sample of research included eight basketball teams, competitors in finals of Radivoj Korac Cup, held in Nis in 2012. In the research seven games were analyzed - four quarterfinal games, two semifinal games and one finals game. The data was collected by the monitoring technique, and analysis of collective defense is done based on variables on which, organization and successfulness of collective defense depends on. Five general variables, seven that refers to the type of defense and five variables of defense activities were included in this analysis and the results of the survey were expressed with quantitative values. With data analysis, it was realized that the team that had higher percentage of general defense efficiency was winning the game. While watching the games an impression that, the players on outer positions were significantly contributing to the efficiency of defense was made, while inner positions players showed much less mobility in defense.

  10. Auditable safety analysis and final hazard classification for Buildings 1310-N and 1314-N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloster, G.L.

    1997-05-01

    This document is a graded auditable safety analysis (ASA) of the deactivation activities planned for the 100-N facility segment comprised of the Building 1310-N pump silo (part of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility) and 1314-N Building (Liquid Waste Disposal Building).The ASA describes the hazards within the facility and evaluates the adequacy of the measures taken to reduce, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. This document also serves as the Final Hazard Classification (FHC) for the 1310-N pump silo and 1314-N Building segment. The FHC is radiological based on the Preliminary Hazard Classification and the total inventory of radioactive and hazardous materials in the segment

  11. ITER final design report, cost review and safety analysis (FDR) and relevant documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains the fourth major milestone report and documents associated with its acceptance, review and approval. This ITER Final Design Report, Cost Review and Safety Analysis was presented to the ITER Council at its 13th meeting in February 1998 and was approved at its extraordinary meeting on 25 June 1998. The contents include an outline of the ITER objectives, the ITER parameters and design overview as well as operating scenarios and plasma performance. Furthermore, design features, safety and environmental characteristics and schedule and cost estimates are given

  12. Final Hazard Classification and Auditable Safety Analysis for the N Basin Segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloster, G.L.

    1998-08-01

    The purposes of this report are to serve as the auditable safety analysis (ASA) for the N Basin Segment, during surveillance and maintenance preceding decontamination and decommissioning; to determine and document the final hazard classification (FHC) for the N Basin Segment. The result of the ASA evaluation are: based on hazard analyses and the evaluation of accidents, no activity could credibly result in an unacceptable exposure to an individual; controls are identified that serve to protect worker health and safety. The results of the FHC evaluation are: potential exposure is much below 10 rem (0.46 rem), and the FHC for the N Basin Segment is Radiological

  13. Gravity Probe B data analysis: II. Science data and their handling prior to the final analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbergleit, A S; Conklin, J W; Heifetz, M I; Holmes, T; Li, J; Mandel, I; Solomonik, V G; Stahl, K; P W Worden Jr; Everitt, C W F; Adams, M; Berberian, J E; Bencze, W; Clarke, B; Al-Jadaan, A; Keiser, G M; Kozaczuk, J A; Al-Meshari, M; Muhlfelder, B; Salomon, M

    2015-01-01

    The results of the Gravity Probe B relativity science mission published in Everitt et al (2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 221101) required a rather sophisticated analysis of experimental data due to several unexpected complications discovered on-orbit. We give a detailed description of the Gravity Probe B data reduction. In the first paper (Silbergleit et al Class. Quantum Grav. 22 224018) we derived the measurement models, i.e., mathematical expressions for all the signals to analyze. In the third paper (Conklin et al Class. Quantum Grav. 22 224020) we explain the estimation algorithms and their program implementation, and discuss the experiment results obtained through data reduction. This paper deals with the science data preparation for the main analysis yielding the relativistic drift estimates. (paper)

  14. Identifying Indicators of Progress in Thermal Spray Research Using Bibliometrics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R.-T.; Khor, K. A.; Yu, L.-G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the research publications on thermal spray in the period of 1985-2015 using the data from Web of Science, Scopus and SciVal®. Bibliometrics analysis was employed to elucidate the country and institution distribution in various thermal spray research areas and to characterize the trends of topic change and technology progress. Results show that China, USA, Japan, Germany, India and France were the top countries in thermal spray research, and Xi'an Jiaotong University, Universite de Technologie Belfort-Montbeliard, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, ETH Zurich, National Research Council of Canada, University of Limoges were among the top institutions that had high scholarly research output during 2005-2015. The terms of the titles, keywords and abstracts of the publications were analyzed by the Latent Dirichlet Allocation model and visually mapped using the VOSviewer software to reveal the progress of thermal spray technology. It is found that thermal barrier coating was consistently the main research area in thermal spray, and high-velocity oxy-fuel spray and cold spray developed rapidly in the last 10 years.

  15. Does colon cancer ever metastasize to bone first? a temporal analysis of colorectal cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Eira S; Fetzer, David T; Barron, Bruce J; Joseph, Usha A; Gayed, Isis W; Wan, David Q

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that colorectal cancer does not frequently metastasize to bone. The aim of this retrospective study was to establish whether colorectal cancer ever bypasses other organs and metastasizes directly to bone and whether the presence of lung lesions is superior to liver as a better predictor of the likelihood and timing of bone metastasis. We performed a retrospective analysis on patients with a clinical diagnosis of colon cancer referred for staging using whole-body 18 F-FDG PET and CT or PET/CT. We combined PET and CT reports from 252 individuals with information concerning patient history, other imaging modalities, and treatments to analyze disease progression. No patient had isolated osseous metastasis at the time of diagnosis, and none developed isolated bone metastasis without other organ involvement during our survey period. It took significantly longer for colorectal cancer patients to develop metastasis to the lungs (23.3 months) or to bone (21.2 months) than to the liver (9.8 months). Conclusion: Metastasis only to bone without other organ involvement in colorectal cancer patients is extremely rare, perhaps more rare than we previously thought. Our findings suggest that resistant metastasis to the lungs predicts potential disease progression to bone in the colorectal cancer population better than liver metastasis does

  16. Rate Dependent Multicontinuum Progressive Failure Analysis of Woven Fabric Composite Structures under Dynamic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lua

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine composite materials typically exhibit significant rate dependent response characteristics when subjected to extreme dynamic loading conditions. In this work, a strain-rate dependent continuum damage model is incorporated with multicontinuum technology (MCT to predict damage and failure progression for composite material structures. MCT treats the constituents of a woven fabric composite as separate but linked continua, thereby allowing a designer to extract constituent stress/strain information in a structural analysis. The MCT algorithm and material damage model are numerically implemented with the explicit finite element code LS-DYNA3D via a user-defined material model (umat. The effects of the strain-rate hardening model are demonstrated through both simple single element analyses for woven fabric composites and also structural level impact simulations of a composite panel subjected to various impact conditions. Progressive damage at the constituent level is monitored throughout the loading. The results qualitatively illustrate the value of rate dependent material models for marine composite materials under extreme dynamic loading conditions.

  17. Visual and statistical analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in primary progressive aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matias-Guiu, Jordi A.; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Garcia-Ramos, Rocio; Fernandez-Matarrubia, Marta; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Matias-Guiu, Jorge [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Department of Neurology, Madrid (Spain); Cabrera-Martin, Maria Nieves; Perez-Castejon, Maria Jesus; Rodriguez-Rey, Cristina; Ortega-Candil, Aida; Carreras, Jose Luis [San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC) Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosing progressive primary aphasia (PPA) and its variants is of great clinical importance, and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) may be a useful diagnostic technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interobserver variability in the interpretation of FDG PET images in PPA as well as the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the technique. We also aimed to compare visual and statistical analyses of these images. There were 10 raters who analysed 44 FDG PET scans from 33 PPA patients and 11 controls. Five raters analysed the images visually, while the other five used maps created using Statistical Parametric Mapping software. Two spatial normalization procedures were performed: global mean normalization and cerebellar normalization. Clinical diagnosis was considered the gold standard. Inter-rater concordance was moderate for visual analysis (Fleiss' kappa 0.568) and substantial for statistical analysis (kappa 0.756-0.881). Agreement was good for all three variants of PPA except for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant studied with visual analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of each rater's diagnosis of PPA was high, averaging 87.8 and 89.9 % for visual analysis and 96.9 and 90.9 % for statistical analysis using global mean normalization, respectively. In cerebellar normalization, sensitivity was 88.9 % and specificity 100 %. FDG PET demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of PPA and its variants. Inter-rater concordance was higher for statistical analysis, especially for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant. These data support the use of FDG PET to evaluate patients with PPA and show that statistical analysis methods are particularly useful for identifying the nonfluent/agrammatic variant of PPA. (orig.)

  18. Visual and statistical analysis of 18F-FDG PET in primary progressive aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matias-Guiu, Jordi A.; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Garcia-Ramos, Rocio; Fernandez-Matarrubia, Marta; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Matias-Guiu, Jorge; Cabrera-Martin, Maria Nieves; Perez-Castejon, Maria Jesus; Rodriguez-Rey, Cristina; Ortega-Candil, Aida; Carreras, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing progressive primary aphasia (PPA) and its variants is of great clinical importance, and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) may be a useful diagnostic technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interobserver variability in the interpretation of FDG PET images in PPA as well as the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the technique. We also aimed to compare visual and statistical analyses of these images. There were 10 raters who analysed 44 FDG PET scans from 33 PPA patients and 11 controls. Five raters analysed the images visually, while the other five used maps created using Statistical Parametric Mapping software. Two spatial normalization procedures were performed: global mean normalization and cerebellar normalization. Clinical diagnosis was considered the gold standard. Inter-rater concordance was moderate for visual analysis (Fleiss' kappa 0.568) and substantial for statistical analysis (kappa 0.756-0.881). Agreement was good for all three variants of PPA except for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant studied with visual analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of each rater's diagnosis of PPA was high, averaging 87.8 and 89.9 % for visual analysis and 96.9 and 90.9 % for statistical analysis using global mean normalization, respectively. In cerebellar normalization, sensitivity was 88.9 % and specificity 100 %. FDG PET demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of PPA and its variants. Inter-rater concordance was higher for statistical analysis, especially for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant. These data support the use of FDG PET to evaluate patients with PPA and show that statistical analysis methods are particularly useful for identifying the nonfluent/agrammatic variant of PPA. (orig.)

  19. Seismic risk analysis for General Electric Plutonium Facility, Pleasanton, California. Final report, part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report is the second of a two part study addressing the seismic risk or hazard of the special nuclear materials (SNM) facility of the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center at Pleasanton, California. The Part I companion to this report, dated July 31, 1978, presented the seismic hazard at the site that resulted from exposure to earthquakes on the Calaveras, Hayward, San Andreas and, additionally, from smaller unassociated earthquakes that could not be attributed to these specific faults. However, while this study was in progress, certain additional geologic information became available that could be interpreted in terms of the existance of a nearby fault. Although substantial geologic investigations were subsequently deployed, the existance of this postulated fault, called the Verona Fault, remained very controversial. The purpose of the Part II study was to assume the existance of such a capable fault and, under this assumption, to examine the loads that the fault could impose on the SNM facility. This report first reviews the geologic setting with a focus on specifying sufficient geologic parameters to characterize the postulated fault. The report next presents the methodology used to calculate the vibratory ground motion hazard. Because of the complexity of the fault geometry, a slightly different methodology is used here compared to the Part I report. This section ends with the results of the calculation applied to the SNM facility. Finally, the report presents the methodology and results of the rupture hazard calculation

  20. Progress in Analysis to Remote Sensed Thermal Abnormity with Fault Activity and Seismogenic Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Lixin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research to the remote sensed thermal abnormity with fault activity and seismogenic process is a vital topic of the Earth observation and remote sensing application. It is presented that a systematic review on the international researches on the topic during the past 30 years, in the respects of remote sensing data applications, anomaly analysis methods, and mechanism understanding. Firstly, the outlines of remote sensing data applications are given including infrared brightness temperature, microwave brightness temperature, outgoing longwave radiation, and assimilated data from multiple earth observations. Secondly, three development phases are summarized as qualitative analysis based on visual interpretation, quantitative analysis based on image processing, and multi-parameter spatio-temporal correlation analysis. Thirdly, the theoretical hypotheses presented for the mechanism understanding are introduced including earth degassing, stress-induced heat, crustal rock battery conversion, latent heat release due to radon decay as well as multi-spheres coupling effect. Finally, three key directions of future research on this topic are proposed:anomaly recognizing by remote sensing monitoring and data analysis for typical tectonic activity areas; anomaly mechanism understanding based on earthquake-related earth system responses; spatio-temporal correlation analysis of air-based, space-based and ground-based stereoscopic observations.

  1. Investigation of modern methods of probalistic sensitivity analysis of final repository performance assessment models (MOSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiessl, Sabine; Becker, Dirk-Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a mathematical means for analysing the sensitivities of a computational model to variations of its input parameters. Thus, it is a tool for managing parameter uncertainties. It is often performed probabilistically as global sensitivity analysis, running the model a large number of times with different parameter value combinations. Going along with the increase of computer capabilities, global sensitivity analysis has been a field of mathematical research for some decades. In the field of final repository modelling, probabilistic analysis is regarded a key element of a modern safety case. An appropriate uncertainty and sensitivity analysis can help identify parameters that need further dedicated research to reduce the overall uncertainty, generally leads to better system understanding and can thus contribute to building confidence in the models. The purpose of the project described here was to systematically investigate different numerical and graphical techniques of sensitivity analysis with typical repository models, which produce a distinctly right-skewed and tailed output distribution and can exhibit a highly nonlinear, non-monotonic or even non-continuous behaviour. For the investigations presented here, three test models were defined that describe generic, but typical repository systems. A number of numerical and graphical sensitivity analysis methods were selected for investigation and, in part, modified or adapted. Different sampling methods were applied to produce various parameter samples of different sizes and many individual runs with the test models were performed. The results were evaluated with the different methods of sensitivity analysis. On this basis the methods were compared and assessed. This report gives an overview of the background and the applied methods. The results obtained for three typical test models are presented and explained; conclusions in view of practical applications are drawn. At the end, a recommendation

  2. Investigation of modern methods of probalistic sensitivity analysis of final repository performance assessment models (MOSEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiessl, Sabine; Becker, Dirk-Alexander

    2017-06-15

    Sensitivity analysis is a mathematical means for analysing the sensitivities of a computational model to variations of its input parameters. Thus, it is a tool for managing parameter uncertainties. It is often performed probabilistically as global sensitivity analysis, running the model a large number of times with different parameter value combinations. Going along with the increase of computer capabilities, global sensitivity analysis has been a field of mathematical research for some decades. In the field of final repository modelling, probabilistic analysis is regarded a key element of a modern safety case. An appropriate uncertainty and sensitivity analysis can help identify parameters that need further dedicated research to reduce the overall uncertainty, generally leads to better system understanding and can thus contribute to building confidence in the models. The purpose of the project described here was to systematically investigate different numerical and graphical techniques of sensitivity analysis with typical repository models, which produce a distinctly right-skewed and tailed output distribution and can exhibit a highly nonlinear, non-monotonic or even non-continuous behaviour. For the investigations presented here, three test models were defined that describe generic, but typical repository systems. A number of numerical and graphical sensitivity analysis methods were selected for investigation and, in part, modified or adapted. Different sampling methods were applied to produce various parameter samples of different sizes and many individual runs with the test models were performed. The results were evaluated with the different methods of sensitivity analysis. On this basis the methods were compared and assessed. This report gives an overview of the background and the applied methods. The results obtained for three typical test models are presented and explained; conclusions in view of practical applications are drawn. At the end, a recommendation

  3. The Impact of Blue Light Cystoscopy with Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) on Progression of Bladder Cancer - A New Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M; Cookson, Michael; Witjes, J Alfred; Stenzl, Arnulf; Grossman, H Barton

    2016-04-27

    Background: The International Bladder Cancer Group (IBCG) recently proposed a new definition of disease progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), including change in T-stage, change to T2 or higher or change from low to high grade. Objective: To establish whether blue light cystoscopy with hexaminolevulinate (HAL) impacts the rate of progression and time to progression using the revised definition. Methods: An earlier long-term follow-up of a controlled Phase III study reported outcomes following blue light cystoscopy with HAL (255 patients) or white light (WL) cystoscopy (261 patients) in NMIBC patients. The data was re-analysed according to the new definition. Results: In the original analysis, after 4.5 years (median), eight HAL and 16 WL patients were deemed to have progressed (transition from NMIBC to muscle invasive bladder cancer, (T2-4)). According to the new definition, additional patients in both groups were found to have progressed: 31 (12.2%) HAL vs 46 (17.6%) WL ( p  = 0.085) with four (1.6%) HAL and 11 (4.2%) WL patients progressing from Ta to CIS. Time to progression was longer in the HAL group ( p  = 0.05). Conclusions: Applying the new IBCG definition there was a trend towards a lower rate of progression in HAL patients, particularly in those progressing from Ta to CIS. Time to progression was significantly prolonged. This suggests that patients should receive blue light cystoscopy with HAL rather than WL at resection. Adoption of the new definition could allow more patients at risk of progression to be treated appropriately earlier.

  4. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwilsky, Klaus M.

    1979-05-01

    This report is the fourth in a series of Quarterly Technical Progress Reports on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) which is one element of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program, conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title (to be published) so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to the Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1 and 2 report topics which are generic to all of the DAFS Program: DAFS Task Group Activities and Irradiation Test Facilities, respectively. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 report the work that is specific to each of the subtasks around which the program is structured: A) Environmental Characterization, B) Damage Production, and C) Damage Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Behavior.

  5. Lipidomic analysis of epidermal lipids: a tool to predict progression of inflammatory skin disease in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K

    2016-05-01

    Lipidomics is the large-scale profiling and characterization of lipid species in a biological system using mass spectrometry. The skin barrier is mainly comprised of corneocytes and a lipid-enriched extracellular matrix. The major skin lipids are ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids (FFA). Lipid compositions are altered in inflammatory skin disorders with disrupted skin barrier such as atopic dermatitis (AD). Here we discuss some of the recent applications of lipidomics in human skin biology and in inflammatory skin diseases such as AD, psoriasis and Netherton syndrome. We also review applications of lipidomics in human skin equivalent and in pre-clinical animal models of skin diseases to gain insight into the pathogenesis of the skin disease. Expert commentary: Skin lipidomics analysis could be a fast, reliable and noninvasive tool to characterize the skin lipid profile and to monitor the progression of inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  6. Cohesive Laws and Progressive Damage Analysis of Composite Bonded Joints, a Combined Numerical/Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations, in agreement with experimental tests, indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  7. A phenomenological analysis of melt progression in the lower head of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.M., E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tourniaire, B. [EDF/Septen, Lyon (France)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • We propose a phenomenological description of melt progression into the lower head. • We examine changes in heat loads on the vessel. • Heat loads are more severe than emphasized by the bounding situation assumption. • Both primary circuit and ex-vessel reflooding are necessary for in-vessel retention. • Vessel failure conditions are examined. - Abstract: The analysis of in-vessel corium cooling (IVC) and retention (IVR) involves the description of very complex and transient physical phenomena. To get round this difficulty, “bounding” situations are often emphasized for the demonstration of corium coolability, by vessel flooding and/or by reactor pit flooding. This approach however comes up against its own limitations. More realistic melt progression scenarios are required to provide plausible corium configurations and vessel failure conditions. Work to develop more realistic melt progression scenarios has been done at CEA, in collaboration with EDF. Development has concentrated on the French 1300 MWe PWR, considering both dry scenarios and the possibility of flooding of the RPC (reactor primary circuit) and/or the reactor pit. The models used for this approach have been derived from the analysis of the TMI2 accident and take benefit from the lessons derived from several programs related to pool thermal hydraulics (BALI, COPO, ACOPO, etc.), material interactions (RASPLAV, MASCA), critical heat flux (CHF) on the external surface of the vessel (KAIST, SULTAN, ULPU), etc. Important conclusions of this work are as follows: (a)After the start of corium melting and onset of melt formation in the core at low pressure (∼1 to 5 bars), it seems questionable that RPV (reactor pressure vessel) reflooding alone would be sufficient to achieve corium retention in the vessel; (b)If the vessel is not cooled externally, it may fail due to local heat-up before the whole core fuel inventory is relocated in the lower head; (c)Even if the vessel is

  8. Plasma sample based analysis of gastric cancer progression using targeted metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, Sergio; Ramírez-Lázaro, Maria José; Sanjuan-Herráez, Daniel; Brunet-Vega, Anna; Pericay, Carles; Gombau, Lourdes; Junquera, Félix; Quintás, Guillermo; Calvet, Xavier

    2017-12-19

    Gastric carcinogenesis is a multifactorial process described as a stepwise progression from non-active gastritis (NAG), chronic active gastritis (CAG), precursor lesions of gastric cancer (PLGC) and gastric adenocarcinoma. Gastric cancer (GC) 5-year survival rate is highly dependent upon stage of disease at diagnosis, which is based on endoscopy, biopsy and pathological examinations. Non-invasive GC biomarkers would facilitate its diagnosis at early stages leading to improved GC prognosis. We analyzed plasma samples collected from 80 patients diagnosed with NAG without H. pylori infection (NAG-), CAG with H. pylori infection (CAG+), PLGC and GC. A panel of 208 metabolites including acylcarnitines, amino acids and biogenic amines, sphingolipids, glycerophospholipids, hexoses, and tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolites were quantified using two complementary quantitative approaches: Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ®p180 kit and a LC-MS method designed for the analysis of 29 tryptophan pathway and phenylalanine metabolites. Significantly altered metabolic profiles were found in GC patients that allowing discrimination from NAG-, CAG+ and PLGC patients. Pathway analysis showed significantly altered tryptophan and nitrogen metabolic pathways (FDR P < 0.01). Three metabolites (histidine, tryprophan and phenylacetylglutamine) discriminated between non-GC and GC groups. These metabolic signatures open new possibilities to improve surveillance of PLGC patients using a minimally invasive blood analysis.

  9. Progress in the neutronic core conversion (HEU-LEU) analysis of Ghana research reactor-1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anim-Sampong, S.; Maakuu, B. T.; Akaho, E. H. K.; Andam, A.; Liaw, J. J. R.; Matos, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Ghana Atomic Energy Commission; Kwame Nkrumah Univ. of Science and Technology

    2006-01-01

    The Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) and has operated at different power levels since its commissioning in March 1995. As required for all nuclear reactors, neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis are being performed for the HEU-LEU core conversion studies of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) facility, which is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). Stochastic Monte Carlo particle transport methods and tools (MCNP4c/MCNP5) were used to fine-tune a previously developed 3-D MCNP model of the GHARR-1 facility and perform neutronic analysis of the 90.2% HEU reference and candidate LEU (UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, U-9Mo) fresh cores with varying enrichments from 12.6%-19.75%. In this paper, the results of the progress made in the Monte Carlo neutronic analysis of the HEU reference and candidate LEU fuels are presented. In particular, a comparative performance assessment of the LEU with respect to neutron flux variations in the fission chamber and experimental irradiation channels are highlighted.

  10. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off

  11. Reliability of steam-turbine rotors. Task 1. Lifetime prediction analysis system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, P.K.; Pennick, H.G.; Peters, J.E.; Wells, C.H.

    1982-12-01

    Task 1 of RP 502, Reliability of Steam Turbine Rotors, resulted in the development of a computerized lifetime prediction analysis system (STRAP) for the automatic evaluation of rotor integrity based upon the results of a boresonic examination of near-bore defects. Concurrently an advanced boresonic examination system (TREES), designed to acquire data automatically for lifetime analysis, was developed and delivered to the maintenance shop of a major utility. This system and a semi-automated, state-of-the-art system (BUCS) were evaluated on two retired rotors as part of the Task 2 effort. A modified nonproprietary version of STRAP, called SAFER, is now available for rotor lifetime prediction analysis. STRAP and SAFER share a common fracture analysis postprocessor for rapid evaluation of either conventional boresonic amplitude data or TREES cell data. The final version of this postprocessor contains general stress intensity correlations for elliptical cracks in a radial stress gradient and provision for elastic-plastic instability of the ligament between an imbedded crack and the bore surface. Both linear elastic and ligament rupture models were developed for rapid analysis of linkup within three-dimensional clusters of defects. Bore stress-rupture criteria are included, but a creep-fatigue crack growth data base is not available. Physical and mechanical properties of air-melt 1CrMoV forgings are built into the program; however, only bounding values of fracture toughness versus temperature are available. Owing to the lack of data regarding the probability of flaw detection for the boresonic systems and of quantitative verification of the flaw linkup analysis, automatic evlauation of boresonic results is not recommended, and the lifetime prediction system is currently restricted to conservative, deterministic analysis of specified flaw geometries

  12. A STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF GDP AND FINAL CONSUMPTION USING SIMPLE LINEAR REGRESSION. THE CASE OF ROMANIA 1990–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Aniela Balacescu; Marian Zaharia

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the causal relationship between GDP and final consumption. The authors used linear regression model in which GDP is considered variable results, and final consumption variable factor. In drafting article we used Excel software application that is a modern computing and statistical data analysis.

  13. A Novel Quantitative Computed Tomographic Analysis Suggests How Sirolimus Stabilizes Progressive Air Trapping in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argula, Rahul G; Kokosi, Maria; Lo, Pechin; Kim, Hyun J; Ravenel, James G; Meyer, Cristopher; Goldin, Jonathan; Lee, Hye-Seung; Strange, Charlie; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-03-01

    The Multicenter International Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Efficacy and Safety of Sirolimus (MILES) trial demonstrated that sirolimus stabilized lung function and improved measures of functional performance and quality of life in patients with lymphangioleiomyomatosis. The physiologic mechanisms of these beneficial actions of sirolimus are incompletely understood. To prospectively determine the longitudinal computed tomographic lung imaging correlates of lung function change in MILES patients treated with placebo or sirolimus. We determined the baseline to 12-month change in computed tomographic image-derived lung volumes and the volume of the lung occupied by cysts in the 31 MILES participants (17 in sirolimus group, 14 in placebo group) with baseline and 12-month scans. There was a trend toward an increase in median expiratory cyst volume percentage in the placebo group and a reduction in the sirolimus group (+2.68% vs. +0.97%, respectively; P = 0.10). The computed tomographic image-derived residual volume and the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity increased more in the placebo group than in the sirolimus group (+214.4 ml vs. +2.9 ml [P = 0.054] and +0.05 ml vs. -0.01 ml [P = 0.0498], respectively). A Markov transition chain analysis of respiratory cycle cyst volume changes revealed greater dynamic variation in the sirolimus group than in the placebo group at the 12-month time point. Collectively, these data suggest that sirolimus attenuates progressive gas trapping in lymphangioleiomyomatosis, consistent with a beneficial effect of the drug on airflow obstruction. We speculate that a reduction in lymphangioleiomyomatosis cell burden around small airways and cyst walls alleviates progressive airflow limitation and facilitates cyst emptying.

  14. Multi-task linear programming discriminant analysis for the identification of progressive MCI individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Yu

    Full Text Available Accurately identifying mild cognitive impairment (MCI individuals who will progress to Alzheimer's disease (AD is very important for making early interventions. Many classification methods focus on integrating multiple imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET. However, the main challenge for MCI classification using multiple imaging modalities is the existence of a lot of missing data in many subjects. For example, in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI study, almost half of the subjects do not have PET images. In this paper, we propose a new and flexible binary classification method, namely Multi-task Linear Programming Discriminant (MLPD analysis, for the incomplete multi-source feature learning. Specifically, we decompose the classification problem into different classification tasks, i.e., one for each combination of available data sources. To solve all different classification tasks jointly, our proposed MLPD method links them together by constraining them to achieve the similar estimated mean difference between the two classes (under classification for those shared features. Compared with the state-of-the-art incomplete Multi-Source Feature (iMSF learning method, instead of constraining different classification tasks to choose a common feature subset for those shared features, MLPD can flexibly and adaptively choose different feature subsets for different classification tasks. Furthermore, our proposed MLPD method can be efficiently implemented by linear programming. To validate our MLPD method, we perform experiments on the ADNI baseline dataset with the incomplete MRI and PET images from 167 progressive MCI (pMCI subjects and 226 stable MCI (sMCI subjects. We further compared our method with the iMSF method (using incomplete MRI and PET images and also the single-task classification method (using only MRI or only subjects with both MRI and

  15. Multi-task linear programming discriminant analysis for the identification of progressive MCI individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guan; Liu, Yufeng; Thung, Kim-Han; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Accurately identifying mild cognitive impairment (MCI) individuals who will progress to Alzheimer's disease (AD) is very important for making early interventions. Many classification methods focus on integrating multiple imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). However, the main challenge for MCI classification using multiple imaging modalities is the existence of a lot of missing data in many subjects. For example, in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study, almost half of the subjects do not have PET images. In this paper, we propose a new and flexible binary classification method, namely Multi-task Linear Programming Discriminant (MLPD) analysis, for the incomplete multi-source feature learning. Specifically, we decompose the classification problem into different classification tasks, i.e., one for each combination of available data sources. To solve all different classification tasks jointly, our proposed MLPD method links them together by constraining them to achieve the similar estimated mean difference between the two classes (under classification) for those shared features. Compared with the state-of-the-art incomplete Multi-Source Feature (iMSF) learning method, instead of constraining different classification tasks to choose a common feature subset for those shared features, MLPD can flexibly and adaptively choose different feature subsets for different classification tasks. Furthermore, our proposed MLPD method can be efficiently implemented by linear programming. To validate our MLPD method, we perform experiments on the ADNI baseline dataset with the incomplete MRI and PET images from 167 progressive MCI (pMCI) subjects and 226 stable MCI (sMCI) subjects. We further compared our method with the iMSF method (using incomplete MRI and PET images) and also the single-task classification method (using only MRI or only subjects with both MRI and PET images

  16. Analysis of temperatures during the firing bricks and final properties solid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Guerrero Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Since the estructural behavior of the walls in a building directly depends on the properties of the blocks used, these properties are very important. In particular, the final properties of a ceramic block (often used in masonry depend on the cooking temperature of the pulp. Objective: The purpose of this research is to determine the relationship between the final properties of a ceramic block and the temperature at which it was cooked. Additionally, it is wroth considering how quickly these temperatures vary in the kiln. Method: In first place, a system based on Labview was used to record the temperatures in the oven. In second place, it was considered the temperature increasing rate according to the ideal curve for baking blocks, which was classified inside the oven. In third place, samples of the product were taken according to the technical norms NTC 4017 and NTC 4205 in order to determine the properties of the block. Results: According to the samples, we determined: the Initial absorption of water (TIA, the absorption rate at 24 hours of immersion, the compressive strength, and the Modulus of Rupture (MR. Additionally, applying a multiple linear regression analysis, it was found a relationship between the TIA, the temperature increase rate, and the MR. Conclusions: From the results in the research, it is possible to conclude that: blocks baked at more than 1000 °C have the highest modulus of rupture (1.54 MPa; however, it was found that blocks baked at lower temperature presented the highest initial absorption rate (0.37 gr/cm2/min and the best compressive strength (7.28 MPa. Finally, since the temperature and time are not controlled during the baking process, it is difficult for properties to be the most suitable.

  17. Using root cause analysis to promote critical thinking in final year Bachelor of Midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Sidebotham, Mary; Creedy, Debra K; Fenwick, Jennifer; Gamble, Jenny

    2014-06-01

    Midwives require well developed critical thinking to practice autonomously. However, multiple factors impinge on students' deep learning in the clinical context. Analysis of actual case scenarios using root cause analysis may foster students' critical thinking and application of 'best practice' principles in complex clinical situations. To examine the effectiveness of an innovative teaching strategy involving root cause analysis to develop students' perceptions of their critical thinking abilities. A descriptive, mixed methods design was used. Final 3rd year undergraduate midwifery students (n=22) worked in teams to complete and present an assessment item based on root cause analysis. The cases were adapted from coroners' reports. After graduation, 17 (77%) students evaluated the course using a standard university assessment tool. In addition 12 (54%) students provided specific feedback on the teaching strategy using a 16-item survey tool based on the domain concepts of Educational Acceptability, Educational Impact, and Preparation for Practice. Survey responses were on a 5-point Likert scale and analysed using descriptive statistics. Open-ended responses were analysed using content analysis. The majority of students perceived the course and this teaching strategy positively. The domain mean scores were high for Educational Acceptability (mean=4.3, SD=.49) and Educational Impact (mean=4.19, SD=.75) but slightly lower for Preparation for Practice (mean=3.7, SD=.77). Overall student responses to each item were positive with no item mean less than 3.42. Students found the root cause analysis challenging and time consuming but reported development of critical thinking skills about the complexity of practice, clinical governance and risk management principles. Analysing complex real life clinical cases to determine a root cause enhanced midwifery students' perceptions of their critical thinking. Teaching and assessment strategies to promote critical thinking need to be

  18. Progress in Addressing DNFSB Recommendation 2002-1 Issues: Improving Accident Analysis Software Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VINCENT, ANDREW

    2005-01-01

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-1 (''Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software'') identified a number of quality assurance issues on the use of software in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for analyzing hazards, and designing and operating controls to prevent or mitigate potential accidents. Over the last year, DOE has begun several processes and programs as part of the Implementation Plan commitments, and in particular, has made significant progress in addressing several sets of issues particularly important in the application of software for performing hazard and accident analysis. The work discussed here demonstrates that through these actions, Software Quality Assurance (SQA) guidance and software tools are available that can be used to improve resulting safety analysis. Specifically, five of the primary actions corresponding to the commitments made in the Implementation Plan to Recommendation 2002-1 are identified and discussed in this paper. Included are the web-based DOE SQA Knowledge Portal and the Central Registry, guidance and gap analysis reports, electronic bulletin board and discussion forum, and a DOE safety software guide. These SQA products can benefit DOE safety contractors in the development of hazard and accident analysis by precluding inappropriate software applications and utilizing best practices when incorporating software results to safety basis documentation. The improvement actions discussed here mark a beginning to establishing stronger, standard-compliant programs, practices, and processes in SQA among safety software users, managers, and reviewers throughout the DOE Complex. Additional effort is needed, however, particularly in: (1) processes to add new software applications to the DOE Safety Software Toolbox; (2) improving the effectiveness of software issue communication; and (3) promoting a safety software quality assurance culture

  19. Analysis of factors affecting local tumor progression of colorectal cancer liver metastasis after radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Seong Hee; Cho, Yun Ku; Choi, Seung A; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Ho Suk [Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent predictive factors for local tumor progression (LTP) of colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) after radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Patients with CRLM were included in the analysis if nodules were up to five in number, each nodule was ≤ 5 cm, and RFA was performed in our center from January 2006 to December 2015. Univariate and multivariate analyses to identify the predictors of LTP were performed by using a Cox proportional hazard model. Overall, 58 tumors from 38 patients were included in this study. LTP occurred in 14 tumors from 9 patients. The overall 1- and 3-year LTP rates were 23.5% and 29.4%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size > 2 cm and insufficient ablative margin were two independently significant adverse prognostic factors for LTP (p = 0.045 and 0.022, respectively). The 3-year LTP rates for 33 and 25 tumors with and without sufficient ablative margin were 4.5% and 61.2%, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The difference in the 3-year LTP rates according to the tumor size was not statistically significant (p = 0.791). Insufficient ablative margin seems to be the most potent predictor of LTP after RFA of CRLM.

  20. Regulatory analysis for final rule on nuclear power plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for the final rule (10 CFR Part 54) that defines the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's requirements for renewing the operating licenses of commercial nuclear power plants. A set of four specific alternatives for the safety review of license renewal applications is defined and evaluated. These are: Alternative A-current licensing basis; Alternative B-extension of Alternative A to require assessment and managing of aging; Alternative C -- extension of Alternative B to require assessment of design differences against selected new-plant standards using probabilistic risk assessment; and Alternative D -- extension of Alternative B to require compliance with all new-plant standards. A quantitative comparison of the four alternatives in terms of impact-to-value ratio is presented, and Alternative B is the most cost-beneficial safety review alternative

  1. Analysis of particle sources by interferometry in a three-body final state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, P.

    1984-01-01

    This work presents the set-up of an original interferometrical method the aim of which is to access the intrinsic parameters (lifetime or natural width) of intermediate resonances created during nuclear collisions. The technic is based on the overlap of two events in the same detection, and shows some analogies with the interferometrical measurements based on the HANBURY-BROWN, TWISS effect. It applies to reactions leading to a three particle final state for which at least two particles are identical. The considered reactions are 11 B(α, 7 Li)αα; 12 C( 16 0,α) 12 C 12 C, 11 B(p,α)αα in which the intermediate source is respectively a level of 11 B*, 16 0*, 8 Be*. The results are in qualitative agreement with such an analysis [fr

  2. Final hazard classification and auditable safety analysis for the N basin segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloster, G.; Smith, R.I.; Larson, A.R.; Duncan, G.M.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the following: To serve as the auditable safety analysis (ASA) for the N Basin Segment, including both the quiescent state and planned intrusive activities. The ASA is developed through the realistic evaluation of potential hazards that envelope the threat to personnel. The ASA also includes the specification of the programmatic, baseline, and activity- specific controls that are necessary for the protection of workers. To determine and document the final hazard classification (FHC) for the N Basin Segment. The FHC is developed through the use of bounding accident analyses that envelope the potential exposures to personnel. The FHC also includes the specification of the special controls that are necessary to remain within the envelope of those accident analyses

  3. Cost analysis for final disposal of double-shell tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, T.W.; Markillie, K.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Cost Analysis For Final Disposal of Double-Shell Tank Waste provides the Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors with a better understanding of costs associated with the transfer, storage, and treatment of liquid mixed wasted within the Double-Shell Tank System (DST). In order to evaluate waste minimization/pollution prevention ideas, it is necessary to have reliable cost data that can be used in cost/benefit analyses; preparation of funding requests and/or proposals; and provide a way for prioritizing and allocating limited resources. This cost per gallon rate will be used by DST waste generators to assess the feasibility of Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (P20A) and to determine the cost avoidances or savings associated with the implementation of those P20As

  4. Automatic progressive damage detection of rotor bar in induction motor using vibration analysis and multiple classifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Vega, Israel; Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose; Ramirez-Cortes, Juan; Peregrina-Barreto, Hayde

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased interest in developing reliable condition monitoring and fault diagnosis systems of machines like induction motors; such interest is not only in the final phase of the failure but also at early stages. In this paper, several levels of damage of rotor bars under different load conditions are identified by means of vibration signals. The importance of this work relies on a simple but effective automatic detection algorithm of the damage before a break occurs. The feature extraction is based on discrete wavelet analysis and auto- correlation process. Then, the automatic classification of the fault degree is carried out by a binary classification tree. In each node, com- paring the learned levels of the breaking off correctly identifies the fault degree. The best results of classification are obtained employing computational intelligence techniques like support vector machines, multilayer perceptron, and the k-NN algorithm, with a proper selection of their optimal parameters.

  5. Automatic progressive damage detection of rotor bar in induction motor using vibration analysis and multiple classifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Vega, Israel; Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose; Ramirez-Cortes, Juan; Peregrina-Barreto, Hayde [Santa María Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2017-06-15

    There is an increased interest in developing reliable condition monitoring and fault diagnosis systems of machines like induction motors; such interest is not only in the final phase of the failure but also at early stages. In this paper, several levels of damage of rotor bars under different load conditions are identified by means of vibration signals. The importance of this work relies on a simple but effective automatic detection algorithm of the damage before a break occurs. The feature extraction is based on discrete wavelet analysis and auto- correlation process. Then, the automatic classification of the fault degree is carried out by a binary classification tree. In each node, com- paring the learned levels of the breaking off correctly identifies the fault degree. The best results of classification are obtained employing computational intelligence techniques like support vector machines, multilayer perceptron, and the k-NN algorithm, with a proper selection of their optimal parameters.

  6. Does monitoring goal progress promote goal attainment? A meta-analysis of the experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, Benjamin; Webb, Thomas L; Chang, Betty P I; Prestwich, Andrew; Conner, Mark; Kellar, Ian; Benn, Yael; Sheeran, Paschal

    2016-02-01

    Control theory and other frameworks for understanding self-regulation suggest that monitoring goal progress is a crucial process that intervenes between setting and attaining a goal, and helps to ensure that goals are translated into action. However, the impact of progress monitoring interventions on rates of behavioral performance and goal attainment has yet to be quantified. A systematic literature search identified 138 studies (N = 19,951) that randomly allocated participants to an intervention designed to promote monitoring of goal progress versus a control condition. All studies reported the effects of the treatment on (a) the frequency of progress monitoring and (b) subsequent goal attainment. A random effects model revealed that, on average, interventions were successful at increasing the frequency of monitoring goal progress (d+ = 1.98, 95% CI [1.71, 2.24]) and promoted goal attainment (d+ = 0.40, 95% CI [0.32, 0.48]). Furthermore, changes in the frequency of progress monitoring mediated the effect of the interventions on goal attainment. Moderation tests revealed that progress monitoring had larger effects on goal attainment when the outcomes were reported or made public, and when the information was physically recorded. Taken together, the findings suggest that monitoring goal progress is an effective self-regulation strategy, and that interventions that increase the frequency of progress monitoring are likely to promote behavior change. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Protein Analysis in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid: Physiological Aspects, Current Progress and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas F. Hühmer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of lumbar puncture into clinical medicine over 100 years ago marks the beginning of the study of central nervous system diseases using the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Ever since, CSF has been analyzed extensively to elucidate the physiological and biochemical bases of neurological disease. The proximity of CSF to the brain makes it a good target for studying the pathophysiology of brain functions, but the barrier function of the CSF also impedes its diagnostic value. Today, measurements to determine alterations in the composition of CSF are central in the differential diagnosis of specific diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. In particular, the analysis of the CSF protein composition provides crucial information in the diagnosis of CNS diseases. This enables the assessment of the physiology of the blood-CSF barrier and of the immunology of intrathecial responses. Besides those routine measurements, protein compositional studies of CSF have been extended recently to many other proteins in the expectation that comprehensive analysis of lower abundance CSF proteins will lead to the discovery of new disease markers. Disease marker discovery by molecular profiling of the CSF tissue has the enormous potential of providing many new disease relevant molecules. New developments in protein profiling techniques hold promise for the discovery and validation of relevant disease markers. In this review, we summarize the current efforts and progress in CSF protein profiling measurements using conventional and current protein analysis tools. We also discuss necessary development in methodology in order to have the highest impact on the study of the molecular composition of CSF proteins.

  8. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  9. Serial analysis of resected prostate cancer suggests up-regulation of type 1 IGF receptor with disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Benjamin W; Turner, Gareth D H; Brewster, Simon F; Macaulay, Valentine M

    2011-05-01

    ) between operations. Conversely, in seven of eight patients who had progression to androgen-independence between procedures, IGF-1R levels increased or remained high. Finally, seven of 11 patients who developed radiologically confirmed metastases between procedures showed stable or increasing IGF-1R staining scores. • The present study is the first to assess changes in IGF-1R expression in serial prostate cancer samples. The results obtained indicate that IGF-1R expression usually remains high throughout the course of histologically-proven disease progression in serial specimens, suggesting that the IGF-1R remains a valid treatment target for advanced prostate cancer. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  10. An Analysis of Stative Verbs Used with the Progressive Aspect in Corpus-Informed Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Serap Atasever

    2018-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether contemporary corpus-informed grammar textbooks written for English language learners and teachers presented the progressive use of stative verbs and if yes, which stative verbs were presented to occur with the progressive aspect and for which functions they took this aspect. A corpus of six electronic…

  11. Relating plastic in the ocean to ecological harm, a review of recent progress in risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuyler, Q. A.; Hardesty, B. D.; Wilcox, C.; van Sebille, E.; Mallos, N. J.; Leonard, G. H.

    2016-02-01

    Plastic pollution in the ocean is emerging as a global environmental concern. Estimates suggest that we dump on the order of 8.4 million tons of plastic in the ocean each year. This plastic reaches substantial concentrations, with at sea sampling measuring densities over 580,000 items per square kilometer. However, it is difficult to relate this exposure to resulting ecological impacts. Animals dying due to plastic ingestion or entanglement may not was ahsore, and sampling at sea is expensive and infrequent. Thus demonstrating a direct relationship between plastic in the envioronment and harm to marine wildlife is challenging. Here we review current progress on risk assessment for impacts to marine wildlife from plastic pollution. The analyses we review range from expert elicitation to integrated statistical and physical models. They range widely in scope, from estimates at the individual level to who taxa analysis. Some of the analyses reach only to exposure to the pressure, whie others carry through to estimate demographic impacts and even mortality due to ingestion of or entanglement in plastic debris in the ocean. We summarize the results of these studies, and provide a roadmap for future contributions toward estimating the actual ecological impact of plastic pollution.

  12. Fuselage Versus Subcomponent Panel Response Correlation Based on ABAQUS Explicit Progressive Damage Analysis Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kevin E.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis performed in this study substantiates the need for high fidelity vehicle level progressive damage analyses (PDA) structural models for use in the verification and validation of proposed sub-scale structural models and to support required full-scale vehicle level testing. PDA results are presented that capture and correlate the responses of sub-scale 3-stringer and 7-stringer panel models and an idealized 8-ft diameter fuselage model, which provides a vehicle level environment for the 7-stringer sub-scale panel model. Two unique skin-stringer attachment assumptions are considered and correlated in the models analyzed: the TIE constraint interface versus the cohesive element (COH3D8) interface. Evaluating different interfaces allows for assessing a range of predicted damage modes, including delamination and crack propagation responses. Damage models considered in this study are the ABAQUS built-in Hashin procedure and the COmplete STress Reduction (COSTR) damage procedure implemented through a VUMAT user subroutine using the ABAQUS/Explicit code.

  13. Mapping cancer cell metabolism with 13 C flux analysis: Recent progress and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Scott Duckwall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The reprogramming of energy metabolism is emerging as an important molecular hallmark of cancer cells. Recent discoveries linking specific metabolic alterations to cancer development have strengthened the idea that altered metabolism is more than a side effect of malignant transformation, but may in fact be a functional driver of tumor growth and progression in some cancers. As a result, dysregulated metabolic pathways have become attractive targets for cancer therapeutics. This review highlights the application of 13 C metabolic flux analysis (MFA to map the flow of carbon through intracellular biochemical pathways of cancer cells. We summarize several recent applications of MFA that have identified novel biosynthetic pathways involved in cancer cell proliferation and shed light on the role of specific oncogenes in regulating these pathways. Through such studies, it has become apparent that the metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells are not as homogeneous as once thought, but instead depend strongly on the molecular alterations and environmental factors at play in each case.

  14. Reactor analysis support package (RASP). Volume 7. PWR set-point methodology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temple, S.M.; Robbins, T.R.

    1986-09-01

    This report provides an overview of the basis and methodology requirements for determining Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) technical specifications related setpoints and focuses on development of the methodology for a reload core. Additionally, the report documents the implementation and typical methods of analysis used by PWR vendors during the 1970's to develop Protection System Trip Limits (or Limiting Safety System Settings) and Limiting Conditions for Operation. The descriptions of the typical setpoint methodologies are provided for Nuclear Steam Supply Systems as designed and supplied by Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, and Westinghouse. The description of the methods of analysis includes the discussion of the computer codes used in the setpoint methodology. Next, the report addresses the treatment of calculational and measurement uncertainties based on the extent to which such information was available for each of the three types of PWR. Finally, the major features of the setpoint methodologies are compared, and the principal effects of each particular methodology on plant operation are summarized for each of the three types of PWR

  15. The Third International Intercomparison on EPR Tooth Dosimetry: Part 2, final analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Debuyst, R.; Fattibene, P.; Meghzifene, A.; Onori, S.; Bayankin, S. N.; Brik, A.; Bugay, A.; Chumak, V.; Ciesielski, B.; Hoshi, M.; Imata, H.; Ivannikov, A.; Ivanov, D.; Junczewska, M.; Miyazawa, C.; Penkowski, M.; Pivovarov, S.; Romanyukha, A.; Romanyukha, L.; Schauer, D.; Scherbina, O.; Schultka, K.; Sholom, S.; Skvortsov, V.; Stepanenko, V.; Thomas, J. A.; Tielewuhan, E.; Toyoda, S.; Trompier, F.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the Third International Intercomparison on EPR Tooth Dosimetry was to evaluate laboratories performing tooth enamel dosimetry <300 mGy. Final analysis of results included a correlation analysis between features of laboratory dose reconstruction protocols and dosimetry performance. Applicability of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth dosimetry at low dose was shown at two applied dose levels of 79 and 176 mGy. Most (9 of 12) laboratories reported the dose to be within 50 mGy of the delivered dose of 79 mGy, and 10 of 12 laboratories reported the dose to be within 100 mGy of the delivered dose of 176 mGy. At the high-dose tested (704 mGy) agreement within 25% of the delivered dose was found in 10 laboratories. Features of EPR dose reconstruction protocols that affect dosimetry performance were found to be magnetic field modulation amplitude in EPR spectrum recording, EPR signal model in spectrum deconvolution and duration of latency period for tooth enamel samples after preparation. (authors)

  16. Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, C.L. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described.

  17. Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, C.L.

    1979-07-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described

  18. A comprehensive analysis on preservation patterns of gene co-expression networks during Alzheimer's disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sumanta; Hossain, Sk Md Mosaddek; Khatun, Lutfunnesa; Mukhopadhyay, Anirban

    2017-12-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neuro-degenerative disruption of the brain which involves in large scale transcriptomic variation. The disease does not impact every regions of the brain at the same time, instead it progresses slowly involving somewhat sequential interaction with different regions. Analysis of the expression patterns of the genes in different regions of the brain influenced in AD surely contribute for a enhanced comprehension of AD pathogenesis and shed light on the early characterization of the disease. Here, we have proposed a framework to identify perturbation and preservation characteristics of gene expression patterns across six distinct regions of the brain ("EC", "HIP", "PC", "MTG", "SFG", and "VCX") affected in AD. Co-expression modules were discovered considering a couple of regions at once. These are then analyzed to know the preservation and perturbation characteristics. Different module preservation statistics and a rank aggregation mechanism have been adopted to detect the changes of expression patterns across brain regions. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway based analysis were also carried out to know the biological meaning of preserved and perturbed modules. In this article, we have extensively studied the preservation patterns of co-expressed modules in six distinct brain regions affected in AD. Some modules are emerged as the most preserved while some others are detected as perturbed between a pair of brain regions. Further investigation on the topological properties of preserved and non-preserved modules reveals a substantial association amongst "betweenness centrality" and "degree" of the involved genes. Our findings may render a deeper realization of the preservation characteristics of gene expression patterns in discrete brain regions affected by AD.

  19. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [SEC 1 THRU 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ULLAH, M K

    2001-02-26

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. The DOE Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is with Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH). Westinghouse Safety Management Systems (WSMS) provides management support to the PFP facility. Since 1991, the mission of the PFP has changed from plutonium material processing to preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The PFP is in transition between its previous mission and the proposed D and D mission. The objective of the transition is to place the facility into a stable state for long-term storage of plutonium materials before final disposition of the facility. Accordingly, this update of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) reflects the current status of the buildings, equipment, and operations during this transition. The primary product of the PFP was plutonium metal in the form of 2.2-kg, cylindrical ingots called buttoms. Plutonium nitrate was one of several chemical compounds containing plutonium that were produced as an intermediate processing product. Plutonium recovery was performed at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) and plutonium conversion (from a nitrate form to a metal form) was performed at the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line as the primary processes. Plutonium oxide was also produced at the Remote Mechanical A (RMA) Line. Plutonium processed at the PFP contained both weapons-grade and fuels-grade plutonium materials. The capability existed to process both weapons-grade and fuels-grade material through the PRF and only weapons-grade material through the RMC Line although fuels-grade material was processed through the line before 1984. Amounts of these materials exist in storage throughout the facility in various residual forms left from previous years of operations.

  20. No evidence of real progress in treatment of acute pain, 1993–2012: scientometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correll DJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Darin J Correll, Kamen V Vlassakov, Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Over the past 2 decades, many new techniques and drugs for the treatment of acute pain have achieved widespread use. The main aim of this study was to assess the progress in their implementation using scientometric analysis. The following scientometric indices were used: 1 popularity index, representing the share of articles on a specific technique (or a drug relative to all articles in the field of acute pain; 2 index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic compared to the previous period; and 3 index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000 biomedical journals covered by PubMed. Publications on specific topics (ten techniques and 21 drugs were assessed during four time periods (1993–1997, 1998–2002, 2003–2007, and 2008–2012. In addition, to determine whether the status of routine acute pain management has improved over the past 20 years, we analyzed surveys designed to be representative of the national population that reflected direct responses of patients reporting pain scores. By the 2008–2012 period, popularity index had reached a substantial level (≥5% only with techniques or drugs that were introduced 30–50 years ago or more (epidural analgesia, patient-controlled analgesia, nerve blocks, epidural analgesia for labor or delivery, bupivacaine, and acetaminophen. In 2008–2012, promising (although modest changes of index of change and index of expectations were found only with dexamethasone. Six national surveys conducted for the past 20 years demonstrated an unacceptably high percentage of patients experiencing moderate or severe pain with not even a trend toward outcome improvement. Thus

  1. Transcriptomic changes in human breast cancer progression as determined by serial analysis of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abba, Martin C; Aldaz, C Marcelo; Drake, Jeffrey A; Hawkins, Kathleen A; Hu, Yuhui; Sun, Hongxia; Notcovich, Cintia; Gaddis, Sally; Sahin, Aysegul; Baggerly, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomic alterations affecting key cellular processes such us cell proliferation, differentiation and genomic stability are considered crucial for the development and progression of cancer. Most invasive breast carcinomas are known to derive from precursor in situ lesions. It is proposed that major global expression abnormalities occur in the transition from normal to premalignant stages and further progression to invasive stages. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was employed to generate a comprehensive global gene expression profile of the major changes occurring during breast cancer malignant evolution. In the present study we combined various normal and tumor SAGE libraries available in the public domain with sets of breast cancer SAGE libraries recently generated and sequenced in our laboratory. A recently developed modified t test was used to detect the genes differentially expressed. We accumulated a total of approximately 1.7 million breast tissue-specific SAGE tags and monitored the behavior of more than 25,157 genes during early breast carcinogenesis. We detected 52 transcripts commonly deregulated across the board when comparing normal tissue with ductal carcinoma in situ, and 149 transcripts when comparing ductal carcinoma in situ with invasive ductal carcinoma (P < 0.01). A major novelty of our study was the use of a statistical method that correctly accounts for the intra-SAGE and inter-SAGE library sources of variation. The most useful result of applying this modified t statistics beta binomial test is the identification of genes and gene families commonly deregulated across samples within each specific stage in the transition from normal to preinvasive and invasive stages of breast cancer development. Most of the gene expression abnormalities detected at the in situ stage were related to specific genes in charge of regulating the proper homeostasis between cell death and cell proliferation. The comparison of in situ lesions

  2. Comparative analysis of rationale used by dentists and patient for final esthetic outcome of dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Varalakshmi; Madineni, Praveen Kumar; Sudheer, A; Gujjarlapudi, Manmohan Choudary; Sreedevi, B; Reddy, Patelu Sunil Kumar

    2013-05-01

    To compare and evaluate the perceptions of esthetics among dentists and patients regarding the final esthetic outcome of a dental treatment. Esthetics is a matter of perception and is associated with the way different people look at an object. What constitutes esthetic for a particular person may not be acceptable for another. Hence it is subjective in nature. This becomes more obvious during the post-treatment evaluation of esthetics by dentist and the concerned patient. Opinion seldom matches. Hence, the study is a necessary part of the process of understanding the mind of dentist and patient regarding what constitutes esthetics. A survey has been conducted by means of a questionnaire consisting of 10 questions, on two groups of people. First group consists of 100 dentists picked at random in Kanyakumari district of Tamil Nadu, India. Second group consisted of 100 patients who required complete denture prosthesis. The second group was divided into two subgroups A and B. Subgroup A consisting of 50 men and subgroup B consisting of 50 women. In each subgroup 25 patients were selected in age group of 40 to 50 and 25 patients were selected in the age group of 50 to 60. The questionnaire was given to both the groups and asked to fill up, which was then statistically analyzed to look for patterns of thought process among them. Results were subjected to statistical analysis by Student's t-test. Perceptions of esthetics differs from dentist who is educated regarding esthetic principles of treatment and a patient who is not subjected to such education. Since, the questions were formulated such that patients could better understand the underlying problem, the final outcome of survey is a proof that dentists need to take into account what the patient regards as esthetics in order to provide a satisfactory treatment. CLINICAL AND ACADEMIC SIGNIFICANCE: The current study helps the dentist to better educate the patient regarding esthetics so that patient appreciates the final

  3. The progress and outcomes of black and minority ethnic (BME) nurses through the Nursing and Midwifery Council's "Fitness to Practise" process: Final report

    OpenAIRE

    West, Elizabeth; Nayar, Shoba; Taskila, Taina; Al-Haboubi, Moustafa

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND\\ud This is the first investigation of the relationship between ethnicity and regulation of the nursing profession conducted internationally. The study was commissioned by the Nursing and Midwifery Council which is the regulator of the professions in the UK. \\ud \\ud AIMS OF THE STUDY\\ud “To establish whether the progress and outcomes of Black and minority ethnic (BME) nurses in relation to fitness to practice, from the point of referral to the point of case closure, is different fro...

  4. The fuzzy set theory application to the analysis of accident progression event trees with phenomenological uncertainty issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Ahn, Kwang-Il

    1991-01-01

    Fuzzy set theory provides a formal framework for dealing with the imprecision and vagueness inherent in the expert judgement, and therefore it can be used for more effective analysis of accident progression of PRA where experts opinion is a major means for quantifying some event probabilities and uncertainties. In this paper, an example application of the fuzzy set theory is first made to a simple portion of a given accident progression event tree with typical qualitative fuzzy input data, and thereby computational algorithms suitable for application of the fuzzy set theory to the accident progression event tree analysis are identified and illustrated with example applications. Then the procedure used in the simple example is extended to extremely complex accident progression event trees with a number of phenomenological uncertainty issues, i.e., a typical plant damage state 'SEC' of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant risk assessment. The results show that the fuzzy averages of the fuzzy outcomes are very close to the mean values obtained by current methods. The main purpose of this paper is to provide a formal procedure for application of the fuzzy set theory to accident progression event trees with imprecise and qualitative branch probabilities and/or with a number of phenomenological uncertainty issues. (author)

  5. Genetic Biomarkers of Barrett's Esophagus Susceptibility and Progression to Dysplasia and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, John M; Middleton, Mark R; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common and important precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). A third of patients with BE are asymptomatic, and our ability to predict the risk of progression of metaplasia to dysplasia and EAC (and therefore guide management) is limited. There is an urgent need for clinically useful biomarkers of susceptibility to both BE and risk of subsequent progression. This study aims to systematically identify, review, and meta-analyze genetic biomarkers reported to predict both. A systematic review of the PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed in May 2014. Study and evidence quality were appraised using the revised American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines, and modified Recommendations for Tumor Marker Scores. Meta-analysis was performed for all markers assessed by more than one study. A total of 251 full-text articles were reviewed; 52 were included. A total of 33 germline markers of susceptibility were identified (level of evidence II-III); 17 were included. Five somatic markers of progression were identified; meta-analysis demonstrated significant associations for chromosomal instability (level of evidence II). One somatic marker of progression/relapse following photodynamic therapy was identified. However, a number of failings of methodology and reporting were identified. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate genetic biomarkers of BE susceptibility and risk of progression. While a number of limitations of study quality temper the utility of those markers identified, some-in particular, those identified by genome-wide association studies, and chromosomal instability for progression-appear plausible, although robust validation is required.

  6. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF DISK SPRING CONFIGURATIONS WITH REGARD TO LOAD CAPACITY OF SAFETY PROGRESSIVE GEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł LONKWIC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the effect of various disk spring package configurations on brake load of safety progressive gears. The numerical analysis is performed using the Abaqus/CAE software and the designed 3D models. The numerical results are then verified in experimental tests. The tests also examine the effect of lubrication on brake load of spring packages. In addition, the paper investigates the work conditions of safety progressive gears at emergency braking. The experimental results show agreement with the numerical results.

  7. Nivolumab for Patients With Advanced Melanoma Treated Beyond Progression: Analysis of 2 Phase 3 Clinical Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Georgina V; Weber, Jeffrey S; Larkin, James

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Immune checkpoint inhibitors have demonstrated atypical response patterns, which may not be fully captured by conventional response criteria. There is a need to better understand the potential benefit of continued immune checkpoint inhibition beyond progression. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate...

  8. Behavioural and neuroanatomical correlates of auditory speech analysis in primary progressive aphasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Chris J D; Agustus, Jennifer L; Marshall, Charles R; Clark, Camilla N; Russell, Lucy L; Bond, Rebecca L; Brotherhood, Emilie V; Thomas, David L; Crutch, Sebastian J; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Warren, Jason D

    2017-07-27

    Non-verbal auditory impairment is increasingly recognised in the primary progressive aphasias (PPAs) but its relationship to speech processing and brain substrates has not been defined. Here we addressed these issues in patients representing the non-fluent variant (nfvPPA) and semantic variant (svPPA) syndromes of PPA. We studied 19 patients with PPA in relation to 19 healthy older individuals. We manipulated three key auditory parameters-temporal regularity, phonemic spectral structure and prosodic predictability (an index of fundamental information content, or entropy)-in sequences of spoken syllables. The ability of participants to process these parameters was assessed using two-alternative, forced-choice tasks and neuroanatomical associations of task performance were assessed using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain magnetic resonance images. Relative to healthy controls, both the nfvPPA and svPPA groups had impaired processing of phonemic spectral structure and signal predictability while the nfvPPA group additionally had impaired processing of temporal regularity in speech signals. Task performance correlated with standard disease severity and neurolinguistic measures. Across the patient cohort, performance on the temporal regularity task was associated with grey matter in the left supplementary motor area and right caudate, performance on the phoneme processing task was associated with grey matter in the left supramarginal gyrus, and performance on the prosodic predictability task was associated with grey matter in the right putamen. Our findings suggest that PPA syndromes may be underpinned by more generic deficits of auditory signal analysis, with a distributed cortico-subcortical neuraoanatomical substrate extending beyond the canonical language network. This has implications for syndrome classification and biomarker development.

  9. Privileges and penalties in the legal profession: an intersectional analysis of career progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Jennifer; Valizade, Danat; Muzio, Daniel; Charlwood, Andy; Aulakh, Sundeep

    2018-04-26

    Intersectionality theory is concerned with integrating social characteristics to better understanding complex human relations and inequalities in organizations and societies (McCall ). Recently, intersectionality research has taken a categorical and quantitative turn as scholars critically adopt but retain existing social categories to explain differences in labour market outcomes. A key contention is that social categories carry penalties or privileges and their intersection promotes or hinders the life chances of particular groups and individuals. An emergent debate is whether the intersection of disadvantaged characteristics (such as female gender or minority ethnic status) produce penalties that are additive, multiplicative or ameliorative. Research is inconclusive and as yet pays little attention to moderating factors such as employer type, size, geographic location or work profile. Drawing on administrative records for individuals qualified as solicitors in England and Wales, collected by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), combined with aggregated workforce data and firm characteristics of their law firms, we undertake a statistical analysis of the intersection of gender and ethnicity in the profession with a degree of precision and nuance not previously possible. In response to calls to broaden studies of inequalities and intersectionality beyond their effect on pay or income (Castilla ) we focus on career progression to partnership as our key measure of success. The original contribution of our study is twofold. First, we establish statistically different profiles of law firms, showing how the solicitors' profession is stratified by gender, ethnicity and socio-economic background, as well as the type of legal work undertaken by developing a model of socio-economic stratification in the profession. Second, we demonstrate that while penalties tend to be additive (i.e. the sum of the individual ethnic and gender penalties) this varies significantly by

  10. [Docimological analysis of the anatomy test for the PCEMII final exam in Dakar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, T; Dia, A; Lo, E A; Cisse, A M; Ndiaye, A; Mauppin, J M; Sow, M L; Mudry, J N; Benkhelil, J

    1991-01-01

    This docimological analysis is based on computer treatment of the results of the anatomy exam for the two sessions of July (159 candidates) and October (56 candidates) of the identification questions, discrimination questions, coupling (paining), grouping, association and diagram labelling. The results were appraised following certain parameters: the gross score revealed a rather low average score for the whole class (14.57 and 9.57 over 30): the low success rate in July and the average figure of October indicate, in general, either the difficulty of the questions for the students or a bad reception of the message; the bad discrimination index, since only 21% of the questions are of the discriminatory type. This finding pointed to a revision of 50 of the 68 questions of July and 53 of the 68 questions of October. On the whole, only 15 questions, over the two sessions, could have been kept unchanged for an eventual bank (stock of data): The correlation coefficient has showed a significant relation between success in the anatomy subject and success in the PCEM2 exam. This work has showed the possibilities that computers may offer in the teaching of anatomy and the evaluation of students. Besides, it emphasizes the importance of the anatomy grade in the PCEM2 exam. Finally, the mode evaluation used help exploring the various levels of the cognitive areas (memorization, interpretation of data, problem-solving) and to build up a bank of anatomy questions.

  11. Modeling and Predicting AD Progression by Regression Analysis of Sequential Clinical Data

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Qing

    2016-02-23

    Alzheimer\\'s Disease (AD) is currently attracting much attention in elders\\' care. As the increasing availability of massive clinical diagnosis data, especially the medical images of brain scan, it is highly significant to precisely identify and predict the potential AD\\'s progression based on the knowledge in the diagnosis data. In this paper, we follow a novel sequential learning framework to model the disease progression for AD patients\\' care. Different from the conventional approaches using only initial or static diagnosis data to model the disease progression for different durations, we design a score-involved approach and make use of the sequential diagnosis information in different disease stages to jointly simulate the disease progression. The actual clinical scores are utilized in progress to make the prediction more pertinent and reliable. We examined our approach by extensive experiments on the clinical data provided by the Alzheimer\\'s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The results indicate that the proposed approach is more effective to simulate and predict the disease progression compared with the existing methods.

  12. Modeling and Predicting AD Progression by Regression Analysis of Sequential Clinical Data

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Qing; Wang, Su; Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is currently attracting much attention in elders' care. As the increasing availability of massive clinical diagnosis data, especially the medical images of brain scan, it is highly significant to precisely identify and predict the potential AD's progression based on the knowledge in the diagnosis data. In this paper, we follow a novel sequential learning framework to model the disease progression for AD patients' care. Different from the conventional approaches using only initial or static diagnosis data to model the disease progression for different durations, we design a score-involved approach and make use of the sequential diagnosis information in different disease stages to jointly simulate the disease progression. The actual clinical scores are utilized in progress to make the prediction more pertinent and reliable. We examined our approach by extensive experiments on the clinical data provided by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The results indicate that the proposed approach is more effective to simulate and predict the disease progression compared with the existing methods.

  13. Recovery of valuable chlorosilane intermediates by a novel waste conversion process. Technical report for phase IIIA (final) and phase IIIB (progress)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, K.E.

    1998-10-01

    From July 1994 through May 1998, direct process residue (DPR) hydrogenolysis has been studied in the laboratory, at a small Pilot Plant, and finally at a larger Pilot Plant within Dow Corning`s Carrollton, Kentucky plant. The system reacts filtered DPR with monomer at high temperature and pressure. The process demonstrates DPR conversion up to 86%. The reaction product contains high concentrations of valuable monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. A larger DPR hydrogenolysis reactor based on these results is being designed for operation in Europe at Dow Corning`s Barry, Wales site.

  14. Retrospective analysis of anthropometric and fitness characteristics associated with long-term career progression in Rugby League.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Kevin; Cobley, Steve; O'Hara, John; Morley, David; Chapman, Chris; Cooke, Carlton

    2015-05-01

    The current study retrospectively investigated the differences in anthropometric and fitness characteristics of junior rugby league players selected onto a talent identification and development (TID) programme between long-term career progression levels (i.e., amateur, academy, professional). Retrospective design. Former junior rugby league players (N=580) selected to a TID programme were grouped according to their career progression level. Anthropometric (height, sitting height, body mass and sum of four skinfolds), maturational and fitness (power, speed, change of direction speed and estimated V̇O2max) assessments were conducted at 13-15 years. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) analyzed differences between career progression levels controlling for chronological age. 57.1% and 12.1% of players selected to the TID programme progressed to academy and professional levels in rugby league, respectively. Sum of four skinfolds (η(2)=0.03), vertical jump (η(2)=0.02), 10 m (η(2)=0.02), 20 m (η(2)=0.02), 30 m (η(2)=0.02), and 60 m (η(2)=0.03) speed, agility 505 left (η(2)=0.06), agility 505 right (η(2)=0.05) and estimated V̇O2max (η(2)=0.03) were superior within junior players who progressed to professional compared to amateur levels. No significant differences were identified between future academy and professional players for any measure. Findings suggest that lower sum of four skinfolds and advanced fitness characteristics within junior (13-15 years) rugby league players may partially contribute to long-term career progression. Therefore, TID programmes within rugby league should aim to assess and develop body composition and fitness characteristics, especially change of direction speed. However, TID programmes should also consider technical, tactical and psycho-social characteristics of junior rugby league players that may be important for long-term career progression. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. Microenvironmental Heterogeneity Parallels Breast Cancer Progression: A Histology-Genomic Integration Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Natrajan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The intra-tumor diversity of cancer cells is under intense investigation; however, little is known about the heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment that is key to cancer progression and evolution. We aimed to assess the degree of microenvironmental heterogeneity in breast cancer and correlate this with genomic and clinical parameters.We developed a quantitative measure of microenvironmental heterogeneity along three spatial dimensions (3-D in solid tumors, termed the tumor ecosystem diversity index (EDI, using fully automated histology image analysis coupled with statistical measures commonly used in ecology. This measure was compared with disease-specific survival, key mutations, genome-wide copy number, and expression profiling data in a retrospective study of 510 breast cancer patients as a test set and 516 breast cancer patients as an independent validation set. In high-grade (grade 3 breast cancers, we uncovered a striking link between high microenvironmental heterogeneity measured by EDI and a poor prognosis that cannot be explained by tumor size, genomics, or any other data types. However, this association was not observed in low-grade (grade 1 and 2 breast cancers. The prognostic value of EDI was superior to known prognostic factors and was enhanced with the addition of TP53 mutation status (multivariate analysis test set, p = 9 × 10-4, hazard ratio = 1.47, 95% CI 1.17-1.84; validation set, p = 0.0011, hazard ratio = 1.78, 95% CI 1.26-2.52. Integration with genome-wide profiling data identified losses of specific genes on 4p14 and 5q13 that were enriched in grade 3 tumors with high microenvironmental diversity that also substratified patients into poor prognostic groups. Limitations of this study include the number of cell types included in the model, that EDI has prognostic value only in grade 3 tumors, and that our spatial heterogeneity measure was dependent on spatial scale and tumor size.To our knowledge, this is the first

  16. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Accident Progression Uncertainty Analysis and Implications for Decommissioning of Fukushima Reactors - Volume I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mattie, Patrick D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysis (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression with the MELCOR code. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). That study focused on reconstructing the accident progressions, as postulated by the limited plant data. This work was focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures-of-merit (e.g., hydrogen production, reactor damage state, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure). The primary intent of this study was to characterize the range of predicted damage states in the 1F1 reactor considering state of knowledge uncertainties associated with MELCOR modeling of core damage progression and to generate information that may be useful in informing the decommissioning activities that will be employed to defuel the damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Additionally, core damage progression variability inherent in MELCOR modeling numerics is investigated.

  17. Analysis of progression of cervical OPLL using computerized tomography: typical sign of maturation of OPLL mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byung-Wan; Baek, Dong-Hoon; Sheffler, Lindsey C; Chang, Han

    2015-07-17

    OBJECT The progression of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) can lead to increase in the size of the OPLL mass and aggravation of neurological symptoms. In the present study, the authors aimed to analyze the progression of cervical OPLL by using CT imaging, elucidate the morphology of OPLL masses, and evaluate the factors associated with the progression of cervical OPLL. METHODS Sixty patients with cervical OPLL were included. All underwent an initial CT examination and had at least 24 months' follow-up with CT. The mean duration of follow-up was 29.6 months. Fourteen patients (Group A) had CT evidence of OPLL progression, and 46 (Group B) did not show evidence of progression on CT. The 2 groups were compared with respect to the following variables: sex, age, number of involved segments, type of OPLL, and treatment methods. The CT findings, such as the connection of an OPLL mass with the vertebral body and formation of trabeculation in the mass, were evaluated. RESULTS Sex and treatment modality were not associated with OPLL progression. The mean age of the patients in Group A was significantly lower than that in Group B (p = 0.03). The mean number of involved segments was 5.3 in Group A and 3.6 in Group B (p = 0.002). Group A had a higher proportion of cases with the mixed type of OPLL, whereas Group B had a higher proportion of cases with the segmental type (p = 0.02). A connection between the vertebral body and OPLL mass and trabeculation formation were more common in Group B (p cervical OPLL is associated with younger age, involvement of multiple levels, and mixed-type morphology. OPLL masses that are contiguous with the vertebral body and have trabecular formation are useful findings for identifying masses that are less likely to progress.

  18. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. C. Culp

    2007-05-01

    Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel.

  19. PHENIX reports. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The various tasks outlined in the Statement of Work for the PHENIX Program have been accomplished. Reports were generated which cover the work done. This report is a compilation of the following reports: Progress Report for May 1998; Progress Report for April 1998; PHENIX FEA Mount/Electron Shield Structural Analysis report; Progress Report for February 1998; Progress Report for March 1998; and Progress Report for December 1997 and January 1998

  20. Impact of HIV Type 1 DNA Levels on Spontaneous Disease Progression: A Meta-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiara, Chrissa G; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Bagos, Pantelis G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have reported the prognostic strength of HIV-1 DNA with variable results however. The aims of the current study were to estimate more accurately the ability of HIV-1 DNA to predict progression of HIV-1 disease toward acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death...... of primary studies indicated that HIV-1 DNA was a significantly better predictor than HIV-1 RNA of either AIDS alone (ratio of RRs=1.47, 95% CI: 1.05-2.07) or of combined (AIDS or death) progression outcomes (ratio of RRs=1.51, 95% CI: 1.11-2.05). HIV-1 DNA is a strong predictor of HIV-1 disease progression...

  1. Shopping the way to my goals: an analysis of purchase impact on perceived goal progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Albornoz Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Abstract This article examines the impact of goal related purchases on goal progress perception, and whether this perception depends on the strength of association between product and goal. To test how consumers perceive the act of purchasing goal-related products, three experiments were conducted in an online setting. Participants exposed to purchasing situations perceived greater goal progress than participants exposed to usage situation or a control group. In addition, studies show that this effect is a result of strength of association between product and goal, since participants exposed to more instrumental products perceived greater goal progress than participants exposed to less instrumental products. Therefore, these studies demonstrate how consumers interpret goal related purchases, and the mechanism that influences this interpretation.

  2. Conjoint utility analysis of technical maturity and project progress of construction project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, taking construction project as the research object, the relationship between the project maturity index calculated by the construction project technical risks with different fine degree and the project progress index is studied, and the equilibrium relationship between the Party A’s utility curve and the Party B’s cost curve of using project maturity index and project progress index as the research variables is analyzed. The results show that, when the construction project technical risk division is more precise, the conjoint utility of the project's technical maturity index and the project progress is higher, and the project’s Party A and Party B two sides are closer to the optimal equilibrium. This shows that the construction project technical risk must be finely divided, and managed and controlled respectively, which will help to improve the conjoint utility of the project Party A and Party B two sides.

  3. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft 2 and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available

  4. The Fourth/Final-Year University Student Future Professional Career: Analysis of Factors and Personal Qualities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lamanauskas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Career management as a lifelong lasting process becomes very actual in today's modern society because of many reasons. The environment becomes turbulent, in a general sense; therefore, it is natural that career environment, basically, is chaotic as well. Nevertheless, career for many people is, undoubtedly, very important, because it is directly related to life quality. Professional activity satisfies almost all human needs: physiological, safety, social, attainment, self-realisation, independence, autonomy and other. The efficiency of the mentioned activity and the ability of the personality to construct his career are closely related things. Individual's career process studies are especially popular recently, because deeper career perception helps to understand the most important relations between man and work, career management and constant learning, helps not only to know man's abilities, but also the abilities to give oneself to modern environment, to understand career projection possibilities, to plan one's professional future. Seeking to analyse final-year university student position regarding career questions, a written form survey was carried out. The research was carried out between September 2015 and March 2016. The research sample (185 was structured applying a consecutive 'bunch' system. The respondents from three Lithuanian universities Klaipėda, Vilnius and Šiauliai, were selected in the sample. Professional career parameters were evaluated: career conception, the importance of work values and abilities, study influence, promoting and limiting factors and personal qualities. The research is grounded on a mixed strategy, when quantitative and qualitative research approach is combined. The obtained results, based on qualitative analysis, about professional personal career promoting and limiting factors and personal qualities are presented in this research.

  5. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - Final Review September 12, 2012 at DHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Phillips, Jason J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-11-26

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program conducted a final program review at the Department of Homeland Security on September 12, 2012. The review was focused on the results of the program over the complete performance period. A summary presentation delineating the accomplished tasks started the meeting, followed by technical presentations on various issues that arose during the performance period. The presentations were completed with a statistical evaluation of the testing results from all the participants in the IDCA Proficiency Test study. The meeting closed with a discussion of potential sources of funding for continuing work to resolve some of these technical issues. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), put the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The study added Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature, and suggested new guidelines and methods to develop safe handling practices for HMEs. Each participating testing laboratory used identical test materials and preparation methods wherever possible. Note, however, the test procedures differ among the laboratories. The results were compared among the laboratories and then compared to historical data from various sources. The testing performers involved were Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division (NSWC IHD), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Air Force Research Laboratory, Tyndall AFB (AFRL/RXQL). These tests were conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to compare results when these testing variables cannot be made consistent.

  6. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 1: Building prototype analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This report provides a detailed description of, and the baseline assumptions and simulation results for, the building prototype simulations conducted for the building types designated in the Work Plan for Demand-side Management Assessment of Hawaii`s Demand-Side Resources (HES-4, Phase 2). This report represents the second revision to the initial building prototype description report provided to DBEDT early in the project. Modifications and revisions to the prototypes, based on further calibration efforts and on comments received from DBEDT Staff have been incorporated into this final version. These baseline prototypes form the basis upon which the DSM measure impact estimates and the DSM measure data base were developed for this project. This report presents detailed information for each of the 17 different building prototypes developed for use with the DOE-21E program (23 buildings in total, including resorts and hotels defined separately for each island) to estimate the impact of the building technologies and measures included in this project. The remainder of this section presents some nomenclature and terminology utilized in the reports, tables, and data bases developed from this project to denote building type and vintage. Section 2 contains a more detailed discussion of the data sources, the definition of the residential sector building prototypes, and results of the DOE-2 analysis. Section 3 provides a similar discussion for the commercial sector. The prototype and baseline simulation results are presented in a separate section for each building type. Where possible, comparison of the baseline simulation results with benchmark data from the ENERGY 2020 model or other demand forecasting models specific to Hawaii is included for each building. Appendix A contains a detailed listing of the commercial sector baseline indoor lighting technologies included in the existing and new prototypes by building type.

  7. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  8. [Psychological distress of children with progressive diseases and multiple disabilities: A crossed analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perifano, A; Scelles, R

    2015-09-01

    , distress, sadness, depression, stress, anger, and frustration. The family and caregivers responded by socializing with the child, providing him with comfort, assisting him in meeting his basic needs, administering medication, etc. Loneliness, disease-progression-related loss of abilities, physical pain, and epilepsy were the main factors of psychological distress. Three children were prescribed an antidepressant, two with an anticonvulsive effect. The results of this research depend on the difficulty making a distinction between physical and psychological pain and the interpretation of the child's relatives remains an imperfect translation of what the child feels. Further research to overcome these shortcomings is currently under consideration. Moreover, quantitative analysis is needed to make this research more robust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic kidney disease progression: a retrospective analysis of 3-year adherence to a low protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetto, Felipe; Leal, Viviane de Oliveira; Bastos, Leonardo Soares; Fouque, Denis; Mafra, Denise

    2017-11-01

    The potential benefits and dangers of dietary protein restriction in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are still controversial. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of low protein diet (LPD) on the renal function in nondialysis CKD patients. A retrospective study was conducted from 321 nondialysis CKD patient's medical files (65.1 ± 12.7 yrs, 58.2% men). These patients received individualized dietary protein prescription (0.6-0.8 g protein/kg/day). Protein intake was evaluated by food diary and 24 h-food recall. Adherence to the LPD was considered when patients intake from 90 to 110% of the prescribed amount of protein. The patients were divided into 4 groups: (G1) adherent diabetes mellitus (DM) patients (n = 83); (G2) non-adherent DM patients (n = 106); (G3) adherent non-DM patients (n = 75); (G4) non-adherent non-DM patients (n = 57). Renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Both groups of patients (DM and non-DM) that adhered to the LPD showed significant improvement in eGFR (G1: 38.7 ± 13.2 mL/min to 51.1 ± 17.0 mL/min (p patients, no differences in albumin and BMI were observed at the end of follow up. In non-adherent patients, eGFR significantly decreased in DM group (G2: 44.2 ± 18.5 mL/min to 38.2 ± 15.8 mL/min (p = 0.003)). According to multivariate analysis, annual changes in eGFR were not independent associated with age, gender, BMI, lipid profile, bicarbonate or smoking status. In summary, adherence to low protein diet could be able to improve serum creatinine and eGFR, well-known markers of renal function. However, prospective studies are needed to control confounders which affect renal function and CKD progression.

  10. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Environmental Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This is volume 1 of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration Information is included on the following: Purpose of and need for action; alternatives including the proposed action; affected environment; and environmental consequences.

  11. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brooks, Dusty Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  12. Application of accident progression event tree technology to the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility SAR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandyberry, M.D.; Baker, W.H.; Wittman, R.S.; Amos, C.N.

    1993-01-01

    The Accident Analysis in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has recently undergone an upgrade. Non-reactor SARs at SRS (and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites) use probabilistic techniques to assess the frequency of accidents at their facilities. This paper describes the application of an extension of the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) approach to accidents at the SRS DWPF. The APET technique allows an integrated model of the facility risk to be developed, where previous probabilistic accident analyses have been limited to the quantification of the frequency and consequences of individual accident scenarios treated independently. Use of an APET allows a more structured approach, incorporating both the treatment of initiators that are common to more than one accident, and of accident progression at the facility

  13. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillips, M.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes MHD equilibrium and stability studies carried out at Northrop Grumman's Advanced Technology and Development Center during the 12 month period starting March 1, 1994. Progress is reported in both ideal and resistive MHD modeling of TFTR plasmas. The development of codes to calculate the significant effects of highly anisotropic pressure distributions is discussed along with results from this model

  14. Item and Error Analysis on Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Farran, Emily; Annaz, Dagmara

    2011-01-01

    Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) is a standardised test that is commonly used to obtain a non-verbal reasoning score for children. As the RCPM involves the matching of a target to a pattern it is also considered to be a visuo-spatial perception task. RCPM is therefore frequently used in studies in Williams Syndrome (WS), in order to…

  15. Presence and progression of white matter hyperintensities and cognition A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenborg, Raoul P.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; van den Berg, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to quantify the effects of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on specific cognitive functions with particular attention to WMH progression and localization. Methods: PubMed (January 1990-July 2013) and bibliographies from included articles were used. Studies that were included

  16. Clinicopathologic analysis of progressive non-fluent aphasia and corticobasal degeneration:Case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto de Brito-Marques

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To investigate progressive non-fluent aphasia and histopathologically-proven corticobasal degeneration. Methods: We evaluated symptoms, signs, neuropsychological deficits, and radiology data longitudinally, in a patient with autopsy-proven corticobasal degeneration and correlated these observations directly to the neuroanatomic distribution of the disease. Results: At presentation, a specific pattern of cognitive impairment was evident with an extreme extrapyramidal motor abnormality. Follow-up examination revealed persistent impairment of praxis and executive functioning, progressive worsening of language performance, and moderately preserved memory. The motor disorder manifested and worsened as the condition progressed. Many of the residual nerve cells were ballooned and achromatic with eccentric nuclei. Tau-immunoreactive pathology was significantly more prominent in neurons in the frontal and parietal cortices and dentate nuclei than in temporal neocortex, hippocampi and brainstem. Conclusion: The clinical diagnosis of progressive non-fluent aphasia secondary to corticobasal degeneration hinged on a specific pattern of impaired cognition as well as an extrapyramidal motor disorder, reflecting the neuroanatomic distribution of the disease in frontal and anterior temporal cortices and the dentate nuclei.

  17. Clinicopathologic analysis of progressive non-fluent aphasia and corticobasal degeneration: Case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito-Marques, Paulo Roberto; Vieira-Mello, Roberto José; Montenegro, Luciano; Aragão, Maria de Fátima Vasco

    2011-01-01

    To investigate progressive non-fluent aphasia and histopathologically-proven corticobasal degeneration. We evaluated symptoms, signs, neuropsychological deficits, and radiology data longitudinally, in a patient with autopsy-proven corticobasal degeneration and correlated these observations directly to the neuroanatomic distribution of the disease. At presentation, a specific pattern of cognitive impairment was evident with an extreme extrapyramidal motor abnormality. Follow-up examination revealed persistent impairment of praxis and executive functioning, progressive worsening of language performance, and moderately preserved memory. The motor disorder manifested and worsened as the condition progressed. Many of the residual nerve cells were ballooned and achromatic with eccentric nuclei. Tau-immunoreactive pathology was significantly more prominent in neurons in the frontal and parietal cortices and dentate nuclei than in temporal neocortex, hippocampi and brainstem. The clinical diagnosis of progressive non-fluent aphasia secondary to corticobasal degeneration hinged on a specific pattern of impaired cognition as well as an extrapyramidal motor disorder, reflecting the neuroanatomic distribution of the disease in frontal and anterior temporal cortices and the dentate nuclei.

  18. Analysis of the progression of fibroepithelial tumours of the breast by PCR-based clonality assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arno; Buerger, H.; Simon, R.; Schaefer, K-L.; Croonen, A.; Boecker, W.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2002-01-01

    Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumour of the breast are both fibroepithelial tumours. Although progression to epithelial malignancy has been described, the behaviour of most fibroadenomas is benign. Phyllodes tumours, on the other hand, can display locally destructive growth and can even metastasize. A

  19. Progressivity, horizontal equity and reranking in health care finance: a decomposition analysis for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Wagstaff (Adam); E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThis paper employs the method of Aronson et al. (1994) to decompose the redistributive effect of the Dutch health care financing system into three components: a progressivity component, a classical horizontal equity component and a reranking component. Results are presented for the

  20. Lung microbiome and disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an analysis of the COMET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, MeiLan K; Zhou, Yueren; Murray, Susan; Tayob, Nabihah; Noth, Imre; Lama, Vibha N; Moore, Bethany B; White, Eric S; Flaherty, Kevin R; Huffnagle, Gary B; Martinez, Fernando J

    2014-07-01

    The role of the lung microbiome in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. We investigated whether unique microbial signatures were associated with progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Patients (aged 35-80 years) with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis within 4 years of diagnosis from the Correlating Outcomes with biochemical Markers to Estimate Time-progression (COMET) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis study were followed up for a maximum of 80 weeks. Progression-free survival was defined as time to death, acute exacerbation, lung transplant, or decrease in forced vital capacity (FVC) of 10% or greater or decrease in diffusion capacity of the lung (DLCO) of 15% or greater. DNA was isolated from 55 samples of bronchoscopic alveolar lavage. 454 pyrosequencing was used to assign operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to bacteria based on a 3% sequence divergence. Adjusted Cox models were used to identify OTUs that were significantly associated with progression-free survival at a pidiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is associated with the presence of specific members within the Staphylococcus and Streptococcus genera. Additional research will be needed to identify the specific bacterial species and to ascertain whether this is a causal association. National Institutes of Health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of the BEV Technology Progress of America, Europe, Japan and Korea Based on Patent Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurong, Huang; Yuanyuan, Hou; Jingyan, Zhou; Ru, Liu

    2018-02-01

    The paper analyzed the Battery Electric Vehicle patent application trend, major country distribution, main technology layout and patentee of America, Europe, Japan and Korea based on patent information from 2006 to 2016 by using patent map method, and visualized the Battery Electric Vehicle technology progress conditions of the four countries and regions in the last decade.

  2. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillips, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes MHD equilibrium and stability studies carried out at Grumman's Corporate Research Center during the 6 month period starting March 1, 1994. Progress is reported in both ideal and resistive MHD modeling of TFTR plasmas. The development of codes to calculate the significant effects of highly anisotropic pressure distributions is discussed along with initial results from this model

  3. Analysis of progressive distorsion. Validation of the method based on effective primary stress. Discussion of Anderson's experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, Didier.

    1981-02-01

    An empirical rule usable for design by analysis against progressive distorsion has been set up from experiments conducted in C.E.N. Saclay. This rule is checked with experimental data obtained by W.F. ANDERSON, this experiment is sufficiently different from the Saclay one to evaluate the merits of the rule. The satisfactory results achieved, are another validation of the efficiency diagram on which the method is based [fr

  4. Evaluation of safety assessment methodologies in Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide (1985) and Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report (1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, B.; Fisher, C.; Zigler, G.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    FSARs. Rockwell International, as operating contractor at the Rocky Flats plant, conducted a safety analysis program during the 1980s. That effort resulted in Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs) for several buildings, one of them being the Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report, June 87 (707FSAR) and a Plant Safety Analysis Report. Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide, March 1985 (RFRAG85) documents the methodologies that were used for those FSARs. Resources available for preparation of those Rocky Flats FSARs were very limited. After addressing the more pressing safety issues, some of which are described below, the present contractor (EG ampersand G) intends to conduct a program of upgrading the FSARs. This report presents the results of a review of the methodologies described in RFRAG85 and 707FSAR and contains suggestions that might be incorporated into the methodology for the FSAR upgrade effort

  5. Tracking progress towards global drinking water and sanitation targets: A within and among country analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, James A; Goldstick, Jason; Bartram, Jamie; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2016-01-15

    Global access to safe drinking water and sanitation has improved dramatically during the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) period. However, there is substantial heterogeneity in progress between countries and inequality within countries. We assessed countries' temporal patterns in access to drinking water and sanitation using publicly available data. We then classified countries using non-linear modeling techniques as having one of the following trajectories: 100% coverage, linear growth, linear decline, no change, saturation, acceleration, deceleration, negative acceleration, or negative deceleration. We further assessed the degree to which temporal profiles follow a sigmoidal pattern and how these patterns might vary within a given country between rural and urban settings. Among countries with more than 10 data points, between 15% and 38% showed a non-linear trajectory, depending on the indicator. Overall, countries' progress followed a sigmoidal trend, but some countries are making better progress and some worse progress than would be expected. We highlight several countries that are not on track to meet the MDG for water or sanitation, but whose access is accelerating, suggesting better performance during the coming years. Conversely, we also highlight several countries that have made sufficient progress to meet the MDG target, but in which access is decelerating. Patterns were heterogeneous and non-linearity was common. Characterization of these heterogeneous patterns will help policy makers allocate resources more effectively. For example, policy makers can identify countries that could make use of additional resources or might be in need of additional institutional capacity development to properly manage resources; this will be essential to meet the forthcoming Sustainable Development Goals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Final Report: Optimal Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Response Surface Uncertainty Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ye [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2018-01-17

    equivalency, all the stratigraphic models were successfully upscaled from the reference heterogeneous model for bulk flow and transport predictions (Zhang & Zhang, 2015). GCS simulation was then simulated with all models, yielding insights into the level of parameterization complexity that is needed for the accurate simulation of reservoir pore pressure, CO2 storage, leakage, footprint, and dissolution over both short (i.e., injection) and longer (monitoring) time scales. Important uncertainty parameters that impact these key performance metrics were identified for the stratigraphic models as well as for the heterogeneous model, leading to the development of reduced/simplified models at lower characterization cost that can be used for the reservoir uncertainty analysis. All the CO2 modeling was conducted using PFLOTRAN – a massively parallel, multiphase, multi-component, and reactive transport simulator developed by a multi-laboratory DOE/SciDAC (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing) project (Zhang et al., 2017, in review). Within the uncertainty analysis framework, increasing reservoir depth were investigated to explore its effect on the uncertainty outcomes and the potential for developing gravity-stable injection with increased storage security (Dai et al., 20126; Dai et al., 2017, in review). Finally, to accurately model CO2 fluid-rock reactions and resulting long-term storage as secondary carbonate minerals, a modified kinetic rate law for general mineral dissolution and precipitation was proposed and verified that is invariant to a scale transformation of the mineral formula weight. This new formulation will lead to more accurate assessment of mineral storage over geologic time scales (Lichtner, 2016).

  7. Colombia's space policy: An analysis of six years of progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Jairo

    2014-07-01

    and decision-making regarding the program, and its implementation. And finally, the members of the CCE do not necessarily act in accordance with a national strategy, but follow their own interests, resulting in undue influence (and perhaps interference) in the development of a coherent national space policy. In brief, the author hopes that this first analysis of Colombia's experience with its Space Commission will serve as an example to other developing countries that also are seeking to develop their space sector, and implement a national space policy. Further, the author hopes that this analysis will allow the various politico-administrative actors “policy makers” in Colombia, as well as the general public, to realize that, while much has been accomplished, much still remains to be done. It is essential to keep alive the interest shown in space activities; otherwise, Colombia's space policy may become an “endangered species”, in danger of failing and disappearing.

  8. Progression of biopsy-measured liver fibrosis in untreated patients with hepatitis C infection: non-Markov multistate model analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bacchetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibrosis stages from liver biopsies reflect liver damage from hepatitis C infection, but analysis is challenging due to their ordered but non-numeric nature, infrequent measurement, misclassification, and unknown infection times. METHODS: We used a non-Markov multistate model, accounting for misclassification, with multiple imputation of unknown infection times, applied to 1062 participants of whom 159 had multiple biopsies. Odds ratios (OR quantified the estimated effects of covariates on progression risk at any given time. RESULTS: Models estimated that progression risk decreased the more time participants had already spent in the current stage, African American race was protective (OR 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.60 to 0.95, p = 0.018, and older current age increased risk (OR 1.33 per decade, 95% confidence interval 1.15 to 1.54, p = 0.0002. When controlled for current age, older age at infection did not appear to increase risk (OR 0.92 per decade, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 1.79, p = 0.80. There was a suggestion that co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus increased risk of progression in the era of highly active antiretroviral treatment beginning in 1996 (OR 2.1, 95% confidence interval 0.97 to 4.4, p = 0.059. Other examined risk factors may influence progression risk, but evidence for or against this was weak due to wide confidence intervals. The main results were essentially unchanged using different assumed misclassification rates or imputation of age of infection. DISCUSSION: The analysis avoided problems inherent in simpler methods, supported the previously suspected protective effect of African American race, and suggested that current age rather than age of infection increases risk. Decreasing risk of progression with longer time already spent in a stage was also previously found for post-transplant progression. This could reflect varying disease activity, with recent progression indicating

  9. Drivers of inequality in Millennium Development Goal progress: a statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckler, David; Basu, Sanjay; McKee, Martin

    2010-03-02

    Many low- and middle-income countries are not on track to reach the public health targets set out in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We evaluated whether differential progress towards health MDGs was associated with economic development, public health funding (both overall and as percentage of available domestic funds), or health system infrastructure. We also examined the impact of joint epidemics of HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which may limit the ability of households to address child mortality and increase risks of infectious diseases. We calculated each country's distance from its MDG goals for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and infant and child mortality targets for the year 2005 using the United Nations MDG database for 227 countries from 1990 to the present. We studied the association of economic development (gross domestic product [GDP] per capita in purchasing-power-parity), the relative priority placed on health (health spending as a percentage of GDP), real health spending (health system expenditures in purchasing-power-parity), HIV/AIDS burden (prevalence rates among ages 15-49 y), and NCD burden (age-standardised chronic disease mortality rates), with measures of distance from attainment of health MDGs. To avoid spurious correlations that may exist simply because countries with high disease burdens would be expected to have low MDG progress, and to adjust for potential confounding arising from differences in countries' initial disease burdens, we analysed the variations in rates of change in MDG progress versus expected rates for each country. While economic development, health priority, health spending, and health infrastructure did not explain more than one-fifth of the differences in progress to health MDGs among countries, burdens of HIV and NCDs explained more than half of between-country inequalities in child mortality progress (R(2)-infant mortality = 0.57, R(2)-under 5 mortality = 0.54). HIV/AIDS and NCD burdens were also

  10. Drivers of inequality in Millennium Development Goal progress: a statistical analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stuckler

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Many low- and middle-income countries are not on track to reach the public health targets set out in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. We evaluated whether differential progress towards health MDGs was associated with economic development, public health funding (both overall and as percentage of available domestic funds, or health system infrastructure. We also examined the impact of joint epidemics of HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs, which may limit the ability of households to address child mortality and increase risks of infectious diseases.We calculated each country's distance from its MDG goals for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and infant and child mortality targets for the year 2005 using the United Nations MDG database for 227 countries from 1990 to the present. We studied the association of economic development (gross domestic product [GDP] per capita in purchasing-power-parity, the relative priority placed on health (health spending as a percentage of GDP, real health spending (health system expenditures in purchasing-power-parity, HIV/AIDS burden (prevalence rates among ages 15-49 y, and NCD burden (age-standardised chronic disease mortality rates, with measures of distance from attainment of health MDGs. To avoid spurious correlations that may exist simply because countries with high disease burdens would be expected to have low MDG progress, and to adjust for potential confounding arising from differences in countries' initial disease burdens, we analysed the variations in rates of change in MDG progress versus expected rates for each country. While economic development, health priority, health spending, and health infrastructure did not explain more than one-fifth of the differences in progress to health MDGs among countries, burdens of HIV and NCDs explained more than half of between-country inequalities in child mortality progress (R(2-infant mortality = 0.57, R(2-under 5 mortality = 0.54. HIV/AIDS and NCD burdens were

  11. GENRE ANALYSIS OF THE ENGLISH FINAL PROJECT ABSTRACTS WRITTEN BY THE STUDENTS OF ENGLISH EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OF IKIP PGRI SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiyaka Wiyaka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is specifically focused on the student final project abstract based on genre analysis which covers the study of the generic structure and the linguistic features. The statements of the study are: (1. How do the students of English Education Department of IKIP PGRI Semarang realize the generic structure in their final project abstracts (2. How do they realize the linguistic features in their final project abstracts, and (3. What is the contribution of the result of the study to the English Education Program of IKIP PGRI Semarang. The main purpose of this study is to find out the generic structure and linguistic features of the final project abstracts and analyze the contribution of this study to the English Department. This study applies the descriptive qualitative method. The object of this study is the final project abstracts written by English Education Department students of ‘IKIP PGRI Semarang’. The total of 10 final projects formed the data of this study. The data of the study were analyzed using the genre analysis approach. The first step of data analysis was identifying the Moves which was done by using Linguistic evidence and understanding the texts. The finding shows that only some of the final project abstracts made by the students of IKIP PGRI applied the five Moves. It is found that two Moves are applied in all abstracts, they are Purpose and Method Moves (100%. Situating the research is used in five abstracts (50%. Meanwhile the third move that is the Result Move used in eight abstracts (80%. The Conclusion Move found in five abstracts (50%. The result of the analysis showed that two personal pronouns were found in the final project abstracts. Personal pronouns such as ‘the writer’ and ‘the researcher’ were found in all of the abstracts. Personal pronoun ‘she’ was found in one abstract. Finally, there are only five expressions of hedges that are used in the final project abstracts, they

  12. Glucocorticoid regimens for prevention of Graves' ophthalmopathy progression following radioiodine treatment: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiber, Shachaf; Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Shimon, Ilan; Grossman, Alon; Robenshtok, Eyal

    2014-10-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy has been shown to prevent Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) progression following radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment. However, the optimal regimen is controversial, with studies from recent years suggesting the use of lower doses and shorter GC treatment courses. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and retrospective controlled trials comparing GC regimens versus placebo, no treatment, or other GC regimens. Eight trials evaluating 850 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. In patients with preexisting GO, standard dose prednisone (0.4-0.5 mg/kg tapered over 3 months) was very effective for prevention of GO progression (OR 0.14 [CI 0.06-0.35], phyperthyroidism resolution (OR 1.05 [CI 0.69-1.58]), and GC side effects were common but mild. Current evidence supports a three-tier approach for prevention of GO progression following RAI. Standard dose prednisone is the best validated regimen and should be used in patients with mild to moderate GO who have high risk of progression, while low dose prednisone can be used in patients with mild GO, and in patients without preexisting GO who have risk factors and are selected for GC prophylaxis. Patients without preexisting GO and without risk factors should not be treated with GC prophylaxis.

  13. Studies of transport pathways of Th, U, rare earths, Ra-228, and Ra-226 from soil to plants and farm animals: Final progress report, 1983-1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsalata, P

    1988-07-01

    This report consists of three parts. Part 1 discusses a field study conducted in an area of enhanced, natural radioactivity to assess the soil to edible vegetable concentration ratios (CR = concentration in dry vegetable/concentration in dry soil) of Th-232, Th-230, Ra-226, Ra-228, and the light rare earth elements (REE's), La, Ce, and Nd. Twenty-eight soil, and approximately 42 vegetable samples consisting of relatively equal numbers of seven varieties, were obtained from 11 farms on the Pocos de Caldas Plateau in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. This region is the site of a major natural analogue study to assess the mobilization and retardation processes affecting thorium and the REE's at the Morro do Ferro ore body, and uranium series radionuclides at the Osamu Utsumi open pit uranium mine. Thorium (IV) serves as a chemical analogue for quadrivalent plutonium, the light REE's (III) as chemical analogues for trivalent americium and curium, and uranium (VI) as an analogue for transuranics with stable oxidation states above IV, e.g., Pu(VI). Part 2 includes our final measurement results for naturally occurring light rare earth elements (REE's include La, Ce, Nd, and SM), U-series and Th-series radionuclides in adult farm animal tissues, feeds and soils. Our findings on soil-to-tissue concentration ratios (CR's) and the comparative behavior of these elements in farm animals raised under natural conditions by local farmers are presented. Part 3 summarizes our findings to date on the distribution and mobilization of Th-232, light rare earth elements (LREE), U-238 and Ra-228 in the MF basin. Estimates of first order, present day, mobilization rate constants resulting from ground water solubilization and seepage/stream transport are calculated using revised inventory estimates for the occurrence of these elements in the ore body and annual flux estimates for the transport of these elements away from the ore body. 151 refs., 20 figs., 40 tabs.

  14. Mastoidectomy performance assessment of virtual simulation training using final-product analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven A W; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Sørensen, Mads S

    2015-01-01

    a modified Welling scale. The simulator gathered basic metrics on time, steps, and volumes in relation to the on-screen tutorial and collisions with vital structures. RESULTS: Substantial inter-rater reliability (kappa = 0.77) for virtual simulation and moderate inter-rater reliability (kappa = 0.......59) for dissection final-product assessment was found. The simulation and dissection performance scores had significant correlation (P = .014). None of the basic simulator metrics correlated significantly with the final-product score except for number of steps completed in the simulator. CONCLUSIONS: A modified...... version of a validated final-product performance assessment tool can be used to assess mastoidectomy on virtual temporal bones. Performance assessment of virtual mastoidectomy could potentially save the use of cadaveric temporal bones for more advanced training when a basic level of competency...

  15. Wind energy mission analysis. Final report, appendices A--J. [USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-02-18

    Information is presented concerning meteorological data and supporting analyses, gross energy consumption patterns and end-use analysis, analysis for industrial applications of wind energy conversion systems (WECS), analysis for residential applications of WECS, analysis for application of WECS to communities remote from utility grids, analysis for agricultural applications of WECS, regional evaluation of the economics of wind turbine generation to the U. S. electric utility district, impact of storage on WECS, financial analysis techniques, and system spacing.

  16. A methodology for the analysis of damage progression in rubble mound breakwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Campos Duque, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, risk based designs as well as reliable rehabilitation and maintenance strategies are essential when dealing with coastal structures. In this sense, the probability of failure due to instability of the armour layer is one of the main issues in rubble mound breakwaters, and so is improving the knowledge on its deterioration rate. Both stability and damage progression on rubble mound breakwaters have been studied for more than 80 years, using different approaches, under regular/irregul...

  17. Labor Productivity Growth, Education, Health and Technological Progress: A Cross-Country Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Supachet Chansarn

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to calculate the growth rates of labor productivity of 30 countries categorized into four groups, including G7 countries, western developed countries, eastern developed countries and eastern developing countries, during 1981 – 2005 and examine the influences of education, health and technological progress on the growth rate of labor productivity. The findings reveal that the growth rates of labor productivity of every country, except the Philippines, were greater than four per...

  18. Transfers from intensive care unit to hospital ward: a multicentre textual analysis of physician progress notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla N; Leigh, Jeanna Parsons; Kamran, Hasham; Bagshaw, Sean M; Fowler, Rob A; Dodek, Peter M; Turgeon, Alexis F; Forster, Alan J; Lamontagne, Francois; Soo, Andrea; Stelfox, Henry T

    2018-01-28

    Little is known about documentation during transitions of patient care between clinical specialties. Therefore, we examined the focus, structure and purpose of physician progress notes for patients transferred from the intensive care unit (ICU) to hospital ward to identify opportunities to improve communication breaks. This was a prospective cohort study in ten Canadian hospitals. We analyzed physician progress notes for consenting adult patients transferred from a medical-surgical ICU to hospital ward. The number, length, legibility and content of notes was counted and compared across care settings using mixed-effects linear regression models accounting for clustering within hospitals. Qualitative content analyses were conducted on a stratified random sample of 32 patients. A total of 447 patient medical records that included 7052 progress notes (mean 2.1 notes/patient/day 95% CI 1.9-2.3) were analyzed. Notes written by the ICU team were significantly longer than notes written by the ward team (mean lines of text 21 vs. 15, p notes; mean agreement of patient issues was 42% [95% CI 31-53%]. Qualitative analyses identified eight themes related to focus (central point - e.g., problem list), structure (organization, - e.g., note-taking style), and purpose (intention - e.g., documentation of patient course) of the notes that varied across clinical specialties and physician seniority. Important gaps and variations in written documentation during transitions of patient care between ICU and hospital ward physicians are common, and include discrepancies in documentation of patient information.

  19. The impact of proto- and metazooplankton on the fate of organic carbon in continental ocean margins. Final progress report, May 1992--July 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.; Verity, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    Three fates potentially consume primary production occurring on ocean margins: portions can be oxidized within the water column, portions can sediment to shelf/slope depots, and portions can be exported to the interior ocean. Zooplankton mediate all three of these processes and thus can alter the pathway and residence time of particulate organic carbon, depending on the size structure and composition of the zooplankton (and phytoplankton). To achieve the long-term goal of quantifying the role of proto- and metazooplankton in removing newly formed POC (primary production), the authors must accomplish two major component objectives: (a) determine plankton carbon biomass at relevant temporal and spatial scales; and (b) measure zooplankton carbon consumption rates and (for metazoan zooplankton) fecal pellet production. These measurements will specify the importance of different zooplankton groups as consumers and transformers of phytoplankton carbon. During Phase 1, they concentrated on methodological and technological developments prerequisite to an organized field program. Specifically, they proposed to develop and test an optical zooplankton counter, and to fully enhance the color image analysis system. In addition, they proposed to evaluate a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunospot assay to quantify predation by metazoan zooplankton on protozoans; and to improve methodology to determine ingestion and growth rates of salps, and accompanying pellet production rates, under conditions which very closely resemble their environment. The image analyzer data provide insights on basic ecosystem parameters relevant to carbon flux from the continental ocean to the deep ocean. Together these approaches provide a powerful set of tools to probe food web relationships in greater detail, to increase the accuracy and speed of carbon biomass and rate measurements, and to enhance data collection and analysis.

  20. Investigating the usefulness of a cluster-based trend analysis to detect visual field progression in patients with open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Shuichiro; Murata, Hiroshi; Fujino, Yuri; Matsuura, Masato; Miki, Atsuya; Tanito, Masaki; Mizoue, Shiro; Mori, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Yamashita, Takehiro; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Hirasawa, Kazunori; Shoji, Nobuyuki; Asaoka, Ryo

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the usefulness of the Octopus (Haag-Streit) EyeSuite's cluster trend analysis in glaucoma. Ten visual fields (VFs) with the Humphrey Field Analyzer (Carl Zeiss Meditec), spanning 7.7 years on average were obtained from 728 eyes of 475 primary open angle glaucoma patients. Mean total deviation (mTD) trend analysis and EyeSuite's cluster trend analysis were performed on various series of VFs (from 1st to 10th: VF1-10 to 6th to 10th: VF6-10). The results of the cluster-based trend analysis, based on different lengths of VF series, were compared against mTD trend analysis. Cluster-based trend analysis and mTD trend analysis results were significantly associated in all clusters and with all lengths of VF series. Between 21.2% and 45.9% (depending on VF series length and location) of clusters were deemed to progress when the mTD trend analysis suggested no progression. On the other hand, 4.8% of eyes were observed to progress using the mTD trend analysis when cluster trend analysis suggested no progression in any two (or more) clusters. Whole field trend analysis can miss local VF progression. Cluster trend analysis appears as robust as mTD trend analysis and useful to assess both sectorial and whole field progression. Cluster-based trend analyses, in particular the definition of two or more progressing cluster, may help clinicians to detect glaucomatous progression in a timelier manner than using a whole field trend analysis, without significantly compromising specificity. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Serum Uric Acid and Progression of Kidney Disease: A Longitudinal Analysis and Mini-Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Wei Tsai

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence supports the association between hyperuricemia and incident chronic kidney disease (CKD; however, there are conflicting data regarding the role of hyperuricemia in the progression of CKD. This study retrospectively assessed the longitudinal association between uric acid (UA level and CKD progression in a Chinese population lived in Taiwan.Patients with physician diagnosis of hyperuricemia or receiving urate-lowering therapy between 2003 and 2005 were identified in the electronic medical records (EMR of a tertiary medical center and were followed up until December 31, 2011. Patients were divided into four UA categories at the cut-off 6, 8, and 10 mg/dL. CKD progression was estimated by the change of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR in the linear mixed models. Kidney failure was defined as an eGFR less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 or requiring renal replacement therapy.A total of 739 patients were analyzed. In the full-adjusted model, patients with a baseline UA level ≥6 mg/dL had greater decline in eGFR ((β = -9.6, 95% CI -16.1, -3.1, comparing to those with a UA level less than 6 mg/dL. When stratifying patients into four UA categories, all three hyperuricemia categories (UA6-8, 8-10, ≥10 mg/dL associated with a greater decline in eGFR over the follow-up period with an increasing dose-response, comparing to the lowest UA category. The risk of progression to renal failure increased 7% (hazard ratio 1.07, 95% CI 1.00, 1.14 for each 1mg/dL increase in baseline UA level. The influences of hyperuricemia on eGFR decline and the risk of kidney failure were more prominent in patients without proteinuria than those with proteinuria.Our study showed a higher uric acid level is associated with a significant rapid decline in eGFR and a higher risk of kidney failure, particularly in patients without proteinuria. Our findings suggest hyperuricemia is a potential modifiable factor of CKD progression.

  2. Analysis of final year DVM research projects submitted to the Faculty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analyzed the intellectual output of the undergraduate final year students. research projects submitted to the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, from 1994 to 2004. The findings of the study show that a total of 194 research projects were produced within the period under study.

  3. The Evaluation of Oral/Aural Skills within the BA Finals Examination: Analysis and Interim Proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Robert

    An examination of the principles and techniques of oral testing in British university-level final examinations in modern languages discusses: (1) the shortcomings of present oral testing procedures; (2) the theoretical controversy surrounding the design and value of oral proficiency tests, arising from research in English as a second language…

  4. Analysis of final year DVM research projects submitted to the Faculty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Central Research Laboratory

    in the library. The essence of this study is to guide prospective final year students and researchers in the choice of research topics as this will help in saving their time. It will also ... and Undergraduate projects of the same department in 2002. Obajemu (1999) also .... majority of the rural people. The distribution by animal ...

  5. Study of the temporal and spatial variation of climate and solar radiation in th metropolitan Phoenix area. Final technical progress report, July 1, 1977-June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrenberger, R.W.

    1978-09-29

    The research performed was designed to identify spatial or temporal variation of any atmospheric parameters that might affect the operation of devices utilizing solar energy in the metropolitan Phoenix area. The first part of the research involved the analysis of all available solar and climatic data to determine their validity and comparability. For the standard climatic parameters, few difficulties were encountered, but the task of determining comparability of solar radiation data involved many pitfalls. It was concluded that most of the solar data acquired before January 1977 could not be used for purposes of identifying spatial variability. And, a year and a half of data does not represent a long enough period of time upon which to base sound conclusions about spatial and temporal variability of solar radiation in the metropolitan Phoenix region. The data currently available to us do not indicate any great variation of solar radiation in the metropolitan Phoenix area. However, any meaningful statements about spatial and temporal variability of solar radiation in the metropolitan Phoenix area must await the acquisition of additional data from well-calibrated equipment.

  6. Areas of progress towards a factor 4 territorial coherence scheme. Which local levers for a post-carbon conurbation? Final report - Scenario 2020-2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvais, Jean Marie; Metais, Benedicte; Baratier, Jerome; Vidalenc, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Taking the Tours conurbation as an example, this study examines how to elaborate and define a new territorial coherence scheme (a land and urban planning tool) which would include a planned reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by a factor 4 between 2020 and 2030. It is therefore a prospective study with 2006 as a reference year (reductions are assessed with respect to 2006 due to data availability). After an analysis of the reference situation (2006) and of objectives, the report presents the scenario for 2020-2030, analyses the various levers in different sectors (mobility, housing, office building, industry and construction, agriculture), and examines possibilities related to the production of renewable energy, the adaptation to climate change, the creation of a new governance to mitigate and to adapt to climate change. Expected gains are discussed for transports, housing, office building, industry, agriculture, renewable energies, and adaptation. The last part reports a sensitive approach to a post-carbon world through different workshops (with children or within a fiction writing workshop)

  7. Coagulation Parameters and Risk of Progressive Hemorrhagic Injury after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danfeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH after traumatic brain injury (TBI commonly increases in size and coagulopathy has been implicated in such progression. Our aim is to perform a meta-analysis to assess their relationship. Cochrane library, PubMed, and EMBASE were searched for literatures. Pooled effect sizes and 95% confidential intervals (CIs were calculated using random-effects model. We included six studies, involving 1700 participants with 540 progressive hemorrhagic injuries (PHIs. Our findings indicate that PT, D-dimer level, and INR value are positively associated with the risk of PHI. Higher level of PLT and Fg seemed to suggest a lower risk of PHI. Among these parameters, higher D-dimer level and INR value would possess more powerful strength in predicting PHI.

  8. How clean are Europe's cars? An analysis of carmaker progress towards EU CO2 targets in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dings, J. (ed.)

    2010-11-15

    This report is the fifth T and E has published on the annual progress Europe's major car manufacturers have made in reducing CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of new cars. The main purpose of these reports is to assess the progress that major car manufacturers in Europe are making towards cutting the average CO2 emissions of their products. We also assess how each carmaker is positioned to hit the mandatory CO2 standards that the European Union has set for 2015. In this year's report, we add an analysis showing to what extent the CO2 reductions achieved can be attributed to the financial crisis i.e. sales of cheaper, smaller cars, and to what extent to technological improvements.

  9. Using a profiling process to insure program quality: Volume II - support materials. Final progress report, May 15, 1991--November 14, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaser, J.S.; Roody, D.S.; Raizen, S.A.

    1996-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1995 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Center for Improving Science Education (National Center) developed a system for ongoing evaluation of K-12 educational programs in the DOE-supported national energy Laboratories. As part of the formative evaluation component of this collaborative endeavor, field staff in the Laboratories began creating profiles of their programs. However, many individuals within DOE Headquarters were not familiar with this profiling process and were unprepared to use the valuable information that the profiles generated. This manual was produced to orient Headquarters staff to profiling. It focuses on how Headquarters staff can use the profiling process to help their funded programs establish and/or maintain high quality. Its purpose, then, is not to train Headquarters staff to become proficient in profiling, but to show them how to draw on the Laboratories` use of profiling to bring about program improvement. Profiling is the process of systematically examining and describing a program`s elements against a set of components that define Effective Practice. The instrument used to capture the data for analysis is called a template, and most of this manual focuses on the templates and how to read and interpret them. However, since it is important to understand these data in context, the authors also describe what should accompany each template in a complete profiling packet and offer guidelines for reviewing complete packets and providing feedback to program managers. This document consists of Support Materials for the manual: exercise answer keys; templates; guidelines for reviewing templates; a complete profiling packet; guidelines for the trainer.

  10. A Small Disc Area Is a Risk Factor for Visual Field Loss Progression in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, Yasushi; Tanito, Masaki; Yokoyama, Yu; Nitta, Koji; Katai, Maki; Omodaka, Kazuko; Nakazawa, Toru

    2018-01-01

    The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study, a cross-sectional multicenter collaborative study, used a stereo fundus camera (nonmyd WX) to assess various morphological parameters of the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucoma patients. We compared the associations of each parameter between the visual field loss progression group and no-progression group. The study included 187 eyes of 187 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or normal-tension glaucoma. We divided the mean deviation (MD) slope values of all patients into the progression group (field progression and patient characteristics or each ONH parameter were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. The MD slope averages in the progression group and no-progression group were -0.58 ± 0.28 dB/year and 0.05 ± 0.26 dB/year, respectively. Among disc parameters, vertical disc width (diameter), disc area, cup area, and cup volume in the progression group were significantly less than those in the no-progression group. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between the visual field progression and disc area (odds ratio 0.49/mm 2 disc area). A smaller disc area may be associated with more rapid glaucomatous visual field progression.

  11. Effect of atorvastatin on glycaemia progression in patients with diabetes: an analysis from the Collaborative Atorvastatin in Diabetes Trial (CARDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Shona J; Looker, Helen C; Akbar, Tahira; Betteridge, D John; Durrington, Paul N; Hitman, Graham A; Neil, H Andrew W; Fuller, John H; Colhoun, Helen M

    2016-02-01

    In an individual-level analysis we examined the effect of atorvastatin on glycaemia progression in type 2 diabetes and whether glycaemia effects reduce the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) with atorvastatin. The study population comprised 2,739 people taking part in the Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS) who were randomised to receive atorvastatin 10 mg or placebo and who had post-randomisation HbA1c data. This secondary analysis used Cox regression to estimate the effect of atorvastatin on glycaemia progression, defined as an increase in HbA1c of ≥ 0.5% (5.5 mmol/mol) or intensification of diabetes therapy. Mixed models were used to estimate the effect of atorvastatin on HbA1c as a continuous endpoint. Glycaemia progression occurred in 73.6% of participants allocated placebo and 78.1% of those allocated atorvastatin (HR 1.18 [95% CI 1.08, 1.29], p effect was seen in on-treatment analyses: HR 1.20 (95% CI 1.07, 1.35), p = 0.001. The net mean treatment effect on HbA1c was 0.14% (95% CI 0.08, 0.21) (1.5 mmol/mol). The effect did not increase through time. Diabetes treatment intensification alone did not differ with statin allocation. Neither baseline nor 1-year-attained HbA1c predicted subsequent CVD, and the atorvastatin effect on CVD did not vary by HbA1c change (interaction p value 0.229). The effect of atorvastatin 10 mg on glycaemia progression among those with diabetes is statistically significant but very small, is not significantly different between sexes, does not increase with duration of statin and does not have an impact on the magnitude of CVD risk reduction with atorvastatin.

  12. [Retrospective analysis of influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wendi; Yin, Daoxin; Cui, Wenying; Liu, Wenhu

    2014-01-28

    To explore retrospectively the influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 159 chronic kidney disease patients at stages 2, 3 and 4 were enrolled and a questionnaire survey was conducted from January 2009 to July 2012. They were followed monthly and their clinical data collected, including primary disease, blood pressure, body mass index and adverse events. Laboratory tests were performed every 3 months, including biochemical parameters, protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), diet reviews and daily protein intake (DPI). A simplified MDRD formula was employed to evaluate the level of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). According to the level of DPI, they were divided into 3 groups of very low protein diet (VLPD): DPI ≤ 0.6 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), low-protein diet (LPD): DPI >0.6-protein diet (NPD): DPI ≥ 0.8 · g · kg(-1) · d(-1). Among them, 4 cases (2.50%) progressed to uremia stage and received renal replacement therapy, 2(1.25%) experienced rapid decline in renal function, 9(5.66%) were hospitalized from cardio-cerebral diseases and the 2-year kidney survival rate was 97.5%. At the end of study, among 9 patients of PEM, 2 subjects had a serum level of albumin under 32 g/L and another 7 with a BMI 0.05). Within a certain range, differential protein intake may not significantly affect the prognosis of kidney for progressive CKD patients.

  13. Procedure for conducting a human-reliability analysis for nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, B.J.; Swain, A.D.

    1983-05-01

    This document describes in detail a procedure to be followed in conducting a human reliability analysis as part of a probabilistic risk assessment when such an analysis is performed according to the methods described in NUREG/CR-1278, Handbook for Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications. An overview of the procedure describing the major elements of a human reliability analysis is presented along with a detailed description of each element and an example of an actual analysis. An appendix consists of some sample human reliability analysis problems for further study

  14. Planning for a program design for energy environmental analysis. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denton, J.C.

    The work reported in this progress report is focused on determining the proper scope of a regional assessment study program suitable for BER/ERDA. Within the tentative scope selected, a tentative set of purposes, goals, and objectives is identified for a preliminary specification of a geographical region. The initial specification of the region includes the states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. The tentative scope of considerations for the regional assessment study program encompasses the interacting facets of environment, energy, and economic well-being of the region with the overarching goal of reconciling these facets within the decision framework of the region

  15. Analysis of ovine colostrum to detect antibody against progressive pneumonia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, T B; Banowetz, G M; Schipper, I A; Gabrielson, D A

    1982-01-01

    Immunoglobulins were isolated and purified from the colostrum and serum of progressive pneumonia virus infected sheep and also from non-infected control sheep. Four classes of immunoglobulins were isolated from sheep colostrum (IgG1, IgG2, IgA and Ig10s). Three classes of immunoglobulins were isolated from sheep serum (IgG1, IgG2 and IgM). Low levels of virus neutralizing activity were demonstrated only in the whole serum and purified serum IgG1 preparations. No complement fixing activity was...

  16. Analysis of Changes in SUMO-2/3 Modification during Breast Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subramonian, Divya; Raghunayakula, Sarita; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-01-01

    SUMOylation is an essential posttranslational modification and regulates many cellular processes. Dysregulation of SUMOylation plays a critical role in metastasis, yet how its perturbation affects this lethal process of cancer is not well understood. We found that SUMO-2/3 modification is greatly...... in metastatic cells. Targets with altered SUMOylation are involved in cell cycle, migration, inflammation, glycolysis, gene expression, and SUMO/ubiquitin pathways, suggesting that perturbations of SUMO-2/3 modification might contribute to metastasis by affecting these processes. Consistent with this, up...... progression and metastasis....

  17. An analysis of the Spanish electrical utility industry. Economies of scale, technological progress and efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, Angel; De Toledo, Pablo Alvarez

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a model to explain the behaviour of the Spanish electrical utility industry during the period 1987-1997, under the then existing regulatory system (Marco Legal Estable). The paper will study the presence of economies of scale, the effect of technological progress and the differences in the efficiency of the different companies within the market. The paper concludes that the Spanish electrical utility industry was not, in fact, characterized by economies of scale during this period, but witnessed a great improvement in efficiency within that period. All the critical market factors remind stable. (author)

  18. Final Sampling and Analysis Plan for Background Sampling, Fort Sheridan, Illinois

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    .... This Background Sampling and Analysis Plan (BSAP) is designed to address this issue through the collection of additional background samples at Fort Sheridan to support the statistical analysis and the Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA...

  19. Analysis of higher order optical aberrations in the SLC final focus using Lie Algebra techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, N.J.; Irwin, J.; Woodley, M.

    1993-04-01

    The SLC final focus system is designed to have an overall demagnification of 30:1, with a β at the interaction point (β*) of 5 mm, and an energy band pass of ∼0.4%. Strong sextupole pairs are used to cancel the large chromaticity which accrues primarily from the final triplet. Third-order aberrations limit the performance of the system, the dominating terms being U 1266 and U 3466 terms (in the notation of K. Brown). Using Lie Algebra techniques, it is possible to analytically calculate the soave of these terms in addition to understanding their origin. Analytical calculations (using Lie Algebra packages developed in the Mathematica language) are presented of the bandwidth and minimum spot size as a function of divergence at the interaction point (IP). Comparisons of the analytical results from the Lie Algebra maps and results from particle tracking (TURTLE) are also presented

  20. Regulatory impact analysis of the part 503 sewage sludge regulation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, S.

    1992-01-01

    The report evaluates the costs, benefits, and economic impacts of the final 40 CFR Part 503 regulation governing the use of disposal of sewage sludge generated during the treatment of domestic sewage in a treatment works and domestic septage. The report begins by describing some relevant characteristics of treatment works and domestic septage haulers. The report focuses on the costs, risks, and benefits of the Part 503 regulation

  1. TRANSITIONING BEYOND UNDERGRADUATE HOSPITALITY EDUCATION; A DIALOGIC ANALYSIS OF FINAL YEAR HOSPITALITY STUDENTS’ NARRATIVES OF EMPLOYABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Hine, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Employability has become a key consideration for graduates, and society. Increasingly the trajectory of individuals at age 18 involves the completion of an undergraduate level degree qualification. This thesis presents a sociologically grounded study into the dialogic construction of employability in final year hospitality students and recent hospitality graduates. Drawing on a nationwide sample of UK based hospitality graduates, as they transition beyond undergraduate level higher educati...

  2. Final hazard classification and auditable safety analysis for the 105-C Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodovsky, T.J.; Larson, A.R.; Dexheimer, D.

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes the inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials present in the 105-C Reactor Facility and the operations associated with the Interim Safe Storage Project which includes decontamination and demolition and interim safe storage of the remaining facility. This document also establishes a final hazard classification and verifies that appropriate and adequate safety functions and controls are in place to reduce or mitigate the risk associated with those operations

  3. Final analysis and design of a thermal protection system for 8-foot HTST combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, S.

    1973-01-01

    The cylindrical shell combustor with T-bar supports in the 8-foot HTST at the NASA-Langley Research Center encountered vibratory fatigue cracking over a period of 50-250 tunnel tests within a limited range of the required operating envelope. A preliminary design study provided several suitable thermal protection system designs for the combustor, one of which was a two-pass regenerative type air-cooled omega-shaped segment liner. A final design layout of the omega segment liner was prepared and analyzed for steady-state and transient conditions. The design of a support system for the fuel spray bar assembly was also included. Detail drawings suitable for fabrication purposes were also prepared. Liner design problems defined during the preliminary study included (1) the ingress of gas into the attachment bulb section of the omega segment, (2) the large thermal gradient along the leg of the omega bulb attachment section and, (3) the local peak metal temperature at the radius between the liner ID and the leg of the bulb attachment. These were resolved during the final design task. Analyses of the final design of the omega segment liner indicated that all design goals were met and the design provided the capability of operating over the required test envelope with a life expectancy substantially above the goal of 1500 cycles.

  4. Progress in Energy Storage Technologies: Models and Methods for Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Schuyler W.

    Climate change and other sustainability challenges have led to the development of new technologies that increase energy efficiency and reduce the utilization of finite resources. To promote the adoption of technologies with social benefits, governments often enact policies that provide financial incentives at the point of purchase. In their current form, these subsidies have the potential to increase the diffusion of emerging technologies; however, accounting for technological progress can improve program success while decreasing net public investment. This research develops novel methods using experience curves for the development of more efficient subsidy policies. By providing case studies in the field of automotive energy storage technologies, this dissertation also applies the methods to show the impacts of incorporating technological progress into energy policies. Specific findings include learning-dependent tapering subsidies for electric vehicles based on the lithium-ion battery experience curve, the effects of residual learning rates in lead-acid batteries on emerging technology cost competitiveness, and a cascading diffusion assessment of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle subsidy programs. Notably, the results show that considering learning rates in policy development can save billions of dollars in public funds, while also lending insight into the decision of whether or not to subsidize a given technology.

  5. Preliminary Analysis of Severe Accident Progression Initiated from Small Break LOCA of a SMART Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Young Ho; Park, Jong Hwa; Kim, Dong Ha; Cho, Seong Won

    2010-01-01

    SMART (System integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), is under the development at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). SMART is an integral type pressurized water reactor which contains a pressurizer, 4 reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), and 8 steam generator cassettes(S/Gs) in a single reactor vessel. This reactor has substantially enhanced its safety with an integral layout of its major components, 4 trains of safety injection systems (SISs), and an adoption of 4 trains of passive residual heat removal systems (PRHRS) instead of an active auxiliary feedwater system . The thermal power is 330 MWth. During the conceptual design stage, a preliminary PSA was performed. PSA results identified that a small break loss of coolant accident (SLOCA) with all safety injections unavailable is one of important severe core damage sequences. Clear understanding of this sequence helps in the developing accident mitigation strategies. MIDAS/SMR computer code is used to simulate the severe accident progression initiated from a small break LOCA in SMART reactor. This code has capability to model a helical steam generator which is adopted in SMART reactor. The important accident progression results for SMART reactor are then compared with the typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) result

  6. Analysis of airborne radiometric data. Volume 2. Description, listing, and operating instructions for the code DELPHI/MAZAS. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperling, M.; Shreve, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The computer code DELPHI is an interactive English language command system for the analysis of airborne radiometric data. The code includes modules for data reduction, data simulation, time filtering, data adjustment and graphical presentation of the results. DELPHI is implemented in FORTRAN on a DEC-10 computer. This volume gives a brief set of operations instructions, samples of the output obtained from hard copies of the display on a Tektronix terminal and finally a listing of the code

  7. Analysis of airborne radiometric data. Volume 2. Description, listing, and operating instructions for the code DELPHI/MAZAS. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, M.; Shreve, D.C.

    1978-12-01

    The computer code DELPHI is an interactive English language command system for the analysis of airborne radiometric data. The code includes modules for data reduction, data simulation, time filtering, data adjustment and graphical presentation of the results. DELPHI is implemented in FORTRAN on a DEC-10 computer. This volume gives a brief set of operations instructions, samples of the output obtained from hard copies of the display on a Tektronix terminal and finally a listing of the code.

  8. Phenomenological analyses and their application to the Defense Waste Processing Facility probabilistic safety analysis accident progression event tree. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinich, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Gough, S.T.; Bailey, R.T.; Kearnaghan, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    In the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for the Savannah River Site (SRS), risk-based perspectives have been included per US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23. The NUREG-1150 Level 2/3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methodology was selected as the basis for calculating facility risk. The backbone of this methodology is the generation of an Accident Progression Event Tree (APET), which is solved using the EVNTRE computer code. To support the development of the DWPF APET, deterministic modeling of accident phenomena was necessary. From these analyses, (1) accident progressions were identified for inclusion into the APET; (2) branch point probabilities and any attendant parameters were quantified; and (3) the radionuclide releases to the environment from accidents were determined. The phenomena of interest for accident progressions included explosions, fires, a molten glass spill, and the response of the facility confinement system during such challenges. A variety of methodologies, from hand calculations to large system-model codes, were used in the evaluation of these phenomena

  9. How accurate are interpretations of curriculum-based measurement progress monitoring data? Visual analysis versus decision rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Ethan R; Christ, Theodore J

    2016-10-01

    Curriculum based measurement of oral reading (CBM-R) is used to monitor the effects of academic interventions for individual students. Decisions to continue, modify, or terminate these interventions are made by interpreting time series CBM-R data. Such interpretation is founded upon visual analysis or the application of decision rules. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of visual analysis and decision rules. Visual analysts interpreted 108 CBM-R progress monitoring graphs one of three ways: (a) without graphic aids, (b) with a goal line, or (c) with a goal line and a trend line. Graphs differed along three dimensions, including trend magnitude, variability of observations, and duration of data collection. Automated trend line and data point decision rules were also applied to each graph. Inferential analyses permitted the estimation of the probability of a correct decision (i.e., the student is improving - continue the intervention, or the student is not improving - discontinue the intervention) for each evaluation method as a function of trend magnitude, variability of observations, and duration of data collection. All evaluation methods performed better when students made adequate progress. Visual analysis and decision rules performed similarly when observations were less variable. Results suggest that educators should collect data for more than six weeks, take steps to control measurement error, and visually analyze graphs when data are variable. Implications for practice and research are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bulk hydrogen analysis, using neutrons. Final report of the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The aims of the Second Co-ordination Meting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) were to report on and review progress against the work programme set at the beginning of the CRP and to discuss the work plans for the second half of the programme. In many cases hydrogen is required to be measured in a bulk medium rather than merely at a surface. For this reason neutrons are used due to their high penetrating power in dense material. In addition, the mass attenuation coefficient for neutrons in hydrogen is significantly larger than for all other elements, meaning that neutrons have a higher probability of interacting with hydrogen than with other elements in the sample matrix. Neutrons have been used in the following areas: Fast Neutron Transmission, Scattering and Activation Technique; Digital Neutron Imaging; Hydrogen Detection by Epithermal Neutrons; Microscopic Behaviour of Hydrogen in Bulk Materials

  11. Identification of risk factors associated with onset and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Dong; Little, Julian; Gomes, James; Cashman, Neil R; Krewski, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was identified as a neurological condition 150 years ago, risk factors related to the onset and progression of ALS remain largely unknown. Monogenic mutations in over 30 genes are associated with about 10% of ALS cases. The age at onset of ALS and disease types has been found to influence ALS progression. The present study was designed to identify additional putative risk factors associated with the onset and progression of ALS using systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Risk factors that may be associated with ALS include: 1) genetic mutations, including the intermediate CAG repeat expansion in ATXN2; 2) previous exposure to heavy metals such as lead and mercury; 3) previous exposure to organic chemicals, such as pesticides and solvents; 4) history of electric shock; 5) history of physical trauma/injury (including head trauma/injury); 6) smoking (a weak risk factor for ALS in women); and 6) other risk factors, such as participating in professional sports, lower body mass index, lower educational attainment, or occupations requiring repetitive/strenuous work, military service, exposure to Beta-N-methylamino-l-alanin and viral infections. Risk factors that may be associated with ALS progression rate include: 1) nutritional status, including vitamin D deficiency; 2) comorbidities; 3) ethnicity and genetic factors; 4) lack of supportive care; and 4) smoking. The extent to which these associations may be causal is discussed, with further research recommended to strengthen the evidence on which determinations of causality may be based. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Quantitative proteomic analysis of paired colorectal cancer and non-tumorigenic tissues reveals signature proteins and perturbed pathways involved in CRC progression and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Manveen K; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Kim, Hoguen; Park, Cheol Keun; Baker, Mark S; Packer, Nicolle H; Paik, Young-Ki; Hancock, William S; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Modern proteomics has proven instrumental in our understanding of the molecular deregulations associated with the development and progression of cancer. Herein, we profile membrane-enriched proteome of tumor and adjacent normal tissues from eight CRC patients using label-free nanoLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomics and advanced pathway analysis. Of the 948 identified proteins, 184 proteins were differentially expressed (P1.5) between the tumor and non-tumor tissue (69 up-regulated and 115 down-regulated in tumor tissues). The CRC tumor and non-tumor tissues clustered tightly in separate groups using hierarchical cluster analysis of the differentially expressed proteins, indicating a strong CRC-association of this proteome subset. Specifically, cancer associated proteins such as FN1, TNC, DEFA1, ITGB2, MLEC, CDH17, EZR and pathways including actin cytoskeleton and RhoGDI signaling were deregulated. Stage-specific proteome signatures were identified including up-regulated ribosomal proteins and down-regulated annexin proteins in early stage CRC. Finally, EGFR(+) CRC tissues showed an EGFR-dependent down-regulation of cell adhesion molecules, relative to EGFR(-) tissues. Taken together, this study provides a detailed map of the altered proteome and associated protein pathways in CRC, which enhances our mechanistic understanding of CRC biology and opens avenues for a knowledge-driven search for candidate CRC protein markers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent Progress and Development of Crystal Structure Analysis of Enzymes and Other Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanokura, Masaru; Nagata, Koji; Miyazono, Ken-Ichi; Miyakawa, Takuya; Okai, Masahiko

    Structural biology has made tremendous progress in this decade. Here we briefly introduce the Target Proteins Research Program, a national project promoted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan. The program aims to reveal the structure and function of proteins that are of great importance in both academic research and industrial application. We also summarize the results of structure-function analyses of (i) transcriptional regulatory proteins useful for the breading of drought and heat stress tolerant crops, (ii) useful enzymes for the production of chiral compounds, and (iii) useful enzymes for the degradation of environmental pollution substances. These results can be utilized in various areas of industries, to enhance food production, to improve the efficiency of pharmaceutical compound production, and to promote the bioremediation of contaminated soil and water.

  14. Nuclear and radiochemical techniques in chemical analysis. Progress report, August 1, 1977--July 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finston, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1978-07-01

    The study of neutron-absorption cross sections of reactor-produced radionuclides has been completed, and results are reported for 22 Na, 126 I, 139 Ce, 88 Y, 184 Re, 182 Ta, 54 Mn, and 94 Zr. The results for 22 Na indicate the existence of a resonance in the thermal region which could explain the discrepancies in the published values for the thermal cross section. The results of air-sampling experiments are described as is the proton-induced x-ray emission system developed at Brooklyn College. Work on sample preparation and applications of the PIXE technique are given. Progress on a nuclear method to determine fluorine-containing gaseous compounds is reported. Work on solvent extraction with propylene carbonate and experiments involving an acid-base hypothesis are described

  15. Real-time motion analysis reveals cell directionality as an indicator of breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Weiger

    Full Text Available Cancer cells alter their migratory properties during tumor progression to invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites. However, it remains unclear how migratory behaviors differ between tumor cells of different malignancy and whether these migratory behaviors can be utilized to assess the malignant potential of tumor cells. Here, we analyzed the migratory behaviors of cell lines representing different stages of breast cancer progression using conventional migration assays or time-lapse imaging and particle image velocimetry (PIV to capture migration dynamics. We find that the number of migrating cells in transwell assays, and the distance and speed of migration in unconstrained 2D assays, show no correlation with malignant potential. However, the directionality of cell motion during 2D migration nicely distinguishes benign and tumorigenic cell lines, with tumorigenic cell lines harboring less directed, more random motion. Furthermore, the migratory behaviors of epithelial sheets observed under basal conditions and in response to stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF or lysophosphatitic acid (LPA are distinct for each cell line with regard to cell speed, directionality, and spatiotemporal motion patterns. Surprisingly, treatment with LPA promotes a more cohesive, directional sheet movement in lung colony forming MCF10CA1a cells compared to basal conditions or EGF stimulation, implying that the LPA signaling pathway may alter the invasive potential of MCF10CA1a cells. Together, our findings identify cell directionality as a promising indicator for assessing the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cell lines and show that LPA induces more cohesive motility in a subset of metastatic breast cancer cells.

  16. Grid-connected ICES: preliminary feasibility analysis and evaluation. Volume 3. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-30

    Maps, charts, and drawings of the Demonstration Community for the grid-connected ICES project composed of the medical complex in New Orleans (HEAL) are presented in Appendix A. The physical profile of the existing buildings and site plans is included. Demand profiles for steam, electric, gas, etc. are presented in Appendix B with extensive tables and graphs. Air quality and noise pollution data are presented in Appendix C. Data on financing in Appendix D are presented and also texts and information on revenue bonds are given. The final appendix gives qualifications for personnel for HEAL; NOSPI; de Laureal Engineers, Inc.; and Orr-Schelen-Mayeron and Associates, Inc.

  17. Primary energy and greenhouse gases embodied in Australian final consumption: an input-output analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenzen, M.

    1998-01-01

    Input-output modeling of primary energy and greenhouse gas embodiments in goods and services is a useful technique for designing greenhouse gas abatement policies. The present paper describes direct and indirect primary energy and greenhouse gas requirements for a given set of Australian final consumption. It considers sectoral disparities in energy prices, capital formation and international trade flows and it accounts for embodiments in the Gross National Expenditure as well as the Gross Domestic Product. Primary energy and greenhouse gas intensities in terms of MJ/$ and kg CO 2 -e/$ are reported, as well as national balance of primary energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. (author)

  18. Impact of OSHA Final Rule—Recording Hearing Loss: An Analysis of an Industrial Audiometric Dataset

    OpenAIRE

    Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Slade, Martin; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Sircar, Kanta; Cullen, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Final Rule changed the definition of recordable work-related hearing loss. We performed a study of the Alcoa Inc. audiometric database to evaluate the impact of this new rule. The 2003 rule increased the rate of potentially recordable hearing loss events from 0.2% to 1.6% per year. A total of 68.6% of potentially recordable cases had American Academy of Audiology/American Medi...

  19. Nuclear waste criticality analysis. Quarterly progress report, 1 October--31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbreth, W.G.

    1996-01-01

    The work to date includes the preparation of a report related to criticality in spent fuel, a report on the Oklo reactors and their relevance to Yucca Mountain, and the creation of a computer program to model the Oklo reactors. The objective of the program includes a computational model of the only known natural analogue to an underground nuclear waste repository and the possible application of the model to predict the long-term behavior of Yucca Mountain. A final summary of all work completed will be presented after the end of the project on February 29, 1996

  20. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, Hans-Joachim [Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany). Fritz-Haber-Inst.

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  1. ESG-CET Final Progress Title

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Middleton

    2011-10-06

    Drawing to a close after five years of funding from DOE's ASCR and BER program offices, the SciDAC-2 project called the Earth System Grid (ESG) Center for Enabling Technologies has successfully established a new capability for serving data from distributed centers. The system enables users to access, analyze, and visualize data using a globally federated collection of networks, computers and software. The ESG software - now known as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) - has attracted a broad developer base and has been widely adopted so that it is now being utilized in serving the most comprehensive multi-model climate data sets in the world. The system is used to support international climate model intercomparison activities as well as high profile U.S. DOE, NOAA, NASA, and NSF projects. It currently provides more than 25,000 users access to more than half a petabyte of climate data (from models and from observations) and has enabled over a 1,000 scientific publications.

  2. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  3. Steam generator automated eddy current data analysis: A benchmarking study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.D.

    1998-12-01

    The eddy current examination of steam generator tubes is a very demanding process. Challenges include: complex signal analysis, massive amount of data to be reviewed quickly with extreme precision and accuracy, shortages of data analysts during peak periods, and the desire to reduce examination costs. One method to address these challenges is by incorporating automation into the data analysis process. Specific advantages, which automated data analysis has the potential to provide, include the ability to analyze data more quickly, consistently and accurately than can be performed manually. Also, automated data analysis can potentially perform the data analysis function with significantly smaller levels of analyst staffing. Despite the clear advantages that an automated data analysis system has the potential to provide, no automated system has been produced and qualified that can perform all of the functions that utility engineers demand. This report investigates the current status of automated data analysis, both at the commercial and developmental level. A summary of the various commercial and developmental data analysis systems is provided which includes the signal processing methodologies used and, where available, the performance data obtained for each system. Also, included in this report is input from seventeen research organizations regarding the actions required and obstacles to be overcome in order to bring automatic data analysis from the laboratory into the field environment. In order to provide assistance with ongoing and future research efforts in the automated data analysis arena, the most promising approaches to signal processing are described in this report. These approaches include: wavelet applications, pattern recognition, template matching, expert systems, artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic, case based reasoning and genetic algorithms. Utility engineers and NDE researchers can use this information to assist in developing automated data

  4. Improvements to the COBRA-TF (EPRI) computer code for steam generator analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Barnhart, J.S.; Koontz, A.S.

    1980-09-01

    The COBRA-TF (EPRI) code has been improved and extended for pressurized water reactor steam generator analysis. New features and models have been added in the areas of subcooled boiling and heat transfer, turbulence, numerics, and global steam generator modeling. The code's new capabilities are qualified against selected experimental data and demonstrated for typical global and microscale steam generator analysis

  5. Use of functionalized surfactants in flame atomic analysis: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Research results in the following areas are briefly summarized: basic properties of surfactants, micelles, and cyclodextrins as they relate to chemical analysis; use of functionalized surfactants, micelles, and cyclodextrins in spectroscopic analysis; macromolecular separation theory and mechanism; use of functionalized surfactants and cyclodextrins in separations; capillary work for future coupling of spectroscopic and LC projects

  6. Preliminary analysis of the transient overpower accident for CRBRP. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Frank, M.V.

    1975-07-01

    A preliminary analysis of the transient overpower accident for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is presented. Several uncertainties in the analysis and the estimation of ramp rates during the transition to disassembly are discussed. The major conclusions are summarized

  7. Impact of OSHA Final Rule—Recording Hearing Loss: An Analysis of an Industrial Audiometric Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Slade, Martin; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Sircar, Kanta; Cullen, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The 2003 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Final Rule changed the definition of recordable work-related hearing loss. We performed a study of the Alcoa Inc. audiometric database to evaluate the impact of this new rule. The 2003 rule increased the rate of potentially recordable hearing loss events from 0.2% to 1.6% per year. A total of 68.6% of potentially recordable cases had American Academy of Audiology/American Medical Association (AAO/AMA) hearing impairment at the time of recordability. On average, recordable loss occurred after onset of impairment, whereas the non-age-corrected 10-dB standard threshold shift (STS) usually preceded impairment. The OSHA Final Rule will significantly increase recordable cases of occupational hearing loss. The new case definition is usually accompanied by AAO/AMA hearing impairment. Other, more sensitive metrics should therefore be used for early detection and prevention of hearing loss. PMID:14665813

  8. Plasma exchange for renal vasculitis and idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Michael; Catapano, Fausta; Szpirt, Wladimir

    2011-01-01

    Plasma exchange may be effective adjunctive treatment for renal vasculitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of plasma exchange for renal vasculitis.......Plasma exchange may be effective adjunctive treatment for renal vasculitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of plasma exchange for renal vasculitis....

  9. Progressing from Identification and Functional Analysis of Precursor Behavior to Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracobly, Joseph D.; Smith, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    This multiple-study experiment evaluated the utility of assessing and treating severe self-injurious behavior (SIB) based on the outcomes of a functional analysis of precursor behavior. In Study 1, a precursor to SIB was identified using descriptive assessment and conditional probability analyses. In Study 2, a functional analysis of precursor…

  10. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progress on NASA's Systems Engineering Cost/Risk Analysis Capability Roadmap Development: General Background and Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenie, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: General Background and Introduction of Capability. Roadmaps for Systems Engineering Cost/Risk Analysis. Agency Objectives. Strategic Planning Transformation. Review Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Review Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Progress to Date).

  11. A Small Disc Area Is a Risk Factor for Visual Field Loss Progression in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Kitaoka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study, a cross-sectional multicenter collaborative study, used a stereo fundus camera (nonmyd WX to assess various morphological parameters of the optic nerve head (ONH in glaucoma patients. We compared the associations of each parameter between the visual field loss progression group and no-progression group. Methods. The study included 187 eyes of 187 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or normal-tension glaucoma. We divided the mean deviation (MD slope values of all patients into the progression group (<−0.3 dB/year and no-progression group (≧−0.3 dB/year. ONH morphological parameters were calculated with prototype analysis software. The correlations between glaucomatous visual field progression and patient characteristics or each ONH parameter were analyzed with Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Results. The MD slope averages in the progression group and no-progression group were −0.58 ± 0.28 dB/year and 0.05 ± 0.26 dB/year, respectively. Among disc parameters, vertical disc width (diameter, disc area, cup area, and cup volume in the progression group were significantly less than those in the no-progression group. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between the visual field progression and disc area (odds ratio 0.49/mm2 disc area. Conclusion. A smaller disc area may be associated with more rapid glaucomatous visual field progression.

  12. Everolimus in advanced, progressive, well-differentiated, non-functional neuroendocrine tumors: RADIANT-4 lung subgroup analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Nicola; Buzzoni, Roberto; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Tesselaar, Margot E; Wolin, Edward; Van Cutsem, Eric; Tomassetti, Paola; Strosberg, Jonathan; Voi, Maurizio; Bubuteishvili-Pacaud, Lida; Ridolfi, Antonia; Herbst, Fabian; Tomasek, Jiri; Singh, Simron; Pavel, Marianne; Kulke, Matthew H; Valle, Juan W; Yao, James C

    2018-01-01

    In the phase III RADIANT-4 study, everolimus improved median progression-free survival (PFS) by 7.1 months in patients with advanced, progressive, well-differentiated (grade 1 or grade 2), non-functional lung or gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) vs placebo (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35-0.67; P < .00001). This exploratory analysis reports the outcomes of the subgroup of patients with lung NETs. In RADIANT-4, patients were randomized (2:1) to everolimus 10 mg/d or placebo, both with best supportive care. This is a post hoc analysis of the lung subgroup with PFS, by central radiology review, as the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints included objective response rate and safety measures. Ninety of the 302 patients enrolled in the study had primary lung NET (everolimus, n = 63; placebo, n = 27). Median PFS (95% CI) by central review was 9.2 (6.8-10.9) months in the everolimus arm vs 3.6 (1.9-5.1) months in the placebo arm (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.88). More patients who received everolimus (58%) experienced tumor shrinkage compared with placebo (13%). Most frequently reported (≥5% incidence) grade 3-4 drug-related adverse events (everolimus vs. placebo) included stomatitis (11% vs. 0%), hyperglycemia (10% vs. 0%), and any infections (8% vs. 0%). In patients with advanced, progressive, well-differentiated, non-functional lung NET, treatment with everolimus was associated with a median PFS improvement of 5.6 months, with a safety profile similar to that of the overall RADIANT-4 cohort. These results support the use of everolimus in patients with advanced, non-functional lung NET. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (no. NCT01524783). © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  13. Risk prediction for chronic kidney disease progression using heterogeneous electronic health record data and time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotte, Adler; Ranganath, Rajesh; Hirsch, Jamie S; Blei, David; Elhadad, Noémie

    2015-07-01

    As adoption of electronic health records continues to increase, there is an opportunity to incorporate clinical documentation as well as laboratory values and demographics into risk prediction modeling. The authors develop a risk prediction model for chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression from stage III to stage IV that includes longitudinal data and features drawn from clinical documentation. The study cohort consisted of 2908 primary-care clinic patients who had at least three visits prior to January 1, 2013 and developed CKD stage III during their documented history. Development and validation cohorts were randomly selected from this cohort and the study datasets included longitudinal inpatient and outpatient data from these populations. Time series analysis (Kalman filter) and survival analysis (Cox proportional hazards) were combined to produce a range of risk models. These models were evaluated using concordance, a discriminatory statistic. A risk model incorporating longitudinal data on clinical documentation and laboratory test results (concordance 0.849) predicts progression from state III CKD to stage IV CKD more accurately when compared to a similar model without laboratory test results (concordance 0.733, P<.001), a model that only considers the most recent laboratory test results (concordance 0.819, P < .031) and a model based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (concordance 0.779, P < .001). A risk prediction model that takes longitudinal laboratory test results and clinical documentation into consideration can predict CKD progression from stage III to stage IV more accurately than three models that do not take all of these variables into consideration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  14. The progress of neutron induced prompt gamma analysis technique in 1988-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuren; Jing Shiwei

    2003-01-01

    The new development of the neutron induced prompt gamma-ray analysis (NIPGA) technology in 1988-2002 are described. The pulse fast-thermal neutron activation analysis method, which utilizes the inelastic reaction and capture reaction jointly is employed to measure the elemental content in the material more efficiently. The lifetime of the neutron generator is more than 10000 h and the capability of HPGe, TeZeCd and MCA (multi-channel analyser) reaches the high level. At the same time, Monte Carlo Library least-square method is used to solve the nonlinearity problem in the PGNAA (Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis)

  15. Progression and prognosis in multiple system atrophy: an analysis of 230 Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hirohisa; Saito, Yufuko; Terao, Shinichi; Ando, Tetsuo; Kachi, Teruhiko; Mukai, Eiichiro; Aiba, Ikuko; Abe, Yuji; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Doyu, Manabu; Hirayama, Masaaki; Sobue, Gen

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the disease progression and survival in 230 Japanese patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA; 131 men, 99 women; 208 probable MSA, 22 definite; mean age at onset, 55.4 years). Cerebellar dysfunction (multiple system atrophy-cerebellar; MSA-C) predominated in 155 patients, and parkinsonism (multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian; MSA-P) in 75. The median time from initial symptom to combined motor and autonomic dysfunction was 2 years (range 1-10). Median intervals from onset to aid-requiring walking, confinement to a wheelchair, a bedridden state and death were 3, 5, 8 and 9 years, respectively. Patients manifesting combined motor and autonomic involvement within 3 years of onset had a significantly increased risk of not only developing advanced disease stage but also shorter survival (P bedridden state, P bedridden state (P = 0.03) and death (P bedridden state and survival were no worse. Gender was not associated with differences in worsening of function or survival. On MRI, a hyperintense rim at the lateral edge of the dorsolateral putamen was seen in 34.5% of cases, and a 'hot cross bun' sign in the pontine basis (PB) in 63.3%. These putaminal and pontine abnormalities became more prominent as MSA-P and MSA-C features advanced. The atrophy of the cerebellar vermis and PB showed a significant correlation particularly with the interval following the appearance of cerebellar symptoms in MSA-C (r = 0.71, P r = 0.76 and P < 0.01, respectively), but the relationship between atrophy and functional status was highly variable among the individuals, suggesting that other factors influenced the functional deterioration. Atrophy of the corpus callosum was seen in a subpopulation of MSA, suggesting hemispheric involvement in a subgroup of MSA patients. The present study suggested that many factors are involved in the progression of MSA but, most importantly, the interval from initial symptom to combined motor and autonomic dysfunction can predict functional

  16. Final Report for Geometric Analysis for Data Reduction and Structure Discovery DE-FG02-10ER25983, STRIPES award # DE-SC0004096

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vixie, Kevin R. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2014-11-27

    This is the final report for the project "Geometric Analysis for Data Reduction and Structure Discovery" in which insights and tools from geometric analysis were developed and exploited for their potential to large scale data challenges.

  17. IVHS Institutional Issues and Case Studies, Analysis and Lessons Learned, Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This 'Analysis and Lessons Learned' report contains observations, conclusions, and recommendations based on the performance of six case studies of Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems (IVHS) projects. Information to support the development of the case...

  18. Brownfields Samoa Peninsula Project: Phase I Sustainable Site Analysis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report provides an analysis and scoring using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, Neighborhood Development Rating System, and the Land and Natural Development Code in order to assess the proposed redevelopment a master plan.

  19. Analysis of reforming process of large distorted ring in final enlarging forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Takeshi; Murai, Etsuo

    2002-01-01

    In the construction of reactors or pressure vessels for oil chemical plants and nuclear power stations, mono block open-die forging rings are often utilized. Generally, a large forged ring is manufactured by means of enlarging forging with reductions of the wall thickness. During the enlarging process the circular ring is often distorted and becomes an ellipse in shape. However the shape control of the ring is a complicated work. This phenomenon makes the matter still worse in forging of larger rings. In order to make precision forging of large rings, we have developed the forging method using a v-shape anvil. The v-shape anvil is geometrically adjusted to fit the distorted ring in the final circle and reform automatically the shape of the ring during enlarging forging. This paper has analyzed the reforming process of distorted ring by computer program based on F.E.M. and examined the effect on the precision of ring forging. (author)

  20. Consumer demand analysis: solar heating and cooling of buildings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, J.E.

    1976-09-01

    This study concerns the acceptability of solar heating and cooling to homebuyers for residential applications. The study assesses the extent of homeowner awareness of solar technologies, estimates the acceptability of elevated first costs including willingness to trade higher initial costs for life cycle savings, and investigates the impact of solar aesthetics. Also explored are other areas of potential concern to homeowners in evaluating a solar alternative as well as positive motivations that would encourage purchase. Finally, the socioeconomic and attitudinal characteristics of individuals more likely to purchase a solar home rather than a conventional home were studied. The results are based on group depth interviews and personal interviews with active homeseekers, top executives of large residential development firms, and architects. The sample was split evenly between Denver, Colorado and the Philadelphia, Pa./Wilmington, Del. areas. Implications of the results for the commercialization of solar energy and possible public policy decisions are also discussed.

  1. Trend analysis report on energy consumptions and savings in France in 2012 and 2013: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollier, Karine; Gregory, Chedin

    2014-09-01

    This report presents and comments a large set of data regarding CO 2 and energy savings recorded in France since 1990 with a focus on the 2008-2012 period which has been marked by a financial and economic crisis which had a strong impact on energy demand. In its first part, the report presents the French economic and energetic context since 1990 with a focus on years between 2008 and 2013. It is based on the last available energy assessments published by the French Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy and addresses the following issues: a fragile economic context, relatively high energy prices, a decrease of final energy consumption since 2010, and a reduction of industry energy intensity. The second part addresses CO 2 and energy savings generated by France between 1990 and 2012, with a focus on recent years: overview of the evolutions in the industrial sector, in the transport sector, and in the building sector (existing buildings)

  2. The Application of Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Program (ASAP) Techniques to NORM Sites; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Robert; Smith, Karen P.; Quinn, John

    1999-01-01

    The results from the Michigan demonstration establish that this type of approach can be very effective for NORM sites. The advantages include (1) greatly reduced per sample analytical costs; (2) a reduced reliance on soil sampling and ex situ gamma spectroscopy analyses; (3) the ability to combine characterization with remediation activities in one fieldwork cycle; (4) improved documentation; and (5) ultimately better remediation, as measured by greater precision in delineating soils that are not in compliance with requirements from soils that are in compliance. In addition, the demonstration showed that the use of real-time technologies, such as the RadInSoil, can facilitate the implementation of a Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM)-based final status survey program

  3. Analysis of ex situ processes of CO2 sequestration. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touze, S.; Bourgeois, F.; Baranger, P.; Durst, P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to bring quantitative elements to evaluate the validation of the CO 2 mineral sequestration to limit the greenhouse effect gases. This analysis aims to calculate the CO 2 accounting of the system (internal energy production balance the energy expend) sequestrated CO 2 and produced CO 2 . The first part detailed the possible experimental solutions. Then two carbonation processes, direct and indirect, have been chosen of the analysis. (A.L.B.)

  4. Progress of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis (II) - thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joo Hwan; Choi, Hang Bok

    2005-03-01

    Thermal-hydraulic compatibility of the DUPIC fuel bundle with a 713 MWe Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU-6) reactor was studied by using both the single channel and sub-channel analysis methods. The single channel analysis provides the fuel channel flow rate, pressure drop, critical channel power, and the channel exit quality, which are assessed against the thermal-hydraulic design requirements of the CANDU-6 reactor. The single channel analysis by the NUCIRC code showed that the thermal-hydraulic performance of the DUPIC fuel is not different from that of the standard CANDU fuel. Regarding the local flow characteristics, the sub-channel analysis also showed that the uncertainty of the critical channel power calculation for the DUPIC fuel channel is very small. As a result, both the single and sub-channel analyses showed that the key thermal-hydraulic parameters of the DUPIC fuel channel do not deteriorate compared to the standard CANDU fuel channel.

  5. Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System -- TRAGIS, progress on improving a routing tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.E.; Lester, P.B.

    1998-05-01

    The Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) model provides a useful tool to calculate and analyze transportation routes for radioactive materials within the continental US. This paper outlines some of the features available in this model

  6. Next Generation Electromagnetic Pump Analysis Tools (PLM DOC-0005-2188). Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stregy, Seth [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Wilmington, NC (United States); Dasilva, Ana [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Wilmington, NC (United States); Yilmaz, Serkan [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Wilmington, NC (United States); Saha, Pradip [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Wilmington, NC (United States); Loewen, Eric [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    2015-10-29

    This report provides the broad historical review of EM Pump development and details of MATRIX development under this project. This report summarizes the efforts made to modernize the legacy performance models used in previous EM Pump designs and the improvements made to the analysis tools. This report provides information on Tasks 1, 3, and 4 of the entire project. The research for Task 4 builds upon Task 1: Update EM Pump Databank and Task 3: Modernize the Existing EM Pump Analysis Model, which are summarized within this report. Where research for Task 2: Insulation Materials Development and Evaluation identified parameters applicable to the analysis model with Task 4, the analysis code was updated, and analyses were made for additional materials. The important design variables for the manufacture and operation of an EM Pump that the model improvement can evaluate are: space constraints; voltage capability of insulation system; maximum flux density through iron; flow rate and outlet pressure; efficiency and manufacturability. The development of the next-generation EM Pump analysis tools during this two-year program provides information in three broad areas: Status of analysis model development; Improvements made to older simulations; and Comparison to experimental data.

  7. Recent progresses in ion beam analysis of aerosol at tandetron laboratory of Beijing Normal University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangfu; Lu Yongfang; Zhu Guanghua

    2007-01-01

    PIXE analysis of aerosol samples for measuring concentrations of elements with Z>12 is one of major applications at the GIC4117 Tandetron in Beijing Normal University. In order to measure H, C, N and O concentration in aerosol samples, proton non-Rutherford back scattering spectrometry (PNBS) and proton elastic scattering analysis(PESA) were employed with two Au(Si) surface barrier detectors at angles of 160 degree and 40 degree in the PIXE chamber. (authors)

  8. Tumor progression: analysis of the instability of the metastatic phenotype, sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The major complications for tumor therapy are 1) tumor spread (metastasis); 2) the mixed nature of tumors (heterogeneity); and 3) the capacity of tumors to evolve (progress). To study these tumor characteristics, the rat 13762NF mammary adenocarcinoma was cloned and studied for metastatic properties and sensitivities to therapy (chemotherapy, radiation and hyperthermia). The cell clones were heterogeneous and no correlation between metastatic potential and therapeutic sensitivities was observed. Further, these phenotypes were unstable during pasage in vitro; yet, the changes were clone dependent and reproducible using different cryoprotected cell stocks. To understand the phenotypic instability, subclones were isolated from low and high passage cell clones. The results demonstrated that 1) tumor cells are heterogeneous for multiple phenotypes; 2) tumor cells are unstable for multiple phenotypes; 3) the magnitude, direction and time of occurrence of phenotypic drift is clone dependent; 4) the sensitivity of cell clones to ionizing radiation (γ or heat) and chemotherapy agents is independent of their metastatic potential; 5) shifts in metastatic potential and sensitivity to therapy may occur simultaneously but are not linked; and 6) tumor cells independently diverge to form several subpopulations with unique phenotypic profiles

  9. Production and analysis of thermonuclear plasmas in high beta devices. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    During the October 1975--July 1976 reporting period, significant progress was reported in all ongoing projects funded by ERDA. Construction of the major new experiment THOR was delayed due to difficulties in bringing the Maxwell Laboratory swinging LC-pulse generators up to specifications. These technical difficulties have now been overcome and the pulsers were accepted late in April. THOR is almost back on schedule and physics results on plasma heating are expected by September of this year. TERP, originally funded as an Exploratory Concept, has been operating successfully for over a year and given confinement physics results which are important for the development of Maximum Beta Tokamaks. The Measurement and Instrumentation efforts have resulted in a number of instrument developments that have been successfully tested on FTP or STP, our fast or small theta pinches. Both FTP and STP were studied intensively to obtain ion and electron heating rates and anomalous post-implosion resistivities. These results are supported by the University of Maryland theory and simulation programs and SAI

  10. Analysis of Fat Intake Based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's 1994-96, 1998 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII, Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA released the final report, Analysis of Fat Intake Based on USDA’s 1994-1996, 1998 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII, Final Report). For this report, the EPA conducted an analysis of fat consumption across the U.S. population based on data derived...

  11. Analysis of progression of fatigue conditions in biceps brachii muscles using surface electromyography signals and complexity based features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, P A; Makaram, Navaneethakrishna; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a neuromuscular condition where muscle performance decreases due to sustained or intense contraction. It is experienced by both normal and abnormal subjects. In this work, an attempt has been made to analyze the progression of muscle fatigue in biceps brachii muscles using surface electromyography (sEMG) signals. The sEMG signals are recorded from fifty healthy volunteers during dynamic contractions under well defined protocol. The acquired signals are preprocessed and segmented in to six equal parts for further analysis. The features, such as activity, mobility, complexity, sample entropy and spectral entropy are extracted from all six zones. The results are found showing that the extracted features except complexity feature have significant variations in differentiating non-fatigue and fatigue zone respectively. Thus, it appears that, these features are useful in automated analysis of various neuromuscular activities in normal and pathological conditions.

  12. Linear and nonlinear dynamic analysis by boundary element method. Ph.D. Thesis, 1986 Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahid

    1991-01-01

    An advanced implementation of the direct boundary element method (BEM) applicable to free-vibration, periodic (steady-state) vibration and linear and nonlinear transient dynamic problems involving two and three-dimensional isotropic solids of arbitrary shape is presented. Interior, exterior, and half-space problems can all be solved by the present formulation. For the free-vibration analysis, a new real variable BEM formulation is presented which solves the free-vibration problem in the form of algebraic equations (formed from the static kernels) and needs only surface discretization. In the area of time-domain transient analysis, the BEM is well suited because it gives an implicit formulation. Although the integral formulations are elegant, because of the complexity of the formulation it has never been implemented in exact form. In the present work, linear and nonlinear time domain transient analysis for three-dimensional solids has been implemented in a general and complete manner. The formulation and implementation of the nonlinear, transient, dynamic analysis presented here is the first ever in the field of boundary element analysis. Almost all the existing formulation of BEM in dynamics use the constant variation of the variables in space and time which is very unrealistic for engineering problems and, in some cases, it leads to unacceptably inaccurate results. In the present work, linear and quadratic isoparametric boundary elements are used for discretization of geometry and functional variations in space. In addition, higher order variations in time are used. These methods of analysis are applicable to piecewise-homogeneous materials, such that not only problems of the layered media and the soil-structure interaction can be analyzed but also a large problem can be solved by the usual sub-structuring technique. The analyses have been incorporated in a versatile, general-purpose computer program. Some numerical problems are solved and, through comparisons

  13. In Situ analysis of CO2 laser irradiation on controlling progression of erosive lesions on dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Taísa Penazzo; Scatolin, Renata Siqueira; Colucci, Vivian; De Alexandria, Adílis Kalina; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2014-08-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate in situ the effect of CO2 laser irradiation to control the progression of enamel erosive lesions. Fifty-six slabs of bovine incisors enamel (5 × 3 × 2.5 mm(3) ) were divided in four distinct areas: (1) sound (reference area), (2) initial erosion, (3) treatment (irradiated or nonirradiated with CO2 laser), (4) final erosion (after in situ phase). The initial erosive challenge was performed with 1% citric acid (pH = 2.3), for 5 min, 2×/day, for 2 days. The slabs were divided in two groups according to surface treatment: irradiated with CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 µm; 0.5 W) and nonirradiate. After a 2-day lead-in period, 14 volunteers wore an intraoral palatal appliance containing two slabs (irradiated and nonirradiated), in two intraoral phases of 5 days each. Following a cross-over design during the first intraoral phase, half of the volunteers immersed the appliance in 100 mL of citric acid for 5 min, 3×/day, while other half of the volunteers used deionized water (control). The volunteers were crossed over in the second phase. Enamel wear was determined by an optical 3D profilometer. Three-way ANOVA for repeated measures revealed that there was no significant interaction between erosive challenge and CO2 laser irradiation (P = 0.419). Erosive challenge significantly increased enamel wear (P = 0.001), regardless whether or not CO2 laser irradiation was performed. There was no difference in enamel wear between specimens CO2 -laser irradiated and non-irradiated (P = 0.513). Under intraoral conditions, CO2 laser irradiation did not control the progression of erosive lesions in enamel caused by citric acid. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Deterministic sensitivity analysis of two-phase flow systems: forward and adjoint methods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.

    1984-07-01

    This report presents a self-contained mathematical formalism for deterministic sensitivity analysis of two-phase flow systems, a detailed application to sensitivity analysis of the homogeneous equilibrium model of two-phase flow, and a representative application to sensitivity analysis of a model (simulating pump-trip-type accidents in BWRs) where a transition between single phase and two phase occurs. The rigor and generality of this sensitivity analysis formalism stem from the use of Gateaux (G-) differentials. This report highlights the major aspects of deterministic (forward and adjoint) sensitivity analysis, including derivation of the forward sensitivity equations, derivation of sensitivity expressions in terms of adjoint functions, explicit construction of the adjoint system satisfied by these adjoint functions, determination of the characteristics of this adjoint system, and demonstration that these characteristics are the same as those of the original quasilinear two-phase flow equations. This proves that whenever the original two-phase flow problem is solvable, the adjoint system is also solvable and, in principle, the same numerical methods can be used to solve both the original and adjoint equations

  15. Progress report on neutron activation analysis at Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc

    2003-01-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is one of most powerful techniques for the simultaneous multi-elements analysis. This technique has been studied and applied to analyze major, minor and trace elements in Geological, Biological and Environmental samples at Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor. At the sixth Workshop, February 8-11, 1999, Yojakarta, Indonesia we had a report on Current Status of Neutron Activation Analysis using Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor. Another report on Neutron Activation Analysis at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor also was presented at the seventh Workshop in Taejon, Korea from November 20-24, 2000. So in this report, we would like to present the results obtained of the application of NAA at NRI for one year as follows: (1) Determination of the concentrations of noble, rare earth, uranium, thorium and other elements in Geological samples according to requirement of clients particularly the geologists, who want to find out the mineral resources. (2) The analysis of concentration of radionuclides and nutrient elements in foodstuffs to attend the program on Asian Reference Man. (3) The evaluation of the contents of trace elements in crude oil and basement rock samples to determine original source of the oil. (4) Determination of the elemental composition of airborne particle in the Ho Chi Minh City for studying air pollution. The analytical data of standard reference material, toxic elements and natural radionuclides in seawater are also presented. (author)

  16. Progress report on neutron activation analysis at Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2003-03-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is one of most powerful techniques for the simultaneous multi-elements analysis. This technique has been studied and applied to analyze major, minor and trace elements in Geological, Biological and Environmental samples at Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor. At the sixth Workshop, February 8-11, 1999, Yojakarta, Indonesia we had a report on Current Status of Neutron Activation Analysis using Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor. Another report on Neutron Activation Analysis at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor also was presented at the seventh Workshop in Taejon, Korea from November 20-24, 2000. So in this report, we would like to present the results obtained of the application of NAA at NRI for one year as follows: (1) Determination of the concentrations of noble, rare earth, uranium, thorium and other elements in Geological samples according to requirement of clients particularly the geologists, who want to find out the mineral resources. (2) The analysis of concentration of radionuclides and nutrient elements in foodstuffs to attend the program on Asian Reference Man. (3) The evaluation of the contents of trace elements in crude oil and basement rock samples to determine original source of the oil. (4) Determination of the elemental composition of airborne particle in the Ho Chi Minh City for studying air pollution. The analytical data of standard reference material, toxic elements and natural radionuclides in seawater are also presented. (author)

  17. Powerplant productivity improvement study: policy analysis and incentive assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-05-01

    Policy options that the Illinois Commerce Commission might adopt in order to promote improved power plant productivity for existing units in Illinois are identified and analyzed. These policy options would generally involve either removing existing disincentives and/or adding direct incentives through the regulatory process. The following activities are reported: in-depth review of existing theoretical and empirical literature in the areas of power plant reliability, regulatory utility efficiency and performance incentives, and impacts of various regulatory mechanisms such as the Fuel Adjustment Clauses on productivity; contacts with other state public utility commissions known to be investigating or implementing productivity improvement incentive mechanisms; documentation and analysis of incentive mechanisms adopted or under consideration in other states; analysis of current regulatory practice in Illinois as it relates to power plant productivity incentives and disincentives; identification of candidate incentive mechanisms for consideration by the Illinois Commerce Commission; and analysis and evaluation of these candidates. 72 references, 8 figures.

  18. Research Progress in Mathematical Analysis of Map Projection by Computer Algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIAN Shaofeng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Map projection is an important component of modern cartography, and involves many fussy mathematical analysis processes, such as the power series expansions of elliptical functions, differential of complex and implicit functions, elliptical integral and the operation of complex numbers. The derivation of these problems by hand not only consumes much time and energy but also makes mistake easily, and sometimes can not be realized at all because of the impossible complexity. The research achievements in mathematical analysis of map projection by computer algebra are systematically reviewed in five aspects, i.e., the symbolic expressions of forward and inverse solution of ellipsoidal latitudes, the direct transformations between map projections with different distortion properties, expressions of Gauss projection by complex function, mathematical analysis of oblique Mercator projection, polar chart projection with its transformation. Main problems that need to be further solved in this research field are analyzed. It will be helpful to promote the development of map projection.

  19. Analysis of the value of post-radiation prostate biopsy in predicting subsequent disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benda, R.; Shamsa, F.; Meetze, K.; Bolton, S.; Littrup, P.; Grignon, D.; Washington, T.; Forman, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the value of Transrectal ultrasound(TRUS), Color flow doppler(CFD) and Prostate specific antigen(PSA) in identifying residual disease in the prostate status post external beam radiation therapy and to determine the value of this pathologic information in predicting subsequent disease progression. Materials and Methods: As part of four prospective protocols, 146 patients had scheduled TRUS guided prostate biopsies 6-25 months status post radiation therapy. The stage distribution was: 13% T1, 51% T2, and 36% T3/T4. Fifty six percent had neo-adjuvant hormones. Conformal photon or mixed neutron/photon irradiation was given to a median 2 Gy/fraction equivalent dose of 77 Gy(range 74 to 84 Gy). Following treatment, patients were assessed by digital rectal exam (DRE), PSA and TRUS guided biopsies at 6, 12 and/or 18 months. The ultrasound and CFD results were scored as normal, suspicious or abnormal. Sextant biopsies were obtained as well as ultrasound guided biopsies from any abnormal ultrasound or doppler area. The biopsies, all read by one pathologist (DG), were graded as negative, marked, moderate, minimal therapeutic effect or positive. The median followup post radiation therapy was 33.6 months and post biopsy was 25.3 months. Comparisons were done by Kappa index with corresponding 95% CI, chi square and Fisher's exact tests. Results: Twenty-eight patients had biopsies at both six and 12-18 months. Overall 35% of patients had all negative cores, 30% had at least one core showing a marked therapeutic effect, and 35% had at least one core showing moderate or minimal therapeutic effect or were positive. Although CFD correlated with a positive biopsy in 9% and a suspicious doppler identified cancer in 15% of cases, an abnormal TRUS identified cancer in 29.5% biopsies ((49(166))). However, a serum PSA >1.5ng/ml at the time of biopsy predicted 61% of positive biopsies ((23(38))). A negative biopsy was associated with low stage (≤T2c, p=0.001), low pre

  20. Coal to SNG: Technical progress, modeling and system optimization through exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Sheng; Ji, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Xiaosong; Gao, Lin; Jin, Hongguang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Technical progresses of coal to SNG technologies are reported. • The entire coal to SNG system is modeled. • Coupling between SNG production and power generation is investigated. • Breakthrough points for further energy saving are determined. • System performance is optimized based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. - Abstract: For both energy security and CO 2 emission reduction, synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from coal is an important path to implement clean coal technologies in China. In this paper, an overview of the progress of coal to SNG technologies, including the development of catalysts, reactor designs, synthesis processes, and systems integration, is provided. The coal to SNG system is modeled, the coupling between SNG production and power generation is investigated, the breakthrough points for further energy savings are determined, and the system performance is optimized based on the first and the second laws of thermodynamics. From the viewpoint of the first law of thermodynamics, the energy conversion efficiency of coal to SNG system can reach 59.8%. To reduce the plant auxiliary power, the breakthrough points are the development of low-energy-consumption oxygen production technology and gas purification technology or seeking new oxidants for coal gasification instead of oxygen. From the viewpoint of the second law of thermodynamics, the major exergy destruction in a coal to SNG system occurs in the coal gasification unit, SNG synthesis unit and the raw syngas cooling process. How to reduce the exergy destruction in these units is the key to energy savings and system performance enhancement. The conversion ratio of the first SNG synthesis reactor and the split ratio of the recycle gas are key factors that determine the performance of both the SNG synthesis process and the whole plant. A “turning point” phenomenon is observed: when the split ratio is higher than 0.90, the exergy destruction of the SNG

  1. Progress Toward Universal Health Coverage: A Comparative Analysis in 5 South Asian Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mizanur; Karan, Anup; Rahman, Md Shafiur; Parsons, Alexander; Abe, Sarah Krull; Bilano, Ver; Awan, Rabia; Gilmour, Stuart; Shibuya, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    Achieving universal health coverage is one of the key targets in the newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations. To investigate progress toward universal health coverage in 5 South Asian countries and assess inequalities in health services and financial risk protection indicators. In a population-based study, nationally representative household (335 373 households) survey data from Afghanistan (2014 and 2015), Bangladesh (2010 and 2014), India (2012 and 2014), Nepal (2014 and 2015), and Pakistan (2014) were used to calculate relative indices of health coverage, financial risk protection, and inequality in coverage among wealth quintiles. The study was conducted from June 2012 to February 2016. Three dimensions of universal health coverage were assessed: access to basic services, financial risk protection, and equity. Composite and indicator-specific coverage rates, stratified by wealth quintiles, were then estimated. Slope and relative index of inequality were used to assess inequalities in service and financial indicators. Access to basic care varied substantially across all South Asian countries, with mean rates of overall prevention coverage and treatment coverage of 53.0% (95% CI, 42.2%-63.6%) and 51.2% (95% CI, 45.2%-57.1%) in Afghanistan, 76.5% (95% CI, 61.0%-89.0%) and 44.8% (95% CI, 37.1%-52.5%) in Bangladesh, 74.2% (95% CI, 57.0%-88.1%) and 83.5% (95% CI, 54.4%-99.1%) in India, 76.8% (95% CI, 66.5%-85.7%) and 57.8% (95% CI, 50.1%-65.4%) in Nepal, and 69.8% (95% CI, 58.3%-80.2%) and 50.4% (95% CI, 37.1%-63.6%) in Pakistan. Financial risk protection was generally low, with 15.3% (95% CI, 14.7%-16.0%) of respondents in Afghanistan, 15.8% (95% CI, 14.9%-16.8%) in Bangladesh, 17.9% (95% CI, 17.7%-18.2%) in India, 11.8% (95% CI, 11.8%-11.9%) in Nepal, and 4.4% (95% CI, 4.0%-4.9%) in Pakistan reporting incurred catastrophic payments due to health care costs. Access to at least 4 antenatal care visits, institutional delivery, and presence

  2. LMFBR fuel analysis. Task A: oxide fuel dynamics. Final report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, V.K.; Hauss, B.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Saqui, R.; Sun, Y.H.; Wong, K.

    1976-11-01

    The report summarizes the results of studies conducted in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's review of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. In particular it deals with three aspects of the unprotected transient overpower accident. The first aspect is the response of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor to low reactivity insertion rates. Second, the investigation of a new method for computing the time, place and mode of fuel pin failure is studied. Lastly, the question of post-failure, fuel freezing, and plate-out is addressed. Several areas of uncertainty in the analysis of these accidents is also discussed

  3. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, J.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

  4. Current landscape of protein glycosylation analysis and recent progress toward a novel paradigm of glycoscience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Sachio; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Shigeo

    2016-10-25

    This review covers the basics and some applications of methodologies for the analysis of glycoprotein glycans. Analytical techniques used for glycoprotein glycans, including liquid chromatography (LC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), mass spectrometry (MS), and high-throughput analytical methods based on microfluidics, were described to supply the essentials about biopharmaceutical and biomarker glycoproteins. We will also describe the MS analysis of glycoproteins and glycopeptides as well as the chemical and enzymatic releasing methods of glycans from glycoproteins and the chemical reactions used for the derivatization of glycans. We hope the techniques have accommodated most of the requests from glycoproteomics researchers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasma Exchange for Renal Vasculitis and Idiopathic Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis: A Meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Michael; Catapano, Fausta; Szpirt, Wladimir

    2010-01-01

    exchange did not differ significantly across the range of baseline serum creatinine values (P = 0.7) or number of plasma exchange treatments (P = 0.8). The RR for end-stage renal disease was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.47-0.88; P = 0.006), whereas the RR for death alone was 1.01 (95% CI, 0.71-1.4; P = 0......BACKGROUND:: Plasma exchange may be effective adjunctive treatment for renal vasculitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of plasma exchange for renal vasculitis. STUDY DESIGN:: Systematic review and meta-analysis of articles identified from...

  6. Reduction and analysis of ATS-6 data. Final report, 1 November 1976--31 October 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, G.A.; Blake, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Results obtained from the analysis of data returned by the energetic particle spectrometer on ATS 6 are presented. The study of the energetic electron environment and the effects of the solar wind parameters on the energetic electrons trapped at the synchronous altitude are emphasized

  7. Regulatory impact analysis of the proposed great lakes water quality guidance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raucher, R.; Dixon, A.; Trabka, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Regulatory Impact Analysis provides direction to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on minimum water quality standards and contains numerical water quality criteria for 32 pollutants as well as methodologies for the development of water quality criteria for additional pollutants discharged to these waters. It also provides guidance to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on antidegradation policies and standards and implementation procedures

  8. Human Factors Analysis of Pipeline Monitoring and Control Operations: Final Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-26

    The purpose of the Human Factors Analysis of Pipeline Monitoring and Control Operations project was to develop procedures that could be used by liquid pipeline operators to assess and manage the human factors risks in their control rooms that may adv...

  9. X-ray fluorescence analysis study. Final report, December 1, 1970-December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneip, T J; Laurer, G R

    1978-01-01

    This report has described the most significant experiments and the results obtained, during the development of a system for the detection and measurement of Pb in blood using radioisotope-excited x-ray fluorescence analysis, over the contract period. Briefly, the report described: detector selection; source selection; source-sample-detector geometry; sample preparation; system calibration; and separation technique. (PSB)

  10. Analysis and comparison of biomass pyrolysis/gasification condensates: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.

    1986-06-01

    This report provides results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from eleven biomass gasification and pyrolysis systems. The samples were representative of the various reactor configurations being researched within the Department of Energy, Biomass Thermochemical Conversion program. The condensates included tar phases and aqueous phases. The analyses included gross compositional analysis (elemental analysis, ash, moisture), physical characterization (pour point, viscosity, density, heat of combustion, distillation), specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and biological activity (Ames assay and mouse skin tumorigenicity tests). These results are the first step of a longer term program to determine the properties, handling requirements, and utility of the condensates recovered from biomass gasification and pyrolysis. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recovered in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic components in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures. 56 refs., 25 figs., 21 tabs.

  11. Truth Commissions, Education, and Positive Peace: An Analysis of Truth Commission Final Reports (1980-2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Julia; Bellino, Michelle J.

    2017-01-01

    Transitional justice and education both occupy increasingly prominent space on the international peacebuilding agenda, though less is known about the ways they might reinforce one another to contribute towards peace. This paper presents a cross-national analysis of truth commission (TC) reports spanning 1980-2015, exploring the range of…

  12. Grid-connected ICES: preliminary feasibility analysis and evaluation. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-30

    The HEAL Complex in New Orleans will serve as a Demonstration Community for which the ICES Demonstration System will be designed. The complex is a group of hospitals, clinics, research facilities, and medical educational facilities. The five tasks reported on are: preliminary energy analysis; preliminary institutional assessment; conceptual design; firming-up of commitments; and detailed work management plan.

  13. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  14. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Dangerous Waste Sampling and Analysis; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes sampling and analytical requirements needed to meet state and federal regulations for dangerous waste (DW). The River Protection Project (RPP) is assigned to the task of storage and interim treatment of hazardous waste. Any final treatment or disposal operations, as well as requirements under the land disposal restrictions (LDRs), fall in the jurisdiction of another Hanford organization and are not part of this scope. The requirements for this Data Quality Objective (DQO) Process were developed using the RPP Data Quality Objective Procedure (Banning 1996), which is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the DW DQO. Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to waste contain requirements that are dependent upon the composition of the waste stream. These regulatory drivers require that pertinent information be obtained. For many requirements, documented process knowledge of a waste composition can be used instead of analytical data to characterize or designate a waste. When process knowledge alone is used to characterize a waste, it is a best management practice to validate the information with analytical measurements

  15. ITEM ANALYSIS FOR FINAL EXAM QUESTIONS OF ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS COURSE (VECTOR CALCULUS IN UKM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NURYAZMIN AHMAT ZAINUR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of course outcome is one of the important elements in assessing students’ performance in higher institutions. Most of the courses depend on examination result as a medium to evaluate the level of students’ performances. In this study, the final exam questions of Vector Calculus course KKKQ1123 is being used to assess the difficulty index and discrimination index. 80 students from Department of Mechanical and Materials (JKMB were involved in this study. This study found that the range of difficulty index is between 0.2 and 0.8, where the question that was categorized as difficult is question number 6 whereas for easy questions is question number 3. Meanwhile the range obtained for discrimination index was in the acceptable range, that is, between 0.2 and 0.6 which indicates that the exam questions are good. With this study, it is hope that it will guide the lecturers in constructing and crafting a good and reliable exam questions consistent with the level of student's ability.

  16. Safety analysis of the transportation of radioactive waste to the Konrad final repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentuc, F.N.; Bruecher, W.

    2010-01-01

    A transport risk assessment study has been conducted for transport of radioactive waste with negligible heat-generation to the German final repository Konrad. This study is a revision of the former Konrad Transport Study performed by GRS in 1991 implementing updated waste data among other improved methods and assumptions for the purpose of a more realistic approach to risk assessment. The first part of the transport risk assessment study concerns the radiological consequences from normal (accident-free) transportation of radioactive material, i.e. the radiation exposure of transport personnel and the public. Based on the assessed detailed information on transport arrangements and on the average number and radiological characteristics of waste packages the maximum annual effective doses for the representative persons were estimated. The risk associated with transport incidents and accidents has been quantified for the area within a radius of 25 km around the repository site. The probabilistic method adopted in this study considers parameters as the frequency and severity of railway or road accidents, characteristics of radioactive waste and transport packagings and the frequency of atmospheric dispersion conditions. From a large set of parameter combinations the spectrum of potential radiological consequences and of the associated probability of occurrence was assessed. (orig.)

  17. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized. The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics in order to extend and improve problem solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space.

  18. Establishing Equivalence: Methodological Progress in Group-Matching Design and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kover, Sara T.; Atwood, Amy K.

    2013-01-01

    This methodological review draws attention to the challenges faced by intellectual and developmental disabilities researchers in the appropriate design and analysis of group comparison studies. We provide a brief overview of matching methodologies in the field, emphasizing group-matching designs used in behavioral research on cognition and…

  19. Genome sequencing and analysis conferences. Progress report, August 15, 1993--August 15, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    The 14 plenary session presentations focused on nematode; yeast; fruit fly; plants; mycobacteria; and man. In addition there were presentations on a variety of technical innovations including database developments and refinements, bioelectronic genesensors, computer-assisted multiplex techniques, and hybridization analysis with DNA chip technology. This document includes only the session schedule.

  20. Progressive Trends and Impact of the Journal of Career Development: A Citation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaichanasakul, Adipat; He, Yuhong; Chen, Hsui-Hui; Allen, G. E. Kawika; Khairallah, Taleb S.; Ramos, Karina

    2011-01-01

    As one of the four premier journals in vocational psychology, the "Journal of Career Development" ("JCD") has published over 830 articles over the past three decades. This study examined the performance of "JCD" through a citation analysis and provided evaluative data for scholars publishing in the field of vocation psychology. Articles published…

  1. Financial Analysis of For Profit Child Care: A Work in Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Keith

    1989-01-01

    Compares revenues, debts, investments, and profit margins of for-profit publicly and privately owned day care centers. An evaluation tool was developed through analysis of financial statements of seven privately owned child care businesses and six publicly owned child care chains. (RJC)

  2. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russek, A.

    1975-06-01

    Progress has been made in calculation of cross-sections for dielectronic and radiative recombination when hot electrons are incident on partially stripped impurity ions. Calculations were completed for the cases of 1 keV and 10 keV electrons incident on ions of arbitrary Z with ionization state consistent with a 1 keV plasma temperature. It was found that dielectronic recombination dominates radiative recombination by a factor of 100 at 1 keV incident electron energy to a factor of 1000 at 10 keV incident electron energy. The work is now being extended to other plasma temperatures and is being improved by more accurate calculation of the matrix elements involved. Progress was also made in the calculation of accurate bremsstrahlung and higher order radiative processes which also occur when hot electrons are incident on partially stripped impurity ions. Formal expressions for the matrix elements have been obtained for cross-sections in a fully relativistic partial wave analysis for bremsstrahlung radiation both with and without electron excitation of the target ion. Final evaluation now awaits the evaluation of the relativistic radial integrals involved in these matrix elements. (U.S.)

  3. On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Carlos W. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weygand, Dennis P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  4. Multivariate analysis of the cleaning efficacy of different final irrigation techniques in the canal and isthmus of mandibular posterior teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Jee Yoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the cleaning efficacy of different final irrigation regimens in canal and isthmus of mandibular molars, and to evaluate the influence of related variables on cleaning efficacy of the irrigation systems. Materials and Methods Mesial root canals from 60 mandibular molars were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups according to the final irrigation technique: Group C, syringe irrigation; Group U, ultrasonics activation; Group SC, VPro StreamClean irrigation; Group EV, EndoVac irrigation. Cross-sections at 1, 3 and 5 mm levels from the apex were examined to calculate remaining debris area in the canal and isthmus spaces. Statistical analysis was completed by using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test for comparison among groups, and multivariate linear analysis to identify the significant variables (regular replenishment of irrigant, vapor lock management, and ultrasonic activation of irrigant affecting the cleaning efficacy of the experimental groups. Results Group SC and EV showed significantly higher canal cleanliness values than group C and U at 1 mm level (p < 0.05, and higher isthmus cleanliness values than group U at 3 mm and all levels of group C (p < 0.05. Multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that all variables had independent positive correlation at 1 mm level of canal and at all levels of isthmus with statistical significances. Conclusions Both VPro StreamClean and EndoVac system showed favorable result as final irrigation regimens for cleaning debris in the complicated root canal system having curved canal and/or isthmus. The debridement of the isthmi significantly depends on the variables rather than the canals.

  5. A Wims E analysis of the zero energy experiments of Dragon prior to charge IV - Part 2: Progress with single element calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, A J; Dubofsky, W; Lancefield, M J; Woloch, F

    1973-09-15

    An earlier paper gave a broad outline of the proposed method of analysing the DRAGON experiments. This paper describes the progress made in collecting and processing the data and in performing the single element calculations. Thus Section 2 covers the data, Section 3 gives a general picture of the whole reactor and Sections 4 to 7 describe the element calculations. Finally, Section 8 contains some results from the element calculations and Section 9 summarises an investigation performed prior to the start of the analysis. It bears emphasising that the data collection was a very time consuming operation due mainly to the diversity of the DRAGON elements and due also to the fact that DRAGON, as an irradiation facility, is not a clean experimental core with the result that data requires careful evaluation and is often difficult to obtain. For similar reasons the element calculations represent a much longer task than in most reactors in which only a small number of element types are present. In DRAGON separate data is supplied for each of the 37 elements.

  6. Growth curve analysis for plasma profiles using smoothing splines. Final report, January 1993--January 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, K.

    1995-07-01

    In this project, we parameterize the shape and magnitude of the temperature and density profiles on JET and the temperature profiles on TFTR. The key control variables for the profiles were tabulated and the response functions were estimated. A sophisticated statistical analysis code was developed to fit the plasma profiles. Our analysis indicate that the JET density shape depends primarily on bar n/B t for Ohmic heating, bar n for L-mode and I p for H-mode. The temperature profiles for JET are mainly determined by q 95 for the case of Ohmic heating, and by B t and P/bar n for the L-mode. For the H-mode the shape depends on the type of auxiliary heating, Z eff , N bar n, q 95 , and P

  7. Direct ultimate disposal of spent fuel DEAB. Systems analysis. Ultimate disposal concepts. Final report. Main volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, A.

    1995-10-01

    The results elaborated under the project, systems analysis of mixed radwaste disposal concepts and systems analysis of ultimate disposal concepts, provide a comprehensive description and assessment of a radwaste repository, for heat generating wastes and for wastes with negligible heat generation, and thus represent the knowledge basis for forthcoming planning work for a repository in an abandoned salt mine. A fact to be considered is that temperature field calculations have shown that there is room for further optimization with regard to the mine layout. The following aspects have been analysed: (1) safety of operation; (2) technical feasibility and realisation and licensability of the concepts; (3) operational aspects; (4) varieties of utilization of the salt dome for the intended purpose (boreholes for waste emplacement, emplacement in galleries, multi-horizon systems); (5) long-term structural stability of the mine; (6) economic efficiency; (7) nuclear materials safeguards. (orig./HP) [de

  8. LMFBR fuel analysis. Task A: Oxide fuel dynamics. Final report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, V.K.; Doshi, J.; Frank, M.; Hauss, B.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Wong, K.

    1977-10-01

    The study presented deals with several areas of uncertainty in the analysis of the unprotected overpower transient for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. These areas of uncertainty include the time, place, and mode of fuel pin failure; pre-failure fuel motion; fuel freezing, plugging, and plate-out following pin failure; and the potential for re-criticality. Internal molten fuel motion prior to pin failure was found to be sensitive to ramp rate and burnup. The strain-limit fuel failure criterion was found to be inappropriate for analysis based on existing data. The coupling of pre-transient- and transient-induced stresses tended to force the failure location towards the core midplane

  9. An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee. Final report and appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

    1985-12-17

    The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

  10. Selectivity in dehydrodimerisation of amides: final product analysis from radiolysis in the liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusaucy, A.C.; Tilquin, B.

    1991-01-01

    N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) were irradiated with γ-rays and accelerated electrons (linac) in the liquid phase at different temperatures. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the radiolysis products have been made by capillary GC. Effects of irradiation temperature and dose rate have revealed secondary mechanisms for the formation of the parent radicals. Irradiation in presence of N 2 O tends to reveal tonic reactions for the immediate formation of parent radicals. (author)

  11. U3O8 production analysis for nonsandstone uranium deposits. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, G.W.; Chase, C.K.; Lewis, N.; Clem, W.L.

    1980-03-01

    The findings of an investigation into the commercialization potential of producing U 3 O 8 from non-sandstone sources are presented. A variety of these non-conventional uranium resources were initially examined to arrive at a selection of seven major resource categories for detailed analysis. The seven categories are: (1) vein-type deposits, (2) wet process phosphoric acid, (3) copper leach solutions, (4) uraniferous coal, (5) black shales, (6) extrusive rocks, and (7) intrusive igneous rocks. Detailed analyses of each resource addressed the following: characterization of the resource in terms of geologic environment and magnitude; current industry interest in production; overview of information available and research being conducted on resource; mining and milling implications of production; and production cost analysis. The results of the individual resource analyses were subsequently compared relative to each other on the basis of production cost, resource magnitude, and qualitative factors such as technical, environmental/land use, political/legal, labor, and capital requirement issues. In addition to the relative rankings, a set of commercialization criteria was employed to evaluate the potential time frames within which commercial production might be possible. In some cases, a specific occurrence within a resource category served as the basis for cost analysis. The analysis revealed findings of economically feasible resources having limited magnitude (e.g., veins, by product recovery from phosphoric acid, copper leach, and coal) and, conversely, resources of large magnitude being economically unattractive (e.g., shales, extrusive, intrusives). In addition to the economic constraint associated with these large resources, there are also numerous environmental, technical, labor, and capital generation constraints to commercial production

  12. Social networking and the Olympic Movement: social media analysis, opportunities and trends : final report

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Peña, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Table of contents : 1: Introduction. - 2 : Sociodemographic data of social networking sites. - 3 : The Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games on Facebook, Twitter and Orkut. - 4 : Singapore 2010 Youth Olympic Games communication strategies on Facebook and Twitter. - 5 : Sport organizations social networking strategies : case study analysis. - 6 : Olympic athletes and social media use during a non olympic-period. - 7. The Olympic Games, NBA and FC Barcelona on Facebook : content and fan participa...

  13. Geological storage of CO2: risks analysis, monitoring and measures. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Akar, A.; Audibert, N.; Audigane, P.; Baranger, P.; Bonijoly, D.; Carnec, C.; Czernichowski, I.; Debeglia, N.; Fabriol, H.; Foerster, E.; Gaus, I.; Le Nindre, Y.; Michel, K.; Morin, D.; Roy, S.; Sanjuan, B.; Sayedi, D.

    2005-01-01

    To use the CO 2 geological storage as a coherent solution in the greenhouse gases reduction it needs to answer to safety and monitoring conditions. In this framework the BRGM presents this study in six chapters: risks analysis, the monitoring methods (geochemistry, geophysics, aerial monitoring, biochemistry, hydrogeology), the metrology, the corrosion problems, the thermal, hydrodynamical, geochemical and mechanical simulation and the today and future regulations. (A.L.B.)

  14. Final safety analysis report (FSAR) for waste receiving and processing (WRAP) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidert, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    This safety analysis report provides a summary description of the WRAP Facility, focusing on significant safety-related characteristics of the location and facility design. This report demonstrates that adherence to the safety basis wi11 ensure necessary operational safety considerations have been addressed sufficiently and justifies the adequacy of the safety basis in protecting the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment

  15. Final Technical Report: Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce Hardison [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burton, Patrick D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Clifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors project focuses on improving the accuracy and reducing the uncertainty of PV performance model predictions by addressing a common element of all PV performance models referred to as “derates”. Widespread use of “rules of thumb”, combined with significant uncertainty regarding appropriate values for these factors contribute to uncertainty in projected energy production.

  16. GAT 3 - fuel cells and their management (PACoGES). Progress report; GAT 3 - piles a combustible et leur gestion (PACoGES). Rapport final (juillet 2002 a juin 2004)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, C.

    2005-07-01

    The Topic Analysis Group PACoGES ('Piles a Combustible et leur Gestion') has conducted thoughts on fuel cells and their management with all the searchers concern with researches and developments on fuel cells and in particular on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC, ITSOFC) running at high temperature (600 to 1000 C). This has concerned about 200 searchers working in about fifty laboratories (CNRS, CEA, EDF, GDF, INRETS, CNAM, Armines, and several industrial teams). Here is given the final report 2002-2004 concerning all the researches carried out by this Group. (O.M.)

  17. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  18. Cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis at NIST; A progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, R L; Lindstrom, R M [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Div. of Inorganic Analytical Research; Vincent, D H [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1994-05-01

    An instrument for prompt gamma-ray activation analysis is now in operation at the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF). The cold neutron beam is relatively free of contamination by fast neutrons and reactor gamma rays, and the neutron fluence rate is 1.5 x 10 [sup 8] cm [sup -2] x s [sup -1] (thermal equivalent). As a result of a compact target-detector geometry the sensitivity is better by a factor of as much as seven than that obtained with an existing thermal instrument, and hydrogen background is a factor of 50 lower. This instrument was applied to multielement analysis of the Allende meteorite and other materials. (author) 14 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab.

  19. Toward an Integrated BAC Library Resource for Genome Sequencing and Analysis; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, M. I.; Kim, U.-J.

    2002-01-01

    We developed a great deal of expertise in building large BAC libraries from a variety of DNA sources including humans, mice, corn, microorganisms, worms, and Arabidopsis. We greatly improved the technology for screening these libraries rapidly and for selecting appropriate BACs and mapping BACs to develop large overlapping contigs. We became involved in supplying BACs and BAC contigs to a variety of sequencing and mapping projects and we began to collaborate with Drs. Adams and Venter at TIGR and with Dr. Leroy Hood and his group at University of Washington to provide BACs for end sequencing and for mapping and sequencing of large fragments of chromosome 16. Together with Dr. Ian Dunham and his co-workers at the Sanger Center we completed the mapping and they completed the sequencing of the first human chromosome, chromosome 22. This was published in Nature in 1999 and our BAC contigs made a major contribution to this sequencing effort. Drs. Shizuya and Ding invented an automated highly accurate BAC mapping technique. We also developed long-term collaborations with Dr. Uli Weier at UCSF in the design of BAC probes for characterization of human tumors and specific chromosome deletions and breakpoints. Finally the contribution of our work to the human genome project has been recognized in the publication both by the international consortium and the NIH of a draft sequence of the human genome in Nature last year. Dr. Shizuya was acknowledged in the authorship of that landmark paper. Dr. Simon was also an author on the Venter/Adams Celera project sequencing the human genome that was published in Science last year

  20. Analysis of select Mod-1 semiscale blowdown heat transfer tests. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irani, A.A.; Fujita, N.; Mecham, D.C.; Ching, J.T.; Gose, G.C.; Hentzen, R.D.; Sawtelle, G.R.; Moore, K.V.

    1976-10-01

    The report contains the RELAP4 analysis and sensitivity studies of Semiscale Tests S-02-2 and S-02-7. The Semiscale System is an electrically heated experiment designed to produce data on system performance typical of PWR thermal-hydraulic behavior. The RELAP4 program used for these analyses is a digital computer program developed to predict the thermal-hydraulic behavior of experimental systems and water-cooled nuclear reactors subjected to postulated transients. The results of the analysis for Test S-02-2 were in very good agreement with the data. Two parameters which required improvement were identified. These were the lower plenum density and the mass flow on the vessel side of the break. Subsequently, before analyzing Test S-02-7, the lower plenum was renodalized and the critical flow model at the vessel side break was modified. The results of the analysis of Test S-02-7 compared more favorably with the data than those of S-02-2. Additional sensitivity studies included time step studies, steam generator and downcomer modeling, and core nodalization

  1. Analysis of the need for intermediate and peaking technologies in the year 2000. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrager, S.M.; Campbell, G.L.

    1980-04-01

    This analysis was conducted to assess the impact of load management on the future need for intermediate- and peak-generating technologies (IPTs) such as combustion turbines, pumped storage, and cycling coal plants. There would be a reduced need for IPTs if load-management activities such as time-of-use pricing, together with customer-owned energy-storage devices, hot-water-heater controls, and interruptible service can economically remove most of the variation from electric power demands. The objective of this analysis is to assess the need for IPTs in an uncertain future, which will probably include load management and time-differentiated electricity prices. The analysis is exploratory in nature and broad in scope. It does not attempt to predict the future or to model precisely the technical characteristics or economic desirability of load management. Rather, its purpose is to provide research and development planners with some basic insights into the order of magnitude of possible hourly demand shifts on a regional basis and to determine the impact of load management on daily and seasonal variations in electricity demand.

  2. Photovoltaic power systems market identification and analysis. Final report, January 1977--February 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-01

    This report summarizes the work done by InterTechnology/Solar Corporation, its consultants, Mobil Tyco Solar Energy Corporation and the University of Delaware Institute for Energy Conversion, and its consultants, during the marketing analysis of near and intermediate term photovoltaic power applications. To obtain estimates of the domestic and foreign market potential for photovoltaically powered devices two approaches were used. First, the study was identifying then screening all possible photovoltaic power supply applications. This approach encompassed the first two tasks of the study: (1) a survey of the current uses of photovoltaic systems, both domestic and international, and a projection of the usage of those systems into the future; and (2) a new idea generation task which attempted to come up with new ways of using photovoltaic power. Second, the study required in-depth analysis of key near-term and intermediate-term photovoltaic applications identified during the first phase to obtain reasonable estimates of photovoltaic market potential. This process encompassed the third and fourth tasks of the analysis: (3) refinement of ideas generated in Task 2 so that certain products/applications could be identified, the product defined and a market survey carried out; and (4) development of a detailed product scenario which forecasts sales, barriers to market acceptance, and technical innovationsrequired for proper introduction of the products. The work performed and findings of each task are presented.

  3. Regional analysis of potential energy production from agricultural wastes: technical and economic study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Have, H

    1981-01-01

    The possibilities for utilization of agricultural wastes for energy production are analyzed in two Danish counties, Ringkoebing and Vestsjaelland, which have different agricultural production patterns. The quantitative analysis shows that the major waste products, surplus straw, waste wood and animal waste, in total with present technique can cover about 28% of the demand for heat energy (mostly space heating) in both counties. The potential coverage from straw, wood and animal waste is about 3, 3 and 22% in Ringkoebing and 18, 2 and 8% in Vestsjaelland respectively. A technical analysis indicates that direct combustion is the most favorable conversion method for straw and wood while biological conversion at present is best suited for animal waste. An economic analysis based on costs of collection, storage, transport and conversion of wastes and costs of corresponding oil and oil conversion were made. From a community point of view only straw and wood are found to be competitive to the expensive gas fuel oil when burned in automatically stoked furnaces. From a heating station point of view waste utilization is more attractive because of the sales tax on oil products. Here straw and wood are competitive fuels to both gas and heavy fuel oil in all the analyzed systems except from the small manually stoked furnaces. Animal waste seems to be competitive only when replacing gas fuel oil in medium size (500 kW) well utilized aerobic fermenters.

  4. Materials, process, product analysis of coal process technology. Phase I final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxton, J. C.; Roig, R. W.; Loridan, A.; Leggett, N. E.; Capell, R. G.; Humpstone, C. C.; Mudry, R. N.; Ayres, E.

    1976-02-01

    The purpose of materials-process-product analysis is a systematic evaluation of alternative manufacturing processes--in this case processes for converting coal into energy and material products that can supplement or replace petroleum-based products. The methodological steps in the analysis include: Definition of functional operations that enter into coal conversion processes, and modeling of alternative, competing methods to accomplish these functions; compilation of all feasible conversion processes that can be assembled from combinations of competing methods for the functional operations; systematic, iterative evaluation of all feasible conversion processes under a variety of economic situations, environmental constraints, and projected technological advances; and aggregative assessments (economic and environmental) of various industrial development scenarios. An integral part of the present project is additional development of the existing computer model to include: A data base for coal-related materials and coal conversion processes; and an algorithmic structure that facilitates the iterative, systematic evaluations in response to exogenously specified variables, such as tax policy, environmental limitations, and changes in process technology and costs. As an analytical tool, the analysis is intended to satisfy the needs of an analyst working at the process selection level, for example, with respect to the allocation of RDandD funds to competing technologies.

  5. THE ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LAW - WILL THE ROMANIAN DOCTRINE FINALLY CATCH UP WITH IT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONICA-FLORENTINA POPA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although a well-established presence on the international legal scene, the economic analysis of law is still an unfamiliar concept to most Romanian scholars. While worldwide, prestigious universities offer special courses on this topic and an impressive body of legal studies continues to add up, only scant traces of this important legal school can be detected in some recent Romanian doctoral thesis and papers. This article explores the main concepts of the economic analysis of law, the recent spin-offs of this theory, especially in the area of comparative law, as well as some of the critiques addressed in the legal doctrine, concerning the consequences on law of overemphasizing “efficiency” to the expense of less quantifiable, moral and social considerations. Some explanations on why the Romanian doctrine is lagging behind with respect to the economic analysis of law will also be attempted, together with a tentative answer to whether this major legal theory will ever make an impact on local doctrinal developments in the near future.

  6. Final Safety Analysis Document for Building 693 Chemical Waste Storage Building at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, R.J.; Lane, S.

    1992-02-01

    This Safety Analysis Document (SAD) for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Building 693, Chemical Waste Storage Building (desipated as Building 693 Container Storage Unit in the Laboratory's RCRA Part B permit application), provides the necessary information and analyses to conclude that Building 693 can be operated at low risk without unduly endangering the safety of the building operating personnel or adversely affecting the public or the environment. This Building 693 SAD consists of eight sections and supporting appendices. Section 1 presents a summary of the facility designs and operations and Section 2 summarizes the safety analysis method and results. Section 3 describes the site, the facility desip, operations and management structure. Sections 4 and 5 present the safety analysis and operational safety requirements (OSRs). Section 6 reviews Hazardous Waste Management's (HWM) Quality Assurance (QA) program. Section 7 lists the references and background material used in the preparation of this report Section 8 lists acronyms, abbreviations and symbols. Appendices contain supporting analyses, definitions, and descriptions that are referenced in the body of this report

  7. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the second volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of failure modes and effects analysis; accident analysis; operational safety requirements; quality assurance program; ES&H management program; environmental, safety, and health systems critical to safety; summary of waste-management program; environmental monitoring program; facility expansion, decontamination, and decommissioning; summary of emergency response plan; summary plan for employee training; summary plan for operating procedures; glossary; and appendices A and B.

  8. Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-19

    A partnership across government, academic, and private sectors has created a novel system that enables climate researchers to solve current and emerging data analysis and visualization challenges. The Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) software project utilizes the Python application programming interface (API) combined with C/C++/Fortran implementations for performance-critical software that offers the best compromise between "scalability" and “ease-of-use.” The UV-CDAT system is highly extensible and customizable for high-performance interactive and batch visualization and analysis for climate science and other disciplines of geosciences. For complex, climate data-intensive computing, UV-CDAT’s inclusive framework supports Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallelism as well as taskfarming and other forms of parallelism. More specifically, the UV-CDAT framework supports the execution of Python scripts running in parallel using the MPI executable commands and leverages Department of Energy (DOE)-funded general-purpose, scalable parallel visualization tools such as ParaView and VisIt. This is the first system to be successfully designed in this way and with these features. The climate community leverages these tools and others, in support of a parallel client-server paradigm, allowing extreme-scale, server-side computing for maximum possible speed-up.

  9. Final Report Scalable Analysis Methods and In Situ Infrastructure for Extreme Scale Knowledge Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, Patrick [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States)

    2017-09-13

    The primary challenge motivating this project is the widening gap between the ability to compute information and to store it for subsequent analysis. This gap adversely impacts science code teams, who can perform analysis only on a small fraction of the data they calculate, resulting in the substantial likelihood of lost or missed science, when results are computed but not analyzed. Our approach is to perform as much analysis or visualization processing on data while it is still resident in memory, which is known as in situ processing. The idea in situ processing was not new at the time of the start of this effort in 2014, but efforts in that space were largely ad hoc, and there was no concerted effort within the research community that aimed to foster production-quality software tools suitable for use by Department of Energy (DOE) science projects. Our objective was to produce and enable the use of production-quality in situ methods and infrastructure, at scale, on DOE high-performance computing (HPC) facilities, though we expected to have an impact beyond DOE due to the widespread nature of the challenges, which affect virtually all large-scale computational science efforts. To achieve this objective, we engaged in software technology research and development (R&D), in close partnerships with DOE science code teams, to produce software technologies that were shown to run efficiently at scale on DOE HPC platforms.

  10. Innovative Method of Analysis of Actual Cost of Work in Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fil, O.; Terentev, V.

    2017-11-01

    The article focuses on the basic theory and practical aspects of improving the strategic management in terms of enhancing the quality of a technological process: these aspects have been proven experimentally by their introduction in company operations. The authors have worked out some proposals aimed at selecting an optimal supplier for building companies as well as the algorithm for the analysis and optimization of a construction company basing on scientific and practical research and the experimental data obtained in the experiment

  11. Progress on RTSS simulation-based analysis for real-time systems development at two laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Y.; Jia, M.; Fei, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, G.; Yang, S.; Chen, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A new object-oriented Real Time System Simulator (RTSS) with the capability for simulation graphics and animation, has been developed and used for modeling the distributed data acquisition and processing systems at JET and ASIPP. Simulation allows estimates of response time, throughput and resource utilization for a variety of configurations to be investigated. Performance measurements, simulation and analysis are used together to calibrate and validate each other

  12. Analysis of final products from the liquid alkanes radiolysis at low dose, low temperature and high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilquin, B.; Doncker, J. de.

    1991-01-01

    Yields of final products (dimers) from the radiolysis of n-hexane and 2,3-dimethylbutane are studied by capillary chromatographic techniques for trace analysis. Reaction of intermediates with the products, the alkane molecules or impurities, is reduced by using low dose (1 kGy), low temperature (195 K) and high dose rate (LINAC). Temperature is the most important experiment variable; by reducing the temperature, reactions with significant activation energies do not compete with radical-radical termination reactions. Products from LINAC radiolysis provide information about active species (reactive fragment, allylic radical...) which deserve a more detailed examination by direct methods [fr

  13. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  14. Recent progress and challenges in nanotechnology for biomedical applications: an insight into the analysis of neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Dhesingh Ravi; Miura, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers exciting opportunities and unprecedented compatibilities in manipulating chemical and biological materials at the atomic or molecular scale for the development of novel functional materials with enhanced capabilities. It plays a central role in the recent technological advances in biomedical technology, especially in the areas of disease diagnosis, drug design and drug delivery. In this review, we present the recent trend and challenges in the development of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with a special emphasis on the analysis of neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters are the chemical messengers which transform information and signals all over the body. They play prime role in functioning of the central nervous system (CNS) and governs most of the metabolic functions including movement, pleasure, pain, mood, emotion, thinking, digestion, sleep, addiction, fear, anxiety and depression. Thus, development of high-performance and user-friendly analytical methods for ultra-sensitive detection of neurotransmitters remain a major challenge in modern biomedical analysis. Nanostructured materials are emerging as a powerful mean for diagnosis of CNS disorders because of their unique optical, size and surface characteristics. This review provides a brief outline on the basic concepts and recent advancements of nanotechnology for biomedical applications, especially in the analysis of neurotransmitters. A brief introduction to the nanomaterials, bionanotechnology and neurotransmitters is also included along with discussions on most of the patents published in these areas.

  15. Study on Progressive Collapse Behavior of SRC Column-Steel Beam Hybrid Frame Based on Pushdown Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liusheng Chu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the progressive collapse behavior of Steel Reinforced Concrete (SRC column-steel beam hybrid frame after the failure of key structural elements, a PQ-Fiber model for an 8-storey structure is established in ABAQUS program. Nonlinear dynamic and static pushdown analysis are carried out after the failure and removal of the bottom-middle and bottom-corner columns. Numerical results of both methods agree well with each other. Results show that SRC column-steel frame has good resistance to progressive collapse under dynamic instantaneous load. After sudden removal of a bottom middle column, the development of structural collapse exhibits two mechanisms, the beam mechanism and the catenary mechanism. When the structure is within small deformation range, the collapse resistance of the residual frame is provided by the beam bending moment capacity, which is beam mechanism. For large deformation situation, the collapse resistance is mainly provided by the beam tensile strength, which is catenary mechanism. However, with the removal of a bottom corner column, the residual structure only undergoes the beam mechanism even for large deformations. For future practical applications, the influence of the steel ratio, steel section size, and the vertical position of the removed key components are investigated through a detailed parametric study.

  16. Analysis and research of influence factors ranking of fuzzy language translation accuracy in literary works based on catastrophe progression method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper researches the problem of decline in translation accuracy caused by language “vagueness” in literary translation, and proposes to use the catastrophe model for importance ranking of various factors affecting the fuzzy language translation accuracy in literary works, and finally gives out the order of factors to be considered before translation. The multi-level evaluation system can be used to construct the relevant catastrophe progression model, and the normalization formula can be used to calculate the relative membership degree of each system and evaluation index, and make evaluation combined with the evaluation criteria table. The results show that, in the fuzzy language translation, in order to improve the translation accuracy, there is a need to consider the indicators ranking: A2 fuzzy language context → A1 words attribute → A3 specific meaning of digital words; B2 fuzzy semantics, B3 blur color words → B1 multiple meanings of words → B4 fuzzy digital words; C3 combination with context and cultural background, C4 specific connotation of color words → C1 combination with words emotion, C2 selection of words meaning → C5 combination with digits and language background.

  17. Design rules of mechanical structure of reactors. Damage due to cyclic loading. Progressive distortion. Practical analysis of ratcheting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, Gerard; Cousseran, Pierre; Lebey, Jacques; Moulin, Didier; Roche, Roland; Tremblais, Andre.

    1982-08-01

    At first is given a definition of what is ratcheting. A short discussion shows that computation results do not agree with experimental results. This is attributed to the complexity of the real material behavior. These considerations lead to try to build a design rule mainly based on the results of experimental tests. A large experimental program is in progress at CEN-Saclay. Using these results and the results available in open litterature, it was possible to propose a rule based on the concept of effective primary stress Psub(eff). The effective primary stress is a fictitious primary stress giving the same effects that the real loading (it is to say the same effect that the combination of an applied primary stress P and a cyclic straining). Determination of an upper bound value of Psub(eff) is made with the help of an efficiency diagram. More precisely the efficiency diagram include a curve giving a conservative value of an efficiency index V=P/Psub(eff) as a function of the secondary quotient SQ=ΔQ/P. Finally limitation of Psub(eff) intensity is discussed in regard with the current practice [fr

  18. Does global progress on sanitation really lag behind water? An analysis of global progress on community- and household-level access to safe water and sanitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Oliver; Elliott, Mark; Overbo, Alycia; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Safe drinking water and sanitation are important determinants of human health and wellbeing and have recently been declared human rights by the international community. Increased access to both were included in the Millennium Development Goals under a single dedicated target for 2015. This target was reached in 2010 for water but sanitation will fall short; however, there is an important difference in the benchmarks used for assessing global access. For drinking water the benchmark is community-level access whilst for sanitation it is household-level access, so a pit latrine shared between households does not count toward the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target. We estimated global progress for water and sanitation under two scenarios: with equivalent household- and community-level benchmarks. Our results demonstrate that the "sanitation deficit" is apparent only when household-level sanitation access is contrasted with community-level water access. When equivalent benchmarks are used for water and sanitation, the global deficit is as great for water as it is for sanitation, and sanitation progress in the MDG-period (1990-2015) outstrips that in water. As both drinking water and sanitation access yield greater benefits at the household-level than at the community-level, we conclude that any post-2015 goals should consider a household-level benchmark for both.

  19. The SocioEconomic Analysis of Repository Siting (SEARS): Technical description: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Socioeconomic impacts must be assessed both for the near term and for the future. One means of addressing the need for the assessment of such impacts has been through the development of the computerized socioeconomic assessment model called the SocioEconomic Analysis of Repository Siting (SEARS) model. The SEARS model was developed for the Battelle Project Management Division. It was refined and adapted from state-of-the-art computerized projection models and thoroughly validated and is now available for use in projecting the likely socioeconomic impacts of a repository facility. This Technical Description is one of six major products that describe the SEARS modeling system. 61 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs

  20. The SocioEconomic analysis of repository siting (SEARS): Guide to data base preparation: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.R.; Murdock, S.H.; Leistritz, F.L.; Kiel, B.; Parpia, B.

    1984-11-01

    This guide describes the data bases in the SocioEconomic Analysis of Repository Siting (SEARS) modeling system. This model is a user-interactive, computerized model for projecting the economic, demographic, public service, and fiscal impacts of repository siting. This guide provides a description of the data bases, sources of data, data formats, and preprocessing programs for adapting and implementing the SEARS system and is seen as an essential reference for technical users of the model. It should be used in conjunction with reports describing the model's features and characteristics. 95 refs., 3 tabs