WorldWideScience

Sample records for analysis chromosomal localization

  1. Porcine UCHL1: genomic organization, chromosome localization and expression analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Bendixen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    to and protection from Parkinson’s disease. Here we report cloning, characterization, expression analysis and mapping of porcine UCHL1. The UCHL1 cDNA was amplified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences. The porcine cDNA codes...... in developing porcine embryos. UCHL1 transcript was detected as early as 40 days of gestation. A significant decrease in UCHL1 transcript was detected in basal ganglia from day 60 to day 115 of gestation...

  2. The murine ufo receptor: molecular cloning, chromosomal localization and in situ expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, M; Ebensperger, C; Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Hameister, H; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1992-07-01

    We have cloned the mouse homologue of the ufo oncogene. It encodes a novel tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by a unique extracellular domain containing two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats. Comparison of the predicted ufo amino acid sequences of mouse and man revealed an overall identity of 87.6%. The ufo locus maps to mouse chromosome 7A3-B1 and thereby extends the known conserved linkage group between mouse chromosome 7 and human chromosome 19. RNA in situ hybridization analysis established the onset of specific ufo expression in the late embryogenesis at day 12.5 post coitum (p.c.) and localized ufo transcription to distinct substructures of a broad spectrum of developing tissues (e.g. subepidermal cells of the skin, mesenchymal cells of the periosteum). In adult animals ufo is expressed in cells forming organ capsules as well as in connective tissue structures. ufo may function as a signal transducer between specific cell types of mesodermal origin.

  3. Comparative analysis of chromosomal localization of ribosomal and telomeric DNA markers in three species of Pyrgomorphidae grasshoppers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya G. Buleu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The karyotypes of three species of Pyrgomorphidae grasshoppers were studied: Zonocerus elegans (Thunberg, 1815, Pyrgomorpha guentheri (Burr, 1899 and Atractomorpha lata (Mochulsky, 1866. Data on karyotypes of P. guentheri and Z. elegans are reported here for the first time. All species have karyotypes consisting of 19 acrocentric chromosomes in males and 20 acrocentric chromosomes in females (2n♂=19, NF=19; 2n♀=20, NF=20 and X0/XX sex determination system. A comparative analysis of the localization of C-heterochromatin, clusters of ribosomal DNA, and telomere repeats revealed inter-species diversity in these cytogenetic markers. These differences indicate that the karyotype divergence in the species studied is not associated with structural chromosome rearrangements, but with the evolution of repeated DNA sequences.

  4. Molecular analysis of human complement component C5: localization of the structural gene to chromosome 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetsel, R.A.; Lemons, R.S.; Le Beau, M.M.; Barnum, S.R.; Noack, D.; Tack, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    A human C5 clone (pC5HG2) was isolated from a cDNA library constructed from Hep G2 mRNA. he DNA sequence showed that the pC5HG2 insert was comprised of 3309 base pairs of pro-C5 coding sequence and 404 base pairs of 3'-untranslated sequence. The derived amino acid sequence contained the entire coding sequence of the C5 α-chain, the β-α-chain junction region, and 100 amino acids (approximately 50%) of the β-chain. Protein sequences of four C5 tryptic peptides were aligned exactly to this sequence and demonstrated that C5 synthesized and secreted by Hep G2 cells is probably identical with plasma-derived C5. Coding sequence alignment of the human C5 sequences with those of murine C5 indicated that 80% of the nucleotides and 79% of the amino acids were placed identically in the two species. Amino acid sequence alignment of the homologous family members C3, C4, and α 2 -macroglobulin with that of C5 demonstrated 27%, 25%, and 19% identity, respectively. As was found in murine C5, the corresponding thiol ester region of human C5 contained several conserved amino acids, but the critical cysteine and glutamine residues which give rise to the intramolecular thiol ester bond in C3, C4, and α 2 -macroglobulin were absent in C5, having been replaced by serine and alanine, respectively. With the use of a panel of hamster-human somatic cell hybrids, the C5 gene was mapped to human chromosome 9. In situ chromosomal hybridization studies employing metaphase cells further localized the gene to bands 9q32-34, with the largest cluster of grains at 9q34.1

  5. Fetal chromosome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, A; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  6. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  7. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finocchiaro, G.; Taroni, F.; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I.; Tarelli, G.T.; DiDonato, S.; Rocchi, M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH 2 -terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH 2 -terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids

  8. Aneuploids of wheat and chromosomal localization of genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aneuploids of wheat and chromosomal localization of genes. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... cytogenetic methods for the chromosomal localization of major genes in wheat including Chinese spring (CS) monosomics (Triticum aestivum, ...

  9. Aneuploids of wheat and chromosomal localization of genes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-22

    Jun 22, 2011 ... chromosome location of such genes is critical for effective utilization and subsequent manipulation. Further, chromosomal localization will lead to the identification of ... Various cytogenetic stocks and techniques have been previously reported useful in localizing genes on wheat chromosomes. The objective ...

  10. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human lymphotoxin gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedwin, G.E.; Jarrett-Nedwin, J.; Smith, D.H.; Naylor, S.L.; Sakaguchi, A.Y.; Goeddel, D.V.; Gray, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have isolated, sequenced, and determined the chromosomal localization of the gene encoding human lymphotoxin (LT). The single copy gene was isolated from a human genomic library using a /sup 32/P-labeled 116 bp synthetic DNA fragment whose sequence was based on the NH/sub 2/-terminal amino acid sequence of LT. The gene spans 3 kb of DNA and is interrupted by three intervening sequences. The LT gene is located on human chromosome 6, as determined by Southern blot analysis of human-murine hybrid DNA. Putative transcriptional control regions and areas of homology with the promoters of interferon and other genes are identified

  11. Linkage disequilibrium network analysis (LDna) gives a global view of chromosomal inversions, local adaptation and geographic structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kemppainen, Petri; Knight, C. G.; Sarma, D. K.; Hlaing, T.; Prakash, A.; Maung, Y. N. M.; Somboon, P.; Mahanta, J.; Walton, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2015), s. 1031-1045 ISSN 1755-098X R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0303 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Anopheles dirus * Anopheles gambiae * chromosomal rearrangement * graph theory * landscape genomics * R package Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.298, year: 2015

  12. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Seldin, M.F. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Semi-automatic laser beam microdissection of the Y chromosome and analysis of Y chromosome DNA in a dioecious plant, Silene latifolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, S.; Kawano, S.; Michimoto, T.; Higashiyama, T.; Nakao, S.; Sakai, A.; Kuroiwa, T.

    1999-01-01

    Silene latifolia has heteromorphic sex chromosomes, the X and Y chromosomes. The Y chromosome, which is thought to carry the male determining gene, was isolated by UV laser microdissection and amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR. In situ chromosome suppression of the amplified Y chromosome DNA in the presence of female genomic DNA as a competitor showed that the microdissected Y chromosome DNA did not specifically hybridize to the Y chromosome, but-hybridized to all chromosomes. This result suggests that the Y chromosome does not contain Y chromosome-enriched repetitive sequences. A repetitive sequence in the microdissected Y chromosome, RMY1, was isolated while screening repetitive sequences in the amplified Y chromosome. Part of the nucleotide sequence shared a similarity to that of X-43.1, which was isolated from microdissected X chromosomes. Since fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with RMY1 demonstrated that RMY1 was localized at the ends of the chromosome, RMY1 may be a subtelomeric repetitive sequence. Regarding the sex chromosomes, RMY1 was detected at both ends of the X chromosome and at one end near the pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome. The different localization of RMY1 on the sex chromosomes provides a clue to the problem of how the sex chromosomes arose from autosomes

  14. Cytometric analysis of irradiation damaged chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, M.E.; Raju, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of cells in interphase results in dose-dependent damage to DNA which is discernable by flow-cytometric analysis of chromosomes. The quantity (and possibly the quality) of chromosomal changes is different in survival-matched doses of x and α irradiation. It may, therefore, be possible to use these methods for analysis of dose and type of exposure in unknown cases

  15. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  16. System for the analysis of plant chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Martin, D.; Peraza Gonzalez, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes a computer system for the automation workers of recognition analysis and interpretation of plant chromosomes. This system permit to carry out the analysis in a more comfortable and faster way, using the image processing techniques

  17. Identification of Local Melon (Cucumis melo L. var. Bartek Based on Chromosomal Characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BUDI SETIADI DARYONO

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bartek is one of local melon varieties mainly cultivated in Pemalang, Central Java. Bartek has three variations of fruits; Long-Green, Ellips-Green, and Yellow. Chromosome characterization of the Bartek was investigated to determine the genetic variation. The main purpose of this research was to determine the genetic characters of Bartek including chromosome number, mitosis, cell cycle, and karyotype. Squash method was used for chromosome preparation. The results showed that all of Bartek observed in this study have similar diploid (2n chromosome number = 24. According to the total number of chromosome, Bartek is closer to melon than cucumber. The mitotic analysis exhibited that the Bartek has similar karyotype formula, 2n = 2x = 24m. Based on the R value of the three kinds of Bartek (R < 0.27, it indicated that three kinds of Bartek were considered to be originated from similar species and one of melon varieties (Cucumis melo L. var. Bartek.

  18. Chromosomal localization of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene to human chromosome 4q13. 1-q21. 1 and mouse chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, U.B.; Dushkin, H.; Beier, D.R.; Chin, W.W. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Altherr, M.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GRHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor on the cell surface of pituitary gonadotropes, where it serves to transduce signals from the extracellular ligand, the hypothalamic factor gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and to modulate the synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. The authors have localized the GRHR gene to the q13.1-q21.1 region of the human chromosome 4 using mapping panels of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids containing different human chromosomes or different regions of human chromosome 4. Furthermore, using linkage analysis of single-strand conformational polymorphisms, the murine GRHR gene was localized to mouse chromosome 5, linked to the endogenous retroviral marker Pmv-11. This is consistent with the evolutionary conservation of homology between these two regions, as has been previously suggested from comparative mapping of several other loci. The localization of the GRHR gene may be useful in the study of disorders of reproduction. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Chromosomal localization of microsatellite loci in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cavasini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata has been used as a model organism for genetics and evolutionary studies in the last three decades. A linkage map with 48 microsatellite loci recently published for this species showed five syntenic groups, which had their homology determined to Drosophila melanogaster chromosomes. Then, by inference, each of the groups was associated with one of the five major chromosomes of D. mediopunctata. Our objective was to carry out a genetic (chromosomal analysis to increase the number of available loci with known chromosomal location. We made a simultaneous analysis of visible mutant phenotypes and microsatellite genotypes in a backcross of a standard strain and a mutant strain, which had each major autosome marked. Hence, we could establish the chromosomal location of seventeen loci; including one from each of the five major linkage groups previously published, and twelve new loci. Our results were congruent with the previous location and they open new possibilities to future work integrating microsatellites, chromosomal inversions, and genetic determinants of physiological and morphological variation.

  20. Localization to Chromosomes of Structural Genes for the Major Protease Inhibitors of Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn; Bjørn, S.E.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Wheat-barley chromosome addition lines were compared by isoelectric focusing of protein extracts to identify chromosomes carrying loci for the major immunochemically distinct protease inhibitors of barley grains. Structural genes for the following inhibitors were localized: an inhibitor of both...... endogenous α-amylase 2 and subtilisin (ASI) on chromosome 2, two chymotrypsin/subtilisin inhibitors (CI-1 and CI-2) on chromosome 5 (long arm) and the major trypsin inhibitor (TI-1) on chromosome 3....

  1. Chromosomal localization of two novel repetitive sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolano, B; Gardunia, B W; Michalska, M; Bonifacio, A; Fairbanks, D; Maughan, P J; Coleman, C E; Stevens, M R; Jellen, E N; Maluszynska, J

    2011-09-01

    The chromosomal organization of two novel repetitive DNA sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome was analyzed across the genomes of selected Chenopodium species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with the repetitive DNA clone 18-24J in the closely related allotetraploids C. quinoa and Chenopodium berlandieri Moq. (2n = 4x = 36) evidenced hybridization signals that were mainly present on 18 chromosomes; however, in the allohexaploid Chenopodium album L. (2n = 6x = 54), cross-hybridization was observed on all of the chromosomes. In situ hybridization with rRNA gene probes indicated that during the evolution of polyploidy, the chenopods lost some of their rDNA loci. Reprobing with rDNA indicated that in the subgenome labeled with 18-24J, one 35S rRNA locus and at least half of the 5S rDNA loci were present. A second analyzed sequence, 12-13P, localized exclusively in pericentromeric regions of each chromosome of C. quinoa and related species. The intensity of the FISH signals differed considerably among chromosomes. The pattern observed on C. quinoa chromosomes after FISH with 12-13P was very similar to GISH results, suggesting that the 12-13P sequence constitutes a major part of the repetitive DNA of C. quinoa.

  2. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:chap 69. Taber's Medical Dictionary Online. Chromosome. www.tabers.com/tabersonline/view/Tabers-Dictionary/753321/all/chromosome?q=Chromosome&ti=0 . Accessed June 11, 2017.

  3. Structure, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of the prepronociceptin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollereau, C; Simons, M J; Soularue, P; Liners, F; Vassart, G; Meunier, J C; Parmentier, M

    1996-08-06

    Nociceptin (orphanin FQ), the newly discovered natural agonist of opioid receptor-like (ORL1) receptor, is a neuropeptide that is endowed with pronociceptive activity in vivo. Nociceptin is derived from a larger precursor, prepronociceptin (PPNOC), whose human, mouse, and rat genes we have now isolated. The PPNOC gene is highly conserved in the three species and displays organizational features that are strikingly similar to those of the genes of preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin, and preproopiomelanocortin, the precursors to endogenous opioid peptides, suggesting the four genes belong to the same family-i.e., have a common evolutionary origin. The PPNOC gene encodes a single copy of nociceptin as well as of other peptides whose sequence is strictly conserved across murine and human species; hence it is likely to be neurophysiologically significant. Northern blot analysis shows that the PPNOC gene is predominantly transcribed in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and, albeit weakly, in the ovary, the sole peripheral organ expressing the gene. By using a radiation hybrid cell line panel, the PPNOC gene was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 8 (8p21), between sequence-tagged site markers WI-5833 and WI-1172, in close proximity of the locus encoding the neurofilament light chain NEFL. Analysis of yeast artificial chromosome clones belonging to the WC8.4 contig covering the 8p21 region did not allow to detect the presence of the gene on these yeast artificial chromosomes, suggesting a gap in the coverage within this contig.

  4. Chromosomal localization of the human vesicular amine transporter genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, D.; Finn, P.; Liu, Y.; Roghani, A.; Edwards, R.H.; Klisak, I.; Kojis, T.; Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S. (UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The physiologic and behavioral effects of pharmacologic agents that interfere with the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters into vesicles suggest that vesicular amine transport may contribute to human neuropsychiatric disease. To determine whether an alteration in the genes that encode vesicular amine transport contributes to the inherited component of these disorders, the authors have isolated a human cDNA for the brain transporter and localized the human vesciular amine transporter genes. The human brain synaptic vesicle amine transporter (SVAT) shows unexpected conservation with rat SVAT in the regions that diverge extensively between rat SVAT and the rat adrenal chromaffin granule amine transporter (CGAT). Using the cloned sequences with a panel of mouse-human hybrids and in situ hybridization for regional localization, the adrenal CGAT gene (or VAT1) maps to human chromosome 8p21.3 and the brain SVAT gene (or VAT2) maps to chromosome 10q25. Both of these sites occur very close to if not within previously described deletions that produce severe but viable phenotypes. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. An approach to automated chromosome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Go, Roland

    1972-01-01

    The methods of approach developed with a view to automatic processing of the different stages of chromosome analysis are described in this study divided into three parts. Part 1 relates the study of automated selection of metaphase spreads, which operates a decision process in order to reject ail the non-pertinent images and keep the good ones. This approach has been achieved by Computing a simulation program that has allowed to establish the proper selection algorithms in order to design a kit of electronic logical units. Part 2 deals with the automatic processing of the morphological study of the chromosome complements in a metaphase: the metaphase photographs are processed by an optical-to-digital converter which extracts the image information and writes it out as a digital data set on a magnetic tape. For one metaphase image this data set includes some 200 000 grey values, encoded according to a 16, 32 or 64 grey-level scale, and is processed by a pattern recognition program isolating the chromosomes and investigating their characteristic features (arm tips, centromere areas), in order to get measurements equivalent to the lengths of the four arms. Part 3 studies a program of automated karyotyping by optimized pairing of human chromosomes. The data are derived from direct digitizing of the arm lengths by means of a BENSON digital reader. The program supplies' 1/ a list of the pairs, 2/ a graphic representation of the pairs so constituted according to their respective lengths and centromeric indexes, and 3/ another BENSON graphic drawing according to the author's own representation of the chromosomes, i.e. crosses with orthogonal arms, each branch being the accurate measurement of the corresponding chromosome arm. This conventionalized karyotype indicates on the last line the really abnormal or non-standard images unpaired by the program, which are of special interest for the biologist. (author) [fr

  6. Genetic analysis of tumorigenesis: XXXII. Localization of constitutionally amplified KRAS sequences to Chinese hamster chromosomes X and Y by in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, G; Anisowicz, A; Sager, R

    1988-11-01

    The KRAS gene is constitutionally amplified in the Chinese hamster. We have mapped the amplified sequences by in situ hybridization to two major sites on the X and Y chromosomes, Xq4 and Yp2. No autosomal site was detected despite a search under relaxed hybridization conditions. KRAS DNA is amplified about 50-fold compared to a human cell line known to have a diploid number of KRAS sequences, whereas mRNA expression is 5- to 10-fold lower than in normal human cells. While mRNA expression levels do not necessarily parallel gene copy number, the low expression level strongly suggests that the amplified sequences are transcriptionally silent. It is suggested that the amplified sequences arose from the original KRAS gene on chromosome 8 and that the KRAS sequences on the Y chromosome arose by X-Y recombination.

  7. Cytological localization of adenosine kinase, nucleoside phosphorylase-1, and esterase-10 genes on mouse chromosome 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelson, L.C.; Farber, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have determined the regional locations on mouse chromosome 14 of the genes for mouse adenosine kinase (ADK), nucleoside phosphorylase- 1 (NP-1), and esterase-10 (ES-10) by analysis of rearranged mouse chromosomes in gamma-irradiated Chinese hamster X mouse hybrid cell lines. Irradiated clones were screened for expression of the murine forms of these enzymes; segregant clones that expressed only one or two of the three markers were karyotyped. The patterns of enzyme expression in these segregants were correlated with the presence of rearranged chromosomes. The Adk gene was localized to bands A2 to B, Np-1 to bands B to C1, and Es-10 to bands D2 to E2

  8. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human renal kallikrein gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, B.A.; Yun, Z.X.; Close, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Glandular kallikreins are a family of proteases encoded by a variable number of genes in different mammalian species. In all species examined, however, one particular kallikrein is functionally conserved in its capacity to release the vasoactive peptide, Lys-bradykinin, from low molecular weight kininogen. This kallikrein is found in the kidney, pancreas, and salivary gland, showing a unique pattern of tissue-specific expression relative to other members of the family. The authors have isolated a genomic clone carrying the human renal kallikrein gene and compared the nucleotide sequence of its promoter region with those of the mouse renal kallikrein gene and another mouse kallikrein gene expressed in a distinct cell type. They find four sequence elements conserved between renal kallikrein genes from the two species. They have also shown that the human gene is localized to 19q13, a position analogous to that of the kallikrein gene family on mouse chromosome 7

  9. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ... dardized even after more than 20 years of research, making it difficult to draw .... (c) Part of a metaphase with a chromosome break in the centromeric region (arrows).

  10. The value of chromosomal analysis in oligozoospermic men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegen, Çarcia; van Rumste, Minouche M. E.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Koks, Carolien A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in relation to sperm concentration in subfertile oligozoospermic men. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Two teaching hospitals. Patient(s): We retrospectively studied all men who received chromosomal analysis prior to

  11. Localization of introduced genes on the chromosomes of transgenic barley, wheat and triticale by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Zimny, J.; Becker, D.

    1997-01-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we localized introduced genes on metaphase chromosomes of barley, wheat, and triticale transformed by microprojectile bombardment of microspores and scutellar tissue with the pDB1 plasmid containing the uidA and bar genes. Thirteen integration sites...... of single-copy integrations. There was a slight tendency towards the localization of transgenes in distal chromosome regions. Using the GAA-satellite sequence for chromosome banding, the chromosomes containing the inserted genes were identified in most cases. Two barley lines derived from the same...... transformant showed a totally different integration pattern. Southern analysis confirmed that the inserted genes were segregating independently, resulting in different integration patterns among the progeny lines. The application of the FISH technique for the analysis of transgenic plants is discussed....

  12. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia: Chromosomal Breakage Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Anneke B.; Nieuwint, Aggie W. M.; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited syndrome with diverse clinical symptoms including developmental defects, short stature, bone marrow failure, and a high risk of malignancies. Fifteen genetic subtypes have been distinguished so far. The mode of inheritance for all subtypes is autosomal recessive, except for FA-B, which is X-linked. Cells derived from FA patients are—by definition—hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, such as mitomycin C, diepoxybutane, or cisplatinum, which becomes manifest as excessive growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and chromosomal breakage upon cellular exposure to these drugs. Here we provide a detailed laboratory protocol for the accurate assessment of the FA diagnosis as based on mitomycin C-induced chromosomal breakage analysis in whole-blood cultures. The method also enables a quantitative estimate of the degree of mosaicism in the lymphocyte compartment of the patient. PMID:22693659

  13. Interphase Chromosome Profiling: A Method for Conventional Banded Chromosome Analysis Using Interphase Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Dev, Vaithilingam G; Koduru, Prasad; Rao, Nagesh; Mitter, Navnit S; Liu, Mingya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Fuentes, Sarah; Papa, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    - Chromosome analysis on bone marrow or peripheral blood samples fails in a small proportion of attempts. A method that is more reliable, with similar or better resolution, would be a welcome addition to the armamentarium of the cytogenetics laboratory. - To develop a method similar to banded metaphase chromosome analysis that relies only on interphase nuclei. - To label multiple targets in an equidistant fashion along the entire length of each chromosome, including landmark subtelomere and centromere regions. Each label so generated by using cloned bacterial artificial chromosome probes is molecularly distinct with unique spectral characteristics, so the number and position of the labels can be tracked to identify chromosome abnormalities. - Interphase chromosome profiling (ICP) demonstrated results similar to conventional chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in 55 previously studied cases and obtained useful ICP chromosome analysis results on another 29 cases in which conventional methods failed. - ICP is a new and powerful method to karyotype peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate preparations without reliance on metaphase chromosome preparations. It will be of particular value for cases with a failed conventional analysis or when a fast turnaround time is required.

  14. The Detection and Analysis of Chromosome Fragile Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Özer, Özgün; Hickson, Ian D

    2018-01-01

    A fragile site is a chromosomal locus that is prone to form a gap or constriction visible within a condensed metaphase chromosome, particularly following exposure of cells to DNA replication stress. Based on their frequency, fragile sites are classified as either common (CFSs; present in all...... for detection and analysis of chromosome fragile sites....

  15. Chromosomal localization of the human diazepam binding inhibitor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBernardi, M.A.; Crowe, R.R.; Mocchetti, I.; Shows, T.B.; Eddy, R.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used in situ chromosome hybridization and human-mouse somatic cell hybrids to map the gene(s) for human diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous putative modulator of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor acting at the allosteric regulatory center of this receptor that includes the benzodiazepine recognition site. In 784 chromosome spreads hybridized with human DBI cDNA, the distribution of 1,476 labeled sites revealed a significant clustering of autoradiographic grains (11.3% of total label) on the long arm of chromosome 2 (2q). Furthermore, 63.5% of the grains found on 2q were located on 2q12-21, suggesting regional mapping of DBI gene(s) to this segment. Secondary hybridization signals were frequently observed on other chromosomes and they were statistically significant mainly for chromosomes 5, 6, 11, and 14. In addition, DNA from 32 human-mouse cell hybrids was digested with BamHI and probed with human DBI cDNA. A 3.5-kilobase band, which probably represents the human DBI gene, was assigned to chromosome 2. Four higher molecular weight bands, also detected in BamHI digests, could not be unequivocally assigned. A chromosome 2 location was excluded for the 27-, 13-, and 10-kilobase bands. These results assign a human DBI gene to chromosome 2 (2q12-21) and indicate that three of the four homologous sequences detected by the human DBI probe are located on three other chromosomes

  16. The human thyroglobulin gene: a polymorphic marker localized distal to C-MYC on chromosome 8 band q24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F.; Bikker, H.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Melsert, R.; Pearson, P. L.; de Vijlder, J. J.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The human thyroglobulin (Tg) gene is localized to chromosome 8 and regionally to band q24 as shown independently by both in situ hybridization techniques and Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Analysis of hybrids derived from a Burkitt lymphoma, with a translocation

  17. Localization of Usher syndrome type II to chromosome 1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberling, W J; Weston, M D; Möller, C; Davenport, S L; Shugart, Y Y; Priluck, I A; Martini, A; Milani, M; Smith, R J

    1990-06-01

    Usher syndrome is characterized by congenital hearing loss, progressive visual impairment due to retinitis pigmentosa, and variable vestibular problems. The two subtypes of Usher syndrome, types I and II, can be distinguished by the degree of hearing loss and by the presence or absence of vestibular dysfunction. Type I is characterized by a profound hearing loss and totally absent vestibular responses, while type II has a milder hearing loss and normal vestibular function. Fifty-five members of eight type II Usher syndrome families were typed for three DNA markers in the distal region of chromosome 1q: D1S65 (pEKH7.4), REN (pHRnES1.9), and D1S81 (pTHH33). Statistically significant linkage was observed for Usher syndrome type II with a maximum multipoint lod score of 6.37 at the position of the marker THH33, thus localizing the Usher type II (USH2) gene to 1q. Nine families with type I Usher syndrome failed to show linkage to the same three markers. The statistical test for heterogeneity of linkage between Usher syndrome types I and II was highly significant, thus demonstrating that they are due to mutations at different genetic loci.

  18. Analysis of the Ceratitis capitata y chromosome using in situ hybridization to mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willhoeft, U.; Franz, G.

    1998-01-01

    In Ceratitis capitata the Y chromosome is responsible for sex-determination. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for cytogenetic analysis of mitotic chromosomes. FISH with the wild-type strain EgyptII and two repetitive DNA probes enabled us to differentiate between the short and the long arm of the Y chromosome and gives a much better resolution than C-banding of mitotic chromosomes. We identified the Y-chromosomal breakpoints in Y-autosome translocations using FISH. Even more complex rearrangements i.e. deletions and insertions in some translocation strains were detected by this method. A strategy for mapping the primary sex determination factor in Ceratitis capitata by FISH is presented. (author)

  19. Chromosome microdissection and cloning in human genome and genetic disease analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Faten; Yu, Jingwei

    1991-01-01

    A procedure has been described for microdissection and microcloning of human chromosomal DNA sequences in which universal amplification of the dissected fragments by Mbo I linker adaptor and polymerase chain reaction is used. A very large library comprising 700,000 recombinant plasmid microclones from 30 dissected chromosomes of human chromosome 21 was constructed. Colony hybridization showed that 42% of the clones contained repetitive sequences and 58% contained single or low-copy sequences. The insert sizes generated by complete Mbo I cleavage ranged from 50 to 1,100 base pairs with a mean of 416 base pairs. Southern blot analysis of microclones from the library confirmed their human origin and chromosome 21 specificity. Some of these clones have also been regionally mapped to specific sites of chromosome 21 by using a regional mapping panel of cell hybrids. This chromosome microtechnology can generate large numbers of microclones with unique sequences from defined chromosomal regions and can be used for processes such as (i) isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones with large inserts, (ii) screening various cDNA libraries for isolating expressed sequences, and (iii) constructing region-specific libraries of the entire human genome. The studies described here demonstrate the power of this technology for high-resolution genome analysis and explicate their use in an efficient search for disease-associated genes localized to specific chromosomal regions

  20. Chromosome Characteristic of Peranakan Etawa (PE) Goat (Capra hircus Linn.) as Indonesian Local Breed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, A. R. I.; Ciptadi, G.; Warih, A. P.

    2018-02-01

    Chromosome characteristics of Peranakan Etawa (PE) goat needs to be analyzed because information about Indonesian goat races is very limited. The purpose of this research was to determine the characteristics of PE goat chromosome as basic data as one of the genetic local resources. Blood was collected from pair of PE goat at Sumber Sekar Field Laboratory, Faculty of Animal Husbandry, Brawijaya University, Malang. Blood cultured using standard cytogenetic technique and stained with G-Banding. Observations being done in metaphase cells and analyzed using Genus Cytovision Image. Chromosomes arranged and numbered by standard goat karyotype. The result of this research showed that PE goat had number of chromosomes 2n=60, consisting of 29 pairs of autosome and a pair of sex chromosomes. Female goat had average of total length (TL) of autosome ranged from 47.91 µm±6.46 to 22.12 µm±3.33. TL of chromosome X are 45.96 µm±4,59 and 44.45 µm±3,96. Centromeric index (Ci) of chromosome X, 31,74 and 32,80. PE goat had average of TL of autosome ranged from 58.20µm±6.72 to 18.97µm±2.82. TL of chromosome X is 56,42µm±7,38 and Y chromosome is 15,80 µm±3,24. Ci in chromosome X and Y are 19.34 and 46.84. These results concluded that the total of goat chromosome was 60 with types of autosomal chromosomes were acrocentric as many as 58 chromosomes and pair of sex chromosomes XX and XY, X classified as subtelocentric and Y submetacentric.

  1. An expert image analysis system for chromosome analysis application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.; Suetens, P.; Oosterlinck, A.; Van den Berghe, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports a recent study on applying a knowledge-based system approach as a new attempt to solve the problem of chromosome classification. A theoretical framework of an expert image analysis system is proposed, based on such a study. In this scheme, chromosome classification can be carried out under a hypothesize-and-verify paradigm, by integrating a rule-based component, in which the expertise of chromosome karyotyping is formulated with an existing image analysis system which uses conventional pattern recognition techniques. Results from the existing system can be used to bring in hypotheses, and with the rule-based verification and modification procedures, improvement of the classification performance can be excepted

  2. New trends and techniques in chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: automation of chromosome analysis; storage of fixed cells from cultures of lymphocytes obtained routinely during periodic employee medical examinations; analysis of banded chromosomes; identification of first division metaphases; sister chromatid exchange; and patterns of aberration induction

  3. Correspondence: chromosomal localization of uv-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berliner, J.; Mello, R.S.; Norman, A.

    1976-01-01

    We have measured the grain density - the number of grains per unit length - over the centromere and noncentromere regions of metaphase chromosomes in autoradiographs of human lymphocytes. When the chromosomes were labeled in G 0 by uv-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis, the grain density was two to four times larger over the centromere than over the noncentromere regions. When the labeling was done by scheduled DNA synthesis in S or unscheduled synthesis in M, the grain densities were approximately equal over both regions

  4. Flow Analysis and Sorting of Plant Chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Šimková, Hana; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Čížková, Jana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, Oct 10 (2016), 5.3.1-5.3.43 ISSN 1934-9300 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : cell cycle synchronization * chromosome genomics * chromosome isolation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko; Omori, Hiroko; Ueda, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy–electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. - Highlights: • This is the first report showing LANA dots on mitotic chromosomes by fluorescent microscopy followed by electron microscopy. • LANA dots localized randomly on condensed chromosomes other than centromere/pericentromere and telomere/peritelomre. • Cellular mitotic checkpoint should not be always involved in the segregation of KSHV genomes in the latency.

  6. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko [Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Omori, Hiroko [Central Instrumentation Laboratory Research Institute for Microbial Diseases (BIKEN), Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueda, Keiji, E-mail: kueda@virus.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy–electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. - Highlights: • This is the first report showing LANA dots on mitotic chromosomes by fluorescent microscopy followed by electron microscopy. • LANA dots localized randomly on condensed chromosomes other than centromere/pericentromere and telomere/peritelomre. • Cellular mitotic checkpoint should not be always involved in the segregation of KSHV genomes in the latency.

  7. Chromosomal Localization of DNA Amplifications in Neuroblastoma Tumors Using cDNA Microarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Beheshti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH profiling of neuroblastomas has identified many genomic aberrations, although the limited resolution has precluded a precise localization of sequences of interest within amplicons. To map high copy number genomic gains in clinically matched stage IV neuroblastomas, CGH analysis using a 19,200-feature cDNA microarray was used. A dedicated (freely available algorithm was developed for rapid in silico determination of chromosomal localizations of microarray cDNA targets, and for generation of an ideogram-type profile of copy number changes. Using these methodologies, novel gene amplifications undetectable by chromosome CGH were identified, and larger MYCN amplicon sizes (in one tumor up to 6 Mb than those previously reported in neuroblastoma were identified. The genes HPCAL1, LPIN1/KIAA0188, NAG, and NSE1/LOC151354 were found to be coamplified with MYCN. To determine whether stage IV primary tumors could be further subclassified based on their genomic copy number profiles, hierarchical clustering was performed. Cluster analysis of microarray CGH data identified three groups: 1 no amplifications evident, 2 a small MYCN amplicon as the only detectable imbalance, and 3 a large MYCN amplicon with additional gene amplifications. Application of CGH to cDNA microarray targets will help to determine both the variation of amplicon size and help better define amplification-dependent and independent pathways of progression in neuroblastoma.

  8. Major Chromosomal Breakpoint Intervals in Breast Cancer Co-Localize with Differentially Methylated Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Tang, Man-Hung [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY (United States); Department of Oncology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Varadan, Vinay; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan [Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States); Zhang, Michael Q. [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY (United States); The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Dimitrova, Nevenka, E-mail: nevenka.dimitrova@philips.com [Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States); Hicks, James, E-mail: hicks@cshl.edu [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY (United States)

    2012-12-27

    Solid tumors exhibit chromosomal rearrangements resulting in gain or loss of multiple chromosomal loci (copy number variation, or CNV), and translocations that occasionally result in the creation of novel chimeric genes. In the case of breast cancer, although most individual tumors each have unique CNV landscape, the breakpoints, as measured over large datasets, appear to be non-randomly distributed in the genome. Breakpoints show a significant regional concentration at genomic loci spanning perhaps several megabases. The proximal cause of these breakpoint concentrations is a subject of speculation, but is, as yet, largely unknown. To shed light on this issue, we have performed a bio-statistical analysis on our previously published data for a set of 119 breast tumors and normal controls (Wiedswang et al., 2003), where each sample has both high-resolution CNV and methylation data. The method examined the distribution of closeness of breakpoint regions with differentially methylated regions (DMR), coupled with additional genomic parameters, such as repeat elements and designated “fragile sites” in the reference genome. Through this analysis, we have identified a set of 93 regional loci called breakpoint enriched DMR (BEDMRs) characterized by altered DNA methylation in cancer compared to normal cells that are associated with frequent breakpoint concentrations within a distance of 1 Mb. BEDMR loci are further associated with local hypomethylation (66%), concentrations of the Alu SINE repeats within 3 Mb (35% of the cases), and tend to occur near a number of cancer related genes such as the protocadherins, AKT1, DUB3, GAB2. Furthermore, BEDMRs seem to deregulate members of the histone gene family and chromatin remodeling factors, e.g., JMJD1B, which might affect the chromatin structure and disrupt coordinate signaling and repair. From this analysis we propose that preference for chromosomal breakpoints is related to genome structure coupled with alterations in DNA

  9. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the three human syntrophin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feener, C.A.; Anderson, M.D.S.; Selig, S. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Dystrophin, the protein product the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus, is normally found to be associated with a complex of proteins. Among these dystrophin-associated proteins are the syntrophins, a group of 59 kDa membrane-associated proteins. When the syntrophins are purified based upon their association with dystrophin, they have been shown previously to form two distinct groups, the acidic ({alpha}) and basic ({beta}) forms. Based on peptide and rodent cDNA sequences, three separate syntrophin genes have been cloned and characterized from human tissues. The predicted amino acid sequences from these cDNA reveal that these proteins are related but are distinct with respect to charge, as predicted from their biochemistry. The family consists of one acidic ({alpha}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-1) and two basic ({beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin; and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-2) genes. Each of the three genes are widely expressed in a variety of human tissues, but the relative abundance of the three are unique with respect to each other. {alpha}-syntrophin is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle and heart as a single transcript. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin is expressed widely in up to five distinct transcript sizes, and is most abundant in brain. The human chromosomal locations of the three syntrophins are currently being mapped. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin maps to chromosome 8q23-24 and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin to chromosome 16. The {alpha}-syntrophin gene will be mapped accordingly. Although all three genes are candidates for neuromuscular diseases, the predominant expression of {alpha}-syntrophin in skeletal muscle and heart makes it a strong candidate to be involved in a neuromuscular disease.

  10. Chromosome aberrations analysis of Serbia population from 1985 to 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovicic, D.; Markovic, B.; Milacic, S.; Joksic, G.

    1996-01-01

    After the accident of NE Chernobyl in May 1986, Chernobyl's fallout with unhomogeneous dispersion of radioactive material in atmosphere caused the difference in contamination of the Serbia territory. The highest contamination was found to be in region Uzice, and the lowest in the region Nis. Two groups of population from these regions were undergone chromosome aberration analysis during 1987, 1988 and 1989. year. The results of our examination show increased frequency of structural chromosome aberrations/dicentrics, rings, peri centric inversions and acentric/ in the Uzice population, especially in the 1987. year. In 1985 and 1995 year have not been found chromosome aberrations. 2 refs.; 1 figs.; 2 tabs

  11. Localization of the panhypopituitary dwarf mutation (df) on mouse chromosome 11 in an intersubspecific backcross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckwalter, M S; Katz, R W; Camper, S A

    1991-07-01

    Ames dwarf (df) is an autosomal recessive mutation characterized by severe dwarfism and infertility. This mutation provides a mouse model for panhypopituitarism. The dwarf phenotype results from failure in the differentiation of the cells which produce growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone. Using the backcross (DF/B-df/df X CASA/Rk) X DF/B-df/df, we confirmed the assignment of df to mouse chromosome 11 and demonstrated recombination between df and the growth hormone gene. This backcross is an invaluable resource for screening candidate genes for the df mutation. The df locus maps to less than 1 cM distal to Pad-1 (0.85 +/- 0.85 cM). Two new genes localized on mouse chromosome 11, Rpo2-1, and Edp-1, map to a region of conserved synteny with human chromosome 17. The localization of the alpha 1 adrenergic receptor, Adra-1, extends a known region of synteny conservation between mouse chromosome 11 and human chromosome 5, and suggests that a human counterpart to df would map to human chromosome 5.

  12. Cell array-based intracellular localization screening reveals novel functional features of human chromosome 21 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlem Pascal

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Chr21 results in Down's syndrome, a complex developmental and neurodegenerative disease. Molecular analysis of Down's syndrome, however, poses a particular challenge, because the aneuploid region of Chr21 contains many genes of unknown function. Subcellular localization of human Chr21 proteins may contribute to further understanding of the functions and regulatory mechanisms of the genes that code for these proteins. Following this idea, we used a transfected-cell array technique to perform a rapid and cost-effective analysis of the intracellular distribution of Chr 21 proteins. Results We chose 89 genes that were distributed over the majority of 21q, ranging from RBM11 (14.5 Mb to MCM3AP (46.6 Mb, with part of them expressed aberrantly in the Down's syndrome mouse model. Open reading frames of these genes were cloned into a mammalian expression vector with an amino-terminal His6 tag. All of the constructs were arrayed on glass slides and reverse transfected into HEK293T cells for protein expression. Co-localization detection using a set of organelle markers was carried out for each Chr21 protein. Here, we report the subcellular localization properties of 52 proteins. For 34 of these proteins, their localization is described for the first time. Furthermore, the alteration in cell morphology and growth as a result of protein over-expression for claudin-8 and claudin-14 genes has been characterized. Conclusion The cell array-based protein expression and detection approach is a cost-effective platform for large-scale functional analyses, including protein subcellular localization and cell phenotype screening. The results from this study reveal novel functional features of human Chr21 proteins, which should contribute to further understanding of the molecular pathology of Down's syndrome.

  13. Biological dosimetry: chromosomal aberration analysis for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In view of the growing importance of chromosomal aberration analysis as a biological dosimeter, the present report provides a concise summary of the scientific background of the subject and a comprehensive source of information at the technical level. After a review of the basic principles of radiation dosimetry and radiation biology basic information on the biology of lymphocytes, the structure of chromosomes and the classification of chromosomal aberrations are presented. This is followed by a presentation of techniques for collecting blood, storing, transporting, culturing, making chromosomal preparations and scaring of aberrations. The physical and statistical parameters involved in dose assessment are discussed and examples of actual dose assessments taken from the scientific literature are given

  14. Establishing working standards of chromosome aberrations analysis for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui Thi Kim Luyen; Tran Que; Pham Ngoc Duy; Nguyen Thi Kim Anh; Ha Thi Ngoc Lien

    2015-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is an dose assessment method using specify bio markers of radiation. IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) defined that dicentric chromosome is specify for radiation, it is a gold standard for biodosimetry. Along with the documents published by IAEA, WHO, ISO and OECD, our results of study on the chromosome aberrations induced by radiation were organized systematically in nine standards that dealing with chromosome aberration test and micronucleus test in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. This standard addresses: the reference dose-effect for dose estimation, the minimum detection levels, cell culture, slide preparation, scoring procedure for chromosome aberrations use for biodosimetry, the criteria for converting aberration frequency into absorbed dose, reporting of results. Following these standards, the automatic analysis devices were calibrated for improving biological dosimetry method. This standard will be used to acquire and maintain accreditation of the Biological Dosimetry laboratory in Nuclear Research Institute. (author)

  15. Preparation and Fluorescent Analysis of Plant Metaphase Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Good preparations are essential for informative analysis of both somatic and meiotic chromosomes, cytogenetics, and cell divisions. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized and counted, showing their morphology. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, populations, or individuals while changes occurring in breeding lines during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols can be assessed. The process of division can be followed during mitosis and meiosis including pairing and chiasma distribution, as well as DNA organization and structure during the evolution of chromosomes can be studied. This chapter presents protocols for pretreatment and fixation of material, including tips of how to grow plants to get good and healthy meristem with many divisions. The chromosome preparation technique is described using proteolytic enzymes, but acids can be used instead. Chromosome slide preparations are suitable for fluorochrome staining for fast screening (described in the chapter) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (see Schwarzacher and Heslop-Harrison, In situ hybridization. BIOS Scientific Publishers, Oxford, 2000).

  16. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Correlation between chromosome 9p21 locus deletion and prognosis in clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Érika Aparecida Felix de; Pontes-Junior, José; Reis, Sabrina Thalita; Lima, Amanda Eunice Ramos; Souza, Isida C; Salgueiro, Jose Lucas; Fontes, Douglas; Dellê, Humberto; Coelho, Rafael Ferreira; Viana, Nayara Izabel; Leite, Kátia Ramos Moreira; Nahas, William C; Srougi, Miguel

    2017-05-04

    Some studies have reported that deletions at chromosome arm 9p occur frequently and represent a critical step in carcinogenesis of some neoplasms. Our aim was to evaluate the deletion of locus 9p21 and chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 in localized prostate cancer (PC) and correlate these alterations with prognostic factors and biochemical recurrence after surgery. We retrospectively evaluated surgical specimens from 111 patients with localized PC who underwent radical prostatectomy. Biochemical recurrence was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >0.2 ng/mL and the mean postoperative follow-up was 123 months. The deletions were evaluated using fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric and locus-specific probes in a tissue microarray containing 2 samples from each patient. We correlated the occurrence of any deletion with pathological stage, Gleason score, ISUP grade group, PSA and biochemical recurrence. We observed a loss of any probe in only 8 patients (7.2%). The most common deletion was the loss of locus 9p21, which occurred in 6.4% of cases. Deletions of chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 were observed in 2.3%, 1.2% and 1.8% patients, respectively. There was no correlation between chromosome loss and Gleason score, ISUP, PSA or stage. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 83% cases involving 9p21 deletions. Loss of 9p21 locus was significantly associated with time to recurrence (p = 0.038). We found low rates of deletion in chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 and 9p21 locus. We observed that 9p21 locus deletion was associated with worse prognosis in localized PC treated by radical prostatectomy.

  18. [Chromosomal localization of foreign genes in transgenic mice using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dan; Gong, Xiu-li; Li, Wei; Guo, Xin-bing; Zhu, Yi-wen; Huang, Ying

    2008-02-01

    To establish a highly sensitive and specific dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) method used for chromosomal localization of foreign genes in double transgenic mice. Two strains of double transgenic mice were used in this experiment, one was integrated with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP), the other was with the short hairpin RNA interference(RNAi) and beta(654). Splenic cells cultured in vitro were arrested in metaphase by colchicine and hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled and biotinylated DNA probes, then detected by rhodamine-conjugated avidin and FITC-conjugated anti-digoxigenin. Dual-color fluorescence signals were detected on the same metaphase in both transgenic mice strains. In HSV-tk/eGFP double transgenic mice, strong green fluorescence for HSV-tk and red for eGFP were observed and localized at 2E5-G3 and 8A2-A4 respectively. In beta(654)/RNAi mice, beta(654) was detected as red fluorescence on chromosome 7D3-E2, and RNAi showed random integration on chromosomes. It was detected as green fluorescence on chromosome 12B1 in one mouse, while on 1E2.3-1F and 3A3 in the other. Highly sensitive and specific D-FISH method was established using the self-prepared DNA probes, and chromosomal localization of the foreign genes was also performed in combination with G-banding in double transgenic mice. This technology will facilitate the researches in transgenic animals and gene therapy models.

  19. Chromosome aberration analysis based on a beta-binomial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, Masanori; Prentice, R.L.

    1983-10-01

    Analyses carried out here generalized on earlier studies of chromosomal aberrations in the populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by allowing extra-binomial variation in aberrant cell counts corresponding to within-subject correlations in cell aberrations. Strong within-subject correlations were detected with corresponding standard errors for the average number of aberrant cells that were often substantially larger than was previously assumed. The extra-binomial variation is accomodated in the analysis in the present report, as described in the section on dose-response models, by using a beta-binomial (B-B) variance structure. It is emphasized that we have generally satisfactory agreement between the observed and the B-B fitted frequencies by city-dose category. The chromosomal aberration data considered here are not extensive enough to allow a precise discrimination between competing dose-response models. A quadratic gamma ray and linear neutron model, however, most closely fits the chromosome data. (author)

  20. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Castano, S.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1990-01-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y =α + β 1 D + β 2 D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs

  1. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navlet Armenta, J.M.; Gonzalez, S.; Silva, A.

    1990-01-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haemathological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study of chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 o C has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y = α+β 1 D+β 2 D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author)

  2. Genetic Analysis of Eight X-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    X-Chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) typing can complement existing DNA profiling protocols and can also offer useful information in cases of complex kinship analysis. This is the first population study of 8 X-linked STRs in Iraq. The purpose of this work was to provide a basic data of allele and haplotype frequency for ...

  3. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome- specific EST sequences. Chuan-Liang Deng, Wei-Li Zhang, Ying Cao, Shao-Jing Wang, ... Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA for mitochondrial half-ABC transporter (STA1 gene). 389 2.31E-13. 98.96. SP3−12. Betula pendula histidine kinase 3 (HK3) mRNA, ...

  4. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CB Toaldo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70 and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity observed among strains from Brazil, the molecular karyotype of all T. rangeli strains analyzed revealed extensive chromosome polymorphism. In addition, it was possible to distinguish T. rangeli from T. cruzi by the chromosomal DNA electrophoresis pattern. The localization of ß-tubulin genes revealed differences among T. rangeli strains and confirmed the similarity between the isolates from Brazil. Hybridization assays using probes directed to the cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin genes discriminated T. rangeli from T. cruzi, proving that these genes are useful molecular markers for the differential diagnosis between these two species. Numerical analysis based on the molecular karyotype data revealed a high degree of polymorphism among T. rangeli strains isolated from southern Brazil and strains isolated from Central and the northern South America. The T. cruzi reference strain was not clustered with any T. rangeli strain.

  5. Identification and chromosomal localization of the monkey retrotransposon in Mesa sp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balint-Kurti, P.; Clendennen, S.; Doleželová, Marie; Valárik, Miroslav; Doležel, Jaroslav; Beetham, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 263, č. 6 (2000), s. 908-915 ISSN 0026-8925 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV521/96/K117; GA AV ČR IAA5020803; GA MŠk ME 376 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : In situ hybridization * chromosomal localization * monkey retrotransposon Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.462, year: 2000

  6. Karyotyping and in situ chromosomal localization of rDNA sites in black cumin Bunium persicum (Boiss B. Fedtsch,1915 (Apiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Chahota

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH technique has been applied to somatic chromosomes in the medicinally important species, Bunium persicum, to elucidate its karyotypes. The bicolour FISH technique involving 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S ribosomal RNA genes as probes was used to assign physical localization and measurement of rDNA sites on homologous pairs of chromosomes. The two 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA gene sites were at the terminal regions of the short arms of the chromosomes 1 and 2 involving NOR region of chromosome 1. The 5S rDNA sites were found on subtelomeric region of the long arm of the chromosome number 5 and at interstitial regions of the short arm of chromosome 7. Based on direct visual analysis of chromosome length, morphology and position of FISH signals, a pioneer attempt has been made to construct metaphase karyotype in B. persicum, an endangered medicinal plant of North Western Himalayas.

  7. Chromosomal and regional localization of the loci for IGKC, IGGC, ALDB, HOXB, GPT, and PRNP in the American mink (Mustela vison): comparisons with human and mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khlebodarova, TM; Malchenko, Sergey; Matveeva, NM

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal localization of the genes for gamma- and kappa-immunoglobulins (IGGC and IGKC, respectively), aldolase B (ALDB), prion protein (PRNP), homeo box B (HOXB), and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) were determined with the use of mink-rodent hybrid cells. Analysis of segregation...

  8. Molecular organization and chromosomal localization of 5S rDNA in Amazonian Engystomops (Anura, Leiuperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Débora Silva; Rivera, Miryan; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni

    2012-03-20

    For anurans, knowledge of 5S rDNA is scarce. For Engystomops species, chromosomal homeologies are difficult to recognize due to the high level of inter- and intraspecific cytogenetic variation. In an attempt to better compare the karyotypes of the Amazonian species Engystomops freibergi and Engystomops petersi, and to extend the knowledge of 5S rDNA organization in anurans, the 5S rDNA sequences of Amazonian Engystomops species were isolated, characterized, and mapped. Two types of 5S rDNA, which were readily differentiated by their NTS (non-transcribed spacer) sizes and compositions, were isolated from specimens of E. freibergi from Brazil and E. petersi from two Ecuadorian localities (Puyo and Yasuní). In the E. freibergi karyotypes, the entire type I 5S rDNA repeating unit hybridized to the pericentromeric region of 3p, whereas the entire type II 5S rDNA repeating unit mapped to the distal region of 6q, suggesting a differential localization of these sequences. The type I NTS probe clearly detected the 3p pericentromeric region in the karyotypes of E. freibergi and E. petersi from Puyo and the 5p pericentromeric region in the karyotype of E. petersi from Yasuní, but no distal or interstitial signals were observed. Interestingly, this probe also detected many centromeric regions in the three karyotypes, suggesting the presence of a satellite DNA family derived from 5S rDNA. The type II NTS probe detected only distal 6q regions in the three karyotypes, corroborating the differential distribution of the two types of 5S rDNA. Because the 5S rDNA types found in Engystomops are related to those of Physalaemus with respect to their nucleotide sequences and chromosomal locations, their origin likely preceded the evolutionary divergence of these genera. In addition, our data indicated homeology between Chromosome 5 in E. petersi from Yasuní and Chromosomes 3 in E. freibergi and E. petersi from Puyo. In addition, the chromosomal location of the type II 5S r

  9. Evaluation of an automated karyotyping system for chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prichard, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome aberration analysis is a promising complement to conventional radiation dosimetry, particularly in the complex radiation fields encountered in the space environment. The capabilities of a recently developed automated karyotyping system were evaluated both to determine current capabilities and limitations and to suggest areas where future development should be emphasized. Cells exposed to radiometric chemicals and to photon and particulate radiation were evaluated by manual inspection and by automated karyotyping. It was demonstrated that the evaluated programs were appropriate for image digitization, storage, and transmission. However, automated and semi-automated scoring techniques must be advanced significantly if in-flight chromosome aberration analysis is to be practical. A degree of artificial intelligence may be necessary to realize this goal

  10. Delineation and analysis of chromosomal regions specifying Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbise, Anne; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Huon, Christèle; Fayolle, Corinne; Demeure, Christian E; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Médigue, Claudine; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2010-09-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has recently diverged from the less virulent enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Its emergence has been characterized by massive genetic loss and inactivation and limited gene acquisition. The acquired genes include two plasmids, a filamentous phage, and a few chromosomal loci. The aim of this study was to characterize the chromosomal regions acquired by Y. pestis. Following in silico comparative analysis and PCR screening of 98 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis, we found that eight chromosomal loci (six regions [R1pe to R6pe] and two coding sequences [CDS1pe and CDS2pe]) specified Y. pestis. Signatures of integration by site specific or homologous recombination were identified for most of them. These acquisitions and the loss of ancestral DNA sequences were concentrated in a chromosomal region opposite to the origin of replication. The specific regions were acquired very early during Y. pestis evolution and were retained during its microevolution, suggesting that they might bring some selective advantages. Only one region (R3pe), predicted to carry a lambdoid prophage, is most likely no longer functional because of mutations. With the exception of R1pe and R2pe, which have the potential to encode a restriction/modification and a sugar transport system, respectively, no functions could be predicted for the other Y. pestis-specific loci. To determine the role of the eight chromosomal loci in the physiology and pathogenicity of the plague bacillus, each of them was individually deleted from the bacterial chromosome. None of the deletants exhibited defects during growth in vitro. Using the Xenopsylla cheopis flea model, all deletants retained the capacity to produce a stable and persistent infection and to block fleas. Similarly, none of the deletants caused any acute flea toxicity. In the mouse model of infection, all deletants were fully virulent upon subcutaneous or aerosol infections. Therefore

  11. Delimiting the origin of a B chromosome by FISH mapping, chromosome painting and DNA sequence analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duílio M Z de A Silva

    Full Text Available Supernumerary (B chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism.

  12. Automatic Metaphase Finding by Inter-Chromosome Extrema Profile Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vega-Alvarado, Leticia

    2001-01-01

    ...-level inter-chromosome coarseness features in microscopic images of metaphase spreads, and allows to quantity the texture of the cytological objects analysing the intensity profile between chromosome...

  13. Radiation dosimetry by automatic image analysis of dicentric chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayley, R.; Carothers, A.; Farrow, S.; Gordon, J.; Ji, L.; Piper, J.; Rutovitz, D.; Stark, M.; Chen, X.; Wald, N.; Pittsburgh Univ., PA

    1991-01-01

    A system for scoring dicentric chromosomes by image analysis comprised fully automatic location of mitotic cells, automatic retrieval, focus and digitisation at high resolution, automatic rejection of nuclei and debris and detection and segmentation of chromosome clusters, automatic centromere location, and subsequent rapid interactive visual review of potential dicentric chromosomes to confirm positives and reject false positives. A calibration set of about 15000 cells was used to establish the quadratic dose response for 60 Co γ-irradiation. The dose-response function parameters were established by a maximum likelihood technique, and confidence limits in the dose response and in the corresponding inverse curve, of estimated dose for observed dicentric frequency, were established by Monte Carlo techniques. The system was validated in a blind trial by analysing a test comprising a total of about 8000 cells irradiated to 1 of 10 dose levels, and estimating the doses from the observed dicentric frequency. There was a close correspondence between the estimated and true doses. The overall sensitivity of the system in terms of the proportion of the total population of dicentrics present in the cells analysed that were detected by the system was measured to be about 40%. This implies that about 2.5 times more cells must be analysed by machine than by visual analysis. Taking this factor into account, the measured review time and false positive rates imply that analysis by the system of sufficient cells to provide the equivalent of a visual analysis of 500 cells would require about 1 h for operator review. (author). 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  14. Molecular cloning of a cDNA and chromosomal localization of a human theta-class glutathione S-transferase gene (GSTT2) to chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.L.; Baker, R.T.; Board, P.G. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    Until recently the Theta-class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were largely overlooked due to their low activity with the model substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and their failure to bind to immobilized glutathione affinity matrices. Little is known about the number of genes in this class. Recently, Pemble et al. reported the cDNA cloning of a human Theta-class GST, termed GSTT1. In this study, we describe the molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding a second human Theta-class GST (GSTT2) from a {lambda}gt11 human liver 5{prime}-stretch cDNA library. The encoded protein contains 244 amino acids and has 78.3% sequence identity with the rat subunit 12 and only 55.0% identity with human GSTT1. GSTT2 has been mapped to chromosome 22 by somatic cell hybrid analysis. The precise position of the gene was localized to subband 22q11.2 by in situ hybridization. The absence of other regions of hybridization suggests that there are no closely related sequences (e.g., reverse transcribed pseudogenes) scattered throughout the genome and that if there are closely related genes, they must be clustered near GSTT2. Southern blot analysis of human DNA digested with BamHI shows that the size of the GSTT2 gene is relatively small, as the coding sequence falls within a 3.6-kb BamHI fragment. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Reproductive isolation and local adaptation quantified for a chromosome inversion in a malaria mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Diego; Guerrero, Rafael F; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Chromosome inversions have long been thought to be involved in speciation and local adaptation. We have little quantitative information, however, about the effects that inversion polymorphisms have on reproductive isolation and viability. Here we provide the first estimates from any organism for the total amount of reproductive isolation associated with an inversion segregating in natural populations. We sampled chromosomes from 751 mosquitoes of the malaria vector Anopheles funestus along a 1421 km transect in Cameroon that traverses savannah, highland, and rainforest ecological zones. We then developed a series of population genetic models that account for selection, migration, and assortative mating, and fit the models to the data using likelihood. Results from the best-fit models suggest there is strong local adaptation, with relative viabilities of homozygotes ranging from 25% to 130% compared to heterozygotes. Viabilities vary qualitatively between regions: the inversion is underdominant in the savannah, whereas in the highlands it is overdominant. The inversion is also implicated in strong assortative mating. In the savannah, the two homozygote forms show 92% reproductive isolation, suggesting that this one inversion can generate most of the genetic barriers needed for speciation. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Chromosome aberration analysis for biological dosimetry: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.F.D.; Venkatachalam, P.; Jeevanram, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Among various biological dosimetry techniques, dicentric chromosome aberration method appears to be the method of choice in analysing accidental radiation exposure in most of the laboratories. The major advantage of this method is its sensitivity as the number of dicentric chromosomes present in control population is too small and more importantly radiation induces mainly dicentric chromosome aberration among unstable aberration. This report brings out the historical development of various cytogenetic methods, the basic structure of DNA, chromosomes and different forms of chromosome aberrations. It also highlights the construction of dose-response curve for dicentric chromosome and its use in the estimation of radiation dose. (author)

  17. Human placental Na+, K+-ATPase α subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na + , K + -ATPase α subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the α subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na + , K + -ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (≅ 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) λgt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the α subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1

  18. Structural analysis of γ radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations observed by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Shuang; Chen Ying; Ge Shili; Liu Xiulin; Zhou Pingkun; Zhang Sa; Zhang Detian

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To find a new method for the measurement of radiation-induced damage, the structures of normal chromosomes and 60 Co γ-ray-induced chromosomal aberration were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Methods: Normal and irradiated chromosomes of human peripheral blood lymphocytes were prepared, then three-dimensional structure and height of chromosomes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Results: Three-dimensional structures of normal chromosomes and dicentric aberration in irradiated chromosomes were observed clearly. The data of chromosome height were helpful to recognizing the dicentric aberrations. Conclusion: Atomic force microscopy providing three-dimension image and linear measurement is a new and valuable tool for structural analysis of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations

  19. Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A interacts with primary microcephaly protein ASPM, localizes to centrosomes and regulates chromosome segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Singhmar

    Full Text Available Many proteins associated with the phenotype microcephaly have been localized to the centrosome or linked to it functionally. All the seven autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH proteins localize at the centrosome. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II protein PCNT and Seckel syndrome (also characterized by severe microcephaly protein ATR are also centrosomal proteins. All of the above findings show the importance of centrosomal proteins as the key players in neurogenesis and brain development. However, the exact mechanism as to how the loss-of-function of these proteins leads to microcephaly remains to be elucidated. To gain insight into the function of the most commonly mutated MCPH gene ASPM, we used the yeast two-hybrid technique to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library with an ASPM bait. The analysis identified Angelman syndrome gene product UBE3A as an ASPM interactor. Like ASPM, UBE3A also localizes to the centrosome. The identification of UBE3A as an ASPM interactor is not surprising as more than 80% of Angelman syndrome patients have microcephaly. However, unlike in MCPH, microcephaly is postnatal in Angelman syndrome patients. Our results show that UBE3A is a cell cycle regulated protein and its level peaks in mitosis. The shRNA knockdown of UBE3A in HEK293 cells led to many mitotic abnormalities including chromosome missegregation, abnormal cytokinesis and apoptosis. Thus our study links Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A to ASPM, centrosome and mitosis for the first time. We suggest that a defective chromosome segregation mechanism is responsible for the development of microcephaly in Angelman syndrome.

  20. Localization of the Laevigatum powdery mildew resistance gene to barley chromosome 2 by the use of RFLP markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.; Holm-Jensen, A.G.; Jensen, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The powdery mildew disease resistance gene Ml(La) was found to belong to a locus on barely chromosome 2. We suggest that this locus be designated MlLa. Linkage analysis was carried out on 72 chromosome-doubled, spring-type progeny lines from a cross between the winter var 'Vogelsanger Gold' and t......' and the spring var 'Alf'. A map of chromosome 2 spanning 119 cM and flanked by two peroxidase gene loci was constructed. In addition to the Laevigatum resistance locus the map includes nine RFLP markers, the two peroxidase gene loci and the six-row locus in barley....

  1. 40 CFR 798.5385 - In vivo mammalian bone marrow cytogenetics tests: Chromosomal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Genetic Toxicity § 798.5385 In vivo mammalian bone marrow cytogenetics tests: Chromosomal analysis. (a... chosen for the test. Slides shall be coded before microscopic analysis. (f) Data and report—(1) Treatment... cytogenetics tests: Chromosomal analysis. 798.5385 Section 798.5385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  2. Deep functional analysis of synII, a 770 kb synthetic yeast chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Yue; Wang, Yun; Chen, Tai; Gao, Feng; Gong, Jianhui; Abramczyk, Dariusz; Walker, Roy; Zhao, Hongcui; Chen, Shihong; Liu, Wei; Luo, Yisha; Müller, Carolin A.; Paul-Dubois-Taine, Adrien; Alver, Bonnie; Stracquadanio, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Herein we report the successful design, construction and characterization of a 770 kb synthetic yeast chromosome II (synII). Our study incorporates characterization at multiple levels, including phenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, chromosome segregation and replication analysis to provide a thorough and comprehensive analysis of a synthetic chromosome. Our “Trans-Omics” analyses reveal a modest but potentially significant pervasive up-regulation of translational machinery observed in synI...

  3. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1...... using death (P = 0.015) and recurrence (P = 0.002) as outcome. The combined mutation score is strongly associated to upregulation of several growth factor pathways....

  4. Chromosomes in the flow to simplify genome analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Šafář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2012), s. 397-416 ISSN 1438-793X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1740; GA ČR GAP501/10/1778 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Chromosome sorting * Chromosome-specific BAC libraries * Chromosome sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2012

  5. [Molecular cytogenetic analysis of a case with ring chromosome 3 syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihui; Song, Fengling; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Ying; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yufeng; Liu, Yi; Gai, Zhongtao

    2016-12-10

    To investigate the genetic cause for a child with developmental delay and congenital heart disease through molecular cytogenetic analysis. G-banded karyotyping and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) were performed for the patient and his parents. The proband's karyotype was detected as ring chromosome 3, and a 3q26.3-25.3 deletion encompassing 45 genes has been found with CMA. Testing of both parents was normal. Clinical phenotype of the patient with ring chromosome 3 mainly depends on the involved genes. It is necessary to combine CMA and karyotyping for the diagnosis of ring chromosome, as CMA can provide more accurate information for variations of the genome.

  6. Regional localization of DNA probes on the short arm of chromosome 11 using aniridia-Wilms' tumor-associated deletions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Slater, R. M.; Heyting, C.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Goedde-Salz, E.; Frants, R. R.; van Ommen, G. J.; Pearson, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    We are interested in the precise localization of various DNA probes on the short arm of chromosome 11 for our research on the aniridia-Wilms' tumor association (AWTA), assigned to region 11p13 (Knudson and Strong 1972; Riccardi et al. 1978). For this purpose we have screened lymphocyte DNA and

  7. Computer aided analysis of additional chromosome aberrations in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia using a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohr Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of complex cytogenetic databases of distinct leukaemia entities may help to detect rare recurring chromosome aberrations, minimal common regions of gains and losses, and also hot spots of genomic rearrangements. The patterns of the karyotype alterations may provide insights into the genetic pathways of disease progression. Results We developed a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation (SCCN by which chromosome findings are normalised at a resolution of 400 bands. Lost or gained chromosomes or chromosome segments are specified in detail, and ranges of chromosome breakpoint assignments are recorded. Software modules were written to summarise the recorded chromosome changes with regard to the respective chromosome involvement. To assess the degree of karyotype alterations the ploidy levels and numbers of numerical and structural changes were recorded separately, and summarised in a complex karyotype aberration score (CKAS. The SCCN and CKAS were used to analyse the extend and the spectrum of additional chromosome aberrations in 94 patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and secondary chromosome anomalies. Dosage changes of chromosomal material represented 92.1% of all additional events. Recurring regions of chromosome losses were identified. Structural rearrangements affecting (pericentromeric chromosome regions were recorded in 24.6% of the cases. Conclusions SCCN and CKAS provide unifying elements between karyotypes and computer processable data formats. They proved to be useful in the investigation of additional chromosome aberrations in Ph-positive ALL, and may represent a step towards full automation of the analysis of large and complex karyotype databases.

  8. Large Scale Chromosome Folding Is Stable against Local Changes in Chromatin Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Florescu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the link between small-scale chromatin structure and large-scale chromosome folding during interphase is a prerequisite for understanding transcription. Yet, this link remains poorly investigated. Here, we introduce a simple biophysical model where interphase chromosomes are described in terms of the folding of chromatin sequences composed of alternating blocks of fibers with different thicknesses and flexibilities, and we use it to study the influence of sequence disorder on chromosome behaviors in space and time. By employing extensive computer simulations, we thus demonstrate that chromosomes undergo noticeable conformational changes only on length-scales smaller than 105 basepairs and time-scales shorter than a few seconds, and we suggest there might exist effective upper bounds to the detection of chromosome reorganization in eukaryotes. We prove the relevance of our framework by modeling recent experimental FISH data on murine chromosomes.

  9. Microscopes and computers combined for analysis of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. W.; Butler, M. K.; Stroud, A. N.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning machine CHLOE, developed for photographic use, is combined with a digital computer to obtain quantitative and statistically significant data on chromosome shapes, distribution, density, and pairing. CHLOE permits data acquisition about a chromosome complement to be obtained two times faster than by manual pairing.

  10. Analysis of repetitive DNA in chromosomes by flow cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brind'Amour, Julie; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    We developed a flow cytometry method, chromosome flow fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), called CFF, to analyze repetitive DNA in chromosomes using FISH with directly labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. We used CFF to measure the abundance of interstitial telomeric sequences in

  11. Spectral Karyotyping. An new method for chromosome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Liying; Qian Jianxin; Guo Xiaokui; Dai Hong; Liu Yulong; Zhou Jianying

    2006-01-01

    Spectral Karyotyping (SKY) can reveal fine changes in Chromosome structure which could not be detected by G, R, Q banding before, has become an accurate, sensitive and reliable method for karyotyping, promoted the development of cell genetics to molecular level and has been used in medicine and radiological injury research. It also has the ability of analyzing 24 chromosomes on its once test run and, find implicated structure of chromosome changes, such as metathesis, depletion, amplification, rearrangement, dikinetochore, equiarm and maker-body, detect the abnormal change of stable Chromosome and calculate the bio-dose curve; The abnormal Chromosome detected by SKY can be adopted as early diagnosis, effective indexes of minor remaining changes for use of monitor of treatment and in the duration of follow up. This technique provides us a more advanced and effective method for relative gene cloning and the study of pathological mechanism of cancer. (authors)

  12. Proteomic analysis of human metaphase chromosomes reveals Topoisomerase II alpha as an Aurora B substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ciaran; Henzing, Alexander J; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    B in the presence of radioactive ATP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the HeLa scaffold fraction to be enriched for known chromosomal proteins including CENP-A, CENP-B, CENP-C, ScII and INCENP. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from one-dimensional polyacrylamide gels further defined the protein......The essential Aurora B kinase is a chromosomal passenger protein that is required for mitotic chromosome alignment and segregation. Aurora B function is dependent on the chromosome passenger, INCENP. INCENP, in turn, requires sister chromatid cohesion for its appropriate behaviour. Relatively few...... composition of the extracted chromosome fraction. Cloning, fluorescent tagging and expression in HeLa cells of the putative GTP-binding protein NGB/CRFG demonstrated it to be a novel mitotic chromosome protein, with a perichromosomal localisation. Identi fication of the protein bands corresponding to those...

  13. Preparation and bivariate analysis of suspensions of human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van den Engh, G.J.; Trask, B.J.; Gray, J.W.; Langlois, R.G.; Yu, L.C.

    1985-01-01

    Chromosomes were isolated from a variety of human cell types using a HEPES-buffered hypotonic solution (pH 8.0) containing KCl, MgSO/sub 4/ dithioerythritol, and RNase. The chromosomes isolated by this procedure could be stained with a variety of fluorescent stains including propidium iodide, chromomycin A3, and Hoeschst 33258. Addition of sodium citrate to the stained chromosomes was found to improve the total fluorescence resolution. High-quality bivariate Hoeschst vs. chromomycin fluorescence distributions were obtained for chromosomes isolated from a human fibroblast cell strain, a human colon carcinoma cell line, and human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. Good flow karyotypes were also obtained from primary amniotic cell cultures. The Hoeschst vs. chromomycin flow karyotypes of a given cell line, made at different times and at dye concentrations varying over fourfold ranges, show little variation in the relative peak positions of the chromosomes. The size of the DNA in chromosomes isolated using this procedure ranges from 20 to 50 kilobases. The described isolation procedure is simple, it yields high-quality flow karyotypes, and it can be used to prepare chromosomes from clinical samples. 22 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  14. Analysis of chromosome rearrangements on the basis of synaptonemal complexes in the offspring of mice exposed to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalikinskaya, E.I.; Bogdanov, Yu.F.; Kolomiets, O.L.; Shevchenko, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-microscopic analysis of synaptonemic complexes (SC), spread on the hypophase surface, was conducted to investigate chromosome rearrangements in sterile and semisterile F 1 malemause offsprings, exposed to 5 Gy γ-rays Paralelly Chromosome rearrangement account in diakinesis-metaphase 1 was conducted using light microscope, in the same animals. During SC analysis in pachytene chromosome rearrangements were found in 63% of spermatocytes. Under chromosome analysis in diakinesis-metaphase 1 in the same animals chromosome rearrangements were found only in 32% of cells. SC analysis allows one to reveal chromosome rearrangements, which can not be revealed in diakinesis-metaphase 1

  15. Localization of preferential sites of rearrangement within the BCR gene in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denny, C.T.; Shah, N.P.; Ogden, S.; Willman, C.; McConnell, T.; Crist, W.; Carroll, A.; Witte, O.N.

    1989-01-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been linked to a hybrid BCR/ABL protein product that differs from that found in chronic myelogenous leukemia. This implies that the molecular structures of the two chromosomal translocations also differ. Localization of translocation breakpoints in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL has been impeded due to the only partial characterization of the BCR locus. The authors have isolated the entire 130-kilobase BCR genomic locus from a human cosmid library. They have demonstrated that these breakpoints are all located at the 3' end of the intron around an unusual restriction fragment length polymorphism caused by deletion of a 1-kilobase fragment containing Alu family reiterated sequences. This clustering is unexpected in light of previous theories of rearrangement in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia that would have predicted a random dispersion of breakpoints in the first intron in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL. The proximity of the translocation breakpoints to this constitutive deletion may indicate shared mechanisms of rearrangement or that such polymorphisms mark areas of the genome prone to recombination

  16. Human tissue factor: cDNA sequence and chromosome localization of the gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpati, E.M.; Wen, D.; Broze, G.J. Jr.; Miletich, J.P.; Flandermeyer, R.R.; Siegel, N.R.; Sadler, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    A human placenta cDNA library in λgt11 was screened for the expression of tissue factor antigens with rabbit polyclonal anti-human tissue factor immunoglobulin G. Among 4 million recombinant clones screened, one positive, λHTF8, expressed a protein that shared epitopes with authentic human brain tissue factor. The 1.1-kilobase cDNA insert of λHTF8 encoded a peptide that contained the amino-terminal protein sequence of human brain tissue factor. Northern blotting identified a major mRNA species of 2.2 kilobases and a minor species of ∼ 3.2 kilobases in poly(A) + RNA of placenta. Only 2.2-kilobase mRNA was detected in human brain and in the human monocytic U937 cell line. In U937 cells, the quantity of tissue factor mRNA was increased several fold by exposure of the cells to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Additional cDNA clones were selected by hybridization with the cDNA insert of λHTF8. These overlapping isolates span 2177 base pairs of the tissue factor cDNA sequence that includes a 5'-noncoding region of 75 base pairs, an open reading frame of 885 base pairs, a stop codon, a 3'-noncoding region of 1141 base pairs, and a poly(a) tail. The open reading frame encodes a 33-kilodalton protein of 295 amino acids. The predicted sequence includes a signal peptide of 32 or 34 amino acids, a probable extracellular factor VII binding domain of 217 or 219 amino acids, a transmembrane segment of 23 acids, and a cytoplasmic tail of 21 amino acids. There are three potential glycosylation sites with the sequence Asn-X-Thr/Ser. The 3'-noncoding region contains an inverted Alu family repetitive sequence. The tissue factor gene was localized to chromosome 1 by hybridization of the cDNA insert of λHTF8 to flow-sorted human chromosomes

  17. Meiotic Chromosome Analysis of the Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisoram, Wijit; Saengthong, Pradit; Ngernsiri, Lertluk

    2013-01-01

    The giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Lepeletier and Serville) (Heteroptera: Belostomatidae), a native species of Southeast Asia, is one of the largest insects belonging to suborder Heteroptera. In this study, the meiotic chromosome of L. indicus was studied in insect samples collected from Thailand, Myanmar, Loas, and Cambodia. Testicular cells stained with lacto-acetic orcein, Giemsa, DAPI, and silver nitrate were analyzed. The results revealed that the chromosome complement of L. indicus was 2n = 22A + neo-XY + 2m, which differed from that of previous reports. Each individual male contained testicular cells with three univalent patterns. The frequency of cells containing neo-XY chromosome univalent (∼5%) was a bit higher than that of cells with autosomal univalents (∼3%). Some cells (∼0.5%) had both sex chromosome univalents and a pair of autosomal univalents. None of the m-chromosome univalents were observed during prophase I. In addition, this report presents clear evidence about the existence of m-chromosomes in Belostomatidae. PMID:23895100

  18. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  19. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Purrott, R.J.; Prosser, J.S.; Dolphin, G.W.; Tipper, P.A.; Reeder, E.J.; White, C.M.; Cooper, S.J.; Stephenson, B.D.

    1977-01-01

    Results from cytogenetic investigations into 66 cases of suspected over-exposure to radiation during 1976 are reviewed. This report is the sixth in an annual series which together contain data on 272 studies. Previous results were published in NRPB-R5, R10, R23, R35 and R41. Results from all investigations have been pooled for general analysis. Brief accounts are given in an appendix of the circumstances behind the past year's investigations and, where possible, physical estimates of dose have been included for comparison. A short review is given of the laboratory's recently published dose response data for several energies of neutron radiation. A description is also given of the group's collaboration in an international experiment in which comparisons were made between a variety of dosemeters exposed to a controlled criticality pulse. In a second appendix two experiments are described in which inter- and intra-donor effects on chromosome aberration yields were examined. It was found that differences in dicentric yields were small whereas acentric aberrations were more variable. (author)

  20. Ultrastructural analysis of radiation induced chromosome breaks and rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.L.; Goyanes, V.J.; Campos, A.; Cajigal, D.

    1990-01-01

    Chinese Hamster chromosomes R-banded in vitro were gamma-irradiated and chromatid breaks and rearrangements examined by electron microscopy employing whole-mounting technique. Breaks were preferentially located at the point of transition between G- and R-bands where the chromosome showed an average diameter 71.65 % of the wide condensed R-bands. This result was similar to the average diameter of narrow G-bands. Three chromosomes which were thin sectioned presented their broken terminal end organized as a coil constituted by two 23 nm wide chromatin fibers coiling together. Coils diameter was 43.70 % of the mean chromatid diameter. The border of damage-breakage was analyzed in whole-mounted chromosomes where breaks were photoinduced in BrdU-substituted DNA. Measurements of the angle of the sharp border of damage with respect to the chromatid axis showed a tendency to be more perpendicular as condensation progressed. These results clearly correlate with the several levels of chromatin fiber organization of the metaphase chromosome. (author)

  1. Genomic organization, expression, and chromosome localization of a third aurora-related kinase gene, Aie1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H M; Chuang, C K; Lee, M J; Tseng, T C; Tang, T K

    2000-11-01

    We previously reported two novel testis-specific serine/threonine kinases, Aie1 (mouse) and AIE2 (human), that share high amino acid identities with the kinase domains of fly aurora and yeast Ipl1. Here, we report the entire intron-exon organization of the Aie1 gene and analyze the expression patterns of Aie1 mRNA during testis development. The mouse Aie1 gene spans approximately 14 kb and contains seven exons. The sequences of the exon-intron boundaries of the Aie1 gene conform to the consensus sequences (GT/AG) of the splicing donor and acceptor sites of most eukaryotic genes. Comparative genomic sequencing revealed that the gene structure is highly conserved between mouse Aie1 and human AIE2. However, much less homology was found in the sequence outside the kinase-coding domains. The Aie1 locus was mapped to mouse chromosome 7A2-A3 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Northern blot analysis indicates that Aie1 mRNA likely is expressed at a low level on day 14 and reaches its plateau on day 21 in the developing postnatal testis. RNA in situ hybridization indicated that the expression of the Aie1 transcript was restricted to meiotically active germ cells, with the highest levels detected in spermatocytes at the late pachytene stage. These findings suggest that Aie1 plays a role in spermatogenesis.

  2. A widespread chromosomal inversion polymorphism contributes to a major life-history transition, local adaptation, and reproductive isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Lowry

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of chromosomal inversions in adaptation and speciation is controversial. Historically, inversions were thought to contribute to these processes either by directly causing hybrid sterility or by facilitating the maintenance of co-adapted gene complexes. Because inversions suppress recombination when heterozygous, a recently proposed local adaptation mechanism predicts that they will spread if they capture alleles at multiple loci involved in divergent adaptation to contrasting environments. Many empirical studies have found inversion polymorphisms linked to putatively adaptive phenotypes or distributed along environmental clines. However, direct involvement of an inversion in local adaptation and consequent ecological reproductive isolation has not to our knowledge been demonstrated in nature. In this study, we discovered that a chromosomal inversion polymorphism is geographically widespread, and we test the extent to which it contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation under natural field conditions. Replicated crosses between the prezygotically reproductively isolated annual and perennial ecotypes of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus, revealed that alternative chromosomal inversion arrangements are associated with life-history divergence over thousands of kilometers across North America. The inversion polymorphism affected adaptive flowering time divergence and other morphological traits in all replicated crosses between four pairs of annual and perennial populations. To determine if the inversion contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation in natural populations, we conducted a novel reciprocal transplant experiment involving outbred lines, where alternative arrangements of the inversion were reciprocally introgressed into the genetic backgrounds of each ecotype. Our results demonstrate for the first time in nature the contribution of an inversion to adaptation, an annual/perennial life-history shift, and

  3. Risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhen Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies on the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology (ART are relatively controversial and insufficient. Thus, to obtain a more precise evaluation of the risk of embryonic chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART, we performed a meta-analysis of all available case-control studies relating to the cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART. METHODS: Literature search in the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL based on the established strategy. Meta-regression, subgroup analysis, and Galbraith plots were conducted to explore the sources of heterogeneity. RESULTS: A total of 15 studies with 1,896 cases and 1,186 controls relevant to the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in first- trimester miscarriage after ART, and 8 studies with 601 cases and 602 controls evaluating frequency of chromosome anomaly for maternal age≥35 versus <35 were eligible for the meta-analysis. No statistical difference was found in risk of chromosomally abnormal miscarriage compared to natural conception and the different types of ART utilized, whereas the risk of fetal aneuploidy significantly increased with maternal age≥35 (OR 2.88, 95% CI: 1.74-4.77. CONCLUSIONS: ART treatment does not present an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities occurring in a first trimester miscarriage, but incidence of fetal aneuploidy could increase significantly with advancing maternal age.

  4. Chromosomal evolution in the Drosophila cardini group (Diptera: Drosophilidae): photomaps and inversion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Juliana; De Toni, Daniela Cristina; da Silva, Gisele de Souza; Valente, Vera Lucia da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Detailed chromosome photomaps are the first step to develop further chromosomal analysis to study the evolution of the genetic architecture in any set of species, considering that chromosomal rearrangements, such as inversions, are common features of genome evolution. In this report, we analyzed inversion polymorphisms in 25 different populations belonging to six neotropical species in the cardini group: Drosophila cardini, D. cardinoides, D. neocardini, D. neomorpha, D. parthenogenetica and D. polymorpha. Furthermore, we present the first reference photomaps for the Neotropical D. cardini and D. parthenogenetica and improved photomaps for D. cardinoides, D. neocardini and D. polymorpha. We found 19 new inversions for these species. An exhaustive pairwise comparison of the polytene chromosomes was conducted for the six species in order to understand evolutionary patterns of their chromosomes.

  5. Chromosome 2 short arm translocations revealed by M-FISH analysis of neuroblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roy, N; Van Limbergen, H; Vandesompele, J; Van Gele, M; Poppe, B; Laureys, G; De Paepe, A; Speleman, F

    2000-12-01

    M-FISH analysis was performed on 18 neuroblastoma cell lines, which were previously studied with cytogenetic, standard FISH and CGH data. One of the most striking findings of this study was the detection of chromosome 2 short arm rearrangements in 61% of the investigated cell lines. These rearrangements resulted from translocations with various partner chromosomes. All translocations, except one were unbalanced, leading to the consistent gain of chromosome segment 2pter-p22. A cryptic balanced translocation t(2;4) was observed with a breakpoint located in the vicinity of MYCN in cell line NBL-S. Combination of M-FISH results together with cytogenetic, standard FISH and CGH data yielded the most comprehensive description of chromosome 2 short arm rearrangements, leading to a consistent gain of chromosome 2 short arm material. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. A novel genetic tool for clonal analysis of fourth chromosome mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa-Neves, Rui; Schinaman, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    The fourth chromosome of Drosophila remains one of the most intractable regions of the fly genome to genetic analysis. The main difficulty posed to the genetic analyses of mutations on this chromosome arises from the fact that it does not undergo meiotic recombination, which makes recombination mapping impossible, and also prevents clonal analysis of mutations, a technique which relies on recombination to introduce the prerequisite recessive markers and FLP-recombinase recognition targets (FR...

  7. Chromosome analysis of five Brazilian species of poison frogs ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ern regions of Amazon, in the states of Mato Grosso do. Sul and Goiás, Brazil, extending west towards the foothills of the Andes from Bolivia to Venezuela, and in Panama. (Frost 2008). The genus Dendrobates is found from South. Keywords. C-banding; chromosomes; cytogenetics; dendrobatids; karyotype; NOR. Journal of ...

  8. Analysis of chromosome aberration data by hybrid-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrawati, Iwiq; Kumazawa, Shigeru

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing data of chromosome aberrations, which is useful to understand the characteristics of dose-response relationships and to construct the calibration curves for the biological dosimetry. The hybrid scale of linear and logarithmic scales brings a particular plotting paper, where the normal section paper, two types of semi-log papers and the log-log paper are continuously connected. The hybrid-hybrid plotting paper may contain nine kinds of linear relationships, and these are conveniently called hybrid scale models. One can systematically select the best-fit model among the nine models by among the conditions for a straight line of data points. A biological interpretation is possible with some hybrid-scale models. In this report, the hybrid scale models were applied to separately reported data on chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes as well as on chromosome breaks in Tradescantia. The results proved that the proposed models fit the data better than the linear-quadratic model, despite the demerit of the increased number of model parameters. We showed that the hybrid-hybrid model (both variables of dose and response using the hybrid scale) provides the best-fit straight lines to be used as the reliable and readable calibration curves of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  9. Genetic Analysis of a Mammalian Chromosomal Origin of Replication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altman, Amy

    2002-01-01

    .... We have shown that a 5.8 kb DNA fragment containing the initiation region (IR) DHFR ori-beta is active at ectopic chromosomal locations in hamster cells and that deletion of three specific elements in ori-beta reduced initiation activity...

  10. Molecular analysis of sex chromosome-linked mutants in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... 1Department of Agricultural and Environmental Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, ... In Bombyx mori, the W chromosome determines the female sex. .... located on an autosome, and there is no difference in the ex- ..... tral nervous system or in a brain-controlled body wall muscle.

  11. Chromosome painting analysis of X-ray-induced aberrations in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, A.; Hayashi, M.; Yamazaki, N.; Sofuni, T.

    1994-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements in human lymphocytes induced by X-rays (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gray) were analyzed using chromosome painting. DNA probes for human chromosomes 1, 3 or 4 alone, and a combination of 1 and 4, were used for analysis. The frequency of cells with rearrangements, i.e. reciprocal translocations, dicentrics, insertions, tricentrics and fragments, involving chromosome 4 increased with dose in both 48 and 72 h cultures. The number of translocations per cell also increased with dose at 48 and 72 h. Dicentrics increased with dose in 48 h but not in 72 h cultures. The estimated genomic frequency of aberrations per cell was comparable with results in banded cells. No difference was shown on the detection efficiency of chromosome rearrangements among the various DNA probes used. Since this technique does not necessarily require well-spread metaphases for analysis, it is possible to increase the number of analyzable metaphases compared with the banding technique. Chromosome painting is a simpler, more objective and practical method for detecting chromosome rearrangements than conventional banding analyses. (Author)

  12. Detailed ordering of markers localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome by the use of an interspecific Mus spretus mouse cross

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avner, P.; Amar, L.; Arnaud, D.; Hanauer, A.; Cambrou, J.

    1987-01-01

    Five probes localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome have been genetically mapped on the mouse X chromosome using an interspecific cross involving Mus spretus to a contiguous region lying proximally to the Tabby (Ta) locus. Pedigree and recombinational analysis establish the marker order as being Hprt-FIX-c11-G6PD-St14-1. The size of this contiguous region is such that the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse mutation probably maps within this segment. This in turn suggests that it is highly improbable that the mouse mdx locus represents a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It is, however, compatible with the idea that this mutation may correspond in man to Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. The high frequency of restriction fragment length polymorphisms found in this interspecific system for all the human cross-reacting probes examined up until now, using only a limited number of restriction enzymes, suggests that the Mus spretus mapping system may be of great potential value for establishing the linkage relationships existing in man when conserved chromosomal regions are concerned and human/mouse cross-reacting probes are available or can be obtained

  13. Preliminary analysis of numerical chromosome abnormalities in reciprocal and Robertsonian translocation preimplantation genetic diagnosis cases with 24-chromosomal analysis with an aCGH/SNP microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanxin; Xu, Yanwen; Wang, Jing; Miao, Benyu; Zeng, Yanhong; Ding, Chenhui; Gao, Jun; Zhou, Canquan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an interchromosomal effect (ICE) occurred in embryos obtained from reciprocal translocation (rcp) and Robertsonian translocation (RT) carriers who were following a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) with whole chromosome screening with an aCGH and SNP microarray. We also analyzed the chromosomal numerical abnormalities in embryos with aneuploidy in parental chromosomes that were not involved with a translocation and balanced in involved parental translocation chromosomes. This retrospective study included 832 embryos obtained from rcp carriers and 382 embryos from RT carriers that were biopsied in 139 PGD cycles. The control group involved embryos obtained from age-matched patient karyotypes who were undergoing preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with non-translocation, and 579 embryos were analyzed in the control group. A single blastomere at the cleavage stage or trophectoderm from a blastocyst was biopsied, and 24-chromosomal analysis with an aCGH/SNP microarray was conducted using the PGD/PGS protocols. Statistical analyses were implemented on the incidences of cumulative aneuploidy rates between the translocation carriers and the control group. Reliable results were obtained from 138 couples, among whom only one patient was a balanced rcp or RT translocation carrier, undergoing PGD testing in our center from January 2012 to June 2014. For day 3 embryos, the aneuploidy rates were 50.7% for rcp carriers and 49.1% for RT carriers, compared with the control group, with 44.8% at a maternal age < 36 years. When the maternal age was ≥ 36 years, the aneuploidy rates were increased to 61.1% for rcp carriers, 56.7% for RT carriers, and 60.3% for the control group. There were no significant differences. In day 5 embryos, the aneuploidy rates were 24.5% for rcp carriers and 34.9% for RT carriers, compared with the control group with 53.6% at a maternal age < 36 years. When the maternal age was ≥ 36

  14. Chromosome aberration analysis in a group of workers who dealt with radioluminious paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovicj, B.; Panov, D.; Joksicj, G.

    1988-01-01

    By using radiotoxicology tests (H-3 analysis in urine) in a group of workers who dealt with radioluminous paints, the presence of internal contamination was discovered. Moreover, the frequency of chromosome aberrations increased as well. The observation of chromosome aberrations was therefore continued for next 6 and 9 months. Chromosome aberrations still exist even 6 months after taking the subject away from the endangered workplace, but nine months after the incident they mostly disappear from peripheral blood. Biodosimetry investigations show that dose estimates were in the range 0,12 - 0,595 Gy. (author). 3 refs.; 1 tab

  15. Localization of BAC clones on mitotic chromosomes of Musa acuminata using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hřibová, Eva; Doleželová, Marie; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2008), s. 445-452 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600380703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cytogenetic mapping * chromosome structure * repetitive DNA Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.426, year: 2008

  16. solation, characterization and chromosome localization of repetitive DNA sequences in bananas (Musa spp.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valárik, Miroslav; Šimková, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Doleželová, Marie; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2002), s. 89-100 ISSN 0967-3849 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6038204; GA AV ČR IBS5038104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : chromosome structure * genome size * in situ hybridization Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.828, year: 2002

  17. Y-chromosomal variation of local goat breeds of Turkey close to the domestication centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cinar Kul, B; Bilgen, N; Lenstra, J A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067852335; Korkmaz Agaoglu, O; Akyuz, B; Ertugrul, O

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in chromosome Y are enabling researchers to identify paternal lineages, which are informative for introgressions and migrations. In this study, the male-specific region markers, sex-determining region-Y (SRY), amelogenin (AMELY) and zinc finger (ZFY) were analysed in seven Turkish

  18. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  19. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  20. Deep functional analysis of synII, a 770-kilobase synthetic yeast chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Wang, Yun; Chen, Tai; Gao, Feng; Gong, Jianhui; Abramczyk, Dariusz; Walker, Roy; Zhao, Hongcui; Chen, Shihong; Liu, Wei; Luo, Yisha; Müller, Carolin A; Paul-Dubois-Taine, Adrien; Alver, Bonnie; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Mitchell, Leslie A; Luo, Zhouqing; Fan, Yanqun; Zhou, Baojin; Wen, Bo; Tan, Fengji; Wang, Yujia; Zi, Jin; Xie, Zexiong; Li, Bingzhi; Yang, Kun; Richardson, Sarah M; Jiang, Hui; French, Christopher E; Nieduszynski, Conrad A; Koszul, Romain; Marston, Adele L; Yuan, Yingjin; Wang, Jian; Bader, Joel S; Dai, Junbiao; Boeke, Jef D; Xu, Xun; Cai, Yizhi; Yang, Huanming

    2017-03-10

    Here, we report the successful design, construction, and characterization of a 770-kilobase synthetic yeast chromosome II (synII). Our study incorporates characterization at multiple levels-including phenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, chromosome segregation, and replication analysis-to provide a thorough and comprehensive analysis of a synthetic chromosome. Our Trans-Omics analyses reveal a modest but potentially relevant pervasive up-regulation of translational machinery observed in synII, mainly caused by the deletion of 13 transfer RNAs. By both complementation assays and SCRaMbLE (synthetic chromosome rearrangement and modification by loxP -mediated evolution), we targeted and debugged the origin of a growth defect at 37°C in glycerol medium, which is related to misregulation of the high-osmolarity glycerol response. Despite the subtle differences, the synII strain shows highly consistent biological processes comparable to the native strain. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Evolutionary insight on localization of 18S, 28S rDNA genes on homologous chromosomes in Primates genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Sofia; Rovatsos, Michail; Schillaci, Odessa; Dumas, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    Abstract We explored the topology of 18S and 28S rDNA units by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the karyotypes of thirteen species representatives from major groups of Primates and Tupaia minor (Günther, 1876) (Scandentia), in order to expand our knowledge of Primate genome reshuffling and to identify the possible dispersion mechanisms of rDNA sequences. We documented that rDNA probe signals were identified on one to six pairs of chromosomes, both acrocentric and metacentric ones. In addition, we examined the potential homology of chromosomes bearing rDNA genes across different species and in a wide phylogenetic perspective, based on the DAPI-inverted pattern and their synteny to human. Our analysis revealed an extensive variability in the topology of the rDNA signals across studied species. In some cases, closely related species show signals on homologous chromosomes, thus representing synapomorphies, while in other cases, signal was detected on distinct chromosomes, leading to species specific patterns. These results led us to support the hypothesis that different mechanisms are responsible for the distribution of the ribosomal DNA cluster in Primates. PMID:29416829

  2. Evolutionary insight on localization of 18S, 28S rDNA genes on homologous chromosomes in Primates genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Mazzoleni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored the topology of 18S and 28S rDNA units by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH in the karyotypes of thirteen species representatives from major groups of Primates and Tupaia minor (Günther, 1876 (Scandentia, in order to expand our knowledge of Primate genome reshuffling and to identify the possible dispersion mechanisms of rDNA sequences. We documented that rDNA probe signals were identified on one to six pairs of chromosomes, both acrocentric and metacentric ones. In addition, we examined the potential homology of chromosomes bearing rDNA genes across different species and in a wide phylogenetic perspective, based on the DAPI-inverted pattern and their synteny to human. Our analysis revealed an extensive variability in the topology of the rDNA signals across studied species. In some cases, closely related species show signals on homologous chromosomes, thus representing synapomorphies, while in other cases, signal was detected on distinct chromosomes, leading to species specific patterns. These results led us to support the hypothesis that different mechanisms are responsible for the distribution of the ribosomal DNA cluster in Primates.

  3. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-11-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  4. Characterization of cDNAs encoding human leukosialin and localization of the leukosialin gene to chromosome 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallant, A.; Eskenazi, A.; Frelinger, J.G.; Mattei, M.G.; Fournier, R.E.K.; Carlsson, S.R.; Fukuda, M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding human leukosialin, a major sialoglycoprotein of human leukocytes. Leukosialin is very closely related or identical to the sialophorin molecule, which is involved in T-cell proliferation and whose expression is altered in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-chromosome-linked immunodeficiency disease. Using a rabbit antiserum to leukosialin, a cDNA clone was isolated from a λgt11 cDNA library constructed from human peripheral blood cells. The λgt11 clone was used to isolate longer cDNA clones that correspond to the entire coding sequence of leukosialin. DNA sequence analysis reveals three domains in the predicted mature protein. The extracellular domain is enriched for Ser, Thr, and Pro and contains four contiguous 18-amino acid repeats. The transmembrane and intracellular domains of the human leukosialin molecule are highly homologous to the rat W3/13 molecule. RNA gel blot analysis reveals two polyadenylylated species of 2.3 and 8 kilobases. Southern blot analysis suggests that human leukosialin is a single-copy gene. Analysis of monochromosomal cell hybrids indicates that the leukosialin gene is not X chromosome linked and in situ hybridization shows leukosialin is located on chromosome 16. These findings demonstrate that the primary mutation in WAS is not a defect in the structural gene for leukosialin

  5. Analysis of the SOS response of Vibrio and other bacteria with multiple chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi; Erill, Ivan

    2012-02-03

    The SOS response is a well-known regulatory network present in most bacteria and aimed at addressing DNA damage. It has also been linked extensively to stress-induced mutagenesis, virulence and the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants. Recently, the SOS response has been shown to regulate the activity of integrases in the chromosomal superintegrons of the Vibrionaceae, which encompasses a wide range of pathogenic species harboring multiple chromosomes. Here we combine in silico and in vitro techniques to perform a comparative genomics analysis of the SOS regulon in the Vibrionaceae, and we extend the methodology to map this transcriptional network in other bacterial species harboring multiple chromosomes. Our analysis provides the first comprehensive description of the SOS response in a family (Vibrionaceae) that includes major human pathogens. It also identifies several previously unreported members of the SOS transcriptional network, including two proteins of unknown function. The analysis of the SOS response in other bacterial species with multiple chromosomes uncovers additional regulon members and reveals that there is a conserved core of SOS genes, and that specialized additions to this basic network take place in different phylogenetic groups. Our results also indicate that across all groups the main elements of the SOS response are always found in the large chromosome, whereas specialized additions are found in the smaller chromosomes and plasmids. Our findings confirm that the SOS response of the Vibrionaceae is strongly linked with pathogenicity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance, and suggest that the characterization of the newly identified members of this regulon could provide key insights into the pathogenesis of Vibrio. The persistent location of key SOS genes in the large chromosome across several bacterial groups confirms that the SOS response plays an essential role in these organisms and sheds light into the

  6. MLL/WDR5 Complex Regulates Kif2A Localization to Ensure Chromosome Congression and Proper Spindle Assembly during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aamir; Veeranki, Sailaja Naga; Chinchole, Akash; Tyagi, Shweta

    2017-06-19

    Mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL), along with multisubunit (WDR5, RbBP5, ASH2L, and DPY30) complex catalyzes the trimethylation of H3K4, leading to gene activation. Here, we characterize a chromatin-independent role for MLL during mitosis. MLL and WDR5 localize to the mitotic spindle apparatus, and loss of function of MLL complex by RNAi results in defects in chromosome congression and compromised spindle formation. We report interaction of MLL complex with several kinesin and dynein motors. We further show that the MLL complex associates with Kif2A, a member of the Kinesin-13 family of microtubule depolymerase, and regulates the spindle localization of Kif2A during mitosis. We have identified a conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif, so far unique to the MLL family, in Kif2A. The Win motif of Kif2A engages in direct interactions with WDR5 for its spindle localization. Our findings highlight a non-canonical mitotic function of MLL complex, which may have a direct impact on chromosomal stability, frequently compromised in cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Eccentric localization of catalase to protect chromosomes from oxidative damages during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Seok; You, Seung Yeop; Cho, Sungrae; Jeon, Hyuk-Joon; Lee, Sukchan; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su

    2016-09-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity and stability is essential for the survival of every organism. Unfortunately, DNA is vulnerable to attack by a variety of damaging agents. Oxidative stress is a major cause of DNA damage because reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced as by-products of normal cellular metabolism. Cells have developed eloquent antioxidant defense systems to protect themselves from oxidative damage along with aerobic metabolism. Here, we show that catalase (CAT) is present in mouse oocytes to protect the genome from oxidative damage during meiotic maturation. CAT was expressed in the nucleus to form unique vesicular structures. However, after nuclear envelope breakdown, CAT was redistributed in the cytoplasm with particular focus at the chromosomes. Inhibition of CAT activity increased endogenous ROS levels, but did not perturb meiotic maturation. In addition, CAT inhibition produced chromosomal defects, including chromosome misalignment and DNA damage. Therefore, our data suggest that CAT is required not only to scavenge ROS, but also to protect DNA from oxidative damage during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes.

  8. Nevada local government revenues analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report analyzes the major sources of revenue for Nevada local government for purposes of estimating the impacts associated with the siting of a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Each major revenue source is analyzed separately to identify relationships between the economic or demographic base, the revenue base and the revenues generated. Trends and changes in the rates and/or base are highlighted. A model is developed for each component to allow impact estimation. This report is a companion to the report Nevada State Revenues Analysis

  9. Insights into the evolution of mammalian telomerase: Platypus TERT shares similarities with genes of birds and other reptiles and localizes on sex chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrdličková Radmila

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TERT gene encodes the catalytic subunit of the telomerase complex and is responsible for maintaining telomere length. Vertebrate telomerase has been studied in eutherian mammals, fish, and the chicken, but less attention has been paid to other vertebrates. The platypus occupies an important evolutionary position, providing unique insight into the evolution of mammalian genes. We report the cloning of a platypus TERT (OanTERT ortholog, and provide a comparison with genes of other vertebrates. Results The OanTERT encodes a protein with a high sequence similarity to marsupial TERT and avian TERT. Like the TERT of sauropsids and marsupials, as well as that of sharks and echinoderms, OanTERT contains extended variable linkers in the N-terminal region suggesting that they were present already in basal vertebrates and lost independently in ray-finned fish and eutherian mammals. Several alternatively spliced OanTERT variants structurally similar to avian TERT variants were identified. Telomerase activity is expressed in all platypus tissues like that of cold-blooded animals and murine rodents. OanTERT was localized on pseudoautosomal regions of sex chromosomes X3/Y2, expanding the homology between human chromosome 5 and platypus sex chromosomes. Synteny analysis suggests that TERT co-localized with sex-linked genes in the last common mammalian ancestor. Interestingly, female platypuses express higher levels of telomerase in heart and liver tissues than do males. Conclusions OanTERT shares many features with TERT of the reptilian outgroup, suggesting that OanTERT represents the ancestral mammalian TERT. Features specific to TERT of eutherian mammals have, therefore, evolved more recently after the divergence of monotremes.

  10. Chromosome-scale comparative sequence analysis unravels molecular mechanisms of genome evolution between two wheat cultivars

    KAUST Repository

    Thind, Anupriya Kaur

    2018-02-08

    Background: Recent improvements in DNA sequencing and genome scaffolding have paved the way to generate high-quality de novo assemblies of pseudomolecules representing complete chromosomes of wheat and its wild relatives. These assemblies form the basis to compare the evolutionary dynamics of wheat genomes on a megabase-scale. Results: Here, we provide a comparative sequence analysis of the 700-megabase chromosome 2D between two bread wheat genotypes, the old landrace Chinese Spring and the elite Swiss spring wheat line CH Campala Lr22a. There was a high degree of sequence conservation between the two chromosomes. Analysis of large structural variations revealed four large insertions/deletions (InDels) of >100 kb. Based on the molecular signatures at the breakpoints, unequal crossing over and double-strand break repair were identified as the evolutionary mechanisms that caused these InDels. Three of the large InDels affected copy number of NLRs, a gene family involved in plant immunity. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density revealed three haploblocks of 8 Mb, 9 Mb and 48 Mb with a 35-fold increased SNP density compared to the rest of the chromosome. Conclusions: This comparative analysis of two high-quality chromosome assemblies enabled a comprehensive assessment of large structural variations. The insight obtained from this analysis will form the basis of future wheat pan-genome studies.

  11. Analysis of chromosome translocation in the residents of Namie Town after the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.; Nakata, Akifumi; Miura, Tomisato; Nishimura, Miya; Takamagi, Shizuka; Kasai, Kosuke; Konno, Norio; Yoshida, Ryoko; Sekine, Shunji

    2014-01-01

    The dose estimation by behavior survey of the residents carried out by Fukushima Prefecture after the accident reported that there are no residents who were exposed by over 1 mSv radiation. However, a lot of the parents are worrying about the health condition of their children in future. Our Hirosaki University accepted the request of the local government of this Namie-Town in Fukushima which wants to know whether children were exposed by radiological substances or not and started the inspection about the contamination and exposure level and dose estimation at an accident using chromosomal translocation analysis for 855 out of 3700 children whose age was under 18 years old at the time of accident. In order to estimate radiation dose using chromosome aberration in the accidents, there are four kinds of cytogenetic method; dicentric assay, a translocation assay, the PCC-ring assay and micronucleus test. A dicentric assay is used for the dose estimation in acute and external exposure cases, the chromosomal translocation method for dose assessment in chronic and old exposure and the PCC method for high dose exposure, respectively. In the case of the residents in Namie-Town, since about one year and ten months had already passed after the accident when implementation of this inspection was determined, the chromosomal translocation method was applied for the dose estimation of the initial exposure level. The main purpose of this translocation analysis using their own cells is to take away affairs of the residents including parents and children and also to reduce the uneasiness which is not wiped away by the health check due to a behavioral survey. In this inspection, after the contents and process of this analysis were explained in the Tsushima, Namie-Town temporarily constructed clinic, 3∼4 ml of whole 5 blood were taken from each children whose parents agreed with this analysis. The lymphocytic cells are isolated from the whole blood using CPT (Cell Preparation Tube

  12. Comparative chromosomal localization of 45S and 5S rDNAs and implications for genome evolution in Cucumis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Tao; Yang, Shu-Qiong; Li, Zi-Ang; Zhang, Yun-Xia; Wang, Yun-Zhu; Cheng, Chun-Yan; Li, Ji; Chen, Jin-Feng; Lou, Qun-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal DNAs are useful cytogenetic markers for chromosome analysis. Studies investigating site numbers and distributions of rDNAs have provided important information for elucidating genome organization and chromosomal relationships of many species by fluorescence in situ hybridization. But relevant studies are scarce for species of the genus Cucumis, especially in wild species. In the present study, FISH was conducted to investigate the organization of 45S and 5S rDNA among 20 Cucumis accessions, including cultivars and wild accessions. Our results showed that the number of 45S rDNA sites varied from one to five pairs in different accessions, and most of these sites are located at the terminal regions of chromosomes. Interestingly, up to five pairs of 45S rDNA sites were observed in C. sativus var. sativus, the species which has the lowest chromosome number, i.e., 2n = 14. Only one pair of 5S rDNA sites was detected in all accessions, except for C. heptadactylus, C. sp, and C. spp that had two pairs of 5S rDNA sites. The distributions of 5S rDNA sites showed more variation than 45S rDNA sites. The phylogenetic analysis in this study showed that 45S and 5S rDNA have contrasting evolutionary patterns. We find that 5S rDNA has a polyploidization-related tendency towards the terminal location from an interstitial location but maintains a conserved site number, whereas the 45S rDNA showed a trend of increasing site number but a relatively conserved location.

  13. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Purrott, R.J.; Prosser, J.S.; Lelliott, D.J.; Stimpson, L.D.

    1981-03-01

    The results are reviewed from investigations during 1980 into 68 cases of suspected overexposure to radiation. Of these, 37 were associated with industrial radiography, 11 with one or other of the major nuclear organisations and 20 with an institution of research, education or health. 55 of the dose estimates were in the range 0.0 - 0.09 Gy (0 - 9 rad) 5 in the range 0.1 - 0.29 Gy (10 - 29 rad) and for various reasons in 8 cases no biological assessment of dose was possible. The dose estimate for the case with the highest confirmed overexposure was 0.22 Gy (22 rads). The chromosome data are compared with information obtained from physical dosimetry and a brief summary is given of the circumstances of each case. (author)

  14. Retrospective chromosome aberration analysis of former uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meszaros, G.; Bognar, G.; Koeteles, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present our data collected in the period of 1981-1985 on 165 persons exposed by different radon concentrations expressed in working level month (WLM) units from 100 up to 600. Following the decommissioning of the uranium mine in Hungary in 1997 cytogenetic status of 131 persons were within a follow-up-study of their health conditions initiated by the Hungarian Academy of Science. The persons have terminated their underground activities 5 to 20 years before testing. The comparison of the two datasets suggest a long-term persistence of cytogenetic alterations above the population average values in large percentages of persons investigated. The frequency of chromosome aberrations of uranium miners was found increased in function of their exposure to radon. The comparison of the miner's categories 20 years ago and in the recent years demonstrated the long-term existence of aberrations for many years after completion of underground mining activities. (authors)

  15. Automation of chromosomes analysis. Automatic system for image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Go, R.; Cosnac, B. de; Spiwack, A.

    1975-01-01

    The A.S.T.I. is an automatic system relating to the fast conversational processing of all kinds of images (cells, chromosomes) converted to a numerical data set (120000 points, 16 grey levels stored in a MOS memory) through a fast D.O. analyzer. The system performs automatically the isolation of any individual image, the area and weighted area of which are computed. These results are directly displayed on the command panel and can be transferred to a mini-computer for further computations. A bright spot allows parts of an image to be picked out and the results to be displayed. This study is particularly directed towards automatic karyo-typing [fr

  16. Sequence and expression analysis of gaps in human chromosome 20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Seemann, Stefan; Mang, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    /or overlap disease-associated loci, including the DLGAP4 locus. In this study, we sequenced ~99% of all three unfinished gaps on human chr 20, determined their complete genomic sizes and assessed epigenetic profiles using a combination of Sanger sequencing, mate pair paired-end high-throughput sequencing......The finished human genome-assemblies comprise several hundred un-sequenced euchromatic gaps, which may be rich in long polypurine/polypyrimidine stretches. Human chromosome 20 (chr 20) currently has three unfinished gaps remaining on its q-arm. All three gaps are within gene-dense regions and...... and chromatin, methylation and expression analyses. We found histone 3 trimethylated at Lysine 27 to be distributed across all three gaps in immortalized B-lymphocytes. In one gap, five novel CpG islands were predominantly hypermethylated in genomic DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes and human cerebellum...

  17. Evidence of Chromosomal Instability in Prostate Cancer Determined by Spectral Karyotyping (SKY and Interphase FISH Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Beheshti

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which cytogenetic aberrations develop in prostate cancer (Cap is poorly understood. Spectral karyotype (SKY analysis of Cap cell lines has shown that they have unstable karyotypes and also have features associated with chromosomal instability (CIN. To accurately determine the incidence of de novo structural and numerical aberrations in vitro in Cap, we performed SKY analysis of three independent clones derived from one representative cell line, DU145. The frequent generation of new chromosomal rearrangements and a wide variation in the number of structural aberrations within two to five passages suggested that this cell line exhibited some of the features associated with a CIN phenotype. To study numerical cell-to-cell variation, chromosome 8 aneusomy was assessed in the LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3 cell lines and a patient cohort of 15 Cap primary tumors by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. This analysis showed that a high frequency of numerical alteration affecting chromosome 8 was present in both in vitro and in Cap tissues. In comparison to normal controls, the patient cohort had a statistically significant (P<.05, greater frequency of cells with one and three centromere 8 copies. These data suggest that a CIN-like process may be contributing towards the generation of de novo numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities in Cap.

  18. Human placental Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-11-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the ..cap alpha.. subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (approx. = 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) lambdagt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1.

  19. Prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis in fetuses with congenital heart disease: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cao, Li; Liang, Dong; Meng, Lulu; Wu, Yun; Qiao, Fengchang; Ji, Xiuqing; Luo, Chunyu; Zhang, Jingjing; Xu, Tianhui; Yu, Bin; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Ting; Pan, Qiong; Ma, Dingyuan; Hu, Ping; Xu, Zhengfeng

    2018-02-01

    Currently, chromosomal microarray analysis is considered the first-tier test in pediatric care and prenatal diagnosis. However, the diagnostic yield of chromosomal microarray analysis for prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease has not been evaluated based on a large cohort. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical utility of chromosomal microarray as the first-tier test for chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with congenital heart disease. In this prospective study, 602 prenatal cases of congenital heart disease were investigated using single nucleotide polymorphism array over a 5-year period. Overall, pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities were identified in 125 (20.8%) of 602 prenatal cases of congenital heart disease, with 52.0% of them being numerical chromosomal abnormalities. The detection rates of likely pathogenic copy number variations and variants of uncertain significance were 1.3% and 6.0%, respectively. The detection rate of pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities in congenital heart disease plus additional structural anomalies (48.9% vs 14.3%, P congenital heart disease group. Additionally, the detection rate in congenital heart disease with additional structural anomalies group was significantly higher than that in congenital heart disease with soft markers group (48.9% vs 19.8%, P congenital heart disease with additional structural anomalies and congenital heart disease with intrauterine growth retardation groups (48.9% vs 50.0%), congenital heart disease with soft markers and congenital heart disease with intrauterine growth retardation groups (19.8% vs 50.0%), or congenital heart disease with soft markers and isolated congenital heart disease groups (19.8% vs 14.3%). The detection rate in fetuses with congenital heart disease plus mild ventriculomegaly was significantly higher than in those with other types of soft markers (50.0% vs 15.6%, P congenital heart disease in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Deep functional analysis of synII, a 770 kb synthetic yeast chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Gong, Jianhui; Abramczyk, Dariusz; Walker, Roy; Zhao, Hongcui; Chen, Shihong; Liu, Wei; Luo, Yisha; Müller, Carolin A.; Paul-Dubois-Taine, Adrien; Alver, Bonnie; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Mitchell, Leslie A.; Luo, Zhouqing; Fan, Yanqun; Zhou, Baojin; Wen, Bo; Tan, Fengji; Wang, Yujia; Zi, Jin; Xie, Zexiong; Li, Bingzhi; Yang, Kun; Richardson, Sarah M.; Jiang, Hui; French, Christopher E.; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Koszul, Romain; Marston, Adele L.; Yuan, Yingjin; Wang, Jian; Bader, Joel S.; Dai, Junbiao; Boeke, Jef D.; Xu, Xun; Cai, Yizhi; Yang, Huanming

    2017-01-01

    Herein we report the successful design, construction and characterization of a 770 kb synthetic yeast chromosome II (synII). Our study incorporates characterization at multiple levels, including phenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, chromosome segregation and replication analysis to provide a thorough and comprehensive analysis of a synthetic chromosome. Our “Trans-Omics” analyses reveal a modest but potentially significant pervasive up-regulation of translational machinery observed in synII is mainly caused by the deletion of 13 tRNAs. By both complementation assays and SCRaMbLE, we targeted and debuged the origin of a growth defect at 37°C in glycerol medium, which is related to misregulation of the HOG response. Despite the subtle differences, the synII strain shows highly consistent biological processes comparable to the native strain. PMID:28280153

  1. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of inv dup(15) chromosomes observed in two patients with autistic disorder and mental retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flejter, W.L. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Bennett-Baker, P.E.; Gorski, J.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and other

    1996-01-11

    A variety of distinct phenotypes has been associated with supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosomes. Although different cytogenetic rearrangements have been associated with distinguishable clinical syndromes, precise genotype-phenotype correlations have not been determined. However, the availability of chromosome 15 DNA markers provides a means to characterize inv dup(15) chromosomes in detail to facilitate the determination of specific genotype-phenotype associations. We describe 2 patients with an autistic disorder, mental retardation, developmental delay, seizures, and supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosomes. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies confirmed the chromosomal origin of the supernumerary chromosomes and showed that the duplicated region extended to at least band 15q13. An analysis of chromosome 15 microsatellite CA polymorphisms suggested a maternal origin of the inv dup(15) chromosomes and biparental inheritance of the two intact chromosome 15 homologs. The results of this study add to the existing literature which suggests that the clinical phenotype of patients with a supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosome is determined not only by the extent of the duplicated region, but by the dosage of genes located within band 15q13 and the origin of the normal chromosomes 15. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Morphological images analysis and chromosomic aberrations classification based on fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Leonardo Peres

    2011-01-01

    This work has implemented a methodology for automation of images analysis of chromosomes of human cells irradiated at IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (located at IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil), and therefore subject to morphological aberrations. This methodology intends to be a tool for helping cytogeneticists on identification, characterization and classification of chromosomal metaphasic analysis. The methodology development has included the creation of a software application based on artificial intelligence techniques using Fuzzy Logic combined with image processing techniques. The developed application was named CHRIMAN and is composed of modules that contain the methodological steps which are important requirements in order to achieve an automated analysis. The first step is the standardization of the bi-dimensional digital image acquisition procedure through coupling a simple digital camera to the ocular of the conventional metaphasic analysis microscope. Second step is related to the image treatment achieved through digital filters application; storing and organization of information obtained both from image content itself, and from selected extracted features, for further use on pattern recognition algorithms. The third step consists on characterizing, counting and classification of stored digital images and extracted features information. The accuracy in the recognition of chromosome images is 93.9%. This classification is based on classical standards obtained at Buckton [1973], and enables support to geneticist on chromosomic analysis procedure, decreasing analysis time, and creating conditions to include this method on a broader evaluation system on human cell damage due to ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  3. Styl RFLP recognized by a human IRBP cDNA localized to chromosome 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, K S; Mathew, C G.P.; Fong, S L; Bridges, C D; Ponder, B A.J.

    1988-02-25

    A 2184 bp cDNA (H.4 IRBP) encoding human interstitial retinol-biding protein isolated from a human retina cDNA library in lambdagt10 by screening with a bovine IRBP cDNA probe. Styl identifies a 2-allele polymorphism with bands at 2.3 kb (Cl) and 1.95 kb (C2) and invariant bands at 1.1, 1.0 and 0.8kb. Codominant segregation was observed in two informative families. The RFLP was mapped to chromosome 10 using somatic cell hybrids. In situ hybridization suggests regional assignments near p11.2 -q11.2 with a secondary site of hybridization at q24-25.

  4. Analysis of the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated with 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Julyanne C.G.; Mendes, Mariana E.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Santos, Neide

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations induced by gamma radiation from a 60 Co source at two different doses. Samples were obtained from a healthy donor and exposed to 60 Co source (Gammacel 220 ) located in the Department of Nuclear Energy of Pernambuco Federal University (DEN/UFPe/Brazil) with a rate of air Kerma to 3,277 Gy/h. Exposures resulted in absorbed dose 0.51 Gy and 0.77 Gy. Mitotic metaphases were obtained by culturing lymphocytes for chromosome analysis and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. Among the unstable chromosomal aberrations the dicentric chromosomes, ring chromosomes and acentric fragments were analyzed. To calculate the significance level the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. To calculate the significance level of the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. The results showed that there was significant difference of the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes (from 0.18 to 0.51 to 0.37 Gy to 0.77 Gy), however there was no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of acentric fragments ( 0.054 to 0, 51 Gy to 0.063 to 0.77 Gy) and ring chromosomes (0.001 to 0.51 Gy to 0.003 to 0.77 Gy). The low number of rings is found justified, considering that in irradiated human lymphocytes, its appearance is rare relative to dicentrics. The results confirm that dicentrics are the most reliable biomarkers in estimating dose after exposure to gamma radiation. These two points will make the calibration curve dose-response being built for Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of CRCN-NE/CNEN

  5. In Vivo Enhancer Analysis Chromosome 16 Conserved NoncodingSequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Ahituv, Nadav; Moses, Alan M.; Nobrega,Marcelo; Prabhakar, Shyam; Shoukry, Malak; Minovitsky, Simon; Visel,Axel; Dubchak, Inna; Holt, Amy; Lewis, Keith D.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Akiyama, Jennifer; De Val, Sarah; Afzal, Veena; Black, Brian L.; Couronne, Olivier; Eisen, Michael B.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-02-01

    The identification of enhancers with predicted specificitiesin vertebrate genomes remains a significant challenge that is hampered bya lack of experimentally validated training sets. In this study, weleveraged extreme evolutionary sequence conservation as a filter toidentify putative gene regulatory elements and characterized the in vivoenhancer activity of human-fish conserved and ultraconserved1 noncodingelements on human chromosome 16 as well as such elements from elsewherein the genome. We initially tested 165 of these extremely conservedsequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 48percent (79/165) functioned reproducibly as tissue-specific enhancers ofgene expression at embryonic day 11.5. While driving expression in abroad range of anatomical structures in the embryo, the majority of the79 enhancers drove expression in various regions of the developingnervous system. Studying a set of DNA elements that specifically droveforebrain expression, we identified DNA signatures specifically enrichedin these elements and used these parameters to rank all ~;3,400human-fugu conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. The testingof the top predictions in transgenic mice resulted in a three-foldenrichment for sequences with forebrain enhancer activity. These datadramatically expand the catalogue of in vivo-characterized human geneenhancers and illustrate the future utility of such training sets for avariety of iological applications including decoding the regulatoryvocabulary of the human genome.

  6. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in an Autism Primary Care Practice: Which Guidelines to Implement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrew, Susan G.; Peters, Brittany R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing is recommended for patients with ASD; however specific recommendations vary by specialty. American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Neurology guidelines recommend G-banded karyotype and Fragile X DNA. The American College of Medical Genetics recommends Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA). We determined the yield of…

  7. Fine mapping analysis confirms and strengthens linkage of four chromosomal regions in familial hypospadias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soderhall, C.; Korberg, I.B.; Thai, H.T.; Cao, J.; Chen, Y; Zhang, X.; Shulu, Z.; Zanden, L.F.M. van der; Rooij, I.A.L.M. van; Frisen, L.; Roeleveld, N.; Markljung, E.; Kockum, I.; Nordenskjold, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common male genital malformation and is regarded as a complex disease affected by multiple genetic as well as environmental factors. In a previous genome-wide scan for familial hypospadias, we reported suggestive linkage in nine chromosomal regions. We have extended this analysis by

  8. The Utility of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) has emerged as a powerful new tool to identify genomic abnormalities associated with a wide range of developmental disabilities including congenital malformations, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. CMA includes array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism…

  9. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, M; Wang, C; Saha, S; Hutmacher, R B; Stelly, D M; Jenkins, J N; Burke, J; Roberts, P A

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome substitution (CS) lines in plants are a powerful genetic resource for analyzing the contribution of chromosome segments to phenotypic variance. In this study, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) CS lines were used to identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode or fungal disease resistance traits. The CS lines were developed in the G. hirsutum L. TM-1 background with chromosome or chromosome segment substitutions from G. barbadense L. Pima 3-79 or G. tomentosum. Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum) (races 1 and 4) resistance alleles and quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously placed on cotton chromosomes using SSR markers in two interspecific recombinant inbred line populations were chosen for testing. Phenotypic responses of increased resistance or susceptibility in controlled inoculation and infested field assays confirmed the resistance QTLs, based on substitution with the positive or negative allele for resistance. Lines CS-B22Lo, CS-B04, and CS-B18 showed high resistance to nematode root-galling, confirming QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 22 (long arm) with resistance alleles from Pima 3-79. Line CS-B16 had less fusarium race 1-induced vascular root staining and higher percent survival than the TM-1 parent, confirming a major resistance QTL on chromosome 16. Lines CS-B(17-11) and CS-B17 had high fusarium race 4 vascular symptoms and low survival due to susceptible alleles introgressed from Pima 3-79, confirming the localization on chromosome 17 of an identified QTL with resistance alleles from TM1 and other resistant lines. Analyses validated regions on chromosomes 11, 16, and 17 harboring nematode and fusarium wilt resistance genes and demonstrated the value of CS lines as both a germplasm resource for breeding programs and as a powerful genetic analysis tool for determining QTL effects for disease

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of fiber strength in upland cotton chromosome introgression lines carrying different Gossypium barbadense chromosomal segments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Fang

    Full Text Available Fiber strength is the key trait that determines fiber quality in cotton, and it is closely related to secondary cell wall synthesis. To understand the mechanism underlying fiber strength, we compared fiber transcriptomes from different G. barbadense chromosome introgression lines (CSILs that had higher fiber strengths than their recipient, G. hirsutum acc. TM-1. A total of 18,288 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were detected between CSIL-35431 and CSIL-31010, two CSILs with stronger fiber and TM-1 during secondary cell wall synthesis. Functional classification and enrichment analysis revealed that these DEGs were enriched for secondary cell wall biogenesis, glucuronoxylan biosynthesis, cellulose biosynthesis, sugar-mediated signaling pathways, and fatty acid biosynthesis. Pathway analysis showed that these DEGs participated in starch and sucrose metabolism (328 genes, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis (122 genes, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis (101 genes, and oxidative phosphorylation (87 genes, etc. Moreover, the expression of MYB- and NAC-type transcription factor genes were also dramatically different between the CSILs and TM-1. Being different to those of CSIL-31134, CSIL-35431 and CSIL-31010, there were many genes for fatty acid degradation and biosynthesis, and also for carbohydrate metabolism that were down-regulated in CSIL-35368. Metabolic pathway analysis in the CSILs showed that different pathways were changed, and some changes at the same developmental stage in some pathways. Our results extended our understanding that carbonhydrate metabolic pathway and secondary cell wall biosynthesis can affect the fiber strength and suggested more genes and/or pathways be related to complex fiber strength formation process.

  11. Analysis of the SOS response of Vibrio and other bacteria with multiple chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Alberola Neus

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SOS response is a well-known regulatory network present in most bacteria and aimed at addressing DNA damage. It has also been linked extensively to stress-induced mutagenesis, virulence and the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants. Recently, the SOS response has been shown to regulate the activity of integrases in the chromosomal superintegrons of the Vibrionaceae, which encompasses a wide range of pathogenic species harboring multiple chromosomes. Here we combine in silico and in vitro techniques to perform a comparative genomics analysis of the SOS regulon in the Vibrionaceae, and we extend the methodology to map this transcriptional network in other bacterial species harboring multiple chromosomes. Results Our analysis provides the first comprehensive description of the SOS response in a family (Vibrionaceae that includes major human pathogens. It also identifies several previously unreported members of the SOS transcriptional network, including two proteins of unknown function. The analysis of the SOS response in other bacterial species with multiple chromosomes uncovers additional regulon members and reveals that there is a conserved core of SOS genes, and that specialized additions to this basic network take place in different phylogenetic groups. Our results also indicate that across all groups the main elements of the SOS response are always found in the large chromosome, whereas specialized additions are found in the smaller chromosomes and plasmids. Conclusions Our findings confirm that the SOS response of the Vibrionaceae is strongly linked with pathogenicity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance, and suggest that the characterization of the newly identified members of this regulon could provide key insights into the pathogenesis of Vibrio. The persistent location of key SOS genes in the large chromosome across several bacterial groups confirms that the SOS response plays an

  12. [Diagnosis of a case with Williams-Beuren syndrome with nephrocalcinosis using chromosome microarray analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S J; Liu, M; Long, W J; Luo, X P

    2016-12-02

    Objective: To explore the clinical phenotypes and the genetic cause for a boy with unexplained growth retardation, nephrocalcinosis, auditory anomalies and multi-organ/system developmental disorders. Method: Routine G-banding and chromosome microarray analysis were applied to a child with unexplained growth retardation, nephrocalcinosis, auditory anomalies and multi-organ/system developmental disorders treated in the Department of Pediatrics of Tongji Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology in September 2015 and his parents to conduct the chromosomal karyotype analysis and the whole genome scanning. Deleted genes were searched in the Decipher and NCBI databases, and their relationships with the clinical phenotypes were analyzed. Result: A six-month-old boy was refered to us because of unexplained growth retardation and feeding intolerance.The affected child presented with abnormal manifestation such as special face, umbilical hernia, growth retardation, hypothyroidism, congenital heart disease, right ear sensorineural deafness, hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis. The child's karyotype was 46, XY, 16qh + , and his parents' karyotypes were normal. Chromosome microarray analysis revealed a 1 436 kb deletion on the 7q11.23(72701098_74136633) region of the child. This region included 23 protein-coding genes, which were reported to be corresponding to Williams-Beuren syndrome and its certain clinical phenotypes. His parents' results of chromosome microarray analysis were normal. Conclusion: A boy with characteristic manifestation of Williams-Beuren syndrome and rare nephrocalcinosis was diagnosed using chromosome microarray analysis. The deletion on the 7q11.23 might be related to the clinical phenotypes of Williams-Beuren syndrome, yet further studies are needed.

  13. Molecular phylogenetic reconstruction and localization of the (TTAGGn telomeric repeats in the chromosomes of Acromyrmex striatus (Roger, 1863 suggests a lower ancestral karyotype for leafcutter ants (Hymenoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tássia Tatiane Pontes Pereira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome counts and karyotype characterization have proved to be important features of a genome. Chromosome changes during the diversification of ants might play an important role, given the diversity and success of Formicidae. Comparative karyotype analyses on ants have enriched and helped ant systematics. Among leafcutter ants, two major chromosome counts have been described, one frequent in Atta Fabricius, 1804 (2n = 22 in all Atta spp. whose karyotype is known and the other frequent in Acromyrmex Mayr, 1865 (2n = 38 in the majority of species whose karyotype is known. The main exception is Acromyrmex striatus (Roger, 1863, which harbors a diploid chromosome set of 22. Here we describe the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with telomeric probes with (TTAGG6 repeats to describe the telomere composition of A. striatus and to recover potential interstitial non-telomeric signals that may reflect fusion events during the evolution of leafcutter lineage from 38 to 22 chromosomes. Further, we reconstruct the ancestral chromosome numbers of the leafcutter clade based on a recently proposed molecular phylogenetic hypothesis and phylogenomic tree. Distinct signals have been observed in both extremities on the telomere chromosomes of A. striatus. Non-telomeric signals have not been retrieved in our analysis. It could be supposed that the low-numbered karyotype indeed represents the ancestral chromosome number of leafcutters. The phylogenetic reconstruction also recovered a low chromosome number from the diverse approaches implemented, suggesting that n = 11 is the most likely ancestral karyotype of the leafcutter ants and is a plesiomorphic feature shared between A. striatus and Atta spp.

  14. Biological dosimetry in radiation accidents. Dose-response curve by chromosomal aberrations analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekova, V.; Hristova, R.; Atanasova, P.; Popova, L.; Stainova, A.; Bulanova, M.; Georgieva, I.; Vukov, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to obtain a dose-response relationship for chromosomal aberrations induced in human lymphocytes after in vitro irradiation. Peripheral blood samples of 7 different donors were used. The blood irradiation was done with Cs137 gamma-rays at different doses: 0.0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 3.0 Gy. Lymphocyte cultures were established and maintain for 48 hours at 37 0 C in CO 2 incubator for chromosomal aberration analysis. The dose response relationship has been established based on dysenteric and ring chromosomes yield. The relationship can be described by the following equation: Y = 0.0274D + 0.0251 D 2 , where (Y) = dysenteric and ring chromosomes yield, (D) = radiation dose obtained. EXCEL software was established for calculation of the received dose by using this equation, as a whole body equivalent dose acute irradiation

  15. Chromosomal damage and apoptosis analysis in exfoliated oral epithelial cells from mouthwash and alcohol users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Rodrigo dos Santos; Meireles, José Roberto Cardoso; de Moraes Marcílio Cerqueira, Eneida

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal damage and apoptosis were analyzed in users of mouthwash and/or alcoholic beverages, using the micronucleus test on exfoliated oral mucosa cells. Samples from four groups of 20 individuals each were analyzed: three exposed groups (EG1, EG2 and EG3) and a control group (CG). EG1 comprised mouthwash users; EG2 comprised drinkers, and EG3 users of both mouthwashes and alcoholic beverages. Cell material was collected by gently scraping the insides of the cheeks. Then the cells were fixed in a methanol/acetic acid (3:1) solution and stained and counterstained, respectively, with Schiff reactive and fast green. Endpoints were computed on 2,000 cells in a blind test. Statistical analysis showed that chromosomal damage and apoptosis were significantly higher in individuals of groups EG1 and EG3 than in controls (p < 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in chromosomal damage and apoptosis was observed between the exposed groups. In EG2, only the occurrence of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the controls. These results suggest that mouthwashes alone or in association with alcoholic drinks induce genotoxic effects, manifested as chromosomal damage and apoptosis. They also suggest that alcoholic drinks are effective for stimulating the process of apoptosis. However, these data need to be confirmed in larger samples. PMID:25505845

  16. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N.; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sex and sex-chromosome dosage (SCD) are known to modulate human brain size and cortical anatomy, but very little is known regarding their impact on subcortical structures that work with the cortex to subserve a range of behaviors in health and disease. Moreover

  17. Molecular analysis of the distribution of chromosomal breakpoints: characterization of a 'hot' region for breaks in human chromosome 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannais, D.B.; Hirai, Y.; Cologne, J.B.; Waldren, C.A.; Ueno, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Ionizing radiation randomly damages DNA and chromosomes whereas subsequent chromosome breaks are non-random. Assuming, as an ideal and naive but useful proposition, that breaks are equally likely anywhere in the chromosome and that a deletion always occurs between two breaks, the frequency of fragments would decrease linearly with increasing fragment size. This simple distribution is not, however, observed. To shed light on the 'real' situation of break formation we mapped breakpoints in the human chromosome no. 11 of 353 independent CD59- mutants isolated from human/hamster hybrid AL cells exposed to radiations (high and low dose-rate gamma rays, high LET carbon or nitrogen ions, protons) or chemicals (arsenic or irradiated, mutagenic histidine) or unexposed. The number of breaks per unit length of DNA differed significantly in different regions of chromosome 11.The highest level of breaks (140/mbp) were in the 0.8 mbp segment between CD59 and Catalase (CAT). Finer mapping of break points was carried out using 26 PCR primer pairs spread across this interval in 15 independent mutants. In two mutants, the break point was in a 107 bp fragment; in the other 13 the breaks were in a single 35 mbp fragment, but not all were at exactly the same site; 4 of 13 occurred in 3 different 3 mbp sub-segments. We are sequencing these fragments to look for such features as repeats: 'colder' regions like that between CD59 and WT will also be analyzed. But, since at least some breaks occurred at different sites and the frequency and distribution of breaks was about the same for all treatments, our we postulate that hot (and cold spots) may be due more to structural features or specific repair than to sequence or type of damage

  18. Analysis of structural chromosomal rearrangements in hematological neoplasias; Study of structural chromosomal rearrangements of cells of chronic lymphocytic leukemia after DSP30/IL2 stimulated cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Hrubá, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of cells of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is difficult because of their low proliferative activity. To obtain sufficient number of mitoses for performing chromosomal analysis a suitable stimulation of cell division is needed. Using DSP30/IL2 stimulated cultivation 391 CLL samples were investigated in 5 years' period. The cultivation was showed to have high success rate (96%; 375/391) with also high rate of detection of pathological clones by both karyotype and metaph...

  19. Refined localization of the Escherichia coli F4ab/F4ac receptor locus on pig chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joller, D.; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Bertschinger, H.U.

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoea in newborn and weaned pigs caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing F4 fimbriae leads to considerable losses in pig production. In this study, we refined the mapping of the receptor locus for ETEC F4ab/F4ac adhesion (F4bcR) by joint analysis of Nordic and Swiss data...... (MUC4-8227) were used to create the linkage map. The region for F4bcR was refined to the interval SW207-S0075 on pig chromosome 13. The most probable position of F4bcR was in the SW207-MUC4 region. The order of six markers was supported by physical mapping on the BAC fingerprint contig from...

  20. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Purrott, R.J.; Prosser, J.S.; White, A.D.; Dolphin, G.W.; Reeder, E.J.; Martin, L.C.; Priseman, S.J.; Gray, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    Results from cytogenetic investigations into 63 cases of suspected over-exposure to radiation during 1978 are reviewed. This report is the eighth in an annual series which together contain data on 390 studies. Results from all investigations have been pooled for general analysis. Brief accounts are given, in an appendix, of the circumstances behind the past year's investigations and, where possible, physical estimates of dose have been included for comparison. One case is described in more detail. It concerns a young man who deliberately irradiated himself with several sources of iridium-192 and received a dose of about 1.5 Gy as a fairly uniform whole body exposure. (author)

  1. mFISH analysis of chromosome aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to mixed radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotnik, Natalia V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Scherthan, Harry [Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology Affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    We performed a study on the presence of chromosome aberrations in a cohort of plutonium workers of the Mayak production association (PA) with a mean age of 73.3 ± 7.2 years to see whether by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) translocation analysis can discriminate individuals who underwent occupational exposure with internal and/or external exposure to ionizing radiation 40 years ago. All Mayak PA workers were occupationally exposed to chronic internal alpha-radiation due to incorporated plutonium-239 and/or to external gamma-rays. First, we obtained the translocation yield in control individuals by mFISH to chromosome spreads of age-matched individuals and obtained background values that are similar to previously published values of an international study (Sigurdson et al. in Mutat Res 652:112-121, 2008). Workers who had absorbed a total dose of >0.5 Gy external gamma-rays to the red bone marrow (RBM) displayed a significantly higher frequency of stable chromosome aberrations relative to a group of workers exposed to <0.5 Gy gamma-rays total absorbed RBM dose. Thus, the translocation frequency may be considered to be a biological marker of external radiation exposure even years after the exposure. In a group of workers who were internally exposed and had incorporated plutonium-239 at a body burden >1.48 kBq, mFISH revealed a considerable number of cells with complex chromosomal rearrangements. Linear associations were observed for translocation yield with the absorbed RBM dose from external gamma-rays as well as for complex chromosomal rearrangements with the plutonium-239 body burden. (orig.)

  2. Chromosome analysis of nuclear power plant workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Giemsa assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Grigorova, Mira; Nikolova, Teodora; Bulanova, Minka; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena; Benova, Donka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in exposed Bulgarian nuclear power plant workers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes. Chromosome analysis using fluorescence in situ hybrydization (FISH) and Giemsa techniques was undertaken on 63 workers and 45 administrative staff controls from the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant. Using the Giemsa method, the frequencies of cells studied with chromosome aberrations, dicentrics plus rings and chromosome fragments in the radiation workers were significantly higher compared with the control group (P=0.044, P=0.014, and P=0.033, respectively). A significant association between frequencies of dicentrics plus rings and accumulated doses was registered (P<0.01). In the present study, a FISH cocktail of whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 4 and 11 was used. A significant association between frequency of translocations and accumulated doses was also observed (P<0.001). Within the control group, a correlation was found between age and the spontaneous frequency of translocations. No correlation was found between smoking status and frequency of translocations. When compared with the control group, workers with accumulated doses up to 100 mSv showed no increase in genome translocation frequency, whereas workers with accumulated doses from 101 to 200 mSv showed a statistically significant doubling of genome translocation frequency (P=0.009). Thus, in cases of chronic exposure and for purposes of retrospective dosimetry, the genome frequency of translocations is a more useful marker for evaluation of genotoxic effects than dicentric frequency. (author)

  3. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Purrott, R.J.; Prosser, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Results from cytogenetic investigations into 55 cases of suspected over-exposure to radiation during 1977 are reviewed. This report is the seventh in an annual series (previous results were published in NRPB-R5, R10, R23, R35, R41 and R57) which together contain data on 327 studies. Results from all investigations have been pooled for general analysis. Brief accounts are given in an appendix of the circumstances behind the past year's investigations and, where possible, physical estimates of dose have been included for comparison. Two cases are described in more detail: the first concerned a non-classified worker who put an iridium-192 source in his pocket and took it home; and the second involved the accidental contamination of two people with tritium gas. In a second appendix, the confidence limits on cytogenetic dosimetry for X- and γ-ray over-exposures are given and the derivation of these limits is discussed. (author)

  4. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  5. Structure of the human gene encoding the associated microfibrillar protein (MFAP1) and localization to chromosome 15q15-q21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, H.; Chow, M.; Abrams, W.R. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Microfibrils with a diameter of 10-12 nm, found either in assocation with elastin or independently, are an important component of the extracellular matrix of many tissues. To extend understanding of the proteins composing these microfibrils, the cDNA and gene encoding the human associated microfibril protein (MRAP1) have been cloned and characterized. The coding portion is contained in 9 exons, and the sequence is very homologous to the previously described chick cDNA, but does not appear to share homology or domain motifs with any other known protein. Interestingly, the gene has been localized to chromosome 15q15-q21 by somatic hybrid cell and chromosome in situ analyses. This is the same chromosomal region to which the fibrillin gene, FBN1, known to be defective in the Marfan syndrome, has been mapped. MFAP1 is a candidate gene for heritable diseases affecting microfibrils. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Analysis of localized damage in creep rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengdong; Wu Dongdi

    1992-01-01

    Continuum Damage Mechanics studies the effect of distributed defects, whereas the failure of engineering structures is usually caused by local damage. In this paper, an analysis of localized damage in creep rupture is carried out. The material tested is a 2 1/4Cr-1Mo pressure vessel steel and the material constants necessary for damage analysis are evaluated. Notched specimens are used to reflect localized damage in creep rupture and the amount of damage is measured using DCPD method. Through FEM computation, stress components and effective stress in the region of notch root are evaluated and it is found that the von Mises effective stress can represent the damage effective stress in the analysis of localized creep damage. It is possible to develop a method for the assessment of safety of pressure vessels under creep through localized creep damage analysis. (orig.)

  7. Molecular cloning, identification, and chromosomal localization of two MADS box genes in peach (Prunus persica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rongcai

    2008-06-01

    MADS box proteins play an important role in floral development. To find genes involved in the floral transition of Prunus species, cDNAs for two MADS box genes, PpMADS1 and PpMADS10, were cloned using degenerate primers and 5'- and 3'-RACE based on the sequence database of P. persica and P. dulcis. The full length of PpMADS1 cDNA is 1,071 bp containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 717 bp and coding for a polypeptide of 238 amino acid residues. The full length of PpMADS10 cDNA is 937 bp containing an ORF of 633 bp and coding for a polypeptide of 210 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison revealed that PpMADS1 and PpMADS10 were highly homologous to genes AP1 and PI in Arabidopsis, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PpMADS1 belongs to the euAP1 clade of class A, and PpMADS10 is a member of GLO/PI clade of class B. RT-PCR analysis showed that PpMADS1 was expressed in sepal, petal, carpel, and fruit, which was slightly different from the expression pattern of AP1; PpMADS10 was expressed in petal and stamen, which shared the same expression pattern as PI. Using selective mapping strategy, PpMADS1 was assigned onto the Bin1:50 on the G1 linkage group between the markers MCO44 and TSA2, and PpMADS10 onto the Bin1:73 on the same linkage group between the markers Lap-1 and FGA8. Our results provided the basis for further dissection of the two MADS box gene function.

  8. Combined fluorescent-chromogenic in situ hybridization for identification and laser microdissection of interphase chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Paz

    Full Text Available Chromosome territories constitute the most conspicuous feature of nuclear architecture, and they exhibit non-random distribution patterns in the interphase nucleus. We observed that in cell nuclei from humans with Down Syndrome two chromosomes 21 frequently localize proximal to one another and distant from the third chromosome. To systematically investigate whether the proximally positioned chromosomes were always the same in all cells, we developed an approach consisting of sequential FISH and CISH combined with laser-microdissection of chromosomes from the interphase nucleus and followed by subsequent chromosome identification by microsatellite allele genotyping. This approach identified proximally positioned chromosomes from cultured cells, and the analysis showed that the identity of the chromosomes proximally positioned varies. However, the data suggest that there may be a tendency of the same chromosomes to be positioned close to each other in the interphase nucleus of trisomic cells. The protocol described here represents a powerful new method for genome analysis.

  9. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S. [Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Safety analysis of accident localization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A complex safety analysis of accident localization system of Ignalina NPP was performed. Calculation results obtained, results of non-destruct ing testing and experimental data of reinforced concrete testing of buildings does not revealed deficiencies of buildings of accident localization system at unit 1 of Ignalina NPP. Calculations were performed using codes NEPTUNE, ALGOR, CONTAIN

  11. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of monoecious hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) cultivars reveals its karyotype variations and sex chromosomes constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, Olga V; Alexandrov, Oleg S; Divashuk, Mikhail G; Sukhorada, Tatiana I; Karlov, Gennady I

    2016-05-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L., 2n = 20) is a dioecious plant. Sex expression is controlled by an X-to-autosome balance system consisting of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes XY for males and XX for females. Genetically monoecious hemp offers several agronomic advantages compared to the dioecious cultivars that are widely used in hemp cultivation. The male or female origin of monoecious maternal plants is unknown. Additionally, the sex chromosome composition of monoecious hemp forms remains unknown. In this study, we examine the sex chromosome makeup in monoecious hemp using a cytogenetic approach. Eight monoecious and two dioecious cultivars were used. The DNA of 210 monoecious plants was used for PCR analysis with the male-associated markers MADC2 and SCAR323. All monoecious plants showed female amplification patterns. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the subtelomeric CS-1 probe to chromosomes plates and karyotyping revealed a lack of Y chromosome and presence of XX sex chromosomes in monoecious cultivars with the chromosome number 2n = 20. There was a high level of intra- and intercultivar karyotype variation detected. The results of this study can be used for further analysis of the genetic basis of sex expression in plants.

  12. Performance Analysis of Local Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin T.

    2018-03-01

    Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is an important data assimilation method for high-dimensional geophysical systems. Efficient implementation of EnKF in practice often involves the localization technique, which updates each component using only information within a local radius. This paper rigorously analyzes the local EnKF (LEnKF) for linear systems and shows that the filter error can be dominated by the ensemble covariance, as long as (1) the sample size exceeds the logarithmic of state dimension and a constant that depends only on the local radius; (2) the forecast covariance matrix admits a stable localized structure. In particular, this indicates that with small system and observation noises, the filter error will be accurate in long time even if the initialization is not. The analysis also reveals an intrinsic inconsistency caused by the localization technique, and a stable localized structure is necessary to control this inconsistency. While this structure is usually taken for granted for the operation of LEnKF, it can also be rigorously proved for linear systems with sparse local observations and weak local interactions. These theoretical results are also validated by numerical implementation of LEnKF on a simple stochastic turbulence in two dynamical regimes.

  13. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, E.; Lamb, J.A.; Barnby, G.

    2005-01-01

    in the genes CUTL1, LAMB1 and PTPRZ1. Analysis of genetic variants provided evidence for association with autism for one of the new missense changes identified in LAMB1; this effect was stronger in a subgroup of affected male sibling pair families, implying a possible specific sex-related effect......Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants...

  14. Statistical methods in regression and calibration analysis of chromosome aberration data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, W.

    1983-01-01

    The method of iteratively reweighted least squares for the regression analysis of Poisson distributed chromosome aberration data is reviewed in the context of other fit procedures used in the cytogenetic literature. As an application of the resulting regression curves methods for calculating confidence intervals on dose from aberration yield are described and compared, and, for the linear quadratic model a confidence interval is given. Emphasis is placed on the rational interpretation and the limitations of various methods from a statistical point of view. (orig./MG)

  15. High resolution genome-wide analysis of chromosomal alterations in Burkitt's lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloua Toujani

    Full Text Available Additional chromosomal abnormalities are currently detected in Burkitt's lymphoma. They play major roles in the progression of BL and in prognosis. The genes involved remain elusive. A whole-genome oligonucleotide array CGH analysis correlated with karyotype and FISH was performed in a set of 27 Burkitt's lymphoma-derived cell lines and primary tumors. More than half of the 145 CNAs2 Mb, gains were found in 1q (12/27, 13q (7/27, 7q (6/27, 8q(4/27, 2p (3/27, 11q (2/27 and 15q (2/27. Losses were found in 3p (5/27, 4p (4/27, 4q (4/27, 9p (4/27, 13q (4/27, 6p (3/27, 17p (3/27, 6q (2/27,11pterp13 (2/27 and 14q12q21.3 (2/27. Twenty one minimal critical regions (MCR, (range 0.04-71.36 Mb, were delineated in tumors and cell lines. Three MCRs were localized to 1q. The proximal one was mapped to 1q21.1q25.2 with a 6.3 Mb amplicon (1q21.1q21.3 harboring BCA2 and PIAS3. In the other 2 MCRs, 1q32.1 and 1q44, MDM4 and AKT3 appeared as possible drivers of these gains respectively. The 13q31.3q32.1 MCR contained an amplicon and ABCC4 might be the driver of this amplicon. The 40 Kb 2p16.1 MCR was the smallest gained MCR and specifically encompassed the REL oncogene which is already implicated in B cell lymphomas. The most frequently deleted MCR was 3p14.1 that removed the fifth exon of FHIT. Further investigations which combined gene expression and functional studies are essential to understand the lymphomagenesis mechanism and for the development of more effective, targeted therapeutic strategies.

  16. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  17. The analysis of a large Danish family supports the presence of a susceptibility locus for adenoma and colorectal cancer on chromosome 11q24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Laura Aviaja; Eiberg, Hans; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary colorectal cancer accounts for approximately 30 % of all colorectal cancers, but currently only 5 % of these families can be explained by highly penetrant, inherited mutations. In the remaining 25 % it is not possible to perform a gene test to identify the family members who would...... benefit from prophylactic screening. Consequently, all family members are asked to follow a screening program. The purpose of this study was to localize a new gene which causes colorectal cancer. We performed a linkage analysis using data from a SNP6.0 chip in one large family with 12 affected family...... areas on chromosome 2 and chromosome 11 with the highest possible LOD scores of 2.6. Two other studies have identified 11q24 as a candidate area for colorectal cancer susceptibility and this area is supported by our results....

  18. Localization of the homolog of a mouse craniofacial mutant to human chromosome 18q11 and evaluation of linkage to human CLP and CPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.C.; Yu, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-15

    The transgene-induced mutation 9257 and the spontaneous mutation twirler cause craniofacial and inner ear malformations and are located on mouse chromosome 18 near the ataxia locus ax. To map the human homolog of 9257, a probe from the transgene insertion site was used to screen a human genomic library. Analysis of a cross-hybridizing human clone identified a 3-kb conserved sequence block that does not appear to contain protein coding sequence. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels assigned the human locus to 18q11. The polymorphic microsatellite markers D18S1001 and D18S1002 were isolated from the human locus and mapped by linkage analysis using the CEPH pedigrees. The 9257 locus maps close to the centromeres of human chromosome 18q and mouse chromosome 18 at the proximal end of a conserved linkage group. To evaluate the role of this locus in human craniofacial disorders, linkage to D18S1002 was tested in 11 families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 3 families with autosomal dominant cleft palate only. Obligatory recombinants were observed in 8 of the families, and negative lod scores from the other families indicated that these disorders are not linked to the chromosome 18 loci. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. [Application of chromosome microarray analysis for fetuses with multicystic dysplastic kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feifei; Lei, Tingying; Fu, Fang; Li, Ru; Zhang, Yongling; Jing, Xiangyi; Yang, Xin; Han, Jin; Zhen, Li; Pan, Min; Liao, Can

    2016-12-10

    To explore the genetic etiology of fetuses with multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) by chromosome microarray analysis (CMA). Seventy-two fetuses with MCDK were analyzed with conventional cytogenetic technique, among which 30 fetuses with a normal karyotype were subjected to CMA analysis with Affymetrix CytoScan HD arrays by following the manufacturer's protocol. The data was analyzed with ChAS software. Conventional cytogenetic technique has revealed three fetuses (4.2%) with identifiable chromosomal aberrations. CMA analysis has detected pathogenic CNVs in 5 fetuses (16.7%), which included two well-known microdeletion or microduplication syndromes, i.e., 17q12 microdeletion syndrome and Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) and three submicroscopic imbalances at 4q35.2, 22q13.33, and 1p33. PEX26, FKBP6, TUBGCP6, ALG12, and CYP4A11 are likely the causative genes. CMA can identify the submicroscopic imbalances unidentifiable by conventional cytogenetic technique, and therefore has a significant role in prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. The detection rate of pathogenic CNVs in fetuses with MCDK was 16.7% by CMA. 17q12 microdeletion syndrome and WBS are associated with MCDK. Mutations of PEX26, FKBP6, TUBGCP6, ALG12, and CYP4A11 genes may be the causes for MCDK.

  20. Cytogenetic analysis of the Amazon stingless bee Melipona seminigra merrillae reveals different chromosome number for the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura Bezerra Francini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis of the Amazon stingless bee Melipona seminigra merrillae, by conventional Giemsa staining and C-banding, revealed a different chromosome number for Melipona: 2n = 22 for females and diploid drones while the haploid drones present n = 11. There is no evidence of B chromosomes. This result contrasts with previous studies, in which the chromosome number of 19 Melipona species was determined as 2n = 18 for females and n = 9 for haploid males. Based on cytogenetic information available for other Melipona species, we propose that M. s. merrillae has a more derived diploid number. This indicates that chromosome number is not a conservative characteristic within the genus as previously thought. Cytogenetic data for stingless bees are scarce, especially in Amazon region. Additional studies will be very important in order to promote Melipona karyoevolution discussion and consequently a taxonomy review.

  1. Physical mapping of the major early-onset familial Alzheimer`s disease locus on chromosome 14 and analysis of candidate gene sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanzi, R.E.; Romano, D.M.; Crowley, A.C. [Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Genetic studies of kindreds displaying evidence for familial AD (FAD) have led to the localization of gene defects responsible for this disorder on chromosomes 14, 19, and 21. A minor early-onset FAD gene on chromosome 21 has been identified to enode the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and the late-onset FAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 19 has been shown to be in linkage disequilibrium with the E4 allele of the APOE gene. Meanwhile, the locus responsible for the major form of early-onset FAD on chromosome 14q24 has not yet been identified. By recombinational analysis, we have refined the minimal candidate region containing the gene defect to approximately 3 megabases in 14q24. We will describe our laboratory`s progress on attempts to finely localize this locus, as well as test known candidate genes from this region for either inclusion in the minimal candidate region or the presence of pathogenic mutations. Candidate genes that have been tested so far include cFOS, heat shock protein 70 member (HSF2A), transforming growth factor beta (TGFB3), the trifunctional protein C1-THF synthase (MTHFD), bradykinin receptor (BR), and the E2k component of a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. HSP2A, E2k, MTHFD, and BR do not map to the current defined minimal candidate region; however, sequence analysis must be performed to confirm exclusion of these genes as true candidates. Meanwhile, no pathogenic mutations have yet been found in cFOS or TGFB3. We have also isolated a large number of novel transcribed sequences from the minimal candidate region in the form of {open_quotes}trapped exons{close_quotes} from cosmids identified by hybridization to select YAC clones; we are currently in the process of searching for pathogenic mutations in these exons in affected individuals from FAD families.

  2. An approach to automated chromosome analysis; Etudes pour une methode d'automatisation des analyses chromosomiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Go, Roland

    1972-05-03

    The methods of approach developed with a view to automatic processing of the different stages of chromosome analysis are described in this study divided into three parts. Part 1 relates the study of automated selection of metaphase spreads, which operates a decision process in order to reject ail the non-pertinent images and keep the good ones. This approach has been achieved by Computing a simulation program that has allowed to establish the proper selection algorithms in order to design a kit of electronic logical units. Part 2 deals with the automatic processing of the morphological study of the chromosome complements in a metaphase: the metaphase photographs are processed by an optical-to-digital converter which extracts the image information and writes it out as a digital data set on a magnetic tape. For one metaphase image this data set includes some 200 000 grey values, encoded according to a 16, 32 or 64 grey-level scale, and is processed by a pattern recognition program isolating the chromosomes and investigating their characteristic features (arm tips, centromere areas), in order to get measurements equivalent to the lengths of the four arms. Part 3 studies a program of automated karyotyping by optimized pairing of human chromosomes. The data are derived from direct digitizing of the arm lengths by means of a BENSON digital reader. The program supplies' 1/ a list of the pairs, 2/ a graphic representation of the pairs so constituted according to their respective lengths and centromeric indexes, and 3/ another BENSON graphic drawing according to the author's own representation of the chromosomes, i.e. crosses with orthogonal arms, each branch being the accurate measurement of the corresponding chromosome arm. This conventionalized karyotype indicates on the last line the really abnormal or non-standard images unpaired by the program, which are of special interest for the biologist. (author) [French] Ce travail expose les methodes d'approche etudiees en vue

  3. Localization of the MEN1 gene to a small region within chromosome 11q13 by deletion mapping in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystroem, C.; Larsson, C.; Blomberg, C.; Nordenskjoeld, M.; Sandelin, K.; Falkmer, U.; Werner, S.; Skogseid, B.; Oeberg, K.

    1990-01-01

    The gene for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), and inherited predisposition to neuroendocrine neoplasm of the parathyroid glands, the pancreatic islet parenchyma, and the anterior pituitary gland, was recently mapped to chromosome 11q13 based on genetic linkage in families. The authors now show that the pathogenesis of MEN1-associated parathyroid lesions involves unmasking of a recessive mutation at the disease locus and that sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism shares the same mechanisms. By examination of allele losses in MEN1-associated lesions, they could define deletions of chromosome 11 and map the MEN1 locus to a small region within chromosome band 11q13, telomeric to the PYGM locus. In contrast, a low incidence of deletions involving the MEN1 gene was found in sporadic pituitary adenomas

  4. Comparative karyotype analysis and chromosome evolution in the genus Aplastodiscus (Cophomantini, Hylinae, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Simone

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frogs of the Tribe Cophomantini present, in general, 2n = 24 karyotype, but data on Aplastodiscus showed variation in diploid number from 2n = 24 to 2n = 18. Five species were karyotyped, one of them for the first time, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques, with the aim to perform a comprehensive comparative analysis towards the understanding of chromosome evolution in light of the phylogeny. Results Aplastodiscus perviridis showed 2n = 24, A. arildae and A. eugenioi, 2n = 22, A. callipygius, 2n = 20, and A. leucopygius, 2n = 18. In the metaphase I cells of two species only bivalents occurred, whereas in A. arildae, A. callipygius, and A. leucopygius one tetravalent was also observed besides the bivalents. BrdU incorporation produced replication bands especially in the largest chromosomes, and a relatively good banding correspondence was noticed among some of them. Silver impregnation and FISH with an rDNA probe identified a single NOR pair: the 11 in A. perviridis and A. arildae; the 6 in A. eugenioi; and the 9 in A. callipygius and A. leucopygius. C-banding showed a predominantly centromeric distribution of the heterochromatin, and in one of the species distinct molecular composition was revealed by CMA3. The telomeric probe hybridised all chromosome ends and additionally disclosed the presence of telomere-like sequences in centromeric regions of three species. Conclusions Based on the hypothesis of 2n = 24 ancestral karyotype for Aplastodiscus, and considering the karyotype differences and similarities, two evolutionary pathways through fusion events were suggested. One of them corresponded to the reduction of 2n = 24 to 22, and the other, the reduction of 2n = 24 to 20, and subsequently to 18. Regarding the NOR, two conditions were recognised: plesiomorphy, represented by the homeologous small-sized NOR-bearing pairs, and derivation, represented by the NOR in

  5. Chromosomal analysis of blastocyst derived from monopronucleated ICSI zygotes: approach by double trophectoderm biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Silvia; Vidal, Francesca; Coll, Lluc; Veiga, Anna; Boada, Montserrat

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to increase the knowledge about monopronucleated ICSI-derived blastocysts, analyzing trophectoderm biopsies by aCGH and FISH to evaluate their chromosome constitution. Fifteen monopronucleated ICSI-derived blastocysts were studied. Double trophectoderm biopsy was performed and analyzed by FISH and aCGH. The blastocysts were classified according to chromosome constitution. Disagreements between the two techniques were assessed. Results obtained after FISH and aCGH analyses showed the following: 20% (3/15) and 60% (9/15) diploid females, respectively; 26.7% (4/15) and 26.7% (4/15) diploid males, respectively; and 53.3% (8/15) and 13.3% (2/15) mosaics, respectively. No mosaic male embryos were found using FISH or aCGH. There were disagreements in 40% (6/15) of the cases due to the higher detection of mosaicism by FISH compared to aCGH. The combination of FISH and aCGH has been shown to be a suitable approach to increase the knowledge about monopronucleated ICSI-derived embryos. FISH analysis of blastocysts derived from monopronucleated ICSI zygotes enabled us to conclude that aCGH underestimates haploidy. Some diploid embryos diagnosed by aCGH are in fact mosaic. In cases where these embryos would be used for reproductive purposes, extra analysis of parental genome origin is recommended.

  6. Analysis of the conservation of synteny between Fugu and human chromosome 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koop Ben F

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pufferfish Fugu rubripes (Fugu with its compact genome is increasingly recognized as an important vertebrate model for comparative genomic studies. In particular, large regions of conserved synteny between human and Fugu genomes indicate its utility to identify disease-causing genes. The human chromosome 12p12 is frequently deleted in various hematological malignancies and solid tumors, but the actual tumor suppressor gene remains unidentified. Results We investigated approximately 200 kb of the genomic region surrounding the ETV6 locus in Fugu (fETV6 in order to find conserved functional features, such as genes or regulatory regions, that could give insight into the nature of the genes targeted by deletions in human cancer cells. Seven genes were identified near the fETV6 locus. We found that the synteny with human chromosome 12 was conserved, but extensive genomic rearrangements occurred between the Fugu and human ETV6 loci. Conclusion This comparative analysis led to the identification of previously uncharacterized genes in the human genome and some potentially important regulatory sequences as well. This is a good indication that the analysis of the compact Fugu genome will be valuable to identify functional features that have been conserved throughout the evolution of vertebrates.

  7. Analysis of B chromosome nondisjunction induced by the r-X1 deficiency in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shih-Hsuan; Peng, Shu-Fen; Cheng, Ya-Ming

    2017-11-20

    The maize B chromosome typically undergoes nondisjunction during the second microspore division. For normal A chromosomes, the r-X1 deficiency in maize can induce nondisjunction during the second megaspore and first microspore divisions. However, it is not known whether the r-X1 deficiency also induces nondisjunction of the maize B chromosome during these cell divisions. To answer this question, chromosome numbers were determined in the progeny of r-X1/R-r female parents carrying two B chromosomes. Some of the r-X1-lacking progeny (21.2%) contained zero or two B chromosomes. However, a much higher percentage of the r-X1-containing progeny (43.4%) exhibited zero or two B chromosomes, but none displayed more than two B chromosomes. Thus, the results indicated that the r-X1 deficiency could also induce nondisjunction of the B chromosome during the second megaspore division; moreover, the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division. In addition, pollen grains from plants with two B chromosomes lacking or exhibiting the r-X1 deficiency were compared via pollen fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a B chromosome-specific probe. The results revealed that the r-X1 deficiency could induce the occurrence of B chromosome nondisjunction during the first microspore division and that the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division at a lower frequency. Our data shed more light on the behavior of the maize B chromosome during cell division.

  8. The role of fusion in ant chromosome evolution: insights from cytogenetic analysis using a molecular phylogenetic approach in the genus mycetophylax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Danon Clemes; das Graças Pompolo, Silvia; Cristiano, Maykon Passos; Tavares, Mara Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Among insect taxa, ants exhibit one of the most variable chromosome numbers ranging from n = 1 to n = 60. This high karyotype diversity is suggested to be correlated to ants diversification. The karyotype evolution of ants is usually understood in terms of Robertsonian rearrangements towards an increase in chromosome numbers. The ant genus Mycetophylax is a small monogynous basal Attini ant (Formicidae: Myrmicinae), endemic to sand dunes along the Brazilian coastlines. A recent taxonomic revision validates three species, Mycetophylax morschi, M. conformis and M. simplex. In this paper, we cytogenetically characterized all species that belongs to the genus and analyzed the karyotypic evolution of Mycetophylax in the context of a molecular phylogeny and ancestral character state reconstruction. M. morschi showed a polymorphic number of chromosomes, with colonies showing 2n = 26 and 2n = 30 chromosomes. M. conformis presented a diploid chromosome number of 30 chromosomes, while M. simplex showed 36 chromosomes. The probabilistic models suggest that the ancestral haploid chromosome number of Mycetophylax was 17 (Likelihood framework) or 18 (Bayesian framework). The analysis also suggested that fusions were responsible for the evolutionary reduction in chromosome numbers of M. conformis and M. morschi karyotypes whereas fission may determines the M. simplex karyotype. These results obtained show the importance of fusions in chromosome changes towards a chromosome number reduction in Formicidae and how a phylogenetic background can be used to reconstruct hypotheses about chromosomes evolution.

  9. Analysis of aneuploid lines of bread wheat to map chromosomal locations of genes controlling root hair length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Rathjen, Tina; Weligama, Kumara; Forrest, Kerrie; Hayden, Matthew; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    Long root hairs enable the efficient uptake of poorly mobile nutrients such as phosphorus. Mapping the chromosomal locations of genes that control root hair length can help exploit the natural variation within crops to develop improved cultivars. Genetic stocks of the wheat cultivar 'Chinese Spring' were used to map genes that control root hair length. Aneuploid stocks of 'Chinese Spring' were screened using a rapid method based on rhizosheath size and then selected lines were assayed for root hair length to identify chromosomes harbouring genes controlling root hair length. A series of lines with various fractional deletions of candidate chromosomes were then screened to map the root hair loci more accurately. A line with a deletion in chromosome 5A was analysed with a 90 000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The phosphorus acquisition efficiency (PAE) of one deletion line was compared with that of euploid 'Chinese Spring' by growing the seedlings in pots at low and luxury phosphorus supplies. Chromosomes 1A, 1D and 5A were found to harbour genes controlling root hair length. The 90 000 SNP array identified two candidate genes controlling root hair length located on chromosome 5A. The line with a deletion in chromosome 5A had root hairs that were approx. 20 % shorter than euploid 'Chinese Spring', but this was insufficient to reduce its PAE. A rapid screen for rhizosheath size enabled chromosomal regions controlling root hair length to be mapped in the wheat cultivar 'Chinese Spring' and subsequent analysis with an SNP array identified candidate genes controlling root hair length. The difference in root hair length between euploid 'Chinese Spring' and a deletion line identified in the rapid screen was still apparent, albeit attenuated, when the seedlings were grown on a fully fertilized soil. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Chromosome segregation analysis in human embryos obtained from couples involving male carriers of reciprocal or Robertsonian translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Yilmaz

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of chromosome segregation patterns in cleavage stage embryos obtained from male carriers of Robertsonian (ROB and reciprocal (REC translocations undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD at our reproductive center. We used FISH to analyze chromosome segregation in 308 day 3 cleavage stage embryos obtained from 26 patients. The percentage of embryos consistent with normal or balanced segregation (55.1% vs. 27.1% and clinical pregnancy (62.5% vs. 19.2% rates were higher in ROB than the REC translocation carriers. Involvement of non-acrocentric chromosome(s or terminal breakpoint(s in reciprocal translocations was associated with an increase in the percent of embryos consistent with adjacent 1 but with a decrease in 3∶1 segregation. Similar results were obtained in the analysis of nontransferred embryos donated for research. 3∶1 segregation was the most frequent segregation type in both day 3 (31% and spare (35% embryos obtained from carriers of t(11;22(q23;q11, the only non-random REC with the same breakpoint reported in a large number of unrelated families mainly identified by the birth of a child with derivative chromosome 22. These results suggest that chromosome segregation patterns in day 3 and nontransferred embryos obtained from male translocation carriers vary with the type of translocation and involvement of acrocentric chromosome(s or terminal breakpoint(s. These results should be helpful in estimating reproductive success in translocation carriers undergoing PGD.

  11. Molecular cloning of the α subunit of human and guinea pig leukocyte adhesion glycoprotein Mo1: Chromosomal localization and homology to the α subunits of integrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaout, M.A.; Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Pierce, M.W.; Harris, P.; Tenen, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface-glycoprotein Mo1 is a member of the family of leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (Leu-CAMs) that includes lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and p150,95. Each Leu-CAM is a heterodimer with a distinct α subunit noncovalently associated with a common β subunit. The authors describe the isolation and analysis of two partial cDNA clones encoding the α subunit of the Leu-CAM Mo1 in humans and guinea pigs. A monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope in the carboxyl-terminal portion of the guinea pig α chain was used for immunoscreening a λgt11 expression library. The sequence of a 378-base-pair insert from one immunoreactive clone revealed a single continuous open reading frame encoding 126 amino acids including a 26-amino acid tryptic peptide isolated from the purified guinea pig α subunit. A cDNA clone of identical size was isolated from a human monocyte/lymphocyte cDNA library by using the guinea pig clone as a probe. The human clone also encoded a 126-amino acid peptide including the sequence of an additional tryptic peptide present in purified human Mo1α chain. Southern analysis of DNA from hamster-human hybrids localized the human Mo1α chain to chromosome 16, which has been shown to contain the gene for the α chain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1. These data suggest that the α subunits of Leu-CAMs evolved by gene duplication from a common ancestral gene and strengthen the hypothesis that the α subunits of these heterodimeric cell adhesion molecules on myeloid and lymphoid cells, platelets, and fibroblasts are evolutionary related

  12. Cluster analysis of European Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes using the discrete Laplace method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Morling, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The European Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype distribution has previously been analysed in various ways. Here, we introduce a new way of analysing population substructure using a new method based on clustering within the discrete Laplace exponential family that models the probabi......The European Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype distribution has previously been analysed in various ways. Here, we introduce a new way of analysing population substructure using a new method based on clustering within the discrete Laplace exponential family that models...... the probability distribution of the Y-STR haplotypes. Creating a consistent statistical model of the haplotypes enables us to perform a wide range of analyses. Previously, haplotype frequency estimation using the discrete Laplace method has been validated. In this paper we investigate how the discrete Laplace...... method can be used for cluster analysis to further validate the discrete Laplace method. A very important practical fact is that the calculations can be performed on a normal computer. We identified two sub-clusters of the Eastern and Western European Y-STR haplotypes similar to results of previous...

  13. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Walton, Jay R; Parshad, Rana D; Storey, Katie; Boggess, May

    2014-06-01

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species.

  14. Family-based multi-SNP X chromosome analysis using parental information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison S. Wise

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method for association analysis of haplotypes on the X chromosome that offers both improved power and robustness to population stratification in studies of affected offspring and their parents if all three have been genotyped. The method makes use of assumed parental haplotype exchangeability, a weaker assumption than Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Parental haplotype exchangeability requires that in the source population, of the three X chromosome haplotypes carried by the two parents, each is equally likely to be carried by the father. We propose a pseudo-sibling approach that exploits that exchangeability assumption. Our method extends the single-SNP PIX-LRT method to multiple SNPs in a high linkage block. We describe methods for testing the parental haplotype exchangeability assumption and also for determining how apparent violations can be distinguished from true fetal effects or maternally-mediated effects. We show results of simulations that demonstrate nominal type I error rate and good power. The methods are then applied to dbGaP data on the birth defect oral cleft, using both Asian and Caucasian families with cleft.

  15. Comparative cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and premature centromere division in persons exposed to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovicic, D.; Rakic, B.; Vukov, T.; Pajic, J.; Milacic, S.; Kovacevic, R.; Stevanovic, M.; Drakulic, D.; Bukvic, N.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the presence of correlation between the frequency of premature centromere division (PCD) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in metaphases in persons professionally exposed to radionuclides. Biological dosimetry was performed by conventional cytogenetic technique. The presence of PCD was confirmed by Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The L1.84 probe (specific for centromeric region of chromosome 18) was used. The analysis included 50 subjects employed in the Clinical Center of Serbia (C) (the average age of 45.24 ± 1.18 and the average exposition time 17.96 ± 1.15) and 40 subjects in control group (K) (the average age of 44.40 ± 0.98 and the average years of employment 19.67 ± 0.98 years) which were not exposed to genotoxic agents in their workplaces. The results showed that frequencies of CA and PCD were statistically significantly higher in subjects exposed to radionuclides than in the control group (Mann-Whitney U test, P [sr

  16. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xueying

    2013-05-24

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  17. Genomic expression analysis of rat chromosome 4 for skeletal traits at femoral neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Imranul; Sun, Qiwei; Liu, Lixiang; Koller, Daniel L; Liu, Yunlong; Edenberg, Howard J; Econs, Michael J; Foroud, Tatiana; Turner, Charles H

    2008-10-08

    Hip fracture is the most devastating osteoporotic fracture type with significant morbidity and mortality. Several studies in humans and animal models identified chromosomal regions linked to hip size and bone mass. Previously, we identified that the region of 4q21-q41 on rat chromosome (Chr) 4 harbors multiple femoral neck quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in inbred Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis (LEW) rats. The purpose of this study is to identify the candidate genes for femoral neck structure and density by correlating gene expression in the proximal femur with the femoral neck phenotypes linked to the QTLs on Chr 4. RNA was extracted from proximal femora of 4-wk-old rats from F344 and LEW strains, and two other strains, Copenhagen 2331 and Dark Agouti, were used as a negative control. Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix Rat Genome 230 2.0 arrays. A total of 99 genes in the 4q21-q41 region were differentially expressed (P level of the gene in that strain. A total of 18 candidate genes were strongly correlated (r(2) > 0.50) with femoral neck width and prioritized for further analysis. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed 14 of 18 of the candidate genes. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed several direct or indirect relationships among the candidate genes related to angiogenesis (VEGF), bone growth (FGF2), bone formation (IGF2 and IGF2BP3), and resorption (TNF). This study provides a shortened list of genetic determinants of skeletal traits at the hip and may lead to novel approaches for prevention and treatment of hip fracture.

  18. Use of M-FISH analysis of α-particle-induced chromosome aberrations for the assessment of chromosomal breakpoint distribution and complex aberration formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.M.; Sumption, N.D.; Papworth, D.G.; Goodhead, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Double strand breaks (dsb) of varying complexity are an important class of damage induced after exposure to ionising radiation and are considered to be the critical lesion for the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Assuming the basic principles of the 'Breakage and Reunion' theory, dsb represent 'breakage' and aberrations are produced from the illegitimate repair (reunion) of the resulting dsb free-'ends'. Numerous questions relate to this process, in particular, (1) do chromosomal breakpoint 'hot-spots' that represent sensitive sites for breakage and/or regions of preferential repair/mis-repair, exist? (2) Considering that individual chromosomes and chromosome regions occupy discrete territories in the interphase nucleus, could rearrangements between specific chromosomes reflect domain organisation at the time of damage? (3) Assuming the topological constraints imposed on chromatin are not dramatically influenced by the presence of dsb, then how do multiple 'ends' from different chromosomes proximally associate for mis-repair as complex chromosome aberrations? To address these questions, we have analysed the chromosome aberrations induced in peripheral blood lymphocytes after exposure to 0.5 Gy α -particles (mean of 1 α -particle/cell) using the technique of M-FISH. This technique 'paints' all the human chromosomes (excluding homologues) uniquely, allowing chromosomal mis-repair to be visualised as differential colour-junctions and in addition, enhanced DAPI banding enables gross breakpoint assignation of these colour junctions. To test for non-randomness, we are comparing the frequency of occurrence of breakpoints obtained up to now with the F98 glioma model our knowledbased on chromosome length. Similarly, the involvement of each chromosome relative to other chromosomes within individual rearrangements can be determined by assuming the volume of chromosome domains is also proportional to their length. The current data to be presented will

  19. G-banding analysis of radiation-induced chromosome damage in lymphocytes of Hiroshima atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo; Nakashima, Eiji.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the G-banding analysis of somatic chromosomes in lymphocytes from 63 atomic-bomb survivors in Hiroshima to determine the type and frequency of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Summary findings are as follows: (1) The cells with stable-type chromosome aberrations (Cs cells) predominated among the aberrant cells and showed a dose-dependent increase. All stable chromosome aberrations were classified into 9 types: reciprocal translocations (t), translocations of complex type (t-cx), insertions (ins), complex exchanges (e-cx), peri- and paracentric inversions (inv-peri, inv-para), terminal and interstitial deletions (del-ter, del-int), and unidentified rearrangements. Aberration frequencies increased with increasing dose for all aberration categories. Among the chromosome aberrations classified, reciprocal translocations predominated in all dose ranges. The frequencies of complex aberrations were low at the low-dose level but increased sharply as dose increased. (2) The linear model was fitted to test the dose-response relationship for Cs-cell frequencies. With a constant neutron relative biological effectiveness of 10, an estimated linear slope of 15.2%/Sv was obtained for Dosimetry System 1986 bone-marrow dose with an intercept of 2.9% at dose 0. The present observation confirmed a wide variability of Cs-cell frequencies among individual survivors in every dose category.(3) Statistical analysis of data on 3370 break sites showed good correlations between relative DNA content and the distribution of chromosome breaks involved in translocations, although the involvement of chromosome 1 is significantly higher, for as-yet-unknown reasons. (J.P.N.)

  20. Comparative sequence analysis of Solanum and Arabidopsis in a hot spot for pathogen resistance on potato chromosome V reveals a patchwork of conserved and rapidly evolving genome segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruggmann Rémy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative phenotypic variation of agronomic characters in crop plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors (quantitative trait loci = QTL. To understand the molecular basis of such QTL, the identification of the underlying genes is of primary interest and DNA sequence analysis of the genomic regions harboring QTL is a prerequisite for that. QTL mapping in potato (Solanum tuberosum has identified a region on chromosome V tagged by DNA markers GP21 and GP179, which contains a number of important QTL, among others QTL for resistance to late blight caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and to root cyst nematodes. Results To obtain genomic sequence for the targeted region on chromosome V, two local BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome contigs were constructed and sequenced, which corresponded to parts of the homologous chromosomes of the diploid, heterozygous genotype P6/210. Two contiguous sequences of 417,445 and 202,781 base pairs were assembled and annotated. Gene-by-gene co-linearity was disrupted by non-allelic insertions of retrotransposon elements, stretches of diverged intergenic sequences, differences in gene content and gene order. The latter was caused by inversion of a 70 kbp genomic fragment. These features were also found in comparison to orthologous sequence contigs from three homeologous chromosomes of Solanum demissum, a wild tuber bearing species. Functional annotation of the sequence identified 48 putative open reading frames (ORF in one contig and 22 in the other, with an average of one ORF every 9 kbp. Ten ORFs were classified as resistance-gene-like, 11 as F-box-containing genes, 13 as transposable elements and three as transcription factors. Comparing potato to Arabidopsis thaliana annotated proteins revealed five micro-syntenic blocks of three to seven ORFs with A. thaliana chromosomes 1, 3 and 5. Conclusion Comparative sequence analysis revealed highly conserved collinear regions

  1. High-Throughput Live-Cell Microscopy Analysis of Association Between Chromosome Domains and the Nucleolus in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renjie; Normand, Christophe; Gadal, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Spatial organization of the genome has important impacts on all aspects of chromosome biology, including transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Frequent interactions of some chromosome domains with specific nuclear compartments, such as the nucleolus, are now well documented using genome-scale methods. However, direct measurement of distance and interaction frequency between loci requires microscopic observation of specific genomic domains and the nucleolus, followed by image analysis to allow quantification. The fluorescent repressor operator system (FROS) is an invaluable method to fluorescently tag DNA sequences and investigate chromosome position and dynamics in living cells. This chapter describes a combination of methods to define motion and region of confinement of a locus relative to the nucleolus in cell's nucleus, from fluorescence acquisition to automated image analysis using two dedicated pipelines.

  2. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  3. Understanding spatial organizations of chromosomes via statistical analysis of Hi-C data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming; Deng, Ke; Qin, Zhaohui; Liu, Jun S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how chromosomes fold provides insights into the transcription regulation, hence, the functional state of the cell. Using the next generation sequencing technology, the recently developed Hi-C approach enables a global view of spatial chromatin organization in the nucleus, which substantially expands our knowledge about genome organization and function. However, due to multiple layers of biases, noises and uncertainties buried in the protocol of Hi-C experiments, analyzing and interpreting Hi-C data poses great challenges, and requires novel statistical methods to be developed. This article provides an overview of recent Hi-C studies and their impacts on biomedical research, describes major challenges in statistical analysis of Hi-C data, and discusses some perspectives for future research. PMID:26124977

  4. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Petitpierre, Eduard; Elgueta, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Br?thes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864) show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864) has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of Henicotherus porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays ...

  5. Genotype-phenotype analysis of recombinant chromosome 4 syndrome: an array-CGH study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmat, Morteza; Hemmat, Omid; Anguiano, Arturo; Boyar, Fatih Z; El Naggar, Mohammed; Wang, Jia-Chi; Wang, Borris T; Sahoo, Trilochan; Owen, Renius; Haddadin, Mary

    2013-05-02

    Recombinant chromosome 4, a rare constitutional rearrangement arising from pericentric inversion, comprises a duplicated segment of 4p13~p15→4pter and a deleted segment of 4q35→4qter. To date, 10 cases of recombinant chromosome 4 have been reported. We describe the second case in which array-CGH was used to characterize recombinant chromosome 4 syndrome. The patient was a one-year old boy with consistent clinical features. Conventional cytogenetics and FISH documented a recombinant chromosome 4, derived from a paternal pericentric inversion, leading to partial trisomy 4p and partial monosomy of 4q. Array-CGH, performed to further characterize the rearranged chromosome 4 and delineate the breakpoints, documented a small (4.36 Mb) 4q35.1 terminal deletion and a large (23.81 Mb) 4p15.1 terminal duplication. Genotype-phenotype analysis of 10 previously reported cases and the present case indicated relatively consistent clinical features and breakpoints. This consistency was more evident in our case and another characterized by array-CGH, where both showed the common breakpoints of p15.1 and q35.1. A genotype-phenotype correlation study between rec(4), dup(4p), and del(4q) syndromes revealed that urogenital and cardiac defects are probably due to the deletion of 4q whereas the other clinical features are likely due to 4p duplication. Our findings support that the clinical features of patients with rec(4) are relatively consistent and specific to the regions of duplication or deletion. Recombinant chromosome 4 syndrome thus appears to be a discrete entity that can be suspected on the basis of clinical features or specific deleted and duplicated chromosomal regions.

  6. Analysis of 62 hybrid assembled human Y chromosomes exposes rapid structural changes and high rates of gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurits Skov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The human Y-chromosome does not recombine across its male-specific part and is therefore an excellent marker of human migrations. It also plays an important role in male fertility. However, its evolution is difficult to fully understand because of repetitive sequences, inverted repeats and the potentially large role of gene conversion. Here we perform an evolutionary analysis of 62 Y-chromosomes of Danish descent sequenced using a wide range of library insert sizes and high coverage, thus allowing large regions of these chromosomes to be well assembled. These include 17 father-son pairs, which we use to validate variation calling. Using a recent method that can integrate variants based on both mapping and de novo assembly, we genotype 10898 SNVs and 2903 indels (max length of 27241 bp in our sample and show by father-son concordance and experimental validation that the non-recurrent SNP and indel variation on the Y chromosome tree is called very accurately. This includes variation called in a 0.9 Mb centromeric heterochromatic region, which is by far the most variable in the Y chromosome. Among the variation is also longer sequence-stretches not present in the reference genome but shared with the chimpanzee Y chromosome. We analyzed 2.7 Mb of large inverted repeats (palindromes for variation patterns among the two palindrome arms and identified 603 mutation and 416 gene conversions events. We find clear evidence for GC-biased gene conversion in the palindromes (and a balancing AT mutation bias, but irrespective of this, also a strong bias towards gene conversion towards the ancestral state, suggesting that palindromic gene conversion may alleviate Muller's ratchet. Finally, we also find a large number of large-scale gene duplications and deletions in the palindromic regions (at least 24 and find that such events can consist of complex combinations of simultaneous insertions and deletions of long stretches of the Y chromosome.

  7. The analysis of distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Li Jin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic x-ray workers. Methods: The breakpoints of lymphocyte chromosomes are analyzed using G-banding. Results: There are 146 breakpoints among 3545 metaphase in 37 cases of X-ray workers. There are statistically significant differences between observed values and expected values (χ 2 =42.82, df=23, P 0.05). Conclusion: The chromosome aberration breakpoints of medical diagnostic X-ray workers are non-random. The observed values of breakpoint numbers are higher than those of the expected values in 7 and 14 chromosomes (P<0.05)

  8. Chromosome painting reveals asynaptic full alignment of homologs and HIM-8-dependent remodeling of X chromosome territories during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Kentaro; Mlynarczyk-Evans, Susanna; Villeneuve, Anne M

    2011-08-01

    During early meiotic prophase, a nucleus-wide reorganization leads to sorting of chromosomes into homologous pairs and to establishing associations between homologous chromosomes along their entire lengths. Here, we investigate global features of chromosome organization during this process, using a chromosome painting method in whole-mount Caenorhabditis elegans gonads that enables visualization of whole chromosomes along their entire lengths in the context of preserved 3D nuclear architecture. First, we show that neither spatial proximity of premeiotic chromosome territories nor chromosome-specific timing is a major factor driving homolog pairing. Second, we show that synaptonemal complex-independent associations can support full lengthwise juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes. Third, we reveal a prominent elongation of chromosome territories during meiotic prophase that initiates prior to homolog association and alignment. Mutant analysis indicates that chromosome movement mediated by association of chromosome pairing centers (PCs) with mobile patches of the nuclear envelope (NE)-spanning SUN-1/ZYG-12 protein complexes is not the primary driver of territory elongation. Moreover, we identify new roles for the X chromosome PC (X-PC) and X-PC binding protein HIM-8 in promoting elongation of X chromosome territories, separable from their role(s) in mediating local stabilization of pairing and association of X chromosomes with mobile SUN-1/ZYG-12 patches. Further, we present evidence that HIM-8 functions both at and outside of PCs to mediate chromosome territory elongation. These and other data support a model in which synapsis-independent elongation of chromosome territories, driven by PC binding proteins, enables lengthwise juxtaposition of chromosomes, thereby facilitating assessment of their suitability as potential pairing partners.

  9. Chromosome Painting Reveals Asynaptic Full Alignment of Homologs and HIM-8–Dependent Remodeling of X Chromosome Territories during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Kentaro; Mlynarczyk-Evans, Susanna; Villeneuve, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    During early meiotic prophase, a nucleus-wide reorganization leads to sorting of chromosomes into homologous pairs and to establishing associations between homologous chromosomes along their entire lengths. Here, we investigate global features of chromosome organization during this process, using a chromosome painting method in whole-mount Caenorhabditis elegans gonads that enables visualization of whole chromosomes along their entire lengths in the context of preserved 3D nuclear architecture. First, we show that neither spatial proximity of premeiotic chromosome territories nor chromosome-specific timing is a major factor driving homolog pairing. Second, we show that synaptonemal complex-independent associations can support full lengthwise juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes. Third, we reveal a prominent elongation of chromosome territories during meiotic prophase that initiates prior to homolog association and alignment. Mutant analysis indicates that chromosome movement mediated by association of chromosome pairing centers (PCs) with mobile patches of the nuclear envelope (NE)–spanning SUN-1/ZYG-12 protein complexes is not the primary driver of territory elongation. Moreover, we identify new roles for the X chromosome PC (X-PC) and X-PC binding protein HIM-8 in promoting elongation of X chromosome territories, separable from their role(s) in mediating local stabilization of pairing and association of X chromosomes with mobile SUN-1/ZYG-12 patches. Further, we present evidence that HIM-8 functions both at and outside of PCs to mediate chromosome territory elongation. These and other data support a model in which synapsis-independent elongation of chromosome territories, driven by PC binding proteins, enables lengthwise juxtaposition of chromosomes, thereby facilitating assessment of their suitability as potential pairing partners. PMID:21876678

  10. Numerical analysis of the Anderson localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markos, P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate, by simple numerical simulations, the main transport properties of disordered electron systems. These systems undergo the metal insulator transition when either Fermi energy crosses the mobility edge or the strength of the disorder increases over critical value. We study how disorder affects the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of electronic eigenstates in the diffusive and insulating regime, as well as in the critical region of the metal-insulator transition. Then, we introduce the transfer matrix and conductance, and we discuss how the quantum character of the electron propagation influences the transport properties of disordered samples. In the weakly disordered systems, the weak localization and anti-localization as well as the universal conductance fluctuation are numerically simulated and discussed. The localization in the one dimensional system is described and interpreted as a purely quantum effect. Statistical properties of the conductance in the critical and localized regimes are demonstrated. Special attention is given to the numerical study of the transport properties of the critical regime and to the numerical verification of the single parameter scaling theory of localization. Numerical data for the critical exponent in the orthogonal models in dimension 2 < d ≤ 5 are compared with theoretical predictions. We argue that the discrepancy between the theory and numerical data is due to the absence of the self-averaging of transmission quantities. This complicates the analytical analysis of the disordered systems. Finally, theoretical methods of description of weakly disordered systems are explained and their possible generalization to the localized regime is discussed. Since we concentrate on the one-electron propagation at zero temperature, no effects of electron-electron interaction and incoherent scattering are discussed in the paper (Author)

  11. Analysis of the origin of the extra chromosome in trisomy 8 in 4 cases of spontaneous abortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, P; von Beust, G; Bugge, M; Karadima, G; Vassilopoulos, D; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Petersen, M B

    1998-01-01

    To determine the origin of the extra chromosome in trisomy 8 in spontaneous abortions. We analyzed 4 cases of nonmosaic trisomy 8 in 1st-trimester spontaneous abortions and their parents with DNA polymorphism analysis using microsatellite DNA markers. In 3 cases the extra chromosome was maternal in origin and in 1 case paternal in origin. In 2 of the cases the nondisjunction had occurred in maternal meiosis, while the other 2 cases were consistent with a postzygotic (mitotic) origin of the additional chromosome. Although a small number of cases studied, these results suggest differences from the common autosomal trisomies 21, 18, 16, and 13 where the vast majority of cases are due to errors in maternal meiosis.

  12. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DY...

  13. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness ...

  14. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and clinical manifestations of a case with de novo mosaic ring chromosome 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jye-Siung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Clinical and molecular cytogenetic investigations of a newborn girl exhibiting facial dysmorphism with developmental delay. Methods Phenotypic evaluation was first applied to examine the proband's developmental status. Computed tomography and colour transcranial Doppler were used then to investigate her brain structure and function. Subsequently, chromosomal abnormalities were examined by karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization was performed to investigate size of fragments lost at the two distal ends of the ring chromosome 7. In addition, multicolour banding was applied to rule out structural rearrangement occurs in between the ring chromosome 7. Results The proband was born with mosaic supernumerary ring chromosome 7, without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral blood lymphocytes. The distal arm of chromosome 7p (at least 255 kb from the telomere was part of an extra ring chromosome 7. In addition, the distal arm of 7q, at least 8 kb from the telomere, was missing. There was no other chromosomal rearrangement detected by multicolour banding. Interpretation This is the 19th reported case of complete ring chromosome 7 mosaicism and the first survived case with mosaic supernumerary ring 7 without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral lymphocytes.

  15. Mapping the pericentric heterochromatin by comparative genomic hybridization analysis and chromosome deletions in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    He, Bing; Caudy, Amy; Parsons, Lance; Rosebrock, Adam; Pane, Attilio; Raj, Sandeep; Wieschaus, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin represents a significant portion of eukaryotic genomes and has essential structural and regulatory functions. Its molecular organization is largely unknown due to difficulties in sequencing through and assembling repetitive sequences enriched in the heterochromatin. Here we developed a novel strategy using chromosomal rearrangements and embryonic phenotypes to position unmapped Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatic sequence to specific chromosomal regions. By excluding seque...

  16. Localization of genetic elements of intact and derivative chromosome 11 and 22 territories in nuclei of Ewing sarcoma cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taslerová, R.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva; Jirsová, Pavla; Kodet, R.; Kozubek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 155, č. 3 (2006), s. 493-504 ISSN 1047-8477 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/04/0907; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8241; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5004306; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : chromatin structure * chromosome territory * Ewing sarcoma Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.496, year: 2006

  17. The X chromosome in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégu, Teddy; Aeby, Eric; Lee, Jeannie T

    2017-06-01

    Extensive 3D folding is required to package a genome into the tiny nuclear space, and this packaging must be compatible with proper gene expression. Thus, in the well-hierarchized nucleus, chromosomes occupy discrete territories and adopt specific 3D organizational structures that facilitate interactions between regulatory elements for gene expression. The mammalian X chromosome exemplifies this structure-function relationship. Recent studies have shown that, upon X-chromosome inactivation, active and inactive X chromosomes localize to different subnuclear positions and adopt distinct chromosomal architectures that reflect their activity states. Here, we review the roles of long non-coding RNAs, chromosomal organizational structures and the subnuclear localization of chromosomes as they relate to X-linked gene expression.

  18. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding human DNA topoisomerase II and localization of the gene to chromosome region 17q21-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai-Pflugfelder, M.; Liu, L.F.; Liu, A.A.; Tewey, K.M.; Whang-Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping cDNA clones encoding human DNA topoisomerase II were identified by two independent methods. In one, a human cDNA library in phage λ was screened by hybridization with a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding a stretch of seven amino acids found in yeast and Drosophila DNA topoisomerase II; in the other, a different human cDNA library in a λgt11 expression vector was screened for the expression of antigenic determinants that are recognized by rabbit antibodies specific to human DNA topoisomerase II. The entire coding sequences of the human DNA topoisomerase II gene were determined from these and several additional clones, identified through the use of the cloned human TOP2 gene sequences as probes. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is encoded by a single-copy gene. The location of the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21-22 by in situ hybridization of a cloned fragment to metaphase chromosomes and by hybridization analysis with a panel of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each retaining a subset of human chromosomes

  19. Precise localization of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia and pseudoachondroplasia mutations by genetic and physical mapping of chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, R.G.; Cekleniak, J.A. [Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cohn, D.H. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1), a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia resulting in peripheral joint deformities and premature osteoarthritis, and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a more severe disorder associated with short-limbed dwarfism, have recently been mapped to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19. Chondrocytes from some PSACH patients accumulate lamellar deposits in the endoplasmic reticulum that are immunologically cross-reactive with aggrecan. However, neither aggrecan nor any known candidate gene maps to the EDM1/PSACH region of chromosome 19. Genetic linkage mapping in two lage families had placed the disease locus between D19S215 (19p12) and D19S212 (19p13.1), an interval of about 3.5 Mb. With at least five potentially informative cross-overs within this interval, recombination mapping at greater resolution was undertaken. From cosmids assigned to the region by fluorescence in situ hybridization and contig assembly, dinucleotide repeat tracts were identified for use as polymorphic genetic markers. Linkage data from three new dinucleotide repeat markers from cosmids mapped between D19S212 and D19S215 limit the EDM1/PSACH locus to an interval spanning approximately 2 Mb.

  20. Frequency and distribution analysis of chromosomal translocations induced by x-ray in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Hidalgo, Juana Ines

    2000-01-01

    The characteristic of ionizing radiation suggests that induced chromosomal damage in the form of translocations would appear to be randomly distributed. However, the outcome of tests performed in vitro and in vivo (irradiated individuals) are contradictories. The most translocation-related chromosomes, as far as some studies reveal on one hand, appear to be less involved in accordance with others. These data, together with those related to molecular mechanisms involved in translocations production suggest that in G 0 -irradiated cells, the frequency and distribution of this kind of chromosomal rearrangement, does not take place at random. They seem to be affected by in-nucleus chromosome distribution, by each chromosome's DNA length and functional features, by the efficiency of DNA repair mechanisms, and by inter individual differences. The objective of this study was to establish the frequency pattern of each human chromosome involved in radio-induced translocations, as well as to analyze the importance the chromosome length, the activity of DNA polymerase- dependant repair mechanisms, and inter individual differences within the scope of such distribution. To achieve the goals, peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors were irradiated in presence and absence of 2'-3' dideoxithimidine (ddThd), a Β - DNA polymerase inhibitor, which takes part in the base repair mechanism (B E R). The results showed that: The presence of ddThd during the irradiation increase the basal frequency of radioinduced translocations in 60 %. This result suggests that ddThd repair synthesis inhibition can be in itself a valid methodology for radiation-induced bases damage assessment, damage which if not BER-repaired may result in translocation-leading double strand breaks. A statistically significant correlation between translocation frequency and chromosome length, in terms of percentage of genome, has been noticed both in (basal) irradiation and in irradiation with ddThd inhibitor

  1. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  2. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpierre, Eduard; Elgueta, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864) show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864) has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of Henicotherus porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily.

  3. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpierre, Eduard; Elgueta, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864) show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864) has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of Henicotherus porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily. PMID:24260673

  4. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Petitpierre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864 show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864 has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of H. porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily.

  5. Expanding the boundaries of local similarity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durno, W Evan; Hanson, Niels W; Konwar, Kishori M; Hallam, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Pairwise comparison of time series data for both local and time-lagged relationships is a computationally challenging problem relevant to many fields of inquiry. The Local Similarity Analysis (LSA) statistic identifies the existence of local and lagged relationships, but determining significance through a p-value has been algorithmically cumbersome due to an intensive permutation test, shuffling rows and columns and repeatedly calculating the statistic. Furthermore, this p-value is calculated with the assumption of normality -- a statistical luxury dissociated from most real world datasets. To improve the performance of LSA on big datasets, an asymptotic upper bound on the p-value calculation was derived without the assumption of normality. This change in the bound calculation markedly improved computational speed from O(pm²n) to O(m²n), where p is the number of permutations in a permutation test, m is the number of time series, and n is the length of each time series. The bounding process is implemented as a computationally efficient software package, FASTLSA, written in C and optimized for threading on multi-core computers, improving its practical computation time. We computationally compare our approach to previous implementations of LSA, demonstrate broad applicability by analyzing time series data from public health, microbial ecology, and social media, and visualize resulting networks using the Cytoscape software. The FASTLSA software package expands the boundaries of LSA allowing analysis on datasets with millions of co-varying time series. Mapping metadata onto force-directed graphs derived from FASTLSA allows investigators to view correlated cliques and explore previously unrecognized network relationships. The software is freely available for download at: http://www.cmde.science.ubc.ca/hallam/fastLSA/.

  6. Genomic expression analysis of rat chromosome 4 for skeletal traits at femoral neck

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Imranul; Sun, Qiwei; Liu, Lixiang; Koller, Daniel L.; Liu, Yunlong; Edenberg, Howard J.; Econs, Michael J.; Foroud, Tatiana; Turner, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    Hip fracture is the most devastating osteoporotic fracture type with significant morbidity and mortality. Several studies in humans and animal models identified chromosomal regions linked to hip size and bone mass. Previously, we identified that the region of 4q21-q41 on rat chromosome (Chr) 4 harbors multiple femoral neck quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in inbred Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis (LEW) rats. The purpose of this study is to identify the candidate genes for femoral neck structure an...

  7. Enhancement of Local Climate Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, F. M.; Timofeyeva, M. M.; Dutton, J.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) will enhance its Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) to incorporate specific capabilities to meet the needs of various users including energy, health, and other communities. LCAT is an online interactive tool that provides quick and easy access to climate data and allows users to conduct analyses at the local level such as time series analysis, trend analysis, compositing, correlation and regression techniques, with others to be incorporated as needed. LCAT uses principles of Artificial Intelligence in connecting human and computer perceptions on application of data and scientific techniques in multiprocessing simultaneous users' tasks. Future development includes expanding the type of data currently imported by LCAT (historical data at stations and climate divisions) to gridded reanalysis and General Circulation Model (GCM) data, which are available on global grids and thus will allow for climate studies to be conducted at international locations. We will describe ongoing activities to incorporate NOAA Climate Forecast System (CFS) reanalysis data (CFSR), NOAA model output data, including output from the National Multi Model Ensemble Prediction System (NMME) and longer term projection models, and plans to integrate LCAT into the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and its protocols for accessing model output and observational data to ensure there is no redundancy in development of tools that facilitate scientific advancements and use of climate model information in applications. Validation and inter-comparison of forecast models will be included as part of the enhancement to LCAT. To ensure sustained development, we will investigate options for open sourcing LCAT development, in particular, through the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).

  8. Towards a cumulative biological dosimeter based on chromosome painting and digital image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, S.; Cremer, C.; Remm, B.; Hausmann, M.; Cremer, T.; Luehrs, H.; Kaick, G. van

    1990-01-01

    An approach for a long-term (cumulative) biological dosimeter is described, based on the idea that stem cells with irradiation-induced reciprocal translocations and their progeny would neither lose nor gain genetic material and thus should retain the same proliferative potential as non-irradiated cells. Rapid detection of chromosome translocations has become possible in irradiated human lymphocytes by a newly developed fluorescent in situ hybridization method called 'chromosome painting'. We have used this approach to score chromosome aberrations, including translocation events, in over 8000 chromosomes painted in lymphocytes from two patients exposed to an X-ray contrast medium containing Th-232 and from two age-matched control persons. The percentage of both the total fraction of aberrant painted chromosomes and of translocations was found significantly higher in exposed patients. A program was developed which can automatically determine the number of normal and aberrant painted chromosomes and classify evaluated cells as 'normal' or 'aberrant' within 1 to 2 seconds. (orig.) [de

  9. Radiobiological application of atomic force microscopy. Analysis on human chromosomes in culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Makoto; Kinjo, Yasuhito

    1995-01-01

    We have proposed a 'Heterogeneous Chromatin Target Model' on the regulating mechanisms involved in chromosome mutation due to ionizing radiations. The heterogeneity of chromatin is derived from the highly condensed organization of chromatin segments that consist of hypersensitive and fragile sites in the fluctuating assembly of nucleosome clusters (superbeads). The above consideration is going to be subjected to a new experimental approach applying the atomic force microscope (AFM), one of the most promising members of a family of scanning probe microscope (SPM). The AFM can be operated in liquid as well as in air. A living specimen can be examined without any preparative procedures (for instance, fixation, staining, vecuum evaporation and so on). Micromanipulation of the isolated chromosome is also possible by the precise positional control of a cantilever on the nanometer scale. In the present report, the mitotic metaphase chromosomes released from living cells (human lymphocytes RPMI) were spread on the clean surface of distilled water filled in a trough. The spread surface film, in which the chromosomes were embedded, was picked up and adhered tightly on a specimen substrate made of silicon. The whole-mounted chromosome were submerged in a solution of culture medium and observed within a liquid immersion cell for AFM. We used an AFM system, SPA-300 made by Seiko Instruments. The particulate chromatin segments of nucleosome clusters (superbeads) were clearly observed within mitotic human chromosomes in a living hydrated condition. These findings support the heterogeneity of chromatin target in a living cell. (author)

  10. [Introduction of hexaploid of Chinese narcissus and analysis of its chromosome change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Ya Nan; Wang, Ya Ying; Tian, Hui Qiao

    2007-06-01

    Anthers of Chinese narcissus (Narcissus tazetta L. var chinesis Roem) were used as explants for callus induction and plant regeneration. About 80% anthers produced callus and 28% of the callus differentiated out bulbs, making a good experiment system of tissue culture of Chinese narcissus for further cellular and gene engineering. The 700 callus were treated by 0.5% colchicin for 5-6 days and then transformed into a MS medium containing 3 mg/L 6-BA to induce differentiation. 90 bulbs were obtained and 55 bulbs among them were checked the chromosome number from their root tips for three times. 29 bulbs (53%, 29/55) still kept triploidy and the most cells of root tips contained 30 chromosomes. 22 bulbs (40%, 22/55) displayed aneuploidy and the most cells of its root tips contained 10-50 chromosomes. 4 bulbs displayed hexaploidy and contained 60 chromosomes. After three months growing, the cells of root tips containing aneuploidy chromosomes disappeared, and the bulbs became triploidy. The chromosomes of 4 hexaploidy bulbs did not changed during three checks. The origin and disappearance of aneuploidy cells of Chinese narcissus after treated by colchicin were discussed.

  11. Comparative analysis of chromosomes in the Palaearctic bush-crickets of tribe Pholidopterini (Orthoptera, Tettigoniinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Warchałowska-Śliwa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the evolution of the karyotype in four genera of the tribe Pholidopterini: Eupholidoptera Mařan, 1953, Parapholidoptera Mařan, 1953, Pholidoptera Wesmaël, 1838, Uvarovistia Mařan, 1953. Chromosomes were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with 18S rDNA and (TTAGGn telomeric probes, and classical techniques, such as C-banding, silver impregnation and fluorochrome DAPI/CMA3 staining. Most species retained the ancestral diploid chromosome number 2n = 31 (male or 32 (female, while some of the taxa, especially a group of species within genus Pholidoptera, evolved a reduced chromosome number 2n = 29. All species show the same sex determination system X0/XX. In some taxa, a pericentric inversion has changed the morphology of the ancestral acrocentric X chromosome to the biarmed X. The rDNA loci coincided with active NORs and C-band/CG-rich segments. A comparison of the location of the single rDNA/NOR in the genus Pholidoptera suggests that reduced chromosome number results from Robertsonian translocation between two pairs of autosomes, one carrying the rDNA/NOR. The results constitute a step towards better understanding of the chromosomal reorganization and evolution within the tribe Phaneropterini and the whole subfamily Tettigoniinae.

  12. Analysis of 62 hybrid assembled human Y chromosomes exposes rapid structural changes and high rates of gene conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Skov, Laurits; Maretty, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    The human Y-chromosome does not recombine across its male-specific part and is therefore an excellent marker of human migrations. It also plays an important role in male fertility. However, its evolution is difficult to fully understand because of repetitive sequences, inverted repeats and the po......The human Y-chromosome does not recombine across its male-specific part and is therefore an excellent marker of human migrations. It also plays an important role in male fertility. However, its evolution is difficult to fully understand because of repetitive sequences, inverted repeats...... and the potentially large role of gene conversion. Here we perform an evolutionary analysis of 62 Y-chromosomes of Danish descent sequenced using a wide range of library insert sizes and high coverage, thus allowing large regions of these chromosomes to be well assembled. These include 17 father-son pairs, which we...... use to validate variation calling. Using a recent method that can integrate variants based on both mapping and de novo assembly, we genotype 10898 SNVs and 2903 indels (max length of 27241 bp) in our sample and show by father-son concordance and experimental validation that the non-recurrent SNP...

  13. Fine-structure analysis and gentic organization at the base of the x chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschytz, E.

    1978-01-01

    Genetic organization at the base of the X chromosome was studied through the analysis of x-ray-induced deficiencies. Deficiencies were recovered so as to have a preselected right end anchored in the centric heterochromatin to the right of the su(f) locus. Free ends of deficiencies occurred at any of 22 intervals in Section 20 and in the proximal portion of Section 19 of Bridges' (1938) polytene chromosome map. The distribution of 130 such free ends of deficiencies induced in normal, In(1)sc 8 , and In(1)w/sup m4/ chromosomes suggests that on the single section level, genes are flanked by hot or cold sites for x-ray-induced breaks, and that occurrence of the hot spots is dependent on their interaction with the fixed-end sites in the centric heterochromatin. In the light of these results, it is argued that long heterochromatic sequences separate the relatively few genes in Section 20, and thus endow it with several characteristics typical of heterochromatic regions. Section 20 is considered to be a transition region between the mostly heterochromatic and mostly euchromatic regions of the X chromosome; the differences between them are suggested as being merely quantitative

  14. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Oral lichen planus patients exhibit consistent chromosomal numerical aberrations: A follow-up analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahalom, Ran; Yarom, Noam; Shani, Tali; Amariglio, Ninet; Kaplan, Ilana; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Hirshberg, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) carries an increased risk for malignant transformation with aneuploid cells (ACs) being found in brush samples of a quarter of patients with OLP. Patients with OLP were followed and repeated brush samples were simultaneously analyzed for morphology and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using centromeric probes for chromosomes 2 and 8. Three patients with a high proportion of ACs developed oral cancer. Fifteen patients had ≥1% ACs (13 in affected sites and 2 in nonaffected sites), whereas only 2 of the 15 patients with <1% ACs in the first sample had ≥1% ACs in the second sample. A strong positive correlation between the results of the initial and repeated samples was found. High proportion of ACs in brush samples from patients with OLP may imply an impending malignant transformation. As FISH analysis is consistent over time, it can be used to identify a subgroup of patients who would require close follow-up. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E741-E746, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Localization of pig Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase [alpha] and [beta] subunit genes to chromosome 4 by radioactive in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahbib-Mansais, Y.; Yerle, M.; Dalens, M.; Chevalet, C.; Gellin, J. (Centre de Recherches de Toulouse (France))

    1993-01-01

    Two genes coding for Na[sup +],K[sup +] -ATPase [alpha] and [beta] subunits are localized on pig chromosome 4, to the q1.6[yields]q2.3 and 1.3[yields]q2.1 regions, respectively, by radioactive in situ hybridization. According to nucleotide and amino acid sequence comparisons with different human isoforms of Na[sup +] ,K[sup +]-ATPase, these pig [alpha] and [beta] ATPase genes show strong homologies with human [alpha]1 and [beta] subunit ATPase genes, respectively. These results are discussed with respect to comparative mapping data of conserved genes in mammalian species. We showed that the pig cDNA probes encoding ATPase [alpha] and, [beta] genes reveal DNA polymorphism in Meishan an Large White pigs. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Polytene chromosome analysis in relation to genetic sex separation in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerremans, P.; Busch-Petersen, E.

    1990-01-01

    The development of stable genetic sexing strains in the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), is hampered by the presence of low levels of male recombination. Such recombination may be reduced by minimizing the distance between the translocation breakpoint and the translocated 'sexing' allele. Cytogenetic analysis of mitotic/meiotic and polytene chromosomes could provide information on the selection of such potentially stable genetic sexing strains. Translocation breakpoints in two genetic sexing strains in the medfly, based on a white female/brown male pupal colour dimorphism, have been determined. Preliminary results are described and the advantages and limitations of polytene chromosome analysis for the isolation of stable genetic sexing strains of the medfly are discussed. (author). 31 refs

  18. [Linkage analysis of susceptibility loci in 2 target chromosomes in pedigrees with paranoid schizophrenia and undifferentiated schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li-ping; Hu, Zheng-mao; Mu, Li-li; Mei, Gui-sen; Lu, Xiu-ling; Zheng, Yong-jun; Li, Pei-jian; Zhang, Ying-xue; Pan, Qian; Long, Zhi-gao; Dai, He-ping; Zhang, Zhuo-hua; Xia, Jia-hui; Zhao, Jing-ping; Xia, Kun

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the relationship of susceptibility loci in chromosomes 1q21-25 and 6p21-25 and schizophrenia subtypes in Chinese population. A genomic scan and parametric and non-parametric analyses were performed on 242 individuals from 36 schizophrenia pedigrees, including 19 paranoid schizophrenia and 17 undifferentiated schizophrenia pedigrees, from Henan province of China using 5 microsatellite markers in the chromosome region 1q21-25 and 8 microsatellite markers in the chromosome region 6p21-25, which were the candidates of previous studies. All affected subjects were diagnosed and typed according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revised (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). All subjects signed informed consent. In chromosome 1, parametric analysis under the dominant inheritance mode of all 36 pedigrees showed that the maximum multi-point heterogeneity Log of odds score method (HLOD) score was 1.33 (α = 0.38). The non-parametric analysis and the single point and multi-point nonparametric linkage (NPL) scores suggested linkage at D1S484, D1S2878, and D1S196. In the 19 paranoid schizophrenias pedigrees, linkage was not observed for any of the 5 markers. In the 17 undifferentiated schizophrenia pedigrees, the multi-point NPL score was 1.60 (P= 0.0367) at D1S484. The single point NPL score was 1.95(P= 0.0145) and the multi-point NPL score was 2.39 (P= 0.0041) at D1S2878. Additionally, the multi-point NPL score was 1.74 (P= 0.0255) at D1S196. These same three loci showed suggestive linkage during the integrative analysis of all 36 pedigrees. In chromosome 6, parametric linkage analysis under the dominant and recessive inheritance and the non-parametric linkage analysis of all 36 pedigrees and the 17 undifferentiated schizophrenia pedigrees, linkage was not observed for any of the 8 markers. In the 19 paranoid schizophrenias pedigrees, parametric analysis showed that under recessive

  19. Chromosomal Microarray Analysis of Consecutive Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using an Ultra-High Resolution Chromosomal Microarray Optimized for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Ho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variants (CNVs detected by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA significantly contribute to understanding the etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD and other related conditions. In recognition of the value of CMA testing and its impact on medical management, CMA is in medical guidelines as a first-tier test in the evaluation of children with these disorders. As CMA becomes adopted into routine care for these patients, it becomes increasingly important to report these clinical findings. This study summarizes the results of over 4 years of CMA testing by a CLIA-certified clinical testing laboratory. Using a 2.8 million probe microarray optimized for the detection of CNVs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, we report an overall CNV detection rate of 28.1% in 10,351 consecutive patients, which rises to nearly 33% in cases without ASD, with only developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID and/or multiple congenital anomalies (MCA. The overall detection rate for individuals with ASD is also significant at 24.4%. The detection rate and pathogenic yield of CMA vary significantly with the indications for testing, age, and gender, as well as the specialty of the ordering doctor. We note discrete differences in the most common recurrent CNVs found in individuals with or without a diagnosis of ASD.

  20. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose-effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.

    2001-09-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, experimentally gamma ray induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes from eight healthy people were studied. Samples from 4 males and 4 females were irradiated in tubes with 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 gray of gamma ray (Co 60 at dose rate 0.3 Gy/min). Irradiated and control samples were incubated in 37 centigrade for 48 hours cell cultures. Cell cultures then were stopped and metaphases spread, Giemsa stained to score the induced chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics + rings and total numbers of breaks in cell for each individual or for all people were drawn. An increase of all chromosomal aberrations types with the elevation of the doses was observed. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  1. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  2. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: psouza@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.br; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  3. Bayesian analysis of overdispersed chromosome aberration data with the negative binomial model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brame, R.S.; Groer, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    The usual assumption of a Poisson model for the number of chromosome aberrations in controlled calibration experiments implies variance equal to the mean. However, it is known that chromosome aberration data from experiments involving high linear energy transfer radiations can be overdispersed, i.e. the variance is greater than the mean. Present methods for dealing with overdispersed chromosome data rely on frequentist statistical techniques. In this paper, the problem of overdispersion is considered from a Bayesian standpoint. The Bayes Factor is used to compare Poisson and negative binomial models for two previously published calibration data sets describing the induction of dicentric chromosome aberrations by high doses of neutrons. Posterior densities for the model parameters, which characterise dose response and overdispersion are calculated and graphed. Calibrative densities are derived for unknown neutron doses from hypothetical radiation accident data to determine the impact of different model assumptions on dose estimates. The main conclusion is that an initial assumption of a negative binomial model is the conservative approach to chromosome dosimetry for high LET radiations. (author)

  4. Examination of X chromosome markers in Rett syndrome: Exclusion mapping with a novel variation on multilocus linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, K.A.; Fill, C.P. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Terwililger, J.; Percy, A.K.; Zobhbi, H. (Columbia University, NY (United States)); DeGennaro, L.J.; Ott, J. (University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester (United States)); Anvret, M.; Martin-Gallardo, A. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurologic disorder characterized by early normal development followed by regression, acquired deceleration of head growth, autism, ataxia, and sterotypic hand movements. The exclusive occurrence of the syndrome in females and the occurrence of a few familial cases with inheritance through maternal lines suggest that this disorder is most likely secondary to a mutation on the X chromosome. To address this hypothesis and to identify candidate regions for the Rett syndrome gene locus, genotypic analysis was performed in two families with maternally related affected half-sisters by using 63 DNA markers from the X chromosome. Nineteen of the loci studied were chosen for multipoint linkage analysis because they have been previously genetically mapped using a large number of meioses from reference families. Using the exclusion criterion of a lod score less than [minus]2, the authors were able to exclude the region between the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus and the DXS456 locus. This region extends from Xp21.2 to Xq21-q23. The use of the multipoint linkage analysis approach outlined in this study should allow the exclusion of additional regions of the X chromosome as new markers are analyzed.

  5. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  6. Chromosomal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Chromosomal conditions Chromosomal conditions ... Disorders See also: Genetic counseling , Your family health history Last reviewed: February, 2013 ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & ...

  7. Chromosome aberration analysis in peripheral lymphocytes of Gulf war and Balkans war veterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, H.; Heimers, A.; Frentzel-Beyme, R.; Schott, A.; Hoffmann, W

    2003-07-01

    Chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were determined in standard peripheral lymphocyte metaphase preparations of 13 British Gulf War veterans, two veterans of the recent war in the Balkans, and one veteran of both wars. All 16 volunteers suspect exposures to depleted uranium while deployed at the two different theatres of war in 1990 and later on. The Bremen laboratory control served as a reference in this study. Compared with this control there was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of dicentric chromosomes (dic) and centric ring chromosomes (cR) in the veterans' group, indicating a previous exposure to ionising radiation. The statistically significant overdispersion of dic and cR indicates non-uniform irradiation as would be expected after non-uniform exposure and/or exposure to radiation with a high linear energy transfer. The frequency of SCEs was decreased when compared with the laboratory control. (author)

  8. Chromosome aberration analysis in peripheral lymphocytes of Gulf war and Balkans war veterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.; Heimers, A.; Frentzel-Beyme, R.; Schott, A.; Hoffmann, W.

    2003-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were determined in standard peripheral lymphocyte metaphase preparations of 13 British Gulf War veterans, two veterans of the recent war in the Balkans, and one veteran of both wars. All 16 volunteers suspect exposures to depleted uranium while deployed at the two different theatres of war in 1990 and later on. The Bremen laboratory control served as a reference in this study. Compared with this control there was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of dicentric chromosomes (dic) and centric ring chromosomes (cR) in the veterans' group, indicating a previous exposure to ionising radiation. The statistically significant overdispersion of dic and cR indicates non-uniform irradiation as would be expected after non-uniform exposure and/or exposure to radiation with a high linear energy transfer. The frequency of SCEs was decreased when compared with the laboratory control. (author)

  9. Cytogenetic biological dosimetry in radiological protection: chromosome aberration analysis in human lymphocyties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, I.M.A. de.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been know for several decades and dose effect relationships are also fairly well established for several doses and dose rates. Apart from its biological significance, the interpretation of chromosome aberration frequency associated with human exposure to radiation plays an important role in dose assessment, particularly in cases where exposure is though to have occurred but no physical dose monitoring system was present. Based on the cytogenetic data obtained from seven cases of exposure to radiation the aberration frequency have been fitted to the quadratic function Y= αD + βD 2 as the dose response curves from literature. The dose equivalent estimate by frequency of chromosomic aberration found here was compared with 60 Co and 192 Ir already published curves obtained at almost similar dose rate together with some hematological data. (author) [pt

  10. Analysis of the karyotype of Callisia elegans Alexand. (Commelinaceae including differential staining of chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Weryszko-Chmielewska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The number and morphology of Callisia elegans Alexand. chromosomes were studied employing staining with acetic carmine and differential Giemsa staining. It was found that its karyotype was 2n = 12 chromosomes, whose lengths fell in the range of 16.8 to 8.8 µm. The chomosomes, arranged in order of length, were classified respectively to types: sm, t, t, t, t, st. The distribution of C-banding is given for this karyotype. The presence of microsatellites on the long and short arms was found in the chromosomes of the second pair. Frequently there were 4 nucleoli of unequal size in interphase nuclei. In many cells, lower numbers of nucleoli (3-1 were seen which was -probably due to their fusion. The maximum number of nucleoli corresponded to the number of nucleolar organizers accompanying the satellites.

  11. Allelic imbalance on chromosome 1 in human breast cancer. I. Minisatellite and RFLP analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupart, M L; Armour, J; Walker, R; Adams, S; Brammar, W; Varley, J

    1995-01-01

    In order to characterise the role of chromosome 1 more fully in breast cancer, polymorphic markers mapping along the length of the whole chromosome were used to assess a panel of 71 tumour-lymphocyte pairs for allelic imbalance. Complex patterns of alterations were established that are consistent with cytogenetic data in the literature. Deletion mapping of individuals with loss of heterozygosity identified five independent smallest common regions of deletion, two of which are novel. There are also three discrete regions showing a gain in copy number of one homologue. The two arms of the chromosome may be subject to different events; the short arm primarily undergoes interstitial deletions, whereas the long arm is subject to whole arm events (as both gains and losses) as well as regional deletions.

  12. Fast-FISH Detection and Semi-Automated Image Analysis of Numerical Chromosome Aberrations in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Esa

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique called Fast-FISH in combination with semi-automated image analysis was applied to detect numerical aberrations of chromosomes 8 and 12 in interphase nuclei of peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Commercially available α-satellite DNA probes specific for the centromere regions of chromosome 8 and chromosome 12, respectively, were used. After application of the Fast-FISH protocol, the microscopic images of the fluorescence-labelled cell nuclei were recorded by the true color CCD camera Kappa CF 15 MC and evaluated quantitatively by computer analysis on a PC. These results were compared to results obtained from the same type of specimens using the same analysis system but with a standard FISH protocol. In addition, automated spot counting after both FISH techniques was compared to visual spot counting after standard FISH. A total number of about 3,000 cell nuclei was evaluated. For quantitative brightness parameters, a good correlation between standard FISH labelling and Fast-FISH was found. Automated spot counting after Fast-FISH coincided within a few percent to automated and visual spot counting after standard FISH. The examples shown indicate the reliability and reproducibility of Fast-FISH and its potential for automatized interphase cell diagnostics of numerical chromosome aberrations. Since the Fast-FISH technique requires a hybridization time as low as 1/20 of established standard FISH techniques, omitting most of the time consuming working steps in the protocol, it may contribute considerably to clinical diagnostics. This may especially be interesting in cases where an accurate result is required within a few hours.

  13. Mapping the pericentric heterochromatin by comparative genomic hybridization analysis and chromosome deletions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Caudy, Amy; Parsons, Lance; Rosebrock, Adam; Pane, Attilio; Raj, Sandeep; Wieschaus, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Heterochromatin represents a significant portion of eukaryotic genomes and has essential structural and regulatory functions. Its molecular organization is largely unknown due to difficulties in sequencing through and assembling repetitive sequences enriched in the heterochromatin. Here we developed a novel strategy using chromosomal rearrangements and embryonic phenotypes to position unmapped Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatic sequence to specific chromosomal regions. By excluding sequences that can be mapped to the assembled euchromatic arms, we identified sequences that are specific to heterochromatin and used them to design heterochromatin specific probes ("H-probes") for microarray. By comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of embryos deficient for each chromosome or chromosome arm, we were able to map most of our H-probes to specific chromosome arms. We also positioned sequences mapped to the second and X chromosomes to finer intervals by analyzing smaller deletions with breakpoints in heterochromatin. Using this approach, we were able to map >40% (13.9 Mb) of the previously unmapped heterochromatin sequences assembled by the whole-genome sequencing effort on arm U and arm Uextra to specific locations. We also identified and mapped 110 kb of novel heterochromatic sequences. Subsequent analyses revealed that sequences located within different heterochromatic regions have distinct properties, such as sequence composition, degree of repetitiveness, and level of underreplication in polytenized tissues. Surprisingly, although heterochromatin is generally considered to be transcriptionally silent, we detected region-specific temporal patterns of transcription in heterochromatin during oogenesis and early embryonic development. Our study provides a useful approach to elucidate the molecular organization and function of heterochromatin and reveals region-specific variation of heterochromatin.

  14. Mapping the pericentric heterochromatin by comparative genomic hybridization analysis and chromosome deletions in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Caudy, Amy; Parsons, Lance; Rosebrock, Adam; Pane, Attilio; Raj, Sandeep; Wieschaus, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin represents a significant portion of eukaryotic genomes and has essential structural and regulatory functions. Its molecular organization is largely unknown due to difficulties in sequencing through and assembling repetitive sequences enriched in the heterochromatin. Here we developed a novel strategy using chromosomal rearrangements and embryonic phenotypes to position unmapped Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatic sequence to specific chromosomal regions. By excluding sequences that can be mapped to the assembled euchromatic arms, we identified sequences that are specific to heterochromatin and used them to design heterochromatin specific probes (“H-probes”) for microarray. By comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of embryos deficient for each chromosome or chromosome arm, we were able to map most of our H-probes to specific chromosome arms. We also positioned sequences mapped to the second and X chromosomes to finer intervals by analyzing smaller deletions with breakpoints in heterochromatin. Using this approach, we were able to map >40% (13.9 Mb) of the previously unmapped heterochromatin sequences assembled by the whole-genome sequencing effort on arm U and arm Uextra to specific locations. We also identified and mapped 110 kb of novel heterochromatic sequences. Subsequent analyses revealed that sequences located within different heterochromatic regions have distinct properties, such as sequence composition, degree of repetitiveness, and level of underreplication in polytenized tissues. Surprisingly, although heterochromatin is generally considered to be transcriptionally silent, we detected region-specific temporal patterns of transcription in heterochromatin during oogenesis and early embryonic development. Our study provides a useful approach to elucidate the molecular organization and function of heterochromatin and reveals region-specific variation of heterochromatin. PMID:22745230

  15. Blood transport method for chromosome analysis of residents living near Semipalatinsk nuclear test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodzi, Mohd; Ihda, Shozo; Yokozeki, Masako; Takeichi, Nobuo; Tanaka, Kimio; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2009-12-01

    A study was conducted to compare the storage conditions and transportation period for blood samples collected from residents living in areas near the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS). Experiments were performed to simulate storage and shipping environments. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blood was stored in 15-ml tubes (condition A: current transport method) in the absence or in 50-ml flasks (condition B: previous transport method) in the presence of RPMI-1640 and 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Samples were kept refrigerated at 4 degrees C and cell viability was assessed after 3, 8, 12 and 14 days of storage. RPMI-1640, 20% FBS and further PHA were added to blood samples under condition A in 50-ml flasks for culture. Whole-blood samples under condition B were directly incubated without further sub-culturing process, neither media nor PHA were added, to adopt a similar protocol to that employed in the previous transport method. Samples in condition A and condition B were incubated for 48 hr at 37 degrees C and their mitotic index was determined. The results showed that viable lymphocytes were consistent in both storage conditions but the mitotic index was higher in condition A than in condition B. Although further confirmation studies have to be carried out, previous chromosomal studies and the present experiment have shown that PHA-stimulated blood could be stored without culture medium for up to 8 days under condition A. The present results will be useful for cytogenetic analysis of blood samples that have been transported long distances wherever a radiation accident has occurred.

  16. Comparative methylome analysis in solid tumors reveals aberrant methylation at chromosome 6p in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Wei; Cheung, Arthur Kwok Leung; Ko, Josephine Mun Yee; Cheng, Yue; Zheng, Hong; Ngan, Roger Kai Cheong; Ng, Wai Tong; Lee, Anne Wing Mui; Yau, Chun Chung; Lee, Victor Ho Fu; Lung, Maria Li

    2015-01-01

    Altered patterns of DNA methylation are key features of cancer. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has the highest incidence in Southern China. Aberrant methylation at the promoter region of tumor suppressors is frequently reported in NPC; however, genome-wide methylation changes have not been comprehensively investigated. Therefore, we systematically analyzed methylome data in 25 primary NPC tumors and nontumor counterparts using a high-throughput approach with the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Comparatively, we examined the methylome data of 11 types of solid tumors collected by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). In NPC, the hypermethylation pattern was more dominant than hypomethylation and the majority of de novo methylated loci were within or close to CpG islands in tumors. The comparative methylome analysis reveals hypermethylation at chromosome 6p21.3 frequently occurred in NPC (false discovery rate; FDR=1.33 × 10 −9 ), but was less obvious in other types of solid tumors except for prostate and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancer (FDR<10 −3 ). Bisulfite pyrosequencing results further confirmed the aberrant methylation at 6p in an additional patient cohort. Evident enrichment of the repressive mark H3K27me3 and active mark H3K4me3 derived from human embryonic stem cells were found at these regions, indicating both DNA methylation and histone modification function together, leading to epigenetic deregulation in NPC. Our study highlights the importance of epigenetic deregulation in NPC. Polycomb Complex 2 (PRC2), responsible for H3K27 trimethylation, is a promising therapeutic target. A key genomic region on 6p with aberrant methylation was identified. This region contains several important genes having potential use as biomarkers for NPC detection

  17. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose- effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Achkar, W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, blood from eight healthy people were studied. Samples were irradiated in tubes with 0.15-2.5 gray of gamma ray.Irradiated and control samples were incubated for cell cultures. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics+ rings and total numbers of breaks were drawn. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  18. A Semi-Closed Device for Chromosome Spreading for Cytogenetic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Mednova, Olga; Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    2014-01-01

    a science. The chromosome spreading greatly depends on the environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature, which govern the evaporation of fixative, in which the cells are suspended. The spreading is normally performed manually in ambient conditions on glass slides, which are hydrophilic...... and a Topasr substrate rendered more hydrophilic by oxygen plasma treatment coupled with photografting. The device consists of a microfluidic chamber with perfusion holes that facilitate the evaporation of fixative and reliable formation of the spreads. The usability of the chromosome spreads formed...

  19. Kinetics of the formation of chromosome aberrations in x-irradiated human lymphocytes: Analysis by premature chromosome condensation with delayed fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greinert, R.; Detzler, E.; Volkmer, B.

    1995-01-01

    Human lymphocytes irradiated with graded doses of up to 5 Gy of 150 kV X rays were fused with mitotic CHO cells after delay times ranging from 0 to 14 h after irradiation. The yields of dicentrics seen under PCC conditions, using C-banding for centromere detection, and of excess acentric fragments observed in the PCC experiment were determined by image analysis. At 4 Gy the time course of the yield of dicentrics shows an early plateau for delay times up to 2 h, then an S-shaped rise and a final plateau which is reached after a delay time of about 8 to 10 h. Whereas the dose-yield curve measured at zero delay time is strictly linear, the shape of the curve obtained for 8 h delay time is linear-quadratic. The linear yield component, αD is formed entirely in the fast process manifested in the early plateau, while component βD 2 is developed slowly in the subsequent hours. Analysis of the kinetics of the rise of the S-shaped curve for yield as a function of time leads to the postulate of an open-quotes intermediate productclose quotes of pairwise DNA lesion interaction, still fragile when subjected to the stress of PCC, but gradually processed into a stable dicentric chromosome. It is concluded that the observed difference in the kinetics of the α and β components explains a number of earlier results, especially the disappearance of the β component at high LET, and opens possibilities for chemical and physical modification of the β component during the extended formation process after irradiation observed here. 22 refs., 4 figs

  20. Kinetics of the formation of chromosome aberrations in X-irradiated human lymphocytes: analysis by premature chromosome condensation with delayed fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, R; Detzler, E; Volkmer, B; Harder, D

    1995-11-01

    Human lymphocytes irradiated with graded doses of up to 5 Gy of 150 kV X rays were fused with mitotic CHO cells after delay times ranging from 0 to 14 h after irradiation. The yields of dicentrics seen under PCC conditions, using C-banding for centromere detection, and of excess acentric fragments observed in the PCC experiment were determined by image analysis. At 4 Gy the time course of the yield of dicentrics shows an early plateau for delay times up to 2 h, then an S-shaped rise and a final plateau which is reached after a delay time of about 8 to 10 h. Whereas the dose-yield curve measured at zero delay time is strictly linear, the shape of the curve obtained for 8 h delay time is linear-quadratic. The linear yield component, alpha D, is formed entirely in the fast process manifested in the early plateau, while component beta D2 is developed slowly in the subsequent hours. Analysis of the kinetics of the rise of the S-shaped curve for yield as a function of time leads to the postulate of an "intermediate product" of pairwise DNA lesion interaction, still fragile when subjected to the stress of PCC, but gradually processed into a stable dicentric chromosome. It is concluded that the observed difference in the kinetics of the alpha and beta components explains a number of earlier results, especially the disappearance of the beta component at high LET, and opens possibilities for chemical and physical modification of the beta component during the extended formation process after irradiation observed here.

  1. Independent clonal origin of multiple uterine leiomyomas that was determined by X chromosome inactivation and microsatellite analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canevari, Renata A; Pontes, Anaglória; Rosa, Fabíola E

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In an attempt to clarify the clonality and genetic relationships that are involved in the tumorigenesis of uterine leiomyomas, we used a total of 43 multiple leiomyomas from 14 patients and analyzed the allelic status with 15 microsatellite markers and X chromosome inactivation analysis...... of the 9 of 12 informative patients; different inactivation patterns were observed in 3 cases. CONCLUSION: Our data support the concept that uterine leiomyomas are derived from a single cell but are generated independently in the uterus. Loss of heterozygosity findings at 7p22-15 are consistent...... with previous data that suggested the relevance of chromosomal aberrations at 7p that were involved in individual uterine leiomyomas....

  2. Mutational analysis of the Wolfram syndrome gene in two families with chromosome 4p-linked bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K L; Lawson, D; Meitinger, T; Blackwood, D H; Porteous, D J

    2000-04-03

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) is a complex disease with a significant genetic component. Heterozygous carriers of Wolfram syndrome (WFS) are at increased risk of psychiatric illness. A gene for WFS (WFS1) has recently been cloned and mapped to chromosome 4p, in the general region we previously reported as showing linkage to BPAD. Here we present sequence analysis of the WFS1 coding sequence in five affected individuals from two chromosome 4p-linked families. This resulted in the identification of six polymorphisms, two of which are predicted to change the amino acid sequence of the WFS1 protein, however none of the changes segregated with disease status. Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 96:158-160, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  4. Identification and Preliminary Analysis of Several Centromere-associated Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones from a Diploid Wheat Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Although the centromeres of some plants have been investigated previously, our knowledge of the wheat centromere is still very limited. To understand the structure and function of the wheat centromere, we used two centromeric repeats (RCS1 and CCS1-5ab) to obtain some centromere-associated bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones in 32 RCS1-related BAC clones that had been screened out from a diploid wheat (Triticum boeoticum Boiss.; 2n=2x=14) BAC library. Southern hybridization results indicated that, of the 32 candidates,there were 28 RCS1-positive clones. Based on gel blot patterns, the frequency of RCS1 was approximately one copy every 69.4 kb in these 28 RCS1-positive BAC clones. More bands were detected when the same filter was probed with CCS1-5ab. Furthermore, the CCS1 bands covered all the bands detected by RCS1, which suggests that some CCS1 repeats were distributed together with RCS1. The frequency of CCS1 families was once every 35.8 kb, nearly twice that of RCS1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that the five BAC clones containing RCS1 and CCS1 sequences all detected signals at the centromeric regions in hexaploid wheat, but the signal intensities on the A-genome chromosomes were stronger than those on the B- and/or D-genome chromosomes. The FISH analysis among nine Triticeae cereals indicated that there were A-genomespecific (or rich) sequences dispersing on chromosome arms in the BAC clone TbBAC5. In addition, at the interphase cells, the centromeres of diploid species usually clustered at one pole and formed a ring-like allocation in the period before metaphase.

  5. Genetic analysis of eight x-chromosomal short tandem repeat loci in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-29

    Jul 29, 2015 ... programs to perform population genetics analyses under Linux and. Windows. Mol. Ecol. Resour. 10: 564-567. Ferreira da Silva IH, Barbosa AG, Azevedo DA, Sanchez-Diz P,. Gusmao L, Tavares CC (2010). An X-chromosome pentaplex in two linkage groups: haplotype data in Alagoas and Rio de Janeiro.

  6. Chromosomal changes in pathology and during evolution: analysis of pericentric inversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.; Aurias, A.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.

    1980-01-01

    The great similarities between pericentric inversions observed in human pathology, having occurred during evolution, or radio-induced in human cells, indicate that they do not occur at random. About 1/3rd to 1/4th of these chromosomal rearrangements are capable to induce abnormal progeny after aneusomy of recombination, during meiosis [fr

  7. Karyotype analysis of Lilium longiflorum and Lilium rubellum by chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, K.B.; Wennekes, J.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Jacobsen, E.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed karyotypes of Lilium longiflorum and L. rubellum were constructed on the basis of chromosome arm lengths, C-banding, AgNO3 staining, and PI-DAPI banding, together with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with the 5S and 45S rDNA sequences as probes. The C-banding patterns that were

  8. Construction of chromosomal recombination maps of three genomes of lilies (Lilium) based on GISH analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadeem Khan, M.; Shujun Zhou,; Barba Gonzalez, R.; Ramanna, M.S.; Visser, R.G.F.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal recombination maps were constructed for three genomes of lily (Lilium) using GISH analyses. For this purpose, the backcross (BC) progenies of two diploid (2n = 2x = 24) interspecific hybrids of lily, viz. Longiflorum × Asiatic (LA) and Oriental × Asiatic (OA), were used. Mostly the BC

  9. Prospects for introgressing tomato chromosomes into the potato genome: An assessment through GISH analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garriga Calderé, F.; Huigen, D.J.; Jacobsen, E.; Ramanna, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    With a view to assess the possibility of homoeologous pairing and crossing-over between the chromosomes of potato (Solanum tuberosum) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), a somatic fusion hybrid and two monosomic alien tomato addition genotypes were investigated through genomic in situ

  10. Molecular phylogenetic reconstruction and localization of the (TTAGG)n telomeric repeats in the chromosomes of Acromyrmex striatus (Roger, 1863) suggests a lower ancestral karyotype for leafcutter ants (Hymenoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tássia Tatiane Pontes; Dos Reis, Ana Caroline Coelho Corrêa; Cardoso, Danon Clemes; Cristiano, Maykon Passos

    2018-01-01

    Chromosome counts and karyotype characterization have proved to be important features of a genome. Chromosome changes during the diversification of ants might play an important role, given the diversity and success of Formicidae. Comparative karyotype analyses on ants have enriched and helped ant systematics. Among leafcutter ants, two major chromosome counts have been described, one frequent in Atta Fabricius, 1804 (2n = 22 in all Atta spp. whose karyotype is known) and the other frequent in Acromyrmex Mayr, 1865 (2n = 38 in the majority of species whose karyotype is known). The main exception is Acromyrmex striatus (Roger, 1863), which harbors a diploid chromosome set of 22. Here we describe the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with telomeric probes with (TTAGG) 6 repeats to describe the telomere composition of A. striatus and to recover potential interstitial non-telomeric signals that may reflect fusion events during the evolution of leafcutter lineage from 38 to 22 chromosomes. Further, we reconstruct the ancestral chromosome numbers of the leafcutter clade based on a recently proposed molecular phylogenetic hypothesis and phylogenomic tree. Distinct signals have been observed in both extremities on the telomere chromosomes of A. striatus . Non-telomeric signals have not been retrieved in our analysis. It could be supposed that the low-numbered karyotype indeed represents the ancestral chromosome number of leafcutters. The phylogenetic reconstruction also recovered a low chromosome number from the diverse approaches implemented, suggesting that n = 11 is the most likely ancestral karyotype of the leafcutter ants and is a plesiomorphic feature shared between A. striatus and Atta spp.

  11. Heterochromatin diversity and its co-localization with 5S and 45S rDNA sites in chromosomes of four Maxillaria species (Orchidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano S. Cabral

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated four orchids of the genus Maxillaria (M. discolor, M. acicularis, M. notylioglossa and M. desvauxiana in regard to the position of heterochromatin blocks as revealed using chromomycin A3 (CMA and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI fluorochrome staining and 5S and 45S rDNA sites using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. The species showed differences in chromosome number and a diversified pattern of CMA+ and DAPI+ bands, including heteromorphism for CMA+ bands. The 5S and 45S rDNA sites also varied in number and most of them were co-localized with CMA+ bands. The relationship between 5S rDNA sites and CMA+ bands was more evident in M. notylioglossa, in which the brighter CMA+ bands were associated with large 5S rDNA sites. However, not all 5S and 45S rDNA sites were co-localized with CMA+ bands, probably due to technical constraints. We compare these results to banding data from other species and suggest that not all blocks of tandemly repetitive sequences, such as 5S rDNA sites, can be observed as heterochromatin blocks.

  12. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Chinese native Cannabis sativa cultivars by using ISSR and chromosome markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L G; Chang, Y; Zhang, X F; Guan, F Z; Yuan, H M; Yu, Y; Zhao, L J

    2014-12-12

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa) is an important fiber crop, and native cultivars exist widely throughout China. In the present study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of 27 important Chinese native hemp cultivars, by using inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and chromosome markers. We determined the following chromosome formulas: 2n = 20 = 14m + 6sm; 2n = 20 = 20m; 2n = 20 = 18m + 2sm; 2n = 20 = 16m + 4sm; and 2n = 20 = 12m + 8sm. The results of our ISSR analysis revealed the genetic relationships among the 27 cultivars; these relationships were analyzed by using the unweighted pair-group method based on DNA polymorphism. Our results revealed that all of the native cultivars showed considerable genetic diversity. At a genetic distance of 0.324, the 27 varieties could be classified into five categories; this grouping corresponded well with the chromosome formulas. All of the investigated hemp cultivars represent relatively primitive types; moreover, the genetic distances show a geographical distribution, with a small amount of regional hybridity.

  13. mBAND analysis for high- and low-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Megumi, E-mail: megumi.hada-1@nasa.gov [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Universities Space Research Association, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Wu Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis A. [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    During long-term space travel or cancer therapy, humans are exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) energetic heavy ions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, and cytogenetic damage can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Epidemiological data, mainly from survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan, have enabled risk estimation from low-LET radiation exposures. The identification of a cytogenetic signature that distinguishes high- from low-LET exposure remains a long-term goal in radiobiology. Recently developed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-painting methodologies have revealed unique endpoints related to radiation quality. Heavy-ions induce a high fraction of complex-type exchanges, and possibly unique chromosome rearrangements. This review will concentrate on recent data obtained with multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) methods in mammalian cells exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. Chromosome analysis with mBAND technique allows detection of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges, and also distribution of the breakpoints of aberrations.

  14. Analysis of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and hematological disorders among workers of wireless communication instruments and cell phone (Mobile) users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldawy, H.A.; Khattab, F.I.; Hassan, N.H.A.; Amin, Y.M.; Mahmoud, M.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the hazardous effect of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) such as chromosomal aberration, disturbed micronucleus formation and hematological disorders that may detected among workers of wireless communication instruments and mobile phone users. Seven individuals ( 3 males and 4 females) of a central workers in the microwave unit of the wireless station and 7 users of Mobil phone (4 males and 3 females ) were volunteered to give blood samples. Chromosomes and micronucleus were prepared for cytogenetic analysis as well as blood film for differential count. The results obtained in the microwave group indicated that, the total summation of all types of aberrations (chromosomes and chromatid aberrations) had a frequency of 6. 14% for the exposed group, whereas, the frequency in the control group amounted to 1.57%. In Mobil phone users, the total summation of all types of aberrations(chromosome and chromatid aberrations) had a frequency of 4.43% for the exposed group and 1.71% for the control group. The incidence of the total number of micronuclei in the exposed microwave group was increased 4.3 folds as compared with those of the control group The incidence of the total number of micronuclei in the exposed mobile phone group was increased 2 fold as compared with those in the control group. On the other hand, normal ranges of total white blood cells counts were determined for mobile phone users but abnormalities in the differential counts of the different types of the white blood cells such as neutropenia, eosinophilia and lymphocytosis were observed in the individuals number 1,2,3,7 in microwave group

  15. Dose response relationships and analysis of primary processes of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, E.

    1977-02-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with 220 kV X-rays, 3 MeV electrons and 15 MeV neutrons. The frequency of dicentric, acentric and atypical chromosomes and the exhange aberrations were measured and dose effect curves were constructed. The aim is to prepare the chromosome analysis to a biological dosimetry. The aberration findings could be adapted to the linear-quadrativ model y = c+ αD + βD 2 . With increasing LET the quantity lambda increased which is a measure for the share of the linear and quadratical components of the dose effect obtained. In case of electrons the RBE-values increased with increasing doses. In the case of neutrons they had their maximum in the low dose range. The feed back distances which lead to formation of primary lesions are for X-rays and electrons approximately 1 μm, for neutrons 1.7 μm. In a fractionation experiment with X-rays, the time of formation of exchange aberrations in radiation-induced primary breaks was measured. The number of dicentric chromosomes decreased with increasing time, while the intercellular distribution was not changed. The number of primary breaks decreasing per temporal interval is proportional to the number of the existing primary breaks. The average feed back time during which the primary breaks lead to induction of dicentric chromosomes, is 110 min. In order to determine the correspondence of the results of in-vivo and in-vitro experiments 15 patients and their blood were irradiated with 60 C-γ-rays. No significant differences were measured. (AJ) [de

  16. Local strains in waste tank deflagration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years extensive effort has been expended to qualify buried nuclear waste storage tanks under accident conditions. One of these conditions is deflagration of the combustible gases which may build up over time. While much work has been done to calculate the general strain state, less effort has been made to address the local strains at structural discontinuities. An analytical method is presented for calculating these local strains and combining them with the general strain state. A closed form solution of the local strains is compared to a finite element solution

  17. Chromosome Territories

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome territories (CTs) constitute a major feature of nuclear architecture. In a brief statement, the possible contribution of nuclear architecture studies to the field of epigenomics is considered, followed by a historical account of the CT concept and the final compelling experimental evidence of a territorial organization of chromosomes in all eukaryotes studied to date. Present knowledge of nonrandom CT arrangements, of the internal CT architecture, and of structural interactions wit...

  18. Bloom syndrome and maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodage, T.; Prasad, M.; Trent, R.J.; Smith, A. (Children' s Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (New Zealand)); Dixon, J.W.; Romain, D.R.; Columbano-Green, L.M.; Selby, R.E. (Wellington Hospital (New Zealand)); Graham, D. (Waikato Hospital, Hamilton (New Zealand)); Rogan, P.K. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey, PA (United States)) (and others)

    1994-07-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increases in the frequency of sister-chromatid exchange and in the incidence of malignancy. Chromosome-transfer studies have shown the BS locus to map to chromosome 15q. This report describes a subject with features of both BS and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Molecular analysis showed maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15. Meiotic recombination between the two disomic chromosomes 15 has resulted in heterodisomy for proximal 15q and isodisomy for distal 15q. In this individual BS is probably due to homozygosity for a gene that is telomeric to D15S95 (15q25), rather than to genetic imprinting, the mechanism responsible for the development of PWS. This report represents the first application of disomy analysis to the regional localization of a disease gene. This strategy promises to be useful in the genetic mapping of other uncommon autosomal recessive conditions. 37 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  20. Evidence that meiotic pairing starts at the telomeres: Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with a pericentric X chromosome inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashi, V.; Allinson, P.S.; Golden, W.L.; Kelly, T.E. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies in yeast have shown that telomeres rather than centromeres lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may have a role in recombination. Cytological studies of meiosis in Drosophila and mice have shown that in pericentric inversion heterozygotes there is lack of loop formation, with recobmination seen only outside the inversion. In a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) we recognized that only affected males and carrier females had a pericentric X chromosome inversion (inv X(p11.4;q26)). Since the short arm inversion breakpoint was proximal to the DMD locus, it could not be implicated in the mutational event causing DMD. There was no history of infertility, recurrent miscarriages or liveborn unbalanced females to suggest there was recombination within the inversion. We studied 22 members over three generations to understand the pattern of meiotic recombination between the normal and the inverted X chromosome. In total, 17 meioses involving the inverted X chromosome in females were studied by cytogenetic analysis and 16 CA repeat polymorphisms along the length of the X chromosome. Results: (a) There was complete concordance between the segregation of the DMD mutation and the inverted X chromosome. (b) On DNA analysis, there was complete absence of recombination within the inverted segment. We also found no recombination at the DMD locus. Recombination was seen only at Xp22 and Xq27-28. (c) Recombination was seen in the same individual at both Xp22 and Xq27-28 without recombination otherwise. Conclusions: (1) Pericentric X inversions reduce the genetic map length of the chromosome, with the physical map length being normal. (2) Meiotic X chromosome pairing in this family is initiated at the telomeres. (3) Following telomeric pairing in pericentric X chromosome inversions, there is inhibition of recombination within the inversion and adjacent regions.

  1. Chromosomal organization of adrenergic receptor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang-Feng, T.L.; Xue, Feiyu; Zhong, Wuwei; Cotecchia, S.; Frielle, T.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Francke, U.

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors (ARs) (subtypes α 1 , α 2 , β 1 , and β 2 ) are a prototypic family of guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors that mediate the physiological effects of the hormone epinephrine and the neurotransmitter norepinephrine. The authors have previously assigned the genes for β 2 -and α 2 -AR to human chromosomes 5 and 10, respectively. By Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, they have now mapped the α 1 -AR gene to chromosome 5q32→q34, the same position as β 2 -AR, and the β 1 -AR gene to chromosome 10q24→q26, the region where α 2 -AR, is located. In mouse, both α 2 -and β 1 -AR genes were assigned to chromosome 19, and the α 1 -AR locus was localized to chromosome 11. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis has shown that the α 1 -and β 2 -AR genes in humans are within 300 kilobases (kb) and the distance between the α 2 - and β 1 -AR genes is <225 kb. The proximity of these two pairs of AR genes and the sequence similarity that exists among all the ARs strongly suggest that they are evolutionarily related. Moreover, they likely arose from a common ancestral receptor gene and subsequently diverged through gene duplication and chromosomal duplication to perform their distinctive roles in mediation the physiological effects of catecholamines. The AR genes thus provide a paradigm for understanding the evolution of such structurally conserved yet functionally divergent families off receptor molecules

  2. Analysis of chromosomal aberration in seven medical staffs suspected with exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lin; Zhao Fengling; Wang Xi'ai; Wang Ping; Jiang Feng; Lu Yumin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the chromosomal aberrations in seven medical staffs suspected with exposure to ionizing radiation and to speculate its possible causation. Methods: The hospital staffs, including 6 females and 1 male,worked in a clinical laboratory where a CT room was located downstairs. The thickness of precast slab between these two rooms was 6 cm. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of seven staffs were examined for conventional chromosomal aberrations. Results: The frequencies of dicentrics in the peripheral lymphocytes of 4 females were from 0.40% to 1.60% that was significantly higher than the spontaneous frequency of dicentrics (0.03%, χ 2 =36.79, P<0.05). The translocation was observed in the lymphocytes from all subjects with frequencies from 0.33% to 1.20%, obviously higher than its spontaneous frequency of 0.01% (χ 2 =42.90, P<0.05). Conclusion: These staffs suffer from ionizing radiation. (authors)

  3. Cytogenetic analysis of X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in spontaneous leukaemic AKR mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szollar, J.

    1975-01-01

    The increased frequency of numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations in spontaneously leukaemic AKR mice, compared with the values of healthy control CBA/H-T 6 T 6 mice, induced by X-irradiation, might be connected with the predisposition to malignant growth, probably indirectly helping the virus activation, or acting together with the immune deficiency, by creating a weaker system that is more sensitive to carcinogenic agents

  4. Distribution of X-ray induced chromosome rearrangement breaks along the polytene chromosomes of Anopheles messeae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleshkova, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution of chromosomal aberrations localization along polytene chromosomes (aoutosomes) of salivary glands of malarial mosquito. Anopheles messeae is presented. Induced aberrations in F 1 posterity from X-ray irradiated fecundated females are studied. Poipts of breaks of inversions and trapslocations are localized separately. There are no considerable dif-- ferences in the distribution character of two types of aberrations. Over the length of autosomes the breaks are more frequent in distal halves, their frequency in proximal parts anally in near centromeric regions of chromosomes is reduced. Concentration of breaks in certain ''hot points'' of the chromosomes is pointed out. Comparison of distribution of actual and expected frequencies of break points according to chi 2 criterion revealed highly fiducial discrepancies, testifying to uneven participation of different regions of chromosomes in aberration formation. Similarities and differences of the data obtained from analogous ones, demonstrated in Drosophila, as well as possible reasons for the distribution unevennes are discussed. On the basis of analysis of intrinsic and literature data a supposition is made that the ''hot points'' (break concentrations) can be considered as localizaion markers of intercalary heterochromatin

  5. Y Chromosome analysis of prehistoric human populations in the West Liao River Valley, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yinqiu; Li, Hongjie; Ning, Chao; Zhang, Ye; Chen, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Hagelberg, Erika; Zhou, Hui

    2013-09-30

    The West Liao River valley in Northeast China is an ecologically diverse region, populated in prehistory by human populations with a wide range of cultures and modes of subsistence. To help understand the human evolutionary history of this region, we performed Y chromosome analyses on ancient human remains from archaeological sites ranging in age from 6500 to 2700 BP. 47 of the 70 individuals provided reproducible results. They were assigned into five different Y sub-haplogroups using diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms, namely N1 (xN1a, N1c), N1c, C/C3e, O3a (O3a3) and O3a3c. We also used 17 Y short tandem repeat loci in the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome. There appears to be significant genetic differences between populations of the West Liao River valley and adjacent cultural complexes in the prehistoric period, and these prehistoric populations were shown to carry similar haplotypes as present-day Northeast Asians, but at markedly different frequencies. Our results suggest that the prehistoric cultural transitions were associated with immigration from the Yellow River valley and the northern steppe into the West Liao River valley. They reveal the temporal continuity of Y chromosome lineages in populations of the West Liao River valley over 5000 years, with a concurrent increase in lineage diversity caused by an influx of immigrants from other populations.

  6. Linkage analysis of Norrie disease with an X-chromosomal ornithine aminotransferase locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, J B; Kojis, T L; Cantor, R M; Heinzmann, C; Ngo, J T; Spence, M A; Inana, G; Kivlin, J D; Curtis, D; Sparkes, R S

    1993-01-01

    Norrie disease is a rare disease of newborn males caused by prenatal or perinatal retinal detachment, which may be associated with mental retardation, psychosis, and/or hearing loss. DXS7 (L1.28) and MAO A and B loci have been linked to the ND locus on the short arm of the X chromosome. Sequences homologous to OAT also have been mapped to the short arm of the X chromosome. We performed linkage analyses between the ND locus and one of the OAT-like clusters of sequences on the X chromosome (OATL1), using a ScaI RFLP in a ND family, and increased the previously calculated lod score (z) to over 3 (3.38; theta = 0.05). Similarly, we calculated a lod score of 4.06 (theta = 0.01) between the OATL1 and DXS7 loci. Alone, the OATL1 ScaI RFLP system is expected to be informative in 48% of females. If this system were used in combination with the DXS7 TaqI polymorphism, 71% of females would be informative for at least one of the markers and 21% would be informative for both. Because the OATL1 ScaI RFLP is a relatively common polymorphism, this system should be useful for the identification of ND carriers and affected male fetuses and newborns.

  7. Genomic imbalances in 5918 malignant epithelial tumors: an explorative meta-analysis of chromosomal CGH data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with most human malignancies, with gains and losses on some genomic regions associated with particular entities. Of the 15429 cases collected for the Progenetix molecular-cytogenetic database, 5918 malignant epithelial neoplasias analyzed by chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) were selected for further evaluation. For the 22 clinico-pathological entities with more than 50 cases, summary profiles for genomic imbalances were generated from case specific data and analyzed. With large variation in overall genomic instability, recurring genomic gains and losses were prominent. Most entities showed frequent gains involving 8q2, while gains on 20q, 1q, 3q, 5p, 7q and 17q were frequent in different entities. Loss 'hot spots' included 3p, 4q, 13q, 17p and 18q among others. Related average imbalance patterns were found for clinically distinct entities, e.g. hepatocellular carcinomas (ca.) and ductal breast ca., as well as for histologically related entities (squamous cell ca. of different sites). Although considerable case-by-case variation of genomic profiles can be found by CGH in epithelial malignancies, a limited set of variously combined chromosomal imbalances may be typical for carcinogenesis. Focus on the respective regions should aid in target gene detection and pathway deduction

  8. Human beta 2 chain of laminin (formerly S chain): cDNA cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Gerecke, D R; Durkin, M E

    1994-01-01

    or other known laminin genes. Immunostaining showed that the beta 2 chain is localized to the smooth muscle basement membranes of the arteries, while the homologous beta 1 chain is confined to the subendothelial basement membranes. The beta 2 chain was found in the basement membranes of ovarian carcinomas......Overlapping cDNA clones that encode the full-length human laminin beta 2 chain, formerly called the S chain, were isolated. The cDNA of 5680 nt contains a 5391-nt open reading frame encoding 1797 amino acids. At the amino terminus is a 32-amino-acid signal peptide that is followed by the mature...... beta 2 chain polypeptide of 1765 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 192,389 Da. The human beta 2 chain is predicted to have all of the seven structural domains typical of the beta chains of laminin, including the short cysteine-rich alpha region. The amino acid sequence of human beta 2...

  9. Analysis of Non Local Image Denoising Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Álvaro

    Image denoising is probably one of the most studied problems in the image processing community. Recently a new paradigm on non local denoising was introduced. The Non Local Means method proposed by Buades, Morel and Coll attracted the attention of other researches who proposed improvements and modifications to their proposal. In this work we analyze those methods trying to understand their properties while connecting them to segmentation based on spectral graph properties. We also propose some improvements to automatically estimate the parameters used on these methods.

  10. Genomewide Clonal Analysis of Lethal Mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster Eye: Comparison of the X Chromosome and Autosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Gerald B.; Olson, John M.; Chen, Jiong; Villarasa, Nikki; Ngo, Kathy T.; Yabroff, Allison M.; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bibikova, Elena; Bui, Chris; Cespedes, Albert; Chan, Cheryl; Chan, Stacy; Cheema, Amrita K.; Chhabra, Akanksha; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Do, Minh-Tu; Fang, Q. Angela; Folick, Andrew; Goodstein, Gelsey L.; Huang, Cheng R.; Hung, Tony; Kim, Eunha; Kim, William; Kim, Yulee; Kohan, Emil; Kuoy, Edward; Kwak, Robert; Lee, Eric; Lee, JiEun; Lin, Henry; Liu, H-C. Angela; Moroz, Tatiana; Prasad, Tharani; Prashad, Sacha L.; Patananan, Alexander N.; Rangel, Alma; Rosselli, Desiree; Sidhu, Sohrab; Sitz, Daniel; Taber, Chelsea E.; Tan, Jingwen; Topp, Kasey; Tran, PhuongThao; Tran, Quynh-Minh; Unkovic, Mary; Wells, Maggie; Wickland, Jessica; Yackle, Kevin; Yavari, Amir; Zaretsky, Jesse M.; Allen, Christopher M.; Alli, Latifat; An, Ju; Anwar, Abbas; Arevalo, Sonia; Ayoub, Danny; Badal, Shawn S.; Baghdanian, Armonde; Baghdanian, Arthur H.; Baumann, Sara A.; Becerra, Vivian N.; Chan, Hei J.; Chang, Aileen E.; Cheng, Xibin A.; Chin, Mabel; Chong, Fleurette; Crisostomo, Carlyn; Datta, Sanjit; Delosreyes, Angela; Diep, Francie; Ekanayake, Preethika; Engeln, Mark; Evers, Elizabeth; Farshidi, Farzin; Fischer, Katrina; Formanes, Arlene J.; Gong, Jun; Gupta, Riju; Haas, Blake E.; Hahm, Vicky; Hsieh, Michael; Hui, James Z.; Iao, Mei L.; Jin, Sophia D.; Kim, Angela Y.; Kim, Lydia S-H.; King, Megan; Knudsen-Robbins, Chloe; Kohanchi, David; Kovshilovskaya, Bogdana; Ku, Amy; Kung, Raymond W.; Landig, Mark E. L.; Latterman, Stephanie S.; Lauw, Stephanie S.; Lee, Daniel S.; Lee, Joann S.; Lei, Kai C.; Leung, Lesley L.; Lerner, Renata; Lin, Jian-ya; Lin, Kathleen; Lim, Bryon C.; Lui, Crystal P. Y.; Liu, Tiffany Q.; Luong, Vincent; Makshanoff, Jacob; Mei, An-Chi; Meza, Miguel; Mikhaeil, Yara A.; Moarefi, Majid; Nguyen, Long H.; Pai, Shekhar S.; Pandya, Manish; Patel, Aadit R.; Picard, Paul D.; Safaee, Michael M.; Salame, Carol; Sanchez, Christian; Sanchez, Nina; Seifert, Christina C.; Shah, Abhishek; Shilgevorkyan, Oganes H.; Singh, Inderroop; Soma, Vanessa; Song, Junia J.; Srivastava, Neetika; Sta.Ana, Jennifer L.; Sun, Christie; Tan, Diane; Teruya, Alison S.; Tikia, Robyn; Tran, Trinh; Travis, Emily G.; Trinh, Jennifer D.; Vo, Diane; Walsh, Thomas; Wong, Regan S.; Wu, Katherine; Wu, Ya-Whey; Yang, Nkau X. V.; Yeranosian, Michael; Yu, James S.; Zhou, Jennifer J.; Zhu, Ran X.; Abrams, Anna; Abramson, Amanda; Amado, Latiffe; Anderson, Jenny; Bashour, Keenan; Beyer, Elsa; Bookatz, Allen; Brewer, Sarah; Buu, Natalie; Calvillo, Stephanie; Cao, Joseph; Chan, Amy; Chan, Jenny; Chang, Aileen; Chang, Daniel; Chang, Yuli; Chen, YiBing; Choi, Joo; Chou, Jeyling; Dang, Peter; Datta, Sumit; Davarifar, Ardy; Deravanesian, Artemis; Desai, Poonam; Fabrikant, Jordan; Farnad, Shahbaz; Fu, Katherine; Garcia, Eddie; Garrone, Nick; Gasparyan, Srpouhi; Gayda, Phyllis; Go, Sherrylene; Goffstein, Chad; Gonzalez, Courtney; Guirguis, Mariam; Hassid, Ryan; Hermogeno, Brenda; Hong, Julie; Hong, Aria; Hovestreydt, Lindsay; Hu, Charles; Huff, Devon; Jamshidian, Farid; Jen, James; Kahen, Katrin; Kao, Linda; Kelley, Melissa; Kho, Thomas; Kim, Yein; Kim, Sarah; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Langenbacher, Adam; Laxamana, Santino; Lee, Janet; Lee, Chris; Lee, So-Youn; Lee, ToHang S.; Lee, Toni; Lewis, Gemma; Lezcano, Sheila; Lin, Peter; Luu, Thanh; Luu, Julie; Marrs, Will; Marsh, Erin; Marshall, Jamie; Min, Sarah; Minasian, Tanya; Minye, Helena; Misra, Amit; Morimoto, Miles; Moshfegh, Yasaman; Murray, Jessica; Nguyen, Kha; Nguyen, Cynthia; Nodado, Ernesto; O'Donahue, Amanda; Onugha, Ndidi; Orjiakor, Nneka; Padhiar, Bhavin; Paul, Eric; Pavel-Dinu, Mara; Pavlenko, Alex; Paz, Edwin; Phaklides, Sarah; Pham, Lephong; Poulose, Preethi; Powell, Russell; Pusic, Aya; Ramola, Divi; Regalia, Kirsten; Ribbens, Meghann; Rifai, Bassel; Saakyan, Manyak; Saarikoski, Pamela; Segura, Miriam; Shadpour, Farnaz; Shemmassian, Aram; Singh, Ramnik; Singh, Vivek; Skinner, Emily; Solomin, Daniel; Soneji, Kosha; Spivey, Kristin; Stageberg, Erika; Stavchanskiy, Marina; Tekchandani, Leena; Thai, Leo; Thiyanaratnam, Jayantha; Tong, Maurine; Toor, Aneet; Tovar, Steve; Trangsrud, Kelly; Tsang, Wah-Yung; Uemura, Marc; Vollmer, Emily; Weiss, Emily; Wood, Damien; Wu, Joy; Wu, Sophia; Wu, Winston; Xu, Qing; Yamauchi, Yuki; Yarosh, Will; Yee, Laura; Yen, George; Banerjee, Utpal

    2007-01-01

    Using a large consortium of undergraduate students in an organized program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), we have undertaken a functional genomic screen in the Drosophila eye. In addition to the educational value of discovery-based learning, this article presents the first comprehensive genomewide analysis of essential genes involved in eye development. The data reveal the surprising result that the X chromosome has almost twice the frequency of essential genes involved in eye development as that found on the autosomes. PMID:17720911

  11. Genomewide clonal analysis of lethal mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster eye: comparison of the X chromosome and autosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Gerald B; Olson, John M; Chen, Jiong; Villarasa, Nikki; Ngo, Kathy T; Yabroff, Allison M; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bibikova, Elena; Bui, Chris; Cespedes, Albert; Chan, Cheryl; Chan, Stacy; Cheema, Amrita K; Chhabra, Akanksha; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Do, Minh-Tu; Fang, Q Angela; Folick, Andrew; Goodstein, Gelsey L; Huang, Cheng R; Hung, Tony; Kim, Eunha; Kim, William; Kim, Yulee; Kohan, Emil; Kuoy, Edward; Kwak, Robert; Lee, Eric; Lee, JiEun; Lin, Henry; Liu, H-C Angela; Moroz, Tatiana; Prasad, Tharani; Prashad, Sacha L; Patananan, Alexander N; Rangel, Alma; Rosselli, Desiree; Sidhu, Sohrab; Sitz, Daniel; Taber, Chelsea E; Tan, Jingwen; Topp, Kasey; Tran, PhuongThao; Tran, Quynh-Minh; Unkovic, Mary; Wells, Maggie; Wickland, Jessica; Yackle, Kevin; Yavari, Amir; Zaretsky, Jesse M; Allen, Christopher M; Alli, Latifat; An, Ju; Anwar, Abbas; Arevalo, Sonia; Ayoub, Danny; Badal, Shawn S; Baghdanian, Armonde; Baghdanian, Arthur H; Baumann, Sara A; Becerra, Vivian N; Chan, Hei J; Chang, Aileen E; Cheng, Xibin A; Chin, Mabel; Chong, Fleurette; Crisostomo, Carlyn; Datta, Sanjit; Delosreyes, Angela; Diep, Francie; Ekanayake, Preethika; Engeln, Mark; Evers, Elizabeth; Farshidi, Farzin; Fischer, Katrina; Formanes, Arlene J; Gong, Jun; Gupta, Riju; Haas, Blake E; Hahm, Vicky; Hsieh, Michael; Hui, James Z; Iao, Mei L; Jin, Sophia D; Kim, Angela Y; Kim, Lydia S-H; King, Megan; Knudsen-Robbins, Chloe; Kohanchi, David; Kovshilovskaya, Bogdana; Ku, Amy; Kung, Raymond W; Landig, Mark E L; Latterman, Stephanie S; Lauw, Stephanie S; Lee, Daniel S; Lee, Joann S; Lei, Kai C; Leung, Lesley L; Lerner, Renata; Lin, Jian-ya; Lin, Kathleen; Lim, Bryon C; Lui, Crystal P Y; Liu, Tiffany Q; Luong, Vincent; Makshanoff, Jacob; Mei, An-Chi; Meza, Miguel; Mikhaeil, Yara A; Moarefi, Majid; Nguyen, Long H; Pai, Shekhar S; Pandya, Manish; Patel, Aadit R; Picard, Paul D; Safaee, Michael M; Salame, Carol; Sanchez, Christian; Sanchez, Nina; Seifert, Christina C; Shah, Abhishek; Shilgevorkyan, Oganes H; Singh, Inderroop; Soma, Vanessa; Song, Junia J; Srivastava, Neetika; StaAna, Jennifer L; Sun, Christie; Tan, Diane; Teruya, Alison S; Tikia, Robyn; Tran, Trinh; Travis, Emily G; Trinh, Jennifer D; Vo, Diane; Walsh, Thomas; Wong, Regan S; Wu, Katherine; Wu, Ya-Whey; Yang, Nkau X V; Yeranosian, Michael; Yu, James S; Zhou, Jennifer J; Zhu, Ran X; Abrams, Anna; Abramson, Amanda; Amado, Latiffe; Anderson, Jenny; Bashour, Keenan; Beyer, Elsa; Bookatz, Allen; Brewer, Sarah; Buu, Natalie; Calvillo, Stephanie; Cao, Joseph; Chan, Amy; Chan, Jenny; Chang, Aileen; Chang, Daniel; Chang, Yuli; Chen, YiBing; Choi, Joo; Chou, Jeyling; Dang, Peter; Datta, Sumit; Davarifar, Ardy; Deravanesian, Artemis; Desai, Poonam; Fabrikant, Jordan; Farnad, Shahbaz; Fu, Katherine; Garcia, Eddie; Garrone, Nick; Gasparyan, Srpouhi; Gayda, Phyllis; Go, Sherrylene; Goffstein, Chad; Gonzalez, Courtney; Guirguis, Mariam; Hassid, Ryan; Hermogeno, Brenda; Hong, Julie; Hong, Aria; Hovestreydt, Lindsay; Hu, Charles; Huff, Devon; Jamshidian, Farid; Jen, James; Kahen, Katrin; Kao, Linda; Kelley, Melissa; Kho, Thomas; Kim, Yein; Kim, Sarah; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Langenbacher, Adam; Laxamana, Santino; Lee, Janet; Lee, Chris; Lee, So-Youn; Lee, ToHang S; Lee, Toni; Lewis, Gemma; Lezcano, Sheila; Lin, Peter; Luu, Thanh; Luu, Julie; Marrs, Will; Marsh, Erin; Marshall, Jamie; Min, Sarah; Minasian, Tanya; Minye, Helena; Misra, Amit; Morimoto, Miles; Moshfegh, Yasaman; Murray, Jessica; Nguyen, Kha; Nguyen, Cynthia; Nodado, Ernesto; O'Donahue, Amanda; Onugha, Ndidi; Orjiakor, Nneka; Padhiar, Bhavin; Paul, Eric; Pavel-Dinu, Mara; Pavlenko, Alex; Paz, Edwin; Phaklides, Sarah; Pham, Lephong; Poulose, Preethi; Powell, Russell; Pusic, Aya; Ramola, Divi; Regalia, Kirsten; Ribbens, Meghann; Rifai, Bassel; Saakyan, Manyak; Saarikoski, Pamela; Segura, Miriam; Shadpour, Farnaz; Shemmassian, Aram; Singh, Ramnik; Singh, Vivek; Skinner, Emily; Solomin, Daniel; Soneji, Kosha; Spivey, Kristin; Stageberg, Erika; Stavchanskiy, Marina; Tekchandani, Leena; Thai, Leo; Thiyanaratnam, Jayantha; Tong, Maurine; Toor, Aneet; Tovar, Steve; Trangsrud, Kelly; Tsang, Wah-Yung; Uemura, Marc; Vollmer, Emily; Weiss, Emily; Wood, Damien; Wu, Joy; Wu, Sophia; Wu, Winston; Xu, Qing; Yamauchi, Yuki; Yarosh, Will; Yee, Laura; Yen, George; Banerjee, Utpal

    2007-10-01

    Using a large consortium of undergraduate students in an organized program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), we have undertaken a functional genomic screen in the Drosophila eye. In addition to the educational value of discovery-based learning, this article presents the first comprehensive genomewide analysis of essential genes involved in eye development. The data reveal the surprising result that the X chromosome has almost twice the frequency of essential genes involved in eye development as that found on the autosomes.

  12. Homologous alpha satellite sequences on human acrocentric chromosomes with selectivity for chromosomes 13, 14, and 21: implications for recombination between nonhomologues and Robertsonian translocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K H; Vissel, B; Brown, R; Filby, R G; Earle, E

    1988-02-25

    The authors report a new subfamily of alpha satellite DNA (pTRA-2) which is found on all the human acrocentric chromosomes. The alphoid nature of the cloned DNA was established by partial sequencing. Southern analysis of restriction enzyme-digested DNA fragments from mouse/human hybrid cells containing only human chromosome 21 showed that the predominant higher-order repeating unit for pTRA-2 is a 3.9 kb structure. Analysis of a consensus in situ hybridization profile derived from 13 normal individuals revealed the localization of 73% of all centromeric autoradiographic grains over the five acrocentric chromosomes, with the following distribution: 20.4%, 21.5%, 17.1%, 7.3% and 6.5% on chromosomes 13, 14, 21, 15 and 22 respectively. An average of 1.4% of grains was found on the centromere of each of the remaining 19 nonacrocentric chromosomes. These results indicate the presence of a common subfamily of alpha satellite DNA on the five acrocentric chromosomes and suggest an evolutionary process consistent with recombination exchange of sequences between the nonhomologues. The results further suggests that such exchanges are more selective for chromosomes 13, 14 and 21 than for chromosomes 15 and 22. The possible role of centromeric alpha satellite DNA in the aetiology of 13q14q and 14q21q Robertsonian translocation involving the common and nonrandom association of chromosomes 13 and 14, and 14 and 21 is discussed.

  13. Fungal ABC Transporter Deletion and Localization Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalchuk, A.; Weber, S.S.; Nijland, J.G.; Bovenberg, R.A.L.; Driessen, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Fungal cells are highly complex as their metabolism is compartmentalized harboring various types of subcellular organelles that are bordered by one or more membranes. Knowledge about the intracellular localization of transporter proteins is often required for the understanding of their biological

  14. Development of local TDC model in core thermal hydraulic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H.S.; Park, J.R.; Hwang, D.H.; Lee, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    The local TDC model consisting of natural mixing and forced mixing part was developed to obtain more realistic local fluid properties in the core subchannel analysis. To evaluate the performance of local TDC model, the CHF prediction capability was tested with the various CHF correlations and local fluid properties at CHF location which are based on the local TDC model. The results show that the standard deviation of measured to predicted CHF ratio (M/P) based on local TDC model can be reduced by about 7% compared to those based on global TDC model when the CHF correlation has no term to account for distance from the spacer grid. (author)

  15. Smoothed Analysis of Local Search Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Bodo; Dehne, Frank; Sack, Jörg-Rüdiger; Stege, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Smoothed analysis is a method for analyzing the performance of algorithms for which classical worst-case analysis fails to explain the performance observed in practice. Smoothed analysis has been applied to explain the performance of a variety of algorithms in the last years. One particular class of

  16. Structural analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations by atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after Giemsa staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Kanda, R.; Minamihisamatsu, M.; Hayata, I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have studied structures of chromosome aberration induced by ionizing radiation by an atomic force microscope (AFM). The AFM could visualize the fine structure of chromosomes on Giemsa stained or unstained samples, although it was difficult to visualize unstained chromosomes by light microscope. The height data of chromosomes obtained by AFM provided useful information to describe detailed structure of chromatid gaps induced by heavy ion irradiation. A fibrous structure was observed on the unstained chromosome and these structures were considered to be the 30nm fibers on the chromosome. These types of structures were observed in the gaps as well as on surface of the chromosome. Further more, other types of chromosome aberration induced by ionizing radiation visualized by AFM will be presented

  17. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities: a study of partial exposure to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Aida M.G. de; Mendes, Mariana E.; Mendonça, Julyanne C.G.; Melo, Laís; Hwang, Suy; Santos, Neide; Lima, Fabiana F. de; Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares; Universidade Federal de Pernambuco

    2017-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is used in case of supposed accidental overexposure. The most commonly used biomarkers for assessing the absorbed dose are unstable chromosomal abnormalities. In a case of a partial body exposure, the frequencies of those abnormalities varies according to the area of the exposed body and may be substantially different from a total exposure of the body with an identical dose. The present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal changes simulating, with blood samples, partial (25%, 50%) and full body irradiation (100%) in X-ray beam. The irradiation was performed at Metrology Service (CRCN-NE / CNEN) with a bundle of 250kVp X-rays, resulting in the absorbed dose of 1.0 Gy. Prior to obtain the metaphases, irradiated blood was mixed with non-irradiated blood, and then the mitotic metaphases for the chromosomal analyzes were obtained by culturing lymphocytes and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. It was observed that there was an increase in dicentric frequency when the dose percentage increases in both subjects (0.024 and 0.049 in subject 1 and 0.016 and 0.038 in subject 2) after irradiation. The cellular distribution was 'contaminated' only at dose 25% of the first individual who had a prolongation of the distribution. The Qdr and Dolphin methods were used to estimate partial absorbed dose, but the Qdr method was not efficient and whereas the Dolphin method was efficient when the individual had a prolonged cell distribution. It is necessary to increase the number of observations to be sure of the observed behaviors. (author)

  18. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities: a study of partial exposure to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Aida M.G. de; Mendes, Mariana E.; Mendonça, Julyanne C.G.; Melo, Laís; Hwang, Suy; Santos, Neide; Lima, Fabiana F. de, E-mail: aidamgandrade@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE),Recife (Brazil). Centro de Biociências. Departamento de Genética

    2017-11-01

    Biological dosimetry is used in case of supposed accidental overexposure. The most commonly used biomarkers for assessing the absorbed dose are unstable chromosomal abnormalities. In a case of a partial body exposure, the frequencies of those abnormalities varies according to the area of the exposed body and may be substantially different from a total exposure of the body with an identical dose. The present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal changes simulating, with blood samples, partial (25%, 50%) and full body irradiation (100%) in X-ray beam. The irradiation was performed at Metrology Service (CRCN-NE / CNEN) with a bundle of 250kVp X-rays, resulting in the absorbed dose of 1.0 Gy. Prior to obtain the metaphases, irradiated blood was mixed with non-irradiated blood, and then the mitotic metaphases for the chromosomal analyzes were obtained by culturing lymphocytes and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. It was observed that there was an increase in dicentric frequency when the dose percentage increases in both subjects (0.024 and 0.049 in subject 1 and 0.016 and 0.038 in subject 2) after irradiation. The cellular distribution was 'contaminated' only at dose 25% of the first individual who had a prolongation of the distribution. The Qdr and Dolphin methods were used to estimate partial absorbed dose, but the Qdr method was not efficient and whereas the Dolphin method was efficient when the individual had a prolonged cell distribution. It is necessary to increase the number of observations to be sure of the observed behaviors. (author)

  19. Analysis of diversity and linkage disequilibrium along chromosome 3B of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Aniko; Didier, Audrey; Koenig, Jean; Exbrayat, Florence; Charmet, Gilles; Balfourier, François

    2009-11-01

    A highly polymorphic core collection of bread wheat and a more narrow-based breeding material, gathered from pedigrees of seven modern cultivars, was analysed in order to compare genetic diversity indices and linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns along the chromosome 3B with microsatellite (SSR) and Diversity Arrays Technology markers. Five ancestral gene pools could be identified within the core collection, indicating a strong geographical structure (Northwest Europe, Southeast Europe, CIMMYT-ICARDA group, Asia, Nepal). The breeding material showed a temporal structure, corresponding to different periods of breeding programmes [old varieties (from old landraces to 1919), semi-modern varieties (1920-1959), modern varieties (1960-2006)]. Basic statistics showed a higher genetic diversity in the core collection than in the breeding material, indicating a stronger selection pressure in this latter material. More generally, the chromosome 3B had a lower diversity than the whole B-genome. LD was weak in all studied materials. Amongst geographical groups, the CIMMYT-ICARDA pool presented the longest ranged LD in contrast to Asian accessions. In the breeding material, LD increased from old cultivars to modern varieties. Genitors of seven modern cultivars were found to be different; most marker pairs in significant LD were observed amongst genitors of Alexandre and Koreli varieties, indicating an important inbreeding effect. At low genetic distances (0-5 cM), the breeding material had higher LD than the core collection, but globally the two materials had similar values in all classes. Marker pairs in significant LD are generally observed around the centromere in both arms and at distal position on the short arm of the chromosome 3B.

  20. Analysis of the temporal program of replication initiation in yeast chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, K L; Raghuraman, M K; Fangman, W L; Brewer, B J

    1995-01-01

    The multiple origins of eukaryotic chromosomes vary in the time of their initiation during S phase. In the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae the presence of a functional telomere causes nearby origins to delay initiation until the second half of S phase. The key feature of telomeres that causes the replication delay is the telomeric sequence (C(1-3)A/G(1-3)T) itself and not the proximity of the origin to a DNA end. A second group of late replicating origins has been found at an internal position on chromosome XIV. Four origins, spanning approximately 140 kb, initiate replication in the second half of S phase. At least two of these internal origins maintain their late replication time on circular plasmids. Each of these origins can be separated into two functional elements: those sequences that provide origin function and those that impose late activation. Because the assay for determining replication time is costly and laborious, it has not been possible to analyze in detail these 'late' elements. We report here the development of two new assays for determining replication time. The first exploits the expression of the Escherichia coli dam methylase in yeast and the characteristic period of hemimethylation that transiently follows the passage of a replication fork. The second uses quantitative hybridization to detect two-fold differences in the amount of specific restriction fragments as a function of progress through S phase. The novel aspect of this assay is the creation in vivo of a non-replicating DNA sequence by site-specific pop-out recombination. This non-replicating fragment acts as an internal control for copy number within and between samples. Both of these techniques are rapid and much less costly than the more conventional density transfer experiments that require CsCl gradients to detect replicated DNA. With these techniques it should be possible to identify the sequences responsible for late initiation, to search for other late replicating

  1. Analysis of Chromosome Number in Some Allium and Silene Wild Species with Ornamental Use

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia DRAGHIA; Elena Liliana CHELARIU; Culiţă SÎRBU; Maria BRÂNZĂ; Cristina SANDU MICULSCHI

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyses the number of somatic chromosomes in plant species with ornamental value, in Romanian indigenous flora, Allium (A. flavum L., A. saxatile Bieb.) and Silene (S. compacta Fischer., S. supina M.Bieb.). The biological material was identified and harvested in the South-Eastern part of Dobrogea (Tulcea and Constanţa counties), area in the South-Eastern part of Romania, situated between the Danube and the Black Sea. Individuals from two populations of Allium flavum and All...

  2. Genetic mapping of centromeres in the nine Citrus clementina chromosomes using half-tetrad analysis and recombination patterns in unreduced and haploid gametes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleza, Pablo; Cuenca, José; Hernández, María; Juárez, José; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2015-03-08

    Mapping centromere locations in plant species provides essential information for the analysis of genetic structures and population dynamics. The centromere's position affects the distribution of crossovers along a chromosome and the parental heterozygosity restitution by 2n gametes is a direct function of the genetic distance to the centromere. Sexual polyploidisation is relatively frequent in Citrus species and is widely used to develop new seedless triploid cultivars. The study's objectives were to (i) map the positions of the centromeres of the nine Citrus clementina chromosomes; (ii) analyse the crossover interference in unreduced gametes; and (iii) establish the pattern of genetic recombination in haploid clementine gametes along each chromosome and its relationship with the centromere location and distribution of genic sequences. Triploid progenies were derived from unreduced megagametophytes produced by second-division restitution. Centromere positions were mapped genetically for all linkage groups using half-tetrad analysis. Inference of the physical locations of centromeres revealed one acrocentric, four metacentric and four submetacentric chromosomes. Crossover interference was observed in unreduced gametes, with variation seen between chromosome arms. For haploid gametes, a strong decrease in the recombination rate occurred in centromeric and pericentromeric regions, which contained a low density of genic sequences. In chromosomes VIII and IX, these low recombination rates extended beyond the pericentromeric regions. The genomic region corresponding to a genetic distance recombination pattern along each chromosome. However, regions with low recombination rates extended beyond the pericentromeric regions of some chromosomes into areas richer in genic sequences. The persistence of strong linkage disequilibrium between large numbers of genes promotes the stability of epistatic interactions and multilocus-controlled traits over successive generations but

  3. Analysis of Local Financial Management Transparency Based on Websites on Local Government in Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa Adriana

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to analyze financial management transparency of local governments in Java using scoring and rating. The financial management transparency of the local governments is scored based on presentation of local financial information uploaded on each local government’s official website in Jawa in the fiscal years 2016.This research is a qualitative research with the object of research is all local government in Java. Data analysis in two levels, namely the transparency of local government financial management and identification of local government characteristics based on transparency of financial management. Data analysis in two levels, namely the transparency of local government financial management and identification of local government characteristics based on transparency of financial management. The results show that the Special Capital Region of Jakarta obtained the highest transparency index, at 58, 02% whereas Madiun Regency received the lowest transparency index, at 3, 40%. The average transparency index in Jawa for the fiscal years 2016 was still low, at only 19, 59%.The conclusion of this research is that Java regional governments consider the transparency of local financial management using less important websites because it is considered as a better thing not delivered to the public.

  4. Comparative analysis of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced 'in vitro' by various types of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, S.

    1975-01-01

    A quantitative analysis on various types of chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro whole blood irradiation with 180 kV X-rays, gamma rays from cobalt 60, 50 MeV protons and scission neutrons is carried out. The following aberrations are scored: breaks, total number of aberrations, aberrant cells, chromosome fragments, dicentrics and interstitial deletions. The experimental data obtained are statistically processed applying the method of the least squares and employing four mathematical models: Y = cD 2 , Y = cD, Y = a + bD and Y = a + bD + cD 2 . Statistical analysis showed that after treatment with low LET (linear energy transfer) radiations the most suitable for the description of the kinetic of the two break aberrations, total number of aberrations and breaks in relation to dose is the polynomial second degree model, whereas for one break aberrations and aberrant cells - the linear model. The linear model is equally appropriate for one or two breaks aberrations when it is a matter of high LET radiations. Using the linear component of the polynominal second degree equation a comparative characteristic of the RBE (relative biological effectiveness) for the various radiations types is made. The following mean values for RBE are obtained: 0,86 +- 0,44 for gamma radiation from cobalt 60, 0,98 +- 0,06 for 50 MeV protons and 2,38 +- 0,11 for scission neutrons. (A.B.)

  5. Haplotype analysis and a novel allele-sharing method refines a chromosome 4p locus linked to bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lee, Andrew J; Underwood, Sarah; Thomson, Pippa A; Morris, Stewart W; Torrance, Helen S; Anderson, Susan M; Adams, Richard R; Navarro, Pau; Christoforou, Andrea; Houlihan, Lorna M; Detera-Wadleigh, Sevilla; Owen, Michael J; Asherson, Philip; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Wray, Naomi R; Porteous, David J; Evans, Kathryn L

    2007-03-15

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) are common conditions. Their causes are unknown, but they include a substantial genetic component. Previously, we described significant linkage of BPAD to a chromosome 4p locus within a large pedigree (F22). Others subsequently have found evidence for linkage of BPAD and SCZ to this region. We constructed high-resolution haplotypes for four linked families, calculated logarithm of the odds (LOD) scores, and developed a novel method to assess the extent of allele sharing within genes between the families. We describe an increase in the F22 LOD score for this region. Definition and comparison of the linked haplotypes allowed us to prioritize two subregions of 3.8 and 4.4 Mb. Analysis of the extent of allele sharing within these subregions identified 200 kb that shows increased allele sharing between families. Linkage of BPAD to chromosome 4p has been strengthened. Haplotype analysis in the additional linked families refined the 20-Mb linkage region. Development of a novel allele-sharing method allowed us to bridge the gap between conventional linkage and association studies. Description of a 200-kb region of increased allele sharing prioritizes this region, which contains two functional candidate genes for BPAD, SLC2A9, and WDR1, for subsequent studies.

  6. Extending the scope of diagnostic chromosome analysis: detection of single gene defects using high-resolution SNP microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Damien L; Stark, Zornitza; Amor, David J; Burgess, Trent; Butler, Kathy; Corrie, Sylvea; Francis, David; Ganesamoorthy, Devika; Hills, Louise; James, Paul A; O'Rielly, Darren; Oertel, Ralph; Savarirayan, Ravi; Prabhakara, Krishnamurthy; Salce, Nicholas; Slater, Howard R

    2011-12-01

    Microarray analysis has provided significant advances in the diagnosis of conditions resulting from submicroscopic chromosome abnormalities. It has been recommended that array testing should be a "first tier" test in the evaluation of individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, congenital anomalies, and autism. The availability of arrays with increasingly high probe coverage and resolution has increased the detection of decreasingly small copy number changes (CNCs) down to the intragenic or even exon level. Importantly, arrays that genotype SNPs also detect extended regions of homozygosity. We describe 14 examples of single gene disorders caused by intragenic changes from a consecutive set of 6,500 tests using high-resolution SNP microarrays. These cases illustrate the increased scope of cytogenetic testing beyond dominant chromosome rearrangements that typically contain many genes. Nine of the cases confirmed the clinical diagnosis, that is, followed a "phenotype to genotype" approach. Five were diagnosed by the laboratory analysis in the absence of a specific clinical diagnosis, that is, followed a "genotype to phenotype" approach. Two were clinically significant, incidental findings. The importance of astute clinical assessment and laboratory-clinician consultation is emphasized to optimize the value of microarrays in the diagnosis of disorders caused by single gene copy number and sequence mutations. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. The Variation Analysis of DNA Methylation in Wheat Carrying Gametocidal Chromosome 3C from Aegilops triuncialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Zhao, Jieyu; Bai, Yan; Ao, You; Guo, Changhong

    2017-08-10

    Gametocidal (Gc) chromosomes can ensure their preferential transmission by killing the gametes without themselves through causing chromosome breakage and therefore have been exploited as an effective tool for genetic breeding. However, to date very little is known about the molecular mechanism of Gc action. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique to assess the extent and pattern of cytosine methylation alterations at the whole genome level between two lines of wheat Gc addition line and their common wheat parent. The results indicated that the overall levels of cytosine methylation of two studied Gc addition lines (CS-3C and CS-3C3C, 48.68% and 48.65%, respectively) were significantly increased when compared to common wheat CS (41.31%) and no matter fully methylated or hemimethylated rates enhanced in Gc addition lines. A set of 30 isolated fragments that showed different DNA methylation or demethylation patterns between the three lines were sequenced and the results indicated that 8 fragments showed significant homology to known sequences, of which three were homologous to MITE transposon (Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements), LTR-retrotransposon WIS-1p and retrotransposon Gypsy , respectively. Overall, our results showed that DNA methylation could play a role in the Gc action.

  8. The Variation Analysis of DNA Methylation in Wheat Carrying Gametocidal Chromosome 3C from Aegilops triuncialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gametocidal (Gc chromosomes can ensure their preferential transmission by killing the gametes without themselves through causing chromosome breakage and therefore have been exploited as an effective tool for genetic breeding. However, to date very little is known about the molecular mechanism of Gc action. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP technique to assess the extent and pattern of cytosine methylation alterations at the whole genome level between two lines of wheat Gc addition line and their common wheat parent. The results indicated that the overall levels of cytosine methylation of two studied Gc addition lines (CS–3C and CS–3C3C, 48.68% and 48.65%, respectively were significantly increased when compared to common wheat CS (41.31% and no matter fully methylated or hemimethylated rates enhanced in Gc addition lines. A set of 30 isolated fragments that showed different DNA methylation or demethylation patterns between the three lines were sequenced and the results indicated that 8 fragments showed significant homology to known sequences, of which three were homologous to MITE transposon (Miniature inverted–repeat transposable elements, LTR-retrotransposon WIS-1p and retrotransposon Gypsy, respectively. Overall, our results showed that DNA methylation could play a role in the Gc action.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of SU(VAR)3-9 distribution in chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Daniil A; Laktionov, Petr P; Posukh, Olga V; Belyakin, Stepan N; Koryakov, Dmitry E

    2018-03-01

    Histone modifications represent one of the key factors contributing to proper genome regulation. One of histone modifications involved in gene silencing is methylation of H3K9 residue. Present in the chromosomes across different eukaryotes, this epigenetic mark is controlled by SU(VAR)3-9 and its orthologs. Despite SU(VAR)3-9 was discovered over two decades ago, little is known about the details of its chromosomal distribution pattern. To fill in this gap, we used DamID-seq approach and obtained high-resolution genome-wide profiles for SU(VAR)3-9 in two somatic (salivary glands and brain ganglia) and two germline (ovarian nurse cells and testes) tissues of Drosophila melanogaster. Analysis of tissue and developmental expression of SU(VAR)3-9-bound genes indicates that in the somatic tissues tested, as well as in the ovarian nurse cells, SU(VAR)3-9 tends to associate with transcriptionally silent genes. In contrast, in the testes, SU(VAR)3-9 shows preferential association with testis-specific genes, and its binding appears dynamic during spermatogenesis. In somatic cells, the mere presence/absence of SU(VAR)3-9 binding correlates with lower/higher expression. No such correlation is found in the male germline. Interestingly, transcription units in piRNA clusters (particularly flanks thereof) are frequently targeted by SU(VAR)3-9, and Su(var)3-9 mutation affects the expression of select piRNA species. Our analyses suggest a context-dependent role of SU(VAR)3-9. In euchromatin, SU(VAR)3-9 may serve to fine-tune the expression of individual genes, whereas in heterochromatin, chromosome 4, and piRNA clusters, it may act more broadly over large chromatin domains.

  10. Job Analysis: A Local Government's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Steve J.

    1997-01-01

    A county personnel department undertook reclassification of all positions by collecting and using job analysis data to rewrite job descriptions. External pay equity and validated selection procedures resulted with only a modest increase in payroll costs. (SK)

  11. Patterns of genic diversity and structure in a species undergoing rapid chromosomal radiation: an allozyme analysis of house mice from the Madeira archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton-Davidian, J; Catalan, J; Lopez, J; Ganem, G; Nunes, A C; Ramalhinho, M G; Auffray, J C; Searle, J B; Mathias, M L

    2007-10-01

    The chromosomal radiation of the house mouse in the island of Madeira most likely involved a human-mediated colonization event followed by within-island geographical isolation and recurrent episodes of genetic drift. The genetic signature of such processes was assessed by an allozyme analysis of the chromosomal races from Madeira. No trace of a decrease in diversity was observed suggesting the possibility of large founder or bottleneck sizes, multiple introductions and/or a high post-colonization expansion rate. The Madeira populations were more closely related to those of Portugal than to other continental regions, in agreement with the documented human colonization of the island. Such a Portuguese origin contrasts with a study indicating a north European source of the mitochondrial haplotypes present in the Madeira mice. This apparent discrepancy may be resolved if not one but two colonization events took place, an initial north European introduction followed by a later one from Portugal. Asymmetrical reproduction between these mice would have resulted in a maternal north European signature with a nuclear Portuguese genome. The extensive chromosomal divergence of the races in Madeira is expected to contribute to their genic divergence. However, there was no significant correlation between chromosomal and allozyme distances. This low apparent chromosomal impact on genic differentiation may be related to the short time since the onset of karyotypic divergence, as the strength of the chromosomal barrier will become significant only at later stages.

  12. The human MCP-2 gene (SCYA8): Cloning, sequence analysis, tissue expression, and assignment to the CC chemokine gene contig on chromosome 17q11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Coillie, E.; Fiten, P.; Van Damme, J.; Opdenakker, G. [Univ. of Leuven (Belgium)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCPs) form a subfamily of chemokines that recruit leukocytes to sites of inflammation and that may contribute to tumor-associated leukocyte infiltration and to the antiviral state against HIV infection. With the use of degenerate primers that were based on CC chemokine consensus sequences, the known MIP-1{alpha}/LD78{alpha}, MCP-1, and MCP-3 genes and the previously unidentified eotaxin and MCP-2 genes were isolated from a YAC contig from human chromosome 17q11.2. The amplified genomic MCP-2 fragment was used to isolate an MCP-2 cosmid from which the gene sequence was determined. The MCP-2 gene shares with the MCP-1 and MCP-3 genes a conserved intron-exon structure and a coding nucleotide sequence homology of 77%. By Northern blot analysis the 1.0-kb MCP-2 mRNA was predominantly detectable in the small intestine, peripheral blood, heart, placenta, lung, skeletal muscle, ovary, colon, spinal cord, pancreas, and thymus. Transcripts of 1.5 and 2.4 kb were found in the testis, the small intestine, and the colon. The isolation of the MCP-2 gene from the chemokine contig localized it on YAC clones of chromosome 17q11.2, which also contain the eotaxin, MCP-1, MCP-3, and NCC-1/MCP-4 genes. The combination of using degenerate primer PCR and YACs illustrates that novel genes can efficiently be isolated from gene cluster contigs with less redundancy and effort than the isolation of novel ESTs. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Analysis gives alterations stable chromosomic induced by the radiation in vitro the sanguine samples to well-known dose. Preliminary results obtained by means of chromosomic painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, M.J.; Moreno, M.; Gomez-Espi, M.; Olivares, P.; Herranz, R.

    1998-01-01

    In the University General Hospital Gregorio Marannon, once standardized the technique in situ hybridization with fluorescence by means of painting chromosomic the couples 1 and 2 you this carrying out the irradiation gives sanguine samples to well-known dose The objective these irradiations it is the elaboration in vitro a calibration chart dose effect for gamma ray. This new curve will allow to estimate dose in individuals with suspicion overexposure to ionizing radiations, solving some gives the limitations that it presents the technique classic cytogenetics

  14. Comparative genomics analysis of rice and pineapple contributes to understand the chromosome number reduction and genomic changes in grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most researched model plant, and has a genome structure most resembling that of the grass common ancestor after a grass common tetraploidization ~100 million years ago. There has been a standing controversy whether there had been 5 or 7 basic chromosomes, before the tetraploidization, which were tackled but could not be well solved for the lacking of a sequenced and assembled outgroup plant to have a conservative genome structure. Recently, the availability of pineapple genome, which has not been subjected to the grass-common tetraploidization, provides a precious opportunity to solve the above controversy and to research into genome changes of rice and other grasses. Here, we performed a comparative genomics analysis of pineapple and rice, and found solid evidence that grass-common ancestor had 2n =2x =14 basic chromosomes before the tetraploidization and duplicated to 2n = 4x = 28 after the event. Moreover, we proposed that enormous gene missing from duplicated regions in rice should be explained by an allotetraploid produced by prominently divergent parental lines, rather than gene losses after their divergence. This means that genome fractionation might have occurred before the formation of the allotetraploid grass ancestor.

  15. Genetic analysis of autoimmune sialadenitis in nonobese diabetic mice: a major susceptibility region on chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, Olivier; Fluteau, Guy; Eloy, Laure; Damotte, Diane; Bedossa, Pierre; Garchon, Henri-Jean

    2002-04-15

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain provides a good study model for Sjögren's syndrome (SS). The genetic control of SS was investigated in this model using different matings, including a (NOD x C57BL/6 (B6))F(2) cross, a (NOD x NZW)F(2) cross, and ((NOD x B6) x NOD) backcross. Multiple and different loci were detected depending on parent strain combination and sex. Despite significant complexity, two main features were prominent. First, the middle region of chromosome 1 (chr.1) was detected in all crosses. Its effect was most visible in the (NOD x B6)F(2) cross and dominated over that of other loci, including those mapping on chr.8, 9, 10, and 16; the effect of these minor loci was observed only in the absence of the NOD haplotype on chr.1. Most critically, the chr.1 region was sufficient to trigger an SS-like inflammatory infiltrate of salivary glands as shown by the study of a new C57BL/6 congenic strain carrying a restricted segment derived from NOD chr.1. Second, several chromosomal regions were previously associated with NOD autoimmune phenotypes, including Iddm (chr.1, 2, 3, 9, and 17, corresponding to Idd5, Idd13, Idd3, Idd2, and Idd1, respectively), accounting for the strong linkage previously reported between insulitis and sialitis, and autoantibody production (chr.10 and 16, corresponding to Bana2 and Bah2, respectively). Interestingly, only two loci were detected in the (NOD x NZW)F(2) cross, on chr.1 in females and on chr.7 in males, probably because of the latent autoimmune predisposition of the NZW strain. Altogether these findings reflect the complexity and heterogeneity of human SS.

  16. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  17. Comparative cytogenetics of six Indo-Pacific moray eels (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae) by chromosomal banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccia, E; Deidda, F; Cannas, R; Lobina, C; Cuccu, D; Deiana, A M; Salvadori, S

    2015-09-01

    A comparative cytogenetic analysis, using both conventional staining techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization, of six Indo-Pacific moray eels from three different genera (Gymnothorax fimbriatus, Gymnothorax flavimarginatus, Gymnothorax javanicus, Gymnothorax undulatus, Echidna nebulosa and Gymnomuraena zebra), was carried out to investigate the chromosomal differentiation in the family Muraenidae. Four species displayed a diploid chromosome number 2n = 42, which is common among the Muraenidae. Two other species, G. javanicus and G. flavimarginatus, were characterized by different chromosome numbers (2n = 40 and 2n = 36). For most species, a large amount of constitutive heterochromatin was detected in the chromosomes, with species-specific C-banding patterns that enabled pairing of the homologous chromosomes. In all species, the major ribosomal genes were localized in the guanine-cytosine-rich region of one chromosome pair, but in different chromosomal locations. The (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences were mapped onto chromosomal ends in all muraenid species studied. The comparison of the results derived from this study with those available in the literature confirms a substantial conservation of the diploid chromosome number in the Muraenidae and supports the hypothesis that rearrangements have occurred that have diversified their karyotypes. Furthermore, the finding of two species with different diploid chromosome numbers suggests that additional chromosomal rearrangements, such as Robertsonian fusions, have occurred in the karyotype evolution of the Muraenidae. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  18. Naturally occurring minichromosome platforms in chromosome engineering: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Artificially modified chromosome vectors are non-integrating gene delivery platforms that can shuttle very large DNA fragments in various recipient cells: theoretically, no size limit exists for the chromosome segments that an engineered minichromosome can accommodate. Therefore, genetically manipulated chromosomes might be potentially ideal vector systems, especially when the complexity of higher eukaryotic genes is concerned. This review focuses on those chromosome vectors generated using spontaneously occurring small markers as starting material. The definition and manipulation of the centromere domain is one of the main obstacles in chromosome engineering: naturally occurring minichromosomes, due to their inherent small size, were helpful in defining some aspects of centromere function. In addition, several distinctive features of small marker chromosomes, like their appearance as supernumerary elements in otherwise normal karyotypes, have been successfully exploited to use them as gene delivery vectors. The key technologies employed for minichromosome engineering are: size reduction, gene targeting, and vector delivery in various recipient cells. In spite of the significant advances that have been recently achieved in all these fields, several unsolved problems limit the potential of artificially modified chromosomes. Still, these vector systems have been exploited in a number of applications where the investigation of the controlled expression of large DNA segments is needed. A typical example is the analysis of genes whose expression strictly depends on the chromosomal environment in which they are positioned, where engineered chromosomes can be envisaged as epigenetically regulated expression systems. A novel and exciting advance concerns the use of engineered minichromosomes to study the organization and dynamics of local chromatin structures.

  19. PDF analysis of PuAl alloys local structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platteau, C. [CEA Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)], E-mail: platteau.cyril@yahoo.fr; Bruckel, P.; Ravat, B.; Delaunay, F. [CEA Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-03-15

    For understanding singular properties of plutonium, there is a need in studying the average and local atomic structure in Pu alloys. To study the local structure of the {delta} phase, a pair distribution function (PDF) analysis was done and has shown some significant differences with the average structure.

  20. Joint multi-population analysis for genetic linkage of bipolar disorder or "wellness" to chromosome 4p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, P M; Haley, C S; Ewald, H; Mors, O; Egeland, J; Thiel, B; Ginns, E; Muir, W; Blackwood, D H

    2005-02-05

    To test the hypothesis that the same genetic loci confer susceptibility to, or protection from, disease in different populations, and that a combined analysis would improve the map resolution of a common susceptibility locus, we analyzed data from three studies that had reported linkage to bipolar disorder in a small region on chromosome 4p. Data sets comprised phenotypic information and genetic marker data on Scottish, Danish, and USA extended pedigrees. Across the three data sets, 913 individuals appeared in the pedigrees, 462 were classified, either as unaffected (323) or affected (139) with unipolar or bipolar disorder. A consensus linkage map was created from 14 microsatellite markers in a 33 cM region. Phenotypic and genetic data were analyzed using a variance component (VC) and allele sharing method. All previously reported elevated test statistics in the region were confirmed with one or both analysis methods, indicating the presence of one or more susceptibility genes to bipolar disorder in the three populations in the studied chromosome segment. When the results from both the VC and allele sharing method were considered, there was strong evidence for a susceptibility locus in the data from Scotland, some evidence in the data from Denmark and relatively less evidence in the data from the USA. The test statistics from the Scottish data set dominated the test statistics from the other studies, and no improved map resolution for a putative genetic locus underlying susceptibility in all three studies was obtained. Studies reporting linkage to the same region require careful scrutiny and preferably joint or meta analysis on the same basis in order to ensure that the results are truly comparable. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Economic Analysis Of Yam Marketing In Obubra Local Government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economic Analysis Of Yam Marketing In Obubra Local Government Area Of Cross River State, Nigeria. ... Characteristics of the sellers, marketing channels, marketing margin and efficiency were also ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  2. Linkage analysis in a large Swedish family supports the presence of a susceptibility locus for adenoma and colorectal cancer on chromosome 9q22.32-31.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoglund, J; Djureinovic, T; Zhou, X-L

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The best known hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), constitute about 2% of all colorectal cancers, and there are at least as many non-FAP, non-HNPCC cases where the family history suggests...... a dominantly inherited colorectal cancer risk. Recently, a locus on chromosome 9q22.2-31.2 was identified by linkage analysis in sib pairs with colorectal cancer or adenoma. METHODS: Linkage analysis for the suggested locus on chromosome 9 was carried out in an extended Swedish family. This family had...... previously been investigated but following the identification of adenomas in several previously unaffected family members, these subjects were now considered to be gene carriers. RESULTS: In the present study, we found linkage of adenoma and colorectal cancer to chromosome 9q22.32-31.1 with a multipoint LOD...

  3. Chromosomal study of lettuce and its allied species (Lactuca spp., Asteraceae) by means of karyotype analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Hideyuki; Mizutani, Takayuki; Nagano, Katsuya; Hoshi, Yoshikazu; Uchiyama, Hiroshi

    2007-12-01

    In this study, in addition to the karyotype analysis, the chromosomal distributions of 5 S and 18 S rDNAs, and the Arabidopsis-type (T3AG3) telomeric sequences were detected by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to promote the information of chromosomal organization and evolution in the cultivated lettuce and its wild relatives, L. sativa, L. serriola, L. saligna and L. virosa. The karyotype analysis revealed the dissimilarity between L. virosa and the remaining species. In all four Lactuca species studied, one 5 S rDNA and two 18 S rDNA loci were detected. The simultaneous FISH of 5 S and 18 S rDNAs revealed that both rDNA loci of L. sativa, L. serriola and L. saligna were identical, however, that of L. virosa was different from the other species. These analyses indicate the closer relationships between L. sativa/L. serriola and L. saligna rather than L. virosa. Arabidopsis-type telomeric sequences were detected at both ends of their chromatids of all chromosomes not in the other regions. This observation suggests the lack of telomere-mediated chromosomal rearrangements among the Lactuca chromosomes.

  4. [Analysis of genetics mechanism for the phenotypic diversity in a patient carrying a rare ring chromosome 9].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengfang; Wang, Xueyan; Li, Yunxing; Wei, Ping; Chen, Chun; Zeng, Lan

    2016-02-01

    To explore the genetics mechanism for the phenotypic variability in a patient carrying a rare ring chromosome 9. The karyotype of the patient was analyzed with cytogenetics method. Presence of sex chromosome was confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SRY gene was subjected to PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Potential deletion and duplication were detected with array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). The karyotype of the patient has comprised 6 types of cell lines containing a ring chromosome 9. The SRY gene sequence was normal. By array-CGH, the patient has carried a hemizygous deletion at 9p24.3-p23 (174 201-9 721 761) encompassing 30 genes from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. The phenotypic variability of the 9p deletion syndrome in conjunct with ring chromosome 9 may be attributable to multiple factors including loss of chromosomal material, insufficient dosage of genes, instability of ring chromosome, and pattern of inheritance.

  5. [Chromosome banding analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with IL2 and CpG oligonucleotide DSP30 in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stěpanovská, K; Vaňková, G; Némethová, V; Tomášiková, L; Smuhařová, P; Divíšková, E; Vallová, V; Kuglík, P; Plevová, K; Oltová, A; Doubek, M; Pospíšilová, S; Mayer, J

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations play an important role as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). These aberrations are mostly detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), as chromosomal banding analysis has been scarce due to low proliferative activity of malignant B-lymphocytes in vitro. In 2006, a new method using stimulation with IL-2 and CpG oligonucleotide DSP30 for metaphase generation in CLL was published [1]. The objective of our study was to verify the efficacy of stimulation and to evaluate if the method is suitable for routine diagnostics. In total, peripheral blood samples of 369 CLL patients were analyzed in parallel by chromosomal banding analysis and by FISH probes for 13q14, 11q22-23, CEP12 and 17p13. Out of 369 patients, 307 (83%) were successfully stimulated for metaphase generation. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 243 (79%) out of 307 patients evaluated by chromosomal banding analysis. Other aberrations that are not included into standard FISH panel were detected in patients karyotypes, e.g. del(6q), del(14q), t(14;18)(q32;q21), t(11;14)(q13;q32) and t(18;22)(q21;q11). One hundred and three (42%) patients showed complex aberrant karyotype not detected by FISH analysis. Stimulation with IL-2 and oligonucleotide DSP30 is an efficient method how to induce proliferation of malignant B-lymphocytes and allows detection of a substantial number of chromosomal aberrations in addition to those detected by standard FISH panel. Using this method in routine diagnostics is helpful particularly in identification of patients with complex aberrant karyotype.

  6. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures

    OpenAIRE

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship b...

  7. Analysis of local subassembly accident in KALIMER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Min; Jeong, Kwan Seong; Hahn, Do Hee

    2000-10-01

    Subassembly Accidents (S-A) in the Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) may cause extensive clad and fuel melting and are thus regarded as a potential whole core accident initiator. The possibility of S-A occurrence must be very low frequency by the design features, and reactor must have specific instrumentation to interrupt the S-A sequences by causing a reactor shutdown. The evaluation of the relevant initiators, the event sequences which follow them, and their detection are the essence of the safety issue. Particularly, the phenomena of flow blockage caused by foreign materials and/or the debris from the failed fuel pin have been researched world-widely. The foreign strategies for dealing with the S-A and the associated safety issues with experimental and theoretical R and D results are reviewed. This report aims at obtaining information to reasonably evaluate the thermal-hydraulic effect of S-A for a wire-wrapped LMR fuel pin bundle. The mechanism of blockage formation and growth within a pin bundle and at the subassembly entrance is reviewed in the phenomenological aspect. Knowledge about the recent LMR subassembly design and operation procedure to prevent flow blockage will be reflected for KALIMER design later. The blockage analysis method including computer codes and related analytical models are reviewed. Especially SABRE4 code is discussed in detail. Preliminary analyses of flow blockage within a 271-pin driver subassembly have been performed using the SABRE4 computer code. As a result no sodium boiling occurred for the central 24-subchannel blockage as well as 6-subchannel blockage.

  8. Characterization of X chromosome inactivation using integrated analysis of whole-exome and mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Szelinger

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI is an epigenetic, gene dosage compensatory mechanism by inactivation of one copy of X in cells. Random XCI of one of the parental chromosomes results in an approximately equal proportion of cells expressing alleles from either the maternally or paternally inherited active X, and is defined by the XCI ratio. Skewed XCI ratio is suggestive of non-random inactivation, which can play an important role in X-linked genetic conditions. Current methods rely on indirect, semi-quantitative DNA methylation-based assay to estimate XCI ratio. Here we report a direct approach to estimate XCI ratio by integrated, family-trio based whole-exome and mRNA sequencing using phase-by-transmission of alleles coupled with allele-specific expression analysis. We applied this method to in silico data and to a clinical patient with mild cognitive impairment but no clear diagnosis or understanding molecular mechanism underlying the phenotype. Simulation showed that phased and unphased heterozygous allele expression can be used to estimate XCI ratio. Segregation analysis of the patient's exome uncovered a de novo, interstitial, 1.7 Mb deletion on Xp22.31 that originated on the paternally inherited X and previously been associated with heterogeneous, neurological phenotype. Phased, allelic expression data suggested an 83∶20 moderately skewed XCI that favored the expression of the maternally inherited, cytogenetically normal X and suggested that the deleterious affect of the de novo event on the paternal copy may be offset by skewed XCI that favors expression of the wild-type X. This study shows the utility of integrated sequencing approach in XCI ratio estimation.

  9. SRY mutation analysis by next generation (deep sequencing in a cohort of chromosomal Disorders of Sex Development (DSD patients with a mosaic karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hersmus Remko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of the Y-chromosome or Y chromosome-derived material is seen in 4-60% of Turner syndrome patients (Chromosomal Disorders of Sex Development (DSD. DSD patients with specific Y-chromosomal material in their karyotype, the GonadoBlastoma on the Y-chromosome (GBY region, have an increased risk of developing type II germ cell tumors/cancer (GCC, most likely related to TSPY. The Sex determining Region on the Y gene (SRY is located on the short arm of the Y-chromosome and is the crucial switch that initiates testis determination and subsequent male development. Mutations in this gene are responsible for sex reversal in approximately 10-15% of 46,XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (46,XY DSD cases. The majority of the mutations described are located in the central HMG domain, which is involved in the binding and bending of the DNA and harbors two nuclear localization signals. SRY mutations have also been found in a small number of patients with a 45,X/46,XY karyotype and might play a role in the maldevelopment of the gonads. Methods To thoroughly investigate the presence of possible SRY gene mutations in mosaic DSD patients, we performed next generation (deep sequencing on the genomic DNA of fourteen independent patients (twelve 45,X/46,XY, one 45,X/46,XX/46,XY, and one 46,XX/46,XY. Results and conclusions The results demonstrate that aberrations in SRY are rare in mosaic DSD patients and therefore do not play a significant role in the etiology of the disease.

  10. Molecular cloning, expression, functional characterization, chromosomal localization, and gene structure of junctate, a novel integral calcium binding protein of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, S; Feriotto, G; Moccagatta, L; Gambari, R; Zorzato, F

    2000-12-15

    Screening a cDNA library from human skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle with a cDNA probe derived from junctin led to the isolation of two groups of cDNA clones. The first group displayed a deduced amino acid sequence that is 84% identical to that of dog heart junctin, whereas the second group had a single open reading frame that encoded a polypeptide with a predicted mass of 33 kDa, whose first 78 NH(2)-terminal residues are identical to junctin whereas its COOH terminus domain is identical to aspartyl beta-hydroxylase, a member of the alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family. We named the latter amino acid sequence junctate. Northern blot analysis indicates that junctate is expressed in a variety of human tissues including heart, pancreas, brain, lung, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the genetic loci of junctin and junctate map to the same cytogenetic band on human chromosome 8. Analysis of intron/exon boundaries of the genomic BAC clones demonstrate that junctin, junctate, and aspartyl beta-hydroxylase result from alternative splicing of the same gene. The predicted lumenal portion of junctate is enriched in negatively charged residues and is able to bind calcium. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium (45)Ca(2+) binding in the presence of a physiological concentration of KCl demonstrate that junctate binds 21.0 mol of Ca(2+)/mol protein with a k(D) of 217 +/- 20 microm (n = 5). Tagging recombinant junctate with green fluorescent protein and expressing the chimeric polypeptide in COS-7-transfected cells indicates that junctate is located in endoplasmic reticulum membranes and that its presence increases the peak amplitude and transient calcium released by activation of surface membrane receptors coupled to InsP(3) receptor activation. Our study shows that alternative splicing of the same gene generates the following functionally distinct proteins: an enzyme (aspartyl beta-hydroxylase), a structural

  11. A meta-analysis of local adaptation in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roosa Leimu

    Full Text Available Local adaptation is of fundamental importance in evolutionary, population, conservation, and global-change biology. The generality of local adaptation in plants and whether and how it is influenced by specific species, population and habitat characteristics have, however, not been quantitatively reviewed. Therefore, we examined published data on the outcomes of reciprocal transplant experiments using two approaches. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the performance of local and foreign plants at all transplant sites. In addition, we analysed frequencies of pairs of plant origin to examine whether local plants perform better than foreign plants at both compared transplant sites. In both approaches, we also examined the effects of population size, and of the habitat and species characteristics that are predicted to affect local adaptation. We show that, overall, local plants performed significantly better than foreign plants at their site of origin: this was found to be the case in 71.0% of the studied sites. However, local plants performed better than foreign plants at both sites of a pair-wise comparison (strict definition of local adaption only in 45.3% of the 1032 compared population pairs. Furthermore, we found local adaptation much more common for large plant populations (>1000 flowering individuals than for small populations (<1000 flowering individuals for which local adaptation was very rare. The degree of local adaptation was independent of plant life history, spatial or temporal habitat heterogeneity, and geographic scale. Our results suggest that local adaptation is less common in plant populations than generally assumed. Moreover, our findings reinforce the fundamental importance of population size for evolutionary theory. The clear role of population size for the ability to evolve local adaptation raises considerable doubt on the ability of small plant populations to cope with changing environments.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1 protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP, regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA

  13. Chromosome painting analysis of radiation-induced aberrant cell clones in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruill, M.D.; Nath, J.; Tucker, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    In a study of the persistence of radiation-induced translocations over the life span of the mouse, we observed a number of clonal cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The presence of clones caused the mean frequency of aberrations at various time points to be elevated which interfered with biodosimetry. For this reason, we have corrected our data for the presence of clones. Mice were given an acute dose of 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 Gy 137 Cs at 8 weeks of age. Aberrations were measured by painting chromosomes 2 and 8 and cells were examined for clones at 3 months and every 3 months thereafter until 21 months. Clones were identified by comparing the color photographic slides of all abnormal cells from each animal. Determination of clonality was made on the basis of similar breakpoint locations or the presence of other identifying characteristics such as unusual aberrations. To correct the frequency of translocations for the presence of clones, each clone, regardless of how many cells it contained, was counted only once. This reflects the original aberration frequency since each clone originated as only one cell. Among mice exposed to 4 Gy, the mean frequencies of aberrant cell clones ranged from 3-29% of the total number of metaphase cells scored with the highest frequency being 1 year post exposure. 32-70% of reciprocal and 19-92% of non-reciprocal translocations were clonal. A dose response relationship for clones was evident until 21 months when the unexposed animals exhibited a mean frequency of aberrant cell clones >10% of the total number of cells scored. Almost 75% of reciprocal and 95% of non-reciprocal translocations in these unexposed control animals were of clonal origin. Correction for clonal expansion greatly reduced the means and their standard errors at most time points where clonal expansion was prevalent. The biodosimetry was much improved suggesting that correction is beneficial in long-term studies

  14. Sequence analysis of chromosome 1 revealed different selection patterns between Chinese wild mice and laboratory strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fuyi; Hu, Shixian; Chao, Tianzhu; Wang, Maochun; Li, Kai; Zhou, Yuxun; Xu, Hongyan; Xiao, Junhua

    2017-10-01

    Both natural and artificial selection play a critical role in animals' adaptation to the environment. Detection of the signature of selection in genomic regions can provide insights for understanding the function of specific phenotypes. It is generally assumed that laboratory mice may experience intense artificial selection while wild mice more natural selection. However, the differences of selection signature in the mouse genome and underlying genes between wild and laboratory mice remain unclear. In this study, we used two mouse populations: chromosome 1 (Chr 1) substitution lines (C1SLs) derived from Chinese wild mice and mouse genome project (MGP) sequenced inbred strains and two selection detection statistics: Fst and Tajima's D to identify the signature of selection footprint on Chr 1. For the differentiation between the C1SLs and MGP, 110 candidate selection regions containing 47 protein coding genes were detected. A total of 149 selection regions which encompass 7.215 Mb were identified in the C1SLs by Tajima's D approach. While for the MGP, we identified nearly twice selection regions (243) compared with the C1SLs which accounted for 13.27 Mb Chr 1 sequence. Through functional annotation, we identified several biological processes with significant enrichment including seven genes in the olfactory transduction pathway. In addition, we searched the phenotypes associated with the 47 candidate selection genes identified by Fst. These genes were involved in behavior, growth or body weight, mortality or aging, and immune systems which align well with the phenotypic differences between wild and laboratory mice. Therefore, the findings would be helpful for our understanding of the phenotypic differences between wild and laboratory mice and applications for using this new mouse resource (C1SLs) for further genetics studies.

  15. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis; Dosimetria biologica de las radiaciones ionizantes mediante el analisis de aberraciones cromosomicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Castano, S.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1990-07-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y ={alpha} + {beta}{sub 1}D + {beta}{sub 2}D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs.

  16. 4p16.3 microdeletions and microduplications detected by chromosomal microarray analysis: New insights into mechanisms and critical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau-Wai; Breman, Amy M; Bacino, Carlos A

    2016-10-01

    Deletions in the 4p16.3 region cause Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, a well known contiguous microdeletion syndrome with the critical region for common phenotype mapped in WHSCR2. Recently, duplications in 4p16.3 were reported in three patients with developmental delay and dysmorphic features. Through chromosomal microarray analysis, we identified 156 patients with a deletion (n = 109) or duplication (n = 47) in 4p16.3 out of approximately 60,000 patients analyzed by Baylor Miraca Genetics Laboratories. Seventy-five of the postnatally detected deletions encompassed the entire critical region, 32 (43%) of which were associated with other chromosome rearrangements, including six patients (8%) that had a duplication adjacent to the terminal deletion. Our data indicate that Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome deletions with an adjacent duplication occur at a higher frequency than previously appreciated. Pure deletions (n = 14) or duplications (n = 15) without other copy number changes distal to or inside the WHSCR2 were identified for mapping of critical regions. Our data suggest that deletion of the segment from 0.6 to 0.9 Mb from the terminus of 4p causes a seizure phenotype and duplications of a region distal to the previously defined smallest region of overlap for 4p16.3 microduplication syndrome are associated with neurodevelopmental problems. We detected seven Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome deletions and one 4p16.3 duplication prenatally; all of the seven are either >8 Mb in size and/or associated with large duplications. In conclusion, our study provides deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms, the critical regions and effective prenatal diagnosis for 4p16.3 deletions/ duplications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The alpha-spectrin gene is on chromosome 1 in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, K; Palumbo, A P; Isobe, M; Kozak, C A; Monaco, S; Rovera, G; Croce, C M; Curtis, P J

    1985-06-01

    By using alpha-spectrin cDNA clones of murine and human origin and somatic cell hybrids segregating either mouse or human chromosomes, the gene for alpha-spectrin has been mapped to chromosome 1 in both species. This assignment of the mouse alpha-spectrin gene to mouse chromosome 1 by DNA hybridization strengthens the previous identification of the alpha-spectrin locus in mouse with the sph locus, which previously was mapped by linkage analysis to mouse chromosome 1, distal to the Pep-3 locus. By in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes, the human alpha-spectrin gene has been localized to 1q22-1q25; interestingly, the locus for a non-Rh-linked form of elliptocytosis has been provisionally mapped to band 1q2 by family linkage studies.

  18. Localization of the cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) gene relative to the acute promyelocytic leukemia-associated breakpoint on human chromosome 15

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); H. de Leeuw (H.); E.J. Dekker (Erik Jan); J.M. Rijks (Jolianne); N. Spurr (N.); A.M. Ledbetter (Andrew M.); E. Kootwijk (E.); M.J. Vaessen (Marie-Josée)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractA human genomic fragment comprising the cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) gene was isolated. By using a panel of somatic cell hybrids, this gene could be assigned to human chromosome 15. Subsequently, a possible involvement of the CRABP gene in translocation (15;17)

  19. Chemical analysis and base-promoted hydrolysis of locally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The study was on the chemical analysis and base- promoted hydrolysis of extracted shea nut fat. The local method of extraction of the shea nut oil was employed in comparison with literature report. A simple cold-process alkali hydrolysis of the shea nut oil was used in producing the soap. The chemical analysis of ...

  20. Local crystallography analysis for atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Li, Qing; Belianinov, Alexei; Gai, Zheng; Baddorf, Arthur P; Pan, Minghu; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Sales, Brian C; Sefat, Athena

    2013-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful and flexible tool for atomically resolved imaging of surface structures. However, due to the amount of information extracted, in many cases the interpretation of such data is limited to being qualitative and semi-quantitative in nature. At the same time, much can be learned from local atom parameters, such as distances and angles, that can be analyzed and interpreted as variations of local chemical bonding, or order parameter fields. Here, we demonstrate an iterative algorithm for indexing and determining atomic positions that allows the analysis of inhomogeneous surfaces. This approach is further illustrated by local crystallographic analysis of several real surfaces, including highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and an Fe-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 . This study provides a new pathway to extract and quantify local properties for scanning probe microscopy images. (paper)

  1. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  2. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  3. Global/local methods for probabilistic structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millwater, H. R.; Wu, Y.-T.

    1993-04-01

    A probabilistic global/local method is proposed to reduce the computational requirements of probabilistic structural analysis. A coarser global model is used for most of the computations with a local more refined model used only at key probabilistic conditions. The global model is used to establish the cumulative distribution function (cdf) and the Most Probable Point (MPP). The local model then uses the predicted MPP to adjust the cdf value. The global/local method is used within the advanced mean value probabilistic algorithm. The local model can be more refined with respect to the g1obal model in terms of finer mesh, smaller time step, tighter tolerances, etc. and can be used with linear or nonlinear models. The basis for this approach is described in terms of the correlation between the global and local models which can be estimated from the global and local MPPs. A numerical example is presented using the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis program with the finite element method used for the structural modeling. The results clearly indicate a significant computer savings with minimal loss in accuracy.

  4. Variation, Evolution, and Correlation Analysis of C+G Content and Genome or Chromosome Size in Different Kingdoms and Phyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Du, Donglei

    2014-01-01

    C+G content (GC content or G+C content) is known to be correlated with genome/chromosome size in bacteria but the relationship for other kingdoms remains unclear. This study analyzed genome size, chromosome size, and base composition in most of the available sequenced genomes in various kingdoms. Genome size tends to increase during evolution in plants and animals, and the same is likely true for bacteria. The genomic C+G contents were found to vary greatly in microorganisms but were quite similar within each animal or plant subkingdom. In animals and plants, the C+G contents are ranked as follows: monocot plants>mammals>non-mammalian animals>dicot plants. The variation in C+G content between chromosomes within species is greater in animals than in plants. The correlation between average chromosome C+G content and chromosome length was found to be positive in Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria (but not in other analyzed bacterial phyla), Ascomycota fungi, and likely also in some plants; negative in some animals, insignificant in two protist phyla, and likely very weak in Archaea. Clearly, correlations between C+G content and chromosome size can be positive, negative, or not significant depending on the kingdoms/groups or species. Different phyla or species exhibit different patterns of correlation between chromosome-size and C+G content. Most chromosomes within a species have a similar pattern of variation in C+G content but outliers are common. The data presented in this study suggest that the C+G content is under genetic control by both trans- and cis- factors and that the correlation between C+G content and chromosome length can be positive, negative, or not significant in different phyla. PMID:24551092

  5. Localization of the endpoints of deletions in the 5' region of the Duchenne gene using a sequence isolated by chromosome jumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenwrick, S.J.; Smith, T.J.; England, S.; Collins, F.; Davies, K.E.

    1988-02-25

    The authors have used chromosome jumping technology to move from within a large intron sequence in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene to a region adjacent to exons of the gene. The single copy jump clone, HH1, was used to characterize deletions in patients previously shown to be deleted for DNA markers in the 5' end of the gene. 12 out of 15 such patients have breakpoints which lie between HH1 and the genomic locus J-47. Thus the vast majority of the deletions in these patients have proximal breakpoints in a similar region distal to the 5'end of the gene. HH1 was mapped with respect to the X;1 translocation in a DMD female and was shown to lie at least 80 kb from the starting point of the chromosome jump, HIP25.

  6. Localization of the endpoints of deletions in the 5' region of the Duchenne gene using a sequence isolated by chromosome jumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenwrick, S J; Smith, T J; England, S; Collins, F; Davies, K E

    1988-02-25

    The authors have used chromosome jumping technology to move from within a large intron sequence in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene to a region adjacent to exons of the gene. The single copy jump clone, HH1, was used to characterize deletions in patients previously shown to be deleted for DNA markers in the 5' end of the gene. 12 out of 15 such patients have breakpoints which lie between HH1 and the genomic locus J-47. Thus the vast majority of the deletions in these patients have proximal breakpoints in a similar region distal to the 5'end of the gene. HH1 was mapped with respect to the X;1 translocation in a DMD female and was shown to lie at least 80 kb from the starting point of the chromosome jump, HIP25.

  7. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship between the H. sapiens and monkey. This similarity will be helpful at theft identification, maternity identification, disease identification, etc.

  8. Heterochromatin diversity and its co-localization with 5S and 45S rDNA sites in chromosomes of four Maxillaria species (Orchidaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, Juliano S.; Felix, Leonardo P.; Guerra, Marcelo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated four orchids of the genus Maxillaria (M. discolor, M. acicularis, M. notylioglossa and M. desvauxiana) in regard to the position of heterochromatin blocks as revealed using chromomycin A3 (CMA) and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) fluorochrome staining and 5S and 45S rDNA sites using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The species showed differences in chromosome number and a diversified pattern of CMA+ and DAPI+ bands, including heteromorphism for CMA+ bands. The 5...

  9. Predominant modifier of extreme liver cancer susceptibility in C57BR/cdJ female mice localized to 6 Mb on chromosome 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peychal, Stephanie E.-M.; Bilger, Andrea; Pitot, Henry C.; Drinkwater, Norman R.

    2009-01-01

    Sex hormones influence the susceptibility of inbred mice to liver cancer. C57BR/cdJ (BR) females are extremely susceptible to spontaneous and chemically induced liver tumors, in part due to a lack of protection against hepatocarcinogenesis normally offered by ovarian hormones. BR males are also moderately susceptible, and the susceptibility of both sexes of BR mice to liver tumors induced with N,N-diethylnitrosamine relative to the resistant C57BL/6J (B6) strain is caused by two loci designated Hcf1 and Hcf2 (hepatocarcinogenesis in females) located on chromosomes 17 and 1, respectively. The Hcf1 locus on chromosome 17 is the predominant modifier of liver cancer in BR mice. To validate the existence of this locus and investigate its potential interaction with Hcf2, congenic mice for each region were generated. Homozygosity for the B6.BR(D17Mit164-D17Mit2) region resulted in a 4-fold increase in liver tumor multiplicity in females and a 4.5-fold increase in males compared with B6 controls. A series of 16 recombinants covering the entire congenic region was developed to further narrow the area containing Hcf1. Susceptible heterozygous recombinants demonstrated a 3- to 7-fold effect in females and a 1.5- to 2-fold effect in males compared with B6 siblings. The effect in susceptible lines completely recapitulated the susceptibility of heterozygous full-length chromosome 17 congenics and furthermore narrowed the location of the Hcf1 locus to a single region of the chromosome from 30.05 to 35.83 Mb. PMID:19255062

  10. Sequencing and association analysis of the type 1 diabetes – linked region on chromosome 10p12-q11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barratt Bryan J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to locate susceptibility genes for type 1 diabetes (T1D several genome-wide linkage scans have been undertaken. A chromosomal region designated IDDM10 retained genome-wide significance in a combined analysis of the main linkage scans. Here, we studied sequence polymorphisms in 23 Mb on chromosome 10p12-q11, including the putative IDDM10 region, to identify genes associated with T1D. Results Initially, we resequenced the functional candidate genes, CREM and SDF1, located in this region, genotyped 13 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and found no association with T1D. We then undertook analysis of the whole 23 Mb region. We constructed and sequenced a contig tile path from two bacterial artificial clone libraries. By comparison with a clone library from an unrelated person used in the Human Genome Project, we identified 12,058 SNPs. We genotyped 303 SNPs and 25 polymorphic microsatellite markers in 765 multiplex T1D families and followed up 22 associated polymorphisms in up to 2,857 families. We found nominal evidence of association in six loci (P = 0.05 – 0.0026, located near the PAPD1 gene. Therefore, we resequenced 38.8 kb in this region, found 147 SNPs and genotyped 84 of them in the T1D families. We also tested 13 polymorphisms in the PAPD1 gene and in five other loci in 1,612 T1D patients and 1,828 controls from the UK. Overall, only the D10S193 microsatellite marker located 28 kb downstream of PAPD1 showed nominal evidence of association in both T1D families and in the case-control sample (P = 0.037 and 0.03, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that polymorphisms in the CREM and SDF1 genes have no major effect on T1D. The weak T1D association that we detected in the association scan near the PAPD1 gene may be either false or due to a small genuine effect, and cannot explain linkage at the IDDM10 region.

  11. Analysis of positional candidate genes in the AAA1 susceptibility locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms on chromosome 19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a complex disorder with multiple genetic risk factors. Using affected relative pair linkage analysis, we previously identified an AAA susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13. This locus has been designated as the AAA1 susceptibility locus in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database. Methods Nine candidate genes were selected from the AAA1 locus based on their function, as well as mRNA expression levels in the aorta. A sample of 394 cases and 419 controls was genotyped for 41 SNPs located in or around the selected nine candidate genes using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Single marker and haplotype analyses were performed. Three genes (CEBPG, PEPD and CD22 were selected for DNA sequencing based on the association study results, and exonic regions were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic tissue sections from AAA and control individuals was carried out for the CD22 and PEPD proteins with specific antibodies. Results Several SNPs were nominally associated with AAA (p CEBPG, peptidase D (PEPD, and CD22. Haplotype analysis found a nominally associated 5-SNP haplotype in the CEBPG/PEPD locus, as well as a nominally associated 2-SNP haplotype in the CD22 locus. DNA sequencing of the coding regions revealed no variation in CEBPG. Seven sequence variants were identified in PEPD, including three not present in the NCBI SNP (dbSNP database. Sequencing of all 14 exons of CD22 identified 20 sequence variants, five of which were in the coding region and six were in the 3'-untranslated region. Five variants were not present in dbSNP. Immunohistochemical staining for CD22 revealed protein expression in lymphocytes present in the aneurysmal aortic wall only and no detectable expression in control aorta. PEPD protein was expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the media-adventitia border in both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal tissue samples. Conclusions Association testing

  12. Sex chromosome diversity in Armenian toad grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Pamphagidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugrov, Alexander G.; Jetybayev, Ilyas E.; Karagyan, Gayane H.; Rubtsov, Nicolay B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although previous cytogenetic analysis of Pamphagidae grasshoppers pointed to considerable karyotype uniformity among most of the species in the family, our study of species from Armenia has discovered other, previously unknown karyotypes, differing from the standard for Pamphagidae mainly in having unusual sets of sex chromosomes. Asiotmethis turritus (Fischer von Waldheim, 1833), Paranocaracris rubripes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846), and Nocaracris cyanipes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846) were found to have the karyotype 2n♂=16+neo-XY and 2n♀=16+neo-XX, the neo-X chromosome being the result of centromeric fusion of an ancient acrocentric X chromosome and a large acrocentric autosome. The karyotype of Paranothrotes opacus (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1882) was found to be 2n♂=14+X1X2Y and 2n♀=14+X1X1X2X2., the result of an additional chromosome rearrangement involving translocation of the neo-Y and another large autosome. Furthermore, evolution of the sex chromosomes in these species has involved different variants of heterochromatinization and miniaturization of the neo-Y. The karyotype of Eremopeza festiva (Saussure, 1884), in turn, appeared to have the standard sex determination system described earlier for Pamphagidae grasshoppers, 2n♂=18+X0 and 2n♀=18+XX, but all the chromosomes of this species were found to have small second C-positive arms. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGG)n DNA repeats to yield new data on the structural organization of chromosomes in the species studied, we found that for most of them, clusters of repeats homologous to 18S rDNA localize on two, three or four pairs of autosomes and on the X. In Eremopeza festiva, however, FISH with labelled 18S rDNA painted C-positive regions of all autosomes and the X chromosome; clusters of telomeric repeats localized primarily on the ends of the chromosome arms. Overall, we conclude that the different stages of neo-Y degradation revealed in

  13. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis XVI: A review of cases investigated, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Edwards, A.A.; Prosser, J.S.; Moquet, J.E.; Finnon, P.

    1986-04-01

    During 1985, 28 cases of suspected overexposure to ionising radiation were referred to NRPB for investigation by cytogenetic analysis, and the results are presented in this report. Of the 28 cases, 17 were associated with industrial radiography, 9 from major nuclear organisations and 2 from research, education and health institutions. In 20 cases, no biological indication of overexposure was found. The remaining 8 cases all arose from industrial uses of radiation. The highest overexposure to a sealed source in 1985 ws about 0.4 Gy from an 192 Ir source that became detached from its winding mechanism. Two serious incidents involving unsealed sources are also described; an accidental ingestion of 125 I, for which cytogenetic analysis is of limited relevance, and an inhalation of droplets of tritiated water. The latter also produced a committed dose equivalent of about 0.4 Sv, the estimates from cytogenetic analysis and urine analysis being in good agreement. (author)

  14. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of a familial duplication of chromosome 13q: A recognizable syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, Inge B.; Hoovers, Jan M. N.; Mul, Adri N. P. M.; Man, Hai-Yen; Ket, Jan L.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a family with six persons in three generations who have mild mental retardation, behavioral problems, seizures, hearing loss, strabismus, dental anomalies, hypermobility, juvenile hallux valgus, and mild dysmorphic features. Classical cytogenetic analysis showed a partial duplication of

  15. Flow cytogenetics and chromosome sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, L S

    1990-06-01

    This review of flow cytogenetics and chromosome sorting provides an overview of general information in the field and describes recent developments in more detail. From the early developments of chromosome analysis involving single parameter or one color analysis to the latest developments in slit scanning of single chromosomes in a flow stream, the field has progressed rapidly and most importantly has served as an important enabling technology for the human genome project. Technological innovations that advanced flow cytogenetics are described and referenced. Applications in basic cell biology, molecular biology, and clinical investigations are presented. The necessary characteristics for large number chromosome sorting are highlighted. References to recent review articles are provided as a starting point for locating individual references that provide more detail. Specific references are provided for recent developments.

  16. Computational Analysis of G-Quadruplex Forming Sequences across Chromosomes Reveals High Density Patterns Near the Terminal Ends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia H Chariker

    Full Text Available G-quadruplex structures (G4 are found throughout the human genome and are known to play a regulatory role in a variety of molecular processes. Structurally, they have many configurations and can form from one or more DNA strands. At the gene level, they regulate gene expression and protein synthesis. In this paper, chromosomal-level patterns of distribution are analyzed on the human genome to identify high-level distribution patterns potentially related to global functional processes. Here we show unique high density banding patterns on individual chromosomes that are highly correlated, appearing in a mirror pattern, across forward and reverse DNA strands. The highest density of G4 sequences occurs within four megabases of one end of most chromosomes and contains G4 motifs that bind with zinc finger proteins. These findings suggest that G4 may play a role in global chromosomal processes such as those found in meiosis.

  17. Chromosome aberration analysis in persons exposed to low-level radiation from the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.; Hayata, Isamu; Kamada, Nanao; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Kodama, Seiji

    2001-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 43 persons who were exposed to low-level radiation of mixed neutrons and γ-rays resulting from the JCO criticality accident. When the age-adjusted frequencies of dicentric and ring chromosomes were compared with the dose calibration curve established in vitro for 60 Co γ-rays as a reference radiation, a significant correlation was observed between the chromosomally estimated doses and the documented doses evaluated by physical means. The regression coefficient of the chromosomal doses against the documented doses, 1.47±0.33, indicates that the relative biological effectiveness of fission neutrons at low doses is considerably higher than that currently adopted in the radiation protection standard. (author)

  18. Global and Local Sensitivity Analysis Methods for a Physical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morio, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is the study of how the different input variations of a mathematical model influence the variability of its output. In this paper, we review the principle of global and local sensitivity analyses of a complex black-box system. A simulated case of application is given at the end of this paper to compare both approaches.…

  19. Harmonic analysis on local fields and adelic spaces. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, D V; Parshin, A N

    2008-01-01

    We develop harmonic analysis on the objects of a category C 2 of infinite-dimensional filtered vector spaces over a finite field. This category includes two-dimensional local fields and adelic spaces of algebraic surfaces defined over a finite field. As the main result, we construct the theory of the Fourier transform on these objects and obtain two-dimensional Poisson formulae

  20. A Local Approach Methodology for the Analysis of Ultimate Strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The local approach methodology in contrast to classical fracture mechanics can be used to predict the onset of tearing fracture, and the effects of geometry in tubular joints. Finite element analysis of T-joints plate geometries, and tubular joints has been done. The parameters of constraint, equivalent stress, plastic strain and ...

  1. Analysis of morphine responses in mice reveals a QTL on Chromosome 7 [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim E. Crusio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL on mouse Chromosome 7 associated with locomotor activity and rearing post morphine treatment. This QTL was revealed after correcting for the effects of another QTL peak on Chromosome 10 using composite interval mapping. The positional candidate genes are Syt9 and Ppfibp2. Several other genes within the interval are linked to neural processes, locomotor activity, and the defensive response to harmful stimuli.

  2. Analysis of morphine responses in mice reveals a QTL on Chromosome 7 [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim E. Crusio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL on mouse Chromosome 7 associated with locomotor activity and rearing post morphine treatment. This QTL was revealed after correcting for the effects of another QTL peak on Chromosome 10 using composite interval mapping. The positional candidate genes are Syt9 and Ppfibp2. Several other genes within the interval are linked to neural processes, locomotor activity, and the defensive response to harmful stimuli.

  3. Dahl (S × R) rat congenic strain analysis confirms and defines a chromosome 17 spatial navigation quantitative trait locus to <10 Mbp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Victoria L; Pasion, Khristine A; Tan, Glaiza A; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative trait locus (QTL) linked with ability to find a platform in the Morris Water Maze (MWM) was located on chromosome 17 (Nav-5 QTL) using intercross between Dahl S and Dahl R rats. We developed two congenic strains, S.R17A and S.R17B introgressing Dahl R-chromosome 17 segments into Dahl S chromosome 17 region spanning putative Nav-5 QTL. Performance analysis of S.R17A, S.R17B and Dahl S rats in the Morris water maze (MWM) task showed a significantly decreased spatial navigation performance in S.R17B congenic rats when compared with Dahl S controls (P = 0.02). The S.R17A congenic segment did not affect MWM performance delimiting Nav-5 to the chromosome 17 65.02-74.66 Mbp region. Additional fine mapping is necessary to identify the specific gene variant accounting for Nav-5 effect on spatial learning and memory in Dahl rats.

  4. Dahl (S × R rat congenic strain analysis confirms and defines a chromosome 17 spatial navigation quantitative trait locus to <10 Mbp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available A quantitative trait locus (QTL linked with ability to find a platform in the Morris Water Maze (MWM was located on chromosome 17 (Nav-5 QTL using intercross between Dahl S and Dahl R rats. We developed two congenic strains, S.R17A and S.R17B introgressing Dahl R-chromosome 17 segments into Dahl S chromosome 17 region spanning putative Nav-5 QTL. Performance analysis of S.R17A, S.R17B and Dahl S rats in the Morris water maze (MWM task showed a significantly decreased spatial navigation performance in S.R17B congenic rats when compared with Dahl S controls (P = 0.02. The S.R17A congenic segment did not affect MWM performance delimiting Nav-5 to the chromosome 17 65.02-74.66 Mbp region. Additional fine mapping is necessary to identify the specific gene variant accounting for Nav-5 effect on spatial learning and memory in Dahl rats.

  5. Analysis of complex-type chromosome exchanges in astronauts' lymphocytes after space flight as a biomarker of high-LET exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, K.; Wu, H.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    High-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is moreefficient in producing complex-type chromosome exchanges than sparsely ionizing radiation, and this can potentially be used as a biomarker of radiation quality. To investigate if complex chromosome exchanges are induced by the high-LET component of space radiation exposure, damage was assessed in astronauts' blood lymphocytes before and after longduration missions of 3-4 months. The frequency of simple translocations increased significantly for most of the crewmembers studied. However, there were few complex exchanges detected and only one crewmember had a significant increase after flight. It has been suggested that the yield of complex chromosome damage could be underestimated when analyzing metaphase cellscollected at one time point after irradiation, andanalysis of chemically-induced premature chromosomecondensation (PCC) may be more accurate since problems with complicated cell-cycle delays are avoided.However, in this case the yields of chromosome damage were similar for metaphase and PCC analysis of astronauts' lymphocytes. It appears that the use of complex-type exchanges as biomarkerof radiation quality in vivo after low-dose chronicexposure in mixed radiation fields is hampered by statistical uncertainties. (author)

  6. Recent Male-Mediated Gene Flow over a Linguistic Barrier in Iberia, Suggested by Analysis of a Y-Chromosomal DNA Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurles, Matthew E.; Veitia, Reiner; Arroyo, Eduardo; Armenteros, Manuel; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Pérez-Lezaun, Anna; Bosch, Elena; Shlumukova, Maria; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; McElreavey, Ken; López de Munain, Adolfo; Röhl, Arne; Wilson, Ian J.; Singh, Lalji; Pandya, Arpita; Santos, Fabrício R.; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Summary We have examined the worldwide distribution of a Y-chromosomal base-substitution polymorphism, the T/C transition at SRY-2627, where the T allele defines haplogroup 22; sequencing of primate homologues shows that the ancestral state cannot be determined unambiguously but is probably the C allele. Of 1,191 human Y chromosomes analyzed, 33 belong to haplogroup 22. Twenty-nine come from Iberia, and the highest frequencies are in Basques (11%; n=117) and Catalans (22%; n=32). Microsatellite and minisatellite (MSY1) diversity analysis shows that non-Iberian haplogroup-22 chromosomes are not significantly different from Iberian ones. The simplest interpretation of these data is that haplogroup 22 arose in Iberia and that non-Iberian cases reflect Iberian emigrants. Several different methods were used to date the origin of the polymorphism: microsatellite data gave ages of 1,650, 2,700, 3,100, or 3,450 years, and MSY1 gave ages of 1,000, 2,300, or 2,650 years, although 95% confidence intervals on all of these figures are wide. The age of the split between Basque and Catalan haplogroup-22 chromosomes was calculated as only 20% of the age of the lineage as a whole. This study thus provides evidence for direct or indirect gene flow over the substantial linguistic barrier between the Indo-European and non–Indo-European–speaking populations of the Catalans and the Basques, during the past few thousand years. PMID:10521311

  7. Multi-environment analysis and improved mapping of a yield-related QTL on chromosome 3B of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Julien; Taylor, Julian; Parent, Boris; Bennett, Dion; Reynolds, Matthew; Feuillet, Catherine; Langridge, Peter; Mather, Diane

    2013-03-01

    Improved mapping, multi-environment quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis and dissection of allelic effects were used to define a QTL associated with grain yield, thousand grain weight and early vigour on chromosome 3BL of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under abiotic stresses. The QTL had pleiotropic effects and showed QTL x environment interactions across 21 diverse environments in Australia and Mexico. The occurrence and the severity of water deficit combined with high temperatures during the growing season affected the responsiveness of this QTL, resulting in a reversal in the direction of allelic effects. The influence of this QTL can be substantial, with the allele from one parent (RAC875) increasing grain yield by up to 12.5 % (particularly in environments where both heat and drought stress occurred) and the allele from the other parent (Kukri) increasing grain yield by up to 9 % in favourable environments. With the application of additional markers and the genotyping of additional recombinant inbred lines, the genetic map in the QTL region was refined to provide a basis for future positional cloning.

  8. The Utility of Lymphocyte Premature Chromosome Condensation Analysis for Biological Dosimetry Following Accidental Overexposure to Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambrette, V.; Laval, F.; Voisin, P.

    1999-01-01

    Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) appears to have a possible utility for biological dosimetry purposes. The PCC technique may be adapted for cases of suspicion of overexposure where sampling is performed at least one day after an accident. For this purpose, human blood samples were exposed in vitro to 60 Co (0.5 Gy.min -1 ) up to 4 Gy and the PCC technique was performed after 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h of DNA repair at 37 deg. C. Analysis of excess PCC fragments distribution showed an overdispersion and the dose-effect relationship was best characterised by linear regression. Radiation-induced damage was reduced to 32% between the first and the second day of repair and to 42% the following day. Statistical precision of the dose was found to be dependent on the irradiation dose and on the number of cells examined. The necessity to establish dose-response relationships after different periods of DNA repair is demonstrated, and the use of PCC excess fragments yield as a bioindicator should take this fact into account. (author)

  9. Meta-Analysis of Results from Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Studies on Pig Chromosome 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moraes Silva, De K.M.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Knol, E.F.; Merks, J.W.M.; Lopes, P.S.; Guimaraes, R.M.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Meta-analysis of results from multiple studies could lead to more precise quantitative trait loci (QTL) position estimates compared to the individual experiments. As the raw data from many different studies are not readily available, the use of results from published articles may be helpful. In this

  10. Analysis of Local Chicken Entreprise in DAS Serayu Banyumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Noor Hidayat

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Objectives of this research was to know income and efficiency level of local chicken entreprise. Beside that, to know potency of local chicken enterprise developing in DAS Serayu, Banyumas and know factors can effect level of that income and efficiency. Methode that used at this research is survey method to farmer families. Take of research data by random sampling.The data is analysed by multiple regression analysis. The results of this research showed that income level of local chicken entreprise at DAS Serayu is Rp 277.375,00 / year and economi efficiency 2.80 , that means the farmers get return Rp 2.80 for every one unit cost addition. The age of farmers and total of chicken possession effect at efficiency of  local chicken entreprise. Potency of local chicken developing very big if showed from power of area and human resources. Very important to increase entreprise capital and increase knowledge for farmer. Beside that more important present motivation and support for develop there enterprise (Animal Production 2(1: 13-17 (2000 Key Words: local chicken, farmers income, economic efficiency

  11. Local buckling failure analysis of high-strength pipelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li; Jian Shuai; Zhong-Li Jin; Ya-Tong Zhao; Kui Xu

    2017-01-01

    Pipelines in geological disaster regions typically suffer the risk of local buckling failure because of slender structure and complex load.This paper is meant to reveal the local buckling behavior of buried pipelines with a large diameter and high strength,which are under different conditions,including pure bending and bending combined with internal pressure.Finite element analysis was built according to previous data to study local buckling behavior of pressurized and unpressurized pipes under bending conditions and their differences in local buckling failure modes.In parametric analysis,a series of parameters,including pipe geometrical dimension,pipe material properties and internal pressure,were selected to study their influences on the critical bending moment,critical compressive stress and critical compressive strain of pipes.Especially the hardening exponent of pipe material was introduced to the parameter analysis by using the Ramberg-Osgood constitutive model.Results showed that geometrical dimensions,material and internal pressure can exert similar effects on the critical bending moment and critical compressive stress,which have different,even reverse effects on the critical compressive strain.Based on these analyses,more accurate design models of critical bending moment and critical compressive stress have been proposed for high-strength pipelines under bending conditions,which provide theoretical methods for highstrength pipeline engineering.

  12. Rapid Simultaneous Amplification and Detection of the MBR/JH Chromosomal Translocation by Fluorescence Melting Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohling, Sandra D.; King, Thomas C.; Wittwer, Carl T.; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and product analysis for the detection of chromosomal translocations, such as the t(14;18), has traditionally been a two-step process. PCR product detection has generally entailed gel electrophoresis and/or hybridization or sequencing for confirmation of assay specificity. Using a microvolume fluorimeter integrated with a thermal cycler and a PCR-compatible double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding fluorescent dye (SYBR Green I), we investigated the feasibility of simultaneous thermal amplification and detection of MBR/JH translocation products by fluorescence melting curve analysis. We analyzed DNA from 30 cases of lymphoproliferative disorders comprising 19 cases of previously documented MBR/JH-positive follicle center lymphoma and 11 reactive lymphadenopathies. The samples were coded and analyzed blindly for the presence of MBR/JH translocations by fluorescence melting curve analysis. We also performed dilutional assays using the MBR/JH-positive cell line SUDHL-6. Multiplex PCR for MBR/JH and β-globin was used to simultaneously assess sample adequacy. All (100%) of the 19 cases previously determined to be MBR/JH positive by conventional PCR analysis showed a characteristic sharp decrease in fluorescence at ∼90°C by melting curve analysis after amplification. Fluorescence melting peaks obtained by plotting the negative derivative of fluorescence over temperature (−dF/dT) versus temperature (T) showed melting temperatures (Tm) at 88.85 ± 1.15°C. In addition, multiplex assays using both MBR/JH and β-globin primers yielded easily distinguishable fluorescence melting peaks at ∼90°C and 81.2°C, respectively. Dilutional assays revealed that fluorescence melting curve analysis was more sensitive than conventional PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis with ultraviolet transillumination by as much as 100-fold. Simultaneous amplification and fluorescence melting curve analysis is a simple, reliable, and sensitive method

  13. Factoring local sequence composition in motif significance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Patrick; Keich, Uri

    2008-01-01

    We recently introduced a biologically realistic and reliable significance analysis of the output of a popular class of motif finders. In this paper we further improve our significance analysis by incorporating local base composition information. Relying on realistic biological data simulation, as well as on FDR analysis applied to real data, we show that our method is significantly better than the increasingly popular practice of using the normal approximation to estimate the significance of a finder's output. Finally we turn to leveraging our reliable significance analysis to improve the actual motif finding task. Specifically, endowing a variant of the Gibbs Sampler with our improved significance analysis we demonstrate that de novo finders can perform better than has been perceived. Significantly, our new variant outperforms all the finders reviewed in a recently published comprehensive analysis of the Harbison genome-wide binding location data. Interestingly, many of these finders incorporate additional information such as nucleosome positioning and the significance of binding data.

  14. Chromosomal analysis and application of biological dosimetry in two cases of apparent over exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M.

    2002-01-01

    The gamma radiation calibration curve of 60 Co is used which was generated in the ININ Laboratory of Biology to calculate the exposure dose of two workers whose dosemeters marked values above of the limit allowed. The analysis indicates that in a first case, the aberrations frequency corresponded to the basal value, therefore there is not over exposure. The aberrations frequency of the second case is lightly above to the basal value and therefore the probability favors to what the physical dosimetry indicates. (Author)

  15. The analysis of cultural architectural trends in Crisan locality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SELA Florentina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data about the identification and analyse of the traditional architectural elements in Crisan locality knowing that the tourism activity is in a continuous development. The field research (during November 2007 enabled us to develop a qualitative and quantitative analysis in terms of identification of traditional architecture elements, their conservation status, and frequency of traditional building materials use, decorative elements and specificcolors used in construction architecture. Further, based on collected data, was realized the chart - Distribution for TraditionalArchitecture Index (TAI on the distance from the center of Crisan locality, showing that in Crisan locality the houses were and are built without taking into account any rule, destroying thus traditional architecture.

  16. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  17. Mitotic chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heermann, Dieter W., E-mail: heermann@tphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2012-07-15

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  18. Analysis of locally controlled esophageal carcinomas treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Yasuo; Yamada, Shogo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hoshi, Akihiko; Ariga, Hisanori; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1996-01-01

    Of 227 esophageal carcinomas treated with a radiation dose of 60 Gy or more, 100 patients had no tumor or ulceration (with or without stenosis) of the esophagus after irradiation. We analyzed local control factors of these 100 patients to determine the need for further treatment. The cumulative local control rate at five years was 40% in all cases, 37% in 21 cases without any stenosis of the esophagus and 40% in 79 cases with stenosis. The presence of stenosis of the esophagus after irradiation was not a critical factor in predicting final local control. Local recurrence of tumors with findings of Borrmann III or Borrmann IV by the pretreatment esophageal barium study, tumors controlled after a total dose of more than 80 Gy, tumors without low dose rate telecobalt therapy (LDRT: 1 Gy/hour, 5 to 7 Gy/day, a total dose of 12 to 15 Gy) as boost therapy, and apparently controlled tumors with a stenotic ratio of 60% or more or with 5 cm or more length of stenosis of the esophagus after irradiation was significantly higher than that of the others (p<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that findings of pretreatment barium study, total dose, with or without LDRT, and length of stenosis of the esophagus after irradiation were significantly important factors in local control. Members of the high risk group of apparently controlled tumors should undertake surgical treatment or further intensive chemotherapy. (author)

  19. Genomic Analysis of the Snn1 Locus on Wheat Chromosome Arm 1BS and the Identification of Candidate Genes

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    Leela Reddy

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathogen produces multiple host-selective toxins (HSTs that induce cell death and necrosis in sensitive wheat ( sp. genotypes. One such HST is SnTox1, which interacts with the host gene on wheat chromosome arm 1BS to cause necrosis leading to disease susceptibility. Toward the positional cloning of , we developed saturated and high-resolution maps of the locus and evaluated colinearity of the region with rice ( L.. An F population of 120 individuals derived from ‘Chinese Spring’ (CS and the CS– chromosome 1B disomic substitution line was used to map 54 markers consisting of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs, simple sequence repeats, and bin mapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Colinearity between wheat 1BS and rice was determined by aligning EST and RFLP probe sequences to the rice genome. Overall, colinearity was poorly conserved due to numerous complex chromosomal rearrangements, and of 48 wheat EST-RFLP sequences mapped, 30 had significant similarity to sequences on nine different rice chromosomes. However, 12 of the wheat sequences had similarity to sequences on rice chromosome 5 and were in a colinear arrangement with only a few exceptions, including an inversion of the markers flanking . High-resolution mapping of the locus in 8510 gametes delineated the gene to a 0.46-cM interval. Two EST-derived markers that cosegregated with were found to share homology to nucleotide binding site–leucine rich repeat–like genes and are considered potential candidates for

  20. Fractal Folding and Medium Viscoelasticity Contribute Jointly to Chromosome Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovnikov, K. E.; Gherardi, M.; Cosentino-Lagomarsino, M.; Tamm, M. V.

    2018-02-01

    Chromosomes are key players of cell physiology, their dynamics provides valuable information about its physical organization. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, the short-time motion of chromosomal loci has been described with a Rouse model in a simple or viscoelastic medium. However, little emphasis has been put on the influence of the folded organization of chromosomes on the local dynamics. Clearly, stress propagation, and thus dynamics, must be affected by such organization, but a theory allowing us to extract such information from data, e.g., on two-point correlations, is lacking. Here, we describe a theoretical framework able to answer this general polymer dynamics question. We provide a scaling analysis of the stress-propagation time between two loci at a given arclength distance along the chromosomal coordinate. The results suggest a precise way to assess folding information from the dynamical coupling of chromosome segments. Additionally, we realize this framework in a specific model of a polymer whose long-range interactions are designed to make it fold in a fractal way and immersed in a medium characterized by subdiffusive fractional Langevin motion with a tunable scaling exponent. This allows us to derive explicit analytical expressions for the correlation functions.

  1. New chromosome numbers in the genus Trigonella L. ( Fabaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic chromosome numbers of 45 Trigonella L. (Fabaceae), collected from different localities in Turkey was examined. Chromosome numbers were determined as 2n = 14, 16, 30 and 46. B chromosome was also observed in somatic cells of some taxa (Trigonella arcuata C.A. Meyer and Trigonella procumbens (Besser) ...

  2. Minimization of local impact of energy systems through exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassetti, Gabriele; Colombo, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The model proposed aims at minimizing local impact of energy systems. • The model is meant to minimize the impact starting from system thermodynamics. • The formulation combines exergy analysis and quantitative risk analysis. • The approach of the model is dual to Thermoeconomics. - Abstract: For the acceptability of energy systems, environmental impacts are becoming more and more important. One primary way for reducing impacts related to processes is by improving efficiency of plants. A key instrument currently used to verify such improvements is exergy analysis, extended to include also the environmental externalities generated by systems. Through exergy-based analyses, it is possible indeed to evaluate the overall amount of resources consumed along all the phases of the life cycle of a system, from construction to dismantling. However, resource consumption is a dimension of the impact of a system at global level, while it may not be considered a measure of its local impact. In the paper a complementary approach named Combined Risk and Exergy Analysis (CRExA) to assess impacts from major accidents in energy systems is proposed, based on the combination of classical exergy analysis and quantitative risk analysis (QRA). Impacts considered are focused on effects on human health. The approach leads to the identification of solutions to minimize damages of major accidents by acting on the energy system design

  3. The hippocampi of children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have localized anterior alterations that predict severity of anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Julia A; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi; Kalish, Kristopher; Lee, Aaron; Hunsaker, Michael R; Schumann, Cynthia M; Carmichael, Owen T; Simon, Tony J

    2016-04-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have an elevated risk for schizophrenia, which increases with history of childhood anxiety. Altered hippocampal morphology is a common neuroanatomical feature of 22q11.2DS and idiopathic schizophrenia. Relating hippocampal structure in children with 22q11.2DS to anxiety and impaired cognitive ability could lead to hippocampus-based characterization of psychosis-proneness in this at-risk population. We measured hippocampal volume using a semiautomated approach on MRIs collected from typically developing children and children with 22q11.2DS. We then analyzed hippocampal morphology with Localized Components Analysis. We tested the modulating roles of diagnostic group, hippocampal volume, sex and age on local hippocampal shape components. Lastly, volume and shape components were tested as covariates of IQ and anxiety. We included 48 typically developing children and 69 children with 22q11.2DS in our study. Hippocampal volume was reduced bilaterally in children with 22q11.2DS, and these children showed greater variation in the shape of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Children with 22q11.2DS had greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus was associated with greater severity of anxiety, specifically fear of physical injury, within the 22q11.2DS group. Shape alterations are not specific to hippocampal subfields. Alterations in the structure of the anterior hippocampus likely affect function and may impact limbic circuitry. We suggest these alterations potentially contribute to anxiety symptoms in individuals with 22q11.2DS through modulatory pathways. Altered hippocampal morphology may be uniquely linked to anxiety risk factors for schizophrenia, which could be a powerful neuroanatomical marker of schizophrenia risk and hence protection.

  4. Functional Analysis of the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Locus on Chromosome 21q22

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    Katherine E. Beaney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The coronary heart disease (CHD risk locus on 21q22 (lead SNP rs9982601 lies within a “gene desert.” The aim of this study was to assess if this locus is associated with CHD risk factors and to identify the functional variant(s and gene(s involved. Methods. A phenome scan was performed with UCLEB Consortium data. Allele-specific protein binding was studied using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Dual-reporter luciferase assays were used to assess the impact of genetic variation on expression. Expression quantitative trait analysis was performed with Advanced Study of Aortic Pathology (ASAP and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx consortium data. Results. A suggestive association between QT interval and the locus was observed (rs9982601  p=0.04. One variant at the locus, rs28451064, showed allele-specific protein binding and its minor allele showed 12% higher luciferase expression (p = 4.82 × 10−3 compared to the common allele. The minor allele of rs9982601 was associated with higher expression of the closest upstream genes (SLC5A3 1.30-fold increase p = 3.98 × 10−5; MRPS6 1.15-fold increase p = 9.60 × 10−4 in aortic intima media in ASAP. Both rs9982601 and rs28451064 showed a suggestive association with MRPS6 expression in relevant tissues in the GTEx data. Conclusions. A candidate functional variant, rs28451064, was identified. Future work should focus on identifying the pathway(s involved.

  5. Analysis of 8 X-chromosomal markers in the population of central Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gršković, Branka; Zidkova, Anastassiya; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Popović, Maja; Primorac, Dragan; Mršić, Gordan

    2013-01-01

    Aim To analyze 8 X-linked short tandem repeat (STR) markers in the population of central Croatia and to evaluate their forensic efficiency. Methods We carried out a statistical analysis of the data from previously performed genetic analyses, collected during routine forensic work by the Forensic Science Centre ‘‘Ivan Vučetić.’’ Mentype® Argus X-8 PCR amplification kit was used for typing the data of 99 unrelated healthy women and 78 men from central Croatia. Haplotype frequencies were calculated only in male samples. Arlequin 3.5 software was used to assess Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), linkage disequilibrium (LD), observed and expected heterozygosity. Power of discrimination (PD) for men and women, polymorphism information content (PIC), power of exclusion, and mean exclusion chance for deficiency cases, normal trios, and duos were determined using online database ChrX-STR.org. Results In female samples, deviations from HWE (P = 0.006) for each locus were not found. LD test performed both on female and male samples revealed no significant association between markers (P = 0.002). DXS10135 was the most polymorphic locus (PIC = 0.931). PD varied from 0.692 to 0.935 in male and from 0.845 to 0.992 in female samples. Combined PD reached 99.999999% in men and 99.9999999999% in women. Conclusion Performed analyses revealed that the studied marker set contained polymorphic markers with high power of discrimination. We can conclude that Mentype® Argus X-8 PCR kit is suitable for application in the population of central Croatia. Results of this study, together with collected allele and haplotype frequencies, are the first step in establishing a national reference X-STR database based on 8 X-STR loci. PMID:23771754

  6. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haishan Wang

    Full Text Available We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82% and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14% and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%. The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  7. GSK-3 inhibitors induce chromosome instability

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    Staples Oliver D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mechanisms operate during mitosis to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. However, during tumour evolution these mechanisms go awry resulting in chromosome instability. While several lines of evidence suggest that mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC may promote chromosome instability, at least in colon cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we turn our attention to GSK-3 – a protein kinase, which in concert with APC, targets β-catenin for proteolysis – and ask whether GSK-3 is required for accurate chromosome segregation. Results To probe the role of GSK-3 in mitosis, we inhibited GSK-3 kinase activity in cells using a panel of small molecule inhibitors, including SB-415286, AR-A014418, 1-Azakenpaullone and CHIR99021. Analysis of synchronised HeLa cells shows that GSK-3 inhibitors do not prevent G1/S progression or cell division. They do, however, significantly delay mitotic exit, largely because inhibitor-treated cells have difficulty aligning all their chromosomes. Although bipolar spindles form and the majority of chromosomes biorient, one or more chromosomes often remain mono-oriented near the spindle poles. Despite a prolonged mitotic delay, anaphase frequently initiates without the last chromosome aligning, resulting in chromosome non-disjunction. To rule out the possibility of "off-target" effects, we also used RNA interference to selectively repress GSK-3β. Cells deficient for GSK-3β exhibit a similar chromosome alignment defect, with chromosomes clustered near the spindle poles. GSK-3β repression also results in cells accumulating micronuclei, a hallmark of chromosome missegregation. Conclusion Thus, not only do our observations indicate a role for GSK-3 in accurate chromosome segregation, but they also raise the possibility that, if used as therapeutic agents, GSK-3 inhibitors may induce unwanted side effects by inducing chromosome instability.

  8. Typing Local Control and State Using Flow Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Arjun; Saftoiu, Claudiu; Krishnamurthi, Shriram

    Programs written in scripting languages employ idioms that confound conventional type systems. In this paper, we highlight one important set of related idioms: the use of local control and state to reason informally about types. To address these idioms, we formalize run-time tags and their relationship to types, and use these to present a novel strategy to integrate typing with flow analysis in a modular way. We demonstrate that in our separation of typing and flow analysis, each component remains conventional, their composition is simple, but the result can handle these idioms better than either one alone.

  9. Analysis of Kerch by Local Indicators of Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazygula, E.; Kharlamova, M.; Kozlova, E.

    2017-11-01

    This article presents an analysis of the city of Kerch (Crimea Republic, Kerch Peninsula) in accordance with the local sustainable development indicators. The authors carried out the assessment of the existing environmental problems in the city which was necessary for the further development of the environmentally oriented infrastructure under various development scenarios. Due to the natural and economic factors, Kerch can develop both as an industrial and recreational centre of the peninsula. The analysis of the atmospheric air condition, use of water and energy resources and the waste management system was conducted. The presented results showed the presence of major environmental problems in almost all spheres.

  10. Analysis of 24 Y chromosomal STR haplotypes in a Chinese Han population sample from Henan Province, Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meisen; Liu, Yaju; Zhang, Juntao; Bai, Rufeng; Lv, Xiaojiao; Ma, Shuhua

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed haplotypes for 24 Y chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs), including 17 Yfiler loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DY438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) and 7 additional STRs (DYS388, DYS444, DYS447, DYS449, DYS522 and DYS527a/b) in 1100 unrelated Chinese Han individuals from Henan Province using AGCU Y24 STR kit systems. The calculated average gene diversity (GD) values ranged from 0.4105 to 0.9647 for the DYS388 and DYS385a/b loci, respectively. The discriminatory capacity (DC) was 72.91% with 802 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci, by the addition of 7 Y-STRs to the Yfiler system, the DC was increased to 79.09% while showing 870 observed haplotypes. Among the additional 7 Y-STRs, DYS449, DYS527a/b, DYS444 and DYS522 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Henan Han population clustered with Han origin populations and showed significant differences from other Non-Han populations. In the present study, we report 24 Y-STR population data in Henan Han population, and we emphasize the need for adding additional markers to the commonly used 17 Yfiler loci to achieve more improved discriminatory capacity in a population with low genetic diversity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Identification and Phylogenetic Analysis of a CC-NBS-LRR Encoding Gene Assigned on Chromosome 7B of Wheat

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    Xiangqi Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hexaploid wheat displays limited genetic variation. As a direct A and B genome donor of hexaploid wheat, tetraploid wheat represents an important gene pool for cultivated bread wheat. Many disease resistant genes express conserved domains of the nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR. In this study, we isolated a CC-NBS-LRR gene locating on chromosome 7B from durum wheat variety Italy 363, and designated it TdRGA-7Ba. Its open reading frame was 4014 bp, encoding a 1337 amino acid protein with a complete NBS domain and 18 LRR repeats, sharing 44.7% identity with the PM3B protein. TdRGA-7Ba expression was continuously seen at low levels and was highest in leaves. TdRGA-7Ba has another allele TdRGA-7Bb with a 4 bp deletion at position +1892 in other cultivars of tetraploid wheat. In Ae. speltoides, as a B genome progenitor, both TdRGA-7Ba and TdRGA-7Bb were detected. In all six species of hexaploid wheats (AABBDD, only TdRGA-7Bb existed. Phylogenic analysis showed that all TdRGA-7Bb type genes were grouped in one sub-branch. We speculate that TdRGA-7Bb was derived from a TdRGA-7Ba mutation, and it happened in Ae. speltoides. Both types of TdRGA-7B participated in tetraploid wheat formation. However, only the TdRGA-7Bb was retained in hexaploid wheat.

  12. Analysis of EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A gene status and chromosomal polysomy in gastric adenocarcinoma from Chinese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Zhiyong; Zeng, Xuan; Gao, Jie; Wu, Shafei; Wang, Peng; Shi, Xiaohua; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Tonghua

    2008-01-01

    The EGFR and HER2 genes are located on chromosomes 7 and 17, respectively. They are therapeutic targets in some tumors. The TOP2A gene, which is located near HER2 on chromosome 17, is the target of many chemotherapeutic agents, and co-amplification of HER2 and TOP2A has been described in several tumor types. Herein, we investigated the gene status of EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A in Chinese gastric carcinoma patients. We determined the rate of polysomy for chromosomes 7 and 17, and we attempted to clarify the relationship between EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A gene copy number and increased expression of their encoded proteins. Furthermore, we tried to address the relationship between alterations in EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A and chromosome polysomy. One hundred cases of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tumor tissues from Chinese gastric carcinoma patients were investigated by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) methods. Forty-two percent of the cases showed EGFR overexpression; 16% showed EGFR FISH positive; 6% showed HER2 overexpression; and 11% showed HER2 gene amplification, including all six HER2 overexpression cases. TOP2A nuclear staining (nuclear index, NI) was determined in all 100 tumors: NI values ranged from 0.5 – 90%. Three percent of the tumors showed TOP2A gene amplification, which were all accompanied by HER2 gene amplification. Nineteen percent of the tumors showed chromosome 7 polysomy, and 16% showed chromosome 17 polysomy. Chromosome 7 polysomy correlated significantly with EGFR FISH-positivity, but was not associated with EGFR overexpression. HER2 overexpression associated significantly with HER2 gene amplification. TOP2A gene amplification was significantly associated with HER2 gene amplification. No relationship was found between alterations in the EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A genes and clinicopathologic variables of gastric carcinoma. The data from our study suggest that chromosome 7 polysomy may be responsible for increased EGFR

  13. Microarray Analysis of Copy Number Variants on the Human Y Chromosome Reveals Novel and Frequent Duplications Overrepresented in Specific Haplogroups.

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    Martin M Johansson

    Full Text Available The human Y chromosome is almost always excluded from genome-wide investigations of copy number variants (CNVs due to its highly repetitive structure. This chromosome should not be forgotten, not only for its well-known relevance in male fertility, but also for its involvement in clinical phenotypes such as cancers, heart failure and sex specific effects on brain and behaviour.We analysed Y chromosome data from Affymetrix 6.0 SNP arrays and found that the signal intensities for most of 8179 SNP/CN probes in the male specific region (MSY discriminated between a male, background signals in a female and an isodicentric male containing a large deletion of the q-arm and a duplication of the p-arm of the Y chromosome. Therefore, this SNP/CN platform is suitable for identification of gain and loss of Y chromosome sequences. In a set of 1718 males, we found 25 different CNV patterns, many of which are novel. We confirmed some of these variants by PCR or qPCR. The total frequency of individuals with CNVs was 14.7%, including 9.5% with duplications, 4.5% with deletions and 0.7% exhibiting both. Hence, a novel observation is that the frequency of duplications was more than twice the frequency of deletions. Another striking result was that 10 of the 25 detected variants were significantly overrepresented in one or more haplogroups, demonstrating the importance to control for haplogroups in genome-wide investigations to avoid stratification. NO-M214(xM175 individuals presented the highest percentage (95% of CNVs. If they were not counted, 12.4% of the rest included CNVs, and the difference between duplications (8.9% and deletions (2.8% was even larger.Our results demonstrate that currently available genome-wide SNP platforms can be used to identify duplications and deletions in the human Y chromosome. Future association studies of the full spectrum of Y chromosome variants will demonstrate the potential involvement of gain or loss of Y chromosome sequence in

  14. A data skimming service for locally resident analysis data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranshaw, J; Gieraltowski, J; Malon, D; May, E; Gardner, R W; Mambelli, M

    2008-01-01

    A Data Skimming Service (DSS) is a site-level service for rapid event filtering and selection from locally resident datasets based on metadata queries to associated 'tag' databases. In US ATLAS, we expect most if not all of the AOD-based datasets to be replicated to each of the five Tier 2 regional facilities in the US Tier 1 'cloud' coordinated by Brookhaven National Laboratory. Entire datasets will consist of on the order of several terabytes of data, and providing easy, quick access to skimmed subsets of these data will be vital to physics working groups. Typically, physicists will be interested in portions of the complete datasets, selected according to event-level attributes (number of jets, missing Et, etc) and content (specific analysis objects for subsequent processing). In this paper we describe methods used to classify data (metadata tag generation) and to store these results in a local database. Next we discuss a general framework which includes methods for accessing this information, defining skims, specifying event output content, accessing locally available storage through a variety of interfaces (SRM, dCache/dccp, gridftp), accessing remote storage elements as specified, and user job submission tools through local or grid schedulers. The advantages of the DSS are the ability to quickly 'browse' datasets and design skims, for example, pre-adjusting cuts to get to a desired skim level with minimal use of compute resources, and to encode these analysis operations in a database for re-analysis and archival purposes. Additionally the framework has provisions to operate autonomously in the event that external, central resources are not available, and to provide, as a reduced package, a minimal skimming service tailored to the needs of small Tier 3 centres or individual users

  15. First description of multivalent ring structures in eutherian mammalian meiosis: new chromosomal characterization of Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae, Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Ramon Everton Ferreira; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; da Costa, Marlyson Jeremias Rodrigues; Noronha, Renata Coelho Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo Ribeiro; Pieczarka, Julio César

    2016-08-01

    Twelve specimens of the bat Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae: Chiroptera) were collected from four localities in the Brazilian Amazon region and analyzed by classical and molecular cytogenetics. The diploid number and autosomal fundamental number were as previously reported (2n = 22 and FNa = 40, respectively). Fluorescence in situ hybridization using rDNA probes and silver nitrate technique demonstrated the presence of two NOR sites and the presence of internal telomeric sequences at pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes with exception of Y. Based on meiotic studies and chromosome banding we suggest that the sex chromosome pair of C. brevirostris was equivocally identified as it appears in the literature. Meiotic analysis demonstrated that at diplotene-diakinesis the cells had a ring conformation involving four chromosome pairs. This suggests the occurrence of multiple reciprocal translocations among these chromosomes, which is a very rare phenomenon in vertebrates, and has never been described in Eutheria.

  16. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  17. Y-chromosome phylogeographic analysis of the Greek-Cypriot population reveals elements consistent with Neolithic and Bronze Age settlements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskarides, Konstantinos; Mazières, Stéphane; Hadjipanagi, Despina; Di Cristofaro, Julie; Ignatiou, Anastasia; Stefanou, Charalambos; King, Roy J; Underhill, Peter A; Chiaroni, Jacques; Deltas, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    The archeological record indicates that the permanent settlement of Cyprus began with pioneering agriculturalists circa 11,000 years before present, (ca. 11,000 y BP). Subsequent colonization events followed, some recognized regionally. Here, we assess the Y-chromosome structure of Cyprus in context to regional populations and correlate it to phases of prehistoric colonization. Analysis of haplotypes from 574 samples showed that island-wide substructure was barely significant in a spatial analysis of molecular variance (SAMOVA). However, analyses of molecular variance (AMOVA) of haplogroups using 92 binary markers genotyped in 629 Cypriots revealed that the proportion of variance among the districts was irregularly distributed. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed potential genetic associations of Greek-Cypriots with neighbor populations. Contrasting haplogroups in the PCA were used as surrogates of parental populations. Admixture analyses suggested that the majority of G2a-P15 and R1b-M269 components were contributed by Anatolia and Levant sources, respectively, while Greece Balkans supplied the majority of E-V13 and J2a-M67. Haplotype-based expansion times were at historical levels suggestive of recent demography. Analyses of Cypriot haplogroup data are consistent with two stages of prehistoric settlement. E-V13 and E-M34 are widespread, and PCA suggests sourcing them to the Balkans and Levant/Anatolia, respectively. The persistent pre-Greek component is represented by elements of G2-U5(xL30) haplogroups: U5*, PF3147, and L293. J2b-M205 may contribute also to the pre-Greek strata. The majority of R1b-Z2105 lineages occur in both the westernmost and easternmost districts. Distinctively, sub-haplogroup R1b- M589 occurs only in the east. The absence of R1b- M589 lineages in Crete and the Balkans and the presence in Asia Minor are compatible with Late Bronze Age influences from Anatolia rather than from Mycenaean Greeks.

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Local Climate Change Adaptation Actions ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Local governments are beginning to take steps to address the consequences of climate change, such as sea level rise and heat events. However, we do not have a clear understanding of what local governments are doing -- the extent to which they expect climate change to affect their community, the types of actions they have in place to address climate change, and the resources at their disposal for implementation. Several studies have been conducted by academics, non-governmental organizations, and public agencies to assess the status of local climate change adaptation. This project collates the findings from dozens of such studies to conduct a meta-analysis of local climate change adaptation actions. The studies will be characterized along several dimensions, including (a) methods used, (b) timing and geographic scope, (c) topics covered, (d) types of adaptation actions identified, (e) implementation status, and (f) public engagement and environmental justice dimensions considered. The poster presents the project's rationale and approach and some illustrative findings from early analyses. [Note: The document being reviewed is an abstract in which a poster is being proposed. The poster will enter clearance if the abstract is accepted] The purpose of this poster is to present the research framework and approaches I am developing for my ORISE postdoctoral project, and to get feedback on early analyses.

  19. Asymptotically optimal data analysis for rejecting local realism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanbao; Glancy, Scott; Knill, Emanuel

    2011-01-01

    Reliable experimental demonstrations of violations of local realism are highly desirable for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. One can quantify the violation witnessed by an experiment in terms of a statistical p value, which can be defined as the maximum probability according to local realism of a violation at least as high as that witnessed. Thus, high violation corresponds to small p value. We propose a prediction-based-ratio (PBR) analysis protocol whose p values are valid even if the prepared quantum state varies arbitrarily and local realistic models can depend on previous measurement settings and outcomes. It is therefore not subject to the memory loophole [J. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. A 66, 042111 (2002)]. If the prepared state does not vary in time, the p values are asymptotically optimal. For comparison, we consider protocols derived from the number of standard deviations of violation of a Bell inequality and from martingale theory [R. Gill, e-print arXiv:quant-ph/0110137]. We find that the p values of the former can be too small and are therefore not statistically valid, while those derived from the latter are suboptimal. PBR p values do not require a predetermined Bell inequality and can be used to compare results from different tests of local realism independent of experimental details.

  20. Dahl (S x R congenic strain analysis confirms and defines a chromosome 5 female-specific blood pressure quantitative trait locus to <7 Mbp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L M Herrera

    Full Text Available The detection of multiple sex-specific blood pressure (BP quantitative trait loci (QTLs in independent total genome analyses of F2 (Dahl S x R-intercross male and female rat cohorts confirms clinical observations of sex-specific disease cause and response to treatment among hypertensive patients, and mandate the identification of sex-specific hypertension genes/mechanisms. We developed and studied two congenic strains, S.R5A and S.R5B introgressing Dahl R-chromosome 5 segments into Dahl S chromosome 5 region spanning putative BP-f1 and BP-f2 QTLs. Radiotelemetric non-stressed 24-hour BP analysis at four weeks post-high salt diet (8% NaCl challenge, identified only S.R5B congenic rats with lower SBP (-26.5 mmHg, P = 0.002, DBP (-23.7 mmHg, P = 0.004 and MAP (-25.1 mmHg, P = 0.002 compared with Dahl S female controls at four months of age confirming BP-f1 but not BP-f2 QTL on rat chromosome 5. The S.R5B congenic segment did not affect pulse pressure and relative heart weight indicating that the gene underlying BP-f1 does not influence arterial stiffness and cardiac hypertrophy. The results of our congenic analysis narrowed BP-f1 to chromosome 5 coordinates 134.9-141.5 Mbp setting up the basis for further fine mapping of BP-f1 and eventual identification of the specific gene variant accounting for BP-f1 effect on blood pressure.

  1. Dahl (S x R) congenic strain analysis confirms and defines a chromosome 5 female-specific blood pressure quantitative trait locus to <7 Mbp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Victoria L M; Pasion, Khristine A; Moran, Ann Marie; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    The detection of multiple sex-specific blood pressure (BP) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in independent total genome analyses of F2 (Dahl S x R)-intercross male and female rat cohorts confirms clinical observations of sex-specific disease cause and response to treatment among hypertensive patients, and mandate the identification of sex-specific hypertension genes/mechanisms. We developed and studied two congenic strains, S.R5A and S.R5B introgressing Dahl R-chromosome 5 segments into Dahl S chromosome 5 region spanning putative BP-f1 and BP-f2 QTLs. Radiotelemetric non-stressed 24-hour BP analysis at four weeks post-high salt diet (8% NaCl) challenge, identified only S.R5B congenic rats with lower SBP (-26.5 mmHg, P = 0.002), DBP (-23.7 mmHg, P = 0.004) and MAP (-25.1 mmHg, P = 0.002) compared with Dahl S female controls at four months of age confirming BP-f1 but not BP-f2 QTL on rat chromosome 5. The S.R5B congenic segment did not affect pulse pressure and relative heart weight indicating that the gene underlying BP-f1 does not influence arterial stiffness and cardiac hypertrophy. The results of our congenic analysis narrowed BP-f1 to chromosome 5 coordinates 134.9-141.5 Mbp setting up the basis for further fine mapping of BP-f1 and eventual identification of the specific gene variant accounting for BP-f1 effect on blood pressure.

  2. Analysis of 62 hybrid assembled human Y chromosomes exposes rapid structural changes and high rates of gene conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Skov, Laurits; Maretty, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    with the chimpanzee Y chromosome. We analyzed 2.7 Mb of large inverted repeats (palindromes) for variation patterns among the two palindrome arms and identified 603 mutation and 416 gene conversions events. We find clear evidence for GC-biased gene conversion in the palindromes (and a balancing AT mutation bias...

  3. Analysis of local influences in structural details of the bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam RUDZIK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the problems of local influences in structural details of bridges as the critical locations, whose damages or excessive force may directly affect the safety of users. These analyses are shown on selected examples. Presented is the example of local changes in the forms of proper vibrations in the node of the truss bridge that can be used in expert issues concerning the causes of damages. The second example are the changes in stresses in the stay cable anchorage element including the nonlinear material models. Models of this type can be successfully used by engineers as they allow for analysis of selected structural details without the need for detailed mapping of the entire structure, but only a selected section.

  4. Preoperative localization strategies for primary hyperparathyroidism: an economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Carrie C; Stephen, Antonia E; Hodin, Richard A; Pandharipande, Pari

    2012-12-01

    Strategies for localizing parathyroid pathology preoperatively vary in cost and accuracy. Our purpose was to compute and compare comprehensive costs associated with common localization strategies. A decision-analytic model was developed to evaluate comprehensive, short-term costs of parathyroid localization strategies for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Eight strategies were compared. Probabilities of accurate localization were extracted from the literature, and costs associated with each strategy were based on 2011 Medicare reimbursement schedules. Differential cost considerations included outpatient versus inpatient surgeries, operative time, and costs of imaging. Sensitivity analyses were performed to determine effects of variability in key model parameters upon model results. Ultrasound (US) followed by 4D-CT was the least expensive strategy ($5,901), followed by US alone ($6,028), and 4D-CT alone ($6,110). Strategies including sestamibi (SM) were more expensive, with associated expenditures of up to $6,329 for contemporaneous US and SM. Four-gland, bilateral neck exploration (BNE) was the most expensive strategy ($6,824). Differences in cost were dependent upon differences in the sensitivity of each strategy for detecting single-gland disease, which determined the proportion of patients able to undergo outpatient minimally invasive parathyroidectomy. In sensitivity analysis, US alone was preferred over US followed by 4D-CT only when both the sensitivity of US alone for detecting an adenoma was ≥ 94 %, and the sensitivity of 4D-CT following negative US was ≤ 39 %. 4D-CT alone was the least costly strategy when US sensitivity was ≤ 31 %. Among commonly used strategies for preoperative localization of parathyroid pathology, US followed by selective 4D-CT is the least expensive.

  5. Application of dissociation curve analysis to radiation hybrid panel marker scoring: generation of a map of river buffalo (B. bubalis chromosome 20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäffer Alejandro A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence of dyes bound to double-stranded PCR products has been utilized extensively in various real-time quantitative PCR applications, including post-amplification dissociation curve analysis, or differentiation of amplicon length or sequence composition. Despite the current era of whole-genome sequencing, mapping tools such as radiation hybrid DNA panels remain useful aids for sequence assembly, focused resequencing efforts, and for building physical maps of species that have not yet been sequenced. For placement of specific, individual genes or markers on a map, low-throughput methods remain commonplace. Typically, PCR amplification of DNA from each panel cell line is followed by gel electrophoresis and scoring of each clone for the presence or absence of PCR product. To improve sensitivity and efficiency of radiation hybrid panel analysis in comparison to gel-based methods, we adapted fluorescence-based real-time PCR and dissociation curve analysis for use as a novel scoring method. Results As proof of principle for this dissociation curve method, we generated new maps of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis chromosome 20 by both dissociation curve analysis and conventional marker scoring. We also obtained sequence data to augment dissociation curve results. Few genes have been previously mapped to buffalo chromosome 20, and sequence detail is limited, so 65 markers were screened from the orthologous chromosome of domestic cattle. Thirty bovine markers (46% were suitable as cross-species markers for dissociation curve analysis in the buffalo radiation hybrid panel under a standard protocol, compared to 25 markers suitable for conventional typing. Computational analysis placed 27 markers on a chromosome map generated by the new method, while the gel-based approach produced only 20 mapped markers. Among 19 markers common to both maps, the marker order on the map was maintained perfectly. Conclusion Dissociation curve

  6. Y-chromosome status identification suggests a recipient origin of posttransplant non-small cell lung carcinomas: chromogenic in situ hybridization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Brodsky, Sergey V; Zhao, Weiqiang; Otterson, Gregory A; Villalona-Calero, Miguel; Satoskar, Anjali A; Hasan, Ayesha; Pelletier, Ronald; Ivanov, Iouri; Ross, Patrick; Nadasdy, Tibor; Shilo, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Owing to the need of lifelong immunosuppression, solid-organ transplant recipients are known to have an increased risk of posttransplant malignancies including lung cancer. Posttransplant neoplastic transformation of donor-derived cells giving rise to hematopoietic malignancies, Kaposi sarcoma, and basal cell carcinoma in nongraft tissues has been reported. The goal of this study was to assess the cell origin (donor versus recipient derived) of posttransplant non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) in kidney and heart transplant recipients. An institutional database search identified 2557 kidney and heart transplant recipients in 8 consecutive years. Among this cohort, 20 (0.8%) renal and 18 (0.7%) heart transplant recipients developed NSCLC. The study cohort comprised 6 of 38 NSCLCs arising in donor-recipient sex-mismatched transplant patients. The tumor cell origin was evaluated by chromogenic in situ hybridization with Y-chromosome probe on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Y-chromosome was identified in 97% ± 1% (range from 92% to 99%) of all types of nucleated cells in male control tissues. In all 5 NSCLCs from male recipients of female donor organ, Y-chromosome was identified in 97% ± 2% (range from 92% to 100%) of tumor cells, statistically equivalent to normal control (P recipient of male kidney. These findings suggest a recipient derivation of NSCLC arising in kidney and heart transplant recipients. A combination of histologic evaluation and chromogenic in situ hybridization with Y-chromosome analysis allows reliable determination of tissue origin in sex-mismatched solid-organ transplant recipients and may aid in management of posttransplant malignancy in such cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Morphometric and Phylogenic Analysis of Six Population Indonesian Local Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Batubara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research objectives were to characterize morphometric and genetic distance between populations of Indonesian local goats. The morphological discriminant and canonical analysis were carried out to estimate the phylogenic relationship and determine the discriminant variable between Benggala goats (n= 96, Marica (n= 60, Jawarandu (n= 94, (Kacang (n= 217, Muara (n= 30 and Samosir (n= 42. Discriminant analysis used to clasify body weight and body measurements. In the analysis of variance showed that body weight and body measurement (body length, height at withers, thorax width, thorax height, hert girth, skull width and height, tail length and width, ear length and width of Muara goats was higher (P<0.05 compared to the other groups, and the lowest was in Marica goats. The smallest genetic distance was between Marica and Samosir (11.207 and the highest were between Muara and Benggala (255.110. The highest similarity between individual within population was found in Kacang (99.28% and the lowest in Samosir (82.50%. The canonical analysis showed high correlation on canon circumference, body weight, skull width, skull height, and tail width variables so these six variables can be used as distinguishing variables among population. The result from Mahalonobis distance for phenogram tree and canonical analysis showed that six populations of Indonesian local goats were divided into six breed of goats: the first was Muara, the second was Jawarandu, the third was Kacang, the fourth was Benggala, the fifth was Samosir and the sixth was Marica goats. The diversity of body size and body weight of goats was observed quite large, so the chances of increasing productivity could be made through selection and mating programs.

  8. Y-chromosome evolution: emerging insights into processes of Y-chromosome degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-02-01

    The human Y chromosome is intriguing not only because it harbours the master-switch gene that determines gender but also because of its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolved from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. Recent whole-genome and transcriptome analyses of Y chromosomes in humans and other primates, in Drosophila species and in plants have shed light on the current gene content of the Y chromosome, its origins and its long-term fate. Furthermore, comparative analysis of young and old Y chromosomes has given further insights into the evolutionary and molecular forces triggering Y-chromosome degeneration and into the evolutionary destiny of the Y chromosome.

  9. The murine retinoblastoma homolog maps to chromosome 14 near Es-10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, J.C.; Crosby, J.J.; Kozak, C.A.; Schievella, A.R.; Bernards, R.A.; Nadeau, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Restriction fragment length variants have been exploited to map genetically Rb-1, the murine homolog of the human retinoblastoma gene. Rb-1 localized to mouse chromosome 14 on the basis of results from analysis of somatic cell hybrids. In an interspecific backcross involving Mus spretus, Rb-1 and

  10. Molecular Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis and Whole-Exome Sequencing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Marshall, Christian R; Walker, Susan; Kaur, Gaganjot; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Lionel, Anath C; Yuen, Ryan K C; Uddin, Mohammed; Roberts, Wendy; Weksberg, Rosanna; Woodbury-Smith, Marc; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Wang, Zhuozhi; Wei, John; Howe, Jennifer L; Gazzellone, Matthew J; Lau, Lynette; Sung, Wilson W L; Whitten, Kathy; Vardy, Cathy; Crosbie, Victoria; Tsang, Brian; D'Abate, Lia; Tong, Winnie W L; Luscombe, Sandra; Doyle, Tyna; Carter, Melissa T; Szatmari, Peter; Stuckless, Susan; Merico, Daniele; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Scherer, Stephen W; Fernandez, Bridget A

    2015-09-01

    The use of genome-wide tests to provide molecular diagnosis for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) requires more study. To perform chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) and whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a heterogeneous group of children with ASD to determine the molecular diagnostic yield of these tests in a sample typical of a developmental pediatric clinic. The sample consisted of 258 consecutively ascertained unrelated children with ASD who underwent detailed assessments to define morphology scores based on the presence of major congenital abnormalities and minor physical anomalies. The children were recruited between 2008 and 2013 in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The probands were stratified into 3 groups of increasing morphological severity: essential, equivocal, and complex (scores of 0-3, 4-5, and ≥6). All probands underwent CMA, with WES performed for 95 proband-parent trios. The overall molecular diagnostic yield for CMA and WES in a population-based ASD sample stratified in 3 phenotypic groups. Of 258 probands, 24 (9.3%, 95%CI, 6.1%-13.5%) received a molecular diagnosis from CMA and 8 of 95 (8.4%, 95%CI, 3.7%-15.9%) from WES. The yields were statistically different between the morphological groups. Among the children who underwent both CMA and WES testing, the estimated proportion with an identifiable genetic etiology was 15.8% (95%CI, 9.1%-24.7%; 15/95 children). This included 2 children who received molecular diagnoses from both tests. The combined yield was significantly higher in the complex group when compared with the essential group (pairwise comparison, P = .002). [table: see text]. Among a heterogeneous sample of children with ASD, the molecular diagnostic yields of CMA and WES were comparable, and the combined molecular diagnostic yield was higher in children with more complex morphological phenotypes in comparison with the children in the essential category. If replicated in additional populations, these findings may

  11. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediates chromosome-specific meiotic synapsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carolyn M; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton, Peter M; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M; Dernburg, Abby F

    2005-12-16

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregation of the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Here we show that loss of him-8 function causes profound X chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairing and synapsis. him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc-finger protein that is expressed during meiosis and concentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as the meiotic pairing center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supported by genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations. HIM-8 bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE) throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 that retains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilize pairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate that stabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which the tethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is not sufficient.

  12. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediates chromosome-specific meiotic synapsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton, Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-01-01

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregation of the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Here we show that loss of him-8 function causes profound X-chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairing and synapsis.him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that is expressed during meiosis and concentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as themeiotic Pairing Center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supported by genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations. HIM-8-bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE)throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 that retains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilize pairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate that stabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which the tethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is not sufficient

  13. Co-regulation analysis of closely linked genes identifies a highly recurrent gain on chromosome 17q25.3 in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudo, Raquel; Martínez-A, Carlos; Ortiz, Ángel R; Fernández, Pedro L; Thomson, Timothy M; Abia, David; Ferrer, Berta; Nayach, Iracema; Benguria, Alberto; Zaballos, Ángel; Rey, Javier del; Miró, Rosa; Campo, Elías

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of prostate cancer (PC) has unveiled new markers of neoplasia and allowed insights into mechanisms underlying this disease. Genomewide analyses have also identified new chromosomal abnormalities associated with PC. The combination of both classes of data for the same sample cohort might provide better criteria for identifying relevant factors involved in neoplasia. Here we describe transcriptional signatures identifying distinct normal and tumoral prostate tissue compartments, and the inference and demonstration of a new, highly recurrent copy number gain on chromosome 17q25.3. We have applied transcriptional profiling to tumoral and non-tumoral prostate samples with relatively homogeneous epithelial representations as well as pure stromal tissue from peripheral prostate and cultured cell lines, followed by quantitative RT-PCR validations and immunohistochemical analysis. In addition, we have performed in silico colocalization analysis of co-regulated genes and validation by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The transcriptomic analysis has allowed us to identify signatures corresponding to non-tumoral luminal and tumoral epithelium, basal epithelial cells, and prostate stromal tissue. In addition, in silico analysis of co-regulated expression of physically linked genes has allowed us to predict the occurrence of a copy number gain at chromosomal region 17q25.3. This computational inference was validated by fluorescent in situ hybridization, which showed gains in this region in over 65% of primary and metastatic tumoral samples. Our approach permits to directly link gene copy number variations with transcript co-regulation in association with neoplastic states. Therefore, transcriptomic studies of carefully selected samples can unveil new diagnostic markers and transcriptional signatures highly specific of PC, and lead to the discovery of novel genomic abnormalities that may provide additional insights into the causes and mechanisms

  14. Analysis of autism susceptibility gene loci on chromosomes 1p, 4p, 6q, 7q, 13q, 15q, 16p, 17q, 19q and 22q in Finnish multiplex families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auranen, M; Nieminen, T; Majuri, S; Vanhala, R; Peltonen, L; Järvelä, I

    2000-05-01

    The role of genetic factors in the etiology of the autistic spectrum of disorders has clearly been demonstrated. Ten chromosomal regions, on chromosomes 1p, 4p, 6q, 7q, 13q, 15q, 16p, 17q, 19q and 22q have potentially been linked to autism.1-8 We have analyzed these chromosomal regions in a total of 17 multiplex families with autism originating from the isolated Finnish population by pairwise linkage analysis and sib-pair analysis. Mild evidence for putative contribution was found only with the 1p chromosomal region in the susceptibility to autism. Our data suggest that additional gene loci exist for autism which will be detectable in and even restricted to the isolated Finnish population.

  15. The human homologue of unc-93 maps to chromosome 6q27 - characterisation and analysis in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Dodds, Phillippa; Emilion, Gracy

    2002-01-01

    In sporadic ovarian cancer, we have previously reported allele loss at D6S193 (62%) on chromosome 6q27, which suggested the presence of a putative tumour suppressor gene. Based on our data and that from another group, the minimal region of allele loss was between D6S264 and D6S149 (7.4 cM). To id...

  16. Quantitative analysis of replication-related mutation and selection pressures in bacterial chromosomes and plasmids using generalised GC skew index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Haruo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to their bi-directional replication machinery starting from a single finite origin, bacterial genomes show characteristic nucleotide compositional bias between the two replichores, which can be visualised through GC skew or (C-G/(C+G. Although this polarisation is used for computational prediction of replication origins in many bacterial genomes, the degree of GC skew visibility varies widely among different species, necessitating a quantitative measurement of GC skew strength in order to provide confidence measures for GC skew-based predictions of replication origins. Results Here we discuss a quantitative index for the measurement of GC skew strength, named the generalised GC skew index (gGCSI, which is applicable to genomes of any length, including bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. We demonstrate that gGCSI is independent of the window size and can thus be used to compare genomes with different sizes, such as bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. It can suggest the existence of different replication mechanisms in archaea and of rolling-circle replication in plasmids. Correlation of gGCSI values between plasmids and their corresponding host chromosomes suggests that within the same strain, these replicons have reproduced using the same replication machinery and thus exhibit similar strengths of replication strand skew. Conclusions gGCSI can be applied to genomes of any length and thus allows comparative study of replication-related mutation and selection pressures in genomes of different lengths such as bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. Using gGCSI, we showed that replication-related mutation or selection pressure is similar for replicons with similar machinery.

  17. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M.; Thatcher, Louise F.; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B.; Manners, John M.; Taylor, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host–pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host–pathogen interactions for experimental verification. PMID:25994930

  19. Analysis of spontaneous and bleomycin-induced chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes of long-haul aircrew members from Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzan, Alejandro D.; Bianchi, Martha S.; Gimenez, Esteban M.; Flaque, Maria C. Diaz; Ciancio, Vicente R.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous and bleomycin (BLM)-induced chromosomal aberrations in G0 and G2 stages of the cell cycle have been analyzed in peripheral lymphocytes of 21 long-haul aircrew members from Argentina in order to assess BLM-induced clastogenesis as a first approach to determine the DNA repair capacity and thereby the susceptibility to environmental cancers in aircrew. The possibility that occupational exposure of flight personnel to cosmic radiation can induce an adaptive response in their peripheral lymphocytes that can be detected by a subsequent in vitro treatment with BLM was also investigated. For comparison, aberrations were also scored in the lymphocytes of 15 healthy volunteers matched by age, health, sex, drinking and smoking habits to the flight personnel group. Aircrew exhibited a higher frequency of spontaneous dicentrics and ring chromosomes than the control population (p 0.05). However, the aircrew sampled population was almost two times more sensitive to BLM G0 clastogenic effects than controls (p < 0.05). Therefore, our data suggest that chronic exposure of aircrew to cosmic radiation increases the in vitro chromosomal sensitivity of their peripheral lymphocytes to BLM (at least in the G0 stage of the cell cycle), and that occupational exposure of flight personnel to cosmic radiation does not induce an adaptive response to this radiomimetic compound. Our results justify further studies aimed at determine if those aircrew members hypersensitive to BLM are more prone to develop environmental cancer than BLM-insensitive individuals

  20. [The haplomatch program for comparing Y-chromosome STR-haplotypes and its application to the analysis of the origin of Don Cossacks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukhryaeva, M I; Ivanov, I O; Frolova, S A; Koshel, S M; Utevska, O M; Skhalyakho, R A; Agdzhoyan, A T; Bogunov, Yu V; Balanovska, E V; Balanovsky, O P

    2016-05-01

    STR haplotypes of the Y chromosome are widely used as effective genetic markers in studies of human populations and in forensic DNA analysis. The task often arises to compare the spectrum of haplotypes in individuals or entire populations. Performing this task manually is too laborious and thus unrealistic. We propose an algorithm for counting similarity between STR haplotypes. This algorithm is suitable for massive analyses of samples. It is implemented in the computer program Haplomatch, which makes it possible to find haplotypes that differ from the target haplotype by 0, 1, 2, 3, or more mutational steps. The program may operate in two modes: comparison of individuals and comparison of populations. Flexibility of the program (the possibility of using any external database), its usability (MS Excel spreadsheets are used), and the capability of being applied to other chromosomes and other species could make this software a new useful tool in population genetics and forensic and genealogical studies. The Haplomatch software is freely available on our website www.genofond.ru. The program is applied to studying the gene pool of Cossacks. Experimental analysis of Y-chromosomal diversity in a representative set (N = 131) of Upper Don Cossacks is performed. Analysis of the STR haplotypes detects genetic proximity of Cossacks to East Slavic populations (in particular, to Southern and Central Russians, as well as to Ukrainians), which confirms the hypothesis of the origin of the Cossacks mainly due to immigration from Russia and Ukraine. Also, a small genetic influence of Turkicspeaking Nogais is found, probably caused by their occurrence in the Don Voisko as part of the Tatar layer. No similarities between haplotype spectra of Cossacks and Caucasus populations are found. This case study demonstrates the effectiveness of the Haplomatch software in analyzing large sets of STR haplotypes.

  1. Updating the maize karyotype by chromosome DNA sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The karyotype is a basic concept regarding the genome, fundamentally described by the number and morphological features of all chromosomes. Chromosome class, centromeric index, intra- and interchromosomal asymmetry index, and constriction localization are important in clinical, systematic and evolutionary approaches. In spite of the advances in karyotype characterization made over the last years, new data about the chromosomes can be generated from quantitative methods, such as image cytometry. Therefore, using Zea mays L., this study aimed to update the species’ karyotype by supplementing information on chromosome DNA sizing. After adjustment of the procedures, chromosome morphometry and class as well as knob localization enabled describing the Z. mays karyotype. In addition, applying image cytometry, DNA sizing was unprecedentedly measured for the arms and satellite of all chromosomes. This way, unambiguous identification of the chromosome pairs, and hence the assembly of 51 karyograms, were only possible after the DNA sizing of each chromosome, their arms and satellite portions. These accurate, quantitative and reproducible data also enabled determining the distribution and variation of DNA content in each chromosome. From this, a correlation between DNA amount and total chromosome length evidenced that the mean DNA content of chromosome 9 was higher than that of chromosome 8. The chromosomal DNA sizing updated the Z. mays karyotype, providing insights into its dynamic genome with regards to the organization of the ten chromosomes and their respective portions. Considering the results and the relevance of cytogenetics in the current scenario of comparative sequencing and genomics, chromosomal DNA sizing should be incorporated as an additional parameter for karyotype definition. Based on this study, it can be affirmed that cytogenetic approaches go beyond the simple morphological description of chromosomes. PMID:29293613

  2. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/μm) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  3. Exceptional Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Three Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannie Kartapradja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an exceptional complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR found in three individuals in a family that involves 4 chromosomes with 5 breakpoints. The CCR was ascertained in a phenotypically abnormal newborn with additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 4. Maternal karyotyping indicated that the mother carried an apparently balanced CCR involving chromosomes 4, 6, 11, and 18. Maternal transmission of the derivative chromosome 4 resulted in partial trisomy for chromosomes 6q and 18q and a partial monosomy of chromosome 4p in the proband. Further family studies found that the maternal grandmother carried the same apparently balanced CCR as the proband’s mother, which was confirmed using the whole chromosome painting (WCP FISH. High resolution whole genome microarray analysis of DNA from the proband’s mother found no evidence for copy number imbalance in the vicinity of the CCR translocation breakpoints, or elsewhere in the genome, providing evidence that the mother’s and grandmother’s CCRs were balanced at a molecular level. This structural rearrangement can be categorized as an exceptional CCR due to its complexity and is a rare example of an exceptional CCR being transmitted in balanced and/or unbalanced form across three generations.

  4. Analysis of the influence of radiation quality on the effectiveness of small doses for induction of reproductive death and chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of RBE - LET relations are made for reproductive death and chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells, as a means of providing insight into the type of mechanisms involved. An analysis of the survival curves for X-rays and gamma rays is discussed and a schematic representation is presented of differences in the dependence of the effectiveness per unit dose on LET, for which data were derived from experiments with X-rays, gamma rays, fast neutrons and heavy ions. (Auth./C.F.)

  5. Analysis of Local Economic Development Capacity in Hungarian Rural Settlements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritter Krisztián

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Besides local economic development (LED theories, especially LED practices have a growing importance nowadays. By a primary research involving more than 400 actors (local governments, local entrepreneurs, local agencies, the necessary competencies, practical experiences, and the field of further skills and extension concerning cooperation in economic development of localities were analysed. Summing up the research results, both local governments and local entrepreneurs have certain lack of competence that has to be improved, while the need of this exercise (and LED as a whole for an appropriate financial background and a national strategy/policy is well-emphasized by the answers of the actors.

  6. Radiotherapy in desmoid tumors. Treatment response, local control, and analysis of local failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santti, Kirsi; Beule, Annette; Tuomikoski, Laura; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Anna-Stina; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tarkkanen, Maija; Blomqvist, Carl [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki (Finland); Roenty, Mikko [HUSLAB and University of Helsinki, Department of Pathology, Helsinki (Finland); Ihalainen, Hanna [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) are rare soft tissue tumors which frequently recur after surgery. Desmoid tumors arise from musculoaponeurotic tissue in the extremities, head and neck, abdominal wall, or intra-abdominally. Our aim was to examine the outcome of radiotherapy of desmoid tumors in a single institution series. We evaluated 41 patients with desmoid tumors treated with 49 radiotherapies between 1987 and 2012. Radiologic images for response evaluation were reassessed and responses to treatment registered according to RECIST criteria 1.1. For patients with local failures radiation dose distribution was determined in each local failure volume using image co-registration. Recurrences were classified as in-target, marginal, or out-of-target. Prognostic factors for radiotherapy treatment failure were evaluated. Radiotherapy doses varied from 20-63 Gy (median 50 Gy) with a median fraction size of 2 Gy. The objective response rate to definitive radiotherapy was 55% (12/22 patients). Median time to response was 14 months. A statistically significant dose-response relation for definitive and postoperative radiotherapy was observed both in univariate (p-value 0.002) and in multivariate analysis (p-value 0.02) adjusted for potential confounding factors. Surgery before radiotherapy or surgical margin had no significant effect on time to progression. Nine of 11 (82%) local failures were classified as marginal and two of 11 (18%) in-target. None of the recurrences occurred totally out-of-target. Radiotherapy is a valuable option for treating desmoid tumors. Radiotherapy dose appears to be significantly associated to local control. (orig.) [German] Desmoide (aggressive Fibromatosen) sind seltene Weichteiltumore der muskulaeren Membranen von Kopf, Hals, Extremitaeten und Bauchwand. Ziel war es, die Wirksamkeit der Strahlentherapie bei aggressiver Fibromatose an einer einzelnen Klinik zu untersuchen. Ausgewertet wurden 41 Patienten mit aggressiver Fibromatose, die

  7. Rapid Online Analysis of Local Feature Detectors and Their Complementarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib Ehsan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A vision system that can assess its own performance and take appropriate actions online to maximize its effectiveness would be a step towards achieving the long-cherished goal of imitating humans. This paper proposes a method for performing an online performance analysis of local feature detectors, the primary stage of many practical vision systems. It advocates the spatial distribution of local image features as a good performance indicator and presents a metric that can be calculated rapidly, concurs with human visual assessments and is complementary to existing offline measures such as repeatability. The metric is shown to provide a measure of complementarity for combinations of detectors, correctly reflecting the underlying principles of individual detectors. Qualitative results on well-established datasets for several state-of-the-art detectors are presented based on the proposed measure. Using a hypothesis testing approach and a newly-acquired, larger image database, statistically-significant performance differences are identified. Different detector pairs and triplets are examined quantitatively and the results provide a useful guideline for combining detectors in applications that require a reasonable spatial distribution of image features. A principled framework for combining feature detectors in these applications is also presented. Timing results reveal the potential of the metric for online applications.

  8. Locality-Driven Parallel Static Analysis for Power Delivery Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Zhiyu

    2011-06-01

    Large VLSI on-chip Power Delivery Networks (PDNs) are challenging to analyze due to the sheer network complexity. In this article, a novel parallel partitioning-based PDN analysis approach is presented. We use the boundary circuit responses of each partition to divide the full grid simulation problem into a set of independent subgrid simulation problems. Instead of solving exact boundary circuit responses, a more efficient scheme is proposed to provide near-exact approximation to the boundary circuit responses by exploiting the spatial locality of the flip-chip-type power grids. This scheme is also used in a block-based iterative error reduction process to achieve fast convergence. Detailed computational cost analysis and performance modeling is carried out to determine the optimal (or near-optimal) number of partitions for parallel implementation. Through the analysis of several large power grids, the proposed approach is shown to have excellent parallel efficiency, fast convergence, and favorable scalability. Our approach can solve a 16-million-node power grid in 18 seconds on an IBM p5-575 processing node with 16 Power5+ processors, which is 18.8X faster than a state-of-the-art direct solver. © 2011 ACM.

  9. Local porosity analysis of pore structure in cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jing; Stroeven, Piet

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) local porosity theory (LPT) was originally proposed by Hilfer and recently used for the analysis of pore space geometry in model sandstone. LPT pursues to define the probability density functions of porosity and porosity connectivity. In doing so, heterogeneity differences in various sandstone samples were assessed. However, fundamental issues as to the stochastic concept of geometric heterogeneity are ignored in Hilfer's LPT theory. This paper focuses on proper sampling procedures that should be based on stochastic approaches to multistage sampling and geometric heterogeneity. Standard LPT analysis provides a 3-D microscopic modeling approach to materials. Traditional experimental techniques yield two-dimensional (2-D) section images, however. Therefore, this paper replaces the method for assessing material data in standard LPT theory to a more practical one, based on stereological, 3-D interpretation of quantitative image analysis data. The developed methodology is used to characterize the pore structure in hardened cement paste with various water/cement ratios (w/c) at different hydration stages

  10. Obtaining local reciprocal lattice vectors from finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, John P; Connolley, Thomas; Hill, Tim P; Huang, Houcheng; Sharp, Doug W; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Finite-element analysis is frequently used by engineers at synchrotron beamlines to calculate the elastic deformation of a single crystal undergoing mechanical bending or thermal load. ANSYS Workbench software is widely used for such simulations. However, although ANSYS Workbench software provides useful information on the displacements, strains and stresses within the crystal, it does not yield the local reciprocal lattice vectors that would be required for X-ray diffraction calculations. To bridge this gap, a method based on the shape functions and interpolation procedures of the software itself has been developed. An application to the double-crystal bent Laue monochromator being designed for the I12 (JEEP) wiggler beamline at the Diamond Light Source is presented.

  11. Characterizing structural transitions using localized free energy landscape analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh K Banavali

    Full Text Available Structural changes in molecules are frequently observed during biological processes like replication, transcription and translation. These structural changes can usually be traced to specific distortions in the backbones of the macromolecules involved. Quantitative energetic characterization of such distortions can greatly advance the atomic-level understanding of the dynamic character of these biological processes.Molecular dynamics simulations combined with a variation of the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method for potential of mean force determination are applied to characterize localized structural changes for the test case of cytosine (underlined base flipping in a GTCAGCGCATGG DNA duplex. Free energy landscapes for backbone torsion and sugar pucker degrees of freedom in the DNA are used to understand their behavior in response to the base flipping perturbation. By simplifying the base flipping structural change into a two-state model, a free energy difference of upto 14 kcal/mol can be attributed to the flipped state relative to the stacked Watson-Crick base paired state. This two-state classification allows precise evaluation of the effect of base flipping on local backbone degrees of freedom.The calculated free energy landscapes of individual backbone and sugar degrees of freedom expectedly show the greatest change in the vicinity of the flipping base itself, but specific delocalized effects can be discerned upto four nucleotide positions away in both 5' and 3' directions. Free energy landscape analysis thus provides a quantitative method to pinpoint the determinants of structural change on the atomic scale and also delineate the extent of propagation of the perturbation along the molecule. In addition to nucleic acids, this methodology is anticipated to be useful for studying conformational changes in all macromolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  12. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.B.; Giorgio, M.D.; Taja, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency measured in peripheral lymphocytes of persons exposed to ionizing radiation has been used since 1960s for dose assessment. Suspected overexposure is usually evaluated by the frequency of dicentrics and centric rings using an appropriate in vitro calibration curve. However, these chromosome aberrations are unstable with time after exposure and dose reconstruction may encounter uncertainties when the time between the exposure and the analysis is considerable or even unknown. It appears that translocations persist with time after exposure and may be used as an indication of acute past overexposures. Moreover, they appear to accumulate the cytogenetical information, which correlates with the dose received under fractionated, chronic or even occupational exposure conditions. Translocations may be detected using G-banding, which allows to score the total amount of radiation induced translocations but it is a time consuming method, or by Chromosome Painting, a method base on the Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technique, painting only some chromosome pairs with specific whole chromosome probes and then extrapolating the observed translocation frequencies to the full genome. The latter method allows a faster aberration scoring than G-banding and appears to be the most promissory tool for biodosimetry, particularly when it is necessary to assess low doses and consequently to score a large number of metaphases, e.g. radiation workers exposed within dose limits. As with the unstable chromosome aberration, it is necessary an in vitro calibration curve based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations to assess doses. Our laboratory performed calibration curves for Co 60 γ-rays based on the frequencies of unstable (dicentrics and centric rings detected by conventional Giemsa staining) and stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions, detected by G-banding). In order to minimize the interlaboratory variability, we

  13. Recombination Proteins Mediate Meiotic Spatial Chromosome Organization and Pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Gargano, Silvana; Ruprich-Robert, Gwenael; Falque, Matthieu; David, Michelle; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic chromosome pairing involves not only recognition of homology but also juxtaposition of entire chromosomes in a topologically regular way. Analysis of filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora reveals that recombination proteins Mer3, Msh4 and Mlh1 play direct roles in all of these aspects, in advance of their known roles in recombination. Absence of Mer3 helicase results in interwoven chromosomes, thereby revealing the existence of features that specifically ensure “entanglement avoidance”. Entanglements that remain at zygotene, i.e. “interlockings”, require Mlh1 for resolution, likely to eliminate constraining recombinational connections. Patterns of Mer3 and Msh4 foci along aligned chromosomes show that the double-strand breaks mediating homologous alignment have spatially separated ends, one localized to each partner axis, and that pairing involves interference among developing interhomolog interactions. We propose that Mer3, Msh4 and Mlh1 execute all of these roles during pairing by modulating the state of nascent double-strand break/partner DNA contacts within axis-associated recombination complexes. PMID:20371348

  14. Cloning an expressed gene shared by the human sex chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, S.M.; Banting, G.S.; Pym, B.; Wolfe, J.; Goodfellow, P.N.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of genes shared by mammalian sex chromosomes has been predicted on both evolutionary and functional grounds. However, the only experimental evidence for such genes in humans is the cell-surface antigen encoded by loci on the X and Y chromosomes (MIC2X and MIC2Y, respectively), which is recognized by the monoclonal antibody 12E7. Using the bacteriophage λgt11 expression system in Escherichia coli and immunoscreening techniques, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone whose primary product is recognized by 12E7. Southern blot analysis using somatic cell hybrids containing only the human X or Y chromosomes shows that the sequences reacting with the cDNA clone are localized to the sex chromosomes. In addition, the clone hybridizes to DNAs isolated from mouse cells that have been transfected with human DNA and selected for 12E7 expression on the fluorescence-activated cell sorter. The authors conclude that the cDNA clone encodes the 12E7 antigen, which is the primary product of the MIC2 loci. The clone was used to explore sequence homology between MIC2X and MIC2Y; these loci are closely related, if not identical

  15. Analysis of spontaneous and bleomycin-induced chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes of long-haul aircrew members from Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzan, Alejandro D. [Laboratorio de Citogenetica y Mutagenesis, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular (IMBICE), C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Miembro de la Carrera del Investigador Cientifico del CONICET (Argentina)], E-mail: abolzan@imbice.org.ar; Bianchi, Martha S. [Laboratorio de Citogenetica y Mutagenesis, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular (IMBICE), C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Miembro de la Carrera del Investigador Cientifico del CONICET (Argentina); Gimenez, Esteban M.; Flaque, Maria C. Diaz [Laboratorio de Citogenetica y Mutagenesis, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular (IMBICE), C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ciancio, Vicente R. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, 120 y 60, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-03-01

    Spontaneous and bleomycin (BLM)-induced chromosomal aberrations in G0 and G2 stages of the cell cycle have been analyzed in peripheral lymphocytes of 21 long-haul aircrew members from Argentina in order to assess BLM-induced clastogenesis as a first approach to determine the DNA repair capacity and thereby the susceptibility to environmental cancers in aircrew. The possibility that occupational exposure of flight personnel to cosmic radiation can induce an adaptive response in their peripheral lymphocytes that can be detected by a subsequent in vitro treatment with BLM was also investigated. For comparison, aberrations were also scored in the lymphocytes of 15 healthy volunteers matched by age, health, sex, drinking and smoking habits to the flight personnel group. Aircrew exhibited a higher frequency of spontaneous dicentrics and ring chromosomes than the control population (p < 0.05). BLM sensitivity test showed that aircrew and controls are equally sensitive to BLM G2 clastogenic effects, since both groups exhibited a similar frequency of chromatid breaks per cell (p > 0.05). However, the aircrew sampled population was almost two times more sensitive to BLM G0 clastogenic effects than controls (p < 0.05). Therefore, our data suggest that chronic exposure of aircrew to cosmic radiation increases the in vitro chromosomal sensitivity of their peripheral lymphocytes to BLM (at least in the G0 stage of the cell cycle), and that occupational exposure of flight personnel to cosmic radiation does not induce an adaptive response to this radiomimetic compound. Our results justify further studies aimed at determine if those aircrew members hypersensitive to BLM are more prone to develop environmental cancer than BLM-insensitive individuals.

  16. Cytogenetic analysis chromosomal status of subjects from the regions in the vicinity of uranium-contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovicic, D.; Milacie, S.; Kovacevic, R.; Petrovic, I.

    2004-01-01

    The past application of nuclear technology has brought about free emission of numerous Due to the military application of the depleted uranium (DU) in our country, the problem of its radioactivity and hemo toxicity if actualized. Likewise every heavy metal, its is highly toxic and, in addition to it, also radioactive: Interaction of the water-soluble uranium forms with soil is an important effect. In this way, it penetrates into food chain and endangers human health. The study was aimed at determining possible karyotype genotoxic effects in individuals from the regions close to the contaminated areas. Biological dosimetry was performed using modified Moorthead's micromethod. Our studies included the targeted group of 29 patients from the affected regions. The subjects were averagely aged 39.5±2.8 years. Average age of the control group (k), unexposed to the effects of the known genotoxic agents comprising 22 individuals was 28.3±1.2 years. The presented data evidenced that increased incidence of the chromosomal aberrations was found in 6 subjects,accounting for 20.6%. Dicentric type changes were evidence, as well ring chromosomes and eccentric fragments, which are, at the same time the most frequent aberrations. The changes are considered reparable aberrations accounting for 2-3% in metaphases of the unexposed individuals. Statistical data processing evidenced significant difference (p<0.005) between structural chromosomal aberrations in the studied and control groups, as well as in the number of chromatid aberrations (p<0.05).Based on the obtained data it may be concluded that human karyotype changes were present in the studied group, resulting from interaction of ionizing irradiation and other genotoxic agents, with possibility of potent synergistic effects. It is necessary to stress the importance of further monitoring and control of the general population health, particularly due to possible late genetic effects that may affect future generations. (Author) 10

  17. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  18. No evidence for a paternal interchromosomal effect from analysis of the origin of nondisjunction in Down syndrome patients with concomitant familial chromosome rearrangements.

    OpenAIRE

    Schinzel, A A; Adelsberger, P A; Binkert, F; Basaran, S; Antonarakis, S E

    1992-01-01

    The parental origin of the extra chromosome 21 was determined with DNA polymorphisms in seven families in whom the proband and one of the parents carried an additional chromosome rearrangement (balanced translocation or pericentric inversion) not involving chromosome 21. The balanced rearrangement was inherited from the mother in two families and from the father in five families, whereas the additional chromosome 21 was derived from the mother in all seven families. These findings are not in ...

  19. Proof of radiation exposure in the vicinity of Kruemmel power plant by chromosomal analysis of the population and by enhanced environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannheim, B.; Heimers, A.; Schmitz-Feuerhake, I.; Schroeder, H.

    2001-01-01

    The leukaemia cluster in the proximity of the German boiling water reactor Kruemmel was detected by a local physician. 9 cases in children were registered in the period 1990-1996 which corresponds to 5.6 fold increase in the 5 km region around the plant. An incidence study conducted between 1984-93 showed an elevated rate of leukaemias also in adults. Because the supervising ministry had attested undisturbed operation of the plant and no conspiceous radioactivity had been noticed at that time, we started an independent investigation. Radiation exposures during the operation of the plant were proven by chromosome aberration studies in the population and by analyses of the environmental radioactivity. (orig.) [de

  20. Genetic Analysis of Three Dominant Female-Sterile Mutations Located on the X Chromosome of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    OpenAIRE

    Busson, D.; Gans, M.; Komitopoulou, K.; Masson, M.

    1983-01-01

    Three dominant female-sterile mutations were isolated following ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis. Females heterozygous for two of these mutations show atrophy of the ovaries and produce no eggs (ovo D1) or few eggs (ovoD2); females heterozygous for the third mutation, ovoD3, lay flaccid eggs. All three mutations are germ line-dependent and map to the cytological region 4D-E on the X chromosome; they represent a single allelic series. Two doses of the wild-type allele restore fertility...

  1. A Back Migration from Asia to Sub-Saharan Africa Is Supported by High-Resolution Analysis of Human Y-Chromosome Haplotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciani, Fulvio; Santolamazza, Piero; Shen, Peidong; Macaulay, Vincent; Moral, Pedro; Olckers, Antonel; Modiano, David; Holmes, Susan; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Coia, Valentina; Wallace, Douglas C.; Oefner, Peter J.; Torroni, Antonio; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Scozzari, Rosaria; Underhill, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    The variation of 77 biallelic sites located in the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome was examined in 608 male subjects from 22 African populations. This survey revealed a total of 37 binary haplotypes, which were combined with microsatellite polymorphism data to evaluate internal diversities and to estimate coalescence ages of the binary haplotypes. The majority of binary haplotypes showed a nonuniform distribution across the continent. Analysis of molecular variance detected a high level of interpopulation diversity (ΦST=0.342), which appears to be partially related to the geography (ΦCT=0.230). In sub-Saharan Africa, the recent spread of a set of haplotypes partially erased pre-existing diversity, but a high level of population (ΦST=0.332) and geographic (ΦCT=0.179) structuring persists. Correspondence analysis shows that three main clusters of populations can be identified: northern, eastern, and sub-Saharan Africans. Among the latter, the Khoisan, the Pygmies, and the northern Cameroonians are clearly distinct from a tight cluster formed by the Niger-Congo–speaking populations from western, central western, and southern Africa. Phylogeographic analyses suggest that a large component of the present Khoisan gene pool is eastern African in origin and that Asia was the source of a back migration to sub-Saharan Africa. Haplogroup IX Y chromosomes appear to have been involved in such a migration, the traces of which can now be observed mostly in northern Cameroon. PMID:11910562

  2. Image-analysis techniques for investigation localized corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, M.J.; Bailey, M.G.; Ikeda, B.M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    We have developed a procedure for determining the mode and depth of penetration of localized corrosion by combining metallography and image analysis of corroded coupons. Two techniques, involving either a face-profiling or an edge-profiling procedure, have been developed. In the face-profiling procedure, successive surface grindings and image analyses were performed until corrosion was no longer visible. In this manner, the distribution of corroded sites on the surface and the total area of the surface corroded were determined as a function of depth into the specimen. In the edge-profiling procedure, surface grinding exposed successive cross sections of the corroded region. Image analysis of the cross section quantified the distribution of depths across the corroded section, and a three-dimensional distribution of penetration depths was obtained. To develop these procedures, we used artificially creviced Grade-2 titanium specimens that were corroded in saline solutions containing various amounts of chloride maintained at various fixed temperatures (105 to 150 degrees C) using a previously developed galvanic-coupling technique. We discuss some results from these experiments to illustrate how the procedures developed can be applied to a real corroded system. (author). 6 refs., 4 tabs., 21 figs

  3. Analysis of α-particle induced incomplete chromosome aberrations, using pan-centro metric and pan-telomeric DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestres, M.; Schmid, E.; Stephan, G.; Barrios, L.; Caballin, M. R.; Barquinero, J. F.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study has been the evaluation of the incompleteness of α-particle induced chromosome aberrations by the simultaneous detection of all centromeres and telomeres present in human lymphocytes. For this purpose attached lymphocytes were irradiated at doses of 0.2, 0.5,0.7 and 1 Gy in a ''241Am source. FISH techniques were applied using pan-centromeric and pan-telomeric probes. All abnormal cells were digitalised and analysed using a Cytovision FISH workstation. A total of 378 incomplete chromosomes plus incomplete acentrics was found. Cases with more than 92 telomeres were not detected. The ratio between total incomplete elements and multicentrics was 1.00. The total number of acentric fragments was 822; 57% of then were complete fragments ace (+.+), 26% incomplete fragments ace (+,-), and 17% interstitial fragment ace (-.-). The percentage of incomplete aberrations is higher after high-LET than described for low-LET exposure. The results seem to indicate that compared to low-LET. after α-particle exposure it is more likely to repair the centromere-containing elements. (Author) 30 refs

  4. Genetic analysis of eight population groups living in Taiwan using a 13 X-chromosomal STR loci multiplex system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Lee, James Chun-I; Chang, Yih-Yuan; Yin, Hsiang-Yi; Chen, Ya-Hui; Tseng, Li-Hui; Su, Yi-Ning; Ko, Tsang-Ming

    2011-01-01

    A 13 X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex system (DXS6807, DXS8378, DSX9902, DXS7132, DXS9898, DXS6809, DXS6789, DXS7424, DXS101, GATA172D05, HPRTB, DXS8377, and DXS7423) was tested on 1,037 DNA samples from eight population groups currently living in Taiwan. Different distributions of the allelic frequencies in different populations were presented. DXS8377 and DXS101 were the two most polymorphic loci in these eight populations, whereas DXS7423 was the least informative marker in most of the populations studied. The genetic distances between the populations and the constructed phylogenetic tree revealed a long genetic distance between Asian and Caucasian populations as well as isolation of the Tao population. The phylogenetic tree grouped populations into clusters compatible with their ethnogeographic relationships. This 13 X-chromosomal short tandem repeat multiplex system offers a considerable number of polymorphic patterns in different populations. This system can be useful in forensic identification casework and ethnogeographic research.

  5. Molecular analysis of an integrative conjugative element, ICEH, present in the chromosome of different strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Marcos Pinto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversification of bacterial species and pathotypes is largely caused by lateral gene transfer (LGT of diverse mobile DNA elements such as plasmids, phages, transposons and genomic islands. Thus, acquisition of new phenotypes by LGT is very important for bacterial evolution and relationship with hosts. This paper reports a 23 kb region containing fourteen CDSs with similarity to the previous described Integrative Conjugal Element of Mycoplasma fermentans (ICEF. This element, named ICEH, is present as one copy at distinct integration sites in the chromosome of 7448 and 232 pathogenic strains and is absent in the type strain J (non-pathogenic. Notable differences in the nucleotide composition of the insertion sites were detected, and could be correlated to a lack of specificity of the ICEH integrase. Although present in strains of the same organism, the ICEH elements are more divergent than the typical similarity between other chromosomal locus of Mycoplasma hyopneunomiae, suggesting an accelerated evolution of these constins or an ongoing process of degeneration, while maintaining conservation of the tra genes. An extrachromosomal form of this element had been detected in the 7448 strain, suggesting a possible involvement in its mobilization and transference of CDSs to new hosts.

  6. Analysis of ParB-centromere interactions by multiplex SPR imaging reveals specific patterns for binding ParB in six centromeres of Burkholderiales chromosomes and plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien Pillet

    Full Text Available Bacterial centromeres-also called parS, are cis-acting DNA sequences which, together with the proteins ParA and ParB, are involved in the segregation of chromosomes and plasmids. The specific binding of ParB to parS nucleates the assembly of a large ParB/DNA complex from which ParA-the motor protein, segregates the sister replicons. Closely related families of partition systems, called Bsr, were identified on the chromosomes and large plasmids of the multi-chromosomal bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia and other species from the order Burkholeriales. The centromeres of the Bsr partition families are 16 bp palindromes, displaying similar base compositions, notably a central CG dinucleotide. Despite centromeres bind the cognate ParB with a narrow specificity, weak ParB-parS non cognate interactions were nevertheless detected between few Bsr partition systems of replicons not belonging to the same genome. These observations suggested that Bsr partition systems could have a common ancestry but that evolution mostly erased the possibilities of cross-reactions between them, in particular to prevent replicon incompatibility. To detect novel similarities between Bsr partition systems, we have analyzed the binding of six Bsr parS sequences and a wide collection of modified derivatives, to their cognate ParB. The study was carried out by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi mulitplex analysis enabling a systematic survey of each nucleotide position within the centromere. We found that in each parS some positions could be changed while maintaining binding to ParB. Each centromere displays its own pattern of changes, but some positions are shared more or less widely. In addition from these changes we could speculate evolutionary links between these centromeres.

  7. Analysis of ParB-centromere interactions by multiplex SPR imaging reveals specific patterns for binding ParB in six centromeres of Burkholderiales chromosomes and plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Flavien; Passot, Fanny Marie; Pasta, Franck; Anton Leberre, Véronique; Bouet, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial centromeres-also called parS, are cis-acting DNA sequences which, together with the proteins ParA and ParB, are involved in the segregation of chromosomes and plasmids. The specific binding of ParB to parS nucleates the assembly of a large ParB/DNA complex from which ParA-the motor protein, segregates the sister replicons. Closely related families of partition systems, called Bsr, were identified on the chromosomes and large plasmids of the multi-chromosomal bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia and other species from the order Burkholeriales. The centromeres of the Bsr partition families are 16 bp palindromes, displaying similar base compositions, notably a central CG dinucleotide. Despite centromeres bind the cognate ParB with a narrow specificity, weak ParB-parS non cognate interactions were nevertheless detected between few Bsr partition systems of replicons not belonging to the same genome. These observations suggested that Bsr partition systems could have a common ancestry but that evolution mostly erased the possibilities of cross-reactions between them, in particular to prevent replicon incompatibility. To detect novel similarities between Bsr partition systems, we have analyzed the binding of six Bsr parS sequences and a wide collection of modified derivatives, to their cognate ParB. The study was carried out by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) mulitplex analysis enabling a systematic survey of each nucleotide position within the centromere. We found that in each parS some positions could be changed while maintaining binding to ParB. Each centromere displays its own pattern of changes, but some positions are shared more or less widely. In addition from these changes we could speculate evolutionary links between these centromeres.

  8. Genetic heritage of Croatians in the Southeastern European gene pool-Y chromosome analysis of the Croatian continental and Island population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šarac, Jelena; Šarić, Tena; Havaš Auguštin, Dubravka; Novokmet, Natalija; Vekarić, Nenad; Mustać, Mate; Grahovac, Blaženka; Kapović, Miljenko; Nevajda, Branimir; Glasnović, Anton; Missoni, Saša; Rootsi, Siiri; Rudan, Pavao

    2016-11-01

    The research objective of this study is to enlarge and deepen the Y chromosome research on the Croatian population and enable additional insights into the population diversity and historic events that shaped the current genetic landscape of Croatia and Southeastern Europe (SEE). A high-resolution phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis of 66 biallelic (SNPs) and 17 microsatellite (STRs) markers of the Y chromosome was performed using 720 Croatian samples. The obtained results were placed in a wider European context by comparison with ∼4450 samples from a number of other European populations. A high diversity of haplogroups was observed in the overall Croatian sample, and all typical European Y chromosome haplogroups with corresponding clinal patterns were observed. Three distinct genetic signals were identifiable in the Croatian paternal gene pool - I2a1b-M423, R1a1a1b1a*-M558, and E1b1b1a1b1a-V13 haplogroups. The analyses of the dominant and autochthonous I2a1b-M423 lineage (>30%) suggest that SEE had a significant role in the Upper Paleolithic, the R1a1a1b1a*-M558 lineage (19%) represents a signal from present day Slavic populations of Central Europe in the Croatian population, and the phylogeography of the E1b1b1a1b1a-V13 clade (around 9%) implies cultural diffusion of agriculture into Europe via the Balkan Peninsula. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:837-845, 2016. © 2016Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Interdependency and phosphorylation of KIF4 and condensin I are essential for organization of chromosome scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonperm, Rawin; Takata, Hideaki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2017-01-01

    Kinesin family member 4 (KIF4) and condensins I and II are essential chromosomal proteins for chromosome organization by locating primarily to the chromosome scaffold. However, the mechanism of how KIF4 and condensins localize to the chromosome scaffold is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate a close relationship between the chromosome localization of KIF4 and condensin I, but not condensin II, and show that KIF4 and condensin I assist each other for stable scaffold formation by forming a stable complex. Moreover, phosphorylation of KIF4 and condensin I by Aurora B and polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is important for KIF4 and condensin I localization to the chromosome. Aurora B activity facilitates the targeting of KIF4 and condensin I to the chromosome, whereas Plk1 activity promotes the dissociation of these proteins from the chromosome. Thus, the interdependency between KIF4 and condensin I, and their phosphorylation states play important roles in chromosome scaffold organization during mitosis.

  10. Epidemiological surveillance of tegumentary leishmaniasis: local territorial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Valdenir Bandeira; Almeida, Andréa Sobral de; Sabroza, Paulo Chagastelles; Vargas, Waldemir Paixão

    2017-06-26

    To propose a new operational unit in the locality scale capable of subsidizing the construction of an information system to control the transmission of tegumentary leishmaniasis at this scale, in a region of high endemicity of the Atlantic Forest. We examined the adequacy of data and instruments in an area of high endemicity in the Atlantic Forest located in the South of the State of Rio de Janeiro from 1990 to 2012. The study proposed an operational unit called Local Surveillance Unit to make all used databases compatible by adjusting census sectors. This enabled the overlap and comparison of information in different periods. The spreading process of the transmission of tegumentary leishmaniasis in the Baía da Ilha Grande region does not depend on great population movements, and can occur in areas with population growth or decrease. The data information system allowed the adequate identification and characterization of the place of residence. We identified relevant characteristics of the place of transmission, such as self-limited in time and not associated with recent deforestation. The results also highlight the lack of synchronicity in the case production in territorial units involved in the endemic-epidemic process, noting that this process is in constant motion. The transmission process seems more connected to the presence and movement of rodents that move continuously in the region than to the local density of vectors or the permanence of infected dogs at home. New control strategies targeted at the foci of transmission must be considered. The construction of a new operational unit, called Local Surveillance Unit, was instrumental in the endemic-epidemic process analysis. Propor uma nova unidade operacional na escala de localidade capaz de subsidiar a construção de um sistema de informação orientado para o controle da transmissão da leishmaniose tegumentar nesse nível. Uma região de alta endemicidade da Mata Atlântica no sul do estado do Rio de

  11. Construction of an Unstable Ring-X Chromosome Bearing the Autosomal Dopa Decarboxylase Gene in Drosophila melanogaster and Analysis of Ddc Mosaics

    OpenAIRE

    Gailey, Donald A.; Bordne, Deborah L.; Vallés, Ana Maria; Hall, Jeffrey C.; White, Kalpana

    1987-01-01

    An unstable Ring-X chromosome, Ddc+- Ring-X carrying a cloned Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) encoding segment was constructed. The construction involved a double recombination event between the unstable Ring-X, R(1)wvC and a Rod-X chromosome which contained a P-element mediated Ddc + insert. The resulting Ddc+-Ring-X chromosome behaves similarly to the parent chromosome with respect to somatic instability. The Ddc+-Ring-X chromosome was used to generate Ddc mosaics. Analyses of Ddc mosaics reveal...

  12. Analysis of Local Government Performance and Leadership in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Uche

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the quality of local government leaderships in Nigeria. It explores how local governments’ inefficiency and poor leadership have been a major challenge facing the development process in Nigeria. The paper has two objectives. The first is to identify the professionalism of a sample of Nigerian local government chairpersons. The second is to examine whether there are systematic correlations between local government chairpersons’ professionalism, political partisanship, local characteristics, and performance. The paper argues that the quality of local government chairpersons has significant policy implications because of their vital role in policy making and implementation. The concluding section provides some policy recommendations on how local government leaders could improve performance.

  13. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sex chromosomes exhibit many unusual patterns in sequence and gene expression relative to autosomes. Birds have evolved a female heterogametic sex system (male ZZ, female ZW), through stepwise suppression of recombination between chrZ and chrW. To address the broad patterns and complex...... driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... ('fast-Z' evolution). And species with a lower level of intronic heterozygosities tend to evolve even faster on the Z chromosome. Further analysis of fast-evolving genes' enriched functional categories and sex-biased expression patterns support that, fast-Z evolution in birds is mainly driven by genetic...

  14. Establishment of a molecular genetic map of distal mouse chromosome 1: further definition of a conserved linkage group syntenic with human chromosome 1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, M F; Morse, H C; LeBoeuf, R C; Steinberg, A D

    1988-01-01

    A linkage map of distal mouse chromosome 1 was constructed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of DNAs from seven sets of recombinant inbred (RI) strains. The data obtained with seven probes on Southern hybridization combined with data from previous studies suggest the gene order Cfh, Pep-3/Ren-1,2, Ly-5, Lamb-2, At-3, Apoa-2/Ly-17,Spna-1. These results confirm and extend analyses of a large linkage group which includes genes present on a 20-30 cM span of mouse chromosome 1 and those localized to human chromosome 1q21-32. Moreover, the data indicate similar relative positions of human and mouse complement receptor-related genes REN, CD45, LAMB2, AT3, APOA2, and SPTA. These results suggest that mouse gene analyses may help in detailed mapping of human genes within such a syntenic group.

  15. Neuropeptide Y receptor genes on human chromosome 4q31-q32 map to conserved linkage groups on mouse chromosomes 3 and 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, C.M.; Frankel, W.N. [Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States); Richards, J.E. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Npy1r and Npy2r, the genes encoding mouse type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptors, have been mapped by interspecific backcross analysis. Previous studies have localized the human genes encoding these receptors to chromosome 4q31-q32. We have now assigned Npy1r and Npy2r to conserved linkage groups on mouse Chr 8 and Chr 3, respectively, which correspond to the distal region of human chromosome 4q. Using yeast artificial chromosomes, we have estimated the distance between the human genes to be approximately 6 cM. Although ancient tandem duplication events may account for some closely spaced G-protein-coupled receptor genes, the large genetic distance between the human type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptor genes raises questions about whether this mechanism accounts for their proximity. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  17. Chromosomal mutation by fission neutrons and X-rays in higher plants. A review on results of the joint research program utilizing Kinki University reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Yoshihiko

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the efficiency of fission neutrons from the nuclear reactor of Kinki University (UTR-KINKI) and X-rays to chromosomes of higher plants for over 20 years. In this review, we described the development of bio-dosimeter using hyper-sensibility of germinating onion roots for irradiation, the analysis of chromosome structure in Haplopappus gracilis (Asteraceae), with the special reference of latent centromeres and survived telomeres throughout chromosomal evolution, the experimental studies on the induction of chromosomal rearrangement in Zebrina pendula (Commelinaceae), the behavior of chromosome fragments with non-localized centromeres in Carex and Eleocharis (Cyperaceae), and the possibility as a bio-dosimeter of pollen mother cells of Tradescantia paludosa (Commelinaceae) for the detection of low-dose radiation. (author)

  18. Human oocyte chromosome analyses need a standardized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies of DNA polymorphisms in human trisomic abor- tions and liveborn have ... Keywords. human oocyte chromosomes; cytogenetic analysis; aneuploidy; nondisjunction; predivision. Journal of .... oocytes and giant embryos. Hum. Reprod.

  19. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Baker, Robert J; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-10-13

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae), focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  20. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  1. Mapping the Flavor Contributing Traits on "Fengwei Melon" (Cucumis melo L. Chromosomes Using Parent Resequencing and Super Bulked-Segregant Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    Full Text Available We used a next-generation high-throughput sequencing platform to resequence the Xinguowei and Shouxing melon cultivars, the parents of Fengwei melon. We found 84% of the reads (under a coverage rate of "13×" placed on the reference genome DHL92. There were 2,550,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 140,000 structural variations in the two genomes. We also identified 1,290 polymorphic genes between Xinguowei and Shouxing. We combined specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq and bulked-segregant analysis (super-BSA to analyze the two parents and the F2 extreme phenotypes. This combined method yielded 12,438,270 reads, 46,087 SLAF tags, and 4,480 polymorphic markers (average depth of 161.81×. There were six sweet trait-related regions containing 13 differential SLAF markers, and 23 sour trait-related regions containing 48 differential SLAF markers. We further fine-mapped the sweet trait to the genomic regions on chromosomes 6, 10, 11, and 12. Correspondingly, we mapped the sour trait-related genomic regions to chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, and 12. Finally, we positioned nine of the 61 differential markers in the sweet and sour trait candidate regions on the parental genome. These markers corresponded to one sweet and eight sour trait-related genes. Our study provides a basis for marker-assisted breeding of desirable sweet and sour traits in Fengwei melons.

  2. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Genetic structure in contemporary south Tyrolean isolated populations revealed by analysis of Y-chromosome, mtDNA, and Alu polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Irene; Mueller, Jakob C; Stefanov, Stefan A; De Grandi, Alessandro; Volpato, Claudia Beu; Pinggera, Gerd K; Mayr, Agnes; Ogriseg, Martin; Ploner, Franz; Meitinger, Thomas; Pramstaller, Peter P

    2006-08-01

    Most of the inhabitants of South Tyrol in the eastern Italian Alps can be considered isolated populations because of their physical separation by mountain barriers and their sociocultural heritage. We analyzed the genetic structure of South Tyrolean populations using three types of genetic markers: Y-chromosome, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and autosomal Alu markers. Using random samples taken from the populations of Val Venosta, Val Pusteria, Val Isarco, Val Badia, and Val Gardena, we calculated genetic diversity within and among the populations. Microsatellite diversity and unique event polymorphism diversity (on the Y chromosome) were substantially lower in the Ladin-speaking population of Val Badia compared to the neighboring German-speaking populations. In contrast, the genetic diversity of mtDNA haplotypes was lowest for the upper Val Venosta and Val Pusteria. These data suggest a low effective population size, or little admixture, for the gene pool of the Ladin-speaking population from Val Badia. Interestingly, this is more pronounced for Ladin males than for Ladin females. For the pattern of genetic Alu variation, both Ladin samples (Val Gardena and Val Badia) are among the samples with the lowest diversity. An admixture analysis of one German-speaking valley (Val Venosta) indicates a relatively high genetic contribution of Ladin origin. The reduced genetic diversity and a high genetic differentiation in the Rhaetoroman- and German-speaking South Tyrolean populations may constitute an important basis for future medical genetic research and gene mapping studies in South Tyrol.

  4. Genomic analysis of a 1 Mb region near the telomere of Hessian fly chromosome X2 and avirulence gene vH13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ming-Shun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To have an insight into the Mayetiola destructor (Hessian fly genome, we performed an in silico comparative genomic analysis utilizing genetic mapping, genomic sequence and EST sequence data along with data available from public databases. Results Chromosome walking and FISH were utilized to identify a contig of 50 BAC clones near the telomere of the short arm of Hessian fly chromosome X2 and near the avirulence gene vH13. These clones enabled us to correlate physical and genetic distance in this region of the Hessian fly genome. Sequence data from these BAC ends encompassing a 760 kb region, and a fully sequenced and assembled 42.6 kb BAC clone, was utilized to perform a comparative genomic study. In silico gene prediction combined with BLAST analyses was used to determine putative orthology to the sequenced dipteran genomes of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and to infer evolutionary relationships. Conclusion This initial effort enables us to advance our understanding of the structure, composition and evolution of the genome of this important agricultural pest and is an invaluable tool for a whole genome sequencing effort.

  5. Local Guided Wavefield Analysis for Characterization of Delaminations in Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Matthew D.; Campbell Leckey, Cara A.

    2012-01-01

    Delaminations in composite laminates resulting from impact events may be accompanied by minimal indication of damage at the surface. As such, inspection techniques are required to ensure defects are within allowable limits. Conventional ultrasonic scanning techniques have been shown to effectively characterize the size and depth of delaminations but require physical contact with the structure. Alternatively, a noncontact scanning laser vibrometer may be used to measure guided wave propagation in the laminate structure. A local Fourier domain analysis method is presented for processing guided wavefield data to estimate spatially-dependent wavenumber values, which can be used to determine delamination depth. The technique is applied to simulated wavefields and results are analyzed to determine limitations of the technique with regards to determining defect size and depth. Finally, experimental wavefield data obtained in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with impact damage is analyzed and wavenumber is measured to an accuracy of 8.5% in the region of shallow delaminations. Keywords: Ultrasonic wavefield imaging, Windowed Fourier transforms, Guided waves, Structural health monitoring, Nondestructive evaluation

  6. Risk analysis for a local gas distribution network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Cost control and service reliability are popular topics when discussing strategic issues facing local distribution companies (LDCs) in the 1990s. The ability to provide secure and uninterrupted gas service is crucial for growth and company image, both with the public and regulatory agencies. At the same time, the industry is facing unprecedented competition from alternate fuels, and cost control is essential for maintaining a competitive edge in the market. On the surface, it would appear that cost control and service reliability are contradictory terms. Improvement in service reliability should cost something, or does it? Risk analysis can provide the answer from a distribution design perspective. From a gas distribution engineer's perspective, projects such as loops, backfeeds and even valve placement are designed to reduce, minimize and/or eliminate potential customer outages. These projects improve service reliability by acting as backups should a failure occur on a component of the distribution network. These contingency projects are cost-effective but their longterm benefit or true value is under question. Their purpose is to maintain supply to an area in the distribution network in the event of a failure somewhere else. Two phrases, potential customer outages and in the event of failure, identify uncertainty

  7. Automatic localization of cerebral cortical malformations using fractal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, A; Arrigoni, F; Romaniello, R; Triulzi, F M; Peruzzo, D; Bertoldo, A

    2016-08-21

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) encompass a variety of brain disorders affecting the normal development and organization of the brain cortex. The relatively low incidence and the extreme heterogeneity of these disorders hamper the application of classical group level approaches for the detection of lesions. Here, we present a geometrical descriptor for a voxel level analysis based on fractal geometry, then define two similarity measures to detect the lesions at single subject level. The pipeline was applied to 15 normal children and nine pediatric patients affected by MCDs following two criteria, maximum accuracy (WACC) and minimization of false positives (FPR), and proved that our lesion detection algorithm is able to detect and locate abnormalities of the brain cortex with high specificity (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  96%), sensitivity (WACC  =  83%, FPR  =  63%) and accuracy (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  90%). The combination of global and local features proves to be effective, making the algorithm suitable for the detection of both focal and diffused malformations. Compared to other existing algorithms, this method shows higher accuracy and sensitivity.

  8. Automatic localization of cerebral cortical malformations using fractal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, A.; Arrigoni, F.; Romaniello, R.; Triulzi, F. M.; Peruzzo, D.; Bertoldo, A.

    2016-08-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) encompass a variety of brain disorders affecting the normal development and organization of the brain cortex. The relatively low incidence and the extreme heterogeneity of these disorders hamper the application of classical group level approaches for the detection of lesions. Here, we present a geometrical descriptor for a voxel level analysis based on fractal geometry, then define two similarity measures to detect the lesions at single subject level. The pipeline was applied to 15 normal children and nine pediatric patients affected by MCDs following two criteria, maximum accuracy (WACC) and minimization of false positives (FPR), and proved that our lesion detection algorithm is able to detect and locate abnormalities of the brain cortex with high specificity (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  96%), sensitivity (WACC  =  83%, FPR  =  63%) and accuracy (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  90%). The combination of global and local features proves to be effective, making the algorithm suitable for the detection of both focal and diffused malformations. Compared to other existing algorithms, this method shows higher accuracy and sensitivity.

  9. Significant genetic differentiation within the population of the Island of Corsica (France) revealed by y-chromosome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Maria Elena; Varesi, Laurent; Mitchell, Robert John; Vona, Giuseppe

    2009-12-01

    Using 10 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat allelic and haplotypic frequencies, we examined genetic variation within the population of Corsica and its relationship with other Mediterranean populations. The most significant finding is the high level of genetic differentiation within Corsica, with strong evidence of an effective barrier to male-mediated gene flow between the south and the rest of the island. This internal differentiation most probably results from low exogamy among small isolated populations and also from the orography of the island, with a central mountain chain running the length of the island restricting human movement. This physical barrier is reflected not only in present-day intraisland linguistic and genetic differences but also in the relatedness of Corsican regions to other Mediterranean groups. Northwest and Central Corsica are much closer to West Mediterranean populations, whereas South Corsica is closer to Central-North Sardinia and East Mediterranean populations.

  10. ParABS system in chromosome partitioning in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A Iniesta

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is an essential cellular function in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. The ParABS system is a fundamental player for a mitosis-like process in chromosome partitioning in many bacterial species. This work shows that the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus also uses the ParABS system for chromosome segregation. Its large prokaryotic genome of 9.1 Mb contains 22 parS sequences near the origin of replication, and it is shown here that M. xanthus ParB binds preferentially to a consensus parS sequence in vitro. ParB and ParA are essential for cell viability in M. xanthus as in Caulobacter crescentus, but unlike in many other bacteria. Absence of ParB results in anucleate cells, chromosome segregation defects and loss of viability. Analysis of ParA subcellular localization shows that it clusters at the poles in all cells, and in some, in the DNA-free cell division plane between two chromosomal DNA masses. This ParA localization pattern depends on ParB but not on FtsZ. ParB inhibits the nonspecific interaction of ParA with DNA, and ParA colocalizes with chromosomal DNA only when ParB is depleted. The subcellular localization of ParB suggests a single ParB-parS complex localized at the edge of the nucleoid, next to a polar ParA cluster, with a second ParB-parS complex migrating after the replication of parS takes place to the opposite nucleoid edge, next to the other polar ParA cluster.

  11. Regional assignment of seven genes on chromosome 1 of man by use of man-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids. I. Results obtained after hybridization of human cells carrying reciprocal translocations involving chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, A P; Burgerhout, W G

    1977-01-01

    Regional localization studies of genes coding for human PGD, PPH1, PGM1, UGPP, GuK1, Pep-C, and FH, which have been assigned to chromosome 1, were performed with man-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids, Informative hybrids that retained fragments of the human chromosome 1 were produced by fusion of hamster cells with human cells carrying reciprocal translocations involving chromosome 1. Analysis of the hybrids that retained one of the translocation chromosomes or de novo rearrangements involving the human 1 revealed the following gene positions: PGD and PPH1 in 1pter leads to 1p32, PGM1 in 1p32 leads to 1p22, UGPP and GuK1 in 1q21 leads to 1q42, FH in 1qter leads to 1q42, and Pep-C probably in 1q42.

  12. Classic theory for chromosome rearrangements with spatially restricted volume for broken ends interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omel'yanchuk, L.V.

    1997-01-01

    D. Lea classic theory for chromosomal rearrangements formation was modified to account for local interaction of broken chromosome ends. This assumption makes it possible to drastically improve coincidence of the theory and experiment in the case of complex rearrangements

  13. Arabidopsis PCH2 Mediates Meiotic Chromosome Remodeling and Maturation of Crossovers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Lambing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic chromosomes are organized into linear looped chromatin arrays by a protein axis localized along the loop-bases. Programmed remodelling of the axis occurs during prophase I of meiosis. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM has revealed dynamic changes in the chromosome axis in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea. We show that the axis associated protein ASY1 is depleted during zygotene concomitant with synaptonemal complex (SC formation. Study of an Atpch2 mutant demonstrates this requires the conserved AAA+ ATPase, PCH2, which localizes to the sites of axis remodelling. Loss of PCH2 leads to a failure to deplete ASY1 from the axes and compromizes SC polymerisation. Immunolocalization of recombination proteins in Atpch2 indicates that recombination initiation and CO designation during early prophase I occur normally. Evidence suggests that CO interference is initially functional in the mutant but there is a defect in CO maturation following designation. This leads to a reduction in COs and a failure to form COs between some homologous chromosome pairs leading to univalent chromosomes at metaphase I. Genetic analysis reveals that CO distribution is also affected in some chromosome regions. Together these data indicate that the axis remodelling defect in Atpch2 disrupts normal patterned formation of COs.

  14. Global/local methods research using a common structural analysis framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Ransom, Jonathan B.; Griffin, O. H., Jr.; Thompson, Danniella M.

    1991-01-01

    Methodologies for global/local stress analysis are described including both two- and three-dimensional analysis methods. These methods are being developed within a common structural analysis framework. Representative structural analysis problems are presented to demonstrate the global/local methodologies being developed.

  15. Targeted introgression of a wheat stem rust resistance gene by DNA marker-assisted chromosome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhixia; Klindworth, Daryl L; Friesen, Timothy L; Chao, Shiaoman; Jin, Yue; Cai, Xiwen; Xu, Steven S

    2011-04-01

    Chromosome engineering is a useful strategy for transfer of alien genes from wild relatives into modern crops. However, this strategy has not been extensively used for alien gene introgression in most crops due to low efficiency of conventional cytogenetic techniques. Here, we report an improved scheme of chromosome engineering for efficient elimination of a large amount of goatgrass (Aegilops speltoides) chromatin surrounding Sr39, a gene that provides resistance to multiple stem rust races, including Ug99 (TTKSK) in wheat. The wheat ph1b mutation, which promotes meiotic pairing between homoeologous chromosomes, was employed to induce recombination between wheat chromosome 2B and goatgrass 2S chromatin using a backcross scheme favorable for inducing and detecting the homoeologous recombinants with small goatgrass chromosome segments. Forty recombinants with Sr39 with reduced surrounding goatgrass chromatin were quickly identified from 1048 backcross progenies through disease screening and molecular marker analysis. Four of the recombinants carrying Sr39 with a minimal amount of goatgrass chromatin (2.87-9.15% of the translocated chromosomes) were verified using genomic in situ hybridization. Approximately 97% of the goatgrass chromatin was eliminated in one of the recombinants, in which a tiny goatgrass chromosome segment containing Sr39 was retained in the wheat genome. Localization of the goatgrass chromatin in the recombinants led to rapid development of three molecular markers tightly linked to Sr39. The new wheat lines and markers provide useful resources for the ongoing global effort to combat Ug99. This study has demonstrated great potential of chromosome engineering in genome manipulation for plant improvement.

  16. Practice guideline: joint CCMG-SOGC recommendations for the use of chromosomal microarray analysis for prenatal diagnosis and assessment of fetal loss in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Christine M; Dougan, Shelley Danielle; Brock, Jo-Ann; Chari, Radha; Chodirker, Bernie N; DeBie, Isabelle; Evans, Jane A; Gibson, William T; Kolomietz, Elena; Nelson, Tanya N; Tihy, Frédérique; Thomas, Mary Ann; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J

    2018-01-01

    Background The aim of this guideline is to provide updated recommendations for Canadian genetic counsellors, medical geneticists, maternal fetal medicine specialists, clinical laboratory geneticists and other practitioners regarding the use of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) for prenatal diagnosis. This guideline replaces the 2011 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC)-Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (CCMG) Joint Technical Update. Methods A multidisciplinary group consisting of medical geneticists, genetic counsellors, maternal fetal medicine specialists and clinical laboratory geneticists was assembled to review existing literature and guidelines for use of CMA in prenatal care and to make recommendations relevant to the Canadian context. The statement was circulated for comment to the CCMG membership-at-large for feedback and, following incorporation of feedback, was approved by the CCMG Board of Directors on 5 June 2017 and the SOGC Board of Directors on 19 June 2017. Results and conclusions Recommendations include but are not limited to: (1) CMA should be offered following a normal rapid aneuploidy screen when multiple fetal malformations are detected (II-1A) or for nuchal translucency (NT) ≥3.5 mm (II-2B) (recommendation 1); (2) a professional with expertise in prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis should provide genetic counselling to obtain informed consent, discuss the limitations of the methodology, obtain the parental decisions for return of incidental findings (II-2A) (recommendation 4) and provide post-test counselling for reporting of test results (III-A) (recommendation 9); (3) the resolution of chromosomal microarray analysis should be similar to postnatal microarray platforms to ensure small pathogenic variants are detected. To minimise the reporting of uncertain findings, it is recommended that variants of unknown significance (VOUS) smaller than 500 Kb deletion or 1 Mb duplication not be routinely

  17. A new approach to chromosome-wide analysis of X-linked markers identifies new associations in Asian and European case-parent triads of orofacial clefts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øivind Skare

    Full Text Available GWAS discoveries on the X-chromosome are underrepresented in the literature primarily because the analytical tools that have been applied were originally designed for autosomal markers. Our objective here is to employ a new robust and flexible tool for chromosome-wide analysis of X-linked markers in complex traits. Orofacial clefts are good candidates for such analysis because of the consistently observed excess of females with cleft palate only (CPO and excess of males with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P.Genotypes for 14,486 X-chromosome SNPs in 1,291 Asian and 1,118 European isolated cleft triads were available from a previously published GWAS. The R-package HAPLIN enables genome-wide-level analyses as well as statistical power simulations for a range of biologic scenarios. We analyzed isolated CL/P and isolated CPO for each ethnicity in HAPLIN, using a sliding-window approach to haplotype analysis and two different statistical models, with and without X-inactivation in females.There was a larger number of associations in the Asian versus the European sample, and similar to previous reports that have analyzed the same GWAS dataset using different methods, we identified associations with EFNB1/PJA1 and DMD. In addition, new associations were detected with several other genes, among which KLHL4, TBX22, CPXCR1 and BCOR were noteworthy because of their roles in clefting syndromes. A few of the associations were only detected by one particular X-inactivation model, whereas a few others were only detected in one sex.We found new support for the involvement of X-linked variants in isolated clefts. The associations were specific for ethnicity, sex and model parameterization, highlighting the need for flexible tools that are capable of detecting and estimating such effects. Further efforts are needed to verify and elucidate the potential roles of EFNB1/PJA1, KLHL4, TBX22, CPXCR1 and BCOR in isolated clefts.

  18. Practice guideline: joint CCMG-SOGC recommendations for the use of chromosomal microarray analysis for prenatal diagnosis and assessment of fetal loss in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Christine M; Dougan, Shelley Danielle; Brock, Jo-Ann; Chari, Radha; Chodirker, Bernie N; DeBie, Isabelle; Evans, Jane A; Gibson, William T; Kolomietz, Elena; Nelson, Tanya N; Tihy, Frédérique; Thomas, Mary Ann; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide updated recommendations for Canadian genetic counsellors, medical geneticists, maternal fetal medicine specialists, clinical laboratory geneticists and other practitioners regarding the use of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) for prenatal diagnosis. This guideline replaces the 2011 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC)-Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (CCMG) Joint Technical Update. A multidisciplinary group consisting of medical geneticists, genetic counsellors, maternal fetal medicine specialists and clinical laboratory geneticists was assembled to review existing literature and guidelines for use of CMA in prenatal care and to make recommendations relevant to the Canadian context. The statement was circulated for comment to the CCMG membership-at-large for feedback and, following incorporation of feedback, was approved by the CCMG Board of Directors on 5 June 2017 and the SOGC Board of Directors on 19 June 2017. Recommendations include but are not limited to: (1) CMA should be offered following a normal rapid aneuploidy screen when multiple fetal malformations are detected (II-1A) or for nuchal translucency (NT) ≥3.5 mm (II-2B) (recommendation 1); (2) a professional with expertise in prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis should provide genetic counselling to obtain informed consent, discuss the limitations of the methodology, obtain the parental decisions for return of incidental findings (II-2A) (recommendation 4) and provide post-test counselling for reporting of test results (III-A) (recommendation 9); (3) the resolution of chromosomal microarray analysis should be similar to postnatal microarray platforms to ensure small pathogenic variants are detected. To minimise the reporting of uncertain findings, it is recommended that variants of unknown significance (VOUS) smaller than 500 Kb deletion or 1 Mb duplication not be routinely reported in the prenatal context. Additionally

  19. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  20. A Meta-Analysis of Local Climate Change Adaptation Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Local governments are beginning to take steps to address the consequences of climate change, such as sea level rise and heat events. However, we do not have a clear understanding of what local governments are doing -- the extent to which they expect climate change to affect their...

  1. Strong Localization in Disordered Media: Analysis of the Backscattering Cone

    KAUST Repository

    Delgado, Edgar

    2012-06-01

    A very interesting effect in light propagation through a disordered system is Anderson localization of light, this phenomenon emerges as the result of multiple scattering of waves by electric inhomogeneities like spatial variations of index of refraction; as the amount of scattering is increased, light propagation is converted from quasi-diffusive to exponentially localized, with photons confined in a limited spatial region characterized by a fundamental quantity known as localization length. Light localization is strongly related to another interference phenomenon emerged from the multiple scattering effect: the coherent backscattering effect. In multiple scattering of waves, in fact, coherence is preserved in the backscattering direction and produces a reinforcement of the field flux originating an observable peak in the backscattered intensity, known as backscattering cone. The study of this peak provide quantitative information about the transport properties of light in the material. In this thesis we report a complete FDTD ab-initio study of light localization and coherent backscattering. In particular, we consider a supercontinuum pulse impinging on a sample composed of randomly positioned scatterers. We study coherent backscattering by averaging over several realizations of the sample properties. We study then the coherent backscattering cone properties as the relative permittivity of the sample is changed, relating the latter with the light localization inside the sample. We demonstrate important relationships between the width of the backscattering cone and the localization length, which shows a linear proportionality in the strong localization regime.

  2. Improved local control with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma: Long-term analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakfoor, Bruce M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Kaufman, S. Donald; Shellito, Paul C.; Daly, William J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Since 1979, our institution has treated locally advanced rectal cancer with preoperative irradiation followed by resection with or without intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). In 1986, our preoperative treatment policy was changed to include bolus 5-FU chemotherapy concurrent with irradiation in hopes of improving resectability, downstaging and/or local control rates. We report the long-term results with the addition of 5-FU chemotherapy to preoperative irradiation. Materials and Methods: From 1979 - 1994, 200 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma (primary or recurrent) received preoperative irradiation, resection and IORT if indicated. Bolus 5-FU (500mg/m 2 /day) chemotherapy was administered for three days during weeks one and five of irradiation. The change in treatment policy was limited to the addition of 5-FU chemotherapy: the radiation techniques (four-field), doses (50.4 Gy), and indications for intraoperative radiation (microscopic residual, gross residual, tumor adherence) remained constant. The median follow-up for the entire group of patients was 33 months (.95 months - 199 months), and the minimum follow-up was 1.5 years. Tabular results are 5-year actuarial calculations. Results: One hundred and five patients received preoperative 5-FU chemotherapy and irradiation whereas 95 patients underwent preoperative irradiation alone. Sixty-five percent of the patients were able to undergo complete resections, and 53% had transmural disease upon pathologic examination. The addition of chemotherapy did not affect the rates of resectability or tumor downstaging. However, the 10-year local control rate was significantly improved for those patients who received preoperative chemotherapy: 77% vs. 44% (p<0.01) (see figure). When stratified by extent of resection and stage, those patients who underwent complete resections or had transmural disease had significantly improved local control rates when compared to the non-chemotherapy group: No

  3. Regional assignment of seven loci to 12p 13. 2-pter by PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing the der(12) or the der(X) chromosome from a mesothelioma showing t(X; 12)(q22; p13)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerssens, J.; Chaffanet, M.; Baens, M.; Matthijs, G.; Van Den Berche, H.; Cassiman, J.J.; Marynen, P. (Arthritis and Metabolic Bone Disease Research Unit, Leuven (Belgium))

    1994-03-01

    Two somatic cell hybrids containing the der(12) or the der(X) from a mesothelioma with a translocation t(X;12) (q22;p13) as the only chromosomal change were generated to characterize the region of 12p12 containing the translocation breakpoint. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed the breakpoint on chromosome 12 to occur between VWF and D12S158. On the linkage map developed by J. Weissenbach et al., the breakpoints were located between DXS1106 and DCS1001 on chromosome X. PCR analysis based on genomic sequences, with DNA from both somatic cell hybrids, enabled mapping of CACNL1A1, FGF6, D12S370, D12S38OE, D12S381E, and D12S382E distally to the 12p13 breakpoint and to VWF. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Robertsonian chromosome polymorphism of Akodon molinae (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae: analysis of trivalents in meiotic prophase Polimorfismo cromosómico Robertsoniano de Akodon molinae (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAÚL FERNÁNDEZ-DONOSO

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Akodon molinae (with 2n = 42-43-44 and an FN = 44 shows a remarkable polymorphism of chromosome 1 in natural and laboratory populations. Specimens 2n = 42, named single homozygotes (SH, have a chromosome pair 1 formed by two large metacentric chromosomes. Specimens 2n = 3, heterozygotes (Ht, have one chromosome 1 and two medium-sized subtelocentric chromosomes, 1a and 1b, which are homologous with the long and short arms of chromosome 1 respectively. Specimens 2n = 44 are double homozygotes (DH, with just two pairs of medium-sized subtelocentric chromosomes, 1a and 1b. Analysis of meiotic metaphases I and II showed that anomalous segregation occurs more frequently in spermatocytes carrying the 1a and 1b chromosomes. This would disturb gametogenesis and other reproductive and developmental processes, producing a marked decrease in viability of DH individuals. There is, as yet, no satisfactory explanation for these phenomena. To investigate structural elements which might explain such segregational anomalies, we have studied bivalent and trivalent synapsis in pachytene spermatocytes from SH, Ht and DH specimens. Of a total of 80 spermatocyte nuclei microspreads, the following results were obtained: of 16 microspreads from two SH individuals, 20 autosomic bivalents plus the XY bivalent were observed; of 48 microspreads from three Ht individuals, 19 autosomic bivalents, 1 trivalent and an XY bivalent were seen; and of the 16 microspreads from two DH individuals, 21 autosomic bivalents plus the XY bivalent were found. Trivalents analysed showed complete pairing between the short arms of 1a and 1b, and having an apparently normal synaptonemal complex (SC with lengths of 1 and 2.8 µm. The trivalent SC showed three telomeric ends, corresponding to arms: q1 and q1a; p1 and q1b; and p1a and p1b, with attachment plates to the nuclear envelope of normal organisation. None of the trivalents showed asynapsis or desynapsis between p1a and p1b, nor an

  5. Chromosome painting in biological dosimetry: Semi-automatic system to score stable chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sagredo, J.M.; Vallcorba, I.; Sanchez-Hombre, M.C.; Ferro, M.T.; San Roman Cos-Gayon, C.; Santos, A.; Malpica, N.; Ortiz, C.

    1997-01-01

    From the beginning of the description of the procedure of chromosome painting by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), it was thought its possible application to score induced chromosomal aberrations in radiation exposition. With chromosome painting it is possible to detect changes between chromosomes that has been validated in radiation exposition. Translocation scoring by FISH, contrarily to the unstable dicentrics, mainly detect stable chromosome aberrations that do not disappear, it allows the capability of quantify delayed acute expositions or chronic cumulative expositions. The large number of cells that have to be analyzed for high accuracy, specially when dealing with low radiation doses, makes it almost imperative to use an automatic analysis system. After validate translocation scoring by FISH in our, we have evaluated the ability and sensitivity to detect chromosomal aberrations by chromosome using different paint probes used, showing that any combination of paint probes can be used to score induced chromosomal aberrations. Our group has developed a FISH analysis that is currently being adapted for translocation scoring analysis. It includes systematic error correction and internal control probes. The performance tests carried out show that 9,000 cells can be analyzed in 10 hr. using a Sparc 4/370. Although with a faster computer, a higher throughput is expected, for large population screening or very low radiation doses, this performance still has to be improved. (author)

  6. Discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)