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Sample records for analysis chromosomal localization

  1. Porcine UCHL1: genomic organization, chromosome localization and expression analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Bendixen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    to and protection from Parkinson’s disease. Here we report cloning, characterization, expression analysis and mapping of porcine UCHL1. The UCHL1 cDNA was amplified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences. The porcine cDNA codes...... in developing porcine embryos. UCHL1 transcript was detected as early as 40 days of gestation. A significant decrease in UCHL1 transcript was detected in basal ganglia from day 60 to day 115 of gestation...

  2. The murine ufo receptor: molecular cloning, chromosomal localization and in situ expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, M; Ebensperger, C; Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Hameister, H; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1992-07-01

    We have cloned the mouse homologue of the ufo oncogene. It encodes a novel tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by a unique extracellular domain containing two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats. Comparison of the predicted ufo amino acid sequences of mouse and man revealed an overall identity of 87.6%. The ufo locus maps to mouse chromosome 7A3-B1 and thereby extends the known conserved linkage group between mouse chromosome 7 and human chromosome 19. RNA in situ hybridization analysis established the onset of specific ufo expression in the late embryogenesis at day 12.5 post coitum (p.c.) and localized ufo transcription to distinct substructures of a broad spectrum of developing tissues (e.g. subepidermal cells of the skin, mesenchymal cells of the periosteum). In adult animals ufo is expressed in cells forming organ capsules as well as in connective tissue structures. ufo may function as a signal transducer between specific cell types of mesodermal origin.

  3. Comparative analysis of chromosomal localization of ribosomal and telomeric DNA markers in three species of Pyrgomorphidae grasshoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buleu, Olesya G; Jetybayev, Ilyas Y; Bugrov, Alexander G

    2017-01-01

    The karyotypes of three species of Pyrgomorphidae grasshoppers were studied: Zonocerus elegans (Thunberg, 1815), Pyrgomorpha guentheri (Burr, 1899) and Atractomorpha lata (Mochulsky, 1866). Data on karyotypes of P. guentheri and Z. elegans are reported here for the first time. All species have karyotypes consisting of 19 acrocentric chromosomes in males and 20 acrocentric chromosomes in females (2n♂=19, NF=19; 2n♀=20, NF=20) and X0/XX sex determination system. A comparative analysis of the localization of C-heterochromatin, clusters of ribosomal DNA, and telomere repeats revealed inter-species diversity in these cytogenetic markers. These differences indicate that the karyotype divergence in the species studied is not associated with structural chromosome rearrangements, but with the evolution of repeated DNA sequences.

  4. Comparative analysis of chromosomal localization of ribosomal and telomeric DNA markers in three species of Pyrgomorphidae grasshoppers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya G. Buleu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The karyotypes of three species of Pyrgomorphidae grasshoppers were studied: Zonocerus elegans (Thunberg, 1815, Pyrgomorpha guentheri (Burr, 1899 and Atractomorpha lata (Mochulsky, 1866. Data on karyotypes of P. guentheri and Z. elegans are reported here for the first time. All species have karyotypes consisting of 19 acrocentric chromosomes in males and 20 acrocentric chromosomes in females (2n♂=19, NF=19; 2n♀=20, NF=20 and X0/XX sex determination system. A comparative analysis of the localization of C-heterochromatin, clusters of ribosomal DNA, and telomere repeats revealed inter-species diversity in these cytogenetic markers. These differences indicate that the karyotype divergence in the species studied is not associated with structural chromosome rearrangements, but with the evolution of repeated DNA sequences.

  5. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...

  6. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications...... who want it, is discussed. Screening for chromosome disease in all pregnancies is not without problems, but may be reasonable in some localities....

  7. Localization, by linkage analysis, of the cystinuria type III gene to chromosome 19q13.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisceglia, L.; Totaro, A.; Melchionda, S. [and others

    1997-03-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive aminoaciduria in which three urinary phenotypes (I, II, and III) have been described. An amino acid transporter gene, SLC3A1 (formerly rBAT), was found to be responsible for this disorder. Mutational and linkage analysis demonstrated the presence of genetic heterogeneity in which the SLC3A1 gene is responsible for type I cystinuria but not for type II or type III. In this study, we report the identification of the cystinuria type III locus on the long arm of chromosome 19 (19q13.1), obtained after a genomewide search. Pairwise linkage analysis in a series of type III or type II families previously excluded from linkage to the cystinuria type I locus (SLC3A1 gene) revealed a significant maximum LOD score (Z{sub max}) of 13.11 at a maximum recombination fraction ({theta}{sub max}) of .00, with marker D19S225. Multipoint linkage analysis performed with the use of additional markers from the region placed the cystinuria type III locus between D19S414 and D19S220. Preliminary data on type II families also seem to place the disease locus for this rare type of cystinuria at 19q13.1 (significant Z{sub max} = 3.11 at {theta}{sub max} of .00, with marker D19S225). 33 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Linkage disequilibrium network analysis (LDna) gives a global view of chromosomal inversions, local adaptation and geographic structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kemppainen, Petri; Knight, C. G.; Sarma, D. K.; Hlaing, T.; Prakash, A.; Maung, Y. N. M.; Somboon, P.; Mahanta, J.; Walton, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2015), s. 1031-1045 ISSN 1755-098X R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0303 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Anopheles dirus * Anopheles gambiae * chromosomal rearrangement * graph theory * landscape genomics * R package Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.298, year: 2015

  9. Monosomic analysis reveals duplicated chromosomal segments in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monosomic analysis reveals duplicated chromosomal segments in maize genome. MAHESH C. YADAV1,2∗, J. K. S. ... cated chromosomal segments in maize genome. Materials and methods. Development and .... each in chromosomes 2 and 7, while 10 other pairs of du- plicate loci had one copy in chromosome 3 and the ...

  10. Aneuploids of wheat and chromosomal localization of genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of useful major or minor genes is an important step in crop improvement programs. The chromosome location of such genes is critical for effective utilization and subsequent manipulation. Further, chromosomal localization will lead to the identification of genomic regions responsible for the expression of the ...

  11. Y-chromosome analysis in Retuertas horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandariz-Fontes, Claudia; Leonard, Jennifer A; Vega-Pla, José Luis; Backström, Niclas; Lindgren, Gabriella; Lippold, Sebastian; Rico, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    Several studies based on a variety of genetic markers have attempted to establish the origins of horse domestication. Thus far a discrepancy between the results of mitochondrial DNA analysis, which show high levels of diversity, and results from the Y-chromosome, with almost no genetic variability, has been identified. Most previous work on the horse Y-chromosome has focused on widespread, popular breeds or local Asian breeds. It is possible that these breeds represent a reduced set of the genetic variation present in the species. Additional genetic variation may be present in local breeds and ancient feral populations, such as the Retuertas horse in Spain. In this study we analyzed the Y-chromosome of the Retuertas horse, a feral horse population on the Iberian Peninsula that is at least several hundred years old, and whose genetic diversity and morphology suggests that it has been reproductively isolated for a long time. Data from the Retuertas horse was compared to another 11 breeds from the region (Portugal, Spain and France) or likely of Iberian origin, and then to data from 15 more breeds from around the globe. We sequenced 31 introns, Zinc finger Y-chromosomal protein (ZFY) and anonymous Y-linked fragments and genotyped 6 microsatellite loci found on the Y-chromosome. We found no sequence variation among all individuals and all breeds studied. However, fifteen differences were discovered between our data set and reference sequences in GenBank. We show that these likely represent errors within the deposited sequences, and suggest that they should not be used as comparative data for future projects.

  12. Y-chromosome analysis in Retuertas horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Brandariz-Fontes

    Full Text Available Several studies based on a variety of genetic markers have attempted to establish the origins of horse domestication. Thus far a discrepancy between the results of mitochondrial DNA analysis, which show high levels of diversity, and results from the Y-chromosome, with almost no genetic variability, has been identified. Most previous work on the horse Y-chromosome has focused on widespread, popular breeds or local Asian breeds. It is possible that these breeds represent a reduced set of the genetic variation present in the species. Additional genetic variation may be present in local breeds and ancient feral populations, such as the Retuertas horse in Spain. In this study we analyzed the Y-chromosome of the Retuertas horse, a feral horse population on the Iberian Peninsula that is at least several hundred years old, and whose genetic diversity and morphology suggests that it has been reproductively isolated for a long time. Data from the Retuertas horse was compared to another 11 breeds from the region (Portugal, Spain and France or likely of Iberian origin, and then to data from 15 more breeds from around the globe. We sequenced 31 introns, Zinc finger Y-chromosomal protein (ZFY and anonymous Y-linked fragments and genotyped 6 microsatellite loci found on the Y-chromosome. We found no sequence variation among all individuals and all breeds studied. However, fifteen differences were discovered between our data set and reference sequences in GenBank. We show that these likely represent errors within the deposited sequences, and suggest that they should not be used as comparative data for future projects.

  13. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Seldin, M.F. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Semi-automatic laser beam microdissection of the Y chromosome and analysis of Y chromosome DNA in a dioecious plant, Silene latifolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, S.; Kawano, S.; Michimoto, T.; Higashiyama, T.; Nakao, S.; Sakai, A.; Kuroiwa, T.

    1999-01-01

    Silene latifolia has heteromorphic sex chromosomes, the X and Y chromosomes. The Y chromosome, which is thought to carry the male determining gene, was isolated by UV laser microdissection and amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR. In situ chromosome suppression of the amplified Y chromosome DNA in the presence of female genomic DNA as a competitor showed that the microdissected Y chromosome DNA did not specifically hybridize to the Y chromosome, but-hybridized to all chromosomes. This result suggests that the Y chromosome does not contain Y chromosome-enriched repetitive sequences. A repetitive sequence in the microdissected Y chromosome, RMY1, was isolated while screening repetitive sequences in the amplified Y chromosome. Part of the nucleotide sequence shared a similarity to that of X-43.1, which was isolated from microdissected X chromosomes. Since fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with RMY1 demonstrated that RMY1 was localized at the ends of the chromosome, RMY1 may be a subtelomeric repetitive sequence. Regarding the sex chromosomes, RMY1 was detected at both ends of the X chromosome and at one end near the pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome. The different localization of RMY1 on the sex chromosomes provides a clue to the problem of how the sex chromosomes arose from autosomes

  15. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  16. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  17. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. METHODS: From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome

  18. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    Objective To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. Methods From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome

  19. Chromosomal localization of autosomal mutations in Drosophila ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1Drosophila Stock Centre, Department of Studies in Zoology, University of Mysore,. Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006, ... of genetic markers. In the present study, we have exploited the differences in karyotypic composition between these two subspecies, and their cross-fertility, in order to localize some autosomal genes.

  20. System for the analysis of plant chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Martin, D.; Peraza Gonzalez, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes a computer system for the automation workers of recognition analysis and interpretation of plant chromosomes. This system permit to carry out the analysis in a more comfortable and faster way, using the image processing techniques

  1. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    somal localizations of 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA were verified by two different colour FISH probes. Briefly, the current data provide an insights for hybridization projects and breeding improvement of tilapias. [Zhu H. P., Lu M. X., Gao F. Y., Huang Z. H., Yang L. P. and Gui J. F. 2010 Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and ...

  2. Chromosomal localization of microsatellite loci in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cavasini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata has been used as a model organism for genetics and evolutionary studies in the last three decades. A linkage map with 48 microsatellite loci recently published for this species showed five syntenic groups, which had their homology determined to Drosophila melanogaster chromosomes. Then, by inference, each of the groups was associated with one of the five major chromosomes of D. mediopunctata. Our objective was to carry out a genetic (chromosomal analysis to increase the number of available loci with known chromosomal location. We made a simultaneous analysis of visible mutant phenotypes and microsatellite genotypes in a backcross of a standard strain and a mutant strain, which had each major autosome marked. Hence, we could establish the chromosomal location of seventeen loci; including one from each of the five major linkage groups previously published, and twelve new loci. Our results were congruent with the previous location and they open new possibilities to future work integrating microsatellites, chromosomal inversions, and genetic determinants of physiological and morphological variation.

  3. Chromosomal localization of rDNA genes and genomic organization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic organization analysis of 5S rDNA revealed two different types of 5S rDNA sequences, 5S type I and 5S type II. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S rDNA probes showed six positive fluorescence signals on six chromosomes of all the analysed metaphases from the three tilapia samples.

  4. Localization to Chromosomes of Structural Genes for the Major Protease Inhibitors of Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn; Bjørn, S.E.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Wheat-barley chromosome addition lines were compared by isoelectric focusing of protein extracts to identify chromosomes carrying loci for the major immunochemically distinct protease inhibitors of barley grains. Structural genes for the following inhibitors were localized: an inhibitor of both...... endogenous α-amylase 2 and subtilisin (ASI) on chromosome 2, two chymotrypsin/subtilisin inhibitors (CI-1 and CI-2) on chromosome 5 (long arm) and the major trypsin inhibitor (TI-1) on chromosome 3....

  5. Chromosomal localization of two novel repetitive sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolano, B; Gardunia, B W; Michalska, M; Bonifacio, A; Fairbanks, D; Maughan, P J; Coleman, C E; Stevens, M R; Jellen, E N; Maluszynska, J

    2011-09-01

    The chromosomal organization of two novel repetitive DNA sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome was analyzed across the genomes of selected Chenopodium species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with the repetitive DNA clone 18-24J in the closely related allotetraploids C. quinoa and Chenopodium berlandieri Moq. (2n = 4x = 36) evidenced hybridization signals that were mainly present on 18 chromosomes; however, in the allohexaploid Chenopodium album L. (2n = 6x = 54), cross-hybridization was observed on all of the chromosomes. In situ hybridization with rRNA gene probes indicated that during the evolution of polyploidy, the chenopods lost some of their rDNA loci. Reprobing with rDNA indicated that in the subgenome labeled with 18-24J, one 35S rRNA locus and at least half of the 5S rDNA loci were present. A second analyzed sequence, 12-13P, localized exclusively in pericentromeric regions of each chromosome of C. quinoa and related species. The intensity of the FISH signals differed considerably among chromosomes. The pattern observed on C. quinoa chromosomes after FISH with 12-13P was very similar to GISH results, suggesting that the 12-13P sequence constitutes a major part of the repetitive DNA of C. quinoa.

  6. Localization of a breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, to chromosome 13q12-13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooster, R.; Mangion, J.; Quirk, Y.; Collins, N.; Seal, S.; Ford, D.; Averill, D. (Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom)); Neuhausen, S.L.; Nguyen, K.; Tran, T. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)) (and others)

    1994-09-30

    A small proportion of breast cancer, in particular those cases arising at a young age, is due to the inheritance of dominant susceptibility genes conferring a high risk of the disease. A genomic linkage search was performed with 15 high-risk breast cancer families that were unlinked to the BRCA1 locus on chromosome 17q21. This analysis localized a second breast cancer susceptibility locus, BRCA2, to a 6-centimorgan interval on chromosome 13q12-13. Preliminary, evidence suggests that BRCA2 confers a high risk of breast cancer but, unlike BRCA1, does not confer a substantially elevated risk of ovarian cancer.

  7. Chromosomal localization of the human vesicular amine transporter genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, D.; Finn, P.; Liu, Y.; Roghani, A.; Edwards, R.H.; Klisak, I.; Kojis, T.; Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S. (UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The physiologic and behavioral effects of pharmacologic agents that interfere with the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters into vesicles suggest that vesicular amine transport may contribute to human neuropsychiatric disease. To determine whether an alteration in the genes that encode vesicular amine transport contributes to the inherited component of these disorders, the authors have isolated a human cDNA for the brain transporter and localized the human vesciular amine transporter genes. The human brain synaptic vesicle amine transporter (SVAT) shows unexpected conservation with rat SVAT in the regions that diverge extensively between rat SVAT and the rat adrenal chromaffin granule amine transporter (CGAT). Using the cloned sequences with a panel of mouse-human hybrids and in situ hybridization for regional localization, the adrenal CGAT gene (or VAT1) maps to human chromosome 8p21.3 and the brain SVAT gene (or VAT2) maps to chromosome 10q25. Both of these sites occur very close to if not within previously described deletions that produce severe but viable phenotypes. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Cytological localization of adenosine kinase, nucleoside phosphorylase-1, and esterase-10 genes on mouse chromosome 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelson, L.C.; Farber, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have determined the regional locations on mouse chromosome 14 of the genes for mouse adenosine kinase (ADK), nucleoside phosphorylase- 1 (NP-1), and esterase-10 (ES-10) by analysis of rearranged mouse chromosomes in gamma-irradiated Chinese hamster X mouse hybrid cell lines. Irradiated clones were screened for expression of the murine forms of these enzymes; segregant clones that expressed only one or two of the three markers were karyotyped. The patterns of enzyme expression in these segregants were correlated with the presence of rearranged chromosomes. The Adk gene was localized to bands A2 to B, Np-1 to bands B to C1, and Es-10 to bands D2 to E2

  9. Cloning, structure, and chromosome localization of the mouse glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeller, D.M.; DiGiulio, A.; Frerman, F.E. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial matrix enzyme. In humans, deficiency of GCDH leads to glutaric acidemia type I, and inherited disorder of amino acid metabolism characterized by a progressive neurodegenerative disease. In this report we describe the cloning and structure of the mouse GCDH (Gcdh) gene and cDNA and its chromosomal localization. The mouse Gcdh cDNA is 1.75 kb long and contains and open reading frame of 438 amino acids. The amino acid sequences of mouse, human, and pig GCDH are highly conserved. The mouse Gcdh gene contains 11 exons and spans 7 kb of genomic DNA. Gcdh was mapped by backcross analysis to mouse chromosome 8 within a region that is homologous to a region of human chromosome 19, where the human gene was previously mapped. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro (Akita Univ. School of Medicine, Akita (Japan)); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The value of chromosomal analysis in oligozoospermic men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegen, Çarcia; van Rumste, Minouche M. E.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Koks, Carolien A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in relation to sperm concentration in subfertile oligozoospermic men. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Two teaching hospitals. Patient(s): We retrospectively studied all men who received chromosomal analysis prior to

  12. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia: Chromosomal Breakage Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke B. Oostra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is a rare inherited syndrome with diverse clinical symptoms including developmental defects, short stature, bone marrow failure, and a high risk of malignancies. Fifteen genetic subtypes have been distinguished so far. The mode of inheritance for all subtypes is autosomal recessive, except for FA-B, which is X-linked. Cells derived from FA patients are—by definition—hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, such as mitomycin C, diepoxybutane, or cisplatinum, which becomes manifest as excessive growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and chromosomal breakage upon cellular exposure to these drugs. Here we provide a detailed laboratory protocol for the accurate assessment of the FA diagnosis as based on mitomycin C-induced chromosomal breakage analysis in whole-blood cultures. The method also enables a quantitative estimate of the degree of mosaicism in the lymphocyte compartment of the patient.

  13. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia: Chromosomal Breakage Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Anneke B.; Nieuwint, Aggie W. M.; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited syndrome with diverse clinical symptoms including developmental defects, short stature, bone marrow failure, and a high risk of malignancies. Fifteen genetic subtypes have been distinguished so far. The mode of inheritance for all subtypes is autosomal recessive, except for FA-B, which is X-linked. Cells derived from FA patients are—by definition—hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, such as mitomycin C, diepoxybutane, or cisplatinum, which becomes manifest as excessive growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and chromosomal breakage upon cellular exposure to these drugs. Here we provide a detailed laboratory protocol for the accurate assessment of the FA diagnosis as based on mitomycin C-induced chromosomal breakage analysis in whole-blood cultures. The method also enables a quantitative estimate of the degree of mosaicism in the lymphocyte compartment of the patient. PMID:22693659

  14. Chromosome analysis using spectral karyotyping (SKY).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imataka, George; Arisaka, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Spectral karyotyping is a novel technique for chromosome analysis that has been developed based on the approach of the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique. Spectral karyotyping makes it feasible to diagnose a variety of diseases, because of its technology in painting each of the 24 human chromosomes with different colors. In recent years, it has become possible to adopt the usage of spectral karyotyping for research in general clinical practice, and its usability has attracted particular attention in the diagnosis of different diseases. In this review, we will explain the principle of the spectral karyotyping, as well as its specificity and limitation in detecting the genetic defects within clinical application by presenting two case reports.

  15. Interphase Chromosome Profiling: A Method for Conventional Banded Chromosome Analysis Using Interphase Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Dev, Vaithilingam G; Koduru, Prasad; Rao, Nagesh; Mitter, Navnit S; Liu, Mingya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Fuentes, Sarah; Papa, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    - Chromosome analysis on bone marrow or peripheral blood samples fails in a small proportion of attempts. A method that is more reliable, with similar or better resolution, would be a welcome addition to the armamentarium of the cytogenetics laboratory. - To develop a method similar to banded metaphase chromosome analysis that relies only on interphase nuclei. - To label multiple targets in an equidistant fashion along the entire length of each chromosome, including landmark subtelomere and centromere regions. Each label so generated by using cloned bacterial artificial chromosome probes is molecularly distinct with unique spectral characteristics, so the number and position of the labels can be tracked to identify chromosome abnormalities. - Interphase chromosome profiling (ICP) demonstrated results similar to conventional chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in 55 previously studied cases and obtained useful ICP chromosome analysis results on another 29 cases in which conventional methods failed. - ICP is a new and powerful method to karyotype peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate preparations without reliance on metaphase chromosome preparations. It will be of particular value for cases with a failed conventional analysis or when a fast turnaround time is required.

  16. Context-based FISH localization of genomic rearrangements within chromosome 15q11.2q13 duplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knoll Joan HM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segmental duplicons (SDs predispose to an increased frequency of chromosomal rearrangements. These rearrangements can cause a diverse range of phenotypes due to haploinsufficiency, in cis positional effects or gene interruption. Genomic microarray analysis has revealed gene dosage changes adjacent to duplicons, but the high degree of similarity between duplicon sequences has confounded unequivocal assignment of chromosome breakpoints within these intervals. In this study, we localize rearrangements within duplicon-enriched regions of Angelman/Prader-Willi (AS/PWS syndrome chromosomal deletions with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Results Breakage intervals in AS deletions were localized recursively with short, coordinate-defined, single copy (SC and low copy (LC genomic FISH probes. These probes were initially coincident with duplicons and regions of previously reported breakage in AS/PWS. Subsequently, probes developed from adjacent genomic intervals more precisely delineated deletion breakage intervals involving genes, pseudogenes and duplicons in 15q11.2q13. The observed variability in the deletion boundaries within previously described Class I and Class II deletion AS samples is related to the local genomic architecture in this chromosomal region. Conclusions Chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with SDs were precisely delineated at a resolution equivalent to genomic Southern analysis. This context-dependent approach can define the boundaries of chromosome rearrangements for other genomic disorders associated with SDs.

  17. The human thyroglobulin gene: a polymorphic marker localized distal to C-MYC on chromosome 8 band q24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F.; Bikker, H.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Melsert, R.; Pearson, P. L.; de Vijlder, J. J.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The human thyroglobulin (Tg) gene is localized to chromosome 8 and regionally to band q24 as shown independently by both in situ hybridization techniques and Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Analysis of hybrids derived from a Burkitt lymphoma, with a translocation

  18. High resolution analysis of interphase chromosome domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A. E.; Jaunin, F.; Fakan, S.; Aten, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome territories need to be well defined at high resolution before functional aspects of chromosome organization in interphase can be explored. To visualize chromosomes by electron microscopy (EM), the DNA of Chinese hamster fibroblasts was labeled in vivo with thymidine analogue BrdU. Labeled

  19. Accommodating chromosome inversions in linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gary K; Slaten, Erin; Ophoff, Roel A; Lange, Kenneth

    2006-08-01

    This work develops a population-genetics model for polymorphic chromosome inversions. The model precisely describes how an inversion changes the nature of and approach to linkage equilibrium. The work also describes algorithms and software for allele-frequency estimation and linkage analysis in the presence of an inversion. The linkage algorithms implemented in the software package Mendel estimate recombination parameters and calculate the posterior probability that each pedigree member carries the inversion. Application of Mendel to eight Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain pedigrees in a region containing a common inversion on 8p23 illustrates its potential for providing more-precise estimates of the location of an unmapped marker or trait gene. Our expanded cytogenetic analysis of these families further identifies inversion carriers and increases the evidence of linkage.

  20. Analysis of the Ceratitis capitata y chromosome using in situ hybridization to mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willhoeft, U.; Franz, G.

    1998-01-01

    In Ceratitis capitata the Y chromosome is responsible for sex-determination. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for cytogenetic analysis of mitotic chromosomes. FISH with the wild-type strain EgyptII and two repetitive DNA probes enabled us to differentiate between the short and the long arm of the Y chromosome and gives a much better resolution than C-banding of mitotic chromosomes. We identified the Y-chromosomal breakpoints in Y-autosome translocations using FISH. Even more complex rearrangements i.e. deletions and insertions in some translocation strains were detected by this method. A strategy for mapping the primary sex determination factor in Ceratitis capitata by FISH is presented. (author)

  1. Chromosome Characteristic of Peranakan Etawa (PE) Goat (Capra hircus Linn.) as Indonesian Local Breed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, A. R. I.; Ciptadi, G.; Warih, A. P.

    2018-02-01

    Chromosome characteristics of Peranakan Etawa (PE) goat needs to be analyzed because information about Indonesian goat races is very limited. The purpose of this research was to determine the characteristics of PE goat chromosome as basic data as one of the genetic local resources. Blood was collected from pair of PE goat at Sumber Sekar Field Laboratory, Faculty of Animal Husbandry, Brawijaya University, Malang. Blood cultured using standard cytogenetic technique and stained with G-Banding. Observations being done in metaphase cells and analyzed using Genus Cytovision Image. Chromosomes arranged and numbered by standard goat karyotype. The result of this research showed that PE goat had number of chromosomes 2n=60, consisting of 29 pairs of autosome and a pair of sex chromosomes. Female goat had average of total length (TL) of autosome ranged from 47.91 µm±6.46 to 22.12 µm±3.33. TL of chromosome X are 45.96 µm±4,59 and 44.45 µm±3,96. Centromeric index (Ci) of chromosome X, 31,74 and 32,80. PE goat had average of TL of autosome ranged from 58.20µm±6.72 to 18.97µm±2.82. TL of chromosome X is 56,42µm±7,38 and Y chromosome is 15,80 µm±3,24. Ci in chromosome X and Y are 19.34 and 46.84. These results concluded that the total of goat chromosome was 60 with types of autosomal chromosomes were acrocentric as many as 58 chromosomes and pair of sex chromosomes XX and XY, X classified as subtelocentric and Y submetacentric.

  2. Chromosome microdissection and cloning in human genome and genetic disease analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Faten; Yu, Jingwei

    1991-01-01

    A procedure has been described for microdissection and microcloning of human chromosomal DNA sequences in which universal amplification of the dissected fragments by Mbo I linker adaptor and polymerase chain reaction is used. A very large library comprising 700,000 recombinant plasmid microclones from 30 dissected chromosomes of human chromosome 21 was constructed. Colony hybridization showed that 42% of the clones contained repetitive sequences and 58% contained single or low-copy sequences. The insert sizes generated by complete Mbo I cleavage ranged from 50 to 1,100 base pairs with a mean of 416 base pairs. Southern blot analysis of microclones from the library confirmed their human origin and chromosome 21 specificity. Some of these clones have also been regionally mapped to specific sites of chromosome 21 by using a regional mapping panel of cell hybrids. This chromosome microtechnology can generate large numbers of microclones with unique sequences from defined chromosomal regions and can be used for processes such as (i) isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones with large inserts, (ii) screening various cDNA libraries for isolating expressed sequences, and (iii) constructing region-specific libraries of the entire human genome. The studies described here demonstrate the power of this technology for high-resolution genome analysis and explicate their use in an efficient search for disease-associated genes localized to specific chromosomal regions

  3. An expert image analysis system for chromosome analysis application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.; Suetens, P.; Oosterlinck, A.; Van den Berghe, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports a recent study on applying a knowledge-based system approach as a new attempt to solve the problem of chromosome classification. A theoretical framework of an expert image analysis system is proposed, based on such a study. In this scheme, chromosome classification can be carried out under a hypothesize-and-verify paradigm, by integrating a rule-based component, in which the expertise of chromosome karyotyping is formulated with an existing image analysis system which uses conventional pattern recognition techniques. Results from the existing system can be used to bring in hypotheses, and with the rule-based verification and modification procedures, improvement of the classification performance can be excepted

  4. New trends and techniques in chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: automation of chromosome analysis; storage of fixed cells from cultures of lymphocytes obtained routinely during periodic employee medical examinations; analysis of banded chromosomes; identification of first division metaphases; sister chromatid exchange; and patterns of aberration induction

  5. Aneuploids of wheat and chromosomal localization of genes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-22

    Jun 22, 2011 ... Identification of useful major or minor genes is an important step in crop improvement programs. The chromosome location of such genes is critical .... monosomic series of CS has provided a tool for considerably circumventing the difficulties of .... using comparative controls. SUBSTITUTION. MONOSOMIC.

  6. Flow Analysis and Sorting of Plant Chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Šimková, Hana; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Čížková, Jana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, Oct 10 (2016), 5.3.1-5.3.43 ISSN 1934-9300 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : cell cycle synchronization * chromosome genomics * chromosome isolation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko [Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Omori, Hiroko [Central Instrumentation Laboratory Research Institute for Microbial Diseases (BIKEN), Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueda, Keiji, E-mail: kueda@virus.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy–electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. - Highlights: • This is the first report showing LANA dots on mitotic chromosomes by fluorescent microscopy followed by electron microscopy. • LANA dots localized randomly on condensed chromosomes other than centromere/pericentromere and telomere/peritelomre. • Cellular mitotic checkpoint should not be always involved in the segregation of KSHV genomes in the latency.

  8. Chromosomal Localization of DNA Amplifications in Neuroblastoma Tumors Using cDNA Microarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Beheshti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH profiling of neuroblastomas has identified many genomic aberrations, although the limited resolution has precluded a precise localization of sequences of interest within amplicons. To map high copy number genomic gains in clinically matched stage IV neuroblastomas, CGH analysis using a 19,200-feature cDNA microarray was used. A dedicated (freely available algorithm was developed for rapid in silico determination of chromosomal localizations of microarray cDNA targets, and for generation of an ideogram-type profile of copy number changes. Using these methodologies, novel gene amplifications undetectable by chromosome CGH were identified, and larger MYCN amplicon sizes (in one tumor up to 6 Mb than those previously reported in neuroblastoma were identified. The genes HPCAL1, LPIN1/KIAA0188, NAG, and NSE1/LOC151354 were found to be coamplified with MYCN. To determine whether stage IV primary tumors could be further subclassified based on their genomic copy number profiles, hierarchical clustering was performed. Cluster analysis of microarray CGH data identified three groups: 1 no amplifications evident, 2 a small MYCN amplicon as the only detectable imbalance, and 3 a large MYCN amplicon with additional gene amplifications. Application of CGH to cDNA microarray targets will help to determine both the variation of amplicon size and help better define amplification-dependent and independent pathways of progression in neuroblastoma.

  9. Should the indications for prenatal chromosome analysis be changed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Bang, J; Madsen, Mette

    1977-01-01

    Amniocentesis for chromosome analysis was performed in 1086 pergnant women, 739 of whom had an increased risk of giving birth to a child with chromosome abnormalities. Such abnormalities were found in almost identical proportions among the fetuses with an increased risk (1.2%) and among those...

  10. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the three human syntrophin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feener, C.A.; Anderson, M.D.S.; Selig, S. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Dystrophin, the protein product the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus, is normally found to be associated with a complex of proteins. Among these dystrophin-associated proteins are the syntrophins, a group of 59 kDa membrane-associated proteins. When the syntrophins are purified based upon their association with dystrophin, they have been shown previously to form two distinct groups, the acidic ({alpha}) and basic ({beta}) forms. Based on peptide and rodent cDNA sequences, three separate syntrophin genes have been cloned and characterized from human tissues. The predicted amino acid sequences from these cDNA reveal that these proteins are related but are distinct with respect to charge, as predicted from their biochemistry. The family consists of one acidic ({alpha}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-1) and two basic ({beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin; and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-2) genes. Each of the three genes are widely expressed in a variety of human tissues, but the relative abundance of the three are unique with respect to each other. {alpha}-syntrophin is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle and heart as a single transcript. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin is expressed widely in up to five distinct transcript sizes, and is most abundant in brain. The human chromosomal locations of the three syntrophins are currently being mapped. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin maps to chromosome 8q23-24 and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin to chromosome 16. The {alpha}-syntrophin gene will be mapped accordingly. Although all three genes are candidates for neuromuscular diseases, the predominant expression of {alpha}-syntrophin in skeletal muscle and heart makes it a strong candidate to be involved in a neuromuscular disease.

  11. Dynamic in situ chromosome immobilisation and DNA extraction using localized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) phase transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh; Marie, Rodolphe

    2011-01-01

    A method of in situ chromosome immobilisation and DNA extraction in a microfluidic polymer chip was presented. Light-induced local heating was used to induce poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) phase transition in order to create a hydrogel and embed a single chromosome such that it was immobilised....... This was achieved with the use of a near-infrared laser focused on an absorption layer integrated in the polymer chip in close proximity to the microchannel. It was possible to proceed to DNA extraction while holding on the chromosome at an arbitrary location by introducing protease K into the microchannel. © 2011...

  12. A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) reference FISH karyotype for chromosome and chromosome-arm identification, integration of genetic linkage groups and analysis of major repeat family distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesold, Susanne; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Dechyeva, Daryna

    2012-11-01

    We developed a reference karyotype for B. vulgaris which is applicable to all beet cultivars and provides a consistent numbering of chromosomes and genetic linkage groups. Linkage groups of sugar beet were assigned to physical chromosome arms by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) using a set of 18 genetically anchored BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) markers. Genetic maps of sugar beet were correlated to chromosome arms, and North-South orientation of linkage groups was established. The FISH karyotype provides a technical platform for genome studies and can be applied for numbering and identification of chromosomes in related wild beet species. The discrimination of all nine chromosomes by BAC probes enabled the study of chromosome-specific distribution of the major repetitive components of sugar beet genome comprising pericentromeric, intercalary and subtelomeric satellites and 18S-5.8S-25S and 5S rRNA gene arrays. We developed a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all nine sugar beet chromosome pairs in a single hybridization using a pool of satellite DNA probes. Fiber-FISH was applied to analyse five chromosome arms in which the furthermost genetic marker of the linkage group was mapped adjacently to terminal repetitive sequences on pachytene chromosomes. Only on two arms telomere arrays and the markers are physically linked, hence these linkage groups can be considered as terminally closed making the further identification of distal informative markers difficult. The results support genetic mapping by marker localization, the anchoring of contigs and scaffolds for the annotation of the sugar beet genome sequence and the analysis of the chromosomal distribution patterns of major families of repetitive DNA. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Monosomic analysis reveals duplicated chromosomal segments in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    g bg. GGg or. Golden plant. –. bGg, GGGg. –, Indicates the absence of dominant allele (due to nondisjunction of chromosome carrying dominant allele) in the egg cell (female gamete) and consequently creating hemizygous condition in the embryos of monosomic plants. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 88, No. 3, December 2009.

  14. Analysis of chromosome termini in potato varieties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fajkus, Jiří; Novotná, Marcela; Ptáček, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 11 (2002), s. 477-479 ISSN 0370-663X R&D Projects: GA MZe QC1164; GA ČR GA204/02/0027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : plant chromosomes * telomere lenght * potato varieties Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.333, year: 2002

  15. Chromosome aberrations analysis of Serbia population from 1985 to 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovicic, D.; Markovic, B.; Milacic, S.; Joksic, G.

    1996-01-01

    After the accident of NE Chernobyl in May 1986, Chernobyl's fallout with unhomogeneous dispersion of radioactive material in atmosphere caused the difference in contamination of the Serbia territory. The highest contamination was found to be in region Uzice, and the lowest in the region Nis. Two groups of population from these regions were undergone chromosome aberration analysis during 1987, 1988 and 1989. year. The results of our examination show increased frequency of structural chromosome aberrations/dicentrics, rings, peri centric inversions and acentric/ in the Uzice population, especially in the 1987. year. In 1985 and 1995 year have not been found chromosome aberrations. 2 refs.; 1 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. SDR-O: an orphan short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase localized at mouse chromosome 10/human chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiguo; Song, Min-Sun; Napoli, Joseph L

    2002-07-10

    We report cloning a cDNA that encodes a novel short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase, SDR-O, conserved in mouse, human and rat. Human and mouse liver express SDR-O (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase-orphan) mRNA intensely. The mouse embryo expresses SDR-O mRNA as early as day seven. Human SDR-O localizes on chromosome 12; mouse SDR-O localizes on chromosome 10 with CRAD1, CRAD2 and RDH4. SDR-O shares highest amino acid similarity with rat RoDH1 and mouse RDH1 (69-70%), but does not have the retinol and 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity of either, nor is it active as a 17beta- or 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases catalyse the metabolism of ligands that bind with nuclear receptors: the occurrence of 'orphan' nuclear receptors may imply existence of 'orphan' SDR, suggesting that SDR-O may catalyse the metabolism of another class of nuclear receptor ligand. Alternatively, SDR-O may not have a catalytic function, but may regulate metabolism by binding substrates/products and/or by serving as a regulatory factor.

  17. Analysis and visualization of chromosome information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, J A Tenreiro; Costa, António C; Quelhas, Maria Dulce

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the DNA code of several species in the perspective of information content. For that purpose several concepts and mathematical tools are selected towards establishing a quantitative method without a priori distorting the alphabet represented by the sequence of DNA bases. The synergies of associating Gray code, histogram characterization and multidimensional scaling visualization lead to a collection of plots with a categorical representation of species and chromosomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Localized uptake of 63-nickel into dinoflagellate chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigee, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    The uptake of 63 Ni into cells of the binucleate dinoflagellate Glenodinium foliaceum was investigated using insoluble compound light and electron microscope autoradiography. Cells labelled over a period of 2 hours showed active uptake throughout the whole population, with an increase in mean cell grain count when the labelling period was extended to 4 hours and 24 hours. The mean grain count did not vary with type of fixation (glutaraldehyde, paraformaldehyde or acetic alcohol) suggesting that retention of 63 Ni is not a specific fixation-binding artefact. At light microscope level, silver grains were not localized to any major cell component, but with the greater resolution of electron microscope autoradiography, a high degree of localization was demonstrated in the typical dinoflagellate (dinocaryotic) nucleus - which contained about 83% of the cell label (cytoplasm 16%, supernumerary nucleus 1%). Silver grain distribution within the dinocaryotic nucleus was consistent with some degree of localization to the condensed chromatin. The autoradiographic results corroborate previous X-ray microanalytical data which demonstrated high levels of transition metals in dinoflagellate nuclei. The distinction between the two types of nucleus in Glenodinium is further emphasized, giving additional support to the concept of a separate phyllogenetic origin of the supernumerary nucleus. (author)

  19. Biological dosimetry: chromosomal aberration analysis for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In view of the growing importance of chromosomal aberration analysis as a biological dosimeter, the present report provides a concise summary of the scientific background of the subject and a comprehensive source of information at the technical level. After a review of the basic principles of radiation dosimetry and radiation biology basic information on the biology of lymphocytes, the structure of chromosomes and the classification of chromosomal aberrations are presented. This is followed by a presentation of techniques for collecting blood, storing, transporting, culturing, making chromosomal preparations and scaring of aberrations. The physical and statistical parameters involved in dose assessment are discussed and examples of actual dose assessments taken from the scientific literature are given

  20. Establishing working standards of chromosome aberrations analysis for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui Thi Kim Luyen; Tran Que; Pham Ngoc Duy; Nguyen Thi Kim Anh; Ha Thi Ngoc Lien

    2015-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is an dose assessment method using specify bio markers of radiation. IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) defined that dicentric chromosome is specify for radiation, it is a gold standard for biodosimetry. Along with the documents published by IAEA, WHO, ISO and OECD, our results of study on the chromosome aberrations induced by radiation were organized systematically in nine standards that dealing with chromosome aberration test and micronucleus test in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. This standard addresses: the reference dose-effect for dose estimation, the minimum detection levels, cell culture, slide preparation, scoring procedure for chromosome aberrations use for biodosimetry, the criteria for converting aberration frequency into absorbed dose, reporting of results. Following these standards, the automatic analysis devices were calibrated for improving biological dosimetry method. This standard will be used to acquire and maintain accreditation of the Biological Dosimetry laboratory in Nuclear Research Institute. (author)

  1. Chromosomal localization of rDNA and DAPI bands in solanaceous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RESEARCH NOTE. Chromosomal localization of rDNA and DAPI bands in solanaceous medicinal plant Hyoscyamus niger L. UMESH C. LAVANIA1∗, JYOTSNA SINGH KUSHWAHA1, SESHU LAVANIA2 and SUROCHITA BASU1,3. 1Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Lucknow 226 015, India. 2Department ...

  2. Cloning, chromosome localization and features of a novel human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We report cloning and some features of a novel human gene, MATH2, which encodes a protein of 337 amino acid residues with a basic helix–loop–helix domain and exhibits 98% similarity to mouse Math2. Results of Northern blot analysis revealed two transcripts of the MATH2 gene of 1.7 kb and 2.4 kb in human brain.

  3. Local Noncollinear Spin Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Bayileyegn A; Joshi, Rajendra P; Peralta, Juan E

    2017-12-12

    In this work, we generalize the local spin analysis of Clark and Davidson [J. Chem. Phys. 2001 115 (16), 7382] for the partitioning of the expectation value of the molecular spin square operator, ⟨Ŝ 2 ⟩, into atomic contributions, ⟨Ŝ A ·Ŝ B ⟩, to the noncollinear spin case in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). We derive the working equations, and we show applications to the analysis of the noncollinear spin solutions of typical spin-frustrated systems and to the calculation of magnetic exchange couplings. In the former case, we employ the triangular H 3 He 3 test molecule and a Mn 3 complex to show that the local spin analysis provides additional information that complements the standard one-particle spin population analysis. For the calculation of magnetic exchange couplings, J AB , we employ the local spin partitioning to extract ⟨Ŝ A ·Ŝ B ⟩ as a function of the interatomic spin orientation given by the angle θ. This, combined with the dependence of the electronic energy with θ, provides a methodology to extract J AB from DFT calculations that, in contrast to conventional energy differences based methods, does not require the use of ad hoc S A and S B values.

  4. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Correlation between chromosome 9p21 locus deletion and prognosis in clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Érika Aparecida Felix de; Pontes-Junior, José; Reis, Sabrina Thalita; Lima, Amanda Eunice Ramos; Souza, Isida C; Salgueiro, Jose Lucas; Fontes, Douglas; Dellê, Humberto; Coelho, Rafael Ferreira; Viana, Nayara Izabel; Leite, Kátia Ramos Moreira; Nahas, William C; Srougi, Miguel

    2017-05-04

    Some studies have reported that deletions at chromosome arm 9p occur frequently and represent a critical step in carcinogenesis of some neoplasms. Our aim was to evaluate the deletion of locus 9p21 and chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 in localized prostate cancer (PC) and correlate these alterations with prognostic factors and biochemical recurrence after surgery. We retrospectively evaluated surgical specimens from 111 patients with localized PC who underwent radical prostatectomy. Biochemical recurrence was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >0.2 ng/mL and the mean postoperative follow-up was 123 months. The deletions were evaluated using fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric and locus-specific probes in a tissue microarray containing 2 samples from each patient. We correlated the occurrence of any deletion with pathological stage, Gleason score, ISUP grade group, PSA and biochemical recurrence. We observed a loss of any probe in only 8 patients (7.2%). The most common deletion was the loss of locus 9p21, which occurred in 6.4% of cases. Deletions of chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 were observed in 2.3%, 1.2% and 1.8% patients, respectively. There was no correlation between chromosome loss and Gleason score, ISUP, PSA or stage. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 83% cases involving 9p21 deletions. Loss of 9p21 locus was significantly associated with time to recurrence (p = 0.038). We found low rates of deletion in chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 and 9p21 locus. We observed that 9p21 locus deletion was associated with worse prognosis in localized PC treated by radical prostatectomy.

  6. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CB Toaldo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70 and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity observed among strains from Brazil, the molecular karyotype of all T. rangeli strains analyzed revealed extensive chromosome polymorphism. In addition, it was possible to distinguish T. rangeli from T. cruzi by the chromosomal DNA electrophoresis pattern. The localization of ß-tubulin genes revealed differences among T. rangeli strains and confirmed the similarity between the isolates from Brazil. Hybridization assays using probes directed to the cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin genes discriminated T. rangeli from T. cruzi, proving that these genes are useful molecular markers for the differential diagnosis between these two species. Numerical analysis based on the molecular karyotype data revealed a high degree of polymorphism among T. rangeli strains isolated from southern Brazil and strains isolated from Central and the northern South America. The T. cruzi reference strain was not clustered with any T. rangeli strain.

  7. Genomic analysis of plant chromosomes based on meiotic pairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisete Chamma Davide

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the principles and applications of classical genomic analysis, with emphasis on plant breeding. The main mathematical models used to estimate the preferential chromosome pairing in diploid or polyploid, interspecific or intergenera hybrids are presented and discussed, with special reference to the applications and studies for the definition of genome relationships among species of the Poaceae family.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Eight X-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    X-Chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) typing can complement existing DNA profiling protocols and can also offer useful information in cases of complex kinship analysis. This is the first population study of 8 X-linked STRs in Iraq. The purpose of this work was to provide a basic data of allele and haplotype frequency for ...

  9. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Castano, S.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1990-01-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y =α + β 1 D + β 2 D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs

  10. Chromosome aberration analysis based on a beta-binomial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, Masanori; Prentice, R.L.

    1983-10-01

    Analyses carried out here generalized on earlier studies of chromosomal aberrations in the populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by allowing extra-binomial variation in aberrant cell counts corresponding to within-subject correlations in cell aberrations. Strong within-subject correlations were detected with corresponding standard errors for the average number of aberrant cells that were often substantially larger than was previously assumed. The extra-binomial variation is accomodated in the analysis in the present report, as described in the section on dose-response models, by using a beta-binomial (B-B) variance structure. It is emphasized that we have generally satisfactory agreement between the observed and the B-B fitted frequencies by city-dose category. The chromosomal aberration data considered here are not extensive enough to allow a precise discrimination between competing dose-response models. A quadratic gamma ray and linear neutron model, however, most closely fits the chromosome data. (author)

  11. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navlet Armenta, J.M.; Gonzalez, S.; Silva, A.

    1990-01-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haemathological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study of chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 o C has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y = α+β 1 D+β 2 D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author)

  12. Identification and chromosomal localization of the monkey retrotransposon in Mesa sp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balint-Kurti, P.; Clendennen, S.; Doleželová, Marie; Valárik, Miroslav; Doležel, Jaroslav; Beetham, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 263, č. 6 (2000), s. 908-915 ISSN 0026-8925 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV521/96/K117; GA AV ČR IAA5020803; GA MŠk ME 376 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : In situ hybridization * chromosomal localization * monkey retrotransposon Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.462, year: 2000

  13. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of one of the human glutamate receptor genes

    OpenAIRE

    Puckett, Carmie; Gomez, Christopher M.; Korenberg, Julie R.; Tung, Howard; Meier, Timothy J.; Chen, Xiao Ning; Hood, Leroy

    1991-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the mammalian brain and are classified on the basis of their activation by different agonists. The agonists kainate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxasolepropionic acid define a class of glutamate receptors termed kainate receptors. We have isolated and sequenced a human glutamate receptor (GluHI) cDNA and determined the chromosomal localization of its gene. The DNA sequence of GluHI would encode a 907-am...

  14. Regional localization of the gene for thyroid peroxidase to human chromosome 2pter----p12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vijlder, J. J.; Dinsart, C.; Libert, F.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Bikker, H.; Bolhuis, P. A.; Vassart, G.

    1988-01-01

    A 2.0-kb thyroid peroxidase cDNA of human origin was used as probe for Southern blot hybridization of genomic DNA from human somatic cells and human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. The results showed that the gene coding for human thyroid peroxidase is located on chromosome. 2. Further analysis of

  15. Chromosomal and regional localization of the loci for IGKC, IGGC, ALDB, HOXB, GPT, and PRNP in the American mink (Mustela vison): comparisons with human and mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khlebodarova, TM; Malchenko, Sergey; Matveeva, NM

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal localization of the genes for gamma- and kappa-immunoglobulins (IGGC and IGKC, respectively), aldolase B (ALDB), prion protein (PRNP), homeo box B (HOXB), and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) were determined with the use of mink-rodent hybrid cells. Analysis of segregation...

  16. Global patterns in human mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome variation caused by spatial instability of the local cultural processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Kumar

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Because of the widespread phenomenon of patrilocality, it is hypothesized that Y-chromosome variants tend to be more localized geographically than those of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. Empirical evidence confirmatory to this hypothesis was subsequently provided among certain patrilocal and matrilocal groups of Thailand, which conforms to the isolation by distance mode of gene diffusion. However, we expect intuitively that the patterns of genetic variability may not be consistent with the above hypothesis among populations with different social norms governing the institution of marriage, particularly among those that adhere to strict endogamy rules. We test the universality of this hypothesis by analyzing Y-chromosome and mtDNA data in three different sets of Indian populations that follow endogamy rules to varying degrees. Our analysis of the Indian patrilocal and the matrilocal groups is not confirmatory to the sex-specific variation observed among the tribes of Thailand. Our results indicate spatial instability of the impact of different cultural processes on the genetic variability, resulting in the lack of universality of the hypothesized pattern of greater Y-chromosome variation when compared to that of mtDNA among the patrilocal populations.

  17. The sequence and analysis of Trypanosoma brucei chromosome II

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Najib M. A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Song, Jinming; MacLeod, Annette; Bringaud, Frederic; Larkin, Christopher; Wanless, David; Peterson, Jeremy; Hou, Lihua; Taylor, Sonya; Tweedie, Alison; Biteau, Nicolas; Khalak, Hanif G.; Lin, Xiaoying; Mason, Tanya; Hannick, Linda; Caler, Elisabet; Blandin, Gaëlle; Bartholomeu, Daniella; Simpson, Anjana J.; Kaul, Samir; Zhao, Hong; Pai, Grace; Aken, Susan Van; Utterback, Teresa; Haas, Brian; Koo, Hean L.; Umayam, Lowell; Suh, Bernard; Gerrard, Caroline; Leech, Vanessa; Qi, Rong; Zhou, Shiguo; Schwartz, David; Feldblyum, Tamara; Salzberg, Steven; Tait, Andrew; Turner, C. Michael R.; Ullu, Elisabetta; White, Owen; Melville, Sara; Adams, Mark D.; Fraser, Claire M.; Donelson, John E.

    2003-01-01

    We report here the sequence of chromosome II from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The 1.2-Mb pairs encode about 470 predicted genes organised in 17 directional clusters on either strand, the largest cluster of which has 92 genes lined up over a 284-kb region. An analysis of the GC skew reveals strand compositional asymmetries that coincide with the distribution of protein-coding genes, suggesting these asymmetries may be the result of transcription-coupled repair on coding versus non-coding strand. A 5-cM genetic map of the chromosome reveals recombinational ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ regions, the latter of which is predicted to include the putative centromere. One end of the chromosome consists of a 250-kb region almost exclusively composed of RHS (pseudo)genes that belong to a newly characterised multigene family containing a hot spot of insertion for retroelements. Interspersed with the RHS genes are a few copies of truncated RNA polymerase pseudogenes as well as expression site associated (pseudo)genes (ESAGs) 3 and 4, and 76 bp repeats. These features are reminiscent of a vestigial variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression site. The other end of the chromosome contains a 30-kb array of VSG genes, the majority of which are pseudogenes, suggesting that this region may be a site for modular de novo construction of VSG gene diversity during transposition/gene conversion events. PMID:12907728

  18. Delineation and analysis of chromosomal regions specifying Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbise, Anne; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Huon, Christèle; Fayolle, Corinne; Demeure, Christian E; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Médigue, Claudine; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2010-09-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has recently diverged from the less virulent enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Its emergence has been characterized by massive genetic loss and inactivation and limited gene acquisition. The acquired genes include two plasmids, a filamentous phage, and a few chromosomal loci. The aim of this study was to characterize the chromosomal regions acquired by Y. pestis. Following in silico comparative analysis and PCR screening of 98 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis, we found that eight chromosomal loci (six regions [R1pe to R6pe] and two coding sequences [CDS1pe and CDS2pe]) specified Y. pestis. Signatures of integration by site specific or homologous recombination were identified for most of them. These acquisitions and the loss of ancestral DNA sequences were concentrated in a chromosomal region opposite to the origin of replication. The specific regions were acquired very early during Y. pestis evolution and were retained during its microevolution, suggesting that they might bring some selective advantages. Only one region (R3pe), predicted to carry a lambdoid prophage, is most likely no longer functional because of mutations. With the exception of R1pe and R2pe, which have the potential to encode a restriction/modification and a sugar transport system, respectively, no functions could be predicted for the other Y. pestis-specific loci. To determine the role of the eight chromosomal loci in the physiology and pathogenicity of the plague bacillus, each of them was individually deleted from the bacterial chromosome. None of the deletants exhibited defects during growth in vitro. Using the Xenopsylla cheopis flea model, all deletants retained the capacity to produce a stable and persistent infection and to block fleas. Similarly, none of the deletants caused any acute flea toxicity. In the mouse model of infection, all deletants were fully virulent upon subcutaneous or aerosol infections. Therefore

  19. The sequence and analysis of Trypanosoma brucei chromosome II

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sayed, Najib M. A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Song, Jinming; MacLeod, Annette; Bringaud, Frederic; Larkin, Christopher; Wanless, David; Peterson, Jeremy; Hou, Lihua; Taylor, Sonya; Tweedie, Alison; Biteau, Nicolas; Khalak, Hanif G.; Lin, Xiaoying; Mason, Tanya

    2003-01-01

    We report here the sequence of chromosome II from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The 1.2-Mb pairs encode about 470 predicted genes organised in 17 directional clusters on either strand, the largest cluster of which has 92 genes lined up over a 284-kb region. An analysis of the GC skew reveals strand compositional asymmetries that coincide with the distribution of protein-coding genes, suggesting these asymmetries may be the result of transcription-couple...

  20. Delimiting the origin of a B chromosome by FISH mapping, chromosome painting and DNA sequence analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duílio M Z de A Silva

    Full Text Available Supernumerary (B chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism.

  1. Localization of the gene for the ciliary neutrotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) to human chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, D.H.; Jones, C.; Patterson, D. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States) Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO (United States)); Britt, D.E.; Jackson, C.L. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to be important for the survival of motor neurons and has shown activity in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). CNTF therefore holds promise as a treatment for ALS, and it and its receptor (CNTFR) are candidates for a gene involved in familial ALS. The CNTFR gene was mapped to chromosome 9 by PCR on a panel of human/CHO somatic cell hybrids and localized to 9p13 by PCR on a panel of radiation hybrids. 18 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genome of spinach single chromosome complement is about 1000 Mbp, which is the model material to study the molecular mechanisms of plant sex differentiation. The cytological study showed that the biggest spinach chromosome (chromosome 1) was taken as spinach sex chromosome. It had three alleles of ...

  3. Molecular cloning of a cDNA and chromosomal localization of a human theta-class glutathione S-transferase gene (GSTT2) to chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.L.; Baker, R.T.; Board, P.G. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    Until recently the Theta-class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were largely overlooked due to their low activity with the model substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and their failure to bind to immobilized glutathione affinity matrices. Little is known about the number of genes in this class. Recently, Pemble et al. reported the cDNA cloning of a human Theta-class GST, termed GSTT1. In this study, we describe the molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding a second human Theta-class GST (GSTT2) from a {lambda}gt11 human liver 5{prime}-stretch cDNA library. The encoded protein contains 244 amino acids and has 78.3% sequence identity with the rat subunit 12 and only 55.0% identity with human GSTT1. GSTT2 has been mapped to chromosome 22 by somatic cell hybrid analysis. The precise position of the gene was localized to subband 22q11.2 by in situ hybridization. The absence of other regions of hybridization suggests that there are no closely related sequences (e.g., reverse transcribed pseudogenes) scattered throughout the genome and that if there are closely related genes, they must be clustered near GSTT2. Southern blot analysis of human DNA digested with BamHI shows that the size of the GSTT2 gene is relatively small, as the coding sequence falls within a 3.6-kb BamHI fragment. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Radiation dosimetry by automatic image analysis of dicentric chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayley, R.; Carothers, A.; Farrow, S.; Gordon, J.; Ji, L.; Piper, J.; Rutovitz, D.; Stark, M.; Chen, X.; Wald, N.; Pittsburgh Univ., PA

    1991-01-01

    A system for scoring dicentric chromosomes by image analysis comprised fully automatic location of mitotic cells, automatic retrieval, focus and digitisation at high resolution, automatic rejection of nuclei and debris and detection and segmentation of chromosome clusters, automatic centromere location, and subsequent rapid interactive visual review of potential dicentric chromosomes to confirm positives and reject false positives. A calibration set of about 15000 cells was used to establish the quadratic dose response for 60 Co γ-irradiation. The dose-response function parameters were established by a maximum likelihood technique, and confidence limits in the dose response and in the corresponding inverse curve, of estimated dose for observed dicentric frequency, were established by Monte Carlo techniques. The system was validated in a blind trial by analysing a test comprising a total of about 8000 cells irradiated to 1 of 10 dose levels, and estimating the doses from the observed dicentric frequency. There was a close correspondence between the estimated and true doses. The overall sensitivity of the system in terms of the proportion of the total population of dicentrics present in the cells analysed that were detected by the system was measured to be about 40%. This implies that about 2.5 times more cells must be analysed by machine than by visual analysis. Taking this factor into account, the measured review time and false positive rates imply that analysis by the system of sufficient cells to provide the equivalent of a visual analysis of 500 cells would require about 1 h for operator review. (author). 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  5. Human placental Na+, K+-ATPase α subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na + , K + -ATPase α subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the α subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na + , K + -ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (≅ 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) λgt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the α subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1

  6. Comparison of genomes of eight species of sections Linum and Adenolinum from the genus Linum based on chromosome banding, molecular markers and RAPD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravenko, Olga V; Yurkevich, Olga Yu; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Nosova, Inna V; Zelenina, Daria A; Volkov, Alexander A; Popov, Konstantin V; Zelenin, Alexander V

    2009-03-01

    Karyotypes of species sects. Linum and Adenolinum have been studied using C/DAPI-banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with 5S and 26S rDNA and RAPD analysis. C/DAPI-banding patterns enabled identification of all homologous chromosome pairs in the studied karyotypes. The revealed high similarity between species L. grandiflorum (2n = 16) and L. decumbens by chromosome and molecular markers proved their close genome relationship and identified the chromosome number in L. decumbens as 2n = 16. The similarity found for C/DAPI-banding patterns between species with the same chromosome numbers corresponds with the results obtained by RAPD-analysis, showing clusterization of 16-, 18- and 30-chromosome species into three separate groups. 5S rDNA and 26S rDNA were co-localized in NOR-chromosome 1 in the genomes of all species investigated. In 30-chromosome species, there were three separate 5S rDNA sites in chromosomes 3, 8 and 13. In 16-chromosome species, a separate 5S rDNA site was also located in chromosome 3, whereas in 18-chromosome species it was found in the long arm of NOR-chromosome 1. Thus, the difference in localization of rDNA sites in species with 2n = 16, 2n = 30 and 2n = 18 confirms taxonomists opinion, who attributed these species to different sects. Linum and Adenolinum, respectively. The obtained results suggest that species with 2n = 16, 2n = 18 and 2n = 30 originated from a 16-chromosome ancestor.

  7. Chromosome aberration analysis for biological dosimetry: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.F.D.; Venkatachalam, P.; Jeevanram, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Among various biological dosimetry techniques, dicentric chromosome aberration method appears to be the method of choice in analysing accidental radiation exposure in most of the laboratories. The major advantage of this method is its sensitivity as the number of dicentric chromosomes present in control population is too small and more importantly radiation induces mainly dicentric chromosome aberration among unstable aberration. This report brings out the historical development of various cytogenetic methods, the basic structure of DNA, chromosomes and different forms of chromosome aberrations. It also highlights the construction of dose-response curve for dicentric chromosome and its use in the estimation of radiation dose. (author)

  8. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Prosser, J.S.; Moquet, J.E.; Finnon, P.

    1984-03-01

    During 1983, 29 cases of suspected overexposure to ionising radiation were referred to NRPB for investigation by cytogenetic analysis, and the results are presented in this report. Of the 29 cases, 15 were associated with industrial radiography, seven originated from one or other of the major nuclear organisations and the remaining seven were from an institution of research, education or health. In 21 cases no biological indication of overexposure was found, and of the remaining eight the highest positive dose estimate was 0.4 Gy. The chromosome data are compared with information obtained from physical dosimetry, and a brief summary is given of the circumstances of each case. (author)

  9. Identification of the human beta A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2): localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T. J.; Cerosaletti, K. M.; Fournier, R. E.; Sinke, R. J.; Rocchi, M.; Marzella, R.; Jenkins, N. A.; Gilbert, D. J.; Copeland, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine beta A2 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe.

  10. Identification of the human beta A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2) : localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T J; Cerosaletti, K M; Fournier, R E; Sinke, R J; Rocchi, M; Marzella, R; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G

    1995-01-01

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine beta A2 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe.

  11. Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A interacts with primary microcephaly protein ASPM, localizes to centrosomes and regulates chromosome segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Singhmar

    Full Text Available Many proteins associated with the phenotype microcephaly have been localized to the centrosome or linked to it functionally. All the seven autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH proteins localize at the centrosome. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II protein PCNT and Seckel syndrome (also characterized by severe microcephaly protein ATR are also centrosomal proteins. All of the above findings show the importance of centrosomal proteins as the key players in neurogenesis and brain development. However, the exact mechanism as to how the loss-of-function of these proteins leads to microcephaly remains to be elucidated. To gain insight into the function of the most commonly mutated MCPH gene ASPM, we used the yeast two-hybrid technique to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library with an ASPM bait. The analysis identified Angelman syndrome gene product UBE3A as an ASPM interactor. Like ASPM, UBE3A also localizes to the centrosome. The identification of UBE3A as an ASPM interactor is not surprising as more than 80% of Angelman syndrome patients have microcephaly. However, unlike in MCPH, microcephaly is postnatal in Angelman syndrome patients. Our results show that UBE3A is a cell cycle regulated protein and its level peaks in mitosis. The shRNA knockdown of UBE3A in HEK293 cells led to many mitotic abnormalities including chromosome missegregation, abnormal cytokinesis and apoptosis. Thus our study links Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A to ASPM, centrosome and mitosis for the first time. We suggest that a defective chromosome segregation mechanism is responsible for the development of microcephaly in Angelman syndrome.

  12. Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A interacts with primary microcephaly protein ASPM, localizes to centrosomes and regulates chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhmar, Pooja; Kumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins associated with the phenotype microcephaly have been localized to the centrosome or linked to it functionally. All the seven autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) proteins localize at the centrosome. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II protein PCNT and Seckel syndrome (also characterized by severe microcephaly) protein ATR are also centrosomal proteins. All of the above findings show the importance of centrosomal proteins as the key players in neurogenesis and brain development. However, the exact mechanism as to how the loss-of-function of these proteins leads to microcephaly remains to be elucidated. To gain insight into the function of the most commonly mutated MCPH gene ASPM, we used the yeast two-hybrid technique to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library with an ASPM bait. The analysis identified Angelman syndrome gene product UBE3A as an ASPM interactor. Like ASPM, UBE3A also localizes to the centrosome. The identification of UBE3A as an ASPM interactor is not surprising as more than 80% of Angelman syndrome patients have microcephaly. However, unlike in MCPH, microcephaly is postnatal in Angelman syndrome patients. Our results show that UBE3A is a cell cycle regulated protein and its level peaks in mitosis. The shRNA knockdown of UBE3A in HEK293 cells led to many mitotic abnormalities including chromosome missegregation, abnormal cytokinesis and apoptosis. Thus our study links Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A to ASPM, centrosome and mitosis for the first time. We suggest that a defective chromosome segregation mechanism is responsible for the development of microcephaly in Angelman syndrome.

  13. Physical localization of molecular markers and assignment of the 15th linkage group to chromosome 11 of the karyotype in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by primed in situ labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J F; Yin, H; Gao, H Q; Zhuang, N S; Liu, J P

    2015-07-28

    Physical localization of molecular markers and assignment of the 15th linkage group to chromosome 11 of the karyotype in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) were achieved using primed in situ labeling. Amplified signals for both the EST507-1 and SSRY13-5 markers were consistently observed in different stages of cell division. A comparison of the length, arm ratio, and other morphological characteristics of somatic metaphase chromosomes in karyotype analysis indicated that the EST507-1 and SSRY13-5 markers were localized on the short and long arm of cassava chromosome 11 with the relative map positions of 41.67 and 23.07, respectively. The physical localization of the 2 markers on chromosome 11 of the karyotype corresponds to their positions on the 15th linkage group in cassava.

  14. Human phenol sulfotransferase STP2 gene: Molecular cloning, structural characterization, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Her, C.; Raftogianis, R.; Weinshilboum, R.M. [Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Sulfonation is an important pathway in the biotransformation of many drugs, xenobiotics, neurotransmitters, and steroid hormones. The thermostable (TS) form of phenol sulfotransferase (PST) preferentially catalyzes the sulfonation of {open_quotes}simple{close_quotes} planar phenols, and levels of activity of TS PST in human tissues are controlled by inheritance. Two different human liver TS PST cDNAs have been cloned that encode proteins with amino acid sequences that are 96% identical. We have determined the structure and chromosomal localization of the gene for one of these two cDNAs, STP2, as a step toward understanding molecular genetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of this enzyme activity in humans. STP2 spans approximately 5.1 kb and contains nine exons that range in length from 74 to 347 bp. The locations of most STP2 exon-intron splice junctions are identical to those of a gene for the thermolabile form of PST in humans, STM; a rat PST gene; a human estrogen ST (EST) gene, STE; and a guinea pig EST gene. The two initial STP2 exons, IA and IB, were identified by performing 5{prime}-rapid amplification of cDNA ends with human liver cDNA as template. Exons IA and IB are noncoding and represent two different human liver TS PST cDNA 5{prime}untranslated region sequences. The two apparent 5{prime}-ons IA and IB, contain no canonical TATA boxes, but do contain CCAAT elements. STP2 was localized to human chromosome 16 by performing the PCR with DNA from NIGMS human/rodent somatic cell hybrids as template. Structural characterization of STP2 will make it possible to begin to study molecular genetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of TS PST activity in human tissues. 63 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Investigation of the diagnostic value of chromosome analysis and bacterial artificial chromosome-based array comparative genomic hybridization in prenatal diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    SAVLI, HAKAN; KESKİN, SEDA EREN; ÇİNE, NACİ

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: To investigate the diagnostic value of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and chromosome analysis in prenatal diagnosis. Materials and methods: This study included the chromosome analysis and BAC-based array CGH analysis of 140 amniocentesis samples with prenatal diagnosis indications. Results: Karyotype analysis showed trisomy 21 in 4 patients, trisomy 18 in 5 patients, monosomy X in 1 patient, and other anomalies in 3 ...

  16. Extensive synteny conservation of holocentric chromosomes in Lepidoptera despite high rates of local genome rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alençon, E; Sezutsu, H; Legeai, F; Permal, E; Bernard-Samain, S; Gimenez, S; Gagneur, C; Cousserans, F; Shimomura, M; Brun-Barale, A; Flutre, T; Couloux, A; East, P; Gordon, K; Mita, K; Quesneville, H; Fournier, P; Feyereisen, R

    2010-04-27

    The recent assembly of the silkworm Bombyx mori genome with 432 Mb on 28 holocentric chromosomes has become a reference in the genomic analysis of the very diverse Order of Lepidoptera. We sequenced BACs from two major pests, the noctuid moths Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda, corresponding to 15 regions distributed on 11 B. mori chromosomes, each BAC/region being anchored by known orthologous gene(s) to analyze syntenic relationships and genome rearrangements among the three species. Nearly 300 genes and numerous transposable elements were identified, with long interspersed nuclear elements and terminal inverted repeats the most abundant transposable element classes. There was a high degree of synteny conservation between B. mori and the two noctuid species. Conserved syntenic blocks of identified genes were very small, however, approximately 1.3 genes per block between B. mori and the two noctuid species and 2.0 genes per block between S. frugiperda and H. armigera. This corresponds to approximately two chromosome breaks per Mb DNA per My. This is a much higher evolution rate than among species of the Drosophila genus and may be related to the holocentric nature of the lepidopteran genomes. We report a large cluster of eight members of the aminopeptidase N gene family that we estimate to have been present since the Jurassic. In contrast, several clusters of cytochrome P450 genes showed multiple lineage-specific duplication events, in particular in the lepidopteran CYP9A subfamily. Our study highlights the value of the silkworm genome as a reference in lepidopteran comparative genomics.

  17. MORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS ON CHROMOSOMES OF TROPICAL Pinus SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lília Rosário Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Karyotypic analysis of Pinus oocarpa Schiede ex Schltdl., Pinus patula Schltdl. & Cham. and of provenances Jócon Yoro, Las Camelias and San Rafael del Norte of Pinus tecunumanii Eguiluz & J. P. Perry were accomplished to provide information for definition of Pinus tecunumanii taxonomic status. Characterization of mitotic chromosomes stained with Giemsa and with 4', 6-diamidino-2- phenylindoldihydrochlorid (DAPI fluorochrome confirmed the karyotypic pattern reported for most of the Pinus species, which present eleven pairs of metacentric chromosomes, very similar in regard to length and morphology, and a submetacentric pair for all the taxa studied. Sharp definition of secondary constrictionsrevealed by DAPI staining allowed distinction of species and provenances by the number and position of this cytological marker. Pinus tecunumanii was also different from the other two species in regard to total length of haploid set. The results support the species status for Pinus tecunumanii as well as present evidence that in addition to point mutations, structural alterations contributed toward intra and interspecies differentiation into the genus Pinus.

  18. Localization of the Laevigatum powdery mildew resistance gene to barley chromosome 2 by the use of RFLP markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.; Holm-Jensen, A.G.; Jensen, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The powdery mildew disease resistance gene Ml(La) was found to belong to a locus on barely chromosome 2. We suggest that this locus be designated MlLa. Linkage analysis was carried out on 72 chromosome-doubled, spring-type progeny lines from a cross between the winter var 'Vogelsanger Gold' and t......' and the spring var 'Alf'. A map of chromosome 2 spanning 119 cM and flanked by two peroxidase gene loci was constructed. In addition to the Laevigatum resistance locus the map includes nine RFLP markers, the two peroxidase gene loci and the six-row locus in barley....

  19. Localization of the Laevigatum powdery mildew resistance gene to barley chromosome 2 by the use of RFLP markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.; Holm-Jensen, A.G.; Jensen, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The powdery mildew disease resistance gene Ml(La) was found to belong to a locus on barely chromosome 2. We suggest that this locus be designated MlLa. Linkage analysis was carried out on 72 chromosome-doubled, spring-type progeny lines from a cross between the winter var 'Vogelsanger Gold......' and the spring var 'Alf'. A map of chromosome 2 spanning 119 cM and flanked by two peroxidase gene loci was constructed. In addition to the Laevigatum resistance locus the map includes nine RFLP markers, the two peroxidase gene loci and the six-row locus in barley....

  20. Hematoxylin: a simple, multiple-use dye for chromosome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerra Marcelo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A staining mixture of hematoxylin-iron alum combined with a strong hydrochloric hydrolysis was successfully applied for chromosome observation of several kinds of plants and some animals. Slightly different procedures were developed for different materials and objectives. For plant cells, the most important technical aspect was the use of 5 N HCl hydrolysis, which resulted in a very transparent cytoplasm, combined with an intense, specific hematoxylin stain. This technique is recommended for cytogenetical analysis in general, and it is especially indicated for practical classes, due to its simplicity and high reproducibility of results. Moreover, the deep contrast observed makes this technique very useful for sequential staining of cells previously analyzed with other stains, as well as for materials with fixation problems.

  1. Chromosomal rearrangement segregating with adrenoleukodystrophy: A molecular analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sack, G.H. Jr.; Morrell, J.C.; Chen, G.; Chen, W.; Moser, H.W. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Alpern, M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Webster, T.; Caskey, C.T. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Houston, TX (United States) Baylore College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Feil, R.P. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale Unite Associatee, Strasbourg (France))

    1993-10-15

    The relationship between X chromosome-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and the red/green color pigment gene cluster on Xq28 was investigated in a large kindred. The DNA in a hemizygous male showed altered restriction fragment sizes compatible with at least a deletion extending from the 5[prime] end of the color pigment genes. Segregation analysis using a DNA probe within the color pigment gene cluster showed significant linkage with adrenoleukodystrophy (logarithm of odds score of 3.19 at [theta] = 0.0). These data demonstrate linkage, rather than association, between a unique molecular rearrangement in the color pigment gene cluster and adrenoleukodystrophy. The DNA changes in this region are thus likely to be helpful for determining the location and identity of the responsible gene. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Analysis of SINE and LINE repeat content of Y chromosomes in the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortschak, R Daniel; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Monotremes feature an extraordinary sex-chromosome system that consists of five X and five Y chromosomes in males. These sex chromosomes share homology with bird sex chromosomes but no homology with the therian X. The genome of a female platypus was recently completed, providing unique insights into sequence and gene content of autosomes and X chromosomes, but no Y-specific sequence has so far been analysed. Here we report the isolation, sequencing and analysis of approximately 700 kb of sequence of the non-recombining regions of Y2, Y3 and Y5, which revealed differences in base composition and repeat content between autosomes and sex chromosomes, and within the sex chromosomes themselves. This provides the first insights into repeat content of Y chromosomes in platypus, which overall show similar patterns of repeat composition to Y chromosomes in other species. Interestingly, we also observed differences between the various Y chromosomes, and in combination with timing and activity patterns we provide an approach that can be used to examine the evolutionary history of the platypus sex-chromosome chain.

  3. Chromosomes in the flow to simplify genome analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Šafář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2012), s. 397-416 ISSN 1438-793X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1740; GA ČR GAP501/10/1778 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Chromosome sorting * Chromosome-specific BAC libraries * Chromosome sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2012

  4. Localization of introduced genes on the chromosomes of transgenic barley, wheat and triticale by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Zimny, J.; Becker, D.

    1997-01-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we localized introduced genes on metaphase chromosomes of barley, wheat, and triticale transformed by microprojectile bombardment of microspores and scutellar tissue with the pDB1 plasmid containing the uidA and bar genes. Thirteen integration sites...

  5. Patterns of rDNA chromosomal localization in Palearctic Cephalota and Cylindera (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelini with different numbers of X-chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia J. R. Proença

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The ribosomal clusters of six Paleartic taxa belonging to the tiger beetle genera Cephalota Dokhtourow, 1883 and Cylindera Westwood, 1831, with multiple sex chromosomes (XXY, XXXY and XXXXY have been localised on mitotic and meiotic cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, using a PCR-amplified 18S rDNA fragment as a probe. Four patterns of rDNA localization in these tiger beetles were found: 1. Two clusters located in one autosomal pair; 2. Two clusters located in one autosomal pair and one in an X chromosome; 3. Three clusters located in three heterosomes (XXY; 4. Two clusters located in one autosomal pair and two in the heterosomes (one of the Xs and the Y. These results illustrate that ribosomal cistrons have changed their number and localization during the evolution of these genera, showing a dynamic rather than a conservative pattern. These changes in rDNA localization are uncoupled with changes in the number of autosomes and/or heterosomes. A mechanism that involves transposable elements that carry ribosomal cistrons appears to be the most plausible explanation for these dynamics that involve jumping from one location in the genome to another, in some cases leaving copies in the original location.

  6. Chromosomal localization of ribosomal and telomeric DNA provides new insights on the evolution of gomphocerinae grasshoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetybayev, I E; Bugrov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Camacho, J P M; Rubtsov, N B

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome location of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and telomeric repeats was analysed in mitotic chromosomes of 15 species of Gomphocerinae grasshoppers belonging to the tribes Arcypterini, Gomphocerini, Stenobothrini, and Chrysochraontini. Two types of rDNA distribution were found in the Gomphocerini tribe. Type 1, found in 9 species, was characterized by the presence of rDNA in the short arm of the long biarmed chromosomes 2 and 3 and, in some species, also in the X chromosome. Type 2 was found only in Aeropus sibiricus and Stauroderus scalaris and consisted in the presence of pericentromeric rDNA blocks in all chromosomes. A comparison of rDNA distribution in Gomphocerini species with 2n ♂ = 23, 2n ♂ = 21, and 2n ♂ = 17 suggested the possible involvement of chromosome 6 in the ancestral karyotype (2n ♂ = 23) in 1 of the 3 centric fusions that decreased the chromosome number in these species. In the tribe Stenobothrini, Stenobothrus eurasius carried a single rDNA cluster in the X chromosome, likewise 2 Spanish species previously analysed, but Omocestus viridulus unusually showed a single rDNA cluster in the longest autosome. Telomeric repeats were located primarily on the ends of chromosome arms. In 2 species, however, we observed the presence of interstitial clusters outside telomeric regions. The first one, Aeropus sibiricus, exhibited a polymorphic interstitial site of telomeric repeats in chromosome 6 as a consequence of a paracentric inversion. Most remarkably, Chorthippus jacobsoni showed the presence of telomeric repeats in the pericentric regions of the 3 biarmed chromosome pairs originated by centric fusion, thus suggesting that these rearrangements were not of the Robertsonian type but true centric fusion with a probable generation of dicentric chromosomes. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. [Molecular cytogenetic analysis of a case with ring chromosome 3 syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihui; Song, Fengling; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Ying; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yufeng; Liu, Yi; Gai, Zhongtao

    2016-12-10

    To investigate the genetic cause for a child with developmental delay and congenital heart disease through molecular cytogenetic analysis. G-banded karyotyping and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) were performed for the patient and his parents. The proband's karyotype was detected as ring chromosome 3, and a 3q26.3-25.3 deletion encompassing 45 genes has been found with CMA. Testing of both parents was normal. Clinical phenotype of the patient with ring chromosome 3 mainly depends on the involved genes. It is necessary to combine CMA and karyotyping for the diagnosis of ring chromosome, as CMA can provide more accurate information for variations of the genome.

  8. Computer aided analysis of additional chromosome aberrations in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia using a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohr Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of complex cytogenetic databases of distinct leukaemia entities may help to detect rare recurring chromosome aberrations, minimal common regions of gains and losses, and also hot spots of genomic rearrangements. The patterns of the karyotype alterations may provide insights into the genetic pathways of disease progression. Results We developed a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation (SCCN by which chromosome findings are normalised at a resolution of 400 bands. Lost or gained chromosomes or chromosome segments are specified in detail, and ranges of chromosome breakpoint assignments are recorded. Software modules were written to summarise the recorded chromosome changes with regard to the respective chromosome involvement. To assess the degree of karyotype alterations the ploidy levels and numbers of numerical and structural changes were recorded separately, and summarised in a complex karyotype aberration score (CKAS. The SCCN and CKAS were used to analyse the extend and the spectrum of additional chromosome aberrations in 94 patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and secondary chromosome anomalies. Dosage changes of chromosomal material represented 92.1% of all additional events. Recurring regions of chromosome losses were identified. Structural rearrangements affecting (pericentromeric chromosome regions were recorded in 24.6% of the cases. Conclusions SCCN and CKAS provide unifying elements between karyotypes and computer processable data formats. They proved to be useful in the investigation of additional chromosome aberrations in Ph-positive ALL, and may represent a step towards full automation of the analysis of large and complex karyotype databases.

  9. Metaphase chromosome analysis by ligation-mediated PCR: heritable chromatin structure and a comparison of active and inactive X chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkovitz, M; Riggs, A D

    1995-03-14

    We report that ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) can be used for high-resolution study of metaphase chromosomes, and we discuss the role of metaphase chromatin structure in the preservation of differentiated cell states. The X chromosome-linked human PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) promoter region was investigated, and euchromatic active X chromosome (Xa) metaphase chromatin was compared with interphase Xa chromatin and to heterochromatic inactive X chromosome (Xi) metaphase and interphase chromatin. We find that (i) good-quality data at single-nucleotide resolution can be obtained by LMPCR analysis of dimethyl sulfate-treated intact metaphase cells; (ii) transcription factors present on the Xa promoter of interphase chromatin are not present on metaphase chromatin, establishing that the transcription complex on the PGK1 promoter must form de novo each cell generation; and (iii) the dimethyl sulfate reactivity pattern of Xa and Xi chromatin at metaphase is very similar to that of naked DNA. These results are discussed in the context of models for heritable chromatin structure and epigenetic mechanisms for cell memory, and they are also relevant to more general aspects of chromatin structure and differences between euchromatin and heterochromatin.

  10. Microscopes and computers combined for analysis of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. W.; Butler, M. K.; Stroud, A. N.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning machine CHLOE, developed for photographic use, is combined with a digital computer to obtain quantitative and statistically significant data on chromosome shapes, distribution, density, and pairing. CHLOE permits data acquisition about a chromosome complement to be obtained two times faster than by manual pairing.

  11. The Detection and Analysis of Chromosome Fragile Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Özer, Özgün; Hickson, Ian D

    2018-01-01

    A fragile site is a chromosomal locus that is prone to form a gap or constriction visible within a condensed metaphase chromosome, particularly following exposure of cells to DNA replication stress. Based on their frequency, fragile sites are classified as either common (CFSs; present in all...

  12. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trast to mitotic cell cultures, the assessment of chromosomal. Figure 7. Prematurely condensed sperm chromatin in uncleaved oocytes. (a) Part of metaphase with 12 oocyte chromosomes (num- bered) and sperm chromatids of which the smaller ones (arrows) re- semble oocyte chromatids. (b) Part of metaphase with single ...

  13. Localization of a gene for an autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism to chromosome 6q25.2-27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumine, Hiroto; Shimoda-Matsubayashi, Satoe; Nakagawa-Hattori, Yuko [Tokyo Metropolitan Ebara Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    An autosomal recessive form of juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP) (MIM 600116) is a levodopa-responsive Parkinsonism whose pathological finding is a highly selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the zona compacta of the substantia nigra. By linkage analysis of diallelic polymorphism of the Mn-superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2), we found a family with AR-JP showing perfect segregation of the disease with the SOD2 locus. By extending the linkage analysis to 13 families with AR-JP, we discovered strong evidence for the localization of the AR-JP gene at chromosome 6q25.2-27, including the SOD2 locus, with the maximal cumulative pairwise LOD scores of 7.26 and 7.71 at D6S305 ({theta} = .03) and D6S253 ({theta} = .02), respectively. Observation of obligate recombination events, as well as multipoint linkage analysis, placed the AR-JP gene in a 17-cM interval between D6S437 and D6S264. Delineation of the AR-JP gene will be an important step toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying selective degeneration of the nigral neurons. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Chromosomal localization of rDNA and DAPI bands in solanaceous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bands in the telomeric region of short arm. The two chro- mosomes that support secondary constriction had only weak. DAPI-positive bands in their centromeric region, but their. 45S rDNA chromosomal site showed DAPI-negative bands. Chromosomes 4 and 17 did not show any DAPI band. Taken in conjunction with the ...

  15. AN INTEGRATED MAP OF HUMAN-CHROMOSOME-13 ALLOWING REGIONAL LOCALIZATION OF GENETIC-MARKERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOY, RF; WIJNGAARD, A; VERLIND, E; SCHEFFER, H; BUYS, CHCM

    1995-01-01

    37 CA repeats, 5 STSs, 9 ESTs, and 4 genes were mapped to 19 different intervals of chromosome 13 determined by the cytogenetic breakpoints of 19 different cell lines with interstitial deletions or translocations involving various parts of chromosome 13. A framework genetic linkage map was

  16. Human interleukin 2 receptor β-chain gene: Chromosomal localization and identification of 5' regulatory sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnarra, J.R.; Otani, Hiroki; Wang, M.G.; McBride, O.W.; Sharon, M.; Leonard, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) binds to and stimulates activated T cells through high-affinity IL-2 receptors (IL-2Rs). Such receptors represent a complex consisting of at least two proteins, the 55-kDa IL-2Rα chain and the 70-kDa IL-2Rβ chain. The low-affinity, IL-2Rα chain cannot by itself transduce a mitogenic signal, whereas IL-2 stimulates resting lymphocytes through the intermediate-affinity, IL-2Rβ receptor. The authors report here identification of the genomic locus for IL-2Rβ. The exons are contained on four EcoRI fragments of 1.1, 9.2, 7.2, and 13.7 kilobases. The 1.1-kilobase EcoRI fragment lies at the 5'-most end of the genomic locus and contains promoter sequences. The promoter contains no TATA box-like elements but does contain the d(GT) n class of middle repetitive elements, which may play an interesting regulatory role. The IL-2Rβ gene is localized to chromosome 22q11.2-q12, a region that is the locus for several lymphoid neoplasias

  17. Detailed analysis of X chromosome inactivation in a 49,XXXXX pentasomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes Albert N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pentasomy X (49,XXXXX has been associated with a severe clinical condition, presumably resulting from failure or disruption of X chromosome inactivation. Here we report that some human X chromosomes from a patient with 49,XXXXX pentasomy were functionally active following isolation in inter-specific (human-rodent cell hybrids. A comparison with cytogenetic and molecular findings provided evidence that more than one active X chromosome was likely to be present in the cells of this patient, accounting for her abnormal phenotype. Results 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU-pulsed cultures showed different patterns among late replicating X chromosomes suggesting that their replication was asynchronic and likely to result in irregular inactivation. Genotyping of the proband and her mother identified four maternal and one paternal X chromosomes in the proband. It also identified the paternal X chromosome haplotype (P, indicating that origin of this X pentasomy resulted from two maternal, meiotic non-disjunctions. Analysis of the HUMANDREC region of the androgen receptor (AR gene in the patient's mother showed a skewed inactivation pattern, while a similar analysis in the proband showed an active paternal X chromosome and preferentially inactivated X chromosomes carrying the 173 AR allele. Analyses of 33 cell hybrid cell lines selected in medium containing hypoxanthine, aminopterin and thymidine (HAT allowed for the identification of three maternal X haplotypes (M1, M2 and MR and showed that X chromosomes with the M1, M2 and P haplotypes were functionally active. In 27 cell hybrids in which more than one X haplotype were detected, analysis of X inactivation patterns provided evidence of preferential inactivation. Conclusion Our findings indicated that 12% of X chromosomes with the M1 haplotype, 43.5% of X chromosomes with the M2 haplotype, and 100% of the paternal X chromosome (with the P haplotype were likely to be functionally active in the

  18. Localization of preferential sites of rearrangement within the BCR gene in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denny, C.T.; Shah, N.P.; Ogden, S.; Willman, C.; McConnell, T.; Crist, W.; Carroll, A.; Witte, O.N.

    1989-01-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been linked to a hybrid BCR/ABL protein product that differs from that found in chronic myelogenous leukemia. This implies that the molecular structures of the two chromosomal translocations also differ. Localization of translocation breakpoints in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL has been impeded due to the only partial characterization of the BCR locus. The authors have isolated the entire 130-kilobase BCR genomic locus from a human cosmid library. They have demonstrated that these breakpoints are all located at the 3' end of the intron around an unusual restriction fragment length polymorphism caused by deletion of a 1-kilobase fragment containing Alu family reiterated sequences. This clustering is unexpected in light of previous theories of rearrangement in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia that would have predicted a random dispersion of breakpoints in the first intron in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL. The proximity of the translocation breakpoints to this constitutive deletion may indicate shared mechanisms of rearrangement or that such polymorphisms mark areas of the genome prone to recombination

  19. Preparation and bivariate analysis of suspensions of human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van den Engh, G.J.; Trask, B.J.; Gray, J.W.; Langlois, R.G.; Yu, L.C.

    1985-01-01

    Chromosomes were isolated from a variety of human cell types using a HEPES-buffered hypotonic solution (pH 8.0) containing KCl, MgSO/sub 4/ dithioerythritol, and RNase. The chromosomes isolated by this procedure could be stained with a variety of fluorescent stains including propidium iodide, chromomycin A3, and Hoeschst 33258. Addition of sodium citrate to the stained chromosomes was found to improve the total fluorescence resolution. High-quality bivariate Hoeschst vs. chromomycin fluorescence distributions were obtained for chromosomes isolated from a human fibroblast cell strain, a human colon carcinoma cell line, and human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. Good flow karyotypes were also obtained from primary amniotic cell cultures. The Hoeschst vs. chromomycin flow karyotypes of a given cell line, made at different times and at dye concentrations varying over fourfold ranges, show little variation in the relative peak positions of the chromosomes. The size of the DNA in chromosomes isolated using this procedure ranges from 20 to 50 kilobases. The described isolation procedure is simple, it yields high-quality flow karyotypes, and it can be used to prepare chromosomes from clinical samples. 22 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  20. A Bayesian analysis of the chromosome architecture of human disorders by integrating reductionist data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Tripathi, Shailesh; Glazko, Galina V; Dehmer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach to estimate a chromosome and a disorder network from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. In contrast to other approaches, we obtain statistic rather than deterministic networks enabling a parametric control in the uncertainty of the underlying disorder-disease gene associations contained in the OMIM, on which the networks are based. From a structural investigation of the chromosome network, we identify three chromosome subgroups that reflect architectural differences in chromosome-disorder associations that are predictively exploitable for a functional analysis of diseases.

  1. Analysis of chromosome rearrangements on the basis of synaptonemal complexes in the offspring of mice exposed to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalikinskaya, E.I.; Bogdanov, Yu.F.; Kolomiets, O.L.; Shevchenko, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-microscopic analysis of synaptonemic complexes (SC), spread on the hypophase surface, was conducted to investigate chromosome rearrangements in sterile and semisterile F 1 malemause offsprings, exposed to 5 Gy γ-rays Paralelly Chromosome rearrangement account in diakinesis-metaphase 1 was conducted using light microscope, in the same animals. During SC analysis in pachytene chromosome rearrangements were found in 63% of spermatocytes. Under chromosome analysis in diakinesis-metaphase 1 in the same animals chromosome rearrangements were found only in 32% of cells. SC analysis allows one to reveal chromosome rearrangements, which can not be revealed in diakinesis-metaphase 1

  2. Mutational analysis of the terminal protein Tpg of Streptomyces chromosomes: identification of the deoxynucleotidylation site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chin Yang

    Full Text Available The linear chromosomes and linear plasmids of Streptomyces are capped by terminal proteins (TPs covalently bound to the 5' ends of the DNA. The TPs serve as primers for DNA synthesis that patches in the single-stranded gaps at the telomeres resulting from the bi-directional replication ('end patching'. Typical Streptomyces TPs, designated Tpgs, are conserved in sequence and size (about 185 amino acids, and contain a predicted helix-turn-helix domain and a functional nuclear localization signal. The Tpg-encoding gene (tpg is often accompanied by an upstream gene tap that encodes an essential telomere-associating protein. Five lone tpg variants (not accompanied by tap from various Streptomyces species were tested, and three were found to be pseudogenes. The lone tpg variant on the SLP2 plasmid, although functional, still requires the presence of tap on the chromosome for end patching. Using a combination of in vitro deoxynucleotidylation, physical localization, and genetic analysis, we identified the threonine at position 114 (T114 in Tpg of Streptomyces lividans chromosome as the deoxynucleotidylated site. Interestingly, T114 could be substituted by a serine without destroying the priming activity of Tpg in vitro and in vivo. Such T114S substitution is seen in and a number of pseudogenes as well as functional Tpgs. T114 lies in a predicted coil flanked by two short helixes in a highly hydrophilic region. The location and structural arrangement of the deoxynucleotidylated site in Tpg is similar to those in the TPs of phage ø 29 and adenoviruses. However, these TPs are distinct in their sequences and sizes, indicating that they have evolved independently during evolution. Using naturally occurring and artificially created tpg variants, we further identified several amino acid residues in the N-terminus and the helix-turn-helix domain that were important for functionality.

  3. The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzny, D.M.; Bolund, Lars; As part of the Chinese Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, E.T.A.L.

    2006-01-01

    chromosomes. Chromosome 3 comprises just four contigs, one of which currently represents the longest unbroken stretch of finished DNA sequence known so far. The chromosome is remarkable in having the lowest rate of segmental duplication in the genome. It also includes a chemokine receptor gene cluster as well...... as numerous loci involved in multiple human cancers such as the gene encoding FHIT, which contains the most common constitutive fragile site in the genome, FRA3B. Using genomic sequence from chimpanzee and rhesus macaque, we were able to characterize the breakpoints defining a large pericentric inversion...

  4. Cotton (Gossypium spp.) R2R3-MYB transcription factors SNP identification, phylogenomic characterization, chromosome localization, and linkage mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chuanfu; Saha, Sukumar; Jenkins, Johnie N; Ma, Din-Pow; Scheffler, Brian E; Kohel, Russell J; Yu, John Z; Stelly, David M

    2008-05-01

    R2R3-MYB transcription factors of plants are involved in the regulation of trichome length and density. Several of them are differentially expressed during initiation and elongation of cotton fibers. We report sequence phylogenomic characterization of the six MYB genes, their chromosomal localization, and linkage mapping via SNP marker in AD-genome cotton (2n = 52). Phylogenetic grouping and comparison to At- and Dt-genome putative ancestral diploid species of allotetraploid cotton facilitated differentiation between genome-specific polymorphisms (GSPs) and marker-suitable locus-specific polymorphisms (LSPs). The SNP frequency averaged one per 77 bases overall, and one per 106 and 30 bases in coding and non-coding regions, respectively. SNP-based multivariate relationships conformed to independent evolution of the six MYB homoeologous loci in the four tetraploid species. Nucleotide diversity analysis indicated that the six MYB loci evolved more quickly in the Dt- than At-genome. The greater variation in the Dt-D genome comparisons than that in At-A genome comparisons showed no significant bias among synonymous substitution, non-synonymous substitution, and nucleotide change in non-coding regions. SNPs were concordantly mapped by deletion analysis and linkage mapping, which confirmed their value as candidate gene markers and indicated the reliability of the SNP discovery strategy in tetraploid cotton species. We consider that these SNPs may be useful for genetic dissection of economically important fiber and yield traits because of the role of these genes in fiber development.

  5. In situ hybridization analysis of isodicentric X-chromosomes with short arm fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, J E; Kølvraa, S; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1990-01-01

    We present here an alternative approach to the study of mosaic cell lines containing dicentric chromosomes. The approach is based on chromosome-specific non-radioactive in situ hybridization with centromere (alpha satellite DNA) probes. The hybridization analysis may be used as an alternative to ...

  6. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome aberrations in desmoid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Magdalena; Kulig, Andrzej; Sygut, Jacek; Dziki, Adam; Simon, Dorota; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna; Ferenc, Tomasz

    2007-01-01

    To date there are only few reports concerning chromosomal changes in desmoid tumors. To extend the knowledge in this field we examined 19 samples from the patients diagnosed with desmoid tumors. In the present study formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded desmoid tumors were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a-satellite probes for chromosomes X, Y, 8 and 20. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in 6 cases, both abdominal and extra-abdominal tumors. FISH studies revealed one case of trisomy 8 and trisomy 20. In four patients we have identified monosomy 20. Our findings confirm earlier reports concerning the diversity of chromosomal changes in desmoid tumors and might suggest that both groups of abdominal and extra-abdominal tumors are genuine neoplasms.

  7. Y-chromosomal DNA analysis in French male lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Luis, E; Blanco-Verea, A; Brión, M; Van Huffel, V; Sánchez-Diz, P; Carracedo, A

    2014-03-01

    French population, despite of its crucial geographic location for repopulation movements of Europe across time, it has been insufficiently characterized at the genetic level, especially for Y-chromosomal DNA variation. In order to make a genetic structure characterization, we have analyzed the Y-chromosome diversity of 558 male individuals, scattered along 7 different French regions: Alsace (Strasbourg), Auvergne (Clermont-Ferrand), Bretagne (Rennes), Île-de-France (Paris), Midi-Pyrénées (Toulouse), Nord-Pas-de-Calais (Lille) and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (Marseille). A total of 17 Y-chromosome STRs and 27 Y-chromosome SNPs were genotyped for each individual. Even though we find that most of the individual populations in France were not differentiated from each other, Bretagne population shows population substructure, an important fact to be considered when establishing general population databases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Principle of least commitment in the analysis of chromosome images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, James M.; Gader, Paul D.; Caldwell, Charles W.

    1995-06-01

    The automation of chromosome identification and visualization for a complete cell (karyotyping) has been the subject of considerable research. While rather high classification rates are possible on individual chromosomes, the cell level classification rates are still quite low. We describe a system which uses partial confidence values generated by neural and fuzzy classifiers with optimization to increase the cell level recognition rates. This is consistent with Marr's Principle of Least Commitment for the design of intelligent computer vision algorithms.

  9. Dicentric chromosome frequency analysis using slit-scan flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, J.N.; Mullikin, J.C.; Gray, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Slit-scan flow cytometry (SSFCM) was used to quantify the frequency of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphoblastoid cells following gamma irradiation. In this study, cultured human cells were irradiated with 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy of 0.66 MeV gamma-rays, cultured for an additional 11 h, and treated for 5 h with colcemid. Chromosomes were then isolated, stained with propidium iodide, and analyzed using SSFCM for total fluorescence and slit-scan profile. The frequency of chromosomes having DNA contents greater than once and less than twice the DNA content of the number 1 chromosome and producing trimodal profiles was determined at each dose. This frequency was used as an estimate of the relative dicentric chromosome frequency at that dose. The estimated dicentric chromosome frequency per cell, f(D), increased with dose, D, in a linear-quadratic manner according to the relation f(D) = 4.52 x 10(-5) + 5.72 x 10(-5) D + 1.19 x 10(-4) D2

  10. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Purrott, R.J.; Prosser, J.S.; Dolphin, G.W.; Tipper, P.A.; Reeder, E.J.; White, C.M.; Cooper, S.J.; Stephenson, B.D.

    1977-01-01

    Results from cytogenetic investigations into 66 cases of suspected over-exposure to radiation during 1976 are reviewed. This report is the sixth in an annual series which together contain data on 272 studies. Previous results were published in NRPB-R5, R10, R23, R35 and R41. Results from all investigations have been pooled for general analysis. Brief accounts are given in an appendix of the circumstances behind the past year's investigations and, where possible, physical estimates of dose have been included for comparison. A short review is given of the laboratory's recently published dose response data for several energies of neutron radiation. A description is also given of the group's collaboration in an international experiment in which comparisons were made between a variety of dosemeters exposed to a controlled criticality pulse. In a second appendix two experiments are described in which inter- and intra-donor effects on chromosome aberration yields were examined. It was found that differences in dicentric yields were small whereas acentric aberrations were more variable. (author)

  11. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  12. Breakpoint localization of the marker chromosome associated with the cat eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, A M; Hough, C A; White, B N; McDermid, H E

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the breakpoints involved in the generation of the supernumerary bisatellited chromosome associated with the Cat Eye syndrome. In situ hybridization of DNA probes from band 22q11 revealed that, for two individuals with the Cat Eye syndrome, both breakpoints for the bisatellited chromosome were distal to the DNA sequence corresponding to probe D22S9 and proximal to the immunoglobulin C lambda genes and to at least one subgroup of the V lambda genes. PMID:3088989

  13. Breakpoint localization of the marker chromosome associated with the cat eye syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, A M; Hough, C A; White, B N; McDermid, H E

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the breakpoints involved in the generation of the supernumerary bisatellited chromosome associated with the Cat Eye syndrome. In situ hybridization of DNA probes from band 22q11 revealed that, for two individuals with the Cat Eye syndrome, both breakpoints for the bisatellited chromosome were distal to the DNA sequence corresponding to probe D22S9 and proximal to the immunoglobulin C lambda genes and to at least one subgroup of the V lambda genes.

  14. Gender-specific gene expression in post-mortem human brain: localization to sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawter, Marquis P; Evans, Simon; Choudary, Prabhakara; Tomita, Hiroaki; Meador-Woodruff, Jim; Molnar, Margherita; Li, Jun; Lopez, Juan F; Myers, Rick; Cox, David; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E

    2004-02-01

    Gender differences in brain development and in the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression have been reported. Gender differences in human brain might be related to patterns of gene expression. Microarray technology is one useful method for investigation of gene expression in brain. We investigated gene expression, cell types, and regional expression patterns of differentially expressed sex chromosome genes in brain. We profiled gene expression in male and female dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and cerebellum using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platform. Differentially expressed genes between males and females on the Y chromosome (DBY, SMCY, UTY, RPS4Y, and USP9Y) and X chromosome (XIST) were confirmed using real-time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of gender-specific genes and neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY in three brain regions examined. The XIST gene, which silences gene expression on regions of the X chromosome, is expressed in a subset of neurons. Since a subset of neurons express gender-specific genes, neural subpopulations may exhibit a subtle sexual dimorphism at the level of differences in gene regulation and function. The distinctive pattern of neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY and other sex chromosome genes in neuronal subpopulations may possibly contribute to gender differences in prevalence noted for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of the protein expression of these sex-chromosome-linked genes in brain tissue are required to address the functional consequences of the observed gene expression differences.

  15. A widespread chromosomal inversion polymorphism contributes to a major life-history transition, local adaptation, and reproductive isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Lowry

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of chromosomal inversions in adaptation and speciation is controversial. Historically, inversions were thought to contribute to these processes either by directly causing hybrid sterility or by facilitating the maintenance of co-adapted gene complexes. Because inversions suppress recombination when heterozygous, a recently proposed local adaptation mechanism predicts that they will spread if they capture alleles at multiple loci involved in divergent adaptation to contrasting environments. Many empirical studies have found inversion polymorphisms linked to putatively adaptive phenotypes or distributed along environmental clines. However, direct involvement of an inversion in local adaptation and consequent ecological reproductive isolation has not to our knowledge been demonstrated in nature. In this study, we discovered that a chromosomal inversion polymorphism is geographically widespread, and we test the extent to which it contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation under natural field conditions. Replicated crosses between the prezygotically reproductively isolated annual and perennial ecotypes of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus, revealed that alternative chromosomal inversion arrangements are associated with life-history divergence over thousands of kilometers across North America. The inversion polymorphism affected adaptive flowering time divergence and other morphological traits in all replicated crosses between four pairs of annual and perennial populations. To determine if the inversion contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation in natural populations, we conducted a novel reciprocal transplant experiment involving outbred lines, where alternative arrangements of the inversion were reciprocally introgressed into the genetic backgrounds of each ecotype. Our results demonstrate for the first time in nature the contribution of an inversion to adaptation, an annual/perennial life-history shift, and

  16. Detection of skewed X-chromosome inactivation in Fragile X syndrome and X chromosome aneuploidy using quantitative melt analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godler, David E; Inaba, Yoshimi; Schwartz, Charles E; Bui, Quang M; Shi, Elva Z; Li, Xin; Herlihy, Amy S; Skinner, Cindy; Hagerman, Randi J; Francis, David; Amor, David J; Metcalfe, Sylvia A; Hopper, John L; Slater, Howard R

    2015-07-01

    Methylation of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) exon 1/intron 1 boundary positioned fragile X related epigenetic element 2 (FREE2), reveals skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in fragile X syndrome full mutation (FM: CGG > 200) females. XCI skewing has been also linked to abnormal X-linked gene expression with the broader clinical impact for sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). In this study, 10 FREE2 CpG sites were targeted using methylation specific quantitative melt analysis (MS-QMA), including 3 sites that could not be analysed with previously used EpiTYPER system. The method was applied for detection of skewed XCI in FM females and in different types of SCA. We tested venous blood and saliva DNA collected from 107 controls (CGG X chromosomes, and in 5% of the 47,XXY individuals. MS-QMA output also showed significant correlation with the EpiTYPER reference method in FM males and females (P < 0.0001) and SCAs (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we demonstrate use of MS-QMA to quantify skewed XCI in two applications with diagnostic utility.

  17. Mouse microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamuta, Makoto; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Hoogeveen, R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) catalyzes the transfer of triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, and phospholipid between membranes. It is essential for the secretion of apolipoprotein B from the cell. Mutations in MTP are a major cause of abetalipoproteinemia. The mouse is a popular animal model for lipoprotein metabolism. We have cloned and sequenced mouse MTP cDNA. The DNA-deduced amino acid sequence indicates that mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence indicates that mouse MTP contains 894 amino acids; the mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence identity to the hamster, human, and bovine sequences, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicates that mouse MTP mRNA is expressed at high levels in the small intestine and at substantially lower levels in the liver and that it is not detectable in six other tissues examined. The mouse MTP gene has been localized to the distal region of chromosome 3 by Southern blots of interspecific backcross panels using progeny derived from matings of (C57BL/6J x SPRET/Ei)F1 x SPRET/Ei. Comparison of MTP sequences from human, bovine, hamster, and mouse indicates that the C-terminal region of MTP is better conserved than its N-terminal region. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Chromosomal Localization of Genes Conferring Desirable Agronomic Traits from Wheat-Agropyron cristatum Disomic Addition Line 5113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cuili; Yao, Miaomiao; Zhang, Jinpeng; Yang, Xinming; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xiuquan; Xi, Yajun; Li, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Creation of wheat-alien disomic addition lines and localization of desirable genes on alien chromosomes are important for utilization of these genes in genetic improvement of common wheat. In this study, wheat-Agropyron cristatum derivative line 5113 was characterized by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), and was demonstrated to be a novel wheat-A. cristatum disomic 6P addition line. Compared with its parent Fukuhokomugi (Fukuho), 5113 displayed multiple elite agronomic traits, including higher uppermost internode/plant height ratio, larger flag leaf, longer spike length, elevated grain number per spike and spikelet number per spike, more kernel number in the middle spikelet, more fertile tiller number per plant, and enhanced resistance to powdery mildew and leaf rust. Genes conferring these elite traits were localized on the A. cristatum 6P chromosome by using SLAF-seq markers and biparental populations (F1, BC1F1 and BC1F2 populations) produced from the crosses between Fukuho and 5113. Taken together, chromosomal localization of these desirable genes will facilitate transferring of high-yield and high-resistance genes from A. cristatum into common wheat, and serve as the foundation for the utilization of 5113 in wheat breeding. PMID:27824906

  19. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  20. Risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhen Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies on the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology (ART are relatively controversial and insufficient. Thus, to obtain a more precise evaluation of the risk of embryonic chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART, we performed a meta-analysis of all available case-control studies relating to the cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART. METHODS: Literature search in the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL based on the established strategy. Meta-regression, subgroup analysis, and Galbraith plots were conducted to explore the sources of heterogeneity. RESULTS: A total of 15 studies with 1,896 cases and 1,186 controls relevant to the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in first- trimester miscarriage after ART, and 8 studies with 601 cases and 602 controls evaluating frequency of chromosome anomaly for maternal age≥35 versus <35 were eligible for the meta-analysis. No statistical difference was found in risk of chromosomally abnormal miscarriage compared to natural conception and the different types of ART utilized, whereas the risk of fetal aneuploidy significantly increased with maternal age≥35 (OR 2.88, 95% CI: 1.74-4.77. CONCLUSIONS: ART treatment does not present an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities occurring in a first trimester miscarriage, but incidence of fetal aneuploidy could increase significantly with advancing maternal age.

  1. Chromosomal evolution in the Drosophila cardini group (Diptera: Drosophilidae): photomaps and inversion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Juliana; De Toni, Daniela Cristina; da Silva, Gisele de Souza; Valente, Vera Lucia da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Detailed chromosome photomaps are the first step to develop further chromosomal analysis to study the evolution of the genetic architecture in any set of species, considering that chromosomal rearrangements, such as inversions, are common features of genome evolution. In this report, we analyzed inversion polymorphisms in 25 different populations belonging to six neotropical species in the cardini group: Drosophila cardini, D. cardinoides, D. neocardini, D. neomorpha, D. parthenogenetica and D. polymorpha. Furthermore, we present the first reference photomaps for the Neotropical D. cardini and D. parthenogenetica and improved photomaps for D. cardinoides, D. neocardini and D. polymorpha. We found 19 new inversions for these species. An exhaustive pairwise comparison of the polytene chromosomes was conducted for the six species in order to understand evolutionary patterns of their chromosomes.

  2. Prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis in fetuses with congenital heart disease: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cao, Li; Liang, Dong; Meng, Lulu; Wu, Yun; Qiao, Fengchang; Ji, Xiuqing; Luo, Chunyu; Zhang, Jingjing; Xu, Tianhui; Yu, Bin; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Ting; Pan, Qiong; Ma, Dingyuan; Hu, Ping; Xu, Zhengfeng

    2018-02-01

    Currently, chromosomal microarray analysis is considered the first-tier test in pediatric care and prenatal diagnosis. However, the diagnostic yield of chromosomal microarray analysis for prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease has not been evaluated based on a large cohort. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical utility of chromosomal microarray as the first-tier test for chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with congenital heart disease. In this prospective study, 602 prenatal cases of congenital heart disease were investigated using single nucleotide polymorphism array over a 5-year period. Overall, pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities were identified in 125 (20.8%) of 602 prenatal cases of congenital heart disease, with 52.0% of them being numerical chromosomal abnormalities. The detection rates of likely pathogenic copy number variations and variants of uncertain significance were 1.3% and 6.0%, respectively. The detection rate of pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities in congenital heart disease plus additional structural anomalies (48.9% vs 14.3%, P microarray analysis is a reliable and high-resolution technology and should be used as the first-tier test for prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jun-Zhen; Pang, Li-Hong; Li, Min-Qing; Xu, Jing; Zhou, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology (ART) are relatively controversial and insufficient. Thus, to obtain a more precise evaluation of the risk of embryonic chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART, we performed a meta-analysis of all available case-control studies relating to the cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART. Literature search in the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) based on the established strategy. Meta-regression, subgroup analysis, and Galbraith plots were conducted to explore the sources of heterogeneity. A total of 15 studies with 1,896 cases and 1,186 controls relevant to the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in first- trimester miscarriage after ART, and 8 studies with 601 cases and 602 controls evaluating frequency of chromosome anomaly for maternal age≥35 versus risk of chromosomally abnormal miscarriage compared to natural conception and the different types of ART utilized, whereas the risk of fetal aneuploidy significantly increased with maternal age≥35 (OR 2.88, 95% CI: 1.74-4.77). ART treatment does not present an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities occurring in a first trimester miscarriage, but incidence of fetal aneuploidy could increase significantly with advancing maternal age.

  4. Nevada local government revenues analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report analyzes the major sources of revenue for Nevada local government for purposes of estimating the impacts associated with the siting of a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Each major revenue source is analyzed separately to identify relationships between the economic or demographic base, the revenue base and the revenues generated. Trends and changes in the rates and/or base are highlighted. A model is developed for each component to allow impact estimation. This report is a companion to the report Nevada State Revenues Analysis

  5. A novel genetic tool for clonal analysis of fourth chromosome mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa-Neves, Rui; Schinaman, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    The fourth chromosome of Drosophila remains one of the most intractable regions of the fly genome to genetic analysis. The main difficulty posed to the genetic analyses of mutations on this chromosome arises from the fact that it does not undergo meiotic recombination, which makes recombination mapping impossible, and also prevents clonal analysis of mutations, a technique which relies on recombination to introduce the prerequisite recessive markers and FLP-recombinase recognition targets (FR...

  6. Novel Integrated Lab-on-Chip System for Chromosome Translocations Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar

    2009-01-01

    This presentation will focus on the development of a chromosome total analysis system (C-TAS) starting from the design strategy and simulations to the integration into a final monolithic plug and play device. Individual modules which perform the sample preprocessing and analysis tasks like - cell...... isolation, cell culture, cell lysing, chromosome extraction and Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization will be presented. How we solved connecting the individual chips and adjusting the microfluidic flows, by using simulations will be discussed....

  7. Genetic Analysis of a Mammalian Chromosomal Origin of Replication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altman, Amy

    2002-01-01

    .... We have shown that a 5.8 kb DNA fragment containing the initiation region (IR) DHFR ori-beta is active at ectopic chromosomal locations in hamster cells and that deletion of three specific elements in ori-beta reduced initiation activity...

  8. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Human oocytes that remained unfertilized in programmes of assisted reproduction have been analysed cytogenetically for more than 20 years to assess the incidence of aneuploidy in female gametes. However ... artefacts, as well as the particular structure of oocyte chromosomes, may predispose one to misinterpretations.

  9. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (DOP-PCR) products were hybridized with cDNA of the male spinach flowers in florescence. The female spinach genome was taken as ... the second stage of the sex chromosome evolution (Ming et al. 2007). It has many different ... no trace of opposite organ degradation in the mature uni- sexual flowers (Sherry et al. 1993).

  10. Analysis of chromosome aberration data by hybrid-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrawati, Iwiq; Kumazawa, Shigeru

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing data of chromosome aberrations, which is useful to understand the characteristics of dose-response relationships and to construct the calibration curves for the biological dosimetry. The hybrid scale of linear and logarithmic scales brings a particular plotting paper, where the normal section paper, two types of semi-log papers and the log-log paper are continuously connected. The hybrid-hybrid plotting paper may contain nine kinds of linear relationships, and these are conveniently called hybrid scale models. One can systematically select the best-fit model among the nine models by among the conditions for a straight line of data points. A biological interpretation is possible with some hybrid-scale models. In this report, the hybrid scale models were applied to separately reported data on chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes as well as on chromosome breaks in Tradescantia. The results proved that the proposed models fit the data better than the linear-quadratic model, despite the demerit of the increased number of model parameters. We showed that the hybrid-hybrid model (both variables of dose and response using the hybrid scale) provides the best-fit straight lines to be used as the reliable and readable calibration curves of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  11. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of part of spinach Y chromosome-specific ESTs clones by dot blot and their size and homology to the sequences available at the GenBank database by BLASTn software. Seq. name. Seq. description. Length e-value Similarity (%). SP1−3. Dolomedes mizhoanus isolate DMTX-401 cystine knot toxin gene, complete cds.

  12. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ing to clone the sex-determining genes and investigated the molecular mechanism of spinach sex differentiation. However, there are no successful cloned reports about these genes. A new technology combining chromosome microdissection with hybridization-specific amplification (HSA) was adopted. The spinach Y ...

  13. Detailed ordering of markers localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome by the use of an interspecific Mus spretus mouse cross

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avner, P.; Amar, L.; Arnaud, D.; Hanauer, A.; Cambrou, J.

    1987-01-01

    Five probes localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome have been genetically mapped on the mouse X chromosome using an interspecific cross involving Mus spretus to a contiguous region lying proximally to the Tabby (Ta) locus. Pedigree and recombinational analysis establish the marker order as being Hprt-FIX-c11-G6PD-St14-1. The size of this contiguous region is such that the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse mutation probably maps within this segment. This in turn suggests that it is highly improbable that the mouse mdx locus represents a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It is, however, compatible with the idea that this mutation may correspond in man to Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. The high frequency of restriction fragment length polymorphisms found in this interspecific system for all the human cross-reacting probes examined up until now, using only a limited number of restriction enzymes, suggests that the Mus spretus mapping system may be of great potential value for establishing the linkage relationships existing in man when conserved chromosomal regions are concerned and human/mouse cross-reacting probes are available or can be obtained

  14. First Chromosomal Analysis in Hepsetidae (Actinopterygii, Characiformes: Insights into Relationship between African and Neotropical Fish Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro C. Carvalho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepsetidae is a small fish family with only the genus Hepsetus, with six described species distributed throughout the South, Central and Western regions of Africa, showing a close relationship with the Alestidae and some Neotropical fish families. However, no cytogenetic information is available for both Hepsetidae and Alestidae species, thus preventing any evolutionary comparative studies at the chromosomal level. In the present study, we are providing new cytogenetic data for Hepsetus odoe, including the standard karyotype, C-banding, repetitive DNAs mapping, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and whole chromosome painting (WCP, providing chromosomal patterns and subsidies for comparative cytogenetics with other characiform families. Both males and females H. odoe have 2n = 58 chromosomes (10m + 28sm + 20st/a, with most of the C-band positive heterochromatin localized in the centromeric and subtelomeric regions. Only one pair of chromosomes bears proximal 5S rDNA sites in the short arms, contrasting with the 18S rDNA sequences which are located in the terminal regions of four chromosome pairs. Clear interstitial hybridization signals are evidenced for the U1 and U2 snDNA probes, but in only one and two chromosome pairs, respectively. Microsatellite motifs are widely distributed in the karyotype, with exception for the (CGG10, (GAA10 and (GAG10 probes, which highlight conspicuous interstitial signals on an unique pair of chromosomes. Comparative data from conventional and molecular cytogenetics, including CGH and WCP experiments, indicate that H. odoe and some Erythrinidae species, particularly Erythrinus erythrinus, share similar chromosomal sequences suggesting some relatedness among them, although bearing genomic specificities in view of their divergent evolutionary histories.

  15. Metaphase chromosome analysis by ligation-mediated PCR: heritable chromatin structure and a comparison of active and inactive X chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hershkovitz, M; Riggs, A D

    1995-01-01

    We report that ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) can be used for high-resolution study of metaphase chromosomes, and we discuss the role of metaphase chromatin structure in the preservation of differentiated cell states. The X chromosome-linked human PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) promoter region was investigated, and euchromatic active X chromosome (Xa) metaphase chromatin was compared with interphase Xa chromatin and to heterochromatic inactive X chromosome (Xi) metaphase and interphase chrom...

  16. [Comparative genome analysis in pea Pisum sativum L. varieties and lines with chromosomal and molecular markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatadze, T E; Zelenina, D A; Shostak, N G; Volkov, A A; Popov, K V; Rachinskaia, O V; Borisov, A Iu; Tikhonovich, I A; Zelenin, A V; Muravenko, O V

    2008-12-01

    C banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with pTa71 (45S rDNA) and pTa794 (5S rDNA), and RAPD-PCR analysis were used to study the genome and chromosome polymorphism in four varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, Rondo, and Finale) and two genetic lines (Sprint-2 and SGE) of pea Pisum sativum L. A comparison of the C-banding patterns did not reveal any polymorphism within the varieties. The most significant between-variety differences were observed for the size of C bands on satellite chromosomes 4 and 7. All grain pea varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, and Rondo) had a large C band in the satellite of chromosome 4 and a medium C band in the region adjacent to the satellite thread on chromosome 7. C bands were almost of the same size in the genetic lines and vegetable variety Finale. In all accessions, 45S rDNA mapped to the secondary constriction regions of chromosomes 1, 3, and 5. The signal from chromosome 5 in the lines was more intense than in the varieties. Ag-NOR staining showed that the transcriptional activity of the 45S rRNA genes on chromosome 7 was higher than on chromosome 4 in all accessions. No more than four Ag-NOR-positive nucleoli were observed in interphase nuclei. Statistical analysis of the total area of Ag-NOR-stained nucleoli did not detect any significant difference between the accessions examined. RAPD-PCR analysis revealed high between-variety and low within-variety genomic polymorphism. Chromosomal and molecular markers proved to be promising for genome identification in pea varieties and lines.

  17. Chromosome painting analysis of X-ray-induced aberrations in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, A.; Hayashi, M.; Yamazaki, N.; Sofuni, T.

    1994-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements in human lymphocytes induced by X-rays (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gray) were analyzed using chromosome painting. DNA probes for human chromosomes 1, 3 or 4 alone, and a combination of 1 and 4, were used for analysis. The frequency of cells with rearrangements, i.e. reciprocal translocations, dicentrics, insertions, tricentrics and fragments, involving chromosome 4 increased with dose in both 48 and 72 h cultures. The number of translocations per cell also increased with dose at 48 and 72 h. Dicentrics increased with dose in 48 h but not in 72 h cultures. The estimated genomic frequency of aberrations per cell was comparable with results in banded cells. No difference was shown on the detection efficiency of chromosome rearrangements among the various DNA probes used. Since this technique does not necessarily require well-spread metaphases for analysis, it is possible to increase the number of analyzable metaphases compared with the banding technique. Chromosome painting is a simpler, more objective and practical method for detecting chromosome rearrangements than conventional banding analyses. (Author)

  18. Y-chromosomal variation of local goat breeds of Turkey close to the domestication centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cinar Kul, B; Bilgen, N; Lenstra, J A; Korkmaz Agaoglu, O; Akyuz, B; Ertugrul, O

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in chromosome Y are enabling researchers to identify paternal lineages, which are informative for introgressions and migrations. In this study, the male-specific region markers, sex-determining region-Y (SRY), amelogenin (AMELY) and zinc finger (ZFY) were analysed in seven Turkish

  19. Localization of BAC clones on mitotic chromosomes of Musa acuminata using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hřibová, Eva; Doleželová, Marie; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2008), s. 445-452 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600380703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cytogenetic mapping * chromosome structure * repetitive DNA Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.426, year: 2008

  20. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  1. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  2. [FISH analysis of chromosomes of sweet potato(Ipomoea batatas cv.Xushu No.18)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jia-Li; Qi, Da-Shi; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Hui-Juan; Sun, Jian-Ying; Cao, Qing-He; Ma, Dai-Fu; Li, Zong-Yun

    2010-02-01

    In order to understand the chromosome structure of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Xushu 18), molecular cytogenetic analyses were carried out on I. batatas. by using 45S rDNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (45S rDNA-FISH), self genomic in situ hybridization (self-GISH), and silver staining techniques. Twelve, sixteen, and eighteen regions were silver stained in the interphase nucleus of I. batatas. The results of FISH analysis demonstrated 16 or 18 signals with different intensity on chromosomes of I. batatas. Self-GISH analysis showed that the intensive signals on I. batatas mitotic chromosomes were distributed along the chromosomes. However, the signals located in centromeric, subcentromeric, and telomeric regions were stronger and denser than those in other regions.

  3. Chromosome analysis and sorting in Vicia sativa using flow cytometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Pavlína; Navrátilová, Alice; Macas, Jiří; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, - (2007), s. 43-48 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/03/0595; GA ČR GA204/04/1207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cell cycle synchronization * chromosome suspension * physical genome mapping Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2007

  4. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    specific EST sequences. Chuan-Liang Deng, Wei-Li Zhang, Ying Cao, Shao-Jing Wang, Shu-Fen Li, Wu-Jun Gao and Long-Dou Lu. J. Genet. 94, 705–713. Table 1. List of part of spinach Y chromosome-specific ESTs clones by dot blot and their size and homology to the sequences available at the GenBank database by ...

  5. Investigation of the diagnostic value of chromosome analysis and bacterial artificial chromosome-based array comparative genomic hybridization in prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savli, Hakan; Keskin, Seda Eren; Cine, Naci

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and chromosome analysis in prenatal diagnosis. This study included the chromosome analysis and BAC-based array CGH analysis of 140 amniocentesis samples with prenatal diagnosis indications. Karyotype analysis showed trisomy 21 in 4 patients, trisomy 18 in 5 patients, monosomy X in 1 patient, and other anomalies in 3 patients. The BAC-based array CGH analysis showed 4 patients with trisomy 21, 4 patients with trisomy 18, and 1 patient with monosomy X as a numerical chromosome anomaly, while partial duplication was observed in chromosome 14 in 1 case as a structural anomaly. The array CGH is the most effective method available to complement cases where chromosome analysis, a gold standard in prenatal diagnosis, proves to be insufficient. Considering the inherent limitations of both methods, complementary features should be introduced in order to be able to give the most accurate data at the right time.

  6. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-11-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  7. Polo kinase regulates the localization and activity of the chromosomal passenger complex in meiosis and mitosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmena, Mar; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Ogawa, Hiromi; Earnshaw, William C

    2014-11-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Polo and Aurora families of protein kinases. The levels of expression and localization of the key regulatory kinases are themselves subject to very tight control. There is increasing evidence that crosstalk between the mitotic kinases provides for an additional level of regulation. We have previously shown that Aurora B activates Polo kinase at the centromere in mitosis, and that the interaction between Polo and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component INCENP is essential in this activation. In this report, we show that Polo kinase is required for the correct localization and activity of the CPC in meiosis and mitosis. Study of the phenotype of different polo allele combinations compared to the effect of chemical inhibition revealed significant differences in the localization and activity of the CPC in diploid tissues. Our results shed new light on the mechanisms that control the activity of Aurora B in meiosis and mitosis.

  8. Differences and homologies of chromosomal alterations within and between breast cancer cell lines: a clustering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Verdun Di Cantogno, Ludovica; Marchiò, Caterina; Rangel, Nelson; Payan-Gomez, Cesar; Gugliotta, Patrizia; Botta, Cristina; Bussolati, Gianni; Ramírez-Clavijo, Sandra R; Pasini, Barbara; Sapino, Anna

    2014-01-23

    The MCF7 (ER+/HER2-), T47D (ER+/HER2-), BT474 (ER+/HER2+) and SKBR3 (ER-/HER2+) breast cancer cell lines are widely used in breast cancer research as paradigms of the luminal and HER2 phenotypes. Although they have been subjected to cytogenetic analysis, their chromosomal abnormalities have not been carefully characterized, and their differential cytogenetic profiles have not yet been established. In addition, techniques such as comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), microarray-based CGH and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) have described specific regions of gains, losses and amplifications of these cell lines; however, these techniques cannot detect balanced chromosomal rearrangements (e.g., translocations or inversions) or low frequency mosaicism. A range of 19 to 26 metaphases of the MCF7, T47D, BT474 and SKBR3 cell lines was studied using conventional (G-banding) and molecular cytogenetic techniques (multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, M-FISH). We detected previously unreported chromosomal changes and determined the content and frequency of chromosomal markers. MCF7 and T47D (ER+/HER2-) cells showed a less complex chromosomal make up, with more numerical than structural alterations, compared to BT474 and SKBR3 (HER2+) cells, which harbored the highest frequency of numerical and structural aberrations. Karyotype heterogeneity and clonality were determined by comparing all metaphases within and between the four cell lines by hierarchical clustering. The latter analysis identified five main clusters. One of these clusters was characterized by numerical chromosomal abnormalities common to all cell lines, and the other four clusters encompassed cell-specific chromosomal abnormalities. T47D and BT474 cells shared the most chromosomal abnormalities, some of which were shared with SKBR3 cells. MCF7 cells showed a chromosomal pattern that was markedly different from those of the other cell lines. Our study provides a comprehensive

  9. MLL/WDR5 Complex Regulates Kif2A Localization to Ensure Chromosome Congression and Proper Spindle Assembly during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aamir; Veeranki, Sailaja Naga; Chinchole, Akash; Tyagi, Shweta

    2017-06-19

    Mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL), along with multisubunit (WDR5, RbBP5, ASH2L, and DPY30) complex catalyzes the trimethylation of H3K4, leading to gene activation. Here, we characterize a chromatin-independent role for MLL during mitosis. MLL and WDR5 localize to the mitotic spindle apparatus, and loss of function of MLL complex by RNAi results in defects in chromosome congression and compromised spindle formation. We report interaction of MLL complex with several kinesin and dynein motors. We further show that the MLL complex associates with Kif2A, a member of the Kinesin-13 family of microtubule depolymerase, and regulates the spindle localization of Kif2A during mitosis. We have identified a conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif, so far unique to the MLL family, in Kif2A. The Win motif of Kif2A engages in direct interactions with WDR5 for its spindle localization. Our findings highlight a non-canonical mitotic function of MLL complex, which may have a direct impact on chromosomal stability, frequently compromised in cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Insights into the evolution of mammalian telomerase: Platypus TERT shares similarities with genes of birds and other reptiles and localizes on sex chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrdličková Radmila

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TERT gene encodes the catalytic subunit of the telomerase complex and is responsible for maintaining telomere length. Vertebrate telomerase has been studied in eutherian mammals, fish, and the chicken, but less attention has been paid to other vertebrates. The platypus occupies an important evolutionary position, providing unique insight into the evolution of mammalian genes. We report the cloning of a platypus TERT (OanTERT ortholog, and provide a comparison with genes of other vertebrates. Results The OanTERT encodes a protein with a high sequence similarity to marsupial TERT and avian TERT. Like the TERT of sauropsids and marsupials, as well as that of sharks and echinoderms, OanTERT contains extended variable linkers in the N-terminal region suggesting that they were present already in basal vertebrates and lost independently in ray-finned fish and eutherian mammals. Several alternatively spliced OanTERT variants structurally similar to avian TERT variants were identified. Telomerase activity is expressed in all platypus tissues like that of cold-blooded animals and murine rodents. OanTERT was localized on pseudoautosomal regions of sex chromosomes X3/Y2, expanding the homology between human chromosome 5 and platypus sex chromosomes. Synteny analysis suggests that TERT co-localized with sex-linked genes in the last common mammalian ancestor. Interestingly, female platypuses express higher levels of telomerase in heart and liver tissues than do males. Conclusions OanTERT shares many features with TERT of the reptilian outgroup, suggesting that OanTERT represents the ancestral mammalian TERT. Features specific to TERT of eutherian mammals have, therefore, evolved more recently after the divergence of monotremes.

  11. Insights into the evolution of mammalian telomerase: platypus TERT shares similarities with genes of birds and other reptiles and localizes on sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdličková, Radmila; Nehyba, Jiří; Lim, Shu Ly; Grützner, Frank; Bose, Henry R

    2012-06-01

    The TERT gene encodes the catalytic subunit of the telomerase complex and is responsible for maintaining telomere length. Vertebrate telomerase has been studied in eutherian mammals, fish, and the chicken, but less attention has been paid to other vertebrates. The platypus occupies an important evolutionary position, providing unique insight into the evolution of mammalian genes. We report the cloning of a platypus TERT (OanTERT) ortholog, and provide a comparison with genes of other vertebrates. The OanTERT encodes a protein with a high sequence similarity to marsupial TERT and avian TERT. Like the TERT of sauropsids and marsupials, as well as that of sharks and echinoderms, OanTERT contains extended variable linkers in the N-terminal region suggesting that they were present already in basal vertebrates and lost independently in ray-finned fish and eutherian mammals. Several alternatively spliced OanTERT variants structurally similar to avian TERT variants were identified. Telomerase activity is expressed in all platypus tissues like that of cold-blooded animals and murine rodents. OanTERT was localized on pseudoautosomal regions of sex chromosomes X3/Y2, expanding the homology between human chromosome 5 and platypus sex chromosomes. Synteny analysis suggests that TERT co-localized with sex-linked genes in the last common mammalian ancestor. Interestingly, female platypuses express higher levels of telomerase in heart and liver tissues than do males. OanTERT shares many features with TERT of the reptilian outgroup, suggesting that OanTERT represents the ancestral mammalian TERT. Features specific to TERT of eutherian mammals have, therefore, evolved more recently after the divergence of monotremes.

  12. Analysis of initial events in radiation-induced lymphomagenesis. Investigation of chromosome aberration including translocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ying

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of chromosome aberrations in radiation-induced lymphomagenesis, chromosome G-banding analysis of the lymphoma cells (8 groups and 34 kinds of cells), of which each group was derived from a single donor by intra-thymic injection of a limited number of prelymphoma cells, was performed. Many numerical and structural aberrations were observed in the donor-derived T cell lymphomas. Common aberrations including translocations were found almost in the lymphomas of all groups. Translocations between chromosomes 11 and 12, 12 and 15, 7 and 10, 1 and 13, 6 and X were found in D, E, F, G, H, groups, respectively. There were also common aberrations such as trisomy 15 in A and F groups. These results indicate that chromosome aberrations including translocations may be important candidates of initiating events in radiation-induced lymphomagenesis

  13. Transcriptional analysis of genes on human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, P.W.; Van Kueren, M.L.; Kurnit, D.M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen embryonic, fetal and adult human cDNA libraries for transcription on chromosome 21q22.1{yields}21q22.3. 73 pairs of oligonucleotide primers on chromosome 21 were applied to analyze 41 different cDNA libraries. Only phage eluate (and therefore no DNA isolation) was required for this sensitive screening. This technique was first used to demonstrate that huntingtin is expressed ubiquitiously throughout human life. 60 of the primers were positive with at least one library screening, indicating that the majority of primers derived from transcribed sequences. We examined embryonic (which we synthesized), fetal and adult human cDNA libraries. Even with our most complex human fetal brain library, we detected only ca. 50% of transcribed sequences, underscoring the need to screen multiple human cDNA libraries to determine if transcription occurred. Since only 2/73 clones were present in only one cDNA library, the vast majority of transcribed sequences are present in more than one tissue. Because this study involves random genes rather than genes selected because of their import, this demonstrates that only few anonymous genes are transcribed in a single tissue type. Expression of genes in different cDNA libraries aids in comparison between genotype and phenotype. Using combinations of gene-specific and vector-specific primers, we went on to develop a PCR-based technology that retrieves the largest sequences present in a cDNA library. This technology was used to isolate large genes on chromosome 21 that can be used in expression studies to examine the Down syndrome phenotype.

  14. Sequence and expression analysis of gaps in human chromosome 20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Seemann, Stefan; Mang, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    /or overlap disease-associated loci, including the DLGAP4 locus. In this study, we sequenced ~99% of all three unfinished gaps on human chr 20, determined their complete genomic sizes and assessed epigenetic profiles using a combination of Sanger sequencing, mate pair paired-end high-throughput sequencing......The finished human genome-assemblies comprise several hundred un-sequenced euchromatic gaps, which may be rich in long polypurine/polypyrimidine stretches. Human chromosome 20 (chr 20) currently has three unfinished gaps remaining on its q-arm. All three gaps are within gene-dense regions and...

  15. Chromosomal aberrations in idiopathic polyhydramnios: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi-Dain, Lena; Sagi, Shlomi

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to summarize the existing literature examining the risk of chromosomal aberrations in idiopathic polyhydramnios. Search was conducted by a research librarian in five databases. Language and time restrictions were not applied. By independent screening of titles and abstracts, two investigators selected original researches examining the risk of chromosomal aberrations in idiopathic polyhydramnios. Twenty articles were included, encompassing a total of 1729 pregnancies with idiopathic polyhydramnios. The average rate of chromosomal aberrations in these cases was 2.8 ± 3.7%, ranging between 0% and 13.8%. No studies were found examining the relative risk for chromosomal abnormalities in low-risk women with idiopathic polyhydramnios. An analysis of seven case-control trials, including women at high risk for aneuploidy, yielded a relative risk of 3.09 (95% confidence interval 1.92-4.97) for chromosomal aberration. Overall quality of evidence was rated as very low using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation criteria. In conclusion, the suboptimal quality of the evidence precludes from drawing any solid recommendations regarding routine karyotype testing in idiopathic polyhydramnios cases, especially in women at low risk for chromosomal aberrations. Future high-quality trials addressing the discussed methodological shortcomings should be conducted to assess this important issue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandas, T.K. [Darthmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Chromosome-scale comparative sequence analysis unravels molecular mechanisms of genome evolution between two wheat cultivars

    KAUST Repository

    Thind, Anupriya Kaur

    2018-02-08

    Background: Recent improvements in DNA sequencing and genome scaffolding have paved the way to generate high-quality de novo assemblies of pseudomolecules representing complete chromosomes of wheat and its wild relatives. These assemblies form the basis to compare the evolutionary dynamics of wheat genomes on a megabase-scale. Results: Here, we provide a comparative sequence analysis of the 700-megabase chromosome 2D between two bread wheat genotypes, the old landrace Chinese Spring and the elite Swiss spring wheat line CH Campala Lr22a. There was a high degree of sequence conservation between the two chromosomes. Analysis of large structural variations revealed four large insertions/deletions (InDels) of >100 kb. Based on the molecular signatures at the breakpoints, unequal crossing over and double-strand break repair were identified as the evolutionary mechanisms that caused these InDels. Three of the large InDels affected copy number of NLRs, a gene family involved in plant immunity. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density revealed three haploblocks of 8 Mb, 9 Mb and 48 Mb with a 35-fold increased SNP density compared to the rest of the chromosome. Conclusions: This comparative analysis of two high-quality chromosome assemblies enabled a comprehensive assessment of large structural variations. The insight obtained from this analysis will form the basis of future wheat pan-genome studies.

  18. Analysis of chromosome translocation in the residents of Namie Town after the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.; Nakata, Akifumi; Miura, Tomisato; Nishimura, Miya; Takamagi, Shizuka; Kasai, Kosuke; Konno, Norio; Yoshida, Ryoko; Sekine, Shunji

    2014-01-01

    The dose estimation by behavior survey of the residents carried out by Fukushima Prefecture after the accident reported that there are no residents who were exposed by over 1 mSv radiation. However, a lot of the parents are worrying about the health condition of their children in future. Our Hirosaki University accepted the request of the local government of this Namie-Town in Fukushima which wants to know whether children were exposed by radiological substances or not and started the inspection about the contamination and exposure level and dose estimation at an accident using chromosomal translocation analysis for 855 out of 3700 children whose age was under 18 years old at the time of accident. In order to estimate radiation dose using chromosome aberration in the accidents, there are four kinds of cytogenetic method; dicentric assay, a translocation assay, the PCC-ring assay and micronucleus test. A dicentric assay is used for the dose estimation in acute and external exposure cases, the chromosomal translocation method for dose assessment in chronic and old exposure and the PCC method for high dose exposure, respectively. In the case of the residents in Namie-Town, since about one year and ten months had already passed after the accident when implementation of this inspection was determined, the chromosomal translocation method was applied for the dose estimation of the initial exposure level. The main purpose of this translocation analysis using their own cells is to take away affairs of the residents including parents and children and also to reduce the uneasiness which is not wiped away by the health check due to a behavioral survey. In this inspection, after the contents and process of this analysis were explained in the Tsushima, Namie-Town temporarily constructed clinic, 3∼4 ml of whole 5 blood were taken from each children whose parents agreed with this analysis. The lymphocytic cells are isolated from the whole blood using CPT (Cell Preparation Tube

  19. Sequence analysis of cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassaDuch.) using microdissected single somatic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Tomohiro; Shirasawa, Kenta; Terachi, Mayuko; Isobe, Sachiko

    2017-01-01

    Cultivated strawberry ( Fragaria  ×  ananassa Duch.) has homoeologous chromosomes because of allo-octoploidy. For example, two homoeologous chromosomes that belong to different sub-genome of allopolyploids have similar base sequences. Thus, when conducting de novo assembly of DNA sequences, it is difficult to determine whether these sequences are derived from the same chromosome. To avoid the difficulties associated with homoeologous chromosomes and demonstrate the possibility of sequencing allopolyploids using single chromosomes, we conducted sequence analysis using microdissected single somatic chromosomes of cultivated strawberry. Three hundred and ten somatic chromosomes of the Japanese octoploid strawberry 'Reiko' were individually selected under a light microscope using a microdissection system. DNA from 288 of the dissected chromosomes was successfully amplified using a DNA amplification kit. Using next-generation sequencing, we decoded the base sequences of the amplified DNA segments, and on the basis of mapping, we identified DNA sequences from 144 samples that were best matched to the reference genomes of the octoploid strawberry, F.  ×  ananassa , and the diploid strawberry, F. vesca . The 144 samples were classified into seven pseudo-molecules of F. vesca . The coverage rates of the DNA sequences from the single chromosome onto all pseudo-molecular sequences varied from 3 to 29.9%. We demonstrated an efficient method for sequence analysis of allopolyploid plants using microdissected single chromosomes. On the basis of our results, we believe that whole-genome analysis of allopolyploid plants can be enhanced using methodology that employs microdissected single chromosomes.

  20. Chromosome painting for plant biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio; Lamb, Jonathan C; Albert, Patrice S; Danilova, Tatiana; Han, Fangpu; Gao, Zhi; Findley, Seth; Birchler, James A

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an invaluable tool for chromosome analysis and engineering. The ability to visually localize endogenous genes, transposable elements, transgenes, naturally occurring organellar DNA insertions - essentially any unique sequence larger than 2 kb - greatly facilitates progress. This chapter details the labeling procedures and chromosome preparation techniques used to produce high-quality FISH signals on somatic metaphase and meiotic pachytene spreads.

  1. The Bactrocera oleae genome: localization of nine genes on the polytene chromosomes of the olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosopoulou, Elena; Nakou, Ifigeneia; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope

    2014-10-01

    Four homologous and five heterologous gene-specific sequences have been mapped by in situ hybridization on the salivary gland polytene chromosomes of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae. The nine genes were dispersed on four of the five autosomal chromosomes, thus enriching the available set of chromosome landmarks for this major agricultural pest. Present data further supports the proposed chromosome homologies among B. oleae, Ceratitis capitata, and Drosophila melanogaster and the idea of the conservation of chromosomal element identity throughout dipteran evolution.

  2. Human placental Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-11-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the ..cap alpha.. subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (approx. = 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) lambdagt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1.

  3. Construction of chromosomal recombination maps of three genomes of lilies (Lilium) based on GISH analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadeem; Barba-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Ramanna, M S; Visser, Richard G F; Van Tuyl, Jaap M

    2009-03-01

    Chromosomal recombination maps were constructed for three genomes of lily (Lilium) using GISH analyses. For this purpose, the backcross (BC) progenies of two diploid (2n = 2x = 24) interspecific hybrids of lily, viz. Longiflorum x Asiatic (LA) and Oriental x Asiatic (OA), were used. Mostly the BC progenies of LA hybrids consisted of both triploid (2n = 3x = 36) and diploid (2n = 2x = 24) with some aneuploid genotypes and those of OA hybrids consisted of triploid (2n = 3x = 36) and some aneuploid genotypes. In all cases, it was possible to identify the homoeologous recombinant chromosomes as well as accurately count the number of crossover points, which are called "recombination sites". Recombination sites were estimated in the BC progeny of 71 LA and 41 OA genotypes. In the case of BC progenies of LA hybrids, 248 recombination sites were cytologically localized on 12 different chromosomes of each genome (i.e., L and A). Similarly, 116 recombinant sites were localized on the 12 chromosomes each from the BC progenies of OA hybrids (O and A genomes). Cytological maps were constructed on the basis of the percentages of distances (micrometres) of the recombination sites from the centromeres. Since an Asiatic parent was involved in both hybrids, viz. LA and OA, two maps were constructed for the A genome that were indicated as Asiatic (L) and Asiatic (O). The other two maps were Longiflorum (A) and Oriental (A). Remarkably, the recombination sites were highly unevenly distributed among the different chromosomes of all four maps. Because the recombination sites can be unequivocally identified through GISH, they serve as reliable landmarks and pave the way for assigning molecular markers or desirable genes to chromosomes of Lilium and also monitor introgression of alien segments.

  4. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Purrott, R.J.; Prosser, J.S.; Lelliott, D.J.; Stimpson, L.D.

    1981-03-01

    The results are reviewed from investigations during 1980 into 68 cases of suspected overexposure to radiation. Of these, 37 were associated with industrial radiography, 11 with one or other of the major nuclear organisations and 20 with an institution of research, education or health. 55 of the dose estimates were in the range 0.0 - 0.09 Gy (0 - 9 rad) 5 in the range 0.1 - 0.29 Gy (10 - 29 rad) and for various reasons in 8 cases no biological assessment of dose was possible. The dose estimate for the case with the highest confirmed overexposure was 0.22 Gy (22 rads). The chromosome data are compared with information obtained from physical dosimetry and a brief summary is given of the circumstances of each case. (author)

  5. Automation of chromosomes analysis. Automatic system for image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Go, R.; Cosnac, B. de; Spiwack, A.

    1975-01-01

    The A.S.T.I. is an automatic system relating to the fast conversational processing of all kinds of images (cells, chromosomes) converted to a numerical data set (120000 points, 16 grey levels stored in a MOS memory) through a fast D.O. analyzer. The system performs automatically the isolation of any individual image, the area and weighted area of which are computed. These results are directly displayed on the command panel and can be transferred to a mini-computer for further computations. A bright spot allows parts of an image to be picked out and the results to be displayed. This study is particularly directed towards automatic karyo-typing [fr

  6. Retrospective chromosome aberration analysis of former uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meszaros, G.; Bognar, G.; Koeteles, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present our data collected in the period of 1981-1985 on 165 persons exposed by different radon concentrations expressed in working level month (WLM) units from 100 up to 600. Following the decommissioning of the uranium mine in Hungary in 1997 cytogenetic status of 131 persons were within a follow-up-study of their health conditions initiated by the Hungarian Academy of Science. The persons have terminated their underground activities 5 to 20 years before testing. The comparison of the two datasets suggest a long-term persistence of cytogenetic alterations above the population average values in large percentages of persons investigated. The frequency of chromosome aberrations of uranium miners was found increased in function of their exposure to radon. The comparison of the miner's categories 20 years ago and in the recent years demonstrated the long-term existence of aberrations for many years after completion of underground mining activities. (authors)

  7. Evidence of Chromosomal Instability in Prostate Cancer Determined by Spectral Karyotyping (SKY and Interphase FISH Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Beheshti

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which cytogenetic aberrations develop in prostate cancer (Cap is poorly understood. Spectral karyotype (SKY analysis of Cap cell lines has shown that they have unstable karyotypes and also have features associated with chromosomal instability (CIN. To accurately determine the incidence of de novo structural and numerical aberrations in vitro in Cap, we performed SKY analysis of three independent clones derived from one representative cell line, DU145. The frequent generation of new chromosomal rearrangements and a wide variation in the number of structural aberrations within two to five passages suggested that this cell line exhibited some of the features associated with a CIN phenotype. To study numerical cell-to-cell variation, chromosome 8 aneusomy was assessed in the LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3 cell lines and a patient cohort of 15 Cap primary tumors by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. This analysis showed that a high frequency of numerical alteration affecting chromosome 8 was present in both in vitro and in Cap tissues. In comparison to normal controls, the patient cohort had a statistically significant (P<.05, greater frequency of cells with one and three centromere 8 copies. These data suggest that a CIN-like process may be contributing towards the generation of de novo numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities in Cap.

  8. A Semi-Closed Device for Chromosome Spreading for Cytogenetic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Mednova, Olga; Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    2014-01-01

    Metaphase chromosome spreading is the most crucial step required for successful karyotyping and FISH analysis. These two techniques are routinely used in cytogenetics to assess the chromosome abnormalities. The spreading process has been studied for years but it is still considered an art more than......, and thus allow for better quality spreads. Further cytogenetic analysis depends on the quality of the spreads, which is dependent on the skills of the personnel and is thus limited to laboratory settings. Here, we present a semi-closed microfluidic chip for preparation of the metaphase spreads on a glass...

  9. Localization of a female-specific marker on the chromosomes of the brown seaweed Saccharina japonica using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available There is a heteromorphic alternative life in the brown seaweed, Saccharina japonica (Aresch. C. E. Lane, C. Mayes et G. W. Saunders ( = Laminaria japonica Aresch., with macroscopic monoecious sporophytes and microscopic diecious gametophytes. Female gametophytes are genetically different from males. It is very difficult to identify the parent of a sporophyte using only routine cytological techniques due to homomorphic chromosomes. A sex-specific marker is one of the best ways to make this determination.To obtain clear images, chromosome preparation was improved using maceration enzymes and fluorochrome 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI. The chromosome number of both male and female haploid gametophytes was 31, and there were 62 chromosomes in diploid sporophytes. Although the female chromosomes ranged from 0.77 µm to 2.61 µm in size and were larger than the corresponding ones in the males (from 0.57 µm to 2.16 µm, there was not a very large X chromosome in the females. Based on the known female-related FRML-494 marker, co-electrophoresis and Southern blot profiles demonstrated that it was inheritable and specific to female gametophytes. Using modified fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, this marker could be localized on one unique chromosome of the female gametophytes as well as the sporophytes, whereas no hybridization signal was detected in the male gametophytes.Our data suggest that this marker was a female chromosome-specific DNA sequence. This is the first report of molecular marker localization on algal chromosomes. This research provides evidence for the benefit of using FISH for identifying molecular markers for sex identification, isolation of specific genes linked to this marker in the females, and sex determination of S. japonica gametophytes in the future.

  10. Premature chromosome condensation in human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes without mitogen stimulation for chromosome aberration analysis using specific whole chromosome DNA hybridization probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rupak; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described a unique, simple, and rapid method for inducing premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in "resting" human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) without mitogen stimulation and an approach for studying numerical changes and/or structural aberrations involving a specific pair of human chromosomes. The current protocol incorporates improvements that provide better PCC, incorporates a high-throughput automated sample preparation unit and metaphase harvester to minimize manual labor and improve quality, and supports simultaneous painting of multiple sets of human autosomes in interphase nuclei. To induce PCC, isolated HPBLs are incubated at 37 °C in cell culture medium supplemented with a phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid or calyculin A), adenosine triphosphate, and p34(cdc2)/cyclin B kinase (an essential component of mitosis-promoting factor) for a short period of time. PCC spreads are prepared on glass slides using a humidity- and temperature-controlled chamber (an auto-spreader) after a brief hypotonic treatment and fixation. Aberrations involving specific sets of painted human chromosome are analyzed using fluorescence microscopy. Each of the normal (undamaged) painted homologous chromosome pairs displays two fluorescent spots, whereas cells with numerical and/or structural aberration involving specific painted chromosome sets show deviation in the number of fluorescent spots. The identification and quantification of aberration involving specific chromosomes in interphase nuclei have important applications in radiobiology, toxicology, radiation therapeutics, and cancer research.

  11. Morphological images analysis and chromosomic aberrations classification based on fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Leonardo Peres

    2011-01-01

    This work has implemented a methodology for automation of images analysis of chromosomes of human cells irradiated at IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (located at IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil), and therefore subject to morphological aberrations. This methodology intends to be a tool for helping cytogeneticists on identification, characterization and classification of chromosomal metaphasic analysis. The methodology development has included the creation of a software application based on artificial intelligence techniques using Fuzzy Logic combined with image processing techniques. The developed application was named CHRIMAN and is composed of modules that contain the methodological steps which are important requirements in order to achieve an automated analysis. The first step is the standardization of the bi-dimensional digital image acquisition procedure through coupling a simple digital camera to the ocular of the conventional metaphasic analysis microscope. Second step is related to the image treatment achieved through digital filters application; storing and organization of information obtained both from image content itself, and from selected extracted features, for further use on pattern recognition algorithms. The third step consists on characterizing, counting and classification of stored digital images and extracted features information. The accuracy in the recognition of chromosome images is 93.9%. This classification is based on classical standards obtained at Buckton [1973], and enables support to geneticist on chromosomic analysis procedure, decreasing analysis time, and creating conditions to include this method on a broader evaluation system on human cell damage due to ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  12. Chromosomal localization of the gene for the human Theta class glutathione transferase (GSTT1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.; Vaska, V. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Goggan, M.; Board, P. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Two loci encoding Theta class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been identified in humans. In situ hybridization studies have localized the GSTT1 gene to 22q11.2. This is the same band to which we previously localized the GSTT2 gene. This finding confirms the trend for human GST genes to be found in class-specific clusters. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Nup98-homeodomain fusions interact with endogenous Nup98 during interphase and localize to kinetochores and chromosome arms during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Songli; Powers, Maureen A

    2010-05-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the Nup98 gene are implicated in leukemias, especially acute myelogenous leukemia. These translocations generate chimeric fusion proteins, all of which have in common the N-terminal half of Nup98, which contains the nucleoporin FG/GLFG repeat motifs. The homeodomain group of Nup98 fusion proteins retain the C-terminus of a homeodomain transcription factor, including the homeobox responsible for DNA binding. Current models for Nup98 leukemogenesis invoke aberrant transcription resulting from recruitment of coregulators by the Nup98 repeat domain. Here we have investigated the behavior of Nup98-homeodomain fusion proteins throughout the cell cycle. At all stages, the fusion proteins exhibit a novel localization distinct from the component proteins or fragments. During interphase, there are dynamic interactions between the Nup98 fusions and endogenous Nup98 that lead to mislocalization of the intranuclear fraction of Nup98, but do not alter the level of Nup98 at the nuclear pore complex. During mitosis, no interaction between the fusion proteins and endogenous Nup98 is observed. However, the fusions are entirely concentrated at kinetochores and on chromosome arms, sites where the APC/C, a target of Nup98 regulation, is also found. Our observations suggest new possibilities for misregulation by which Nup98 translocations may contribute to cellular transformation and leukemogenesis.

  14. Mammalian E-type cyclins control chromosome pairing, telomere stability and CDK2 localization in male meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Martinerie

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Loss of function of cyclin E1 or E2, important regulators of the mitotic cell cycle, yields viable mice, but E2-deficient males display reduced fertility. To elucidate the role of E-type cyclins during spermatogenesis, we characterized their expression patterns and produced additional deletions of Ccne1 and Ccne2 alleles in the germline, revealing unexpected meiotic functions. While Ccne2 mRNA and protein are abundantly expressed in spermatocytes, Ccne1 mRNA is present but its protein is detected only at low levels. However, abundant levels of cyclin E1 protein are detected in spermatocytes deficient in cyclin E2 protein. Additional depletion of E-type cyclins in the germline resulted in increasingly enhanced spermatogenic abnormalities and corresponding decreased fertility and loss of germ cells by apoptosis. Profound meiotic defects were observed in spermatocytes, including abnormal pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, heterologous chromosome associations, unrepaired double-strand DNA breaks, disruptions in telomeric structure and defects in cyclin-dependent-kinase 2 localization. These results highlight a new role for E-type cyclins as important regulators of male meiosis.

  15. A complete YAC contig of the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosome region (15q11-q13) and refined localization of the SNRPN gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutirangura, A.; Jayakumar, A.; Sutcliffe, J.S.; Nakao, M.; McKinney, M.J.; Beaudet, A.L.; Chinault, A.C.; Ledbetter, D.H. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Buiting, K.; Horsthemke, B. (Institut fur Humangenetik (Germany))

    1993-12-01

    Since a previous report of a partial YAC contig of the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosome region (15q11-q13), a complete contig spanning approximately 3.5 Mb has been developed. YACs were isolated from two human genomic libraries by PCR and hybridization screening methods. Twenty-three sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were mapped within the contig, a density of [approximately]1 per 200 kb. Overlaps between YAC clones were identified by Alu-PCR dot-blot analysis and confirmed by STS mapping or hybridization with ends of YAC inserts. The gene encoding small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated peptide N (SNRPN), recently identified as a candidate gene for Prader-Willi syndrome, was localized within this contig between markers PW71 and TD3-21. Loci mapped within and immediately flanking the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosome region contig are ordered as follows: cen-IR39-ML34-IR4-3R-TD189-1-PW71-SNRPN-TD3-21-LS6-1-GABRB3,D15S97-GABRA5-IR10-1-CMW1-tel. This YAC contig will be a useful resource for more detailed physical mapping of the region, for generation of new DNA markers, and for mapping or cloning candidate genes for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. 36 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. In Vivo Enhancer Analysis Chromosome 16 Conserved NoncodingSequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Ahituv, Nadav; Moses, Alan M.; Nobrega,Marcelo; Prabhakar, Shyam; Shoukry, Malak; Minovitsky, Simon; Visel,Axel; Dubchak, Inna; Holt, Amy; Lewis, Keith D.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Akiyama, Jennifer; De Val, Sarah; Afzal, Veena; Black, Brian L.; Couronne, Olivier; Eisen, Michael B.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-02-01

    The identification of enhancers with predicted specificitiesin vertebrate genomes remains a significant challenge that is hampered bya lack of experimentally validated training sets. In this study, weleveraged extreme evolutionary sequence conservation as a filter toidentify putative gene regulatory elements and characterized the in vivoenhancer activity of human-fish conserved and ultraconserved1 noncodingelements on human chromosome 16 as well as such elements from elsewherein the genome. We initially tested 165 of these extremely conservedsequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 48percent (79/165) functioned reproducibly as tissue-specific enhancers ofgene expression at embryonic day 11.5. While driving expression in abroad range of anatomical structures in the embryo, the majority of the79 enhancers drove expression in various regions of the developingnervous system. Studying a set of DNA elements that specifically droveforebrain expression, we identified DNA signatures specifically enrichedin these elements and used these parameters to rank all ~;3,400human-fugu conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. The testingof the top predictions in transgenic mice resulted in a three-foldenrichment for sequences with forebrain enhancer activity. These datadramatically expand the catalogue of in vivo-characterized human geneenhancers and illustrate the future utility of such training sets for avariety of iological applications including decoding the regulatoryvocabulary of the human genome.

  17. Genetic Mapping and Phylogenetic Analysis Reveal Intraspecific Variation in Sex Chromosomes of the Virginian Strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Na; Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Tennessen, Jacob A; Liston, Aaron; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2017-10-30

    With their extraordinary diversity in sexual systems, flowering plants offer unparalleled opportunities to understand sex determination and to reveal generalities in the evolution of sex chromosomes. Comparative genetic mapping of related taxa with good phylogenetic resolution can delineate the extent of sex chromosome diversity within plant groups, and lead the way to understanding the evolutionary drivers of such diversity. The North American octoploid wild strawberries provide such an opportunity. We performed linkage mapping using targeted sequence capture for the subdioecious western Fragaria virginiana ssp. platypetala and compared the location of its sex-determining region (SDR) to those of 2 other (sub)dioecious species, the eastern subspecies, F. virginiana ssp. virginiana (whose SDR is at 0-5.5 Mb on chromosome VI of the B2 subgenome), and the sister species F. chiloensis (whose SDR is at 37 Mb on chromosome VI of the Av subgenome). Male sterility was dominant in F. virginiana ssp. platypetala and mapped to a chromosome also in homeologous group VI. Likewise, one major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for female fertility overlapped the male sterility region. However, the SDR mapped to yet another subgenome (B1), and to a different location (13 Mb), but similar to the location inferred in one population of the naturally occurring hybrid between F. chiloensis and F. virginiana (F. ×ananassa ssp. cuneifolia). Phylogenetic analysis of chromosomes across the octoploid taxa showed consistent subgenomic composition reflecting shared evolutionary history but also reinforced within-species variation in the SDR-carrying chromosome, suggesting either repeated evolution, or recent turnovers in SDR. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Analysis of the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated with 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Julyanne C.G.; Mendes, Mariana E.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Santos, Neide

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations induced by gamma radiation from a 60 Co source at two different doses. Samples were obtained from a healthy donor and exposed to 60 Co source (Gammacel 220 ) located in the Department of Nuclear Energy of Pernambuco Federal University (DEN/UFPe/Brazil) with a rate of air Kerma to 3,277 Gy/h. Exposures resulted in absorbed dose 0.51 Gy and 0.77 Gy. Mitotic metaphases were obtained by culturing lymphocytes for chromosome analysis and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. Among the unstable chromosomal aberrations the dicentric chromosomes, ring chromosomes and acentric fragments were analyzed. To calculate the significance level the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. To calculate the significance level of the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. The results showed that there was significant difference of the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes (from 0.18 to 0.51 to 0.37 Gy to 0.77 Gy), however there was no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of acentric fragments ( 0.054 to 0, 51 Gy to 0.063 to 0.77 Gy) and ring chromosomes (0.001 to 0.51 Gy to 0.003 to 0.77 Gy). The low number of rings is found justified, considering that in irradiated human lymphocytes, its appearance is rare relative to dicentrics. The results confirm that dicentrics are the most reliable biomarkers in estimating dose after exposure to gamma radiation. These two points will make the calibration curve dose-response being built for Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of CRCN-NE/CNEN

  19. Genomewide copy number analysis of Müllerian adenosarcoma identified chromosomal instability in the aggressive subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jen-Chieh; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Changou, Chun A; Liang, Cher-Wei; Huang, Hsien-Neng; Lauria, Alexandra; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Lin, Chin-Yao; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Davidson, Ben; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Kuo, Kuan-Ting

    2016-09-01

    Müllerian adenosarcomas are malignant gynecologic neoplasms. Advanced staging and sarcomatous overgrowth predict poor prognosis. Because the genomic landscape remains poorly understood, we conducted this study to characterize the genomewide copy number variations in adenosarcomas. Sixteen tumors, including eight with and eight without sarcomatous overgrowth, were subjected to a molecular inversion probe array analysis. Copy number variations, particularly losses, were significantly higher in cases with sarcomatous overgrowth. Frequent gains of chromosomal 12q were noted, often involving cancer-associated genes CDK4 (six cases), MDM2, CPM, YEATS4, DDIT3, GLI1 (five each), HMGA2 and STAT6 (four), without association with sarcomatous overgrowth status. The most frequent losses involved chromosomes 13q (five cases), 9p, 16q and 17q (four cases each) and were almost limited to cases with sarcomatous overgrowth. MDM2 and CDK4 amplification, as well as losses of RB1 (observed in two cases) and CDKN2A/B (one case), was verified by FISH. By immunohistochemistry, all MDM2/CDK4-coamplified cases were confirmed to overexpress both encoded proteins, whereas all four cases with (plus an additional four without) gain of HMGA2 overexpressed the HMGA2 protein. Both cases with RB1 loss were negative for the immunostaining of the encoded protein. Chromothripsis-like copy number profiles involving chromosome 12 or 14 were observed in three fatal cases, all of which harbored sarcomatous overgrowth. With whole chromosome painting and deconvolution fluorescent microscopy, dividing tumor cells in all three cases were shown to have scattered extrachromosomal materials derived from chromosomes involved by chromothripsis, suggesting that this phenomenon may serve as visual evidence for chromothripsis in paraffin tissue. In conclusion, we identified frequent chromosome 12q amplifications, including loci containing potential pharmacological targets. Global chromosomal instability and

  20. Karyotype analysis and ribosomal gene localization of spotted knifejaw Oplegnathus punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P Z; Cao, D D; Liu, X B; Wang, Y J; Yu, H Y; Li, X J; Zhang, Q Q; Wang, X B

    2016-12-23

    The spotted knifejaw, Oplegnathus punctatus, is an important aquaculture fish species in China. To better understand the chromosomal microstructure and the karyotypic origin of this species, cytogenetic analysis was performed using Giemsa staining to identify metaphase chromosomes, C-banding to detect C-positive heterochromatin, silver staining to identify the nucleolus organizer regions (Ag-NORs), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for physical mapping of the major (18S rDNA) and minor (5S rDNA) ribosomal genes. The species showed a karyotype of 2n = 48 for females, composed of 2 submetacentric and 46 telocentric chromosomes, with a fundamental number (FN) = 50, while the karyotype of males was 2n = 47, composed of 1 exclusive large metacentric, 2 submetacentric, and 44 telocentric chromosomes, with FN = 50. These karyotype results suggest that O. punctatus might have an X 1 X 1 X 2 X 2 /X 1 X 2 Y multiple sex chromosome system. C-positive heterochromatin was distributed in the centromeres of all chromosomal pairs and in the terminal portions of some chromosomes. A single pair of Ag-positive NORs was found to be localized at the terminal regions of the short arms of the subtelocentric chromosome pair, which was supported by FISH of 18S rDNA. After FISH, 5S rDNA were located on the interstitial regions of the smallest telocentric chromosome pair. This study was the first to identify the karyotype of this species and will facilitate further research on karyotype evolution in the order Perciformes.

  1. Local Laplacian Coding From Theoretical Analysis of Local Coding Schemes for Locally Linear Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Junbiao; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Chunjie; Zhang, Weigang; Huang, Qingming; Yin, Baocai

    2015-12-01

    Local coordinate coding (LCC) is a framework to approximate a Lipschitz smooth function by combining linear functions into a nonlinear one. For locally linear classification, LCC requires a coding scheme that heavily determines the nonlinear approximation ability, posing two main challenges: 1) the locality making faraway anchors have smaller influences on current data and 2) the flexibility balancing well between the reconstruction of current data and the locality. In this paper, we address the problem from the theoretical analysis of the simplest local coding schemes, i.e., local Gaussian coding and local student coding, and propose local Laplacian coding (LPC) to achieve the locality and the flexibility. We apply LPC into locally linear classifiers to solve diverse classification tasks. The comparable or exceeded performances of state-of-the-art methods demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Quantitative analysis of NOR expression in a B chromosome of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, María; Cabrero, Josefa; Perfectti, Francisco; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2009-06-01

    The B24 chromosome in the Torrox population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans is recurrently attached to a nucleolus in diplotene cells, indicating the activity of its distally located ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The frequency of males expressing the B chromosome nucleolus organizer region (B-NOR) almost doubled in 4 years. The likelihood of expressing the B-NOR increased with the B number and, in males expressing it, about 20% of their cells showed a nucleolus attached to the B. When active, the B-NOR contributed more than 25% of total cell nucleolar area (NA). Within males expressing the B-NOR, total cell NA did not differ between cells showing the active or inactive B-NOR, suggesting that total cell NA is tightly regulated in this species. However, this parameter tended to increase in this population from 1999 to 2004, in parallel to the neutralization process which is taking place in this population. Finally, an analysis of A chromosome NOR interdependence for activity revealed a positive correlation among autosomes but a negative correlation between autosomes and the X chromosome, the manifestation of which depends on B-NOR activity. These results are discussed in the context of the nucleolus as a sensor of the stress caused by parasitic B chromosomes.

  3. Analysis of chromosomal aberrations frequency, haematological parameters and received doses by nuclear medicine professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djokovic-Davidovic, Jelena; Milovanovic, Andjela; Milovanovic, Jovica; Antic, Vojislav; Gajic, Milan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to analyse the impact of low-dose ionizing radiation to nuclear medicine professionals of the Nuclear Medicine Centre of Serbia (NMCRS). Data from the previous/initial and the last medical check-ups, obtained from the medical records of 65 employees from NMCRS, were analysed. A typical checkup, haematological parameters analysis, as well as special cytogenetical analyses, such as unstable chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus test, were carried out. For analyses of chromosomal aberrations the modified Moorhead's micro method was applied to the culture of peripheral blood lymphocytes and conventional cytogenetic technique of chromosomal aberrations was applied. The received cumulative 5-year dose was measured by personal inactive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) calibrated into personal doses equivalent Hp(10). An increased frequency of all unstable chromosomal aberration forms, such as acentric chromosomes and isochromatid lesions, was noticed in the last periodical check-up as compared to the previous/initial checkups (pNuclear medicine employees have increased health risks and there is a need to monitor their health condition by periodical check-ups for prevention from occupational diseases (carcinoma).

  4. Analysis of morphological markers of chromosomal instability in ascitic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ruchita; Dey, Pranab; Uppal, Radha; Rajwanshi, Arvind

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal instability (CI) plays a major role in the carcinogenesis. Micronuclei, nuclear budding, chromatin bridges,and multipolar mitoses are the morphological markers of CI and have never been studied in routine cytological specimens. Aims of the study is to analyze the significance of morphological markers of CI in malignant and benign ascitic fluid smears. A total of sixty benign and 40 malignant ascitic fluid samples were selected for this study. All the cases with malignant ascitic fluid showed histopathological evidence of malignancy in ovary and omentum. Chromatin bridges, multipolar mitosis (MPM), micronuclei and nuclear budding were counted in 1000 cells in representative May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) stained smears. The CI markers were correlated with the cytological diagnosis of effusion. The mean number of micronuclei, nuclear budding, chromatin bridge and multipolar mitoses found in malignant effusions were 13.2611.79, 10.1067.07, 2.5362.67, 1.964.5, respectively. The mean number of micronuclei, nuclear budding, anaphase bridges, and MPM found in benign effusion cases were 0.566761.07934, 0.516761.33, 0.66760.25, and 0, respectively. The student t test showed significant differences between malignant and benign ascitic fluid samples for each marker of CI. This is the first comprehensive study of morphological markers of CI in ascitic fluid smears. This study has shown strong correlation between markers of CI and cytological diagnosis of malignancy. In future, the knowledge of these markers can be applied to diagnose malignancy in suspected cases of effusion in difficult situations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Parents' Perceptions of the Usefulness of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Marian; Giarelli, Ellen; Bernhardt, Barbara A.; Easley, Ebony; Spinner, Nancy B.; Sankar, Pamela L.; Mulchandani, Surabhi

    2015-01-01

    Clinical guidelines recommend chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) for all children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We explored the test's perceived usefulness among parents of children with ASD who had undergone CMA, and received a result categorized as pathogenic, variant of uncertain significance, or negative. Fifty-seven parents…

  6. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in an Autism Primary Care Practice: Which Guidelines to Implement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrew, Susan G.; Peters, Brittany R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing is recommended for patients with ASD; however specific recommendations vary by specialty. American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Neurology guidelines recommend G-banded karyotype and Fragile X DNA. The American College of Medical Genetics recommends Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA). We determined the yield of…

  7. The Utility of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) has emerged as a powerful new tool to identify genomic abnormalities associated with a wide range of developmental disabilities including congenital malformations, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. CMA includes array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism…

  8. Economic analysis of chromosome testing in couples with recurrent miscarriage to prevent handicapped offspring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, M. van; Vansenne, F.; Korevaar, J.C.; Veen, F. van der; Goddijn, M.; Mol, B.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Question: Which strategy is least expensive to prevent the birth of a handicapped child in couples with recurrent miscarriage (RM); parental chromosome analysis followed by amniocentesis in case of carrier status of one of the parents, or amniocentesis in all ongoing pregnancies without the

  9. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, M; Wang, C; Saha, S; Hutmacher, R B; Stelly, D M; Jenkins, J N; Burke, J; Roberts, P A

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome substitution (CS) lines in plants are a powerful genetic resource for analyzing the contribution of chromosome segments to phenotypic variance. In this study, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) CS lines were used to identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode or fungal disease resistance traits. The CS lines were developed in the G. hirsutum L. TM-1 background with chromosome or chromosome segment substitutions from G. barbadense L. Pima 3-79 or G. tomentosum. Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum) (races 1 and 4) resistance alleles and quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously placed on cotton chromosomes using SSR markers in two interspecific recombinant inbred line populations were chosen for testing. Phenotypic responses of increased resistance or susceptibility in controlled inoculation and infested field assays confirmed the resistance QTLs, based on substitution with the positive or negative allele for resistance. Lines CS-B22Lo, CS-B04, and CS-B18 showed high resistance to nematode root-galling, confirming QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 22 (long arm) with resistance alleles from Pima 3-79. Line CS-B16 had less fusarium race 1-induced vascular root staining and higher percent survival than the TM-1 parent, confirming a major resistance QTL on chromosome 16. Lines CS-B(17-11) and CS-B17 had high fusarium race 4 vascular symptoms and low survival due to susceptible alleles introgressed from Pima 3-79, confirming the localization on chromosome 17 of an identified QTL with resistance alleles from TM1 and other resistant lines. Analyses validated regions on chromosomes 11, 16, and 17 harboring nematode and fusarium wilt resistance genes and demonstrated the value of CS lines as both a germplasm resource for breeding programs and as a powerful genetic analysis tool for determining QTL effects for disease

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of fiber strength in upland cotton chromosome introgression lines carrying different Gossypium barbadense chromosomal segments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Fang

    Full Text Available Fiber strength is the key trait that determines fiber quality in cotton, and it is closely related to secondary cell wall synthesis. To understand the mechanism underlying fiber strength, we compared fiber transcriptomes from different G. barbadense chromosome introgression lines (CSILs that had higher fiber strengths than their recipient, G. hirsutum acc. TM-1. A total of 18,288 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were detected between CSIL-35431 and CSIL-31010, two CSILs with stronger fiber and TM-1 during secondary cell wall synthesis. Functional classification and enrichment analysis revealed that these DEGs were enriched for secondary cell wall biogenesis, glucuronoxylan biosynthesis, cellulose biosynthesis, sugar-mediated signaling pathways, and fatty acid biosynthesis. Pathway analysis showed that these DEGs participated in starch and sucrose metabolism (328 genes, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis (122 genes, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis (101 genes, and oxidative phosphorylation (87 genes, etc. Moreover, the expression of MYB- and NAC-type transcription factor genes were also dramatically different between the CSILs and TM-1. Being different to those of CSIL-31134, CSIL-35431 and CSIL-31010, there were many genes for fatty acid degradation and biosynthesis, and also for carbohydrate metabolism that were down-regulated in CSIL-35368. Metabolic pathway analysis in the CSILs showed that different pathways were changed, and some changes at the same developmental stage in some pathways. Our results extended our understanding that carbonhydrate metabolic pathway and secondary cell wall biosynthesis can affect the fiber strength and suggested more genes and/or pathways be related to complex fiber strength formation process.

  11. Analysis of the SOS response of Vibrio and other bacteria with multiple chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Alberola Neus

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SOS response is a well-known regulatory network present in most bacteria and aimed at addressing DNA damage. It has also been linked extensively to stress-induced mutagenesis, virulence and the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants. Recently, the SOS response has been shown to regulate the activity of integrases in the chromosomal superintegrons of the Vibrionaceae, which encompasses a wide range of pathogenic species harboring multiple chromosomes. Here we combine in silico and in vitro techniques to perform a comparative genomics analysis of the SOS regulon in the Vibrionaceae, and we extend the methodology to map this transcriptional network in other bacterial species harboring multiple chromosomes. Results Our analysis provides the first comprehensive description of the SOS response in a family (Vibrionaceae that includes major human pathogens. It also identifies several previously unreported members of the SOS transcriptional network, including two proteins of unknown function. The analysis of the SOS response in other bacterial species with multiple chromosomes uncovers additional regulon members and reveals that there is a conserved core of SOS genes, and that specialized additions to this basic network take place in different phylogenetic groups. Our results also indicate that across all groups the main elements of the SOS response are always found in the large chromosome, whereas specialized additions are found in the smaller chromosomes and plasmids. Conclusions Our findings confirm that the SOS response of the Vibrionaceae is strongly linked with pathogenicity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance, and suggest that the characterization of the newly identified members of this regulon could provide key insights into the pathogenesis of Vibrio. The persistent location of key SOS genes in the large chromosome across several bacterial groups confirms that the SOS response plays an

  12. Fine mapping analysis confirms and strengthens linkage of four chromosomal regions in familial hypospadias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderhäll, Cilla; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Thai, Hanh T T; Cao, Jia; Chen, Yougen; Zhang, Xufeng; Shulu, Zu; van der Zanden, Loes F M; van Rooij, Iris A L M; Frisén, Louise; Roeleveld, Nel; Markljung, Ellen; Kockum, Ingrid; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common male genital malformation and is regarded as a complex disease affected by multiple genetic as well as environmental factors. In a previous genome-wide scan for familial hypospadias, we reported suggestive linkage in nine chromosomal regions. We have extended this analysis by including new families and additional markers using non-parametric linkage. The fine mapping analysis displayed an increased LOD score on chromosome 8q24.1 and 10p15 in altogether 82 families. On chromosome 10p15, with the highest LOD score, we further studied AKR1C2, AKR1C3 and AKR1C4 involved in steroid metabolism, as well as KLF6 expressed in preputial tissue from hypospadias patients. Mutation analysis of the AKR1C3 gene showed a new mutation, c.643G>A (p.(Ala215Thr)), in a boy with penile hypospadias. This mutation is predicted to have an impact on protein function and structure and was not found in controls. Altogether, we homed in on four chromosomal regions likely to harbor genes for hypospadias. Future studies will aim for studying regulatory sequence variants in these regions. PMID:24986825

  13. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  14. Analysis and visualization of chromosomal abnormalities in SNP data with SNPscan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Jason C; Ye, Ying; Thomas, George H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Pevsner, Jonathan

    2006-01-18

    A variety of diseases are caused by chromosomal abnormalities such as aneuploidies (having an abnormal number of chromosomes), microdeletions, microduplications, and uniparental disomy. High density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays provide information on chromosomal copy number changes, as well as genotype (heterozygosity and homozygosity). SNP array studies generate multiple types of data for each SNP site, some with more than 100,000 SNPs represented on each array. The identification of different classes of anomalies within SNP data has been challenging. We have developed SNPscan, a web-accessible tool to analyze and visualize high density SNP data. It enables researchers (1) to visually and quantitatively assess the quality of user-generated SNP data relative to a benchmark data set derived from a control population, (2) to display SNP intensity and allelic call data in order to detect chromosomal copy number anomalies (duplications and deletions), (3) to display uniparental isodisomy based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH) across genomic regions, (4) to compare paired samples (e.g. tumor and normal), and (5) to generate a file type for viewing SNP data in the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Human Genome Browser. SNPscan accepts data exported from Affymetrix Copy Number Analysis Tool as its input. We validated SNPscan using data generated from patients with known deletions, duplications, and uniparental disomy. We also inspected previously generated SNP data from 90 apparently normal individuals from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) collection, and identified three cases of uniparental isodisomy, four females having an apparently mosaic X chromosome, two mislabelled SNP data sets, and one microdeletion on chromosome 2 with mosaicism from an apparently normal female. These previously unrecognized abnormalities were all detected using SNPscan. The microdeletion was independently confirmed by fluorescence in situ

  15. Analysis and visualization of chromosomal abnormalities in SNP data with SNPscan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas George H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of diseases are caused by chromosomal abnormalities such as aneuploidies (having an abnormal number of chromosomes, microdeletions, microduplications, and uniparental disomy. High density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarrays provide information on chromosomal copy number changes, as well as genotype (heterozygosity and homozygosity. SNP array studies generate multiple types of data for each SNP site, some with more than 100,000 SNPs represented on each array. The identification of different classes of anomalies within SNP data has been challenging. Results We have developed SNPscan, a web-accessible tool to analyze and visualize high density SNP data. It enables researchers (1 to visually and quantitatively assess the quality of user-generated SNP data relative to a benchmark data set derived from a control population, (2 to display SNP intensity and allelic call data in order to detect chromosomal copy number anomalies (duplications and deletions, (3 to display uniparental isodisomy based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH across genomic regions, (4 to compare paired samples (e.g. tumor and normal, and (5 to generate a file type for viewing SNP data in the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC Human Genome Browser. SNPscan accepts data exported from Affymetrix Copy Number Analysis Tool as its input. We validated SNPscan using data generated from patients with known deletions, duplications, and uniparental disomy. We also inspected previously generated SNP data from 90 apparently normal individuals from the Centre d'Étude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH collection, and identified three cases of uniparental isodisomy, four females having an apparently mosaic X chromosome, two mislabelled SNP data sets, and one microdeletion on chromosome 2 with mosaicism from an apparently normal female. These previously unrecognized abnormalities were all detected using SNPscan. The microdeletion was independently

  16. Localization of a gene (CMT2A) for autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 to chromosome 1p and evidence of genetic heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmane, K.B.; Loprest, L.J.; Wilkinson, K.M. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Middleton, L.T. (Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics, Nicosia (Cyprus)) (and others)

    1993-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 (CMT2) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by variable age of onset and normal or slightly diminished nerve conduction velocity. CMT2 is pathologically and genetically distinct from CMT type 1 (CMT1). While CMT1 has been shown to be genetically heterogeneous, no chromosomal localization has been established for CMT2. The authors have performed pedigree linkage analysis in six large autosomal dominant CMT2 families and have demonstrated linkage and heterogeneity to a series of microsatellites (D1S160, D1S170, D1S244, D1S228 and D1S199) in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found using admixture analyses and the two-point lod scores. Admixture analyses using the multipoint results for the markers D1S244, D1S228, and D1S199 supported the two-point findings. Three families, DUK662, DUK1241, and 1523 gave posterior probabilities of 1.0, 0.98, and 0.88 of being of the linked type. Multipoint analysis examining the [open quotes]linked[close quotes] families showed that the most favored location for the CMT2A gene is within the interval flanked by D1S244 and D1S228 (odds approximately 70:1 of lying within versus outside that interval). These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrate further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  17. Safety analysis of accident localization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A complex safety analysis of accident localization system of Ignalina NPP was performed. Calculation results obtained, results of non-destruct ing testing and experimental data of reinforced concrete testing of buildings does not revealed deficiencies of buildings of accident localization system at unit 1 of Ignalina NPP. Calculations were performed using codes NEPTUNE, ALGOR, CONTAIN

  18. Sequence analysis of cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch. using microdissected single somatic chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Yanagi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch. has homoeologous chromosomes because of allo-octoploidy. For example, two homoeologous chromosomes that belong to different sub-genome of allopolyploids have similar base sequences. Thus, when conducting de novo assembly of DNA sequences, it is difficult to determine whether these sequences are derived from the same chromosome. To avoid the difficulties associated with homoeologous chromosomes and demonstrate the possibility of sequencing allopolyploids using single chromosomes, we conducted sequence analysis using microdissected single somatic chromosomes of cultivated strawberry. Results Three hundred and ten somatic chromosomes of the Japanese octoploid strawberry ‘Reiko’ were individually selected under a light microscope using a microdissection system. DNA from 288 of the dissected chromosomes was successfully amplified using a DNA amplification kit. Using next-generation sequencing, we decoded the base sequences of the amplified DNA segments, and on the basis of mapping, we identified DNA sequences from 144 samples that were best matched to the reference genomes of the octoploid strawberry, F. × ananassa, and the diploid strawberry, F. vesca. The 144 samples were classified into seven pseudo-molecules of F. vesca. The coverage rates of the DNA sequences from the single chromosome onto all pseudo-molecular sequences varied from 3 to 29.9%. Conclusion We demonstrated an efficient method for sequence analysis of allopolyploid plants using microdissected single chromosomes. On the basis of our results, we believe that whole-genome analysis of allopolyploid plants can be enhanced using methodology that employs microdissected single chromosomes.

  19. Quantitative analysis of mutation and selection pressures on base composition skews in bacterial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Carton W

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most bacterial chromosomes exhibit asymmetry of base composition with respect to leading vs. lagging strands (GC and AT skews. These skews reflect mainly those in protein coding sequences, which are driven by asymmetric mutation pressures during replication and transcription (notably asymmetric cytosine deamination plus subsequent selection for preferred structures, signals, amino acid or codons. The transcription-associated effects but not the replication-associated effects contribute to the overall skews through the uneven distribution of the coding sequences on the leading and lagging strands. Results Analysis of 185 representative bacterial chromosomes showed diverse and characteristic patterns of skews among different clades. The base composition skews in the coding sequences were used to derive quantitatively the effect of replication-driven mutation plus subsequent selection ('replication-associated pressure', RAP, and the effect of transcription-driven mutation plus subsequent selection at translation level ('transcription-associate pressure', TAP. While different clades exhibit distinct patterns of RAP and TAP, RAP is absent or nearly absent in some bacteria, but TAP is present in all. The selection pressure at the translation level is evident in all bacteria based on the analysis of the skews at the three codon positions. Contribution of asymmetric cytosine deamination was found to be weak to TAP in most phyla, and strong to RAP in all the Proteobacteria but weak in most of the Firmicutes. This possibly reflects the differences in their chromosomal replication machineries. A strong negative correlation between TAP and G+C content and between TAP and chromosomal size were also revealed. Conclusion The study reveals the diverse mutation and selection forces associated with replication and transcription in various groups of bacteria that shape the distinct patterns of base composition skews in the chromosomes during

  20. The scale and nature of Viking settlement in Ireland from Y-chromosome admixture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Brian; Brady, Claire; Moore, Laoise T; Bradley, Daniel G

    2006-12-01

    The Vikings (or Norse) played a prominent role in Irish history but, despite this, their genetic legacy in Ireland, which may provide insights into the nature and scale of their immigration, is largely unexplored. Irish surnames, some of which are thought to have Norse roots, are paternally inherited in a similar manner to Y-chromosomes. The correspondence of Scandinavian patrilineal ancestry in a cohort of Irish men bearing surnames of putative Norse origin was examined using both slow mutating unique event polymorphisms and relatively rapidly changing short tandem repeat Y-chromosome markers. Irish and Scandinavian admixture proportions were explored for both systems using six different admixture estimators, allowing a parallel investigation of the impact of method and marker type in Y-chromosome admixture analysis. Admixture proportion estimates in the putative Norse surname group were highly consistent and detected little trace of Scandinavian ancestry. In addition, there is scant evidence of Scandinavian Y-chromosome introgression in a general Irish population sample. Although conclusions are largely dependent on the accurate identification of Norse surnames, the findings are consistent with a relatively small number of Norse settlers (and descendents) migrating to Ireland during the Viking period (ca. AD 800-1200) suggesting that Norse colonial settlements might have been largely composed of indigenous Irish. This observation adds to previous genetic studies that point to a flexible Viking settlement approach across North Atlantic Europe.

  1. Chromosomal damage and apoptosis analysis in exfoliated oral epithelial cells from mouthwash and alcohol users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Rodrigo dos Santos; Meireles, José Roberto Cardoso; de Moraes Marcílio Cerqueira, Eneida

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal damage and apoptosis were analyzed in users of mouthwash and/or alcoholic beverages, using the micronucleus test on exfoliated oral mucosa cells. Samples from four groups of 20 individuals each were analyzed: three exposed groups (EG1, EG2 and EG3) and a control group (CG). EG1 comprised mouthwash users; EG2 comprised drinkers, and EG3 users of both mouthwashes and alcoholic beverages. Cell material was collected by gently scraping the insides of the cheeks. Then the cells were fixed in a methanol/acetic acid (3:1) solution and stained and counterstained, respectively, with Schiff reactive and fast green. Endpoints were computed on 2,000 cells in a blind test. Statistical analysis showed that chromosomal damage and apoptosis were significantly higher in individuals of groups EG1 and EG3 than in controls (p < 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in chromosomal damage and apoptosis was observed between the exposed groups. In EG2, only the occurrence of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the controls. These results suggest that mouthwashes alone or in association with alcoholic drinks induce genotoxic effects, manifested as chromosomal damage and apoptosis. They also suggest that alcoholic drinks are effective for stimulating the process of apoptosis. However, these data need to be confirmed in larger samples. PMID:25505845

  2. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N.; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sex and sex-chromosome dosage (SCD) are known to modulate human brain size and cortical anatomy, but very little is known regarding their impact on subcortical structures that work with the cortex to subserve a range of behaviors in health and disease. Moreover

  3. Tiling microarray analysis of rice chromosome 10 to identify the transcriptome and relate its expression to chromosomal architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng; Xia, Mian

    2005-01-01

    gene models and in identifying novel transcriptional units. The tiling microarray sanalysis further revealed a chromosome-wide transcription pattern that suggests a role for transposable element-enriched heterochromatin in shaping global transcription in response to environmental changes in rice...

  4. Localization of the human RNA polymerase I transcription factor gene (UBTF) to the D17S183 locus on chromosome 17q21 and construction of a long-range restriction map of the region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.A.; Black, D.M.; Griffiths, B.L.; Solomon, E. [Somatic Cell Genetics Lab., London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-10

    Human upstream binding factor (hUBF) is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that is essential for the activation of human 18s and 28s rRNA gene transcription. We have isolated and localized the gene (UBTF) encoding hUBF to the D17S183 locus on chromosome 17q21 by analyzing a cosmid from the region and carrying out Southern analysis on a previously constructed chromosome 17 somatic cell hybrid mapping panel using a probe from the hUBF cDNA. Confirmation of its location at this region was obtained from the results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA using the hUBF cDNA and other probes from the region. These data also enabled the construction of a long-range restriction map of the region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Purrott, R.J.; Prosser, J.S.; White, A.D.; Dolphin, G.W.; Reeder, E.J.; Martin, L.C.; Priseman, S.J.; Gray, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    Results from cytogenetic investigations into 63 cases of suspected over-exposure to radiation during 1978 are reviewed. This report is the eighth in an annual series which together contain data on 390 studies. Results from all investigations have been pooled for general analysis. Brief accounts are given, in an appendix, of the circumstances behind the past year's investigations and, where possible, physical estimates of dose have been included for comparison. One case is described in more detail. It concerns a young man who deliberately irradiated himself with several sources of iridium-192 and received a dose of about 1.5 Gy as a fairly uniform whole body exposure. (author)

  6. Gene mapping of Usher syndrome type IIa: Localization of the gene to a 2.1-cM segment on chromosome 1q41

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberling, W.J.; Weston, M.D.; Ing, P.S.; Connolly, C. [Center for Hereditary Communication Disorders, Omaha, NE (United States); Sumegi, J. [Univ. of Nebraska, Omaha, NE (United States); Moeller, C. [Univ. of Linkoeping Medical School (Sweden); Aarem, A. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J. [University Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Martini, A.; Milani, M. [and others

    1995-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II is associated with hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa but not with any vestibular problems. It is known to be genetically heterogeneous, and one locus (termed USH2A) has been linked to chromosome 1q41. In an effort to refine the localization of USH2A, the genetic map of the region between and adjacent to the marker loci previously recognized as flanking USH2A (D1S70 and PPOL) is updated. Analysis of marker data on 68 Usher II families places the USH2A gene into a 2.1-cM region between the markers D1S237 and D1S229. The gene for transforming growth factor {beta}2 (TGFB2) and the gene for the homeodomain box (HLX1) are both eliminated as candidates for USH2A, by virtue of their localization outside these flanking markers. The earlier finding of genetic heterogeneity was confirmed in six new families, and the proportion of unlinked Usher II families is estimated at 12.5%. The placement of the USH2A gene into this region will aid in the physical mapping and isolation of the gene itself. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Purrott, R.J.; Prosser, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Results from cytogenetic investigations into 55 cases of suspected over-exposure to radiation during 1977 are reviewed. This report is the seventh in an annual series (previous results were published in NRPB-R5, R10, R23, R35, R41 and R57) which together contain data on 327 studies. Results from all investigations have been pooled for general analysis. Brief accounts are given in an appendix of the circumstances behind the past year's investigations and, where possible, physical estimates of dose have been included for comparison. Two cases are described in more detail: the first concerned a non-classified worker who put an iridium-192 source in his pocket and took it home; and the second involved the accidental contamination of two people with tritium gas. In a second appendix, the confidence limits on cytogenetic dosimetry for X- and γ-ray over-exposures are given and the derivation of these limits is discussed. (author)

  8. mFISH analysis of chromosome aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to mixed radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotnik, Natalia V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Scherthan, Harry [Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology Affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    We performed a study on the presence of chromosome aberrations in a cohort of plutonium workers of the Mayak production association (PA) with a mean age of 73.3 ± 7.2 years to see whether by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) translocation analysis can discriminate individuals who underwent occupational exposure with internal and/or external exposure to ionizing radiation 40 years ago. All Mayak PA workers were occupationally exposed to chronic internal alpha-radiation due to incorporated plutonium-239 and/or to external gamma-rays. First, we obtained the translocation yield in control individuals by mFISH to chromosome spreads of age-matched individuals and obtained background values that are similar to previously published values of an international study (Sigurdson et al. in Mutat Res 652:112-121, 2008). Workers who had absorbed a total dose of >0.5 Gy external gamma-rays to the red bone marrow (RBM) displayed a significantly higher frequency of stable chromosome aberrations relative to a group of workers exposed to <0.5 Gy gamma-rays total absorbed RBM dose. Thus, the translocation frequency may be considered to be a biological marker of external radiation exposure even years after the exposure. In a group of workers who were internally exposed and had incorporated plutonium-239 at a body burden >1.48 kBq, mFISH revealed a considerable number of cells with complex chromosomal rearrangements. Linear associations were observed for translocation yield with the absorbed RBM dose from external gamma-rays as well as for complex chromosomal rearrangements with the plutonium-239 body burden. (orig.)

  9. GenomeLandscaper: Landscape analysis of genome-fingerprints maps assessing chromosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Hannan; Ai, Yuncan; Meng, Fanmei

    2018-01-18

    Assessing correctness of an assembled chromosome architecture is a central challenge. We create a geometric analysis method (called GenomeLandscaper) to conduct landscape analysis of genome-fingerprints maps (GFM), trace large-scale repetitive regions, and assess their impacts on the global architectures of assembled chromosomes. We develop an alignment-free method for phylogenetics analysis. The human Y chromosomes (GRCh.chrY, HuRef.chrY and YH.chrY) are analysed as a proof-of-concept study. We construct a galaxy of genome-fingerprints maps (GGFM) for them, and a landscape compatibility among relatives is observed. But a long sharp straight line on the GGFM breaks such a landscape compatibility, distinguishing GRCh38p1.chrY (and throughout GRCh38p7.chrY) from GRCh37p13.chrY, HuRef.chrY and YH.chrY. We delete a 1.30-Mbp target segment to rescue the landscape compatibility, matching the antecedent GRCh37p13.chrY. We re-locate it into the modelled centromeric and pericentromeric region of GRCh38p10.chrY, matching a gap placeholder of GRCh37p13.chrY. We decompose it into sub-constituents (such as BACs, interspersed repeats, and tandem repeats) and trace their homologues by phylogenetics analysis. We elucidate that most examined tandem repeats are of reasonable quality, but the BAC-sized repeats, 173U1020C (176.46 Kbp) and 5U41068C (205.34 Kbp), are likely over-repeated. These results offer unique insights into the centromeric and pericentromeric regions of the human Y chromosomes.

  10. Structure of the human gene encoding the associated microfibrillar protein (MFAP1) and localization to chromosome 15q15-q21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, H.; Chow, M.; Abrams, W.R. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Microfibrils with a diameter of 10-12 nm, found either in assocation with elastin or independently, are an important component of the extracellular matrix of many tissues. To extend understanding of the proteins composing these microfibrils, the cDNA and gene encoding the human associated microfibril protein (MRAP1) have been cloned and characterized. The coding portion is contained in 9 exons, and the sequence is very homologous to the previously described chick cDNA, but does not appear to share homology or domain motifs with any other known protein. Interestingly, the gene has been localized to chromosome 15q15-q21 by somatic hybrid cell and chromosome in situ analyses. This is the same chromosomal region to which the fibrillin gene, FBN1, known to be defective in the Marfan syndrome, has been mapped. MFAP1 is a candidate gene for heritable diseases affecting microfibrils. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Molecular cloning, identification, and chromosomal localization of two MADS box genes in peach (Prunus persica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rongcai

    2008-06-01

    MADS box proteins play an important role in floral development. To find genes involved in the floral transition of Prunus species, cDNAs for two MADS box genes, PpMADS1 and PpMADS10, were cloned using degenerate primers and 5'- and 3'-RACE based on the sequence database of P. persica and P. dulcis. The full length of PpMADS1 cDNA is 1,071 bp containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 717 bp and coding for a polypeptide of 238 amino acid residues. The full length of PpMADS10 cDNA is 937 bp containing an ORF of 633 bp and coding for a polypeptide of 210 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison revealed that PpMADS1 and PpMADS10 were highly homologous to genes AP1 and PI in Arabidopsis, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PpMADS1 belongs to the euAP1 clade of class A, and PpMADS10 is a member of GLO/PI clade of class B. RT-PCR analysis showed that PpMADS1 was expressed in sepal, petal, carpel, and fruit, which was slightly different from the expression pattern of AP1; PpMADS10 was expressed in petal and stamen, which shared the same expression pattern as PI. Using selective mapping strategy, PpMADS1 was assigned onto the Bin1:50 on the G1 linkage group between the markers MCO44 and TSA2, and PpMADS10 onto the Bin1:73 on the same linkage group between the markers Lap-1 and FGA8. Our results provided the basis for further dissection of the two MADS box gene function.

  12. Performance Analysis of Local Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin T.

    2018-03-01

    Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is an important data assimilation method for high-dimensional geophysical systems. Efficient implementation of EnKF in practice often involves the localization technique, which updates each component using only information within a local radius. This paper rigorously analyzes the local EnKF (LEnKF) for linear systems and shows that the filter error can be dominated by the ensemble covariance, as long as (1) the sample size exceeds the logarithmic of state dimension and a constant that depends only on the local radius; (2) the forecast covariance matrix admits a stable localized structure. In particular, this indicates that with small system and observation noises, the filter error will be accurate in long time even if the initialization is not. The analysis also reveals an intrinsic inconsistency caused by the localization technique, and a stable localized structure is necessary to control this inconsistency. While this structure is usually taken for granted for the operation of LEnKF, it can also be rigorously proved for linear systems with sparse local observations and weak local interactions. These theoretical results are also validated by numerical implementation of LEnKF on a simple stochastic turbulence in two dynamical regimes.

  13. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  14. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S. [Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. [Application of chromosome microarray analysis for prenatal diagnosis of a fetus with partial duplication of 1p and uniparental disomy of chromosome 6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ruifang; Zhu, Xiangyu; Wang, Yaping; Li, Jie; Ru, Tong; Yang, Ying

    2015-12-01

    To explore the genetic cause for a fetus with structural anomaly, and to correlate the phenotype with the genotype. Amniotic fluid was obtained following the revelation of structural anomaly by ultrasonography. Cell culture and direct DNA extraction were performed in parallel. G-banded karyotyping analysis and chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) were subsequently carried out. G-banded karyotyping has suggested the fetus to be a normal male. However, CMA analysis has revealed the presence of a mosaic 3.24 Mb duplication of 1p36.33p36.32 (24%) and uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 6. The genetic diagnosis for the fetus was therefore 46,XY, arr 1p36.33 p36.32(849,466-4,090,472)×2-3, (6)×2 hmz. The anomaly can probably explain the ultrasound findings in the fetus. Compared with conventional cytogenetic methods, CMA has greater resolution and throughput, and can serve as a more efficient platform for the detection of chromosomal microdeletion, microduplication, loss of heterozygosity and UPD.

  16. Combined fluorescent-chromogenic in situ hybridization for identification and laser microdissection of interphase chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Paz

    Full Text Available Chromosome territories constitute the most conspicuous feature of nuclear architecture, and they exhibit non-random distribution patterns in the interphase nucleus. We observed that in cell nuclei from humans with Down Syndrome two chromosomes 21 frequently localize proximal to one another and distant from the third chromosome. To systematically investigate whether the proximally positioned chromosomes were always the same in all cells, we developed an approach consisting of sequential FISH and CISH combined with laser-microdissection of chromosomes from the interphase nucleus and followed by subsequent chromosome identification by microsatellite allele genotyping. This approach identified proximally positioned chromosomes from cultured cells, and the analysis showed that the identity of the chromosomes proximally positioned varies. However, the data suggest that there may be a tendency of the same chromosomes to be positioned close to each other in the interphase nucleus of trisomic cells. The protocol described here represents a powerful new method for genome analysis.

  17. Effects of colcemid concentration on chromosome aberration analysis in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Reiko; Hayata, Isamu; Kobayashi, Sadayoshi (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)); Jiang, Tao

    1994-03-01

    As a part of technical improvements of chromosome aberration analysis on human peripheral lymphocytes for biological radiation dosimetry, we examined the optimal conditions for the use of colcemid in chromosome preparation in order to obtain enough number of cells at metaphase in the first cell division. When treated with colcemid at concentrations below 0.01 [mu]g/ml from the beginning of culture, cultures harvested at 48 hours had low mitotic indices. Colcemid treatment at 0.025 to 0.05 [mu]g/ml during 48 hours resulted in high mitotic indices (8 to 15%) and almost of the mitotic cells remaining in the 1st cell division, suggesting that this range of colcemid concentration was appropriate for continuous treatment with colcemid. We further examined the effect of colcemid concentration on the quantitative consistency of the yields of radiation-induced chromosome aberration. Repeated experiments showed that the yield of dicentrics and centric rings in the culture having colcemid at 0.025 [mu]g/ml concentration were larger than that at 0.05 [mu]g/ml. These data indicate the importance of assuring the accuracy of colcemid concentration in the lymphocyte culture for cytogenetic radiation dosimetry. (author).

  18. Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Six Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Damasceno Espirito Santo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cri-du-chat syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The disease severity, levels of intellectual and developmental delay, and patient prognosis have been related to the size and position of the deletion. Aiming to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, we applied array-CGH to evaluate six patients carrying cytogenetically detected deletions of the short arm of chromosome 5 who were followed at a genetics community service. The patients’ cytogenetic and clinical profiles were reevaluated. A database review was performed to predict additional genes and regulatory elements responsible for the characteristic phenotypic and behavioral traits of this disorder. Array-CGH analysis allowed for delineation of the terminal deletions, which ranged in size from approximately 11.2 Mb to 28.6 Mb, with breakpoints from 5p15.2 to 5p13. An additional dup(8(p23 (3.5 Mb, considered to be a benign copy number variation, was also observed in one patient. The correlation coefficient value (ρ=0.13 calculated indicated the presence of a weak relationship between developmental delay and deletion size. Genetic background, family history, epigenetic factors, quantitative trait locus polymorphisms, and environmental factors may also affect patient phenotype and must be taken into account in genotype-phenotype correlations.

  19. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of monoecious hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) cultivars reveals its karyotype variations and sex chromosomes constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, Olga V; Alexandrov, Oleg S; Divashuk, Mikhail G; Sukhorada, Tatiana I; Karlov, Gennady I

    2016-05-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L., 2n = 20) is a dioecious plant. Sex expression is controlled by an X-to-autosome balance system consisting of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes XY for males and XX for females. Genetically monoecious hemp offers several agronomic advantages compared to the dioecious cultivars that are widely used in hemp cultivation. The male or female origin of monoecious maternal plants is unknown. Additionally, the sex chromosome composition of monoecious hemp forms remains unknown. In this study, we examine the sex chromosome makeup in monoecious hemp using a cytogenetic approach. Eight monoecious and two dioecious cultivars were used. The DNA of 210 monoecious plants was used for PCR analysis with the male-associated markers MADC2 and SCAR323. All monoecious plants showed female amplification patterns. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the subtelomeric CS-1 probe to chromosomes plates and karyotyping revealed a lack of Y chromosome and presence of XX sex chromosomes in monoecious cultivars with the chromosome number 2n = 20. There was a high level of intra- and intercultivar karyotype variation detected. The results of this study can be used for further analysis of the genetic basis of sex expression in plants.

  20. Genetic counseling for a prenatal diagnosis of structural chromosomal abnormality with high-resolution analysis using a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Takashima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year old pregnant woman underwent amniocentesis to conduct a conventional karyotyping analysis; the analysis reported an abnormal karyotype: 46,XY,add(9(p24. Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA is utilized in prenatal diagnoses. A single nucleotide polymorphism microarray revealed a male fetus with balanced chromosomal translocations on 9p and balanced chromosomal rearrangements, but another chromosomal abnormality was detected. The fetus had microduplication. The child was born as a phenotypically normal male. CMA is a simple and informative procedure for prenatal genetic diagnosis. CMA is the detection of chromosomal variants of unknown clinical significance; therefore, genetic counseling is important during prenatal genetic testing.

  1. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the human cyclin C (CCNC) and cyclin E (CCNE) genes: Deletion of the CCNC gene in human tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haimin; Lahti, J.M.; Kidd, V.J. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The human G1-phase cyclins are important regulators of cell cycle progression that interact with various cyclin-dependent kinases and facilitate entry into S-phase. We have confirmed the localization of the human cyclin C (CCNC) gene to chromosome 6q21 and of human cyclin E (CCNE to 19q12). The CCNC gene structure was also determined, and we have shown that it is deleted in a subset of acute lymphoblastic leukemias, including a patient sample containing a t(2;6)(p21;q15), with no apparent cytogenetic deletion. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of the remaining CCNC allele from patients with a deletion of one allele established that there were no further mutations within the exons or the flanking intronic sequences. These results suggest either that haploinsufficiency of the cyclin C protein is sufficient to promote tumorigenesis or that the important tumor suppressor gene is linked to the CCNC locus. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Localization of the homolog of a mouse craniofacial mutant to human chromosome 18q11 and evaluation of linkage to human CLP and CPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.C.; Yu, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-15

    The transgene-induced mutation 9257 and the spontaneous mutation twirler cause craniofacial and inner ear malformations and are located on mouse chromosome 18 near the ataxia locus ax. To map the human homolog of 9257, a probe from the transgene insertion site was used to screen a human genomic library. Analysis of a cross-hybridizing human clone identified a 3-kb conserved sequence block that does not appear to contain protein coding sequence. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels assigned the human locus to 18q11. The polymorphic microsatellite markers D18S1001 and D18S1002 were isolated from the human locus and mapped by linkage analysis using the CEPH pedigrees. The 9257 locus maps close to the centromeres of human chromosome 18q and mouse chromosome 18 at the proximal end of a conserved linkage group. To evaluate the role of this locus in human craniofacial disorders, linkage to D18S1002 was tested in 11 families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 3 families with autosomal dominant cleft palate only. Obligatory recombinants were observed in 8 of the families, and negative lod scores from the other families indicated that these disorders are not linked to the chromosome 18 loci. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, E.; Lamb, J.A.; Barnby, G.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants...... in the genes CUTL1, LAMB1 and PTPRZ1. Analysis of genetic variants provided evidence for association with autism for one of the new missense changes identified in LAMB1; this effect was stronger in a subgroup of affected male sibling pair families, implying a possible specific sex-related effect...

  4. Chromosome evolution in tiger beetles: Karyotypes and localization of 18S rDNA loci in Neotropical Megacephalini (Coleoptera, Cicindelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia J.R. Proença

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Four Neotropical tiger beetle species, three from the genus Megacephala and one from the genus Oxycheila, currently assigned to the tribe Megacephalini were examined cytogenetically. All three Megacephala species showed simple sex chromosome systems of the X0/XX type but different numbers of autosomal pairs (15 in M. cruciata, 14 in M. sobrina and 12 in M. rutilans, while Oxycheila tristis was inferred to have a multiple sex chromosome system with four X chromosomes (2n = 24 + X1X2X3X4Y/X1X1X2X2X3X3X4X4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using a PCR-amplified 18S rDNA fragment as a probe revealed the presence of rDNA clusters located exclusively on the autosomes in all the Megacephala species (five clusters in M. cruciata, eight in M. sobrina and three in M. rutilans, indicating variability in the number of clusters and the presence of structural polymorphisms. The same methodology showed that O. tristis had six rDNA clusters, apparently also located on the autosomes. Although our data also show cytogenetic variability within the genus Megacephala, our findings support the most accepted hypothesis for chromosome evolution in the family Cicindelidae. The description of multiple sex chromosomes in O. tristis along with phylogenetic analyses and larval morphological characters may be assumed as an additional evidence for the exclusion of the genus Oxycheila and related taxa from the tribe Megacephalini.

  5. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  6. Mechanism of the t(14;18) chromosomal translocation: structural analysis of both derivative 14 and 18 reciprocal partners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhshi, A.; Wright, J.J.; Graninger, W.; Seto, M.; Owens, J.; Cossman, J.; Jensen, J.P.; Goldman, P.; Korsmeyer, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of the t(14;18)(q32;q21) chromosomal translocation found in follicular lymphoma, the authors examined the structure of both derivative (der) chromosomal breakpoints as well as their germ-line predecessors. They noted that chromosome segment 18q21 was juxtaposed with immunoglobulin heavy (H) chain gene diversity (D/sub H/) regions on all five der(18) chromosomes they examined, and they confirmed the juncture with immunoglobulin H-chain gene joining (J/sub H/) regions on the der(14) chromosome. However, the t(14;18) was not fully reciprocal in that chromosome 14 DNA between the D/sub H/ and J/sub H/ regions was deleted. Furthermore, extra nucleotides, reminiscent of N segments, were present at the der(14) and possibly der(18) junctions. This indicates that despite the mature B-cell phenotype of follicular lymphoma, the t(14;18) occurs during attempted D/sub H/-J/sub H/ joining, the earliest event in immunoglobulin rearrangement in a pre-B-cell. The detailed analysis of the germ-line 18q21 region indicated that most breakpoints clustered within a 150-base-pair major breakpoint region. A direct repeat duplication of chromosome 18 sequences was discovered at both chromosomal junctures, typical of the repair of a naturally occurring staggered double-stranded DNA break. These results prompt a translocation model with illegitimate pairing of a staggered double-stranded DNA break at 18q21 and an immunoglobulin endonuclease-mediated break at 14q32 and with N-segment addition, repair, and ligation to generate der(14) and der(18) chromosomes

  7. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis shows different epidemiology of chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Lahti

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens, one of the most common causes of food poisonings, can carry the enterotoxin gene, cpe, in its chromosome or on a plasmid. C. perfringens food poisonings are more frequently caused by the chromosomal cpe-carrying strains, while the plasmid-borne cpe-positive genotypes are more commonly found in the human feces and environmental samples. Different tolerance to food processing conditions by the plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains has been reported, but the reservoirs and contamination routes of enterotoxin-producing C. perfringens remain unknown. A comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis with a DNA microarray based on three C. perfringens type A genomes was conducted to shed light on the epidemiology of C. perfringens food poisonings caused by plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains by comparing chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive and cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates from human, animal, environmental, and food samples. The chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive C. perfringens genotypes formed two distinct clusters. Variable genes were involved with myo-inositol, ethanolamine and cellobiose metabolism, suggesting a new epidemiological model for C. perfringens food poisonings. The CGH results were complemented with growth studies, which demonstrated different myo-inositol, ethanolamine, and cellobiose metabolism between the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying strains. These findings support a ubiquitous occurrence of the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains and their adaptation to the mammalian intestine, whereas the chromosomal cpe-positive strains appear to have a narrow niche in environments containing degrading plant material. Thus the epidemiology of the food poisonings caused by two populations appears different, the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains probably contaminating foods via humans and the chromosomal strains being connected to plant material.

  8. Localization of the MEN1 gene to a small region within chromosome 11q13 by deletion mapping in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystroem, C.; Larsson, C.; Blomberg, C.; Nordenskjoeld, M.; Sandelin, K.; Falkmer, U.; Werner, S.; Skogseid, B.; Oeberg, K.

    1990-01-01

    The gene for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), and inherited predisposition to neuroendocrine neoplasm of the parathyroid glands, the pancreatic islet parenchyma, and the anterior pituitary gland, was recently mapped to chromosome 11q13 based on genetic linkage in families. The authors now show that the pathogenesis of MEN1-associated parathyroid lesions involves unmasking of a recessive mutation at the disease locus and that sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism shares the same mechanisms. By examination of allele losses in MEN1-associated lesions, they could define deletions of chromosome 11 and map the MEN1 locus to a small region within chromosome band 11q13, telomeric to the PYGM locus. In contrast, a low incidence of deletions involving the MEN1 gene was found in sporadic pituitary adenomas

  9. Dispersed Benzoxazinone Gene Cluster: Molecular Characterization and Chromosomal Localization of Glucosyltransferase and Glucosidase Genes in Wheat and Rye1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Masayuki; Nakamura, Chihiro; Nomura, Taiji

    2011-01-01

    Benzoxazinones (Bxs) are major defensive secondary metabolites in wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), and maize (Zea mays). Here, we identified full sets of homeologous and paralogous genes encoding Bx glucosyltransferase (GT) and Bx-glucoside glucosidase (Glu) in hexaploid wheat (2n = 6x = 42; AABBDD). Four GT loci (TaGTa–TaGTd) were mapped on chromosomes 7A, 7B (two loci), and 7D, whereas four glu1 loci (Taglu1a–Taglu1d) were on chromosomes 2A, 2B (two loci), and 2D. Transcript levels differed greatly among the four loci; B-genome loci of both TaGT and Taglu1 genes were preferentially transcribed. Catalytic properties of the enzyme encoded by each homeolog/paralog also differed despite high levels of identity among amino acid sequences. The predominant contribution of the B genome to GT and Glu reactions was revealed, as observed previously for the five Bx biosynthetic genes, TaBx1 to TaBx5, which are separately located on homeologous groups 4 and 5 chromosomes. In rye, where the ScBx1 to ScBx5 genes are dispersed to chromosomes 7R and 5R, ScGT and Scglu were located separately on chromosomes 4R and 2R, respectively. The dispersal of Bx-pathway loci to four distinct chromosomes in hexaploid wheat and rye suggests that the clustering of Bx-pathway genes, as found in maize, is not essential for coordinated transcription. On the other hand, barley (Hordeum vulgare) was found to lack the orthologous GT and glu loci like the Bx1 to Bx5 loci despite its close phylogenetic relationship with wheat and rye. These results contribute to our understanding of the evolutionary processes that the Bx-pathway loci have undergone in grasses. PMID:21875895

  10. Dispersed benzoxazinone gene cluster: molecular characterization and chromosomal localization of glucosyltransferase and glucosidase genes in wheat and rye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Masayuki; Nakamura, Chihiro; Nomura, Taiji

    2011-11-01

    Benzoxazinones (Bxs) are major defensive secondary metabolites in wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), and maize (Zea mays). Here, we identified full sets of homeologous and paralogous genes encoding Bx glucosyltransferase (GT) and Bx-glucoside glucosidase (Glu) in hexaploid wheat (2n = 6x = 42; AABBDD). Four GT loci (TaGTa-TaGTd) were mapped on chromosomes 7A, 7B (two loci), and 7D, whereas four glu1 loci (Taglu1a-Taglu1d) were on chromosomes 2A, 2B (two loci), and 2D. Transcript levels differed greatly among the four loci; B-genome loci of both TaGT and Taglu1 genes were preferentially transcribed. Catalytic properties of the enzyme encoded by each homeolog/paralog also differed despite high levels of identity among amino acid sequences. The predominant contribution of the B genome to GT and Glu reactions was revealed, as observed previously for the five Bx biosynthetic genes, TaBx1 to TaBx5, which are separately located on homeologous groups 4 and 5 chromosomes. In rye, where the ScBx1 to ScBx5 genes are dispersed to chromosomes 7R and 5R, ScGT and Scglu were located separately on chromosomes 4R and 2R, respectively. The dispersal of Bx-pathway loci to four distinct chromosomes in hexaploid wheat and rye suggests that the clustering of Bx-pathway genes, as found in maize, is not essential for coordinated transcription. On the other hand, barley (Hordeum vulgare) was found to lack the orthologous GT and glu loci like the Bx1 to Bx5 loci despite its close phylogenetic relationship with wheat and rye. These results contribute to our understanding of the evolutionary processes that the Bx-pathway loci have undergone in grasses.

  11. Comparative karyotype analysis and chromosome evolution in the genus Aplastodiscus (Cophomantini, Hylinae, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Simone

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frogs of the Tribe Cophomantini present, in general, 2n = 24 karyotype, but data on Aplastodiscus showed variation in diploid number from 2n = 24 to 2n = 18. Five species were karyotyped, one of them for the first time, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques, with the aim to perform a comprehensive comparative analysis towards the understanding of chromosome evolution in light of the phylogeny. Results Aplastodiscus perviridis showed 2n = 24, A. arildae and A. eugenioi, 2n = 22, A. callipygius, 2n = 20, and A. leucopygius, 2n = 18. In the metaphase I cells of two species only bivalents occurred, whereas in A. arildae, A. callipygius, and A. leucopygius one tetravalent was also observed besides the bivalents. BrdU incorporation produced replication bands especially in the largest chromosomes, and a relatively good banding correspondence was noticed among some of them. Silver impregnation and FISH with an rDNA probe identified a single NOR pair: the 11 in A. perviridis and A. arildae; the 6 in A. eugenioi; and the 9 in A. callipygius and A. leucopygius. C-banding showed a predominantly centromeric distribution of the heterochromatin, and in one of the species distinct molecular composition was revealed by CMA3. The telomeric probe hybridised all chromosome ends and additionally disclosed the presence of telomere-like sequences in centromeric regions of three species. Conclusions Based on the hypothesis of 2n = 24 ancestral karyotype for Aplastodiscus, and considering the karyotype differences and similarities, two evolutionary pathways through fusion events were suggested. One of them corresponded to the reduction of 2n = 24 to 22, and the other, the reduction of 2n = 24 to 20, and subsequently to 18. Regarding the NOR, two conditions were recognised: plesiomorphy, represented by the homeologous small-sized NOR-bearing pairs, and derivation, represented by the NOR in

  12. Analysis of the terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and identification of the dif site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    The terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and the dif chromosome dimer resolution site were characterized. The Caulobacter genome contains skewed sequences that abruptly switch strands at dif and may have roles in chromosome maintenance and segregation. Absence of dif or the Xer...

  13. From the chromosome to DNA: Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and its clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, R; Donoff, R B; Kim, Y; Wong, D T

    2001-06-01

    Understanding how chromosomal alterations contribute to acquired and inherited human disease requires the ability to manage the enormous physical and informational complexity of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) packaged within. Important concepts and techniques involved in the analysis of DNA include restriction enzymes, Southern blotting, and restriction fragment length polymorphism/linkage analysis. These techniques have been essential in the understanding and diagnosis of several syndromes associated with the head and neck. The purpose of this article is to introduce DNA structure, describe some techniques fundamental to DNA analysis, and provide a brief overview of the clinical applications of this technology with respect to dentinogenesis imperfecta and oral field cancerization. Copyright 2001 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

  14. Chromosomal analysis of blastocyst derived from monopronucleated ICSI zygotes: approach by double trophectoderm biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Silvia; Vidal, Francesca; Coll, Lluc; Veiga, Anna; Boada, Montserrat

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to increase the knowledge about monopronucleated ICSI-derived blastocysts, analyzing trophectoderm biopsies by aCGH and FISH to evaluate their chromosome constitution. Fifteen monopronucleated ICSI-derived blastocysts were studied. Double trophectoderm biopsy was performed and analyzed by FISH and aCGH. The blastocysts were classified according to chromosome constitution. Disagreements between the two techniques were assessed. Results obtained after FISH and aCGH analyses showed the following: 20% (3/15) and 60% (9/15) diploid females, respectively; 26.7% (4/15) and 26.7% (4/15) diploid males, respectively; and 53.3% (8/15) and 13.3% (2/15) mosaics, respectively. No mosaic male embryos were found using FISH or aCGH. There were disagreements in 40% (6/15) of the cases due to the higher detection of mosaicism by FISH compared to aCGH. The combination of FISH and aCGH has been shown to be a suitable approach to increase the knowledge about monopronucleated ICSI-derived embryos. FISH analysis of blastocysts derived from monopronucleated ICSI zygotes enabled us to conclude that aCGH underestimates haploidy. Some diploid embryos diagnosed by aCGH are in fact mosaic. In cases where these embryos would be used for reproductive purposes, extra analysis of parental genome origin is recommended.

  15. Molecular cloning of the α subunit of human and guinea pig leukocyte adhesion glycoprotein Mo1: Chromosomal localization and homology to the α subunits of integrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaout, M.A.; Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Pierce, M.W.; Harris, P.; Tenen, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface-glycoprotein Mo1 is a member of the family of leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (Leu-CAMs) that includes lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and p150,95. Each Leu-CAM is a heterodimer with a distinct α subunit noncovalently associated with a common β subunit. The authors describe the isolation and analysis of two partial cDNA clones encoding the α subunit of the Leu-CAM Mo1 in humans and guinea pigs. A monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope in the carboxyl-terminal portion of the guinea pig α chain was used for immunoscreening a λgt11 expression library. The sequence of a 378-base-pair insert from one immunoreactive clone revealed a single continuous open reading frame encoding 126 amino acids including a 26-amino acid tryptic peptide isolated from the purified guinea pig α subunit. A cDNA clone of identical size was isolated from a human monocyte/lymphocyte cDNA library by using the guinea pig clone as a probe. The human clone also encoded a 126-amino acid peptide including the sequence of an additional tryptic peptide present in purified human Mo1α chain. Southern analysis of DNA from hamster-human hybrids localized the human Mo1α chain to chromosome 16, which has been shown to contain the gene for the α chain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1. These data suggest that the α subunits of Leu-CAMs evolved by gene duplication from a common ancestral gene and strengthen the hypothesis that the α subunits of these heterodimeric cell adhesion molecules on myeloid and lymphoid cells, platelets, and fibroblasts are evolutionary related

  16. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mölter-Väär, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Ounap, Katrin

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009-2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1-3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5 Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists.

  17. Numerical analysis of the Anderson localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markos, P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate, by simple numerical simulations, the main transport properties of disordered electron systems. These systems undergo the metal insulator transition when either Fermi energy crosses the mobility edge or the strength of the disorder increases over critical value. We study how disorder affects the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of electronic eigenstates in the diffusive and insulating regime, as well as in the critical region of the metal-insulator transition. Then, we introduce the transfer matrix and conductance, and we discuss how the quantum character of the electron propagation influences the transport properties of disordered samples. In the weakly disordered systems, the weak localization and anti-localization as well as the universal conductance fluctuation are numerically simulated and discussed. The localization in the one dimensional system is described and interpreted as a purely quantum effect. Statistical properties of the conductance in the critical and localized regimes are demonstrated. Special attention is given to the numerical study of the transport properties of the critical regime and to the numerical verification of the single parameter scaling theory of localization. Numerical data for the critical exponent in the orthogonal models in dimension 2 < d ≤ 5 are compared with theoretical predictions. We argue that the discrepancy between the theory and numerical data is due to the absence of the self-averaging of transmission quantities. This complicates the analytical analysis of the disordered systems. Finally, theoretical methods of description of weakly disordered systems are explained and their possible generalization to the localized regime is discussed. Since we concentrate on the one-electron propagation at zero temperature, no effects of electron-electron interaction and incoherent scattering are discussed in the paper (Author)

  18. Analysis of B chromosome nondisjunction induced by the r-X1 deficiency in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shih-Hsuan; Peng, Shu-Fen; Cheng, Ya-Ming

    2017-11-20

    The maize B chromosome typically undergoes nondisjunction during the second microspore division. For normal A chromosomes, the r-X1 deficiency in maize can induce nondisjunction during the second megaspore and first microspore divisions. However, it is not known whether the r-X1 deficiency also induces nondisjunction of the maize B chromosome during these cell divisions. To answer this question, chromosome numbers were determined in the progeny of r-X1/R-r female parents carrying two B chromosomes. Some of the r-X1-lacking progeny (21.2%) contained zero or two B chromosomes. However, a much higher percentage of the r-X1-containing progeny (43.4%) exhibited zero or two B chromosomes, but none displayed more than two B chromosomes. Thus, the results indicated that the r-X1 deficiency could also induce nondisjunction of the B chromosome during the second megaspore division; moreover, the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division. In addition, pollen grains from plants with two B chromosomes lacking or exhibiting the r-X1 deficiency were compared via pollen fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a B chromosome-specific probe. The results revealed that the r-X1 deficiency could induce the occurrence of B chromosome nondisjunction during the first microspore division and that the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division at a lower frequency. Our data shed more light on the behavior of the maize B chromosome during cell division.

  19. Karyotype analysis in Chaerophyllum cicutaria Vill. with special emphasis on satellited chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Chojnacki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Karyological studies were carried out on plants of Chaerophyllum cicutaria (Umbelliferae, which came from both lowland and montane natural populations. The chromosome number in all the examined plants was 2n = 22 and their karyotypes, though similar in general, showed some minute but distinct differences. There was` a single pair of SAT chromosomes in the chromosome complement. They had compound satellites divided into two or three segments. Seven morphological types of SAT chromosomes differing in number and size of satellite segments were distinguished. With respect to SAT chromosome morphology, the species showed both intra- and interpopulational karyological variation.

  20. Proteomic analysis of human metaphase chromosomes reveals Topoisomerase II alpha as an Aurora B substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ciaran; Henzing, Alexander J; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    The essential Aurora B kinase is a chromosomal passenger protein that is required for mitotic chromosome alignment and segregation. Aurora B function is dependent on the chromosome passenger, INCENP. INCENP, in turn, requires sister chromatid cohesion for its appropriate behaviour. Relatively few...... composition of the extracted chromosome fraction. Cloning, fluorescent tagging and expression in HeLa cells of the putative GTP-binding protein NGB/CRFG demonstrated it to be a novel mitotic chromosome protein, with a perichromosomal localisation. Identi fication of the protein bands corresponding to those...

  1. The role of fusion in ant chromosome evolution: insights from cytogenetic analysis using a molecular phylogenetic approach in the genus mycetophylax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Danon Clemes; das Graças Pompolo, Silvia; Cristiano, Maykon Passos; Tavares, Mara Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Among insect taxa, ants exhibit one of the most variable chromosome numbers ranging from n = 1 to n = 60. This high karyotype diversity is suggested to be correlated to ants diversification. The karyotype evolution of ants is usually understood in terms of Robertsonian rearrangements towards an increase in chromosome numbers. The ant genus Mycetophylax is a small monogynous basal Attini ant (Formicidae: Myrmicinae), endemic to sand dunes along the Brazilian coastlines. A recent taxonomic revision validates three species, Mycetophylax morschi, M. conformis and M. simplex. In this paper, we cytogenetically characterized all species that belongs to the genus and analyzed the karyotypic evolution of Mycetophylax in the context of a molecular phylogeny and ancestral character state reconstruction. M. morschi showed a polymorphic number of chromosomes, with colonies showing 2n = 26 and 2n = 30 chromosomes. M. conformis presented a diploid chromosome number of 30 chromosomes, while M. simplex showed 36 chromosomes. The probabilistic models suggest that the ancestral haploid chromosome number of Mycetophylax was 17 (Likelihood framework) or 18 (Bayesian framework). The analysis also suggested that fusions were responsible for the evolutionary reduction in chromosome numbers of M. conformis and M. morschi karyotypes whereas fission may determines the M. simplex karyotype. These results obtained show the importance of fusions in chromosome changes towards a chromosome number reduction in Formicidae and how a phylogenetic background can be used to reconstruct hypotheses about chromosomes evolution.

  2. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  3. Analysis of α-particle-induced chromosomal aberrations by chemically-induced PCC. Elaboration of dose-effect curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Roser; Pujol, Mònica; Barrios, Leonardo; Caballín, María Rosa; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc

    2016-09-01

    In a similar way to high-dose exposures to low-LET radiations, cells show difficulties reaching mitosis after high-LET radiation exposure. For this reason, techniques have been proposed that are able to analyze chromosome aberrations in interphase by prematurely condensing the chromosomes (PCC-techniques). Few dose-effect curves for high-LET radiation types have been reported, and none for α-particles. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by chemically-induced PCC, the chromosome aberrations induced by several doses of α-particles. Monolayers of peripheral lymphocytes were exposed to an α-source of Americium-241 with a mean energy entering the cells of 2.7 MeV. Lymphocytes were exposed to 10 doses, from 0-2.5 Gy, and then cultured for 48 h. Colcemid and Calyculin-A were added at 24 and 1 h before harvesting, respectively. During microscope analysis, chromosome rings and extra chromosome pieces were scored in G2/M-PCC and M cells, while dicentric chromosomes were only scored in M cells. As the dose increased, fewer cells were able to reach mitosis and the proportion of G2/M-PCC cells increased. Chromosome rings were hardly observed in M cells when compared to G2/M-PCC cells. Extra fragments were more frequent than rings in both G2/M-PCC and M cells, but with lower frequencies than in G2/M-PCC cells. The distribution of dicentrics and extra fragments showed a clear overdispersion; this was not so evident for rings. The dose-effect curves obtained fitted very well to a linear model. Damaged cells after α-particle irradiation show more difficulties in reaching mitosis than cells exposed to γ-rays. After α-particle irradiation the frequency of all the chromosome aberrations considered increased linearly with the dose, and α-particles clearly produced more dicentrics and extra chromosome pieces with respect to γ-rays. After α-particle exposure, the existence of extra chromosome fragments in PCC cells seems to be a good candidate for use as a biomarker

  4. Comparative cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and premature centromere division in persons exposed to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovicic, D.; Rakic, B.; Vukov, T.; Pajic, J.; Milacic, S.; Kovacevic, R.; Stevanovic, M.; Drakulic, D.; Bukvic, N.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the presence of correlation between the frequency of premature centromere division (PCD) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in metaphases in persons professionally exposed to radionuclides. Biological dosimetry was performed by conventional cytogenetic technique. The presence of PCD was confirmed by Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The L1.84 probe (specific for centromeric region of chromosome 18) was used. The analysis included 50 subjects employed in the Clinical Center of Serbia (C) (the average age of 45.24 ± 1.18 and the average exposition time 17.96 ± 1.15) and 40 subjects in control group (K) (the average age of 44.40 ± 0.98 and the average years of employment 19.67 ± 0.98 years) which were not exposed to genotoxic agents in their workplaces. The results showed that frequencies of CA and PCD were statistically significantly higher in subjects exposed to radionuclides than in the control group (Mann-Whitney U test, P [sr

  5. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xueying

    2013-05-24

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  6. Analysis and dynamics of the chromosomal complements of wild sparkling-wine yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, D; Carro, D; Fernández-Larrea, J; Piña, B

    1999-04-01

    We isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains that are able to carry out the second fermentation of sparkling wine from spontaneously fermenting musts in El Penedès (Spain) by specifically designed selection protocols. All of them (26 strains) showed one of two very similar mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction patterns, whereas their karyotypes differed. These strains showed high rates of karyotype instability, which were dependent on both the medium and the strain, during vegetative growth. In all cases, the mtDNA restriction pattern was conserved in strains kept under the same conditions. Analysis of different repetitive sequences in their genomes suggested that ribosomal DNA repeats play an important role in the changes in size observed in chromosome XII, whereas SUC genes or Ty elements did not show amplification or transposition processes that could be related to rearrangements of the chromosomes showing these sequences. Karyotype changes also occurred in monosporidic diploid derivatives. We propose that these changes originated mainly from ectopic recombination between repeated sequences interspersed in the genome. None of the rearranged karyotypes provided a selective advantage strong enough to allow the strains to displace the parental strains. The nature and frequency of these changes suggest that they may play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of the genetic diversity observed in S. cerevisiae wild populations.

  7. Use of M-FISH analysis of α-particle-induced chromosome aberrations for the assessment of chromosomal breakpoint distribution and complex aberration formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.M.; Sumption, N.D.; Papworth, D.G.; Goodhead, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Double strand breaks (dsb) of varying complexity are an important class of damage induced after exposure to ionising radiation and are considered to be the critical lesion for the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Assuming the basic principles of the 'Breakage and Reunion' theory, dsb represent 'breakage' and aberrations are produced from the illegitimate repair (reunion) of the resulting dsb free-'ends'. Numerous questions relate to this process, in particular, (1) do chromosomal breakpoint 'hot-spots' that represent sensitive sites for breakage and/or regions of preferential repair/mis-repair, exist? (2) Considering that individual chromosomes and chromosome regions occupy discrete territories in the interphase nucleus, could rearrangements between specific chromosomes reflect domain organisation at the time of damage? (3) Assuming the topological constraints imposed on chromatin are not dramatically influenced by the presence of dsb, then how do multiple 'ends' from different chromosomes proximally associate for mis-repair as complex chromosome aberrations? To address these questions, we have analysed the chromosome aberrations induced in peripheral blood lymphocytes after exposure to 0.5 Gy α -particles (mean of 1 α -particle/cell) using the technique of M-FISH. This technique 'paints' all the human chromosomes (excluding homologues) uniquely, allowing chromosomal mis-repair to be visualised as differential colour-junctions and in addition, enhanced DAPI banding enables gross breakpoint assignation of these colour junctions. To test for non-randomness, we are comparing the frequency of occurrence of breakpoints obtained up to now with the F98 glioma model our knowledbased on chromosome length. Similarly, the involvement of each chromosome relative to other chromosomes within individual rearrangements can be determined by assuming the volume of chromosome domains is also proportional to their length. The current data to be presented will

  8. [Extending the capabilities of human chromosome analysis: from high-resolution banding to chromatin fiber-FISH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, T

    1997-06-01

    The rapid development in human chromosome studies during the past 2 decades has opened up a variety of new avenues in both basic and clinical human genetics. This has been due to the extended resolution of chromosome analysis especially by the introduction of high-resolution banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques. High-resolution banding methods using elongated chromosomes from cells at early mitotic stage can be divided into two main categories: one involves S-phase synchronization using methotrexate or thymidine with subsequent release from the block, and the other involves the application of DNA-binding agents, such as ethidium bromide, which inhibit mitotic chromosome condensation. High-resolution band analysis facilitates refined determination of the breakpoints on rearranged chromosomes, and thus minute deletions, small translocations and other subtle chromosome mutations can readily be detected and identified. It has also proved to be valuable for accurate gene mapping and comparative cytogenetics. Each of the high-resolution bands consists of DNA molecules as long as approximately 3Mb on the average, and this resolution limitation has been overcome by the introduction of the FISH method, which enables chromosome and genomic analyses to be carried out at the DNA molecule level. For FISH analysis, appropriate DNA probes of various insert sizes can be chosen for different purposes, and FISH with specific probes permits high-resolution analysis of chromosome DNA constitution at particular loci. For instance, it is possible to detect and map unique sequences more than 1 kb in size on mitotic chromosomes, and to identify cryptic chromosome rearrangements not recognizable even by high-resolution band analysis. Better resolution of breakpoint determination can also be expected by FISH using an adequate series of DNA clones arrayed on the physical map within the relevant chromosome region. An even better genomic resolution by FISH can be

  9. Nup98-Homeodomain Fusions Interact with Endogenous Nup98 during Interphase and Localize to Kinetochores and Chromosome Arms during Mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Songli; Powers, Maureen A.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the Nup98 gene are implicated in leukemias, especially acute myelogenous leukemia. These translocations generate chimeric fusion proteins, all of which have in common the N-terminal half of Nup98, which contains the nucleoporin FG/GLFG repeat motifs. The homeodomain group of Nup98 fusion proteins retain the C-terminus of a homeodomain transcription factor, including the homeobox responsible for DNA binding. Current models for Nup98 leukemogenesis invoke ab...

  10. Magnetic Exchange Couplings from Local Spin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rajendra; Abate, Bayileyegn Akanie; Peralta, Juan

    We propose a method to calculate the magnetic exchange coupling parameters in transition metal complexes from a single spin-configuration. Our method uses constraint density functional theory and a local spin population analysis in combination to a non spin formalism to effectively extract the magnetic exchange parameter from the derivative of the electronic energy and spin pair correlation values. We show proof-of-concept calculations on the H-He-H systems and small transition metal complexes. DOE DE-SC0005027.

  11. Human ciliary neurotrophic factor: Localization to the proximal region of the long arm of chromosome 11 and association with CA/GT dinucleotide repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lev, A.A.; Rosen, D.R.; Kos, C.; Brown, R.H. Jr.; Clifford, E.; Landes, G.; Hauser, S.L.

    1993-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes survival and differentiation of several types of sensory, motor, sympathetic, and parasympathetic neurons. The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to amplify, clone, and partially sequence CNTF cDNA from human muscle. Using a rodent-human mapping panel and fluorescence in situ hybridization, they have localized a single copy of the gene for human CNTF to the proximal long arm of chromosome 11. They have also identified a polymorphic tandem CA/GT dinucleotide repeat associated with the human CNTF gene. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  13. Analysis of chromosome-sized DNA and genome typing of isolated strains of Taylorella equigenitalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Asami, Y; Miyazawa, T; Samata, T; Isayama, Y; Honda, M; Ide, Y

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of chromosome-sized DNA and genome typing of Taylorella equigenitalis NCTC11184, Kentucky 188, and five strains of T. equigenitalis isolated in Japan were carried out. The three restriction enzymes used, ApaI, NaeI and NotI, cleaved the genomic DNAs of five Japanese strains of T. equigenitalis into relatively limited numbers of restriction fragments, which were well resolved on crossed-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE). The respective profiles after CFGE of the restriction fragments from all five strains were essentially identical to each other after digestion by ApaI, NaeI or NotI. Hence it appears that these strains have a common genome type with respect to these three restriction enzymes. It was also shown that the respective profiles from these strains were essentially different from those of T. equigenitalis NCTC11184 and those of Kentucky 188 after digestion with ApaI, NaeI or NotI.

  14. Understanding spatial organizations of chromosomes via statistical analysis of Hi-C data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming; Deng, Ke; Qin, Zhaohui; Liu, Jun S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how chromosomes fold provides insights into the transcription regulation, hence, the functional state of the cell. Using the next generation sequencing technology, the recently developed Hi-C approach enables a global view of spatial chromatin organization in the nucleus, which substantially expands our knowledge about genome organization and function. However, due to multiple layers of biases, noises and uncertainties buried in the protocol of Hi-C experiments, analyzing and interpreting Hi-C data poses great challenges, and requires novel statistical methods to be developed. This article provides an overview of recent Hi-C studies and their impacts on biomedical research, describes major challenges in statistical analysis of Hi-C data, and discusses some perspectives for future research. PMID:26124977

  15. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, E.; Lamb, J.A.; Barnby, G.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants...... in the genes CUTL1, LAMB1 and PTPRZ1. Analysis of genetic variants provided evidence for association with autism for one of the new missense changes identified in LAMB1; this effect was stronger in a subgroup of affected male sibling pair families, implying a possible specific sex-related effect...... for this variant. Association was also detected for several polymorphisms in the promoter and untranslated region of NRCAM, suggesting that alterations in expression of this gene may be linked to autism susceptibility....

  16. Cluster analysis of European Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes using the discrete Laplace method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Morling, Niels

    2014-01-01

    method can be used for cluster analysis to further validate the discrete Laplace method. A very important practical fact is that the calculations can be performed on a normal computer. We identified two sub-clusters of the Eastern and Western European Y-STR haplotypes similar to results of previous......The European Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype distribution has previously been analysed in various ways. Here, we introduce a new way of analysing population substructure using a new method based on clustering within the discrete Laplace exponential family that models...... the probability distribution of the Y-STR haplotypes. Creating a consistent statistical model of the haplotypes enables us to perform a wide range of analyses. Previously, haplotype frequency estimation using the discrete Laplace method has been validated. In this paper we investigate how the discrete Laplace...

  17. Expanding the boundaries of local similarity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durno, W Evan; Hanson, Niels W; Konwar, Kishori M; Hallam, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Pairwise comparison of time series data for both local and time-lagged relationships is a computationally challenging problem relevant to many fields of inquiry. The Local Similarity Analysis (LSA) statistic identifies the existence of local and lagged relationships, but determining significance through a p-value has been algorithmically cumbersome due to an intensive permutation test, shuffling rows and columns and repeatedly calculating the statistic. Furthermore, this p-value is calculated with the assumption of normality -- a statistical luxury dissociated from most real world datasets. To improve the performance of LSA on big datasets, an asymptotic upper bound on the p-value calculation was derived without the assumption of normality. This change in the bound calculation markedly improved computational speed from O(pm²n) to O(m²n), where p is the number of permutations in a permutation test, m is the number of time series, and n is the length of each time series. The bounding process is implemented as a computationally efficient software package, FASTLSA, written in C and optimized for threading on multi-core computers, improving its practical computation time. We computationally compare our approach to previous implementations of LSA, demonstrate broad applicability by analyzing time series data from public health, microbial ecology, and social media, and visualize resulting networks using the Cytoscape software. The FASTLSA software package expands the boundaries of LSA allowing analysis on datasets with millions of co-varying time series. Mapping metadata onto force-directed graphs derived from FASTLSA allows investigators to view correlated cliques and explore previously unrecognized network relationships. The software is freely available for download at: http://www.cmde.science.ubc.ca/hallam/fastLSA/.

  18. Expanding the boundaries of local similarity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durno W Evan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pairwise comparison of time series data for both local and time-lagged relationships is a computationally challenging problem relevant to many fields of inquiry. The Local Similarity Analysis (LSA statistic identifies the existence of local and lagged relationships, but determining significance through a p-value has been algorithmically cumbersome due to an intensive permutation test, shuffling rows and columns and repeatedly calculating the statistic. Furthermore, this p-value is calculated with the assumption of normality -- a statistical luxury dissociated from most real world datasets. Results To improve the performance of LSA on big datasets, an asymptotic upper bound on the p-value calculation was derived without the assumption of normality. This change in the bound calculation markedly improved computational speed from O(pm2n to O(m2n, where p is the number of permutations in a permutation test, m is the number of time series, and n is the length of each time series. The bounding process is implemented as a computationally efficient software package, FASTLSA, written in C and optimized for threading on multi-core computers, improving its practical computation time. We computationally compare our approach to previous implementations of LSA, demonstrate broad applicability by analyzing time series data from public health, microbial ecology, and social media, and visualize resulting networks using the Cytoscape software. Conclusions The FASTLSA software package expands the boundaries of LSA allowing analysis on datasets with millions of co-varying time series. Mapping metadata onto force-directed graphs derived from FASTLSA allows investigators to view correlated cliques and explore previously unrecognized network relationships. The software is freely available for download at: http://www.cmde.science.ubc.ca/hallam/fastLSA/.

  19. Clinical implementation of chromosomal microarray analysis: summary of 2513 postnatal cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyan Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (a-CGH is a powerful molecular cytogenetic tool to detect genomic imbalances and study disease mechanism and pathogenesis. We report our experience with the clinical implementation of this high resolution human genome analysis, referred to as Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CMA was performed clinically on 2513 postnatal samples from patients referred with a variety of clinical phenotypes. The initial 775 samples were studied using CMA array version 4 and the remaining 1738 samples were analyzed with CMA version 5 containing expanded genomic coverage. Overall, CMA identified clinically relevant genomic imbalances in 8.5% of patients: 7.6% using V4 and 8.9% using V5. Among 117 cases referred for additional investigation of a known cytogenetically detectable rearrangement, CMA identified the majority (92.5% of the genomic imbalances. Importantly, abnormal CMA findings were observed in 5.2% of patients (98/1872 with normal karyotypes/FISH results, and V5, with expanded genomic coverage, enabled a higher detection rate in this category than V4. For cases without cytogenetic results available, 8.0% (42/524 abnormal CMA results were detected; again, V5 demonstrated an increased ability to detect abnormality. Improved diagnostic potential of CMA is illustrated by 90 cases identified with 51 cryptic microdeletions and 39 predicted apparent reciprocal microduplications in 13 specific chromosomal regions associated with 11 known genomic disorders. In addition, CMA identified copy number variations (CNVs of uncertain significance in 262 probands; however, parental studies usually facilitated clinical interpretation. Of these, 217 were interpreted as familial variants and 11 were determined to be de novo; the remaining 34 await parental studies to resolve the clinical significance. CONCLUSIONS: This large set of clinical results demonstrates the significantly improved sensitivity

  20. Enhancement of Local Climate Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, F. M.; Timofeyeva, M. M.; Dutton, J.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) will enhance its Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) to incorporate specific capabilities to meet the needs of various users including energy, health, and other communities. LCAT is an online interactive tool that provides quick and easy access to climate data and allows users to conduct analyses at the local level such as time series analysis, trend analysis, compositing, correlation and regression techniques, with others to be incorporated as needed. LCAT uses principles of Artificial Intelligence in connecting human and computer perceptions on application of data and scientific techniques in multiprocessing simultaneous users' tasks. Future development includes expanding the type of data currently imported by LCAT (historical data at stations and climate divisions) to gridded reanalysis and General Circulation Model (GCM) data, which are available on global grids and thus will allow for climate studies to be conducted at international locations. We will describe ongoing activities to incorporate NOAA Climate Forecast System (CFS) reanalysis data (CFSR), NOAA model output data, including output from the National Multi Model Ensemble Prediction System (NMME) and longer term projection models, and plans to integrate LCAT into the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and its protocols for accessing model output and observational data to ensure there is no redundancy in development of tools that facilitate scientific advancements and use of climate model information in applications. Validation and inter-comparison of forecast models will be included as part of the enhancement to LCAT. To ensure sustained development, we will investigate options for open sourcing LCAT development, in particular, through the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).

  1. Localization of genetic elements of intact and derivative chromosome 11 and 22 territories in nuclei of Ewing sarcoma cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taslerová, R.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva; Jirsová, Pavla; Kodet, R.; Kozubek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 155, č. 3 (2006), s. 493-504 ISSN 1047-8477 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/04/0907; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8241; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5004306; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : chromatin structure * chromosome territory * Ewing sarcoma Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.496, year: 2006

  2. Chromosome painting reveals asynaptic full alignment of homologs and HIM-8-dependent remodeling of X chromosome territories during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nabeshima

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During early meiotic prophase, a nucleus-wide reorganization leads to sorting of chromosomes into homologous pairs and to establishing associations between homologous chromosomes along their entire lengths. Here, we investigate global features of chromosome organization during this process, using a chromosome painting method in whole-mount Caenorhabditis elegans gonads that enables visualization of whole chromosomes along their entire lengths in the context of preserved 3D nuclear architecture. First, we show that neither spatial proximity of premeiotic chromosome territories nor chromosome-specific timing is a major factor driving homolog pairing. Second, we show that synaptonemal complex-independent associations can support full lengthwise juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes. Third, we reveal a prominent elongation of chromosome territories during meiotic prophase that initiates prior to homolog association and alignment. Mutant analysis indicates that chromosome movement mediated by association of chromosome pairing centers (PCs with mobile patches of the nuclear envelope (NE-spanning SUN-1/ZYG-12 protein complexes is not the primary driver of territory elongation. Moreover, we identify new roles for the X chromosome PC (X-PC and X-PC binding protein HIM-8 in promoting elongation of X chromosome territories, separable from their role(s in mediating local stabilization of pairing and association of X chromosomes with mobile SUN-1/ZYG-12 patches. Further, we present evidence that HIM-8 functions both at and outside of PCs to mediate chromosome territory elongation. These and other data support a model in which synapsis-independent elongation of chromosome territories, driven by PC binding proteins, enables lengthwise juxtaposition of chromosomes, thereby facilitating assessment of their suitability as potential pairing partners.

  3. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in a Cohort of Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders from a Highly Consanguineous Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamari, Watfa; Al-Saegh, Abeer; Al-Kindy, Adila; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Al-Thihli, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders are a complicated group of disorders characterized with heterogeneous genetic etiologies. The genetic investigations for this group of disorders have expanded considerably over the past decade. In our study we designed a tired approach and studied the diagnostic yield of chromosomal microarray analysis on patients…

  4. Time-optimized analysis of slit-scan chromosome profiles on a general-purpose personal computer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heilig, R.; Hausmann, M.; Rens, W.; Aten, J. A.; Cremer, C.

    1993-01-01

    Slit-scan flow cytometry provides a method to analyze large numbers of metaphase chromosomes in a relatively short time due to morphological features. The high detection rate requires fast computing for on-line analysis. Up to now, this has been achieved using special-purpose computers, parallel

  5. High resolution chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients referred for Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-08

    Laboratory testing is helpful in the evaluation of patients suspected to have either Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) or Angelman syndrome (AS) because most of the patients have recognizable cytogenetic deletions of 15q11q13. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, identified by molecular genetic techniques, is found in about 20 to 25% of PWS patients. Paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 is seen in 2 to 3% of AS patients. Thus, PWS and AS represent the first examples in humans of genetic imprinting or the differential expression of genetic information depending on the parental origin. Herein, I report our experience with FISH and high resolution chromosome analysis in patients referred to confirm or rule out PWS or AS. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...... with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical...

  7. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness ...

  8. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and clinical manifestations of a case with de novo mosaic ring chromosome 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jye-Siung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Clinical and molecular cytogenetic investigations of a newborn girl exhibiting facial dysmorphism with developmental delay. Methods Phenotypic evaluation was first applied to examine the proband's developmental status. Computed tomography and colour transcranial Doppler were used then to investigate her brain structure and function. Subsequently, chromosomal abnormalities were examined by karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization was performed to investigate size of fragments lost at the two distal ends of the ring chromosome 7. In addition, multicolour banding was applied to rule out structural rearrangement occurs in between the ring chromosome 7. Results The proband was born with mosaic supernumerary ring chromosome 7, without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral blood lymphocytes. The distal arm of chromosome 7p (at least 255 kb from the telomere was part of an extra ring chromosome 7. In addition, the distal arm of 7q, at least 8 kb from the telomere, was missing. There was no other chromosomal rearrangement detected by multicolour banding. Interpretation This is the 19th reported case of complete ring chromosome 7 mosaicism and the first survived case with mosaic supernumerary ring 7 without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral lymphocytes.

  9. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DY...

  10. A System To Generate Chromosomal Mutations in Lactococcus lactis Which Allows Fast Analysis of Targeted Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Jean; Buist, Girbe; Haandrikman, Alfred; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus; Leenhouts, Kees

    1995-01-01

    A system for generating chromosomal insertions in lactococci is described. It is based on the conditional replication of lactococcal pWV01-derived Ori+ RepA- vector pORI19, containing lacZα and the multiple cloning site of pUC19. Chromosomal AluI fragments of Lactococcus lactis were cloned in pORI19

  11. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the {alpha} receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, D.M.; Rojas, E.; McClain, J. [Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor {alpha} (CNTFR{alpha}). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR{alpha}. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain in encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding human DNA topoisomerase II and localization of the gene to chromosome region 17q21-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai-Pflugfelder, M.; Liu, L.F.; Liu, A.A.; Tewey, K.M.; Whang-Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping cDNA clones encoding human DNA topoisomerase II were identified by two independent methods. In one, a human cDNA library in phage λ was screened by hybridization with a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding a stretch of seven amino acids found in yeast and Drosophila DNA topoisomerase II; in the other, a different human cDNA library in a λgt11 expression vector was screened for the expression of antigenic determinants that are recognized by rabbit antibodies specific to human DNA topoisomerase II. The entire coding sequences of the human DNA topoisomerase II gene were determined from these and several additional clones, identified through the use of the cloned human TOP2 gene sequences as probes. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is encoded by a single-copy gene. The location of the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21-22 by in situ hybridization of a cloned fragment to metaphase chromosomes and by hybridization analysis with a panel of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each retaining a subset of human chromosomes

  13. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA in the fish Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ricardo Vicari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We used differential staining techniques (BSG, GTG, AgNO3, DAPI and CMA3 banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with 5S and 18S probes to investigated the karyotypic and cytogenetic chracteristics of Prochilodus lineatus specimens from a population in Vila Velha state park (Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná state, southern Brazil. The specimens studied showed the same karyotype as that found in other P. lineatus populations, i.e. 2n = 54 biarmed chromosomes (40m + 14 sm and c-positive heterochromatin preferentially located pericentromerically in all chromosomes. The presence of partial or totally heterochromatic supernumerary chromosomes with numeric intra-individual variation was confirmed in the analyzed population. The nucleolar organizing regions (NORs were interstitially situated on the long arm of chromosome pair 4 directly beneath the centromere. The differential banding techniques and FISH revealed NOR size polymorphism due to structural events such as breaks and duplication of the larger rDNA site cluster. We also observed syntenic localization of the 5S ribosomal genes in the distal segment of the 45S cluster.

  14. Chromosomal distribution patterns of the (AC)10microsatellite and other repetitive sequences, and their use in chromosome rearrangement analysis of species of the genus Avena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominaya, Araceli; Loarce, Yolanda; Montes, Alexander; Ferrer, Esther

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine the physical location of the (AC) 10 microsatellite in metaphase chromosomes of six diploid species (AA or CC genomes), two tetraploid species (AACC genome), and five cultivars of two hexaploid species (AACCDD genome) of the genus Avena, a genus in which genomic relationships remain obscure. A preferential distribution of the (AC) 10 microsatellite in the pericentromeric and interstitial regions was seen in both the A- and D-genome chromosomes, while in C-genome chromosomes the majority of signals were located in the pericentromeric heterochromatic regions. New large chromosome rearrangements were detected in two polyploid species: an intergenomic translocation involving chromosomes 17AL and 21DS in Avena sativa 'Araceli' and another involving chromosomes 4CL and 21DS in the analyzed cultivars of Avena byzantina. The latter 4CL-21DS intergenomic translocation differentiates clearly between A. sativa and A. byzantina. Searches for common hybridization patterns on the chromosomes of different species revealed chromosome 10A of Avena magna and 21D of hexaploid oats to be very similar in terms of the distribution of 45S and Am1 sequences. This suggests a common origin for these chromosomes and supports a CCDD rather than an AACC genomic designation for this species.

  15. [Application of chromosome microarray analysis for patients with skeletal anomalies and a normal karyotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaoli; Fu, Fang; Li, Ru; Zhang, Yongling; Yang, Xin; Han, Jin; Pan, Min; Zhen, Li; Liao, Can

    2016-06-01

    To analyze patients with skeletal anomalies (SA) but a normal karyotype using chromosome microarray analysis (CMA). From June 2012 to May 2015, 43 children found to have skeletal anomalies with or without other abnormalities were subjected to karyotyping analysis. For those with a normal karyotype, DNA was extracted and hybridized with Affymetrix CytoScan 750 kb arrays following the manufacturer's protocol. The results were analyzed with CHAS v2.0 software. Two patients (4.65%) were detected with an abnormal karyotype. The remaining 41 patients with a normal karyotype were classified into 3 groups: isolated SA (n=17), SA with mental retardation (n=6), and SA with other structural anomalies (n=18). Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs) were found in 21.95% (9/41) of the cases, which included 17.65% (3/17) with isolated SA, 33.33% (2/6) with SA and mental retardation, and 22.22% (4/18) of SA with other structural deformities. Whole-genome CMA can detect clinically significant CNVs which may not be found by conventional karyotyping analysis and increase the detection rate by approximately 21.95%. It may be recommended for patients with SA but a normal karyotype.

  16. Universal Prenatal Chromosomal Microarray Analysis: Additive Value and Clinical Dilemmas in Fetuses with a Normal Karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Eran; Berger, Sharon; Cheung, Sau W; Maliszewski, Kristen T; Patel, Ankita; Pursley, Amber N; Lenchner, Erez; Bacino, Carlos; Beaudet, Arthur L; Divon, Michael Y

    2017-03-01

    Objective  To assess the additive value of prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) for all indications and the likelihood of detecting pathologic copy number variations (CNVs) based on specific indications. Methods  A retrospective analysis was performed on amniocentesis and chorionic villi sampling results obtained between 2010 and 2014 in a single institution. A total of 3,314 consecutive patients undergoing invasive genetic testing for different indications were offered CMA in addition to standard karyotype. The prevalence of pathologic CNVs was compared between patients with low-risk indications and those with high-risk indications. Likewise, the prevalence of pathologic CNVs among patients with different sonographic abnormalities was calculated and compared with the low-risk group. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Results  The prevalence of pathologic CNVs was significantly higher in patients with high-risk indications and specifically those with sonographic abnormalities, compared with the low-risk group (2.8 and 5.9% vs. 0.4%, respectively; all p  karyotype. Major structural malformations and nuchal translucency (NT) ≥ 3.0 mm are associated with the highest risk for a CMA abnormality. Nevertheless, the prevalence of pathologic CNVs in the low-risk population was high enough (1:250) to consider genetic counseling in this group. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  18. Comprehensive genome-wide proteomic analysis of human placental tissue for the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Na, Keun; Lee, Min Jung; Lee, Sun Hee; Lim, Jong-Sun; Cha, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Jin-Young; Kwon, Ja-Young; Kim, Hoguen; Song, Si Young; Yoo, Jong Shin; Park, Young Mok; Kim, Hail; Hancock, William S; Paik, Young-Ki

    2013-06-07

    As a starting point of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP), we established strategies of genome-wide proteomic analysis, including protein identification, quantitation of disease-specific proteins, and assessment of post-translational modifications, using paired human placental tissues from healthy and preeclampsia patients. This analysis resulted in identification of 4239 unique proteins with high confidence (two or more unique peptides with a false discovery rate less than 1%), covering 21% of approximately 20, 059 (Ensembl v69, Oct 2012) human proteins, among which 28 proteins exhibited differentially expressed preeclampsia-specific proteins. When these proteins are assigned to all human chromosomes, the pattern of the newly identified placental protein population is proportional to that of the gene count distribution of each chromosome. We also identified 219 unique N-linked glycopeptides, 592 unique phosphopeptides, and 66 chromosome 13-specific proteins. In particular, protein evidence of 14 genes previously known to be specifically up-regulated in human placenta was verified by mass spectrometry. With respect to the functional implication of these proteins, 38 proteins were found to be involved in regulatory factor biosynthesis or the immune system in the placenta, but the molecular mechanism of these proteins during pregnancy warrants further investigation. As far as we know, this work produced the highest number of proteins identified in the placenta and will be useful for annotating and mapping all proteins encoded in the human genome.

  19. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Petitpierre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864 show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864 has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of H. porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily.

  20. Global features of sequences of bacterial chromosomes, plasmids and phages revealed by analysis of oligonucleotide usage patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tümmler Burkhard

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oligonucleotide frequencies were shown to be conserved signatures for bacterial genomes, however, the underlying constraints have yet not been resolved in detail. In this paper we analyzed oligonucleotide usage (OU biases in a comprehensive collection of 155 completely sequenced bacterial chromosomes, 316 plasmids and 104 phages. Results Two global features were analyzed: pattern skew (PS and variance of OU deviations normalized by mononucleotide content of the sequence (OUV. OUV reflects the strength of OU biases and taxonomic signals. PS denotes asymmetry of OU in direct and reverse DNA strands. A trend towards minimal PS was observed for almost all complete sequences of bacterial chromosomes and plasmids, however, PS was substantially higher in separate genomic loci and several types of plasmids and phages characterized by long stretches of non-coding DNA and/or asymmetric gene distribution on the two DNA strands. Five of the 155 bacterial chromosomes have anomalously high PS, of which the chromosomes of Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c and Prochlorococcus marinus MIT9313 exhibit extreme PS values suggesting an intermediate unstable state of these two genomes. Conclusions Strand symmetry as indicated by minimal PS is a universally conserved feature of complete bacterial genomes that results from the matching mutual compensation of local OU biases on both replichors while OUV is more a taxon specific feature. Local events such as inversions or the incorporation of genome islands are balanced by global changes in genome organization to minimize PS that may represent one of the leading evolutionary forces driving bacterial genome diversification.

  1. Painting analysis of chromosome aberrations induced by energetic heavy ions in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation genetic mutations and cancer induction Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults Over the years we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell We will summarize the results of the investigations and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure

  2. Functional Analysis of Chromosome 18 in Pancreatic Cancer: Strong Evidence for New Tumour Suppressor Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu P. Lefter

    2004-04-01

    Conclusion: These data represent strong functional evidence that chromosome 18q encodes strong tumour and metastasis suppressor activity that is able to switch human pancreatic cancer cells to a dormant phenotype.

  3. Chromosome 7 Multiplication in EGFR-positive Lung Carcinomas Based on Tissue Microarray Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiambas, Evangelos; Mastronikolis, Nicholas S; Lefas, Alicia Y; Georgiannos, Stavros N; Ragos, Vasileios; Fotiades, Panagiotis P; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Karameris, Andreas; Peschos, Dimitrios; Patsouris, Efstratios; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-activation is observed in significant proportions of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Our aim was to investigate the role of chromosome 7 multiplication with regard to its influence in EGFR expression, combined or not with gene amplification. Using tissue microarray technology, fifty (n=50) primary NSCLCs were cored and re-embedded into the final recipient block. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and also chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) were performed. EGFR expression at any level was detected in 40/50 (80%) cores. Over-expression was observed in 23/40 (57.5%) cases. Gene amplification was identified in 11/50 (22%) cases whereas chromosome 7 polysomy in 8/50 (16%) cases. Pure chromosome 7 multiplication alone led to low or moderate levels of expression. Overall EGFR expression was correlated with gene (p=0.001) and interestingly with chromosome 7 centromere numerical imbalances (p=0.004). EGFR expression is associated not only with amplification, but also with chromosome 7 centromere multiple copies. Chromosome 7 multiplication -due to centromere region amplification or true polysomy- is critical for applying monoclonal antibody targeted therapeutic strategies excluding the pure non-amplified cases. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative analysis of chromosomes in the Palaearctic bush-crickets of tribe Pholidopterini (Orthoptera, Tettigoniinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Warchałowska-Śliwa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the evolution of the karyotype in four genera of the tribe Pholidopterini: Eupholidoptera Mařan, 1953, Parapholidoptera Mařan, 1953, Pholidoptera Wesmaël, 1838, Uvarovistia Mařan, 1953. Chromosomes were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with 18S rDNA and (TTAGGn telomeric probes, and classical techniques, such as C-banding, silver impregnation and fluorochrome DAPI/CMA3 staining. Most species retained the ancestral diploid chromosome number 2n = 31 (male or 32 (female, while some of the taxa, especially a group of species within genus Pholidoptera, evolved a reduced chromosome number 2n = 29. All species show the same sex determination system X0/XX. In some taxa, a pericentric inversion has changed the morphology of the ancestral acrocentric X chromosome to the biarmed X. The rDNA loci coincided with active NORs and C-band/CG-rich segments. A comparison of the location of the single rDNA/NOR in the genus Pholidoptera suggests that reduced chromosome number results from Robertsonian translocation between two pairs of autosomes, one carrying the rDNA/NOR. The results constitute a step towards better understanding of the chromosomal reorganization and evolution within the tribe Phaneropterini and the whole subfamily Tettigoniinae.

  5. Spatial arrangement of chromosomes in oocytes and spermatocytes of malaria mosquitoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegnii, V.N.; Vasserlauf, I.E. [Tomsk State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-02-01

    It is shown that prophase chromosomes of oocytes in Anopheles messeae ovaries do not form local chromocenters, unlike spermatocytes, in which chromosomes fuse in a joint centromeric assembly. This fact reflects the dynamic nature of the system of chromocenter formation in generative tissues. During analysis of interspecific hybrids F{sub 1} A. maculipennis x A. subalpinus, no conjunction of homeologous chromosomes was observed, and the latter remained separated from one another. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Systematic Triple-Mutant Analysis Uncovers Functional Connectivity between Pathways Involved in Chromosome Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Haber

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic interactions reveal the functional relationships between pairs of genes. In this study, we describe a method for the systematic generation and quantitation of triple mutants, termed triple-mutant analysis (TMA. We have used this approach to interrogate partially redundant pairs of genes in S. cerevisiae, including ASF1 and CAC1, two histone chaperones. After subjecting asf1Δ cac1Δ to TMA, we found that the Swi/Snf Rdh54 protein compensates for the absence of Asf1 and Cac1. Rdh54 more strongly associates with the chromatin apparatus and the pericentromeric region in the double mutant. Moreover, Asf1 is responsible for the synthetic lethality observed in cac1Δ strains lacking the HIRA-like proteins. A similar TMA was carried out after deleting both CLB5 and CLB6, cyclins that regulate DNA replication, revealing a strong functional connection to chromosome segregation. This approach can reveal functional redundancies that cannot be uncovered through traditional double-mutant analyses.

  7. Localization of pig Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase [alpha] and [beta] subunit genes to chromosome 4 by radioactive in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahbib-Mansais, Y.; Yerle, M.; Dalens, M.; Chevalet, C.; Gellin, J. (Centre de Recherches de Toulouse (France))

    1993-01-01

    Two genes coding for Na[sup +],K[sup +] -ATPase [alpha] and [beta] subunits are localized on pig chromosome 4, to the q1.6[yields]q2.3 and 1.3[yields]q2.1 regions, respectively, by radioactive in situ hybridization. According to nucleotide and amino acid sequence comparisons with different human isoforms of Na[sup +] ,K[sup +]-ATPase, these pig [alpha] and [beta] ATPase genes show strong homologies with human [alpha]1 and [beta] subunit ATPase genes, respectively. These results are discussed with respect to comparative mapping data of conserved genes in mammalian species. We showed that the pig cDNA probes encoding ATPase [alpha] and, [beta] genes reveal DNA polymorphism in Meishan an Large White pigs. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Fine-structure analysis and gentic organization at the base of the x chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschytz, E.

    1978-01-01

    Genetic organization at the base of the X chromosome was studied through the analysis of x-ray-induced deficiencies. Deficiencies were recovered so as to have a preselected right end anchored in the centric heterochromatin to the right of the su(f) locus. Free ends of deficiencies occurred at any of 22 intervals in Section 20 and in the proximal portion of Section 19 of Bridges' (1938) polytene chromosome map. The distribution of 130 such free ends of deficiencies induced in normal, In(1)sc 8 , and In(1)w/sup m4/ chromosomes suggests that on the single section level, genes are flanked by hot or cold sites for x-ray-induced breaks, and that occurrence of the hot spots is dependent on their interaction with the fixed-end sites in the centric heterochromatin. In the light of these results, it is argued that long heterochromatic sequences separate the relatively few genes in Section 20, and thus endow it with several characteristics typical of heterochromatic regions. Section 20 is considered to be a transition region between the mostly heterochromatic and mostly euchromatic regions of the X chromosome; the differences between them are suggested as being merely quantitative

  10. Gene expression analysis of induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid chromosomal syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human aneuploidy is the leading cause of early pregnancy loss, mental retardation, and multiple congenital anomalies. Due to the high mortality associated with aneuploidy, the pathophysiological mechanisms of aneuploidy syndrome remain largely unknown. Previous studies focused mostly on whether dosage compensation occurs, and the next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq is expected to eventually uncover the mechanisms of gene expression regulation and the related pathological phenotypes in human aneuploidy. Results Using next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq, we profiled the transcriptomes of four human aneuploid induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines generated from monosomy × (Turner syndrome), trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), and partial trisomy 11:22 (Emanuel syndrome) as well as two umbilical cord matrix iPSC lines as euploid controls to examine how phenotypic abnormalities develop with aberrant karyotype. A total of 466 M (50-bp) reads were obtained from the six iPSC lines, and over 13,000 mRNAs were identified by gene annotation. Global analysis of gene expression profiles and functional analysis of differentially expressed (DE) genes were implemented. Over 5000 DE genes are determined between aneuploidy and euploid iPSCs respectively while 9 KEGG pathways are overlapped enriched in four aneuploidy samples. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the extra or missing chromosome has extensive effects on the whole transcriptome. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes reveals that the genes most affected in aneuploid individuals are related to central nervous system development and tumorigenesis. PMID:24564826

  11. Local strains in waste tank deflagration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years extensive effort has been expended to qualify buried nuclear waste storage tanks under accident conditions. One of these conditions is deflagration of the combustible gases which may build up over time. While much work has been done to calculate the general strain state, less effort has been made to address the local strains at structural discontinuities. An analytical method is presented for calculating these local strains and combining them with the general strain state. A closed form solution of the local strains is compared to a finite element solution

  12. Human neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1: structure of the gene (SLC1A4) and localization to chromosome 2p13-p15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, K; Düker, M; Fink, T; Lichter, P; Stoffel, W

    1994-11-01

    Screening for cDNAs encoding proteins similar to the sodium-coupled glutamate transporter GLAST1 led to the isolation of a cDNA clone coding for a protein that turned out to be identical to the recently described neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. The new member of the GLAST-related transporter family does not transport glutamate or aspartate but alanine, serine, cysteine, and threonine instead. The expressed sequence tag EST02446, a short cDNA sequence found in the course of a large-scale sequencing project of human brain-derived cDNAs, showed significant similarity to the eukaryotic glutamate transporter GLAST1 and was therefore used as probe in the search for further glutamate transporter cDNAs. Fragments of the cDNA were used for the isolation and characterization of human ASCT1 genomic clones. The ORF of 1572 bp encoding 524 amino acid residues is distributed over 8 exons, which span at least 40 kb of human chromosomal DNA. The ASCT1 gene locus was assigned to chromosome 2p13-p15 by chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) studies. The gene structure is not related to any other previously characterized transporter gene. In contrast to the genes of the sodium-coupled nonglutamate neurotransmitter transporters, it shows no obvious correspondence between intron/exon structure and transmembrane organization. The transcription start site in human liver tissue was determined by primer extension analysis to be located 291 bp upstream of the initiating ATG codon. The DNA region immediately upstream of the transcription start lacks any TATA or CAAT boxes but contains several binding sites for the transcription factors Sp1 and Egr-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Human neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1: Structure of the gene (SLC1A4) and localization to chromosome 2p13-p15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, K.; Dueker, M.; Stoffel, W. [Universitaet Koeln (Germany)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    Screening for cDNAs encoding proteins similar to the sodium-coupled glutamate transporter GLAST1 led to the isolation of a cDNA clone coding for a protein that turned out to be identical to the recently described neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. The new member of the GLAST-related transporter family does not transport glutamate or aspartate but alanine, serine, cysteine, and threonine instead. The expressed sequence tag EST02446, a short cDNA sequence found in the course of a large-scale sequencing project of human brain-derived cDNA, showed significant similarity to the eukaryotic glutamate transporter GLAST1 and was therefore used as probe in the search for further glutamate transporter cDNAs. Fragments of the cDNA were used for the isolation and characterization of human ASCT1 genomic clones. The ORF of 1572 bp encoding 524 amino acid residues is distributed over 8 exons, which span at least 40 kb of human chromosomal DNA. The ASCT1 gene locus was assigned to chromosome 2p13-p15 by chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) studies. The gene structure is not related to any other previously characterized transporter gene. In contrast to the genes of the sodium-coupled nonglutamate neurotransmitter transporters, it shows no obvious correspondence between intron/exon structure and transmembrane organization. The transcription start site in human liver tissue was determined by primer extension analysis to be located 291 bp upstream of the initiating ATG codon. The DNA region immediately upstream of the transcription start lacks any TATA or CAAT boxes but contains several bindings sites for the transcription factors Sp1 and Egr-1. The ASCT1 gene (SLC1A4) structure reported here will facilitate the characterization of the genes of the other members of the GLAST-related transporter family and might be useful in the elucidation of amino acid transport-related defects. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Polytene chromosome analysis in relation to genetic sex separation in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerremans, P.; Busch-Petersen, E.

    1990-01-01

    The development of stable genetic sexing strains in the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), is hampered by the presence of low levels of male recombination. Such recombination may be reduced by minimizing the distance between the translocation breakpoint and the translocated 'sexing' allele. Cytogenetic analysis of mitotic/meiotic and polytene chromosomes could provide information on the selection of such potentially stable genetic sexing strains. Translocation breakpoints in two genetic sexing strains in the medfly, based on a white female/brown male pupal colour dimorphism, have been determined. Preliminary results are described and the advantages and limitations of polytene chromosome analysis for the isolation of stable genetic sexing strains of the medfly are discussed. (author). 31 refs

  15. Independent clonal origin of multiple uterine leiomyomas that was determined by X chromosome inactivation and microsatellite analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canevari, Renata A; Pontes, Anaglória; Rosa, Fabíola E

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In an attempt to clarify the clonality and genetic relationships that are involved in the tumorigenesis of uterine leiomyomas, we used a total of 43 multiple leiomyomas from 14 patients and analyzed the allelic status with 15 microsatellite markers and X chromosome inactivation analysis...... pattern in 7 of the 8 cases with allelic loss for at least 1 of 15 microsatellite markers that were analyzed. A similar loss of heterozygosity findings at 7p22-15 was detected in 3 samples from the same patient. X chromosome inactivation analysis demonstrated the same inactivated allele in all tumors...... of the 9 of 12 informative patients; different inactivation patterns were observed in 3 cases. CONCLUSION: Our data support the concept that uterine leiomyomas are derived from a single cell but are generated independently in the uterus. Loss of heterozygosity findings at 7p22-15 are consistent...

  16. Chromosomal microarray analysis of consecutive individuals with autism spectrum disorders or learning disability presenting for genetic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jennifer L; Hovanes, Karine; Dasouki, Majed; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2014-02-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis is now commonly used in clinical practice to identify copy number variants (CNVs) in the human genome. We report our experience with the use of the 105 K and 180K oligonucleotide microarrays in 215 consecutive patients referred with either autism or autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or developmental delay/learning disability for genetic services at the University of Kansas Medical Center during the past 4 years (2009-2012). Of the 215 patients [140 males and 75 females (male/female ratio=1.87); 65 with ASD and 150 with learning disability], abnormal microarray results were seen in 45 individuals (21%) with a total of 49 CNVs. Of these findings, 32 represented a known diagnostic CNV contributing to the clinical presentation and 17 represented non-diagnostic CNVs (variants of unknown significance). Thirteen patients with ASD had a total of 14 CNVs, 6 CNVs recognized as diagnostic and 8 as non-diagnostic. The most common chromosome involved in the ASD group was chromosome 15. For those with a learning disability, 32 patients had a total of 35 CNVs. Twenty-six of the 35 CNVs were classified as a known diagnostic CNV, usually a deletion (n=20). Nine CNVs were classified as an unknown non-diagnostic CNV, usually a duplication (n=8). For the learning disability subgroup, chromosomes 2 and 22 were most involved. Thirteen out of 65 patients (20%) with ASD had a CNV compared with 32 out of 150 patients (21%) with a learning disability. The frequency of chromosomal microarray abnormalities compared by subject group or gender was not statistically different. A higher percentage of individuals with a learning disability had clinical findings of seizures, dysmorphic features and microcephaly, but not statistically significant. While both groups contained more males than females, a significantly higher percentage of males were present in the ASD group. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chromosome localization of the loci for PEPA, PEPB, PEPS, IDH1, GSR, MPI, PGM1, NP, SOD1, and ME1 in the common shrew (Sorex araneus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyakhina, L D; Colonin, M G; Pack, S D; Borodin, P M; Searle, J B; Serov, O L

    1996-04-01

    This report extends the genetic map of the common shrew (Sorex araneus) by adding chromosome assignments for ten genes to the seven already mapped (Pack et al. 1995). A somatic cell hybrid panel was used for the mapping. The genes for peptidase A (PEPA) and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) map to chromosome de; the genes for phosphoglucomutase-1 (PGM1), superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), and mannosephosphate isomerase (MPI) are located on chromosome af; the genes for nucleoside phosphorylase (NP) and glutathione reductase (GSR) are on chromosome ik; and the genes for peptidase S (PEPS), malic enzyme-1 (ME1), peptidase B (PEPB) are found on chromosomes jl, go, and mp respectively.

  18. Genomewide Clonal Analysis of Lethal Mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster Eye: Comparison of the X Chromosome and Autosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Call, Gerald B.; Olson, John M.; Chen, Jiong; Villarasa, Nikki; Ngo, Kathy T.; Yabroff, Allison M.; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bibikova, Elena; Bui, Chris; Cespedes, Albert; Chan, Cheryl; Chan, Stacy; Cheema, Amrita K.; Chhabra, Akanksha

    2007-01-01

    Using a large consortium of undergraduate students in an organized program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), we have undertaken a functional genomic screen in the Drosophila eye. In addition to the educational value of discovery-based learning, this article presents the first comprehensive genomewide analysis of essential genes involved in eye development. The data reveal the surprising result that the X chromosome has almost twice the frequency of essential genes involved ...

  19. A chromosomal analysis of Nepa cinerea Linnaeus, 1758 and Ranatra linearis (Linnaeus, 1758 (Heteroptera, Nepidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Angus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An account is given of the karyotypes and male meiosis of the Water Scorpion Nepa cinerea Linnaeus, 1758 and the Water Stick Insect Ranatra linearis (Linnaeus, 1758 (Heteroptera, Nepomorpha, Nepidae. A number of different approaches and techniques were tried: the employment of both male and female gonads and mid-guts as the sources of chromosomes, squash and air-drying methods for chromosome preparations, C-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for chromosome study. We found that N. cinerea had a karyotype comprising 14 pairs of autosomes and a multiple sex chromosome system, which is X1X2X3X4Y (♂ / X1X1X2X2X3X3X4X4 (♀, whereas R. linearis had a karyotype comprising 19 pairs of autosomes and a multiple sex chromosome system X1X2X3X4Y (♂ / X1X1X2X2X3X3X4X4 (♀. In both N. cinerea and R. linearis, the autosomes formed chiasmate bivalents in spermatogenesis, and the sex chromosome univalents divided during the first meiotic division and segregated during the second one suggesting thus a post-reductional type of behaviour. These results confirm and amplify those of Steopoe (1925, 1927, 1931, 1932 but are inconsistent with those of other researchers. C-banding appeared helpful in pairing up the autosomes for karyotype assembly; however in R. linearis the chromosomes were much more uniform in size and general appearance than in N. cinerea. FISH for 18S ribosomal DNA (major rDNA revealed hybridization signals on two of the five sex chromosomes in N. cinerea. In R. linearis, rDNA location was less obvious than in N. cinerea; however it is suggested to be similar. We have detected the presence of the canonical “insect” (TTAGGn telomeric repeat in chromosomes of these species. This is the first application of C-banding and FISH in the family Nepidae.

  20. Bayesian analysis of overdispersed chromosome aberration data with the negative binomial model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brame, R.S.; Groer, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    The usual assumption of a Poisson model for the number of chromosome aberrations in controlled calibration experiments implies variance equal to the mean. However, it is known that chromosome aberration data from experiments involving high linear energy transfer radiations can be overdispersed, i.e. the variance is greater than the mean. Present methods for dealing with overdispersed chromosome data rely on frequentist statistical techniques. In this paper, the problem of overdispersion is considered from a Bayesian standpoint. The Bayes Factor is used to compare Poisson and negative binomial models for two previously published calibration data sets describing the induction of dicentric chromosome aberrations by high doses of neutrons. Posterior densities for the model parameters, which characterise dose response and overdispersion are calculated and graphed. Calibrative densities are derived for unknown neutron doses from hypothetical radiation accident data to determine the impact of different model assumptions on dose estimates. The main conclusion is that an initial assumption of a negative binomial model is the conservative approach to chromosome dosimetry for high LET radiations. (author)

  1. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  2. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose-effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.

    2001-09-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, experimentally gamma ray induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes from eight healthy people were studied. Samples from 4 males and 4 females were irradiated in tubes with 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 gray of gamma ray (Co 60 at dose rate 0.3 Gy/min). Irradiated and control samples were incubated in 37 centigrade for 48 hours cell cultures. Cell cultures then were stopped and metaphases spread, Giemsa stained to score the induced chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics + rings and total numbers of breaks in cell for each individual or for all people were drawn. An increase of all chromosomal aberrations types with the elevation of the doses was observed. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  3. Chromosomal Microarray Analysis of Consecutive Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using an Ultra-High Resolution Chromosomal Microarray Optimized for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Ho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variants (CNVs detected by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA significantly contribute to understanding the etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD and other related conditions. In recognition of the value of CMA testing and its impact on medical management, CMA is in medical guidelines as a first-tier test in the evaluation of children with these disorders. As CMA becomes adopted into routine care for these patients, it becomes increasingly important to report these clinical findings. This study summarizes the results of over 4 years of CMA testing by a CLIA-certified clinical testing laboratory. Using a 2.8 million probe microarray optimized for the detection of CNVs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, we report an overall CNV detection rate of 28.1% in 10,351 consecutive patients, which rises to nearly 33% in cases without ASD, with only developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID and/or multiple congenital anomalies (MCA. The overall detection rate for individuals with ASD is also significant at 24.4%. The detection rate and pathogenic yield of CMA vary significantly with the indications for testing, age, and gender, as well as the specialty of the ordering doctor. We note discrete differences in the most common recurrent CNVs found in individuals with or without a diagnosis of ASD.

  4. Rapid rise and fall of selfish sex-ratio X chromosomes in Drosophila simulans: spatiotemporal analysis of phenotypic and molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastide, Héloïse; Cazemajor, Michel; Ogereau, David; Derome, Nicolas; Hospital, Frédéric; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2011-09-01

    Sex-ratio drive, which has been documented in several Drosophila species, is induced by X-linked segregation distorters. Contrary to Mendel's law of independent assortment, the sex-ratio chromosome (X(SR)) is inherited by more than half the offspring of carrier males, resulting in a female-biased sex ratio. This segregation advantage allows X(SR) to spread in populations, even if it is not beneficial for the carriers. In the cosmopolitan species D. simulans, the Paris sex-ratio is caused by recently emerged selfish X(SR) chromosomes. These chromosomes have triggered an intragenomic conflict, and their propagation has been halted over a large area by the evolution of complete drive suppression. Previous molecular population genetics analyses revealed a selective sweep indicating that the invasion of X(SR) chromosomes was very recent in Madagascar (likely less than 100 years ago). Here, we show that X(SR) chromosomes are now declining at this location as well as in Mayotte and Kenya. Drive suppression is complete in the three populations, which display little genetic differentiation and share swept haplotypes, attesting to a common and very recent ancestry of the X(SR) chromosomes. Patterns of DNA sequence variation also indicate a fitness cost of the segmental duplication involved in drive. The data suggest that X(SR) chromosomes started declining first on the African continent, then in Mayotte, and finally in Madagascar and strongly support a scenario of rapid cycling of X chromosomes. Once drive suppression has evolved, standard X(ST) chromosomes locally replace costly X(SR) chromosomes in a few decades.

  5. Examination of X chromosome markers in Rett syndrome: Exclusion mapping with a novel variation on multilocus linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, K.A.; Fill, C.P. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Terwililger, J.; Percy, A.K.; Zobhbi, H. (Columbia University, NY (United States)); DeGennaro, L.J.; Ott, J. (University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester (United States)); Anvret, M.; Martin-Gallardo, A. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurologic disorder characterized by early normal development followed by regression, acquired deceleration of head growth, autism, ataxia, and sterotypic hand movements. The exclusive occurrence of the syndrome in females and the occurrence of a few familial cases with inheritance through maternal lines suggest that this disorder is most likely secondary to a mutation on the X chromosome. To address this hypothesis and to identify candidate regions for the Rett syndrome gene locus, genotypic analysis was performed in two families with maternally related affected half-sisters by using 63 DNA markers from the X chromosome. Nineteen of the loci studied were chosen for multipoint linkage analysis because they have been previously genetically mapped using a large number of meioses from reference families. Using the exclusion criterion of a lod score less than [minus]2, the authors were able to exclude the region between the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus and the DXS456 locus. This region extends from Xp21.2 to Xq21-q23. The use of the multipoint linkage analysis approach outlined in this study should allow the exclusion of additional regions of the X chromosome as new markers are analyzed.

  6. BUDGET ANALYSIS IN THE LOCAL ACTION GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BUMBESCU SORINA SIMONA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to highlight the importance of budgets for any organization, there is an interdependence relationship between the degree of the objectives achievement and transfer them into the budget. Based on the previous existing studies regarding the budgets, in this article there is developed a theoretical framework of the budgets, conceptual approaches on the budget, features and stages of budgeting, budgeting principles, methods for forecasting costs and also is developed a case study conducted on the peculiarities budgets in Local Action Groups in Romania. The case study is divided into three parts that refers to to main characteristics of Local Action Groups, particularityes of the costs budgeting within the Local Action Groups and a questionnaire applied to all Local Action Gropups for Romania. The research leads to two important categories of tangible results; on the one hand it is realised a theoretical qualitative synthesis on budgets, and on the other hand it is analized the structure of the expenditure budget, the budget management in the Local Action Groups for Romania.

  7. Characterization of a caprine beta-lactoglobulin pseudogene, identification and chromosomal localization by in situ hybridization in goat, sheep and cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, J M; Coll, A; Hayes, H C; Sànchez, A

    1996-10-24

    A beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) pseudogene has been isolated and sequenced (7634 bp) in goat. Its structure is remarkably similar to that of the beta-LG gene with all seven exons placed in the same relative position. The pseudogene seems to have originated by gene duplication, but a non uniform distribution of similarities along the sequence suggests that events of gene conversion have also occurred during its evolution. The comparison of the predicted ancestral protein encoded by the pseudogene shows its evolutionary relationship to the monomeric beta-LG II forms of the beta-LG reported in some non-ruminant species. Southern-blot analysis shows that similar pseudogenes are also found in the genome of sheep and cow. The pseudogene has been mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to sheep chromosome 3p28 and cattle and goat chromosomes 11q28, in the same mapped position as that found for the beta-LG gene in all these species.

  8. Chromosome aberration analysis in peripheral lymphocytes of Gulf war and Balkans war veterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.; Heimers, A.; Frentzel-Beyme, R.; Schott, A.; Hoffmann, W.

    2003-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were determined in standard peripheral lymphocyte metaphase preparations of 13 British Gulf War veterans, two veterans of the recent war in the Balkans, and one veteran of both wars. All 16 volunteers suspect exposures to depleted uranium while deployed at the two different theatres of war in 1990 and later on. The Bremen laboratory control served as a reference in this study. Compared with this control there was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of dicentric chromosomes (dic) and centric ring chromosomes (cR) in the veterans' group, indicating a previous exposure to ionising radiation. The statistically significant overdispersion of dic and cR indicates non-uniform irradiation as would be expected after non-uniform exposure and/or exposure to radiation with a high linear energy transfer. The frequency of SCEs was decreased when compared with the laboratory control. (author)

  9. The sequence and analysis of duplication-rich human chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Chan, Yee Man; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C; Bruno, William J; Buckingham, Judith M; Callen, David F; Campbell, Connie S; Campbell, Mary L; Campbell, Evelyn W; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F; Chasteen, Leslie A; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M; Cohn, Judith D; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A; Grady, Deborah L; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip B; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Manohar, Chitra F; Mark, Graham A; McMurray, Kimberly L; Meincke, Linda J; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K; Mundt, Mark O; Munk, A Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O; Robinson, Donna L; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P Scott; Williams, Albert L; Wills, Patricia L; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dejong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman A; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Eichler, Evan E; Gilna, Paul; Lucas, Susan M; Myers, Richard M; Rubin, Edward M; Pennacchio, Len A

    2004-12-23

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,670 aligned transcripts, 19 transfer RNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and three RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukaemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. Whereas the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene-poor pericentromere of the p arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events that are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  10. Cytogenetic biological dosimetry in radiological protection: chromosome aberration analysis in human lymphocyties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, I.M.A. de.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been know for several decades and dose effect relationships are also fairly well established for several doses and dose rates. Apart from its biological significance, the interpretation of chromosome aberration frequency associated with human exposure to radiation plays an important role in dose assessment, particularly in cases where exposure is though to have occurred but no physical dose monitoring system was present. Based on the cytogenetic data obtained from seven cases of exposure to radiation the aberration frequency have been fitted to the quadratic function Y= αD + βD 2 as the dose response curves from literature. The dose equivalent estimate by frequency of chromosomic aberration found here was compared with 60 Co and 192 Ir already published curves obtained at almost similar dose rate together with some hematological data. (author) [pt

  11. The origin of T cells in permanently reconstituted old athymic nude rats. Analysis using chromosome or allotype markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, E B; Sparshott, S M; Drayson, M T; Hunt, S V

    1989-12-01

    Athymic PVG-rnu/rnu rats receiving a single intravenous injection of syngeneic euthymic thoracic duct lymphocytes (TDL) develop normal levels of CD4+ T lymphocytes and survive for more than 2 years in a conventional animal house. We investigated the origin of the T cells (and B cells) in reconstituted nude recipients by transferring TDL carrying either the 3T chromosome marker or the RT6b + Igk-1b allotype or the RT7b (leucocyte-common) allotype markers. Karyotype analysis of spleen and lymph node (LN) cells from 1- to 2-year-old PVG-3T/3T-reconstituted nude recipients, stimulated in vitro with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), unexpectedly revealed that a majority (79-97%) of dividing cells were of nude origin. However, extensive nude cell division was also recorded in PHA-stimulated cultures using mixtures of euthymic (PVG-3T/3T) and unreconstituted nude spleen cells; the assumption that only T cells divide in PHA-stimulated cultures thus appears to be erroneous. In contrast to the karyotype analysis, sIg- RT6b+ LN cells obtained from nude recipients reconstituted 2 years earlier with PVG-RT6b allotype-marked TDL, were all of donor origin with no indication of a nude-derived sIg- RT6a+ population. Igk-1b+ donor B cells were not found in these same recipients. Dual fluorescence analysis of TDL from 18- to 20-month RT7b-reconstituted nudes showed that 91-100% of CD4+ cells were donor-derived. When tested functionally, sIg- RT7b+ (donor) cells, but not sIg- RT7b- (nude-derived) cells, were able to reject skin allografts and induce local graft-versus-host (GVH) responses. Donor T cells, in contrast to CD4+ cells of nude origin, divided extensively in nude recipients; FACS-purified RT7b+ (donor) TDL retransferred from 17-month primary reconstituted nude rats, expanded further (60-100-fold) in secondary nude recipients. In conclusion, only the donor-derived CD4+ cells in reconstituted nude rats displayed T-cell function; evidence to the contrary from karyotype analysis was

  12. Human beta 2 chain of laminin (formerly S chain): cDNA cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Gerecke, D R; Durkin, M E

    1994-01-01

    or other known laminin genes. Immunostaining showed that the beta 2 chain is localized to the smooth muscle basement membranes of the arteries, while the homologous beta 1 chain is confined to the subendothelial basement membranes. The beta 2 chain was found in the basement membranes of ovarian carcinomas...... but not colon carcinomas. These results indicate that the expression of the beta 2 chain gene is tightly regulated in normal human tissues and in disease....

  13. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose- effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Achkar, W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, blood from eight healthy people were studied. Samples were irradiated in tubes with 0.15-2.5 gray of gamma ray.Irradiated and control samples were incubated for cell cultures. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics+ rings and total numbers of breaks were drawn. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  14. Comparative Analysis of Foreign and Local Rice Demand in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acomparative analysis of foreign and local rice consumption in Umuahia North and Ikwuano local government Areas of Abia state was undertaken in this study. A total of 93 rice consumers were selected using the simple random technique across the two local government areas. Data, which comprised of information on the ...

  15. Molecular phylogenetic reconstruction and localization of the (TTAGG)n telomeric repeats in the chromosomes of Acromyrmex striatus (Roger, 1863) suggests a lower ancestral karyotype for leafcutter ants (Hymenoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tássia Tatiane Pontes; Dos Reis, Ana Caroline Coelho Corrêa; Cardoso, Danon Clemes; Cristiano, Maykon Passos

    2018-01-01

    Chromosome counts and karyotype characterization have proved to be important features of a genome. Chromosome changes during the diversification of ants might play an important role, given the diversity and success of Formicidae. Comparative karyotype analyses on ants have enriched and helped ant systematics. Among leafcutter ants, two major chromosome counts have been described, one frequent in Atta Fabricius, 1804 (2n = 22 in all Atta spp. whose karyotype is known) and the other frequent in Acromyrmex Mayr, 1865 (2n = 38 in the majority of species whose karyotype is known). The main exception is Acromyrmex striatus (Roger, 1863), which harbors a diploid chromosome set of 22. Here we describe the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with telomeric probes with (TTAGG) 6 repeats to describe the telomere composition of A. striatus and to recover potential interstitial non-telomeric signals that may reflect fusion events during the evolution of leafcutter lineage from 38 to 22 chromosomes. Further, we reconstruct the ancestral chromosome numbers of the leafcutter clade based on a recently proposed molecular phylogenetic hypothesis and phylogenomic tree. Distinct signals have been observed in both extremities on the telomere chromosomes of A. striatus . Non-telomeric signals have not been retrieved in our analysis. It could be supposed that the low-numbered karyotype indeed represents the ancestral chromosome number of leafcutters. The phylogenetic reconstruction also recovered a low chromosome number from the diverse approaches implemented, suggesting that n = 11 is the most likely ancestral karyotype of the leafcutter ants and is a plesiomorphic feature shared between A. striatus and Atta spp.

  16. Smoothed Analysis of Local Search Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Bodo; Dehne, Frank; Sack, Jörg-Rüdiger; Stege, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Smoothed analysis is a method for analyzing the performance of algorithms for which classical worst-case analysis fails to explain the performance observed in practice. Smoothed analysis has been applied to explain the performance of a variety of algorithms in the last years. One particular class of

  17. Computational Identification and Comparative Analysis of miRNAs in Wheat Group 7 Chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deng, P.; Nie, X.; Berkman, P.; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Song, W.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2014), s. 487-500 ISSN 0735-9640 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Wheat * miRNA * Group 7 chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.656, year: 2014

  18. 40 CFR 798.5385 - In vivo mammalian bone marrow cytogenetics tests: Chromosomal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... aberrations also occur. (b) Definitions. (1) Chromosome-type aberrations are changes which result from damage... used. Examples of commonly used rodent species are rats, mice, and hamsters. (ii) Age. Healthy young adult animals shall be used. (iii) Number and sex. At least five female and five male animals per...

  19. Genetic analysis of eight x-chromosomal short tandem repeat loci in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-29

    Jul 29, 2015 ... programs to perform population genetics analyses under Linux and. Windows. Mol. Ecol. Resour. 10: 564-567. Ferreira da Silva IH, Barbosa AG, Azevedo DA, Sanchez-Diz P,. Gusmao L, Tavares CC (2010). An X-chromosome pentaplex in two linkage groups: haplotype data in Alagoas and Rio de Janeiro.

  20. Construction of chromosomal recombination maps of three genomes of lilies (Lilium) based on GISH analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadeem Khan, M.; Shujun Zhou,; Barba Gonzalez, R.; Ramanna, M.S.; Visser, R.G.F.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal recombination maps were constructed for three genomes of lily (Lilium) using GISH analyses. For this purpose, the backcross (BC) progenies of two diploid (2n = 2x = 24) interspecific hybrids of lily, viz. Longiflorum × Asiatic (LA) and Oriental × Asiatic (OA), were used. Mostly the BC

  1. Prospects for introgressing tomato chromosomes into the potato genome: An assessment through GISH analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garriga Calderé, F.; Huigen, D.J.; Jacobsen, E.; Ramanna, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    With a view to assess the possibility of homoeologous pairing and crossing-over between the chromosomes of potato (Solanum tuberosum) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), a somatic fusion hybrid and two monosomic alien tomato addition genotypes were investigated through genomic in situ

  2. Comparative sequence analysis of primate subtelomeres originating from a chromosome fission event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, M. Katharine; Endicott, RaeLynn M.; Friedman, Cynthia; Walker, Megan; Young, Janet M.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; de Jong, Pieter J.; Green, Eric D.; Trask, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Subtelomeres are concentrations of interchromosomal segmental duplications capped by telomeric repeats at the ends of chromosomes. The nature of the segments shared by different sets of human subtelomeres reflects their high rate of recent interchromosomal exchange. Here, we characterize the rearrangements incurred by the 15q subtelomere after it arose from a chromosome fission event in the common ancestor of great apes. We used FISH, sequencing of genomic clones, and PCR to map the breakpoint of this fission and track the fate of flanking sequence in human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque genomes. The ancestral locus, a cluster of olfactory receptor (OR) genes, lies internally on macaque chromosome 7. Sequence originating from this fission site is split between the terminus of 15q and the pericentromere of 14q in the great apes. Numerous structural rearrangements, including interstitial deletions and transfers of material to or from other subtelomeres, occurred subsequent to the fission, such that each species has a unique 15q structure and unique collection of ORs derived from the fission locus. The most striking rearrangement involved transfer of at least 200 kb from the fission-site region to the end of chromosome 4q, where much still resides in chimpanzee and gorilla, but not in human. This gross structural difference places the subtelomeric defect underlying facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) much closer to the telomere in human 4q than in the hybrid 4q–15q subtelomere of chimpanzee. PMID:18952852

  3. Karyotype analysis of Lilium longiflorum and Lilium rubellum by chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, K.B.; Wennekes, J.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Jacobsen, E.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed karyotypes of Lilium longiflorum and L. rubellum were constructed on the basis of chromosome arm lengths, C-banding, AgNO3 staining, and PI-DAPI banding, together with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with the 5S and 45S rDNA sequences as probes. The C-banding patterns that were

  4. Identification and molecular analysis of transgenic potato chromosomes transferred to tomato through microprotoplast fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, E.; Ramulu, K.S.; Dijkhuis, P.; Blaas, J.; Krens, F.A.; Verhoeven, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    Results are reported on the integration sites and copy number of alien marker genes neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) and β-glucuronidase (uidA), introduced into diploid potato Solanum tuberosum through transformation by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Also, the transgenic potato chromosomes 3 and 5

  5. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  6. Analysis of Local Financial Management Transparency Based on Websites on Local Government in Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa Adriana

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to analyze financial management transparency of local governments in Java using scoring and rating. The financial management transparency of the local governments is scored based on presentation of local financial information uploaded on each local government’s official website in Jawa in the fiscal years 2016.This research is a qualitative research with the object of research is all local government in Java. Data analysis in two levels, namely the transparency of local government financial management and identification of local government characteristics based on transparency of financial management. Data analysis in two levels, namely the transparency of local government financial management and identification of local government characteristics based on transparency of financial management. The results show that the Special Capital Region of Jakarta obtained the highest transparency index, at 58, 02% whereas Madiun Regency received the lowest transparency index, at 3, 40%. The average transparency index in Jawa for the fiscal years 2016 was still low, at only 19, 59%.The conclusion of this research is that Java regional governments consider the transparency of local financial management using less important websites because it is considered as a better thing not delivered to the public.

  7. A one-step real-time multiplex PCR for screening Y-chromosomal microdeletions without downstream amplicon size analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Kozina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Y-chromosomal microdeletions (YCMD are one of the major genetic causes for non-obstructive azoospermia. Genetic testing for YCMD by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR is an established method for quick and robust screening of deletions in the AZF regions of the Y-chromosome. Multiplex PCRs have the advantage of including a control gene in every reaction and significantly reducing the number of reactions needed to screen the relevant genomic markers. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The widely established "EAA/EMQN best practice guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions (2004" were used as a basis for designing a real-time multiplex PCR system, in which the YCMD can simply be identified by their melting points. For this reason, some AZF primers were substituted by primers for regions in their genomic proximity, and the ZFX/ZFY control primer was exchanged by the AMELX/AMELY control primer. Furthermore, we substituted the classical SybrGreen I dye by the novel and high-performing DNA-binding dye EvaGreen™ and put substantial effort in titrating the primer combinations in respect to optimal melting peak separation and peak size. SIGNIFICANCE: With these changes, we were able to develop a platform-independent and robust real-time based multiplex PCR, which makes the need for amplicon identification by electrophoretic sizing expendable. By using an open-source system for real-time PCR analysis, we further demonstrate the applicability of automated melting point and YCMD detection.

  8. Genetic Alterations in Pesticide Exposed Bolivian Farmers: An evaluation by analysis of chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørs, Erik; Gonzáles, Ana Rosa; Ascarrunz, Maria Eugenia; Tirado, Noemi; Takahashi, Catharina; Lafuente, Erika; Dos Santos, Raquel A; Bailon, Natalia; Cervantes, Rafael; O, Huici; Bælum, Jesper; Lander, Flemming

    2007-11-12

    Pesticides are of concern in Bolivia because of increasing use. Frequent intoxications have been demonstrated due to use of very toxic pesticides, insufficient control of distribution and sale and little knowledge among farmers of protective measures and hygienic procedures. Questionnaires were applied and blood tests taken from 81 volunteers from La Paz County, of whom 48 were pesticide exposed farmers and 33 non-exposed controls. Sixty males and 21 females participated with a mean age of 37.3 years (range 17-76). Data of exposure and possible genetic damage were collected and evaluated by well known statistical methods, controlling for relevant confounders. To measure genetic damage chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay analysis were performed. Pesticide exposed farmers had a higher degree of genetic damage compared to the control group. The number of chromosomal aberrations increased with the intensity of pesticide exposure. Females had a lower number of chromosomal aberrations than males, and people living at altitudes above 2500 metres seemed to exhibit more DNA damage measured by the comet assay. Bolivian farmers showed signs of genotoxic damage, probably related to exposure to pesticides. Due to the potentially negative long term health effects of genetic damage on reproduction and the development of cancer, preventive measures are recommended. Effective control with imports and sales, banning of the most toxic pesticides, education and information are possible measures, which could help preventing the negative effects of pesticides on human health and the environment.

  9. Genetic Alterations in Pesticide Exposed Bolivian Farmers: An evaluation by analysis of chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Jørs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pesticides are of concern in Bolivia because of increasing use. Frequent intoxications have been demonstrated due to use of very toxic pesticides, insufficient control of distribution and sale and little knowledge among farmers of protective measures and hygienic procedures.Method: Questionnaires were applied and blood tests taken from 81 volunteers from La Paz County, of whom 48 were pesticide exposed farmers and 33 non-exposed controls. Sixty males and 21 females participated with a mean age of 37.3 years (range 17–76. Data of exposure and possible genetic damage were collected and evaluated by well known statistical methods, controlling for relevant confounders. To measure genetic damage chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay analysis were performed.Results: Pesticide exposed farmers had a higher degree of genetic damage compared to the control group. The number of chromosomal aberrations increased with the intensity of pesticide exposure. Females had a lower number of chromosomal aberrations than males, and people living at altitudes above 2500 metres seemed to exhibit more DNA damage measured by the comet assay.Conclusions: Bolivian farmers showed signs of genotoxic damage, probably related to exposure to pesticides. Due to the potentially negative long term health effects of genetic damage on reproduction and the development of cancer, preventive measures are recommended. Effective control with imports and sales, banning of the most toxic pesticides, education and information are possible measures, which could help preventing the negative effects of pesticides on human health and the environment.

  10. Significant Role of Segmental Duplications and SIDD Sites in Chromosomal Translocations of Hematological Malignancies: A Multi-parametric Bioinformatic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Aditi; Ansari, Afzal; Pandya, Medha; Shah, Krupa; Patel, Shanaya; Rawal, Rakesh; Umrania, Valentina

    2016-11-28

    Recurrent non-random chromosomal translocations are hallmark characteristics of leukemogenesis, and however, molecular mechanisms underlying these rearrangements are less explored. The fundamental question is, why and how chromosomes break and reunite so precisely in the genome. Meticulous understanding of mechanism leading to chromosomal rearrangement can be achieved by characterizing breakpoints. To address this hypothesis, a novel multi-parametric computational approach for characterization of major leukemic translocations within and around breakpoint region was performed. To best of our knowledge, this bioinformatic analysis is unique in finding the presence of segmental duplications (SDs) flanking breakpoints of all major leukemic translocation. Breakpoint islands (BpIs) were analyzed for stress-induced duplex destabilization (SIDD) sites along with other complex genomic architecture and physicochemical properties. Our study distinctly emphasizes on the probable correlative role of SDs, SIDD sites and various genomic features in the occurrence of breakpoints. Further, it also highlights potential features which may be playing a crucial role in causing double-strand breaks, leading to translocation.

  11. mBAND analysis for high- and low-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Megumi, E-mail: megumi.hada-1@nasa.gov [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Universities Space Research Association, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Wu Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis A. [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    During long-term space travel or cancer therapy, humans are exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) energetic heavy ions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, and cytogenetic damage can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Epidemiological data, mainly from survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan, have enabled risk estimation from low-LET radiation exposures. The identification of a cytogenetic signature that distinguishes high- from low-LET exposure remains a long-term goal in radiobiology. Recently developed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-painting methodologies have revealed unique endpoints related to radiation quality. Heavy-ions induce a high fraction of complex-type exchanges, and possibly unique chromosome rearrangements. This review will concentrate on recent data obtained with multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) methods in mammalian cells exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. Chromosome analysis with mBAND technique allows detection of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges, and also distribution of the breakpoints of aberrations.

  12. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Chinese native Cannabis sativa cultivars by using ISSR and chromosome markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L G; Chang, Y; Zhang, X F; Guan, F Z; Yuan, H M; Yu, Y; Zhao, L J

    2014-12-12

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa) is an important fiber crop, and native cultivars exist widely throughout China. In the present study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of 27 important Chinese native hemp cultivars, by using inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and chromosome markers. We determined the following chromosome formulas: 2n = 20 = 14m + 6sm; 2n = 20 = 20m; 2n = 20 = 18m + 2sm; 2n = 20 = 16m + 4sm; and 2n = 20 = 12m + 8sm. The results of our ISSR analysis revealed the genetic relationships among the 27 cultivars; these relationships were analyzed by using the unweighted pair-group method based on DNA polymorphism. Our results revealed that all of the native cultivars showed considerable genetic diversity. At a genetic distance of 0.324, the 27 varieties could be classified into five categories; this grouping corresponded well with the chromosome formulas. All of the investigated hemp cultivars represent relatively primitive types; moreover, the genetic distances show a geographical distribution, with a small amount of regional hybridity.

  13. A single, recent origin of the accessory B chromosome of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Pajares, A Jesús; Martínez-Rodríguez, Laura; Teruel, María; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; Perfectti, Francisco

    2011-03-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable chromosomes found in >2000 eukaryotic species, usually behaving as genomic parasites. Most B chromosomes seem to be made up of the same kind of DNA sequences present in the A chromosomes. This sequence similarity makes it difficult to obtain specific molecular probes that may permit B-presence diagnosis without cytogenetic analysis. We have developed a sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker for B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans, which specifically amplifies a 1510-bp DNA fragment exclusively in B-carrying individuals. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and fiber FISH analyses showed that this marker is a tandemly repeated DNA sequence closely intermingled with 45S rDNA. PCR reactions showed the presence of SCAR-like sequences in the A chromosomes, but in two separate fragments, supporting the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in this species. SCAR marker DNA sequence showed to be identical in B chromosome variants from several localities from Spain and Morocco, and it was very similar to those found in B chromosome variants from Greece and Armenia. This strongly suggests that this sequence was already present in the ancestral B chromosome of this species. In addition, the scarce sequence variation observed among several B variants from very distant populations suggests either a functional constraint or, more likely, a recent and unique origin for B chromosomes in this species. © 2011 by the Genetics Society of America

  14. Analysis of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and hematological disorders among workers of wireless communication instruments and cell phone (Mobile) users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldawy, H.A.; Khattab, F.I.; Hassan, N.H.A.; Amin, Y.M.; Mahmoud, M.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the hazardous effect of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) such as chromosomal aberration, disturbed micronucleus formation and hematological disorders that may detected among workers of wireless communication instruments and mobile phone users. Seven individuals ( 3 males and 4 females) of a central workers in the microwave unit of the wireless station and 7 users of Mobil phone (4 males and 3 females ) were volunteered to give blood samples. Chromosomes and micronucleus were prepared for cytogenetic analysis as well as blood film for differential count. The results obtained in the microwave group indicated that, the total summation of all types of aberrations (chromosomes and chromatid aberrations) had a frequency of 6. 14% for the exposed group, whereas, the frequency in the control group amounted to 1.57%. In Mobil phone users, the total summation of all types of aberrations(chromosome and chromatid aberrations) had a frequency of 4.43% for the exposed group and 1.71% for the control group. The incidence of the total number of micronuclei in the exposed microwave group was increased 4.3 folds as compared with those of the control group The incidence of the total number of micronuclei in the exposed mobile phone group was increased 2 fold as compared with those in the control group. On the other hand, normal ranges of total white blood cells counts were determined for mobile phone users but abnormalities in the differential counts of the different types of the white blood cells such as neutropenia, eosinophilia and lymphocytosis were observed in the individuals number 1,2,3,7 in microwave group

  15. Dose response relationships and analysis of primary processes of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, E.

    1977-02-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with 220 kV X-rays, 3 MeV electrons and 15 MeV neutrons. The frequency of dicentric, acentric and atypical chromosomes and the exhange aberrations were measured and dose effect curves were constructed. The aim is to prepare the chromosome analysis to a biological dosimetry. The aberration findings could be adapted to the linear-quadrativ model y = c+ αD + βD 2 . With increasing LET the quantity lambda increased which is a measure for the share of the linear and quadratical components of the dose effect obtained. In case of electrons the RBE-values increased with increasing doses. In the case of neutrons they had their maximum in the low dose range. The feed back distances which lead to formation of primary lesions are for X-rays and electrons approximately 1 μm, for neutrons 1.7 μm. In a fractionation experiment with X-rays, the time of formation of exchange aberrations in radiation-induced primary breaks was measured. The number of dicentric chromosomes decreased with increasing time, while the intercellular distribution was not changed. The number of primary breaks decreasing per temporal interval is proportional to the number of the existing primary breaks. The average feed back time during which the primary breaks lead to induction of dicentric chromosomes, is 110 min. In order to determine the correspondence of the results of in-vivo and in-vitro experiments 15 patients and their blood were irradiated with 60 C-γ-rays. No significant differences were measured. (AJ) [de

  16. Chromosomal localization of three repair genes: the xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene and two human homologs of yeast RAD23.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Spek (Peter); E.M.E. Smit (Elisabeth); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); C. Matsutani; F. Hanaoka (Fumio); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A. Hagemeier

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by sun (UV) sensitivity, predisposition to skin cancer, and extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, we reported the cloning and analysis of three human NER genes, XPC, HHR23A, and HHR23B. The

  17. ERROR CONVERGENCE ANALYSIS FOR LOCAL HYPERTHERMIA APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEERU MALHOTRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of numerical solution for electromagnetic problem is greatly influenced by the convergence of the solution obtained. In order to quantify the correctness of the numerical solution the errors produced on solving the partial differential equations are required to be analyzed. Mesh quality is another parameter that affects convergence. The various quality metrics are dependent on the type of solver used for numerical simulation. The paper focuses on comparing the performance of iterative solvers used in COMSOL Multiphysics software. The modeling of coaxial coupled waveguide applicator operating at 485MHz has been done for local hyperthermia applications using adaptive finite element method. 3D heat distribution within the muscle phantom depicting spherical leison and localized heating pattern confirms the proper selection of the solver. The convergence plots are obtained during simulation of the problem using GMRES (generalized minimal residual and geometric multigrid linear iterative solvers. The best error convergence is achieved by using nonlinearity multigrid solver and further introducing adaptivity in nonlinear solver.

  18. Porcine gamma-synuclein: molecular cloning, expression analysis, chromosomal localization and functional expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Pernille Munk; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Bendixen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    which shows a high similarity to bovine (90%), human (87%) and mouse (83%) γ-synuclein. A genomic clone containing the entire porcine SNCG gene was isolated and its genomic organization determined. The gene is composed of five exons, the general structure being observed to be very similar...

  19. Evidence that meiotic pairing starts at the telomeres: Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with a pericentric X chromosome inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashi, V.; Allinson, P.S.; Golden, W.L.; Kelly, T.E. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies in yeast have shown that telomeres rather than centromeres lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may have a role in recombination. Cytological studies of meiosis in Drosophila and mice have shown that in pericentric inversion heterozygotes there is lack of loop formation, with recobmination seen only outside the inversion. In a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) we recognized that only affected males and carrier females had a pericentric X chromosome inversion (inv X(p11.4;q26)). Since the short arm inversion breakpoint was proximal to the DMD locus, it could not be implicated in the mutational event causing DMD. There was no history of infertility, recurrent miscarriages or liveborn unbalanced females to suggest there was recombination within the inversion. We studied 22 members over three generations to understand the pattern of meiotic recombination between the normal and the inverted X chromosome. In total, 17 meioses involving the inverted X chromosome in females were studied by cytogenetic analysis and 16 CA repeat polymorphisms along the length of the X chromosome. Results: (a) There was complete concordance between the segregation of the DMD mutation and the inverted X chromosome. (b) On DNA analysis, there was complete absence of recombination within the inverted segment. We also found no recombination at the DMD locus. Recombination was seen only at Xp22 and Xq27-28. (c) Recombination was seen in the same individual at both Xp22 and Xq27-28 without recombination otherwise. Conclusions: (1) Pericentric X inversions reduce the genetic map length of the chromosome, with the physical map length being normal. (2) Meiotic X chromosome pairing in this family is initiated at the telomeres. (3) Following telomeric pairing in pericentric X chromosome inversions, there is inhibition of recombination within the inversion and adjacent regions.

  20. Y Chromosome analysis of prehistoric human populations in the West Liao River Valley, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yinqiu; Li, Hongjie; Ning, Chao; Zhang, Ye; Chen, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Hagelberg, Erika; Zhou, Hui

    2013-09-30

    The West Liao River valley in Northeast China is an ecologically diverse region, populated in prehistory by human populations with a wide range of cultures and modes of subsistence. To help understand the human evolutionary history of this region, we performed Y chromosome analyses on ancient human remains from archaeological sites ranging in age from 6500 to 2700 BP. 47 of the 70 individuals provided reproducible results. They were assigned into five different Y sub-haplogroups using diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms, namely N1 (xN1a, N1c), N1c, C/C3e, O3a (O3a3) and O3a3c. We also used 17 Y short tandem repeat loci in the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome. There appears to be significant genetic differences between populations of the West Liao River valley and adjacent cultural complexes in the prehistoric period, and these prehistoric populations were shown to carry similar haplotypes as present-day Northeast Asians, but at markedly different frequencies. Our results suggest that the prehistoric cultural transitions were associated with immigration from the Yellow River valley and the northern steppe into the West Liao River valley. They reveal the temporal continuity of Y chromosome lineages in populations of the West Liao River valley over 5000 years, with a concurrent increase in lineage diversity caused by an influx of immigrants from other populations.

  1. Chromosome analysis of five Brazilian species of poison frogs (Anura: Dendrobatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Paula Camargo; Aguiar, Odair; Serpieri, Flávia; Lima, Albertina Pimentel; Uetanebaro, Masao; Recco-Pimentel, Shirlei Maria

    2011-04-01

    Dendrobatid frogs have undergone an extensive systematic reorganization based on recent molecular findings. The present work describes karyotypes of the Brazilian species Adelphobates castaneoticus, A. quinquevittatus, Ameerega picta, A. galactonotus and Dendrobates tinctorius which were compared to each other and with previously described related species. All karyotypes consisted of 2n = 18 chromosomes, except for A. picta which had 2n = 24. The karyotypes of the Adelphobates and D. tinctorius species were highly similar to each other and to the other 2n = 18 previously studied species, revealing conserved karyotypic characteristics in both genera. In recent phylogenetic studies, all Adelphobates species were grouped in a clade separated from the Dendrobates species. Thus, we hypothesized that their common karyotypic traits may have a distinct origin by chromosome rearrangements and mutations. In A. picta, with 2n = 24, chromosome features of pairs from 1 to 8 are shared with other previously karyotyped species within this genus. Hence, the A. picta data reinforced that the C-banding pattern and the NOR location are species-specific traits in the genus Ameerega. Moreover, the Ameerega monophyletism proposed by previous phylogenetic studies indicates that the karyotypic differences among species in this genus result from a long divergence time.

  2. Genomic imbalances in 5918 malignant epithelial tumors: an explorative meta-analysis of chromosomal CGH data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudis Michael

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with most human malignancies, with gains and losses on some genomic regions associated with particular entities. Methods Of the 15429 cases collected for the Progenetix molecular-cytogenetic database, 5918 malignant epithelial neoplasias analyzed by chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH were selected for further evaluation. For the 22 clinico-pathological entities with more than 50 cases, summary profiles for genomic imbalances were generated from case specific data and analyzed. Results With large variation in overall genomic instability, recurring genomic gains and losses were prominent. Most entities showed frequent gains involving 8q2, while gains on 20q, 1q, 3q, 5p, 7q and 17q were frequent in different entities. Loss "hot spots" included 3p, 4q, 13q, 17p and 18q among others. Related average imbalance patterns were found for clinically distinct entities, e.g. hepatocellular carcinomas (ca. and ductal breast ca., as well as for histologically related entities (squamous cell ca. of different sites. Conclusion Although considerable case-by-case variation of genomic profiles can be found by CGH in epithelial malignancies, a limited set of variously combined chromosomal imbalances may be typical for carcinogenesis. Focus on the respective regions should aid in target gene detection and pathway deduction.

  3. The human osmoregulatory Na{sup +}/myo-inositol cotransporter gene (SLC5A3): Molecular cloning and localization to chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, G.T.; Mallee, J.J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Muenke, M. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    A human Na{sup +}/myo-inositol cotransporter (SLC5A3) gene was cloned; sequencing revealed a single intron-free open reading frame of 2157 nucleotides. Containing 718 amino acid residues, the predicted protein is highly homologous to the product of the canine osmoregulatory SLC5A3 gene. The SLC5A3 protein is number 3 of the solute carrier family 5 and was previously designated SMIT. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the human SLC5A3 gene was localized to band q22 on chromosome 21. Many tissues including brain demonstrate gene expression. The inability of a trisomic 21 cell to downregulate expression of three copies of this osmoregulatory gene could result in increased flux of both myo-inositol and Na{sup +} across the plasma membrane. The potential consequences include perturbations in the cell membrane potential and tissue osmolyte levels. The SLC5A3 gene may play a role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. 54 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Ordered subset linkage analysis supports a susceptibility locus for age-related macular degeneration on chromosome 16p12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weeks Daniel E

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex disorder that is responsible for the majority of central vision loss in older adults living in developed countries. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity complicate the analysis of genome-wide scans for AMD susceptibility loci. The ordered subset analysis (OSA method is an approach for reducing heterogeneity, increasing statistical power for detecting linkage, and helping to define the most informative data set for follow-up analysis. OSA assesses the linkage evidence in subsets of potentially more homogeneous families by rank-ordering family-specific lod scores with respect to trait-associated covariates or phenotypic features. Here, we present results of incorporating five continuous covariates into our genome-wide linkage analysis of 389 microsatellite markers in 62 multiplex families: Body mass index (BMI, systolic (SBP and diastolic (DBP blood pressure, intraocular pressure (IOP, and pack-years of cigarette smoking. Chromosome-wide significance of increases in nonparametric multipoint lod scores in covariate-defined subsets relative to the overall sample was assessed by permutation. Results Using a correction for testing multiple covariates, statistically significant lod score increases were observed for two chromosomal regions: 14q13 with a lod score of 3.2 in 28 families with average IOP ≤ 15.5 (p = 0.002, and 6q14 with a lod score of 1.6 in eight families with average BMI ≥ 30.1 (p = 0.0004. On chromosome 16p12, nominally significant lod score increases (p ≤ 0.05, up to a lod score of 2.9 in 32 families, were observed with several covariate orderings. While less significant, this was the only region where linkage evidence was associated with multiple clinically meaningful covariates and the only nominally significant finding when analysis was restricted to advanced forms of AMD. Families with linkage to 16p12 had higher averages of SBP, IOP and BMI and were

  5. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  6. Genomewide clonal analysis of lethal mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster eye: comparison of the X chromosome and autosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Gerald B; Olson, John M; Chen, Jiong; Villarasa, Nikki; Ngo, Kathy T; Yabroff, Allison M; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bibikova, Elena; Bui, Chris; Cespedes, Albert; Chan, Cheryl; Chan, Stacy; Cheema, Amrita K; Chhabra, Akanksha; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Do, Minh-Tu; Fang, Q Angela; Folick, Andrew; Goodstein, Gelsey L; Huang, Cheng R; Hung, Tony; Kim, Eunha; Kim, William; Kim, Yulee; Kohan, Emil; Kuoy, Edward; Kwak, Robert; Lee, Eric; Lee, JiEun; Lin, Henry; Liu, H-C Angela; Moroz, Tatiana; Prasad, Tharani; Prashad, Sacha L; Patananan, Alexander N; Rangel, Alma; Rosselli, Desiree; Sidhu, Sohrab; Sitz, Daniel; Taber, Chelsea E; Tan, Jingwen; Topp, Kasey; Tran, PhuongThao; Tran, Quynh-Minh; Unkovic, Mary; Wells, Maggie; Wickland, Jessica; Yackle, Kevin; Yavari, Amir; Zaretsky, Jesse M; Allen, Christopher M; Alli, Latifat; An, Ju; Anwar, Abbas; Arevalo, Sonia; Ayoub, Danny; Badal, Shawn S; Baghdanian, Armonde; Baghdanian, Arthur H; Baumann, Sara A; Becerra, Vivian N; Chan, Hei J; Chang, Aileen E; Cheng, Xibin A; Chin, Mabel; Chong, Fleurette; Crisostomo, Carlyn; Datta, Sanjit; Delosreyes, Angela; Diep, Francie; Ekanayake, Preethika; Engeln, Mark; Evers, Elizabeth; Farshidi, Farzin; Fischer, Katrina; Formanes, Arlene J; Gong, Jun; Gupta, Riju; Haas, Blake E; Hahm, Vicky; Hsieh, Michael; Hui, James Z; Iao, Mei L; Jin, Sophia D; Kim, Angela Y; Kim, Lydia S-H; King, Megan; Knudsen-Robbins, Chloe; Kohanchi, David; Kovshilovskaya, Bogdana; Ku, Amy; Kung, Raymond W; Landig, Mark E L; Latterman, Stephanie S; Lauw, Stephanie S; Lee, Daniel S; Lee, Joann S; Lei, Kai C; Leung, Lesley L; Lerner, Renata; Lin, Jian-ya; Lin, Kathleen; Lim, Bryon C; Lui, Crystal P Y; Liu, Tiffany Q; Luong, Vincent; Makshanoff, Jacob; Mei, An-Chi; Meza, Miguel; Mikhaeil, Yara A; Moarefi, Majid; Nguyen, Long H; Pai, Shekhar S; Pandya, Manish; Patel, Aadit R; Picard, Paul D; Safaee, Michael M; Salame, Carol; Sanchez, Christian; Sanchez, Nina; Seifert, Christina C; Shah, Abhishek; Shilgevorkyan, Oganes H; Singh, Inderroop; Soma, Vanessa; Song, Junia J; Srivastava, Neetika; StaAna, Jennifer L; Sun, Christie; Tan, Diane; Teruya, Alison S; Tikia, Robyn; Tran, Trinh; Travis, Emily G; Trinh, Jennifer D; Vo, Diane; Walsh, Thomas; Wong, Regan S; Wu, Katherine; Wu, Ya-Whey; Yang, Nkau X V; Yeranosian, Michael; Yu, James S; Zhou, Jennifer J; Zhu, Ran X; Abrams, Anna; Abramson, Amanda; Amado, Latiffe; Anderson, Jenny; Bashour, Keenan; Beyer, Elsa; Bookatz, Allen; Brewer, Sarah; Buu, Natalie; Calvillo, Stephanie; Cao, Joseph; Chan, Amy; Chan, Jenny; Chang, Aileen; Chang, Daniel; Chang, Yuli; Chen, YiBing; Choi, Joo; Chou, Jeyling; Dang, Peter; Datta, Sumit; Davarifar, Ardy; Deravanesian, Artemis; Desai, Poonam; Fabrikant, Jordan; Farnad, Shahbaz; Fu, Katherine; Garcia, Eddie; Garrone, Nick; Gasparyan, Srpouhi; Gayda, Phyllis; Go, Sherrylene; Goffstein, Chad; Gonzalez, Courtney; Guirguis, Mariam; Hassid, Ryan; Hermogeno, Brenda; Hong, Julie; Hong, Aria; Hovestreydt, Lindsay; Hu, Charles; Huff, Devon; Jamshidian, Farid; Jen, James; Kahen, Katrin; Kao, Linda; Kelley, Melissa; Kho, Thomas; Kim, Yein; Kim, Sarah; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Langenbacher, Adam; Laxamana, Santino; Lee, Janet; Lee, Chris; Lee, So-Youn; Lee, ToHang S; Lee, Toni; Lewis, Gemma; Lezcano, Sheila; Lin, Peter; Luu, Thanh; Luu, Julie; Marrs, Will; Marsh, Erin; Marshall, Jamie; Min, Sarah; Minasian, Tanya; Minye, Helena; Misra, Amit; Morimoto, Miles; Moshfegh, Yasaman; Murray, Jessica; Nguyen, Kha; Nguyen, Cynthia; Nodado, Ernesto; O'Donahue, Amanda; Onugha, Ndidi; Orjiakor, Nneka; Padhiar, Bhavin; Paul, Eric; Pavel-Dinu, Mara; Pavlenko, Alex; Paz, Edwin; Phaklides, Sarah; Pham, Lephong; Poulose, Preethi; Powell, Russell; Pusic, Aya; Ramola, Divi; Regalia, Kirsten; Ribbens, Meghann; Rifai, Bassel; Saakyan, Manyak; Saarikoski, Pamela; Segura, Miriam; Shadpour, Farnaz; Shemmassian, Aram; Singh, Ramnik; Singh, Vivek; Skinner, Emily; Solomin, Daniel; Soneji, Kosha; Spivey, Kristin; Stageberg, Erika; Stavchanskiy, Marina; Tekchandani, Leena; Thai, Leo; Thiyanaratnam, Jayantha; Tong, Maurine; Toor, Aneet; Tovar, Steve; Trangsrud, Kelly; Tsang, Wah-Yung; Uemura, Marc; Vollmer, Emily; Weiss, Emily; Wood, Damien; Wu, Joy; Wu, Sophia; Wu, Winston; Xu, Qing; Yamauchi, Yuki; Yarosh, Will; Yee, Laura; Yen, George; Banerjee, Utpal

    2007-10-01

    Using a large consortium of undergraduate students in an organized program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), we have undertaken a functional genomic screen in the Drosophila eye. In addition to the educational value of discovery-based learning, this article presents the first comprehensive genomewide analysis of essential genes involved in eye development. The data reveal the surprising result that the X chromosome has almost twice the frequency of essential genes involved in eye development as that found on the autosomes.

  7. Genomic structure, chromosomal localization and expression profile of a novel melanoma differentiation associated (mda-7) gene with cancer specific growth suppressing and apoptosis inducing properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, E. Y.; Madireddi, M. T.; Gopalkrishnan, R. V.; Leszczyniecka, M.; Su, Z. Z.; Lebedeva, I. V.; Kang, D. C.; Jian, H.; Lin, J. J.; Alexandre, D.; Chen, Y.; Vozhilla, N.; Mei, M. X.; Christiansen, K. A.; Sivo, F.; Goldstein, N. I.; Chada, S.; Huberman, E.; Pestka, S.; Fisher, P. B.; Biochip Technology Center; Columbia Univ.; Introgen Therapeutics Inc.; UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    2001-10-25

    Abnormalities in cellular differentiation are frequent occurrences in human cancers. Treatment of human melanoma cells with recombinant fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta) and the protein kinase C activator mezerein (MEZ) results in an irreversible loss in growth potential, suppression of tumorigenic properties and induction of terminal cell differentiation. Subtraction hybridization identified melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7), as a gene induced during these physiological changes in human melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of mda-7 by means of a replication defective adenovirus results in growth suppression and induction of apoptosis in a broad spectrum of additional cancers, including melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, osteosarcoma and carcinomas of the breast, cervix, colon, lung, nasopharynx and prostate. In contrast, no apparent harmful effects occur when mda-7 is expressed in normal epithelial or fibroblast cells. Human clones of mda-7 were isolated and its organization resolved in terms of intron/exon structure and chromosomal localization. Hu-mda-7 encompasses seven exons and six introns and encodes a protein with a predicted size of 23.8 kDa, consisting of 206 amino acids. Hu-mda-7 mRNA is stably expressed in the thymus, spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes. De novo mda-7 mRNA expression is also detected in human melanocytes and expression is inducible in cells of melanocyte/melanoma lineage and in certain normal and cancer cell types following treatment with a combination of IFN-beta plus MEZ. Mda-7 expression is also induced during megakaryocyte differentiation induced in human hematopoietic cells by treatment with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate). In contrast, de novo expression of mda-7 is not detected nor is it inducible by IFN-beta+MEZ in a spectrum of additional normal and cancer cells. No correlation was observed between induction of mda-7 mRNA expression and growth suppression following treatment with IFN-beta+MEZ and

  8. Abnormalities in spontaneous abortions detected by G-banding and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) at a national reference laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Boris T; Chong, Thomas P; Boyar, Fatih Z; Kopita, Kimberly A; Ross, Leslie P; El-Naggar, Mohamed M; Sahoo, Trilochan; Wang, Jia-Chi; Hemmat, Morteza; Haddadin, Mary H; Owen, Renius; Anguiano, Arturo L

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic evaluation of products of conception (POC) for chromosomal abnormalities is central to determining the cause of pregnancy loss. We compared the test success rates in various specimen types and the frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities detected by G-banding analysis with those found by Oligo-SNP chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). We evaluated the benefit of CMA testing in cases of failed culture growth. Conventional cytogenetic results of 5457 consecutive POC specimens were reviewed and categorized as placental villi, fetal parts, and unspecified POC tissue. The CMA was performed on 268 cases. Of those, 32 cases had concurrent G-banding results. The remaining 236 cases included 107 cases with culture failure and 129 cases evaluated by CMA alone. The overall POC culture success rate was 75%, with the lowest for fetal parts (37.4%) and the highest for placental villi (81%). The abnormality rate was 58% for placental villi, but only 25% for fetal parts. Of the abnormalities detected, the most common were aneuploidies, including trisomy 16, triploidy, monosomy X, trisomy 22, trisomy 21 and trisomy 15, while the least encountered aneuploidies were trisomy 1, trisomy 19 and monosomies (except monosomy 21). Overall, POC specimens studied by CMA were successful in 89.6% of cases and yielded a 44.6% abnormality rate. Placental villi yielded higher rates of culture success and a higher percentage of abnormal karyotypes than did other specimen types. The Oligo-SNP CMA method has demonstrated a viable alternative to the G-banding method in view of its advantages in detection of submicroscopic genomic aberrations, shorter turnaround time due to elimination of time required for culture and a higher test success rate.

  9. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities: a study of partial exposure to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Aida M.G. de; Mendes, Mariana E.; Mendonça, Julyanne C.G.; Melo, Laís; Hwang, Suy; Santos, Neide; Lima, Fabiana F. de; Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares; Universidade Federal de Pernambuco

    2017-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is used in case of supposed accidental overexposure. The most commonly used biomarkers for assessing the absorbed dose are unstable chromosomal abnormalities. In a case of a partial body exposure, the frequencies of those abnormalities varies according to the area of the exposed body and may be substantially different from a total exposure of the body with an identical dose. The present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal changes simulating, with blood samples, partial (25%, 50%) and full body irradiation (100%) in X-ray beam. The irradiation was performed at Metrology Service (CRCN-NE / CNEN) with a bundle of 250kVp X-rays, resulting in the absorbed dose of 1.0 Gy. Prior to obtain the metaphases, irradiated blood was mixed with non-irradiated blood, and then the mitotic metaphases for the chromosomal analyzes were obtained by culturing lymphocytes and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. It was observed that there was an increase in dicentric frequency when the dose percentage increases in both subjects (0.024 and 0.049 in subject 1 and 0.016 and 0.038 in subject 2) after irradiation. The cellular distribution was 'contaminated' only at dose 25% of the first individual who had a prolongation of the distribution. The Qdr and Dolphin methods were used to estimate partial absorbed dose, but the Qdr method was not efficient and whereas the Dolphin method was efficient when the individual had a prolonged cell distribution. It is necessary to increase the number of observations to be sure of the observed behaviors. (author)

  10. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities: a study of partial exposure to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Aida M.G. de; Mendes, Mariana E.; Mendonça, Julyanne C.G.; Melo, Laís; Hwang, Suy; Santos, Neide; Lima, Fabiana F. de, E-mail: aidamgandrade@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE),Recife (Brazil). Centro de Biociências. Departamento de Genética

    2017-11-01

    Biological dosimetry is used in case of supposed accidental overexposure. The most commonly used biomarkers for assessing the absorbed dose are unstable chromosomal abnormalities. In a case of a partial body exposure, the frequencies of those abnormalities varies according to the area of the exposed body and may be substantially different from a total exposure of the body with an identical dose. The present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal changes simulating, with blood samples, partial (25%, 50%) and full body irradiation (100%) in X-ray beam. The irradiation was performed at Metrology Service (CRCN-NE / CNEN) with a bundle of 250kVp X-rays, resulting in the absorbed dose of 1.0 Gy. Prior to obtain the metaphases, irradiated blood was mixed with non-irradiated blood, and then the mitotic metaphases for the chromosomal analyzes were obtained by culturing lymphocytes and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. It was observed that there was an increase in dicentric frequency when the dose percentage increases in both subjects (0.024 and 0.049 in subject 1 and 0.016 and 0.038 in subject 2) after irradiation. The cellular distribution was 'contaminated' only at dose 25% of the first individual who had a prolongation of the distribution. The Qdr and Dolphin methods were used to estimate partial absorbed dose, but the Qdr method was not efficient and whereas the Dolphin method was efficient when the individual had a prolonged cell distribution. It is necessary to increase the number of observations to be sure of the observed behaviors. (author)

  11. Chromosome elasticity and mitotic polar ejection force measured in living Drosophila embryos by four-dimensional microscopy-based motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, W F; Marko, J F; Agard, D A; Sedat, J W

    2001-04-17

    Mitosis involves the interaction of many different components, including chromatin, microtubules, and motor proteins. Dissecting the mechanics of mitosis requires methods of studying not just each component in isolation, but also the entire ensemble of components in its full complexity in genetically tractable model organisms. We have developed a mathematical framework for analyzing motion in four-dimensional microscopy data sets that allows us to measure elasticity, viscosity, and forces by tracking the conformational movements of mitotic chromosomes. We have used this approach to measure, for the first time, the basic biophysical parameters of mitosis in wild-type Drosophila melanogaster embryos. We found that Drosophila embryo chromosomes are significantly less rigid than the much larger chromosomes of vertebrates. Anaphase kinetochore force and nucleoplasmic viscosity were comparable with previous estimates in other species. Motion analysis also allowed us to measure the magnitude of the polar ejection force exerted on chromosome arms during metaphase by individual microtubules. We find the magnitude of this force to be approximately 1 pN, a number consistent with force generation either by collision of growing microtubules with chromosomes or by single kinesin motors. Motion analysis allows noninvasive mechanical measurements to be made in complex systems. This approach should allow the functional effects of Drosophila mitotic mutants on chromosome condensation, kinetochore forces, and the polar ejection force to be determined.

  12. mBAND Analysis of Early and Late Damages in the Chromosome of Human Lymphocytes after Exposures to Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    Stable type chromosome aberrations that survive multiple generations of cell division include translocation and inversions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. At the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Detailed analysis of breaks participating in total chromosome exchanges within the first cell cycle post irradiation revealed a common hotspot located in the 3p21 region, which is a known fragile site corresponding to the band 6 in the mBand analysis. The breakpoint distribution in chromosomes collected at 7 days, but not at 14 days, post irradiation appeared similar to the distribution in cells collected within the first cell cycle post irradiation. The breakpoint distribution for human lymphocytes after radiation exposure was different from the previously published distribution for human

  13. Analysis of local subassembly accident in KALIMER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Min; Jeong, Kwan Seong; Hahn, Do Hee

    2000-10-01

    Subassembly Accidents (S-A) in the Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) may cause extensive clad and fuel melting and are thus regarded as a potential whole core accident initiator. The possibility of S-A occurrence must be very low frequency by the design features, and reactor must have specific instrumentation to interrupt the S-A sequences by causing a reactor shutdown. The evaluation of the relevant initiators, the event sequences which follow them, and their detection are the essence of the safety issue. Particularly, the phenomena of flow blockage caused by foreign materials and/or the debris from the failed fuel pin have been researched world-widely. The foreign strategies for dealing with the S-A and the associated safety issues with experimental and theoretical R and D results are reviewed. This report aims at obtaining information to reasonably evaluate the thermal-hydraulic effect of S-A for a wire-wrapped LMR fuel pin bundle. The mechanism of blockage formation and growth within a pin bundle and at the subassembly entrance is reviewed in the phenomenological aspect. Knowledge about the recent LMR subassembly design and operation procedure to prevent flow blockage will be reflected for KALIMER design later. The blockage analysis method including computer codes and related analytical models are reviewed. Especially SABRE4 code is discussed in detail. Preliminary analyses of flow blockage within a 271-pin driver subassembly have been performed using the SABRE4 computer code. As a result no sodium boiling occurred for the central 24-subchannel blockage as well as 6-subchannel blockage.

  14. Haplotype analysis and a novel allele-sharing method refines a chromosome 4p locus linked to bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lee, Andrew J; Underwood, Sarah; Thomson, Pippa A; Morris, Stewart W; Torrance, Helen S; Anderson, Susan M; Adams, Richard R; Navarro, Pau; Christoforou, Andrea; Houlihan, Lorna M; Detera-Wadleigh, Sevilla; Owen, Michael J; Asherson, Philip; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Wray, Naomi R; Porteous, David J; Evans, Kathryn L

    2007-03-15

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) are common conditions. Their causes are unknown, but they include a substantial genetic component. Previously, we described significant linkage of BPAD to a chromosome 4p locus within a large pedigree (F22). Others subsequently have found evidence for linkage of BPAD and SCZ to this region. We constructed high-resolution haplotypes for four linked families, calculated logarithm of the odds (LOD) scores, and developed a novel method to assess the extent of allele sharing within genes between the families. We describe an increase in the F22 LOD score for this region. Definition and comparison of the linked haplotypes allowed us to prioritize two subregions of 3.8 and 4.4 Mb. Analysis of the extent of allele sharing within these subregions identified 200 kb that shows increased allele sharing between families. Linkage of BPAD to chromosome 4p has been strengthened. Haplotype analysis in the additional linked families refined the 20-Mb linkage region. Development of a novel allele-sharing method allowed us to bridge the gap between conventional linkage and association studies. Description of a 200-kb region of increased allele sharing prioritizes this region, which contains two functional candidate genes for BPAD, SLC2A9, and WDR1, for subsequent studies.

  15. Extending the scope of diagnostic chromosome analysis: detection of single gene defects using high-resolution SNP microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Damien L; Stark, Zornitza; Amor, David J; Burgess, Trent; Butler, Kathy; Corrie, Sylvea; Francis, David; Ganesamoorthy, Devika; Hills, Louise; James, Paul A; O'Rielly, Darren; Oertel, Ralph; Savarirayan, Ravi; Prabhakara, Krishnamurthy; Salce, Nicholas; Slater, Howard R

    2011-12-01

    Microarray analysis has provided significant advances in the diagnosis of conditions resulting from submicroscopic chromosome abnormalities. It has been recommended that array testing should be a "first tier" test in the evaluation of individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, congenital anomalies, and autism. The availability of arrays with increasingly high probe coverage and resolution has increased the detection of decreasingly small copy number changes (CNCs) down to the intragenic or even exon level. Importantly, arrays that genotype SNPs also detect extended regions of homozygosity. We describe 14 examples of single gene disorders caused by intragenic changes from a consecutive set of 6,500 tests using high-resolution SNP microarrays. These cases illustrate the increased scope of cytogenetic testing beyond dominant chromosome rearrangements that typically contain many genes. Nine of the cases confirmed the clinical diagnosis, that is, followed a "phenotype to genotype" approach. Five were diagnosed by the laboratory analysis in the absence of a specific clinical diagnosis, that is, followed a "genotype to phenotype" approach. Two were clinically significant, incidental findings. The importance of astute clinical assessment and laboratory-clinician consultation is emphasized to optimize the value of microarrays in the diagnosis of disorders caused by single gene copy number and sequence mutations. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Analysis of two novel cDNAs from the Smith-Magenis syndrome region on chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Jiralerspong, S. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome associated with deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. To date, only one gene encoding snRNA U3 has been mapped to this region. Here we report the identification of two novel genes, designated 463 and B9, which have been mapped to the SMS region. A full-length cDNA corresponding to each of these genes has been cloned and sequenced. Deletion analysis has been conducted on somatic cell hybrids retaining the del(17)(p11.2) chromosome from each of 15 SMS patients by PCR of sequence tagged sites for the cDNAs and confirmed by Southern analysis. The gene 463 is deleted in 15/15 patients analyzed to date, whereas the gene B9 is deleted in 10/15 of the patients analyzed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is used to analyze additional SMS patients for hemizygosity at these loci. A physical map of the region is being constructed to determine the relative location of these cDNAs within 17p11.2. Our studies to date, thus, suggest that although both genes 463 and B9 are located within 17p11.2, gene 463 is more likely to be associated with SMS. Complete and exhaustive definition of the critical interval is required to demonstrate the role and importance of gene 463 in SMS.

  17. Histogram-based DNA analysis for the visualization of chromosome, genome and species information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, António M; Machado, José T; Quelhas, Maria D

    2011-05-01

    We describe a novel approach to explore DNA nucleotide sequence data, aiming to produce high-level categorical and structural information about the underlying chromosomes, genomes and species. The article starts by analyzing chromosomal data through histograms using fixed length DNA sequences. After creating the DNA-related histograms, a correlation between pairs of histograms is computed, producing a global correlation matrix. These data are then used as input to several data processing methods for information extraction and tabular/graphical output generation. A set of 18 species is processed and the extensive results reveal that the proposed method is able to generate significant and diversified outputs, in good accordance with current scientific knowledge in domains such as genomics and phylogenetics. Source code freely available for download at http://www4.dei.isep.ipp.pt/etc/dnapaper2010, implemented in Free Pascal and UNIX scripting tools. Study input data available online for download at University of California at Santa Cruz Genome Bioinformatics, http://hgdownload.cse.ucsc.edu/downloads.html.

  18. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridisation to chromosome analysis of aged bone marrow smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, D W; Hinchliffe, R F; Goyns, M H; Potter, A M; Lilleyman, J S

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the reliability of fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) in the retrospective cytogenetic assessment of old bone marrow smears stored for periods of up to 20 years. METHODS--A series of bone marrow smears either Romanowsky stained, or frozen and unstained, and aged from one month to 20 years were hybridised with biotin labelled probes specific for the centromeric regions of human chromosomes X, 6, and 18. Sites of hybridisation were detected with fluoresceinated avidin. One hundred to 400 cells from each preparation were examined and the number of signals observed was recorded. RESULTS--All smears exhibited signals in most cells examined. In cytogenetically normal cases, an average 67.6% of cells (range 36%-90%) demonstrated the appropriate number of X centromere signals. In those samples known to contain extra chromosomes X, 6, or 18 the presence of cells with the abnormal copy number was clearly detected in each case. CONCLUSION--When applied in the way described, FISH can give consistent and accurate results with a variety of archival bone marrow smears, including aged prestained material. This will permit retrospective assessment of specific cytogenetic abnormalities in patients with leukaemia using their initial diagnostic slides even where these are several years old. Images PMID:8063931

  19. Comparison of chromosome analysis using cell culture by coverslip technique with flask technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajapala, Suraphan; Buranawut, Kitti; NiwatArunyakasemsuk, Md

    2014-02-01

    To determine accuracy rate ofchromosome study from amniotic cellculture by coverslip technique compared with flask technique and to compared timing ofamniotic cell culture, amount ofamniotic cell culture media and cost ofamniotic cell culture. Cross sectional study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Phramongkutklao Hospital. Subjects: 70 pregnant women who underwent amniocentesis at Phramongkutklao Hospital during November 1, 2007 to February 29, 2008. Amniotic cell culture by flask technique and coverslip technique. Accuracy of amniotic cell culture for chromosome study by coverslip technique compared with flask technique. Totally 70 pregnant women who underwent to amniocentesis and dividedamniotic fluid to cell culture by flask technique and coverslip technique. 69 samples had similar resultfrom both techniques. The only one sample had cell culture failure inboth methods due to blood contamination. Accuracy in coverslip technique was 100% compared with flask technique. In timing of amniotic cell culture, amount ofamniotic cell culture media and cost of amniotic cell culture between 2 methods that coverslip technique was lesser than flask technique. There is statistically significant of accuracy in chromosome result between coverslip technique and flask technique. Coverslip technique was lesser than flask technique in timing, amniotic cell culture media and costs ofamniotic cell culture.

  20. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M.T.; Santos, Lorna H.; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F.; Domingues, Patricia M.; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D.; Hill, Carolyn R.; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D’Amato, Maria E.; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H.D.; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E.; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E.; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M.; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S. Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L.S.; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K.; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L.; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U.; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M.; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H.; Gwynne, Gareth M.; Jobling, Mark A.; Whittle, Martin R.; Sumita, Denilce R.; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y.Y.; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  1. A One-Step Real-Time Multiplex PCR for Screening Y-Chromosomal Microdeletions without Downstream Amplicon Size Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozina, Viviana; Cappallo-Obermann, Heike; Gromoll, Jörg; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    Backgound Y-chromosomal microdeletions (YCMD) are one of the major genetic causes for non-obstructive azoospermia. Genetic testing for YCMD by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an established method for quick and robust screening of deletions in the AZF regions of the Y-chromosome. Multiplex PCRs have the advantage of including a control gene in every reaction and significantly reducing the number of reactions needed to screen the relevant genomic markers. Principal Findings The widely established “EAA/EMQN best practice guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions (2004)” were used as a basis for designing a real-time multiplex PCR system, in which the YCMD can simply be identified by their melting points. For this reason, some AZF primers were substituted by primers for regions in their genomic proximity, and the ZFX/ZFY control primer was exchanged by the AMELX/AMELY control primer. Furthermore, we substituted the classical SybrGreen I dye by the novel and high-performing DNA-binding dye EvaGreen™ and put substantial effort in titrating the primer combinations in respect to optimal melting peak separation and peak size. Significance With these changes, we were able to develop a platform-independent and robust real-time based multiplex PCR, which makes the need for amplicon identification by electrophoretic sizing expendable. By using an open-source system for real-time PCR analysis, we further demonstrate the applicability of automated melting point and YCMD detection. PMID:21887237

  2. Genome-wide analysis of SU(VAR)3-9 distribution in chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Daniil A; Laktionov, Petr P; Posukh, Olga V; Belyakin, Stepan N; Koryakov, Dmitry E

    2018-03-01

    Histone modifications represent one of the key factors contributing to proper genome regulation. One of histone modifications involved in gene silencing is methylation of H3K9 residue. Present in the chromosomes across different eukaryotes, this epigenetic mark is controlled by SU(VAR)3-9 and its orthologs. Despite SU(VAR)3-9 was discovered over two decades ago, little is known about the details of its chromosomal distribution pattern. To fill in this gap, we used DamID-seq approach and obtained high-resolution genome-wide profiles for SU(VAR)3-9 in two somatic (salivary glands and brain ganglia) and two germline (ovarian nurse cells and testes) tissues of Drosophila melanogaster. Analysis of tissue and developmental expression of SU(VAR)3-9-bound genes indicates that in the somatic tissues tested, as well as in the ovarian nurse cells, SU(VAR)3-9 tends to associate with transcriptionally silent genes. In contrast, in the testes, SU(VAR)3-9 shows preferential association with testis-specific genes, and its binding appears dynamic during spermatogenesis. In somatic cells, the mere presence/absence of SU(VAR)3-9 binding correlates with lower/higher expression. No such correlation is found in the male germline. Interestingly, transcription units in piRNA clusters (particularly flanks thereof) are frequently targeted by SU(VAR)3-9, and Su(var)3-9 mutation affects the expression of select piRNA species. Our analyses suggest a context-dependent role of SU(VAR)3-9. In euchromatin, SU(VAR)3-9 may serve to fine-tune the expression of individual genes, whereas in heterochromatin, chromosome 4, and piRNA clusters, it may act more broadly over large chromatin domains.

  3. A meta-analysis of local adaptation in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roosa Leimu

    Full Text Available Local adaptation is of fundamental importance in evolutionary, population, conservation, and global-change biology. The generality of local adaptation in plants and whether and how it is influenced by specific species, population and habitat characteristics have, however, not been quantitatively reviewed. Therefore, we examined published data on the outcomes of reciprocal transplant experiments using two approaches. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the performance of local and foreign plants at all transplant sites. In addition, we analysed frequencies of pairs of plant origin to examine whether local plants perform better than foreign plants at both compared transplant sites. In both approaches, we also examined the effects of population size, and of the habitat and species characteristics that are predicted to affect local adaptation. We show that, overall, local plants performed significantly better than foreign plants at their site of origin: this was found to be the case in 71.0% of the studied sites. However, local plants performed better than foreign plants at both sites of a pair-wise comparison (strict definition of local adaption only in 45.3% of the 1032 compared population pairs. Furthermore, we found local adaptation much more common for large plant populations (>1000 flowering individuals than for small populations (<1000 flowering individuals for which local adaptation was very rare. The degree of local adaptation was independent of plant life history, spatial or temporal habitat heterogeneity, and geographic scale. Our results suggest that local adaptation is less common in plant populations than generally assumed. Moreover, our findings reinforce the fundamental importance of population size for evolutionary theory. The clear role of population size for the ability to evolve local adaptation raises considerable doubt on the ability of small plant populations to cope with changing environments.

  4. The human MCP-2 gene (SCYA8): Cloning, sequence analysis, tissue expression, and assignment to the CC chemokine gene contig on chromosome 17q11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Coillie, E.; Fiten, P.; Van Damme, J.; Opdenakker, G. [Univ. of Leuven (Belgium)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCPs) form a subfamily of chemokines that recruit leukocytes to sites of inflammation and that may contribute to tumor-associated leukocyte infiltration and to the antiviral state against HIV infection. With the use of degenerate primers that were based on CC chemokine consensus sequences, the known MIP-1{alpha}/LD78{alpha}, MCP-1, and MCP-3 genes and the previously unidentified eotaxin and MCP-2 genes were isolated from a YAC contig from human chromosome 17q11.2. The amplified genomic MCP-2 fragment was used to isolate an MCP-2 cosmid from which the gene sequence was determined. The MCP-2 gene shares with the MCP-1 and MCP-3 genes a conserved intron-exon structure and a coding nucleotide sequence homology of 77%. By Northern blot analysis the 1.0-kb MCP-2 mRNA was predominantly detectable in the small intestine, peripheral blood, heart, placenta, lung, skeletal muscle, ovary, colon, spinal cord, pancreas, and thymus. Transcripts of 1.5 and 2.4 kb were found in the testis, the small intestine, and the colon. The isolation of the MCP-2 gene from the chemokine contig localized it on YAC clones of chromosome 17q11.2, which also contain the eotaxin, MCP-1, MCP-3, and NCC-1/MCP-4 genes. The combination of using degenerate primer PCR and YACs illustrates that novel genes can efficiently be isolated from gene cluster contigs with less redundancy and effort than the isolation of novel ESTs. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Dilemmas in genetic counseling for low-penetrance neuro-susceptibility loci detected on prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabbing-Goldstein, Dana; Reches, Adi; Svirsky, Ran; Bar-Shira, Anat; Yaron, Yuval

    2018-02-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis is standard of care in fetuses with malformations, detecting clinically significant copy number variants in 5-7% of cases over conventional karyotyping. However, it also detects variants of uncertain significance in 1.6-4.2% of the cases, some of which are low-penetrance neuro-susceptibility loci. The interpretation of these variants in pregnancy is particularly challenging because the significance is often unclear and the clinical implications may be difficult to predict. The purpose of this study was to describe counseling dilemmas regarding low-penetrance neuro-susceptibility loci that are detected by prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis. During the study period (January 2014 to December 2015), 700 prenatal chromosomal microarray analyses were performed. Cases were categorized as "indicated" (n=375) if there were abnormal sonographic findings or suggestive medical history and "patient choice" (n=325) in the presence of a structurally normal fetus with no other particular indication. The laboratory reported on copy number variants ≥400 Kb in size in loci known to be associated with genetic syndromes and ≥1 Mb in other areas of genome. Results were classified as gross aneuploidy, copy number variants, and normal. Copy number variants were categorized according to the American College of Medical Genetics standards and guidelines: pathogenic, variants of uncertain significance, or benign. Variants of uncertain significance were further subdivided into categories of likely pathogenic, variants of uncertain significance with no subclassification, and likely benign. Statistical analysis was performed with the use of Chi square test and Fisher's exact test to compare intergroup differences in incidence of the different result categories and demographic data. Patient choice cases became more prevalent with time (35.5% in the beginning of the study, compared with 48.4% at the end of the study period). Clinically significant copy

  6. Patterns of genic diversity and structure in a species undergoing rapid chromosomal radiation: an allozyme analysis of house mice from the Madeira archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton-Davidian, J; Catalan, J; Lopez, J; Ganem, G; Nunes, A C; Ramalhinho, M G; Auffray, J C; Searle, J B; Mathias, M L

    2007-10-01

    The chromosomal radiation of the house mouse in the island of Madeira most likely involved a human-mediated colonization event followed by within-island geographical isolation and recurrent episodes of genetic drift. The genetic signature of such processes was assessed by an allozyme analysis of the chromosomal races from Madeira. No trace of a decrease in diversity was observed suggesting the possibility of large founder or bottleneck sizes, multiple introductions and/or a high post-colonization expansion rate. The Madeira populations were more closely related to those of Portugal than to other continental regions, in agreement with the documented human colonization of the island. Such a Portuguese origin contrasts with a study indicating a north European source of the mitochondrial haplotypes present in the Madeira mice. This apparent discrepancy may be resolved if not one but two colonization events took place, an initial north European introduction followed by a later one from Portugal. Asymmetrical reproduction between these mice would have resulted in a maternal north European signature with a nuclear Portuguese genome. The extensive chromosomal divergence of the races in Madeira is expected to contribute to their genic divergence. However, there was no significant correlation between chromosomal and allozyme distances. This low apparent chromosomal impact on genic differentiation may be related to the short time since the onset of karyotypic divergence, as the strength of the chromosomal barrier will become significant only at later stages.

  7. [Analysis of non-invasive prenatal screening detection in fetal chromosome aneuploidy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, A J; Zhu, C F; Xue, S W; Cui, S Y; Qu, S Z; Liu, N; Kong, X D

    2017-11-25

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of non-invasive prenatal screening (NIPS) in the detection of fetal aneuploidies. Methods: Cell free DNA was sequenced in 5 566 pregnant women to identify the fetal aneuploidies in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from January 1(st), 2015 to March 15(th), 2016. Among them, 5 230 (93.96%, 5 230/5 566) were singleton pregnancies and 336 (6.04%, 336/5 566) were twin pregnancies. In singleton pregnancies, 1 809 (34.59%, 1 809/5 230) were women with advanced maternal age, and 3 421 (65.41%, 3 421/5 230) were young women. The positive results of NIPS were validated by karyotyping through invasive procedures and neonatal outcomes were followed up by telephone. Results: Among the 5 566 women, 69 (1.24%, 69/5 566) got positive NIPS results, with 66 in singleton pregnancies and 3 in twin pregnancies. Two were monochorionic diamniotic twins and 1 was dichorionic twin pregnancy. The positive predictive value of NIPS for trisomy 21, 18 and 13 were 100.0%, 90.9% and 100.0%, and was 55.6% for sex chromosome aneuploidies. There was no false negative case found during the follow-up. In the advanced maternal age group and young women group, the prevalence rates of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies were 1.11%(20/1 809) and 0.94%(32/3 421), respectively. In the young women with soft markers in fetal ultrasound, the prevalence of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies was 1.44% (7/487), and in serum high risk women, it was 0.94% (7/747). In women with the serum screening risk with cut-off value, 0.89%(9/1 016) had fetal aneuploidies, and the prevalence was 0.77%(9/1 171) in volunteers. There was no statistically significant difference among these groups ( P= 0.636). Conclusions: There is no difference in the detection rate of fetal aneuploidies between high-risk women in serum screening and volunteers in NIPS. NIPS is more suitable as a first line screening test for women without fetal ultrasound abnormalities. It should be used carefully

  8. Analysis gives alterations stable chromosomic induced by the radiation in vitro the sanguine samples to well-known dose. Preliminary results obtained by means of chromosomic painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, M.J.; Moreno, M.; Gomez-Espi, M.; Olivares, P.; Herranz, R.

    1998-01-01

    In the University General Hospital Gregorio Marannon, once standardized the technique in situ hybridization with fluorescence by means of painting chromosomic the couples 1 and 2 you this carrying out the irradiation gives sanguine samples to well-known dose The objective these irradiations it is the elaboration in vitro a calibration chart dose effect for gamma ray. This new curve will allow to estimate dose in individuals with suspicion overexposure to ionizing radiations, solving some gives the limitations that it presents the technique classic cytogenetics

  9. A Habermasian Analysis of Local Renewable Energy Deliberations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    This study pursues a Habermasian analysis of citizen discussions and of the local public sphere to shed light on renewable energy futures in rural east-central Canada. Using data from group discussions, it pursues an investigation of utterances, validity claims and of discourses. The analysis is supplemented by participant observation of publicly…

  10. chemical analysis and base- promoted hydrolysis of locally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wara

    ABSTRACT. The study was on the chemical analysis and base- promoted hydrolysis of extracted shea nut fat. The local method of extraction of the shea nut oil was employed in comparison with literature report. A simple cold-process alkali hydrolysis of the shea nut oil was used in producing the soap. The chemical analysis ...

  11. Chemical analysis and base-promoted hydrolysis of locally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was on the chemical analysis and base- promoted hydrolysis of extracted shea nut fat. The local method of extraction of the shea nut oil was employed in comparison with literature report. A simple cold-process alkali hydrolysis of the shea nut oil was used in producing the soap. The chemical analysis of the oil ...

  12. Searching for the origin of Gagauzes: inferences from Y-chromosome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzari, Alexander; Kharkov, Vladimir; Stephan, Wolfgang; Dergachev, Valentin; Puzyrev, Valery; Weiss, Elisabeth H; Stepanov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    The Gagauzes are a small Turkish-speaking ethnic group living mostly in southern Moldova and northeastern Bulgaria. The origin of the Gagauzes is obscure. They may be descendants of the Turkic nomadic tribes from the Eurasian steppes, as suggested by the "Steppe" hypothesis, or have a complex Anatolian-steppe origin, as postulated by the "Seljuk" or "Anatolian" hypothesis. To distinguish these hypotheses, a sample of 89 Y-chromosomes representing two Gagauz populations from the Republic of Moldova was analyzed for 28 binary and seven STR polymorphisms. In the gene pool of the Gagauzes a total of 15 Y-haplogroups were identified, the most common being I-P37 (20.2%), R-M17 (19.1%), G-M201 (13.5%), R-M269 (12.4%), and E-M78 (11.1%). The present Gagauz populations were compared with other Balkan, Anatolian, and Central Asian populations by means of genetic distances, nonmetric multidimentional scaling and analyses of molecular variance. The analyses showed that Gagauzes belong to the Balkan populations, suggesting that the Gagauz language represents a case of language replacement in southeastern Europe. Interestingly, the detailed study of microsatellite haplotypes revealed some sharing between the Gagauz and Turkish lineages, providing some support of the hypothesis of the "Seljuk origin" of the Gagauzes. The faster evolving microsatellite loci showed that the two Gagauz samples investigated do not represent a homogeneous group. This finding matches the cultural and linguistic heterogeneity of the Gagauzes well, suggesting a crucial role of social factors in shaping the Gagauz Y-chromosome pool and possibly also of effects of genetic drift. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Molecular cloning, expression pattern, and chromosomal localization of human CDKN2D/INK4d, an inhibitor of cyclin D-dependent kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Tsukasa; Shurtleff, S.A.; Downing, J.R. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-10

    Progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is dependent on the activity of holoenzymes formed between D-type cyclins and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases cdk4 and cdk6. p16{sup INK4a} p15{sup INK4b}, and p18{sup INK4c}, a group of structurally related proteins, function as specific inhibitors of the cyclin D-dependent kinases and are likely to play physiologic roles as specific regulators of these kinases in vivo. A new member of the INK4 gene family, murine INK4d, has recently been identified. Here we report the isolation of human INK4d (gene symbol CDKN2D), which is 86 identical at the amino acid level to the murine clone and {approximately}44% identical to each of the other human INK4 family members. The INK4d gene is ubiquitously expressed as a single 1.4-kb mRNA with the highest levels detected in thymus, spleen, peripheral blood leukocytes, fetal liver, brain, and testes. The abundance of INK4d mRNA oscillates in a cell-cycle-dependent manner with expression lowest at mid G1 and maximal during S phase. Using a P1-phage genomic clone of INK4d for fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, the location of this gene was mapped to chromosome 19p13. No rearrangements or deletions of the INK4d gene were observed in Southern blot analysis of selected cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) containing a variant (1;19)(q23;p13) translocation that lacks rearrangement of either E2A or PBX1, or in ALL cases containing homozygous or hemizygous deletions of the related genes, INK4a and INK4b. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Local crystallography analysis for atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Li, Qing; Belianinov, Alexei; Gai, Zheng; Baddorf, Arthur P; Pan, Minghu; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Sales, Brian C; Sefat, Athena

    2013-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful and flexible tool for atomically resolved imaging of surface structures. However, due to the amount of information extracted, in many cases the interpretation of such data is limited to being qualitative and semi-quantitative in nature. At the same time, much can be learned from local atom parameters, such as distances and angles, that can be analyzed and interpreted as variations of local chemical bonding, or order parameter fields. Here, we demonstrate an iterative algorithm for indexing and determining atomic positions that allows the analysis of inhomogeneous surfaces. This approach is further illustrated by local crystallographic analysis of several real surfaces, including highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and an Fe-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 . This study provides a new pathway to extract and quantify local properties for scanning probe microscopy images. (paper)

  15. Financial side analysis of local autonomy in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Cristinel ICHIM

    2012-01-01

    Financial side of local autonomy expresses the capacity of local communities to have their own revenue and expenditure budget, distinct from that of the state in which revenues can cover expenses incurred to meet their requirements. The analysis of financial autonomy of administrative-territorial units in Romania is an interesting but complex approach given that some factors are actually difficult to predict and quantify. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the meaning of financial side o...

  16. Skin pattern analysis for lesion classification using local isotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zhishun; Excell, Peter S

    2011-05-01

    The observation that skin pattern tends to be disrupted by malignant skin lesions, but not by benign ones suggests that measurements of skin pattern disruption on simply captured white light optical clinical (WLC) skin images could be a useful contribution to a diagnostic feature set. Previous work, which generated a flow field of skin pattern using a measurement of local line direction and intensity, was encouraging. The aim of this paper is to investigate the possibility of extracting new features using local isotropy metrics to quantify the skin pattern disruption. The skin pattern was extracted from WLC skin images by high-pass filtering. A local tensor matrix was computed. The local isotropy was measured by the condition number of the local tensor matrix. The difference of this measure over the lesion and normal skin areas, combined with the local line direction and the ABCD features, was used as a lesion classifier. A set of images of malignant melanoma and benign naevi was analysed. A one-dimensional scatter plot showed the potential of a local isotropy metric, showing an area of 0.70 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A two-dimensional scatter plot, combined with the local line direction, indicated enhancement of the classification performance, showing an area of 0.89 under the ROC curve. A three-dimensional scatter plot combined with the local line direction and the ABCD features, using principal component analysis, demonstrated excellent separation of benign and malignant lesions. An ROC plot for this case enclosed an area of 0.96. The experimental results show that the local isotropy metric has a potential to increase lesion classifier accuracy. Combined with the local line direction and the ABCD features, it is very promising as a method to distinguish malignant melanoma from benign lesions. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Y-chromosomal analysis of Greek Cypriots reveals a primarily common pre-Ottoman paternal ancestry with Turkish Cypriots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Domínguez, Eva; Bertoncini, Stefania; Chimonas, Marios; Christofi, Vasilis; King, Jonathan; Budowle, Bruce; Manoli, Panayiotis

    2017-01-01

    Genetics can provide invaluable information on the ancestry of the current inhabitants of Cyprus. A Y-chromosome analysis was performed to (i) determine paternal ancestry among the Greek Cypriot (GCy) community in the context of the Central and Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East; and (ii) identify genetic similarities and differences between Greek Cypriots (GCy) and Turkish Cypriots (TCy). Our haplotype-based analysis has revealed that GCy and TCy patrilineages derive primarily from a single gene pool and show very close genetic affinity (low genetic differentiation) to Calabrian Italian and Lebanese patrilineages. In terms of more recent (past millennium) ancestry, as indicated by Y-haplotype sharing, GCy and TCy share much more haplotypes between them than with any surrounding population (7–8% of total haplotypes shared), while TCy also share around 3% of haplotypes with mainland Turks, and to a lesser extent with North Africans. In terms of Y-haplogroup frequencies, again GCy and TCy show very similar distributions, with the predominant haplogroups in both being J2a-M410, E-M78, and G2-P287. Overall, GCy also have a similar Y-haplogroup distribution to non-Turkic Anatolian and Southwest Caucasian populations, as well as Cretan Greeks. TCy show a slight shift towards Turkish populations, due to the presence of Eastern Eurasian (some of which of possible Ottoman origin) Y-haplogroups. Overall, the Y-chromosome analysis performed, using both Y-STR haplotype and binary Y-haplogroup data puts Cypriot in the middle of a genetic continuum stretching from the Levant to Southeast Europe and reveals that despite some differences in haplotype sharing and haplogroup structure, Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots share primarily a common pre-Ottoman paternal ancestry. PMID:28622394

  18. Detecting chromosomal alterations at 1p and 19q by FISH and DNA fragment analysis - a comparative study in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, H.; Born, P.W.; Guterbaum, D.

    2008-01-01

    as primers and capillary electrophoresis or southern blot as detection method. The objective of the present study was to compare the accuracy, reliability and feasibility of detecting chromosomal changes at 1p/19q with PCR microsatellite analysis and FISH in glial tumors in the clinical laboratory, where......Histological classification of gliomas is important for treatment and as a prognostic predictor, but classification by histology alone can be a challenge. Molecular genetic investigations, in particular the combined loss of the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 19 (LOH1p/19q......), has become a significant predictor of outcome in oligodendrogliomas. 1p/19q alterations can be investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), but controversies persist in the interpretation ofresults. Another technique is polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using microsatellites...

  19. Role of quercetin on mitomycin C induced genotoxicity: analysis of micronucleus and chromosome aberrations in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Mehnaz; Giri, Sarbani; Giri, Anirudha

    2011-04-03

    Quercetin, a flavonol group of plant flavonoid, has generated immense interest because of its potential antioxidant, anti-proliferative, chemoprotective, anti-inflammatory and gene expression modulating properties. However, the pro-oxidant chemistry of quercetin is important as it is related to the generation of mutagenic quinone-type metabolites. In the present study, 25mg/kg, 50mg/kg and 100mg/kg of quercetin given through the intra peritoneal (i.p.) route induced 2.31 ± 0.27%, 4.72 ± 0.58% and 6.38 ± 0.68% (control value=0.67 ± 0.30%) respectively, of cells with micronucleus (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow cells and 10.93 ± 0.98%, 10.00 ± 0.89% and 14.27 ± 3.94% (control 2.61 ± 0.48) of cells with chromosome aberrations (CA) following 24h of the treatments. Higher frequencies of MN and CA were also observed after 48h of the treatments. To verify the effect of route of treatment on the quercetin induced damage, 100mg/kg b.w. was given through oral route which declined frequency of MN (Psticky chromosomes and C-mitosis. Pre-treatment with quercetin significantly reduced the frequency of mitomycin C (MMC) induced MN as well as CA, but no clear correlation between the dose and effect could be observed. Further studies are required to elucidate the possible interaction of quercetin with DNA as well as with other DNA damaging agents like MMC in vivo. The protective action of quercetin was not enhanced when given orally. Our findings suggest that quercetin may result in genomic instability in the tested dose range and significant reduction in MMC induced genotoxicity in the highest dose tested. These effects of quercetin are to be taken into consideration while evaluating the possible use of quercetin as a therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Stable locality sensitive discriminant analysis for image recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Quanxue; Liu, Jingjing; Cui, Kai; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-06-01

    Locality Sensitive Discriminant Analysis (LSDA) is one of the prevalent discriminant approaches based on manifold learning for dimensionality reduction. However, LSDA ignores the intra-class variation that characterizes the diversity of data, resulting in unstableness of the intra-class geometrical structure representation and not good enough performance of the algorithm. In this paper, a novel approach is proposed, namely stable locality sensitive discriminant analysis (SLSDA), for dimensionality reduction. SLSDA constructs an adjacency graph to model the diversity of data and then integrates it in the objective function of LSDA. Experimental results in five databases show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic analysis of the proximal region of chromosome 2 of Drosophila melanogaster. I. Detachment products of compound autosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliker, A.J.; Holm, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    To examine the genetic composition of proximal heterochromatin in chromosome 2, the detachment of compound second autosomes, for generating proximal deficiencies, appeared a promising method. Compound seconds were detached by gamma radiation. A fraction of the detachment products were recessive lethals owing to proximal deficiencies. Analysis by inter se complementation, pseudo-dominance tests with proximal mutations and allelism tests with known deficiencies provided evidence for at least two loci between the centromere and the light locus in 2L and one locus in 2R between the rolled locus and the centromere. The data further demonstrate that rolled, and probably light, are located within the proximal heterochromatin. Thus, functional genetic loci are found in heterochromatin, albeit at low density

  2. Characterization of X chromosome inactivation using integrated analysis of whole-exome and mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Szelinger

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI is an epigenetic, gene dosage compensatory mechanism by inactivation of one copy of X in cells. Random XCI of one of the parental chromosomes results in an approximately equal proportion of cells expressing alleles from either the maternally or paternally inherited active X, and is defined by the XCI ratio. Skewed XCI ratio is suggestive of non-random inactivation, which can play an important role in X-linked genetic conditions. Current methods rely on indirect, semi-quantitative DNA methylation-based assay to estimate XCI ratio. Here we report a direct approach to estimate XCI ratio by integrated, family-trio based whole-exome and mRNA sequencing using phase-by-transmission of alleles coupled with allele-specific expression analysis. We applied this method to in silico data and to a clinical patient with mild cognitive impairment but no clear diagnosis or understanding molecular mechanism underlying the phenotype. Simulation showed that phased and unphased heterozygous allele expression can be used to estimate XCI ratio. Segregation analysis of the patient's exome uncovered a de novo, interstitial, 1.7 Mb deletion on Xp22.31 that originated on the paternally inherited X and previously been associated with heterogeneous, neurological phenotype. Phased, allelic expression data suggested an 83∶20 moderately skewed XCI that favored the expression of the maternally inherited, cytogenetically normal X and suggested that the deleterious affect of the de novo event on the paternal copy may be offset by skewed XCI that favors expression of the wild-type X. This study shows the utility of integrated sequencing approach in XCI ratio estimation.

  3. Genetic and molecular analysis in the 70CD region of the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, T; Mink, M; Pál, M; Lászlóffy, Z; Lepesant, J; Maróy, P

    2000-04-04

    A collection of lethal and semi-lethal P-element insertions in the 70CD region of chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster was used to investigate genes and gene arrangements by a combination of genetic, cytological, functional and molecular methods. The 12 lethal insertions studied fall into seven complementation groups of six genes. Lethal phases, expression patterns and other phenotypic aspects of these genes were determined. The genes and additional available sequences were placed on cloned genomic DNA fragments and arranged in an EcoRI map of 150kb that covers approximately the bands 70C7-8 to 70D1. Determination of deficiency breakpoints links the genetic, physical and molecular data. The sequences adjacent to seven independent P-element insertions were established after plasmid rescue or polymerase chain reaction. Similarity searches allowed the assignment of the P-element insertions to known mutations, expressed sequence tags, sequence tagged sites, or homologous genes of other species. Among these were identified a putative transacylase, a putative cell cycle gene, and the gene responsible for the dominant Polycomb-suppressor phenotype of devenir. The genomic sequence of the l(3)70Ca/b gene reveals a novel heat shock protein (hsc70Cb). l(3)70Da was identified as a member of the CDC48/PEX1 ATPase family and its coding sequence was determined.

  4. Sequence analysis, chromosomal location, and developmental expression of the mouse preproendothelin-1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maemura, Koji; Kurihara, Hiroki; Kurihara, Yukiko [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-01-15

    Recent studies have designated endothelins (ETs) as morphogenetic factors in embryonic development. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the mouse preproendothelin-1 (preproET-1) gene (Edn1) and examined its expression in reference to development. Edn1 comprises five exons, and the open reading frame encodes the 202-amino-acid preproET-1. The sequences and structural organization of Edn1 are highly homologous to those of other species, especially in the terminal 200-bp sequence of the 3{prime}-noncoding region. Interspecific backcross mapping located Edn1 in the central region of chromosomal 13, where a mouse mutation, congenital hydrocephalus (ch), is also mapped. The highest expression of Edn1 mRNA is detected in the lung in adult mice, whereas Edn1 is predominantly expressed in the epithelium and mesenchyme of the pharyngeal arches and in the endothelium of the large arteries. Edn1 expression and ET-1 peptide levels in the lung progressively increase during the perinatal stage, whereas the expression of Edn3, a gene encoding ET-3, reciprocally decreases. These results suggest that Edn1 expression is developmentally regulated in different tissues and organs in mice in a spatial- and temporal-specific manner. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  5. [Analysis of linkage disequilibrium and linkage for 12 short tandem repeat loci on chromosome X].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qiansu; Tang, Jianpin; Chen, Zucong; Li, Fagui; Yu, Xin; Wang, Ping; Lin, Hanguang; Shi, Meisen

    2014-12-01

    To analyze linkage disequilibrium of 12 short tandem repeat loci on chromosome X (X-STR) among an ethnic Han population from Guilin, Guangxi, and to study the genetic linkage and haplotype distributions of such loci in 2 linkage groups. 12 X-STR loci including DXS8378, DXS10159, DXS10162, DXS10164, DXS981, DXS6789, DXS7424, DXS101, DXS7133, GATA165B12, GATA31E08 and DXS7423 were genotyped using an AGCU X12 STR PCR Amplification kit. A total of 119 pedigrees were analyzed for linkage and linkage disequilibrium. Two mutations were found at DXS7424, and 1 mutation was found at DXS10164. A total of 93 haplotypes of DXS10159-DXS10162-DXS10164 were constructed for 261 unrelated males and females, in addition with 167 haplotypes of DXS6789-DXS7424-DXS101-DXS7133. The values of recombination fraction between DXS10159 and DXS10162, DXS10162 and DXS10164, DXS6789 and DXS7424, and DXS7424 and DXS101 were 0.0269, 0.0236, 0.0505 and 0.0438, respectively. Linkage disequilibrium of X-STR does not only depend on physical and genetic distances. There was incomplete linkage relationship between loci on DXS10159-DXS1016-DXS10164 and DXS6789-DXS7424-DXS101 linkage groups.

  6. Transcription of a protein-coding gene on B chromosomes of the Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Vladimir A; Dementyeva, Polina V; Larkin, Denis M; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Perelman, Polina L; Yang, Fengtang; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2013-08-06

    Most eukaryotic species represent stable karyotypes with a particular diploid number. B chromosomes are additional to standard karyotypes and may vary in size, number and morphology even between cells of the same individual. For many years it was generally believed that B chromosomes found in some plant, animal and fungi species lacked active genes. Recently, molecular cytogenetic studies showed the presence of additional copies of protein-coding genes on B chromosomes. However, the transcriptional activity of these genes remained elusive. We studied karyotypes of the Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) that possess up to 14 B chromosomes to investigate the presence and expression of genes on supernumerary chromosomes. Here, we describe a 2 Mbp region homologous to cattle chromosome 3 and containing TNNI3K (partial), FPGT, LRRIQ3 and a large gene-sparse segment on B chromosomes of the Siberian roe deer. The presence of the copy of the autosomal region was demonstrated by B-specific cDNA analysis, PCR assisted mapping, cattle bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone localization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). By comparative analysis of B-specific and non-B chromosomal sequences we discovered some B chromosome-specific mutations in protein-coding genes, which further enabled the detection of a FPGT-TNNI3K transcript expressed from duplicated genes located on B chromosomes in roe deer fibroblasts. Discovery of a large autosomal segment in all B chromosomes of the Siberian roe deer further corroborates the view of an autosomal origin for these elements. Detection of a B-derived transcript in fibroblasts implies that the protein coding sequences located on Bs are not fully inactivated. The origin, evolution and effect on host of B chromosomal genes seem to be similar to autosomal segmental duplications, which reinforces the view that supernumerary chromosomal elements might play an important role in genome evolution.

  7. SRY mutation analysis by next generation (deep sequencing in a cohort of chromosomal Disorders of Sex Development (DSD patients with a mosaic karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hersmus Remko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of the Y-chromosome or Y chromosome-derived material is seen in 4-60% of Turner syndrome patients (Chromosomal Disorders of Sex Development (DSD. DSD patients with specific Y-chromosomal material in their karyotype, the GonadoBlastoma on the Y-chromosome (GBY region, have an increased risk of developing type II germ cell tumors/cancer (GCC, most likely related to TSPY. The Sex determining Region on the Y gene (SRY is located on the short arm of the Y-chromosome and is the crucial switch that initiates testis determination and subsequent male development. Mutations in this gene are responsible for sex reversal in approximately 10-15% of 46,XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (46,XY DSD cases. The majority of the mutations described are located in the central HMG domain, which is involved in the binding and bending of the DNA and harbors two nuclear localization signals. SRY mutations have also been found in a small number of patients with a 45,X/46,XY karyotype and might play a role in the maldevelopment of the gonads. Methods To thoroughly investigate the presence of possible SRY gene mutations in mosaic DSD patients, we performed next generation (deep sequencing on the genomic DNA of fourteen independent patients (twelve 45,X/46,XY, one 45,X/46,XX/46,XY, and one 46,XX/46,XY. Results and conclusions The results demonstrate that aberrations in SRY are rare in mosaic DSD patients and therefore do not play a significant role in the etiology of the disease.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1 protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP, regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA

  9. Analysis of bovine growth hormone gene polymorphism of local and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of bovine growth hormone gene polymorphism of local and Holstein cattle breeds in Kerman province of Iran using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... RFLPs in this segment were studied using AluI restriction enzyme.

  10. Global and Local Sensitivity Analysis Methods for a Physical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morio, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is the study of how the different input variations of a mathematical model influence the variability of its output. In this paper, we review the principle of global and local sensitivity analyses of a complex black-box system. A simulated case of application is given at the end of this paper to compare both approaches.…

  11. A Local Approach Methodology for the Analysis of Ultimate Strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The local approach methodology in contrast to classical fracture mechanics can be used to predict the onset of tearing fracture, and the effects of geometry in tubular joints. Finite element analysis of T-joints plate geometries, and tubular joints has been done. The parameters of constraint, equivalent stress, plastic strain and ...

  12. Triplex Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction Optimization for AZF Y-chromosome Microdeletion Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Tatiana Puga; Rojas, Xavier Blum; Narváez, Medardo Blum; Montanero, Edith López; Sarasti, Alexandra Narváez

    2015-05-01

    Y chromosome microdeletions at the "Azoospermia Factor" regions (AZFa, AZFb, AZFc) are the second genetic cause of spermatogenic failure in infertile men. Despite its importance for the treatment of infertile patients, no prior investigations have been previously published in Ecuador. . The purpose of this study is to optimize a molecular technique that allows detection of microdeletions in the AZF region. Using a genomic DNA of healthy male with natural conceived offsprings, a multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was standarized with eigth sequence-tagged site (STS) sY85, G34990, sY133, sY127, sY254, sY255, and using as internal control sex-determine region Y (SRY) and Ameologenin Y (AMELY). With this technique, 35 DNA samples taken from peripheral blood of patients with severe oligozoospermia were analyzed. A triplex qPCR was standardized using EvaGreen DNA-binding dye to obtain melting temperature (Tm) of the STS previously mentioned. Three of the patients evaluated were detected to have partial microdeletion in the AZFa region, with a frequency of 8.8%; being losses in the G34990 section (one patient) and sY85 section (two patients). No cases of microdeletions in other AZF regions were found. The triplex qPCR optimizated allows the identification of microdeletions in AZFa, AZFb and AZFc region in infertile men and a better clinical management of the patient's treatment decision. This first report for Ecuador reveled a higher prevalence of microdeletions in the AZFa region in comparison with those previously described in other populations.

  13. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of a pseudogene related to the human Acyl-CoA binding protein/diazepam binding inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersuk, V.H. [Virginia Mason Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Rose, T.M.; Todaro, G.J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-01-20

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) and the diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) or endozepine are independent isolates of a single 86-amino-acid, 10-kDa protein. ACBP/DBI is highly conserved between species and has been identified in several diverse organisms, including human, cow, rat, frog, duck, insects, plants, and yeast. Although the genomic locus has not yet been cloned in humans, complementary DNA clones with different 5{prime} ends have been isolated and characterized. These cDNA clones appear to be encoded by a single gene. However, Southern blot analyses, in situ hybridizations, and somatic cell hybrid chromosomal mapping all suggest that there are multiple ACBP/DBI-related sequences in the genome. To identify potential members of this gene family, degenerate oligonucleotides corresponding to highly conserved regions of ACBP/DBI were used to screen a human genomic DNA library using the polymerase chain reaction. A novel gene, DBIP1, that is closely related to ACBP/DBI but is clearly distinct was identified. DBIP1 bears extensive sequence homology to ACBP/DBI but lacks the introns predicted by rat and duck genomic sequence studies. A 1-base deletion in the coding region results in a frameshift and, along with the absence of introns and the lack of a detectable transcript, suggests that DBIP1 is a pseudogene. ACBP/DBI has previously been mapped to chromosome 2, although this was recently disputed, and a chromosome 6 location was suggested. We show that ACBP/DBI is correctly placed on chromosome 2 and that the gene identified on chromosome 6 is DBIP1. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis; Dosimetria biologica de las radiaciones ionizantes mediante el analisis de aberraciones cromosomicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Castano, S.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1990-07-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y ={alpha} + {beta}{sub 1}D + {beta}{sub 2}D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs.

  15. Bearing Capacity Analysis Using Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mužík Juraj

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with use of the meshless method for soil bearing capacity analysis. There are many formulations of the meshless methods. The article presents the Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin method (MLPG - local weak formulation of the equilibrium equations. The main difference between meshless methods and the conventional finite element method (FEM is that meshless shape functions are constructed using randomly scattered set of points without any relation between points. The Heaviside step function is test function used in the meshless implementation presented in the article. Heaviside test function makes weak formulation integral very simple, because only body integral in governing equation is due a body force.

  16. Hybrid origin of European commercial pigs examined by an in-depth haplotype analysis on chromosome 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirte eBosse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although all farm animals have an original source of domestication, a large variety of modern breeds exists that are phenotypically highly distinct from the ancestral wild population. This phenomenon can be the result of artificial selection or gene flow from other sources into the domesticated population. The Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa has been domesticated at least twice in two geographically distinct regions during the Neolithic revolution when hunting shifted to farming. Prior to the establishment of the commercial European pig breeds we know today, some 200 years ago Chinese pigs were imported into Europe to improve local European pigs. Commercial European domesticated pigs are genetically more diverse than European wild boars, although historically the latter represents the source population for domestication. In this study we examine the cause of the higher diversity within the genomes of European commercial pigs compared to their wild ancestors by testing two different hypotheses. In the first hypothesis we consider that European commercial pigs are a mix of different European wild populations as a result of movement throughout Europe, hereby acquiring haplotypes from all over the European continent. As an alternative hypothesis, we examine whether the introgression of Asian haplotypes into European breeds during the Industrial Revolution caused the observed increase in diversity. By using re-sequence data for chromosome 1 of 136 pigs and wild boars, we show that an Asian introgression of about 20% into the genome of European commercial pigs explains the majority of the increase in genetic diversity. These findings confirm that the Asian hybridization, that was used to improve production traits of local breeds, left its signature in the genome of the commercial pigs we know today.

  17. Characterizing the chromosomes of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Daniel; Miethke, Pat; Alsop, Amber E; Rens, Willem; O'Brien, Patricia; Trifonov, Vladimir; Veyrunes, Frederic; Schatzkamer, Kyriena; Kremitzki, Colin L; Graves, Tina; Warren, Wesley; Grützner, Frank; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2007-01-01

    Like the unique platypus itself, the platypus genome is extraordinary because of its complex sex chromosome system, and is controversial because of difficulties in identification of small autosomes and sex chromosomes. A 6-fold shotgun sequence of the platypus genome is now available and is being assembled with the help of physical mapping. It is therefore essential to characterize the chromosomes and resolve the ambiguities and inconsistencies in identifying autosomes and sex chromosomes. We have used chromosome paints and DAPI banding to identify and classify pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes. We have established an agreed nomenclature and identified anchor BAC clones for each chromosome that will ensure unambiguous gene localizations.

  18. A comparative chromosome analysis of Thai wild boar (Sus scrofa jubatus and relationship to domestic pig (S. s. domestica by conventional staining, G-banding and high-resolution technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornnarong Siripiyasing

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is the first comparative chromosome analysis report of Thai wild boar (Sus scrofa jubatus and its relationship to domestic pig (S. s. domestica by conventional staining, G-banding and high-resolution technique. Blood samples of the Thai wild boar were taken from two males and two females kept in Nakhon Ratchasima Zoo. After standard whole blood lymphocyte culture at 37 oC for 72 hr. in the presence of colchicine, the metaphase spreads were performed on microscopic slides and airdried. Conventional staining, G-banding and high-resolution technique were applied to stain the chromosomes. The results showed that the number of diploid chromosomes of Thai wild boar was 2n (diploid = 38, and the fundamental numbers (NF were 62 in the male and female. The type of autosomes were 12 metacentric, 14 submetacentric, 4 acrocentric and 6 telocentric chromosomes, with X and Y chromosomes being metacentric chromosomes. We found that chromosomes 1, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, X and Y had the same Gbanding and high-resolution technique patterns as those of domestic pig chromosomes. Chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 15 are similar to those of domestic pig chromosomes. These results show the evolutionary relationship between the Thai wild boar and the domestic pig.

  19. The analysis of cultural architectural trends in Crisan locality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SELA Florentina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data about the identification and analyse of the traditional architectural elements in Crisan locality knowing that the tourism activity is in a continuous development. The field research (during November 2007 enabled us to develop a qualitative and quantitative analysis in terms of identification of traditional architecture elements, their conservation status, and frequency of traditional building materials use, decorative elements and specificcolors used in construction architecture. Further, based on collected data, was realized the chart - Distribution for TraditionalArchitecture Index (TAI on the distance from the center of Crisan locality, showing that in Crisan locality the houses were and are built without taking into account any rule, destroying thus traditional architecture.

  20. Expression and human chromosomal localization to 17q25 of the growth-regulated gene encoding the mitochondrial ribosomal protein MRPL12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, L.; Fort, P. [Institut de Genetique Moleculaire, Montpellier (France); Taviaux, S. [INSERM, Montpellier (France)

    1997-05-01

    Mitochondrial activity requires the expression of nuclear genes, whose products are part of multiproteic complexes leading to ATP production and delivery. We recently characterized a growth-activated mRNA encoding the human mitochondrial ribosomal MRPL12 protein, which is thought to act as a translational regulator of mitochondrial mRNAs. We show here that MRPL12 mRNA expression is enhanced in growth-stimulated cells as a result of transcriptional activation, a feature lost in transformed cell lines. MRPL12 mRNA is highly expressed in the colon, in which a reduction in mitochondrial activity was shown to be associated with tumor formation. The human MRPL12 protein is encoded by a unique gene located on chromosome 17 (q25-qter). As no predisposition to colon cancer linked to this chromosomal region was hitherto reported, the MRPL12 gene might be involved in the process of differentiation of colonic epithelial cells. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Genetic characterization of Polish ccRCC patients: somatic mutation analysis of PBRM1, BAP1 and KDMC5, genomic SNP array analysis in tumor biopsy and preliminary results of chromosome aberrations analysis in plasma cell free DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluzek, Katarzyna; Srebniak, Malgorzata I; Majer, Weronika; Ida, Agnieszka; Milecki, Tomasz; Huminska, Kinga; van der Helm, Robert M; Silesian, Adrian; Wrzesinski, Tomasz M; Wojciechowicz, Jacek; Beverloo, Berna H; Kwias, Zbigniew; Bluyssen, Hans A R; Wesoly, Joanna

    2017-04-25

    Mutation analysis and cytogenetic testing in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is not yet implemented in a routine diagnostics of ccRCC. We characterized the chromosomal alterations in 83 ccRCC tumors from Polish patients using whole genome SNP genotyping assay. Moreover, the utility of next generation sequencing of cell free DNA (cfDNA) in patients plasma as a potential tool for non-invasive cytogenetic analysis was tested. Additionally, tumor specific somatic mutations in PBRM1, BAP1 and KDM5C were determined. We confirmed a correlation between deletions at 9p and higher tumor size, and deletion of chromosome 20 and the survival time. In Fuhrman grade 1, only aberrations of 3p and 8p deletion, gain of 5q and 13q and gains of chromosome 7 and 16 were present. The number of aberrations increased with Fuhrman grade, all chromosomes displayed cytogenetic changes in G3 and G4. ccRCC specific chromosome aberrations were observed in cfDNA, although discrepancies were found between cfDNA and tumor samples. In total 12 common and 94 rare variants were detected in PBRM1, BAP1 and KDM5C, with four potentially pathogenic variants. We observed markedly lower mutation load in PBRM1. Cytogenetic analysis of cfDNA may allow more accurate diagnosis of tumor aberrations and therefore the correlation between the chromosome aberrations in cfDNA and clinical outcome should be studied in larger cohorts. The functional studies on in BAP1, KDM5C, PBRM1 mutations in large, independent sample set would be necessary for the assessment of their prognostic and diagnostic potential.

  2. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  3. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  4. Chromosomal differences between European and North American Atlantic salmon discovered by linkage mapping and supported by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenna-Hansen Silje

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographical isolation has generated a distinct difference between Atlantic salmon of European and North American Atlantic origin. The European Atlantic salmon generally has 29 pairs of chromosomes and 74 chromosome arms whereas it has been reported that the North American Atlantic salmon has 27 chromosome pairs and an NF of 72. In order to predict the major chromosomal rearrangements causing these differences, we constructed a dense linkage map for Atlantic salmon of North American origin and compared it with the well-developed map for European Atlantic salmon. Results The presented male and female genetic maps for the North American subspecies of Atlantic salmon, contains 3,662 SNPs located on 27 linkage groups. The total lengths of the female and male linkage maps were 2,153 cM and 968 cM respectively, with males characteristically showing recombination only at the telomeres. We compared these maps with recently published SNP maps from European Atlantic salmon, and predicted three chromosomal reorganization events that we then tested using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis. The proposed rearrangements, which define the differences in the karyotypes of the North American Atlantic salmon relative to the European Atlantic salmon, include the translocation of the p arm of ssa01 to ssa23 and polymorphic fusions: ssa26 with ssa28, and ssa08 with ssa29. Conclusions This study identified major chromosomal differences between European and North American Atlantic salmon. However, while gross structural differences were significant, the order of genetic markers at the fine-resolution scale was remarkably conserved. This is a good indication that information from the International Cooperation to Sequence the Atlantic salmon Genome, which is sequencing a European Atlantic salmon, can be transferred to Atlantic salmon from North America.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of familial dysautonomia by analysis of linked CA-repeat polymorphisms on chromosome 9q31-q33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, C.M.; Desnick, R.J. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Slaugenhaupt, S.A.; Gusella, J.F. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-20

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is an autosomal recessive sensory neuropathy that affects about 1 in 3,700 individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. The underlying biochemical and genetic defects are unknown, thereby precluding prenatal diagnosis in at-risk families. Recently, the FD gene (DYS) was mapped with strong linkage disequilibrium to polymorphic markers in the chromosome 9 region q31-q33. In this report, the use of these markers for the prenatal diagnosis of FD by linkage analysis in families with a previously affected child was evaluated. Genomic DNA from appropriate family members was analyzed to construct haplotypes using informative CA repeat polymorphisms closely linked to and flanking the FD locus. The calculation of risk for the prenatal diagnoses was performed by linkage analysis. All seven FD families were informative for the closely linked polymorphic markers and fetal diagnoses were made in eight pregnancies. Six fetal diagnoses were predicted with >98% accuracy, while two with recombinations were predicted with at least 88% and 92% accuracy. Use of these closely linked markers permitted the reliable prenatal diagnosis of FD in families with a previously affected child. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Variation, Evolution, and Correlation Analysis of C+G Content and Genome or Chromosome Size in Different Kingdoms and Phyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Du, Donglei

    2014-01-01

    C+G content (GC content or G+C content) is known to be correlated with genome/chromosome size in bacteria but the relationship for other kingdoms remains unclear. This study analyzed genome size, chromosome size, and base composition in most of the available sequenced genomes in various kingdoms. Genome size tends to increase during evolution in plants and animals, and the same is likely true for bacteria. The genomic C+G contents were found to vary greatly in microorganisms but were quite similar within each animal or plant subkingdom. In animals and plants, the C+G contents are ranked as follows: monocot plants>mammals>non-mammalian animals>dicot plants. The variation in C+G content between chromosomes within species is greater in animals than in plants. The correlation between average chromosome C+G content and chromosome length was found to be positive in Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria (but not in other analyzed bacterial phyla), Ascomycota fungi, and likely also in some plants; negative in some animals, insignificant in two protist phyla, and likely very weak in Archaea. Clearly, correlations between C+G content and chromosome size can be positive, negative, or not significant depending on the kingdoms/groups or species. Different phyla or species exhibit different patterns of correlation between chromosome-size and C+G content. Most chromosomes within a species have a similar pattern of variation in C+G content but outliers are common. The data presented in this study suggest that the C+G content is under genetic control by both trans- and cis- factors and that the correlation between C+G content and chromosome length can be positive, negative, or not significant in different phyla. PMID:24551092

  7. Minimization of local impact of energy systems through exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassetti, Gabriele; Colombo, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The model proposed aims at minimizing local impact of energy systems. • The model is meant to minimize the impact starting from system thermodynamics. • The formulation combines exergy analysis and quantitative risk analysis. • The approach of the model is dual to Thermoeconomics. - Abstract: For the acceptability of energy systems, environmental impacts are becoming more and more important. One primary way for reducing impacts related to processes is by improving efficiency of plants. A key instrument currently used to verify such improvements is exergy analysis, extended to include also the environmental externalities generated by systems. Through exergy-based analyses, it is possible indeed to evaluate the overall amount of resources consumed along all the phases of the life cycle of a system, from construction to dismantling. However, resource consumption is a dimension of the impact of a system at global level, while it may not be considered a measure of its local impact. In the paper a complementary approach named Combined Risk and Exergy Analysis (CRExA) to assess impacts from major accidents in energy systems is proposed, based on the combination of classical exergy analysis and quantitative risk analysis (QRA). Impacts considered are focused on effects on human health. The approach leads to the identification of solutions to minimize damages of major accidents by acting on the energy system design

  8. Biodosimetry estimation using the ratio of the longest:shortest length in the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method applying autocapture and automatic image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jorge E; Romero, Ivonne; Gregoire, Eric; Martin, Cécile; Lamadrid, Ana I; Voisin, Philippe; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; García, Omar

    2014-09-01

    The combination of automatic image acquisition and automatic image analysis of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) spreads was tested as a rapid biodosimeter protocol. Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with (60)Co gamma rays in a single dose of between 1 and 20 Gy, stimulated with phytohaemaglutinin and incubated for 48 h, division blocked with Colcemid, and PCC-induced by Calyculin A. Images of chromosome spreads were captured and analysed automatically by combining the Metafer 4 and CellProfiler platforms. Automatic measurement of chromosome lengths allows the calculation of the length ratio (LR) of the longest and the shortest piece that can be used for dose estimation since this ratio is correlated with ionizing radiation dose. The LR of the longest and the shortest chromosome pieces showed the best goodness-of-fit to a linear model in the dose interval tested. The application of the automatic analysis increases the potential use of the PCC method for triage in the event of massive radiation causalities. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  9. Analysis of complex-type chromosome exchanges in astronauts' lymphocytes after space flight as a biomarker of high-LET exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Willingham, Veronica; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    High-LET radiation is more efficient in producing complex-type chromosome exchanges than sparsely ionizing radiation, and this can potentially be used as a biomarker of radiation quality. To investigate if complex chromosome exchanges are induced by the high-LET component of space radiation exposure, damage was assessed in astronauts' blood lymphocytes before and after long duration missions of 3-4 months. The frequency of simple translocations increased significantly for most of the crewmembers studied. However, there were few complex exchanges detected and only one crewmember had a significant increase after flight. It has been suggested that the yield of complex chromosome damage could be underestimated when analyzing metaphase cells collected at one time point after irradiation, and analysis of chemically-induced PCC may be more accurate since problems with complicated cell-cycle delays are avoided. However, in this case the yields of chromosome damage were similar for metaphase and PCC analysis of astronauts' lymphocytes. It appears that the use of complex-type exchanges as biomarker of radiation quality in vivo after low-dose chronic exposure in mixed radiation fields is hampered by statistical uncertainties.

  10. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship between the H. sapiens and monkey. This similarity will be helpful at theft identification, maternity identification, disease identification, etc.

  11. Analysis of positional candidate genes in the AAA1 susceptibility locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms on chromosome 19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a complex disorder with multiple genetic risk factors. Using affected relative pair linkage analysis, we previously identified an AAA susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13. This locus has been designated as the AAA1 susceptibility locus in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database. Methods Nine candidate genes were selected from the AAA1 locus based on their function, as well as mRNA expression levels in the aorta. A sample of 394 cases and 419 controls was genotyped for 41 SNPs located in or around the selected nine candidate genes using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Single marker and haplotype analyses were performed. Three genes (CEBPG, PEPD and CD22 were selected for DNA sequencing based on the association study results, and exonic regions were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic tissue sections from AAA and control individuals was carried out for the CD22 and PEPD proteins with specific antibodies. Results Several SNPs were nominally associated with AAA (p CEBPG, peptidase D (PEPD, and CD22. Haplotype analysis found a nominally associated 5-SNP haplotype in the CEBPG/PEPD locus, as well as a nominally associated 2-SNP haplotype in the CD22 locus. DNA sequencing of the coding regions revealed no variation in CEBPG. Seven sequence variants were identified in PEPD, including three not present in the NCBI SNP (dbSNP database. Sequencing of all 14 exons of CD22 identified 20 sequence variants, five of which were in the coding region and six were in the 3'-untranslated region. Five variants were not present in dbSNP. Immunohistochemical staining for CD22 revealed protein expression in lymphocytes present in the aneurysmal aortic wall only and no detectable expression in control aorta. PEPD protein was expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the media-adventitia border in both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal tissue samples. Conclusions Association testing

  12. Sequencing and association analysis of the type 1 diabetes – linked region on chromosome 10p12-q11

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    Barratt Bryan J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to locate susceptibility genes for type 1 diabetes (T1D several genome-wide linkage scans have been undertaken. A chromosomal region designated IDDM10 retained genome-wide significance in a combined analysis of the main linkage scans. Here, we studied sequence polymorphisms in 23 Mb on chromosome 10p12-q11, including the putative IDDM10 region, to identify genes associated with T1D. Results Initially, we resequenced the functional candidate genes, CREM and SDF1, located in this region, genotyped 13 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and found no association with T1D. We then undertook analysis of the whole 23 Mb region. We constructed and sequenced a contig tile path from two bacterial artificial clone libraries. By comparison with a clone library from an unrelated person used in the Human Genome Project, we identified 12,058 SNPs. We genotyped 303 SNPs and 25 polymorphic microsatellite markers in 765 multiplex T1D families and followed up 22 associated polymorphisms in up to 2,857 families. We found nominal evidence of association in six loci (P = 0.05 – 0.0026, located near the PAPD1 gene. Therefore, we resequenced 38.8 kb in this region, found 147 SNPs and genotyped 84 of them in the T1D families. We also tested 13 polymorphisms in the PAPD1 gene and in five other loci in 1,612 T1D patients and 1,828 controls from the UK. Overall, only the D10S193 microsatellite marker located 28 kb downstream of PAPD1 showed nominal evidence of association in both T1D families and in the case-control sample (P = 0.037 and 0.03, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that polymorphisms in the CREM and SDF1 genes have no major effect on T1D. The weak T1D association that we detected in the association scan near the PAPD1 gene may be either false or due to a small genuine effect, and cannot explain linkage at the IDDM10 region.

  13. Nanoscale SIMS analysis: the next generation in local analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, M.; Tomiyasu, B.; Kanda, Y.; Owari, M.; Nihei, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) provides very sensitive chemical and elemental information. Nanoscale SIMS analysis is, however, very difficult to carry out by conventional methods, mainly because of the primary beam diameter and vibrations. In our work, we used the latest technology for focused ion beam (FIB) formation, which realizes nanoscale beam diameter. Our detection system (Mattauch-Herzog type mass-analyzer and 120-channel parallel detector) realizes highly sensitive parallel-mass-detection with parallel counting units. In order to minimize the influence of vibrations, the sample was mounted on the end cap of FIB column directly. Under this condition, the ion induced secondary electron image of a vacuum-evaporated Au film on a carbon plate was obtained without the influence of vibrations. The beam profile and a secondary ion image of the IC pattern was obtained using same geometry. The lateral resolution was estimated to be 30 nm at worst. As a result, simultaneous multi-elemental measurements on nanoscale dimension became possible

  14. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of a familial duplication of chromosome 13q: A recognizable syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, Inge B.; Hoovers, Jan M. N.; Mul, Adri N. P. M.; Man, Hai-Yen; Ket, Jan L.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a family with six persons in three generations who have mild mental retardation, behavioral problems, seizures, hearing loss, strabismus, dental anomalies, hypermobility, juvenile hallux valgus, and mild dysmorphic features. Classical cytogenetic analysis showed a partial duplication of

  15. A 4 Mb High Resolution BAC Contig on Bovine Chromosome 1q12 and Comparative Analysis With Human Chromosome 21q22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottmar Distl

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The bovine RPCI-42 BAC library was screened to construct a sequence-ready ~4 Mb single contig of 92 BAC clones on BTA 1q12. The contig covers the region between the genes KRTAP8P1 and CLIC6. This genomic segment in cattle is of special interest as it contains the dominant gene responsible for the hornless or polled phenotype in cattle. The construction of the BAC contig was initiated by screening the bovine BAC library with heterologous cDNA probes derived from 12 human genes of the syntenic region on HSA 21q22. Contig building was facilitated by BAC end sequencing and chromosome walking. During the construction of the contig, 165 BAC end sequences and 109 single-copy STS markers were generated. For comparative mapping of 25 HSA 21q22 genes, genomic PCR primers were designed from bovine EST sequences and the gene-associated STSs mapped on the contig. Furthermore, bovine BAC end sequence comparisons against the human genome sequence revealed significant matches to HSA 21q22 and allowed the in silico mapping of two new genes in cattle. In total, 31 orthologues of human genes located on HSA 21q22 were directly mapped within the bovine BAC contig, of which 16 genes have been cloned and mapped for the first time in cattle. In contrast to the existing comparative bovine–human RH maps of this region, these results provide a better alignment and reveal a completely conserved gene order in this 4 Mb segment between cattle, human and mouse. The mapping of known polled linked BTA 1q12 microsatellite markers allowed the integration of the physical contig map with existing linkage maps of this region and also determined the exact order of these markers for the first time. Our physical map and transcript map may be useful for positional cloning of the putative polled gene in cattle. The nucleotide sequence data reported in this paper have been submitted to EMBL and have been assigned Accession Numbers AJ698510–AJ698674.

  16. Analysis of Kerch by Local Indicators of Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazygula, E.; Kharlamova, M.; Kozlova, E.

    2017-11-01

    This article presents an analysis of the city of Kerch (Crimea Republic, Kerch Peninsula) in accordance with the local sustainable development indicators. The authors carried out the assessment of the existing environmental problems in the city which was necessary for the further development of the environmentally oriented infrastructure under various development scenarios. Due to the natural and economic factors, Kerch can develop both as an industrial and recreational centre of the peninsula. The analysis of the atmospheric air condition, use of water and energy resources and the waste management system was conducted. The presented results showed the presence of major environmental problems in almost all spheres.

  17. High-throughput analysis of subtelomeric chromosome rearrangements by use of array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Eussen, B.H.; Janssen, I.M.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Cleef, B. van; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Brunner, H.G.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Telomeric chromosome rearrangements may cause mental retardation, congenital anomalies, and miscarriages. Automated detection of subtle deletions or duplications involving telomeres is essential for high-throughput diagnosis, but impossible when conventional cytogenetic methods are used. Array-based

  18. Chromosomal analysis of Astyanax fasciatus (PISCES, CHARACIDAE from the Araguari river, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Torres-Mariano

    Full Text Available The genus Astyanax is one of the most numerous of the family Characidae, comprising a large number of similar-shaped species, but displaying innumerable karyotypic variations in its chromosome number and/or structure. The literature describes A. fasciatus populations with diploid chromosome numbers varying from 2n = 45 to 2n = 48. In this study, A. fasciatus specimens captured in the Araguari River (Alto Paraná basin were cytogenetically characterized, revealing a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 46. The nucleolar organizing regions (NORs, detected with silver nitrate staining, showed a multiple system with two pairs of marked chromosomes. These findings are congruent with those of other studies involving populations of the same species.

  19. Local classification: Locally weighted-partial least squares-discriminant analysis (LW-PLS-DA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Marta; Marini, Federico

    2014-08-01

    The possibility of devising a simple, flexible and accurate non-linear classification method, by extending the locally weighted partial least squares (LW-PLS) approach to the cases where the algorithm is used in a discriminant way (partial least squares discriminant analysis, PLS-DA), is presented. In particular, to assess which category an unknown sample belongs to, the proposed algorithm operates by identifying which training objects are most similar to the one to be predicted and building a PLS-DA model using these calibration samples only. Moreover, the influence of the selected training samples on the local model can be further modulated by adopting a not uniform distance-based weighting scheme which allows the farthest calibration objects to have less impact than the closest ones. The performances of the proposed locally weighted-partial least squares-discriminant analysis (LW-PLS-DA) algorithm have been tested on three simulated data sets characterized by a varying degree of non-linearity: in all cases, a classification accuracy higher than 99% on external validation samples was achieved. Moreover, when also applied to a real data set (classification of rice varieties), characterized by a high extent of non-linearity, the proposed method provided an average correct classification rate of about 93% on the test set. By the preliminary results, showed in this paper, the performances of the proposed LW-PLS-DA approach have proved to be comparable and in some cases better than those obtained by other non-linear methods (k nearest neighbors, kernel-PLS-DA and, in the case of rice, counterpropagation neural networks). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of morphine responses in mice reveals a QTL on Chromosome 7 [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Wim E. Crusio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL on mouse Chromosome 7 associated with locomotor activity and rearing post morphine treatment. This QTL was revealed after correcting for the effects of another QTL peak on Chromosome 10 using composite interval mapping. The positional candidate genes are Syt9 and Ppfibp2. Several other genes within the interval are linked to neural processes, locomotor activity, and the defensive response to harmful stimuli.

  1. Analysis of morphine responses in mice reveals a QTL on Chromosome 7 [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim E. Crusio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL on mouse Chromosome 7 associated with locomotor activity and rearing post morphine treatment. This QTL was revealed after correcting for the effects of another QTL peak on Chromosome 10 using composite interval mapping. The positional candidate genes are Syt9 and Ppfibp2. Several other genes within the interval are linked to neural processes, locomotor activity, and the defensive response to harmful stimuli.

  2. A Meta-Analysis of Local Climate Change Adaptation Actions ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Local governments are beginning to take steps to address the consequences of climate change, such as sea level rise and heat events. However, we do not have a clear understanding of what local governments are doing -- the extent to which they expect climate change to affect their community, the types of actions they have in place to address climate change, and the resources at their disposal for implementation. Several studies have been conducted by academics, non-governmental organizations, and public agencies to assess the status of local climate change adaptation. This project collates the findings from dozens of such studies to conduct a meta-analysis of local climate change adaptation actions. The studies will be characterized along several dimensions, including (a) methods used, (b) timing and geographic scope, (c) topics covered, (d) types of adaptation actions identified, (e) implementation status, and (f) public engagement and environmental justice dimensions considered. The poster presents the project's rationale and approach and some illustrative findings from early analyses. [Note: The document being reviewed is an abstract in which a poster is being proposed. The poster will enter clearance if the abstract is accepted] The purpose of this poster is to present the research framework and approaches I am developing for my ORISE postdoctoral project, and to get feedback on early analyses.

  3. Asymptotically optimal data analysis for rejecting local realism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanbao [Department of Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Applied and Computational Mathematics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Glancy, Scott; Knill, Emanuel [Applied and Computational Mathematics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Reliable experimental demonstrations of violations of local realism are highly desirable for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. One can quantify the violation witnessed by an experiment in terms of a statistical p value, which can be defined as the maximum probability according to local realism of a violation at least as high as that witnessed. Thus, high violation corresponds to small p value. We propose a prediction-based-ratio (PBR) analysis protocol whose p values are valid even if the prepared quantum state varies arbitrarily and local realistic models can depend on previous measurement settings and outcomes. It is therefore not subject to the memory loophole [J. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. A 66, 042111 (2002)]. If the prepared state does not vary in time, the p values are asymptotically optimal. For comparison, we consider protocols derived from the number of standard deviations of violation of a Bell inequality and from martingale theory [R. Gill, e-print arXiv:quant-ph/0110137]. We find that the p values of the former can be too small and are therefore not statistically valid, while those derived from the latter are suboptimal. PBR p values do not require a predetermined Bell inequality and can be used to compare results from different tests of local realism independent of experimental details.

  4. Asymptotically optimal data analysis for rejecting local realism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanbao; Glancy, Scott; Knill, Emanuel

    2011-01-01

    Reliable experimental demonstrations of violations of local realism are highly desirable for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. One can quantify the violation witnessed by an experiment in terms of a statistical p value, which can be defined as the maximum probability according to local realism of a violation at least as high as that witnessed. Thus, high violation corresponds to small p value. We propose a prediction-based-ratio (PBR) analysis protocol whose p values are valid even if the prepared quantum state varies arbitrarily and local realistic models can depend on previous measurement settings and outcomes. It is therefore not subject to the memory loophole [J. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. A 66, 042111 (2002)]. If the prepared state does not vary in time, the p values are asymptotically optimal. For comparison, we consider protocols derived from the number of standard deviations of violation of a Bell inequality and from martingale theory [R. Gill, e-print arXiv:quant-ph/0110137]. We find that the p values of the former can be too small and are therefore not statistically valid, while those derived from the latter are suboptimal. PBR p values do not require a predetermined Bell inequality and can be used to compare results from different tests of local realism independent of experimental details.

  5. Meta-Analysis of Results from Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Studies on Pig Chromosome 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moraes Silva, De K.M.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Knol, E.F.; Merks, J.W.M.; Lopes, P.S.; Guimaraes, R.M.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Meta-analysis of results from multiple studies could lead to more precise quantitative trait loci (QTL) position estimates compared to the individual experiments. As the raw data from many different studies are not readily available, the use of results from published articles may be helpful. In this

  6. High-Throughput Analysis of DNA Break-Induced Chromosome Rearrangements by Amplicon Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexander J; Al-Soodani, Aneesa T; Saul, Miles; Her, Stephanie; Garcia, Juan C; Ramsden, Dale A; Her, Chengtao; Roberts, Steven A

    2018-01-01

    The mechanistic understanding of how DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are repaired is rapidly advancing in part due to the advent of inducible site-specific break model systems as well as the employment of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to sequence repair junctions at high depth. Unfortunately, the sheer volume of data produced by these methods makes it difficult to analyze the structure of repair junctions manually or with other general-purpose software. Here, we describe methods to produce amplicon libraries of DSB repair junctions for sequencing, to map the sequencing reads, and then to use a robust, custom python script, Hi-FiBR, to analyze the sequence structure of mapped reads. The Hi-FiBR analysis processes large data sets quickly and provides information such as number and type of repair events, size of deletion, size of insertion and inserted sequence, microhomology usage, and whether mismatches are due to sequencing error or biological effect. The analysis also corrects for common alignment errors generated by sequencing read mapping tools, allowing high-throughput analysis of DSB break repair fidelity to be accurately conducted regardless of which suite of NGS analysis software is available. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential chromosomal introgression barriers revealed by linkage analysis in a hybrid of Pinus massoniana and P. hwangshanensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuxian; Chen, Ying; Gao, Handong; Yin, Tongming

    2010-02-25

    Exploring the genetic mechanisms underlying speciation is a hot topic in modern genetics and evolutionary studies. Distortion of marker transmission ratio is frequently ascribed to selection against alleles that cause hybrid incompatibility. The natural introgression between P. massoniana and P. hwangshanensis and their distribution ranges lead to the emergence of the two species as desirable organisms to study the genetic mechanisms for speciation. Using seeds sampled from trees at different elevations, we consistently detected sharp decreases in seed germination rates of trees in the hybrid zone, which might be due largely to the hybrid incompatibility. A genetic map was established using 192 megagametophytes from a single tree in the hybrid zone of the two species. Segregation distortion analysis revealed that the percentage of significant-segregation-distortion (SSD) markers was extremely high, accounting for more than 25% of the segregating markers. The extension range, the distortion direction, and the distortion intensity of SSD markers also varied dramatically on different linkage groups. In this study, we display the potential chromosomal introgression barriers between P. massoniana and P. hwangshanensis. Our study provides a valuable platform for conducting genome-wide association of hybrid incompatible QTLs and/or candidate genes with marker transmission ratio distortion in the hybrid.

  8. Potential chromosomal introgression barriers revealed by linkage analysis in a hybrid of Pinus massoniana and P. hwangshanensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Tongming

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exploring the genetic mechanisms underlying speciation is a hot topic in modern genetics and evolutionary studies. Distortion of marker transmission ratio is frequently ascribed to selection against alleles that cause hybrid incompatibility. The natural introgression between P. massoniana and P. hwangshanensis and their distribution ranges lead to the emergence of the two species as desirable organisms to study the genetic mechanisms for speciation. Results Using seeds sampled from trees at different elevations, we consistently detected sharp decreases in seed germination rates of trees in the hybrid zone, which might be due largely to the hybrid incompatibility. A genetic map was established using 192 megagametophytes from a single tree in the hybrid zone of the two species. Segregation distortion analysis revealed that the percentage of significant-segregation-distortion (SSD markers was extremely high, accounting for more than 25% of the segregating markers. The extension range, the distortion direction, and the distortion intensity of SSD markers also varied dramatically on different linkage groups. Conclusions In this study, we display the potential chromosomal introgression barriers between P. massoniana and P. hwangshanensis. Our study provides a valuable platform for conducting genome-wide association of hybrid incompatible QTLs and/or candidate genes with marker transmission ratio distortion in the hybrid.

  9. Comparing seven mitogens with PHA-M for improved lymphocyte stimulation in dicentric chromosome analysis for bio-dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beinke, C.; Port, M.; Lamkowski, A.; Abend, M.

    2016-01-01

    Dicentric chromosome analysis (DCA) is the gold standard for individual radiation dose estimation. Two limiting factors of DCA are the time-consuming lymphocyte stimulation and proliferation using the lectin PHA-M and the upper dose limit of individual dose assessment of ∼4 Gy. By measuring the mitotic index (MI), the authors investigated systematically whether the stimulation of lymphocytes can be improved after administration of alternative (and combined) mitogens. The authors compared the lymphocyte stimulation effectiveness of the traditionally used PHA-M (from Phaseolus vulgaris) with seven cited mitogens by determination of MIs: five lectins namely CNA (concanavalin A), PW (pokeweed), LMA (Maackia amurensis), LTV (T. vulgaris), PHA-L (P. vulgaris) as well as LPS (lipopolysaccharide, Escherichia coli) and SLO (strepto-lysine O, Streptococcus pyogenes) were applied. The conventional protocol using PHA-M for lymphocyte stimulation proved to be superior over lower/higher PHA-M concentrations as well as seven other mitogens administered either alone or combined with SLO or LPS. (authors)

  10. Recent Male-Mediated Gene Flow over a Linguistic Barrier in Iberia, Suggested by Analysis of a Y-Chromosomal DNA Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurles, Matthew E.; Veitia, Reiner; Arroyo, Eduardo; Armenteros, Manuel; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Pérez-Lezaun, Anna; Bosch, Elena; Shlumukova, Maria; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; McElreavey, Ken; López de Munain, Adolfo; Röhl, Arne; Wilson, Ian J.; Singh, Lalji; Pandya, Arpita; Santos, Fabrício R.; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Summary We have examined the worldwide distribution of a Y-chromosomal base-substitution polymorphism, the T/C transition at SRY-2627, where the T allele defines haplogroup 22; sequencing of primate homologues shows that the ancestral state cannot be determined unambiguously but is probably the C allele. Of 1,191 human Y chromosomes analyzed, 33 belong to haplogroup 22. Twenty-nine come from Iberia, and the highest frequencies are in Basques (11%; n=117) and Catalans (22%; n=32). Microsatellite and minisatellite (MSY1) diversity analysis shows that non-Iberian haplogroup-22 chromosomes are not significantly different from Iberian ones. The simplest interpretation of these data is that haplogroup 22 arose in Iberia and that non-Iberian cases reflect Iberian emigrants. Several different methods were used to date the origin of the polymorphism: microsatellite data gave ages of 1,650, 2,700, 3,100, or 3,450 years, and MSY1 gave ages of 1,000, 2,300, or 2,650 years, although 95% confidence intervals on all of these figures are wide. The age of the split between Basque and Catalan haplogroup-22 chromosomes was calculated as only 20% of the age of the lineage as a whole. This study thus provides evidence for direct or indirect gene flow over the substantial linguistic barrier between the Indo-European and non–Indo-European–speaking populations of the Catalans and the Basques, during the past few thousand years. PMID:10521311

  11. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of a member of the MAP kinase phosphatase gene family to human chromosome 11p15.5 and a pseudogene to 10q11.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesbit, M. A.; Hodges, M. D.; Campbell, L.; de Meulemeester, T. M.; Alders, M.; Rodrigues, N. R.; Talbot, K.; Theodosiou, A. M.; Mannens, M. A.; Nakamura, Y.; Little, P. F.; Davies, K. E.

    1997-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs) play a central role in a variety of signaling pathways. We recently described a novel murine MKP, M3/6, which is uniquely specific for c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase and p38 kinase. Here we report the localization of the

  12. CHROMOSOME STUDY OF SOME GRASSHOPPER SPECIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, this research is aimed at studying the chromosomes of some Ethiopian grasshopper species. The grasshopper specimens used in this study were collected from eight localities in central Ethiopia. The specimens were identified as belonging to two families (Acrididae and Tetrigidae). Chromosome preparations were ...

  13. Analysis of local influences in structural details of the bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam RUDZIK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the problems of local influences in structural details of bridges as the critical locations, whose damages or excessive force may directly affect the safety of users. These analyses are shown on selected examples. Presented is the example of local changes in the forms of proper vibrations in the node of the truss bridge that can be used in expert issues concerning the causes of damages. The second example are the changes in stresses in the stay cable anchorage element including the nonlinear material models. Models of this type can be successfully used by engineers as they allow for analysis of selected structural details without the need for detailed mapping of the entire structure, but only a selected section.

  14. Evolutionary dynamics of autosomal-heterosomal rearrangements in a multiple-X chromosome system of tiger beetles (Cicindelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogler Alfried P

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic systems involving multiple X chromosomes have arisen repeatedly in sexually reproducing animals. Tiger beetles (Cicindelidae exhibit a phylogenetically ancient multiple-X system typically consisting of 2–4 X chromosomes and a single Y. Because recombination rates are suppressed in sex chromosomes, changes in their numbers and movement of genes between sex chromosomes and autosomes, could have important consequences for gene evolution and rates of speciation induced by these rearrangements. However, it remains unclear how frequent these rearrangements are and which genes are affected. Results Karyotype analyses were performed for a total of 26 North American species in the highly diverse genus Cicindela, tallying the number of X chromosomes and autosomes during mitosis and meiosis. The chromosomal location of the ribosomal rRNA gene cluster (rDNA was used as an easily scored marker for genic turnover between sex chromosomes or autosomes. The findings were assessed in the light of a recent phylogenetic analysis of the group. While autosome numbers remained constant throughout the lineage, sex chromosome numbers varied. The predominant karyotype was n = 9+X1X2X3Y which was also inferred to be the ancestral state, with several changes to X1X2Y and X1X2X3X4Y confined to phylogenetically isolated species. The total (haploid numbers of rDNA clusters varied between two, three, and six (in one exceptional case, and clusters were localized either on the autosomes, the sex chromosomes, or both. Transitions in rDNA localization and in numbers of rDNA clusters varied independently of each other, and also independently of changes in sex chromosome numbers. Conclusion Changes of X chromosome numbers and transposition of the rDNA locus (and presumably other genes between autosomes and sex chromosomes in Cicindela occur frequently, and are likely to be the result of fusions or fissions between X chromosomes, rather than between sex

  15. Rapid Simultaneous Amplification and Detection of the MBR/JH Chromosomal Translocation by Fluorescence Melting Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohling, Sandra D.; King, Thomas C.; Wittwer, Carl T.; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and product analysis for the detection of chromosomal translocations, such as the t(14;18), has traditionally been a two-step process. PCR product detection has generally entailed gel electrophoresis and/or hybridization or sequencing for confirmation of assay specificity. Using a microvolume fluorimeter integrated with a thermal cycler and a PCR-compatible double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding fluorescent dye (SYBR Green I), we investigated the feasibility of simultaneous thermal amplification and detection of MBR/JH translocation products by fluorescence melting curve analysis. We analyzed DNA from 30 cases of lymphoproliferative disorders comprising 19 cases of previously documented MBR/JH-positive follicle center lymphoma and 11 reactive lymphadenopathies. The samples were coded and analyzed blindly for the presence of MBR/JH translocations by fluorescence melting curve analysis. We also performed dilutional assays using the MBR/JH-positive cell line SUDHL-6. Multiplex PCR for MBR/JH and β-globin was used to simultaneously assess sample adequacy. All (100%) of the 19 cases previously determined to be MBR/JH positive by conventional PCR analysis showed a characteristic sharp decrease in fluorescence at ∼90°C by melting curve analysis after amplification. Fluorescence melting peaks obtained by plotting the negative derivative of fluorescence over temperature (−dF/dT) versus temperature (T) showed melting temperatures (Tm) at 88.85 ± 1.15°C. In addition, multiplex assays using both MBR/JH and β-globin primers yielded easily distinguishable fluorescence melting peaks at ∼90°C and 81.2°C, respectively. Dilutional assays revealed that fluorescence melting curve analysis was more sensitive than conventional PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis with ultraviolet transillumination by as much as 100-fold. Simultaneous amplification and fluorescence melting curve analysis is a simple, reliable, and sensitive method

  16. Molecular cytogenetic analysis reveals the existence of two independent neo-XY sex chromosome systems in Anatolian Pamphagidae grasshoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetybayev, Ilyas Yerkinovich; Bugrov, Alexander Gennadievich; Ünal, Mustafa; Buleu, Olesya Georgievna; Rubtsov, Nikolay Borisovich

    2017-02-07

    Neo-XY sex chromosome determination is a rare event in short horned grasshoppers, but it appears with unusual frequency in the Pamphagidae family. The neo-Y chromosomes found in several species appear to have undergone heterochromatinization and degradation, but this subject needs to be analyzed in other Pamphagidae species. We perform here karyotyping and molecular cytogenetic analyses in 12 Pamphagidae species from the center of biodiversity of this group in the previously-unstudied Anatolian plateau. The basal karyotype for the Pamphagidae family, consisting of 18 acrocentric autosomes and an acrocentric X chromosome (2n♂ = 19, X0; 2n♀ = 20, XX), was found only in G. adaliae. The karyotype of all other studied species consisted of 16 acrocentric autosomes and a neo-XY sex chromosome system (2n♂♀ = 18, neo-XX♀/neo-XY♂). Two different types of neo-Y chromosomes were found. One of them was typical for three species of the Glyphotmethis genus, and showed a neo-Y chromosome being similar in size to the XR arm of the neo-X, with the addition of two small subproximal interstitial C-blocks. The second type of the neo-Y chromosome was smaller and more heterochromatinized than the XR arm, and was typical for all Nocarodeini species studied. The chromosome distribution of C-positive regions and clusters of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and telomeric repeats yielded additional information on evolution of these neo-XY systems. Most Pamphagidae species in the Anatolian region were found to have neo-XY sex chromosome systems, belonging to two different evolutionary lineages, marked by independent X-autosome fusion events occurred within the Trinchinae and Pamphaginae subfamilies. The high density of species carrying neo-XY systems in the Anatolian region, and the different evolutionary stage for the two lineages found, one being older than the other, indicates that this region has a long history of neo-XY sex chromosome formation.

  17. Localization of a new type of X-linked liver glycogenosis to the chromosomal region Xp22 containing the liver {alpha}-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (PHKA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, J.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.J. [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe here a new type of X-linked liver glycogen storage disease. The main symptoms include liver enlargement and growth retardation. The clinical and biochemical abnormalities of this glycogenosis are similar to those of classical X-linked liver glycogenosis due to phosphorylase kinase deficiency (XLG). However, in constrast to patients with XLG, the patients described here have no reduced phosphorylase kinase activity in erythrocytes and leukocytes, and no enzyme deficiency could be found. Linkage analysis of four families with this X-linked type of liver glycogenosis assigned the disease gene to Xp22. Lod scores obtained with the markers DXS987, DXS207, and DXS999 were 3.97, 2.71, and 2.40, respectively, all at 0% recombination. Multipoint linkage analysis localized the disease gene between DXS143 and DXS989 with a maximum lod score of 4.70 at {theta}=0, relative to DXS987. As both the classical XLG gene and the liver {alpha}-subunit of PHK (PHKA2) are also located in Xp22, this variant type of XLG may be allelic to classical XLG, and both diseases may be caused by mutations in PHKA2. Therefore, they propose to classify XLG as XLG type I (the classical type of XLG) and XLG type II (the variant type of XLG). 28 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Chromosomal analysis and application of biological dosimetry in two cases of apparent over exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M.

    2002-01-01

    The gamma radiation calibration curve of 60 Co is used which was generated in the ININ Laboratory of Biology to calculate the exposure dose of two workers whose dosemeters marked values above of the limit allowed. The analysis indicates that in a first case, the aberrations frequency corresponded to the basal value, therefore there is not over exposure. The aberrations frequency of the second case is lightly above to the basal value and therefore the probability favors to what the physical dosimetry indicates. (Author)

  19. Human synaptonemal complex protein 1 (SCP1): Isolation and characterization of the cDNA and chromosomal localization of the gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuwissen, R.L.J.; Meerts, I.; Heyting, C. [Agricultural Univ., Wageningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Synaptonemal complexes (SCs) are structures that are formed between homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiotic prophase. They consist of two proteinaceous axes, one along each homolog, that are connected along their length by numerous transverse filaments (TFs). The cDNA encoding one major component of TFs of SCs of the rat, rnSCP1, has recently been isolated and characterized. In this paper we describe the isolation and characterization of the cDNA encoding the human protein homologous to rnSCP1, hsSCP1. hsSCP1 and rnSCP1 have 75% amino acid identity. The most prominent structural features and amino acid sequence motifs of rnSCP1 have been conserved in hsSCP1. Most probably, hsSCP1 is functionally homologous to rnSCP1. The hsSCP1 gene was assigned to human chromosome 1p12-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  20. The hippocampi of children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have localized anterior alterations that predict severity of anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Julia A; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi; Kalish, Kristopher; Lee, Aaron; Hunsaker, Michael R; Schumann, Cynthia M; Carmichael, Owen T; Simon, Tony J

    2016-04-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have an elevated risk for schizophrenia, which increases with history of childhood anxiety. Altered hippocampal morphology is a common neuroanatomical feature of 22q11.2DS and idiopathic schizophrenia. Relating hippocampal structure in children with 22q11.2DS to anxiety and impaired cognitive ability could lead to hippocampus-based characterization of psychosis-proneness in this at-risk population. We measured hippocampal volume using a semiautomated approach on MRIs collected from typically developing children and children with 22q11.2DS. We then analyzed hippocampal morphology with Localized Components Analysis. We tested the modulating roles of diagnostic group, hippocampal volume, sex and age on local hippocampal shape components. Lastly, volume and shape components were tested as covariates of IQ and anxiety. We included 48 typically developing children and 69 children with 22q11.2DS in our study. Hippocampal volume was reduced bilaterally in children with 22q11.2DS, and these children showed greater variation in the shape of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Children with 22q11.2DS had greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus was associated with greater severity of anxiety, specifically fear of physical injury, within the 22q11.2DS group. Shape alterations are not specific to hippocampal subfields. Alterations in the structure of the anterior hippocampus likely affect function and may impact limbic circuitry. We suggest these alterations potentially contribute to anxiety symptoms in individuals with 22q11.2DS through modulatory pathways. Altered hippocampal morphology may be uniquely linked to anxiety risk factors for schizophrenia, which could be a powerful neuroanatomical marker of schizophrenia risk and hence protection.

  1. Visual exploratory analysis of integrated chromosome 19 proteomic data derived from glioma cancer stem-cell lines based on novel nonlinear dimensional data reduction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespinats, Sylvain; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2015-05-01

    Chromosome 19 is known to be linked to neurodegeneration and many cancers. Glioma-derived cancer stem cells (GSCs) are tumor-initiating cells and may be refractory to radiation and chemotherapy and thus have important implications for tumor biology and therapeutics. The analysis and interpretation of large proteomic data sets requires the development of new data mining and visualization approaches. Traditional techniques are insufficient to interpret and visualize these resulting experimental data. The emphasis of this paper lies in the presentation of novel approaches for the visualization, clustering and projection representation to unveil hidden data structures relevant for the accurate interpretation of biological experiments. These qualitative and quantitative methods are applied to the proteomic analysis of data sets derived from the GSCs. The achieved clustering and visualization results provide a more detailed insight into the expression patterns for chromosome 19 proteins.

  2. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate...... method enabled us to start the analysis on the distribution of various chromosomal loci inside slowly growing cells. With the actual counting and measuring no longer being any problem we could easily analyze 14 loci distributed on the E.coli chromosome. More than 15.000 cells were analyzed in total...... the new system, which is based on the pMT1 par system from Yersenia pestis, we labeled loci on opposite sides of the E.coli chromosome simultaneously and were able to show that the E.coli chromosome is organized with one chromosomal arm in each cell half. This astounding result is described in Paper III...

  3. Local sensitivity analysis of a distributed parameters water quality model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastres, R.; Franco, D.; Pecenik, G.; Solidoro, C.; Dejak, C.

    1997-01-01

    A local sensitivity analysis is presented of a 1D water-quality reaction-diffusion model. The model describes the seasonal evolution of one of the deepest channels of the lagoon of Venice, that is affected by nutrient loads from the industrial area and heat emission from a power plant. Its state variables are: water temperature, concentrations of reduced and oxidized nitrogen, Reactive Phosphorous (RP), phytoplankton, and zooplankton densities, Dissolved Oxygen (DO) and Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD). Attention has been focused on the identifiability and the ranking of the parameters related to primary production in different mixing conditions

  4. An improved solution of local window parameters setting for local singularity analysis based on Excel VBA batch processing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daojun; Cheng, Qiuming; Agterberg, Frits; Chen, Zhijun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper Excel VBA is used for batch calculation in Local Singularity Analysis (LSA), which is for the information extracting from different kinds of geoscience data. Capabilities and advantages of a new module called Batch Tool for Local Singularity Index Mapping (BTLSIM) are: (1) batch production of series of local singularity maps with different settings of local window size, shape and orientation parameters; (2) local parameter optimization based on statistical tests; and (3) provision of extra output layers describing how spatial changes induced by parameter optimization are related to spatial structure of the original input layers.

  5. [Comparative analysis of a new human cell line 4BL karyotype at long-term cultivation. Ploidy of chromosomal set].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopian, H R; Huleiuk, N L; Kushniruk, V O; Mykytenko, D O; Iatsyshyna, A P; Lukash, L L

    2013-01-01

    Long-term cultivation of human cells, including stem cells, can lead to substantial transformation of the karyotype and occurrence of genetic instability. The aim of this research was a comparative cytogenetic study of the karyotype of a new human stem cell line 4BL at 160 and 205 passages. The absence of 10 and 13 pairs of chromosomes and the monosomy of chromosomes 4, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 21, X were observed; also six regular marker chromosomes were detected. Chromosomes 1, 15 and 21 are involved in translocations t(l;11), t(5;15), t(12; 15), t(16;21). Modal class of the karyotype is within 41-43 chromosomes at both 160 and 205 passages. The frequency of polyploid cells have been increased from 2.8% at 160 passage up to 36% at 205 passage. Cells with a near-haploid karyotype were not detected at 205 passage (in contrast to 24.6% at 160 passages) and a decline of the level of premature separation of chromatids was observed. We assume stabilization of karyotype of the cell line 4BL at 205 passage and consider that further research is needed to predict the direction of karyotypic evolution of these cells in vitro.

  6. Genomic Analysis of the Snn1 Locus on Wheat Chromosome Arm 1BS and the Identification of Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leela Reddy

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathogen produces multiple host-selective toxins (HSTs that induce cell death and necrosis in sensitive wheat ( sp. genotypes. One such HST is SnTox1, which interacts with the host gene on wheat chromosome arm 1BS to cause necrosis leading to disease susceptibility. Toward the positional cloning of , we developed saturated and high-resolution maps of the locus and evaluated colinearity of the region with rice ( L.. An F population of 120 individuals derived from ‘Chinese Spring’ (CS and the CS– chromosome 1B disomic substitution line was used to map 54 markers consisting of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs, simple sequence repeats, and bin mapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Colinearity between wheat 1BS and rice was determined by aligning EST and RFLP probe sequences to the rice genome. Overall, colinearity was poorly conserved due to numerous complex chromosomal rearrangements, and of 48 wheat EST-RFLP sequences mapped, 30 had significant similarity to sequences on nine different rice chromosomes. However, 12 of the wheat sequences had similarity to sequences on rice chromosome 5 and were in a colinear arrangement with only a few exceptions, including an inversion of the markers flanking . High-resolution mapping of the locus in 8510 gametes delineated the gene to a 0.46-cM interval. Two EST-derived markers that cosegregated with were found to share homology to nucleotide binding site–leucine rich repeat–like genes and are considered potential candidates for

  7. Canine TCOF1; cloning, chromosome assignment and genetic analysis in dogs with different head types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, K E; Islam, I; Breen, M; Putt, W; Makrinou, E; Binns, M; Hopkinson, D; Edwards, Y

    2001-08-01

    We describe the construction of a dog embryonic head/neck cDNA library and the isolation of the dog homolog of the Treacher Collins Syndrome gene, TCOF1. The protein shows a similar three-domain structure to that described for human TCOF1, but the dog gene lacks exon 10 and contains two exons not present in the human sequence. In addition, exon 19 is differentially spliced in the dog. How these structural differences relate to TCOF1 phosphorylation is discussed. Isolation of a genomic clone allowed the exon/intron boundaries to be characterized and the dog TCOF1 gene to be mapped to CF Chr 4q31, a region syntenic to human Chr 5. Genetic analysis of DNA of dogs from 13 different breeds identified nine DNA sequence variants, three of which gave rise to amino acid substitutions. Grouping dogs according to head type showed that a C396T variant, leading to a Pro117Ser substitution, is associated with skull/face shape in our dog panel. The numbers are small, but the association between the T allele and brachycephaly, broad skull/short face, was highly significant (p = 0.000024). The short period of time during which the domestic dog breeds have been established suggests that this mutation has arisen only once in the history of dog domestication.

  8. Functional Analysis of the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Locus on Chromosome 21q22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Beaney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The coronary heart disease (CHD risk locus on 21q22 (lead SNP rs9982601 lies within a “gene desert.” The aim of this study was to assess if this locus is associated with CHD risk factors and to identify the functional variant(s and gene(s involved. Methods. A phenome scan was performed with UCLEB Consortium data. Allele-specific protein binding was studied using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Dual-reporter luciferase assays were used to assess the impact of genetic variation on expression. Expression quantitative trait analysis was performed with Advanced Study of Aortic Pathology (ASAP and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx consortium data. Results. A suggestive association between QT interval and the locus was observed (rs9982601  p=0.04. One variant at the locus, rs28451064, showed allele-specific protein binding and its minor allele showed 12% higher luciferase expression (p = 4.82 × 10−3 compared to the common allele. The minor allele of rs9982601 was associated with higher expression of the closest upstream genes (SLC5A3 1.30-fold increase p = 3.98 × 10−5; MRPS6 1.15-fold increase p = 9.60 × 10−4 in aortic intima media in ASAP. Both rs9982601 and rs28451064 showed a suggestive association with MRPS6 expression in relevant tissues in the GTEx data. Conclusions. A candidate functional variant, rs28451064, was identified. Future work should focus on identifying the pathway(s involved.

  9. Fractal Folding and Medium Viscoelasticity Contribute Jointly to Chromosome Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovnikov, K. E.; Gherardi, M.; Cosentino-Lagomarsino, M.; Tamm, M. V.

    2018-02-01

    Chromosomes are key players of cell physiology, their dynamics provides valuable information about its physical organization. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, the short-time motion of chromosomal loci has been described with a Rouse model in a simple or viscoelastic medium. However, little emphasis has been put on the influence of the folded organization of chromosomes on the local dynamics. Clearly, stress propagation, and thus dynamics, must be affected by such organization, but a theory allowing us to extract such information from data, e.g., on two-point correlations, is lacking. Here, we describe a theoretical framework able to answer this general polymer dynamics question. We provide a scaling analysis of the stress-propagation time between two loci at a given arclength distance along the chromosomal coordinate. The results suggest a precise way to assess folding information from the dynamical coupling of chromosome segments. Additionally, we realize this framework in a specific model of a polymer whose long-range interactions are designed to make it fold in a fractal way and immersed in a medium characterized by subdiffusive fractional Langevin motion with a tunable scaling exponent. This allows us to derive explicit analytical expressions for the correlation functions.

  10. A rapid local singularity analysis algorithm with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijun; Cheng, Qiuming; Agterberg, Frits

    2015-04-01

    The local singularity model developed by Cheng is fast gaining popularity in characterizing mineralization and detecting anomalies of geochemical, geophysical and remote sensing data. However in one of the conventional algorithms involving the moving average values with different scales is time-consuming especially while analyzing a large dataset. Summed area table (SAT), also called as integral image, is a fast algorithm used within the Viola-Jones object detection framework in computer vision area. Historically, the principle of SAT is well-known in the study of multi-dimensional probability distribution functions, namely in computing 2D (or ND) probabilities (area under the probability distribution) from the respective cumulative distribution functions. We introduce SAT and it's variation Rotated Summed Area Table in the isotropic, anisotropic or directional local singularity mapping in this study. Once computed using SAT, any one of the rectangular sum can be computed at any scale or location in constant time. The area for any rectangular region in the image can be computed by using only 4 array accesses in constant time independently of the size of the region; effectively reducing the time complexity from O(n) to O(1). New programs using Python, Julia, matlab and C++ are implemented respectively to satisfy different applications, especially to the big data analysis. Several large geochemical and remote sensing datasets are tested. A wide variety of scale changes (linear spacing or log spacing) for non-iterative or iterative approach are adopted to calculate the singularity index values and compare the results. The results indicate that the local singularity analysis with SAT is more robust and superior to traditional approach in identifying anomalies.

  11. Characterization of a human glycoprotein with a potential role in sperm-egg fusion: cDNA cloning, immunohistochemical localization, and chromosomal assignment of the gene (AEGL1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Takano, Hiroko [Hokkaido Univ. School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    Acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), thus far identified only in rodents, is one of the sperm surface proteins involved in the fusion of the sperm and egg plasma membranes. In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a human glycoprotein related to AEG. Although this protein, designated ARP (AEG-related protein), is not the ortholog of rodent AEG, it resembles AEG in that it is an epididymal secretory glycoprotein that binds to the postacrosomal region of the sperm head. The fact that no AEG mRNA can be detected in the human epididymis suggests that ARP might be the functional counterpart of rodent AEG. The gene encoding ARP (AEGL1) was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 6p21.1-p21.2. This result indicates that AEGL1 and the mouse gene for AEG are located in the chromosomal segments with conserved syntenies. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  12. New chromosome numbers in the genus Trigonella L. ( Fabaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic chromosome numbers of 45 Trigonella L. (Fabaceae), collected from different localities in Turkey was examined. Chromosome numbers were determined as 2n = 14, 16, 30 and 46. B chromosome was also observed in somatic cells of some taxa (Trigonella arcuata C.A. Meyer and Trigonella procumbens (Besser) ...

  13. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haishan; Luo, Xuan; You, Weiwei; Dong, Yunwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82%) and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14%) and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%). The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA)3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  14. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haishan Wang

    Full Text Available We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82% and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14% and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%. The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  15. Identification and Phylogenetic Analysis of a CC-NBS-LRR Encoding Gene Assigned on Chromosome 7B of Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqi Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hexaploid wheat displays limited genetic variation. As a direct A and B genome donor of hexaploid wheat, tetraploid wheat represents an important gene pool for cultivated bread wheat. Many disease resistant genes express conserved domains of the nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR. In this study, we isolated a CC-NBS-LRR gene locating on chromosome 7B from durum wheat variety Italy 363, and designated it TdRGA-7Ba. Its open reading frame was 4014 bp, encoding a 1337 amino acid protein with a complete NBS domain and 18 LRR repeats, sharing 44.7% identity with the PM3B protein. TdRGA-7Ba expression was continuously seen at low levels and was highest in leaves. TdRGA-7Ba has another allele TdRGA-7Bb with a 4 bp deletion at position +1892 in other cultivars of tetraploid wheat. In Ae. speltoides, as a B genome progenitor, both TdRGA-7Ba and TdRGA-7Bb were detected. In all six species of hexaploid wheats (AABBDD, only TdRGA-7Bb existed. Phylogenic analysis showed that all TdRGA-7Bb type genes were grouped in one sub-branch. We speculate that TdRGA-7Bb was derived from a TdRGA-7Ba mutation, and it happened in Ae. speltoides. Both types of TdRGA-7B participated in tetraploid wheat formation. However, only the TdRGA-7Bb was retained in hexaploid wheat.

  16. Analysis of 24 Y chromosomal STR haplotypes in a Chinese Han population sample from Henan Province, Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meisen; Liu, Yaju; Zhang, Juntao; Bai, Rufeng; Lv, Xiaojiao; Ma, Shuhua

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed haplotypes for 24 Y chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs), including 17 Yfiler loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DY438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) and 7 additional STRs (DYS388, DYS444, DYS447, DYS449, DYS522 and DYS527a/b) in 1100 unrelated Chinese Han individuals from Henan Province using AGCU Y24 STR kit systems. The calculated average gene diversity (GD) values ranged from 0.4105 to 0.9647 for the DYS388 and DYS385a/b loci, respectively. The discriminatory capacity (DC) was 72.91% with 802 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci, by the addition of 7 Y-STRs to the Yfiler system, the DC was increased to 79.09% while showing 870 observed haplotypes. Among the additional 7 Y-STRs, DYS449, DYS527a/b, DYS444 and DYS522 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Henan Han population clustered with Han origin populations and showed significant differences from other Non-Han populations. In the present study, we report 24 Y-STR population data in Henan Han population, and we emphasize the need for adding additional markers to the commonly used 17 Yfiler loci to achieve more improved discriminatory capacity in a population with low genetic diversity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Angelman syndrome: Validation of molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 for deletion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, L.; Knoll, J.H.M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-03-13

    In a series of 18 individuals comprising parents of Angelman syndrome (AS) patients and AS patients with large deletions, microdeletions, and no deletions, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with genomic phage clones for loci D15S63 and GABRB3 for deletion detection of chromosome 15q11-q13. Utilization of probes at these loci allows detection of common large deletions and permits discrimination of less common small deletions. In all individuals the molecular cytogenetic data were concordant with the DNA deletion analyses. FISH provides an accurate method of deletion detection for chromosome 15q11-q13. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Analysis of EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A gene status and chromosomal polysomy in gastric adenocarcinoma from Chinese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Zhiyong; Zeng, Xuan; Gao, Jie; Wu, Shafei; Wang, Peng; Shi, Xiaohua; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Tonghua

    2008-01-01

    The EGFR and HER2 genes are located on chromosomes 7 and 17, respectively. They are therapeutic targets in some tumors. The TOP2A gene, which is located near HER2 on chromosome 17, is the target of many chemotherapeutic agents, and co-amplification of HER2 and TOP2A has been described in several tumor types. Herein, we investigated the gene status of EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A in Chinese gastric carcinoma patients. We determined the rate of polysomy for chromosomes 7 and 17, and we attempted to clarify the relationship between EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A gene copy number and increased expression of their encoded proteins. Furthermore, we tried to address the relationship between alterations in EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A and chromosome polysomy. One hundred cases of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tumor tissues from Chinese gastric carcinoma patients were investigated by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) methods. Forty-two percent of the cases showed EGFR overexpression; 16% showed EGFR FISH positive; 6% showed HER2 overexpression; and 11% showed HER2 gene amplification, including all six HER2 overexpression cases. TOP2A nuclear staining (nuclear index, NI) was determined in all 100 tumors: NI values ranged from 0.5 – 90%. Three percent of the tumors showed TOP2A gene amplification, which were all accompanied by HER2 gene amplification. Nineteen percent of the tumors showed chromosome 7 polysomy, and 16% showed chromosome 17 polysomy. Chromosome 7 polysomy correlated significantly with EGFR FISH-positivity, but was not associated with EGFR overexpression. HER2 overexpression associated significantly with HER2 gene amplification. TOP2A gene amplification was significantly associated with HER2 gene amplification. No relationship was found between alterations in the EGFR, HER2, and TOP2A genes and clinicopathologic variables of gastric carcinoma. The data from our study suggest that chromosome 7 polysomy may be responsible for increased EGFR

  19. Chromosomal Inversions, Natural Selection and Adaptation in the Malaria Vector Anopheles funestus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Diego; Fontaine, Michael C.; Cohuet, Anna; Fontenille, Didier; Vitalis, Renaud; Simard, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal polymorphisms, such as inversions, are presumably involved in the rapid adaptation of populations to local environmental conditions. Reduced recombination between alternative arrangements in heterozygotes may protect sets of locally adapted genes, promoting ecological divergence and potentially leading to reproductive isolation and speciation. Through a comparative analysis of chromosomal inversions and microsatellite marker polymorphisms, we hereby present biological evidence that strengthens this view in the mosquito Anopheles funestus s.s, one of the most important and widespread malaria vectors in Africa. Specimens were collected across a wide range of geographical, ecological, and climatic conditions in Cameroon. We observed a sharp contrast between population structure measured at neutral microsatellite markers and at chromosomal inversions. Microsatellite data detected only a weak signal for population structuring among geographical zones (FST 0.190, P < 0.01). Using standardized estimates of FST, we show that inversions behave at odds with neutral expectations strongly suggesting a role of environmental selection in shaping their distribution. We further demonstrate through canonical correspondence analysis that heterogeneity in eco-geographical variables measured at specimen sampling sites explained 89% of chromosomal variance in A. funestus. These results are in agreement with a role of chromosomal inversions in ecotypic adaptation in this species. We argue that this widespread mosquito represents an interesting model system for the study of chromosomal speciation mechanisms and should provide ample opportunity for comparative studies on the evolution of reproductive isolation and speciation in major human malaria vectors. PMID:20837604

  20. [Evaluation of detection and analysis of chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion by multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DENG, Jian-ying; ZHANG, Ze-wei; LI, Jian-hua; ZHU, Yu-ning; YANG, Jian-bin; GAO, Zhan; YING, Li-yang

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay detection in analysis of chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion. Between March 2008 and September 2009, thirty-two patients including 10 males and 16 females aged between years (3.6±3.1) were selected and evaluated by history, physical examination and medical records. Of these patients, sixteen patients who were previous diagnostic as 22q11.2 microdeletion were in positive control group, the other 16 healthy children were in negative control group. All the patients were detected by MLPA and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the presence of a 22q11.2 microdeletion after informed consent. Diagnostic efficacy was assessed by sensitivity, specificity and Kappa analysis. We have applied the two assays of detection of chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion in 32 patients. Sixteen patients in positive control group were found to have a 22q11.2 deletion and, with the deletion size of 3-Mb. However, as expected, chromosome 22q11.2 deletion was not found in negative control group. The MLPA results were in good agreement with that by FISH. Therefore, MLPA has high sensitivity and specificity. MLPA is a rapid, reliable, high-throughput and relatively economical alternative to FISH technology for the diagnosis of 22q11.2 microdeletion. It can provide reliable and helpful information for clinical diagnosis of 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome.

  1. Analysis of structural and numerical chromosomal anomalies at the first, second, and third mitosis after irradiation of one-cell mouse embryos with X-rays or neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenborn, U.; Streffer, C.

    1988-01-01

    One-cell mouse embryos were irradiated with X-rays or neutrons. Analysis of the first, second, and third postradiation mitoses revealed yields of structural aberrations increasing linearly after exposure to both radiation qualities. For X-rays aberration frequency decreased from first to third mitosis; after neutrons it decreased from first to second mitosis but then increased in the third. RBEs of 4.7, 4.8, and 7.4 were calculated for corresponding mitoses. New aberrations were produced after the first postradiation mitosis and expressed during the second and third mitosis. Chromosome loss also increased with increasing radiation dose at the second mitosis. An RBE of 2 was calculated for this effect. Comparing the data with previous investigations on embryonic and fetal death after prenatal irradiation, it was concluded that the high radiosensitivity of the one-cell embryo is due to the induction of structural as well as of numerical chromosome aberrations. (author)

  2. GSK-3 inhibitors induce chromosome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staples Oliver D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mechanisms operate during mitosis to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. However, during tumour evolution these mechanisms go awry resulting in chromosome instability. While several lines of evidence suggest that mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC may promote chromosome instability, at least in colon cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we turn our attention to GSK-3 – a protein kinase, which in concert with APC, targets β-catenin for proteolysis – and ask whether GSK-3 is required for accurate chromosome segregation. Results To probe the role of GSK-3 in mitosis, we inhibited GSK-3 kinase activity in cells using a panel of small molecule inhibitors, including SB-415286, AR-A014418, 1-Azakenpaullone and CHIR99021. Analysis of synchronised HeLa cells shows that GSK-3 inhibitors do not prevent G1/S progression or cell division. They do, however, significantly delay mitotic exit, largely because inhibitor-treated cells have difficulty aligning all their chromosomes. Although bipolar spindles form and the majority of chromosomes biorient, one or more chromosomes often remain mono-oriented near the spindle poles. Despite a prolonged mitotic delay, anaphase frequently initiates without the last chromosome aligning, resulting in chromosome non-disjunction. To rule out the possibility of "off-target" effects, we also used RNA interference to selectively repress GSK-3β. Cells deficient for GSK-3β exhibit a similar chromosome alignment defect, with chromosomes clustered near the spindle poles. GSK-3β repression also results in cells accumulating micronuclei, a hallmark of chromosome missegregation. Conclusion Thus, not only do our observations indicate a role for GSK-3 in accurate chromosome segregation, but they also raise the possibility that, if used as therapeutic agents, GSK-3 inhibitors may induce unwanted side effects by inducing chromosome instability.

  3. First description of multivalent ring structures in eutherian mammalian meiosis: new chromosomal characterization of Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae, Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Ramon Everton Ferreira; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; da Costa, Marlyson Jeremias Rodrigues; Noronha, Renata Coelho Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo Ribeiro; Pieczarka, Julio César

    2016-08-01

    Twelve specimens of the bat Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae: Chiroptera) were collected from four localities in the Brazilian Amazon region and analyzed by classical and molecular cytogenetics. The diploid number and autosomal fundamental number were as previously reported (2n = 22 and FNa = 40, respectively). Fluorescence in situ hybridization using rDNA probes and silver nitrate technique demonstrated the presence of two NOR sites and the presence of internal telomeric sequences at pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes with exception of Y. Based on meiotic studies and chromosome banding we suggest that the sex chromosome pair of C. brevirostris was equivocally identified as it appears in the literature. Meiotic analysis demonstrated that at diplotene-diakinesis the cells had a ring conformation involving four chromosome pairs. This suggests the occurrence of multiple reciprocal translocations among these chromosomes, which is a very rare phenomenon in vertebrates, and has never been described in Eutheria.

  4. Systematic mutation analysis of KIAA0767 and KIAA1646 in chromosome 22q-linked periodic catatonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawlik Micha

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodic catatonia is a familial subtype of schizophrenia characterized by hyperkinetic and akinetic episodes, followed by a catatonic residual syndrome. The phenotype has been evaluated in two independent genome-wide linkage scans with evidence for a major locus on chromosome 15q15, and a second independent locus on chromosome 22qtel. Methods In the positional and brain-expressed candidate genes KIAA0767 and KIAA1646, we searched for variants in the complete exons and adjacent splice-junctions as well as in parts of the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions by means of a systematic mutation screening in individuals from chromosome 22q-linked pedigrees. Results The mutation scan revealed 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms, among them two rare codon variants (KIAA0767: S159I; KIAA1646: V338G. However, both were neither found segregating with the disease in the respective pedigree nor found at a significant frequency in a case-control association sample. Conclusion Starting from linkage signals at chromosome22qtel in periodic catatonia, we screened two positional brain-expressed candidate genes for genetic variation. Our study excludes genetic variations in the coding and putative promoter regions of KIAA0767 and KIAA1646 as causative factors for periodic catatonia.

  5. Analysis of 62 hybrid assembled human Y chromosomes exposes rapid structural changes and high rates of gene conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Skov, Laurits; Maretty, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    with the chimpanzee Y chromosome. We analyzed 2.7 Mb of large inverted repeats (palindromes) for variation patterns among the two palindrome arms and identified 603 mutation and 416 gene conversions events. We find clear evidence for GC-biased gene conversion in the palindromes (and a balancing AT mutation bias...

  6. Radiotherapy in desmoid tumors. Treatment response, local control, and analysis of local failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santti, Kirsi; Beule, Annette; Tuomikoski, Laura; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Anna-Stina; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tarkkanen, Maija; Blomqvist, Carl [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki (Finland); Roenty, Mikko [HUSLAB and University of Helsinki, Department of Pathology, Helsinki (Finland); Ihalainen, Hanna [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) are rare soft tissue tumors which frequently recur after surgery. Desmoid tumors arise from musculoaponeurotic tissue in the extremities, head and neck, abdominal wall, or intra-abdominally. Our aim was to examine the outcome of radiotherapy of desmoid tumors in a single institution series. We evaluated 41 patients with desmoid tumors treated with 49 radiotherapies between 1987 and 2012. Radiologic images for response evaluation were reassessed and responses to treatment registered according to RECIST criteria 1.1. For patients with local failures radiation dose distribution was determined in each local failure volume using image co-registration. Recurrences were classified as in-target, marginal, or out-of-target. Prognostic factors for radiotherapy treatment failure were evaluated. Radiotherapy doses varied from 20-63 Gy (median 50 Gy) with a median fraction size of 2 Gy. The objective response rate to definitive radiotherapy was 55% (12/22 patients). Median time to response was 14 months. A statistically significant dose-response relation for definitive and postoperative radiotherapy was observed both in univariate (p-value 0.002) and in multivariate analysis (p-value 0.02) adjusted for potential confounding factors. Surgery before radiotherapy or surgical margin had no significant effect on time to progression. Nine of 11 (82%) local failures were classified as marginal and two of 11 (18%) in-target. None of the recurrences occurred totally out-of-target. Radiotherapy is a valuable option for treating desmoid tumors. Radiotherapy dose appears to be significantly associated to local control. (orig.) [German] Desmoide (aggressive Fibromatosen) sind seltene Weichteiltumore der muskulaeren Membranen von Kopf, Hals, Extremitaeten und Bauchwand. Ziel war es, die Wirksamkeit der Strahlentherapie bei aggressiver Fibromatose an einer einzelnen Klinik zu untersuchen. Ausgewertet wurden 41 Patienten mit aggressiver Fibromatose, die

  7. Rapid Online Analysis of Local Feature Detectors and Their Complementarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib Ehsan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A vision system that can assess its own performance and take appropriate actions online to maximize its effectiveness would be a step towards achieving the long-cherished goal of imitating humans. This paper proposes a method for performing an online performance analysis of local feature detectors, the primary stage of many practical vision systems. It advocates the spatial distribution of local image features as a good performance indicator and presents a metric that can be calculated rapidly, concurs with human visual assessments and is complementary to existing offline measures such as repeatability. The metric is shown to provide a measure of complementarity for combinations of detectors, correctly reflecting the underlying principles of individual detectors. Qualitative results on well-established datasets for several state-of-the-art detectors are presented based on the proposed measure. Using a hypothesis testing approach and a newly-acquired, larger image database, statistically-significant performance differences are identified. Different detector pairs and triplets are examined quantitatively and the results provide a useful guideline for combining detectors in applications that require a reasonable spatial distribution of image features. A principled framework for combining feature detectors in these applications is also presented. Timing results reveal the potential of the metric for online applications.

  8. Cloning of allene oxide cyclase gene from Leymus mollis and analysis of its expression in wheat-Leymus chromosome addition lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltayeb Habora, Mohamed Elsadig; Eltayeb, Amin Elsadig; Oka, Mariko; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-03-01

    Leymus mollis (Triticeae; Poaceae) is a useful genetic resource for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) breeding via wide hybridization to introduce its chromosomes and integrate its useful traits into wheat. Leymus mollis is highly tolerant to abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity and resistant to various diseases, but the genetic mechanisms controlling its physiological tolerance remain largely unexplored. We identified and cloned an allene oxide cyclase (AOC) gene from L. mollis that was strongly expressed under salt stress. AOC is involved in biosynthesis of jasmonic acid, an important signaling compound that mediates a wide range of adaptive responses. LmAOC cDNA consisted of 717 bp, coding for a protein with 238 amino acids that was highly similar to AOCs from barley (Hordeum vulgare) and other monocots. Subcellular localization using Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed it as a chloroplast-localized protein. LmAOC was found to be a multiple-copy gene, and that some copies were conserved and efficiently expressed in wheat-Leymus chromosome addition lines. LmAOC expression was upregulated under drought, heat, cold and wounding stresses, and by jasmonic acid and abscisic acid. Our results suggest that LmAOC plays an important role in L. mollis adaptation to abiotic stresses and it could be useful for wheat improvement.

  9. Cloning of allene oxide cyclase gene from Leymus mollis and analysis of its expression in wheat–Leymus chromosome addition lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltayeb Habora, Mohamed Elsadig; Eltayeb, Amin Elsadig; Oka, Mariko; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Leymus mollis (Triticeae; Poaceae) is a useful genetic resource for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) breeding via wide hybridization to introduce its chromosomes and integrate its useful traits into wheat. Leymus mollis is highly tolerant to abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity and resistant to various diseases, but the genetic mechanisms controlling its physiological tolerance remain largely unexplored. We identified and cloned an allene oxide cyclase (AOC) gene from L. mollis that was strongly expressed under salt stress. AOC is involved in biosynthesis of jasmonic acid, an important signaling compound that mediates a wide range of adaptive responses. LmAOC cDNA consisted of 717 bp, coding for a protein with 238 amino acids that was highly similar to AOCs from barley (Hordeum vulgare) and other monocots. Subcellular localization using Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed it as a chloroplast-localized protein. LmAOC was found to be a multiple-copy gene, and that some copies were conserved and efficiently expressed in wheat–Leymus chromosome addition lines. LmAOC expression was upregulated under drought, heat, cold and wounding stresses, and by jasmonic acid and abscisic acid. Our results suggest that LmAOC plays an important role in L. mollis adaptation to abiotic stresses and it could be useful for wheat improvement. PMID:23641183

  10. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  11. Locality-Driven Parallel Static Analysis for Power Delivery Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Zhiyu

    2011-06-01

    Large VLSI on-chip Power Delivery Networks (PDNs) are challenging to analyze due to the sheer network complexity. In this article, a novel parallel partitioning-based PDN analysis approach is presented. We use the boundary circuit responses of each partition to divide the full grid simulation problem into a set of independent subgrid simulation problems. Instead of solving exact boundary circuit responses, a more efficient scheme is proposed to provide near-exact approximation to the boundary circuit responses by exploiting the spatial locality of the flip-chip-type power grids. This scheme is also used in a block-based iterative error reduction process to achieve fast convergence. Detailed computational cost analysis and performance modeling is carried out to determine the optimal (or near-optimal) number of partitions for parallel implementation. Through the analysis of several large power grids, the proposed approach is shown to have excellent parallel efficiency, fast convergence, and favorable scalability. Our approach can solve a 16-million-node power grid in 18 seconds on an IBM p5-575 processing node with 16 Power5+ processors, which is 18.8X faster than a state-of-the-art direct solver. © 2011 ACM.

  12. Obtaining local reciprocal lattice vectors from finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, John P; Connolley, Thomas; Hill, Tim P; Huang, Houcheng; Sharp, Doug W; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Finite-element analysis is frequently used by engineers at synchrotron beamlines to calculate the elastic deformation of a single crystal undergoing mechanical bending or thermal load. ANSYS Workbench software is widely used for such simulations. However, although ANSYS Workbench software provides useful information on the displacements, strains and stresses within the crystal, it does not yield the local reciprocal lattice vectors that would be required for X-ray diffraction calculations. To bridge this gap, a method based on the shape functions and interpolation procedures of the software itself has been developed. An application to the double-crystal bent Laue monochromator being designed for the I12 (JEEP) wiggler beamline at the Diamond Light Source is presented.

  13. Characterizing structural transitions using localized free energy landscape analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh K Banavali

    Full Text Available Structural changes in molecules are frequently observed during biological processes like replication, transcription and translation. These structural changes can usually be traced to specific distortions in the backbones of the macromolecules involved. Quantitative energetic characterization of such distortions can greatly advance the atomic-level understanding of the dynamic character of these biological processes.Molecular dynamics simulations combined with a variation of the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method for potential of mean force determination are applied to characterize localized structural changes for the test case of cytosine (underlined base flipping in a GTCAGCGCATGG DNA duplex. Free energy landscapes for backbone torsion and sugar pucker degrees of freedom in the DNA are used to understand their behavior in response to the base flipping perturbation. By simplifying the base flipping structural change into a two-state model, a free energy difference of upto 14 kcal/mol can be attributed to the flipped state relative to the stacked Watson-Crick base paired state. This two-state classification allows precise evaluation of the effect of base flipping on local backbone degrees of freedom.The calculated free energy landscapes of individual backbone and sugar degrees of freedom expectedly show the greatest change in the vicinity of the flipping base itself, but specific delocalized effects can be discerned upto four nucleotide positions away in both 5' and 3' directions. Free energy landscape analysis thus provides a quantitative method to pinpoint the determinants of structural change on the atomic scale and also delineate the extent of propagation of the perturbation along the molecule. In addition to nucleic acids, this methodology is anticipated to be useful for studying conformational changes in all macromolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  14. Application of dissociation curve analysis to radiation hybrid panel marker scoring: generation of a map of river buffalo (B. bubalis chromosome 20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäffer Alejandro A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence of dyes bound to double-stranded PCR products has been utilized extensively in various real-time quantitative PCR applications, including post-amplification dissociation curve analysis, or differentiation of amplicon length or sequence composition. Despite the current era of whole-genome sequencing, mapping tools such as radiation hybrid DNA panels remain useful aids for sequence assembly, focused resequencing efforts, and for building physical maps of species that have not yet been sequenced. For placement of specific, individual genes or markers on a map, low-throughput methods remain commonplace. Typically, PCR amplification of DNA from each panel cell line is followed by gel electrophoresis and scoring of each clone for the presence or absence of PCR product. To improve sensitivity and efficiency of radiation hybrid panel analysis in comparison to gel-based methods, we adapted fluorescence-based real-time PCR and dissociation curve analysis for use as a novel scoring method. Results As proof of principle for this dissociation curve method, we generated new maps of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis chromosome 20 by both dissociation curve analysis and conventional marker scoring. We also obtained sequence data to augment dissociation curve results. Few genes have been previously mapped to buffalo chromosome 20, and sequence detail is limited, so 65 markers were screened from the orthologous chromosome of domestic cattle. Thirty bovine markers (46% were suitable as cross-species markers for dissociation curve analysis in the buffalo radiation hybrid panel under a standard protocol, compared to 25 markers suitable for conventional typing. Computational analysis placed 27 markers on a chromosome map generated by the new method, while the gel-based approach produced only 20 mapped markers. Among 19 markers common to both maps, the marker order on the map was maintained perfectly. Conclusion Dissociation curve

  15. The Inner Centromere Protein (INCENP) Coil Is a Single α-Helix (SAH) Domain That Binds Directly to Microtubules and Is Important for Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC) Localization and Function in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, Kumiko; Platani, Melpomeni; Wolny, Marcin; Ogawa, Hiromi; Vargiu, Giulia; Knight, Peter J; Peckham, Michelle; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-08-28

    The chromosome passenger complex (CPC) is a master regulator of mitosis. Inner centromere protein (INCENP) acts as a scaffold regulating CPC localization and activity. During early mitosis, the N-terminal region of INCENP forms a three-helix bundle with Survivin and Borealin, directing the CPC to the inner centromere where it plays essential roles in chromosome alignment and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The C-terminal IN box region of INCENP is responsible for binding and activating Aurora B kinase. The central region of INCENP has been proposed to comprise a coiled coil domain acting as a spacer between the N- and C-terminal domains that is involved in microtubule binding and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Here we show that the central region (213 residues) of chicken INCENP is not a coiled coil but a ∼ 32-nm-long single α-helix (SAH) domain. The N-terminal half of this domain directly binds to microtubules in vitro. By analogy with previous studies of myosin 10, our data suggest that the INCENP SAH might stretch up to ∼ 80 nm under physiological forces. Thus, the INCENP SAH could act as a flexible "dog leash," allowing Aurora B to phosphorylate dynamic substrates localized in the outer kinetochore while at the same time being stably anchored to the heterochromatin of the inner centromere. Furthermore, by achieving this flexibility via an SAH domain, the CPC avoids a need for dimerization (required for coiled coil formation), which would greatly complicate regulation of the proximity-induced trans-phosphorylation that is critical for Aurora B activation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. [POSSIBILITIES AND LIMITATIONS