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Sample records for analysing healthcare incident

  1. A human error taxonomy for analysing healthcare incident reports: assessing reporting culture and its effects on safety perfomance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itoh, Kenji; Omata, N.; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2009-01-01

    The present paper reports on a human error taxonomy system developed for healthcare risk management and on its application to evaluating safety performance and reporting culture. The taxonomy comprises dimensions for classifying errors, for performance-shaping factors, and for the maturity...

  2. Challenges of information security incident learning: An industrial case study in a Chinese healthcare organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Johnson, Chris

    2017-12-01

    Security incidents can have negative impacts on healthcare organizations, and the security of medical records has become a primary concern of the public. However, previous studies showed that organizations had not effectively learned lessons from security incidents. Incident learning as an essential activity in the "follow-up" phase of security incident response lifecycle has long been addressed but not given enough attention. This paper conducted a case study in a healthcare organization in China to explore their current obstacles in the practice of incident learning. We interviewed both IT professionals and healthcare professionals. The results showed that the organization did not have a structured way to gather and redistribute incident knowledge. Incident response was ineffective in cycling incident knowledge back to inform security management. Incident reporting to multiple stakeholders faced a great challenge. In response to this case study, we suggest the security assurance modeling framework to address those obstacles.

  3. The Incidence of Public Spending on Healthcare: Comparative Evidence from Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. O'Donnell (Owen); E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy); R.P. Rannan-Eliya (Ravi)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe article compares the incidence of public healthcare across 11 Asian countries and provinces, testing the dominance of healthcare concentration curves against an equal distribution and Lorenz curves and across countries. The analysis reveals that the distribution of public healthcare

  4. Safety culture and learning from incidents: the role of incident reporting and causal analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilpert, B.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear industry more than any other industrial branch has developed and used predictive risk analysis as a method of feedforward control of safety and reliability. Systematic evaluation of operating experience, statistical documentation of component failures, systematic documentation and analysis of incidents are important complementary elements of feedback control: we are dealing here with adjustment and learning from experience, in particular from past incidents. Using preliminary findings from ongoing research at the Research Center Systems Safety at the Berlin University of Technology the contribution discusses preconditions for an effective use of lessons to be learnt from closely matched incident reporting and in depth analyses of causal chains leading to incidents. Such conditions are especially standardized documentation, reporting and analyzing methods of incidents; structured information flows and feedback loops; abstaining from culpability search; mutual trust of employees and management; willingness of all concerned to continually evaluate and optimize the established learning system. Thus, incident related reporting and causal analyses contribute to safety culture, which is seen to emerge from tightly coupled organizational measures and respective change in attitudes and behaviour. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs

  5. Association between osteoporosis treatment change and adherence, incident fracture, and total healthcare costs in a Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, M A; Xu, Y; Viswanathan, H N; Stolshek, B S; Clay, B; Adams, J L; Kallich, J D; Fine, S; Saag, K G

    2013-04-01

    We examined the association between osteoporosis treatment change and adherence, incident fractures, and healthcare costs among Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug (MAPD) plan members. Treatment change was associated with a small but significant increase in adherence, but was not associated with incident fracture or total healthcare costs. Overall adherence remained low. We examined the association between osteoporosis treatment change and adherence, incident fractures, and healthcare costs among MAPD plan members in a large US health plan. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of MAPD plan members aged≥50 years newly initiated on an osteoporosis medication between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2008. Members were identified as having or not having an osteoporosis treatment change within 12 months after initiating osteoporosis medication. Logistic regression analyses and difference-in-difference (DID) generalized linear models were used to investigate the association between osteoporosis treatment change and (1) adherence to treatment, (2) incident fracture, and (3) healthcare costs at 12 and 24 months follow-up. Of the 33,823 members newly initiated on osteoporosis treatment, 3,573 (10.6%) changed osteoporosis treatment within 12 months. After controlling for covariates, osteoporosis treatment change was associated with significantly higher odds of being adherent (medication possession ratio [MPR]≥0.8) at 12 months (odds ratio [OR]=1.18) and 24 months (OR=1.13) follow-up. However, overall adherence remained low (MPR=0.59 and 0.51 for the change cohort and MPR=0.51 and 0.44 for the no-change cohort at 12 and 24 months, respectively). Osteoporosis treatment change was not significantly associated with incident fracture (OR=1.00 at 12 months and OR=0.98 at 24 months) or total direct healthcare costs (p>0.4) in the DID analysis, but was associated with higher pharmacy costs (p<0.004). Osteoporosis treatment change was associated with a small but significant

  6. Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) in complex systems: cultural adaptation and safety impacts in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Leonhardt, Alice; Mitchell, Shannon G; Vogt, Joachim; Schürmann, Tim

    2014-07-01

    In complex systems, such as hospitals or air traffic control operations, critical incidents (CIs) are unavoidable. These incidents can not only become critical for victims but also for professionals working at the "sharp end" who may have to deal with critical incident stress (CIS) reactions that may be severe and impede emotional, physical, cognitive and social functioning. These CIS reactions may occur not only under exceptional conditions but also during every-day work and become an important safety issue. In contrast to air traffic management (ATM) operations in Europe, which have readily adopted critical incident stress management (CISM), most hospitals have not yet implemented comprehensive peer support programs. This survey was conducted in 2010 at the only European general hospital setting which implemented CISM program since 2004. The aim of the article is to describe possible contribution of CISM in hospital settings framed from the perspective of organizational safety and individual health for healthcare professionals. Findings affirm that daily work related incidents also can become critical for healthcare professionals. Program efficiency appears to be influenced by the professional culture, as well as organizational structure and policies. Overall, findings demonstrate that the adaptation of the CISM program in general hospitals takes time but, once established, it may serve as a mechanism for changing professional culture, thereby permitting the framing of even small incidents or near misses as an opportunity to provide valuable feedback to the system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Accelerate Healthcare Data Analytics: An Agile Practice to Perform Collaborative and Reproducible Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Bibo; Sun, Wen; Yu, Yiqin; Li, Jing; Hu, Gang; Xie, Guotong

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in cloud computing and machine learning made it more convenient for researchers to gain insights from massive healthcare data, while performing analyses on healthcare data in current practice still lacks efficiency for researchers. What's more, collaborating among different researchers and sharing analysis results are challenging issues. In this paper, we developed a practice to make analytics process collaborative and analysis results reproducible by exploiting and extending Jupyter Notebook. After applying this practice in our use cases, we can perform analyses and deliver results with less efforts in shorter time comparing to our previous practice.

  8. Manual handling incident claims in the healthcare sector: Factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Sara; Johnson, Muriel; Ganly, Joe; Bennett, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Manual handling (MH) incidents may result in injury, absenteeism and/or compensation claim. This study investigated the factors associated with MH incidents among healthcare workers who had made a claim, and the management and outcome of those workers. A national sample of healthcare sector MH incident claim files (n=247) were accessed and 35~files met the inclusion criteria. Data were collected and presented graphically or descriptively using percentages (and 95% Confidence intervals, CI). Chi-square (χ2) tests were used for comparing proportions between groups. SPSS (v14.0) was used for analysis. Significance at phandling tasks at the time of incident; 46% (37%, 54%) involved inanimate handling. Ninety-one percent (89%, 94%) took sick leave, with 52% (43%, 60%) taking > 52 weeks. Only 58% (49%, 65%) returned to work. Claimants who had been in communication with employers were significantly more likely to return to work than those who did not (χ2 test, p=0.017). Improved management of MH incidents and injured workers are recommended.

  9. How a major incident plan can be used in an acute healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Seth; Smith, L; McDevitt, K

    2018-04-06

    All NHS Trusts face a diverse range of potential threats and disruptions that can overwhelm the delivery of their routine healthcare services. Major incidents range from significant infrastructure failure to responding to significant casualty numbers from natural disasters and malicious incidents. Major incident plans are one of the body of documents that support trusts and in this instance acute NHS trusts in emergency preparedness. Major incident plans can be used as a reference point for staff of all disciplines, that is, clinical and non-clinical. Major incident plans incorporate the requirements of the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 for NHS-funded providers to ensure trusts conduct risk assessments, emergency planning, cooperating with other organisations, and internal and external communication. This paper summarises some of the key aspects in the construction and the use of major incident plans in acute care trusts. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Comparison of six electronic healthcare databases in Europe using standardized protocols: a descriptive study on the incidence of cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afonso, A.S.; Groot, M.C.H. de; Ham, R. van den; Bruin, M.L. de; Huerta Alvarez, C.; Gil, M.; Hesse, U.; Ronn, P.F.; Souverein, P.C.; Alvarez, Y.; Slattery, J.; Rottenkolber, M.; Dijk, L. van; Schlienger, R.; Reynolds, R.; Klungel, O.H.; Grimaldi-Bensouda, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are several national cancer registries available across Europe, but information on cancer incidence from routine electronic healthcare record (EHR) databases (DBs), such as General Practitioners (GPs) and comparisons across different databases are rather scarce. It is important to

  11. Comparison of six electronic healthcare databases in Europe using standardized protocols: A descriptive study on the incidence of cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afonso, Ana S.; De Groot, Mark C.H.; Van Den Ham, Rianne; Bruin, Marie L.; Alvarez, Consuelo Huerta; Gil, Miguel; Hesse, Ulrik; Rønn, Pernille F.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Alvarez, Yolanda; Slattery, Jim; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Van Dijk, Liset; Schlienger, Raymond G.; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf H.; Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are several national cancer registries available across Europe, but information on cancer incidence from routine electronic healthcare record (EHR) databases (DBs), such as General Practitioners (GPs) and comparisons across different databases are rather scarce. It is important to

  12. Incidence of eating disorders in Danish psychiatric secondary healthcare 1970-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Carina; Jensen, Signe Ow; Plessen, Kerstin J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Is an increased focus on eating disorders during the past few decades reflected by increasing occurrence in the psychiatric health service system. METHOD: All first-time diagnoses of eating disorders identified in the Danish Central Psychiatric Research Register 1970-2008 constitute...... the present research database. Age-standardized rates per 100,000 inhabitants were calculated and autoregressive models were fitted for males and females separately as well as for in- and outpatients. RESULTS: The incidence of eating disorders diagnosed in Danish psychiatric secondary healthcare has increased...... considerably during a nearly 40-year period of observation both within the general category of eating disorders and also specifically for anorexia nervosa. The steepest increase is seen within females aged 15-19 years, where the highest incidences are also found. Anorexia nervosa constitutes the vast majority...

  13. Incidence of eating disorders in Danish psychiatric secondary healthcare 1970-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammelmark, Carina; Jensen, Signe O W; Plessen, Kerstin J; Skadhede, Søren; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2015-08-01

    Is an increased focus on eating disorders during the past few decades reflected by increasing occurrence in the psychiatric health service system. All first-time diagnoses of eating disorders identified in the Danish Central Psychiatric Research Register 1970-2008 constitute the present research database. Age-standardized rates per 100,000 inhabitants were calculated and autoregressive models were fitted for males and females separately as well as for in- and outpatients. The incidence of eating disorders diagnosed in Danish psychiatric secondary healthcare has increased considerably during a nearly 40-year period of observation both within the general category of eating disorders and also specifically for anorexia nervosa. The steepest increase is seen within females aged 15-19 years, where the highest incidences are also found. Anorexia nervosa constitutes the vast majority of all eating disorders. Throughout the time interval investigated, the number of males, however, is negligible compared to females. Most patients are seen in outpatient services, increasing towards recent years. However, the number of patients being treated as inpatients has increased linearly through the entire four decenniums investigated. Changes in registration principles, public awareness and higher acceptance of mental disorders in the public is the most obvious explanation for the incidence increase of anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders. This study does not answer whether there has been an increase in true incidence in the population. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  14. Survey to identify depth of penetration of critical incident reporting systems in Austrian healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendlhofer, Gerald; Eder, Harald; Leitgeb, Karina; Gorges, Roland; Jakse, Heidelinde; Raiger, Marianne; Türk, Silvia; Petschnig, Walter; Pregartner, Gudrun; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Brunner, Gernot

    2018-01-01

    Incident reporting systems or so-called critical incident reporting systems (CIRS) were first recommended for use in health care more than 15 years ago. The uses of these CIRS are highly variable among countries, ranging from being used to report critical incidents, falls, or sentinel events resulting in death. In Austria, CIRS have only been introduced to the health care sector relatively recently. The goal of this work, therefore, was to determine whether and specifically how CIRS are used in Austria. A working group from the Austrian Society for Quality and Safety in Healthcare (ASQS) developed a survey on the topic of CIRS to collect information on penetration of CIRS in general and on how CIRS reports are used to increase patient safety. Three hundred seventy-one health care professionals from 274 health care facilities were contacted via e-mail. Seventy-eight respondents (21.0%) completed the online survey, thereof 66 from hospitals and 12 from other facilities (outpatient clinics, nursing homes). In all, 64.1% of the respondents indicated that CIRS were used in the entire health care facility; 20.6% had not yet introduced CIRS and 15.4% used CIRS only in particular areas. Most often, critical incidents without any harm to patients were reported (76.9%); however, some health care facilities also use their CIRS to report patient falls (16.7%), needle stick injuries (17.9%), technical problems (51.3%), or critical incidents involving health care professionals. CIRS are not yet extensively or homogeneously used in Austria. Inconsistencies exist with respect to which events are reported as well as how they are followed up and reported to health care professionals. Further recommendations for general use are needed to support the dissemination in Austrian health care environments.

  15. Training healthcare personnel for mass-casualty incidents in a virtual emergency department: VED II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Wm Leroy; Youngblood, Patricia; Harter, Phillip; Kusumoto, Laura; Dev, Parvati

    2010-01-01

    Training emergency personnel on the clinical management of a mass-casualty incident (MCI) with prior chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear, or explosives (CBRNE) -exposed patients is a component of hospital preparedness procedures. The objective of this research was to determine whether a Virtual Emergency Department (VED), designed after the Stanford University Medical Center's Emergency Department (ED) and populated with 10 virtual patient victims who suffered from a dirty bomb blast (radiological) and 10 who suffered from exposure to a nerve toxin (chemical), is an effective clinical environment for training ED physicians and nurses for such MCIs. Ten physicians with an average of four years of post-training experience, and 12 nurses with an average of 9.5 years of post-graduate experience at Stanford University Medical Center and San Mateo County Medical Center participated in this IRB-approved study. All individuals were provided electronic information about the clinical features of patients exposed to a nerve toxin or radioactive blast before the study date and an orientation to the "game" interface, including an opportunity to practice using it immediately prior to the study. An exit questionnaire was conducted using a Likert Scale test instrument. Among these 22 trainees, two-thirds of whom had prior Code Triage (multiple casualty incident) training, and one-half had prior CBRNE training, about two-thirds felt immersed in the virtual world much or all of the time. Prior to the training, only four trainees (18%) were confident about managing CBRNE MCIs. After the training, 19 (86%) felt either "confident" or "very confident", with 13 (59%) attributing this change to practicing in the virtual ED. Twenty-one (95%) of the trainees reported that the scenarios were useful for improving healthcare team skills training, the primary objective for creating them. Eighteen trainees (82%) believed that the cases also were instructive in learning about clinical

  16. Comprehensive CFD analyses concerning the serious incident occurred in the Paks NPP, Spring 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legradi, Gabor; Boros, Ildiko; Aszodi, Attila

    2007-01-01

    On 10-11 April, 2003, a serious incident occurred in a special fuel assembly cleaning tank, which was installed into the service shaft of the 2. unit of the Paks NPP of Hungary. As a consequence of the incident, most of the 30 fuel assemblies put into the cleaning tank have seriously damaged. At the Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, several CFD investigations were performed concerning the course of the incident, the post incidental conditions and the recovery work. The main reason of the incident can be originated from the defective design of the cleaning tank which resulted in the insufficient cooling of the system. First, the CFD calculations, with which the thermal-hydraulic deficiencies of the design were revealed, are presented in this paper. This investigation clearly showed how as strong temperature stratification could develop inside the cleaning tank that it was able to block the coolant flow through the fuel assemblies. After the blocking of the flow, the coolant started to boil, and the assemblies became uncovered. The temperature of the surfaces of the fuel assemblies rose above 1000 deg. C. With the aid of the radiative heat transfer model of the CFX-5.6 code, the surface temperatures and also the heat transfer between the shrouds of the assemblies and the inner surface of the cleaning tank mantle were analyzed. When the cleaning instrument got opened the fuel assemblies suffered a serious thermal shock and the assemblies highly damaged. For better understanding of the post-incident state inside the cleaning vessel and for serving as a basis for the safety analyses of the cooling systems, other detailed 3D thermal-hydraulic calculations were performed. These calculations also serve as a basis for the recovery work. The recovery work is planned to be started in the close future. During this work, the service shaft will be operated in a low-coolant-level operational mode. The operators of the damaged fuel

  17. Increasing incidence of hospital-acquired and healthcare-associated bacteremia in northeast Thailand: a multicenter surveillance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliwan Hongsuwan

    Full Text Available Little is known about the epidemiology of nosocomial bloodstream infections in public hospitals in developing countries. We evaluated trends in incidence of hospital-acquired bacteremia (HAB and healthcare-associated bacteremia (HCAB and associated mortality in a developing country using routinely available databases.Information from the microbiology and hospital databases of 10 provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand was linked with the national death registry for 2004-2010. Bacteremia was considered hospital-acquired if detected after the first two days of hospital admission, and healthcare-associated if detected within two days of hospital admission with a prior inpatient episode in the preceding 30 days.A total of 3,424 patients out of 1,069,443 at risk developed HAB and 2,184 out of 119,286 at risk had HCAB. Of these 1,559 (45.5% and 913 (41.8% died within 30 days, respectively. Between 2004 and 2010, the incidence rate of HAB increased from 0.6 to 0.8 per 1,000 patient-days at risk (p<0.001, and the cumulative incidence of HCAB increased from 1.2 to 2.0 per 100 readmissions (p<0.001. The most common causes of HAB were Acinetobacter spp. (16.2%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.9%, and Staphylococcus aureus (13.9%, while those of HCAB were Escherichia coli (26.3%, S. aureus (14.0%, and K. pneumoniae (9.7%. There was an overall increase over time in the proportions of ESBL-producing E. coli causing HAB and HCAB.This study demonstrates a high and increasing incidence of HAB and HCAB in provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand, increasing proportions of ESBL-producing isolates, and very high associated mortality.

  18. Safer healthcare at home: Detecting, correcting and learning from incidents involving infusion devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, I.; Blandford, A. E.

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Complex medical devices such as infusion pumps are increasingly being used in patients’ homes with little known about the impact on patient safety. Our aim was to better understand the risks to patient safety in this situation and how these risks might be minimised, by reference to incident reports. DESIGN: We identified 606 records of incidents associated with infusion devices that had occurred in a private home and were reported to the UK National Reporting and Learni...

  19. Healthcare-associated ventriculitis and meningitis in a neuro-ICU: Incidence and risk factors selected by machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Ivan; Ershova, Ksenia; Kurdyumova, Nataliya; Ershova, Olga; Khomenko, Oleg; Danilov, Gleb; Shifrin, Michael; Zelman, Vladimir

    2018-02-05

    To define the incidence of healthcare-associated ventriculitis and meningitis (HAVM) in the neuro-ICU and to identify HAVM risk factors using tree-based machine learning (ML) algorithms. An observational cohort study was conducted in Russia from 2010 to 2017, and included high-risk neuro-ICU patients. We utilized relative risk analysis, regressions, and ML to identify factors associated with HAVM development. 2286 patients of all ages were included, 216 of them had HAVM. The cumulative incidence of HAVM was 9.45% [95% CI 8.25-10.65]. The incidence of EVD-associated HAVM was 17.2 per 1000 EVD-days or 4.3% [95% CI 3.47-5.13] per 100 patients. Combining all three methods, we selected four important factors contributing to HAVM development: EVD, craniotomy, superficial surgical site infections after neurosurgery, and CSF leakage. The ML models performed better than regressions. We first reported HAVM incidence in a neuro-ICU in Russia. We showed that tree-based ML is an effective approach to study risk factors because it enables the identification of nonlinear interaction across factors. We suggest that the number of found risk factors and the duration of their presence in patients should be reduced to prevent HAVM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Benefit Analyses of Technologies for Automatic Identification to Be Implemented in the Healthcare Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Mike; Schlatter, Ueli

    The tasks and objectives of automatic identification (Auto-ID) are to provide information on goods and products. It has already been established for years in the areas of logistics and trading and can no longer be ignored by the German healthcare sector. Some German hospitals have already discovered the capabilities of Auto-ID. Improvements in quality, safety and reductions in risk, cost and time are aspects and areas where improvements are achievable. Privacy protection, legal restraints, and the personal rights of patients and staff members are just a few aspects which make the heath care sector a sensible field for the implementation of Auto-ID. Auto-ID in this context contains the different technologies, methods and products for the registration, provision and storage of relevant data. With the help of a quantifiable and science-based evaluation, an answer is sought as to which Auto-ID has the highest capability to be implemented in healthcare business.

  1. Incidence of Appendicitis over Time: A Comparative Analysis of an Administrative Healthcare Database and a Pathology-Proven Appendicitis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Stephanie; Kareemi, Hashim; Clement, Fiona; Zimmer, Scott; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G; Heitman, Steven J; Swain, Mark; Ghosh, Subrata; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2016-01-01

    At the turn of the 21st century, studies evaluating the change in incidence of appendicitis over time have reported inconsistent findings. We compared the differences in the incidence of appendicitis derived from a pathology registry versus an administrative database in order to validate coding in administrative databases and establish temporal trends in the incidence of appendicitis. We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study to identify all individuals with appendicitis from 2000 to2008. Two population-based data sources were used to identify cases of appendicitis: 1) a pathology registry (n = 8,822); and 2) a hospital discharge abstract database (n = 10,453). The administrative database was compared to the pathology registry for the following a priori analyses: 1) to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV) of administrative codes; 2) to compare the annual incidence of appendicitis; and 3) to assess differences in temporal trends. Temporal trends were assessed using a generalized linear model that assumed a Poisson distribution and reported as an annual percent change (APC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Analyses were stratified by perforated and non-perforated appendicitis. The administrative database (PPV = 83.0%) overestimated the incidence of appendicitis (100.3 per 100,000) when compared to the pathology registry (84.2 per 100,000). Codes for perforated appendicitis were not reliable (PPV = 52.4%) leading to overestimation in the incidence of perforated appendicitis in the administrative database (34.8 per 100,000) as compared to the pathology registry (19.4 per 100,000). The incidence of appendicitis significantly increased over time in both the administrative database (APC = 2.1%; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.8) and pathology registry (APC = 4.1; 95% CI: 3.1, 5.0). The administrative database overestimated the incidence of appendicitis, particularly among perforated appendicitis. Therefore, studies utilizing administrative data to analyze

  2. Incidence of Appendicitis over Time: A Comparative Analysis of an Administrative Healthcare Database and a Pathology-Proven Appendicitis Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Coward

    Full Text Available At the turn of the 21st century, studies evaluating the change in incidence of appendicitis over time have reported inconsistent findings.We compared the differences in the incidence of appendicitis derived from a pathology registry versus an administrative database in order to validate coding in administrative databases and establish temporal trends in the incidence of appendicitis.We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study to identify all individuals with appendicitis from 2000 to2008.Two population-based data sources were used to identify cases of appendicitis: 1 a pathology registry (n = 8,822; and 2 a hospital discharge abstract database (n = 10,453.The administrative database was compared to the pathology registry for the following a priori analyses: 1 to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV of administrative codes; 2 to compare the annual incidence of appendicitis; and 3 to assess differences in temporal trends. Temporal trends were assessed using a generalized linear model that assumed a Poisson distribution and reported as an annual percent change (APC with 95% confidence intervals (CI. Analyses were stratified by perforated and non-perforated appendicitis.The administrative database (PPV = 83.0% overestimated the incidence of appendicitis (100.3 per 100,000 when compared to the pathology registry (84.2 per 100,000. Codes for perforated appendicitis were not reliable (PPV = 52.4% leading to overestimation in the incidence of perforated appendicitis in the administrative database (34.8 per 100,000 as compared to the pathology registry (19.4 per 100,000. The incidence of appendicitis significantly increased over time in both the administrative database (APC = 2.1%; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.8 and pathology registry (APC = 4.1; 95% CI: 3.1, 5.0.The administrative database overestimated the incidence of appendicitis, particularly among perforated appendicitis. Therefore, studies utilizing administrative data to analyze perforated

  3. Safer healthcare at home: Detecting, correcting and learning from incidents involving infusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Imogen; Blandford, Ann

    2018-02-01

    Complex medical devices such as infusion pumps are increasingly being used in patients' homes with little known about the impact on patient safety. Our aim was to better understand the risks to patient safety in this situation and how these risks might be minimised, by reference to incident reports. We identified 606 records of incidents associated with infusion devices that had occurred in a private home and were reported to the UK National Reporting and Learning Service (2005-2015 inclusive). We used thematic analysis to identify key themes. In this paper we focus on two emergent themes: detecting and diagnosing incidents; and locating the patient, lay caregivers and their family in incident reports. The majority of incidents were attributed to device malfunction, and resulted in the patient being under-dosed. Delays in recognising and responding to problems were identified, alongside challenges in identifying the cause. We propose a process model for fault diagnosis and correction. Patients and caregivers did not feature strongly in reports; we highlight how the device is in the home but of the care system, and propose an agent model to describe this; we also identify ways of mitigating this disjoint. Devices need to be appropriately tailored to the setting in which they are employed, and within a system of care that ensures they are used optimally and safely. Suggested features to improve patient safety include devices that can provide better feedback to identify problems and support resolution, alongside greater monitoring and technical support by care providers for both patients and frontline professionals. The proposed process and agent models provide a structure for reviewing safety and learning from incidents in home health care. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Endemic influences of political regimes, healthcare systems, and preferences on the frequencies and incidences of nephropathies in eastern Saxony, Germany
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Sam; Heshmati, Eleène Sahmila; Frese, Thomas; Rasche, Wilma Gertrud; Barinka, Filip; Fahr, Florian; Beige, Joachim; Schiekofer, Stephan; Rasche, Franz Maximilian

    2017-12-01

    The possible confounding influence of investigator-related preferences, available histological techniques, and healthcare systems on the frequencies and incidences of primary and secondary nephropathies was evaluated in this long-term observation. The observation time from 1983 to 2010 was divided in regard to the political regimes: a) prior to and after German reunification: German Democratic Republic (GDR, period 1 from 1983 to 1990)/Federal Republic of Germany (FRG, period 2 from 1990 to 2010); and the two heads of the division of nephrology, b) conductor 1 (1983 - 2006) and conductor 2 (2006 - 2010). 467 kidney biopsies at the University Hospital of Leipzig were included in our analysis. In period 1, due to the unavailability of immunofluorescence methods, mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (MesP) was the most dominating nephropathy. In period 2, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was the most common nephropathy (17%). IgAN was followed by crescentic glomerulonephritis (13%), hypertensive nephropathy (10%), minimal-change disease, and membranous glomerulonephritis (each 9%). From period 1 to period 2, MesP/IgAN (62% to 16%), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and postinfectious glomerulonephritis decreased significantly (p < 0.05). IgAN decreased significantly (p < 0.05) from conductor 1 to conductor 2 (21% to 6%), while diabetic nephropathy significantly increased. Focal-segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) had the highest incidence rate with 1.0, followed by IgAN with 0.8 (per 100,000 per year). In a nearly ethnically identical cohort, we have demonstrated that confounding factors, e.g., healthcare systems and preferences of conductors, have a strong influence - more than 10-fold variance - on frequency and incidence on the spectrum of nephropathies.
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  5. Incidence of adverse events among healthcare workers following H1N1 Mass immunization in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankrah, Daniel N A; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; De Bruin, Marie L

    2013-01-01

    in the Pandemrix(®) SPC, but while injection-site pain was the most frequent in the SPC and other foreign studies, we recorded headache as the most frequent. Even fatigue, muscle/joint aches and fever had higher incidence rates compared with injection-site pain. Tachycardia (n = 6), tinnitus (n = 1) and decreased...

  6. Social sustainability in healthcare facilities: a rating tool for analysing and improving social aspects in environments of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capolongo, Stefano; Gola, Marco; di Noia, Michela; Nickolova, Maria; Nachiero, Dario; Rebecchi, Andrea; Settimo, Gaetano; Vittori, Gail; Buffoli, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays several rating systems exist for the evaluation of the sustainability of buildings, but often their focus is limited to environmental and efficiency aspects. Hospitals are complex constructions in which many variables affect hospital processes. Therefore, a research group has developed a tool for the evaluation of sustainability in healthcare facilities. The paper analyses social sustainability issues through a tool which evaluates users' perception from a the quality and well-being perspective. It presents a hierarchical structure composed of a criteria and indicators system which is organised through a weighing system calculated by using the Analytic Network Process. The output is the definition of a tool which evaluates how Humanisation, Comfort and Distribution criteria can affect the social sustainability of a building. Starting from its application, it is evident that the instrument enables the improvement of healthcare facilities through several design and organisational suggestions for achieving healing and sustainable architectures.

  7. Geographic analysis of the variation in the incidence of ADHD in a country with free access to healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kathrine Bang; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Olsen, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    with access to diagnostic services, diagnostic culture, neighbourhood socioeconomic status and municipal spending on health care for children. METHODS: We combined information on registered diagnosis of ICD-10 Hyperkinetic Disorder and ADHD medication use in a Danish register-based cohort of children born...... between neighbouring municipalities, no significant associations were found between ADHD and access to diagnostic services, different diagnostic culture, socioeconomic status at municipality level or the municipal spending on health care for children. CONCLUSIONS: A large geographical variation of ADHD...... in the municipalities was observed despite tax-financed and free access to healthcare. Although not statistically significant, results indicate that accessibility to diagnostic resources might explain some of the variation in ADHD incidence. In contrast to US studies the observed variation was not statistically...

  8. Prevalence and incidence of latent tuberculosis infection in georgian healthcare workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Whitaker

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a major occupational hazard in low and middle-income countries. Limited data exist on serial testing of healthcare workers (HCWs with interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI, especially in low and middle-income countries. We sought to evaluate the rates of and risk factors for LTBI prevalence and LTBI test conversion among HCWs using the tuberculin skin test (TST and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube assay (QFT-GIT.A prospective longitudinal study was conducted among HCWs in the country of Georgia. Subjects completed a questionnaire, and TST and QFT-GIT tests were performed. LTBI testing was repeated 6-26 months after baseline testing.Among 319 HCWs enrolled, 89% reported prior BCG vaccination, and 60% worked in TB healthcare facilities (HCFs. HCWs from TB HCFs had higher prevalence of positive QFT-GIT and TST than those from non-TB HCFs: 107/194 (55% vs. 30/125 (31% QFT-GIT positive (p<0.0001 and 128/189 (69% vs. 64/119 (54% TST positive (p = 0.01. There was fair agreement between TST and QFT-GIT (kappa = 0.42, 95% CI 0.31-0.52. In multivariate analysis, frequent contact with TB patients was associated with increased risk of positive QFT-GIT (aOR 3.04, 95% CI 1.79-5.14 but not positive TST. Increasing age was associated with increased risk of positive QFT-GIT (aOR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.09 and TST (aOR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10. High rates of HCW conversion were seen: the QFT-GIT conversion rate was 22.8/100 person-years, and TST conversion rate was 17.1/100 person-years. In multivariate analysis, female HCWs had decreased risk of TST conversion (aOR 0.05, 95% CI 0.01-0.43, and older HCWs had increased risk of QFT-GIT conversion (aOR 1.07 per year, 95% CI 1.01-1.13.LTBI prevalence and LTBI test conversion rates were high among Georgian HCWs, especially among those working at TB HCFs. These data highlight the need for increased implementation of TB infection control measures.

  9. Incidence of Appendicitis over Time: A Comparative Analysis of an Administrative Healthcare Database and a Pathology-Proven Appendicitis Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Fiona; Zimmer, Scott; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G.; Heitman, Steven J.; Swain, Mark; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Importance At the turn of the 21st century, studies evaluating the change in incidence of appendicitis over time have reported inconsistent findings. Objectives We compared the differences in the incidence of appendicitis derived from a pathology registry versus an administrative database in order to validate coding in administrative databases and establish temporal trends in the incidence of appendicitis. Design We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study to identify all individuals with appendicitis from 2000 to2008. Setting & Participants Two population-based data sources were used to identify cases of appendicitis: 1) a pathology registry (n = 8,822); and 2) a hospital discharge abstract database (n = 10,453). Intervention & Main Outcome The administrative database was compared to the pathology registry for the following a priori analyses: 1) to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV) of administrative codes; 2) to compare the annual incidence of appendicitis; and 3) to assess differences in temporal trends. Temporal trends were assessed using a generalized linear model that assumed a Poisson distribution and reported as an annual percent change (APC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Analyses were stratified by perforated and non-perforated appendicitis. Results The administrative database (PPV = 83.0%) overestimated the incidence of appendicitis (100.3 per 100,000) when compared to the pathology registry (84.2 per 100,000). Codes for perforated appendicitis were not reliable (PPV = 52.4%) leading to overestimation in the incidence of perforated appendicitis in the administrative database (34.8 per 100,000) as compared to the pathology registry (19.4 per 100,000). The incidence of appendicitis significantly increased over time in both the administrative database (APC = 2.1%; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.8) and pathology registry (APC = 4.1; 95% CI: 3.1, 5.0). Conclusion & Relevance The administrative database overestimated the incidence of appendicitis

  10. Analysing a Chinese Regional Integrated Healthcare Organisation Reform Failure using a Complex Adaptive System Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Wenxi; Wei, Lai; Zhang, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: China’s organised health system has remained outdated for decades. Current health systems in many less market-oriented countries still adhere to traditional administrative-based directives and linear planning. Furthermore, they neglect the responsiveness and feedback of institutions and professionals, which often results in reform failure in integrated care. Complex adaptive system theory (CAS) provides a new perspective and methodology for analysing the health system and policy...

  11. Analysing a Chinese Regional Integrated Healthcare Organisation Reform Failure using a Complex Adaptive System Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxi Tang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: China’s organised health system has remained outdated for decades. Current health systems in many less market-oriented countries still adhere to traditional administrative-based directives and linear planning. Furthermore, they neglect the responsiveness and feedback of institutions and professionals, which often results in reform failure in integrated care. Complex adaptive system theory (CAS provides a new perspective and methodology for analysing the health system and policy implementation.  Methods: We observed the typical case of Qianjiang’s Integrated Health Organization Reform (IHO for 2 years to analyse integrated care reforms using CAS theory. Via questionnaires and interviews, we observed 32 medical institutions and 344 professionals. We compared their cooperative behaviours from both organisational and inter-professional levels between 2013 and 2015, and further investigated potential reasons for why medical institutions and professionals did not form an effective IHO. We discovered how interested parties in the policy implementation process influenced reform outcome, and by theoretical induction, proposed a new semi-organised system and corresponding policy analysis flowchart that potentially suits the actual realisation of CAS.  Results: The reform did not achieve its desired effect. The Qianjiang IHO was loosely integrated rather than closely integrated, and the cooperation levels between organisations and professionals were low. This disappointing result was due to low mutual trust among IHO members, with the main contributing factors being insufficient financial incentives and the lack of a common vision.  Discussion and Conclusions: The traditional 'organised health system' is old-fashioned. Rather than being completely organised or adaptive, the health system is currently more similar to a s'emi-organised system'. Medical institutions and professionals operate in a middle ground between complete adherence

  12. Analysing a Chinese Regional Integrated Healthcare Organisation Reform Failure using a Complex Adaptive System Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenxi; Wei, Lai; Zhang, Liang

    2017-06-19

    China's organised health system has remained outdated for decades. Current health systems in many less market-oriented countries still adhere to traditional administrative-based directives and linear planning. Furthermore, they neglect the responsiveness and feedback of institutions and professionals, which often results in reform failure in integrated care. Complex adaptive system theory (CAS) provides a new perspective and methodology for analysing the health system and policy implementation. We observed the typical case of Qianjiang's Integrated Health Organization Reform (IHO) for 2 years to analyse integrated care reforms using CAS theory. Via questionnaires and interviews, we observed 32 medical institutions and 344 professionals. We compared their cooperative behaviours from both organisational and inter-professional levels between 2013 and 2015, and further investigated potential reasons for why medical institutions and professionals did not form an effective IHO. We discovered how interested parties in the policy implementation process influenced reform outcome, and by theoretical induction, proposed a new semi-organised system and corresponding policy analysis flowchart that potentially suits the actual realisation of CAS. The reform did not achieve its desired effect. The Qianjiang IHO was loosely integrated rather than closely integrated, and the cooperation levels between organisations and professionals were low. This disappointing result was due to low mutual trust among IHO members, with the main contributing factors being insufficient financial incentives and the lack of a common vision. The traditional organised health system is old-fashioned. Rather than being completely organised or adaptive, the health system is currently more similar to a semi-organised syste m. Medical institutions and professionals operate in a middle ground between complete adherence to administrative orders from state-run health systems and completely adapting to the market

  13. A method for analysing incidents due to human errors on nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffon, M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of a methodology adapted to a detailed analysis of incidents considered to be due to human errors. An identification of human errors and a search for their eventual multiple causes is then needed. They are categorized in eight classes: education and training of personnel, installation design, work organization, time and work duration, physical environment, social environment, history of the plant and performance of the operator. The method is illustrated by the analysis of a handling incident generated by multiple human errors. (author)

  14. Effect of Probiotics on the Incidence of Healthcare-Associated Infections in Mechanically Ventilated Neurocritical Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, John; Mahmoud, Leana; Zullo, Andrew R; Potter, N Stevenson; Fehnel, Corey R; Thompson, Bradford B; Wendell, Linda C

    2016-02-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are seen in 17% of critically ill patients. Probiotics, live nonpathogenic microorganisms, may aid in reducing the incidence of infection in critically ill patients. We hypothesized that administration of probiotics would be safe and reduce the incidence of HAIs among mechanically ventilated neurocritical care patients. We assembled 2 retrospective cohorts of mechanically ventilated neurocritical care patients. In the preintervention cohort from July 1, 2011, to December 31, 2011, probiotics were not used. In the postintervention group from July 1, 2012, to December 31, 2012, 1 g of a combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus helveticus was administered twice daily to all patients who were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 hours. There were a total of 167 patients included, 80 patients in the preintervention group and 87 patients in the postintervention group. No patients in the preintervention group received probiotics. Eighty-five (98%) patients in the postintervention group received probiotics for a median of 10 days (interquartile range, 4-20 days). There were 14 (18%) HAIs in the preintervention group and 8 (9%) HAIs in the postintervention group (P = .17). Ventilator days, lengths of stay, in-hospital mortality, and discharge disposition were similar between the pre- and postintervention groups. There were no cases of Lactobacillus bacteremia or other adverse events associated with probiotics use. Probiotics are safe to administer in neurocritical care patients; however, this study failed to demonstrate a significant decrease in HAIs or secondary outcomes associated with probiotics. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. Prevalence, Incidence, and Sex Ratio of Transsexualism in the Autonomous Region of Madrid (Spain) According to Healthcare Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Fernández, Antonio; Rodríguez-Molina, José Miguel; Asenjo-Araque, Nuria; Lucio-Pérez, María Jesús; Cuchí-Alfaro, Miguel; García-Camba, Eduardo; Pérez-López, Gilberto; Menacho-Román, Miriam; Berrocal-Sertucha, María Carmen; Ly-Pen, Domingo; Aguilar-Vilas, María Victorina

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, different studies have provided estimates of the prevalence of transsexualism with very diverse results. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the prevalence, incidence, and sex ratio of transsexualism in the autonomous region of Madrid (Spain). A total of 1234 patients who attended from 2007 to the end of 2015 in the only Gender Identity Unit (GIU) in Madrid were analyzed. Sixty-three patients were excluded for various reasons; thus, 1171 could be included: 803 male-to-female (MtF) and 368 female-to-male (FtM) transsexual patients. Transsexualism was diagnosed based on the ICD-10, World Health Organization, 1992, and/or gender identity disorder based on the DSM-IV-TR, American Psychiatric Association, 2000. The demographic statistics were calculated on the basis of the population over 15 years old of Madrid. Based on healthcare demand, the prevalence of transsexualism was 22.1 in 100,000 inhabitants: 31.2 for MtF and 12.9 for FtM, making the MtF/FtM ratio approximately 2.2:1. The incidence rate was 2.5 in 100,000 inhabitants, representing an annual average of 130 demands. Although transsexualism occurs in all countries with different rates of prevalence, in our area, this prevalence was higher than reported from other European countries. We believe that two main circumstances might influence this high prevalence: the easy accessibility and the absence of a waiting list to the GIU, and the permissive social and legal climate and openness of Spain, especially in Madrid.

  16. What Happened, and Why: Toward an Understanding of Human Error Based on Automated Analyses of Incident Reports. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maille, Nicolas P.; Statler, Irving C.; Ferryman, Thomas A.; Rosenthal, Loren; Shafto, Michael G.; Statler, Irving C.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) project of NASA s Aviation Safety and Security Program was to develop technologies that will enable proactive management of safety risk, which entails identifying the precursor events and conditions that foreshadow most accidents. This presents a particular challenge in the aviation system where people are key components and human error is frequently cited as a major contributing factor or cause of incidents and accidents. In the aviation "world", information about what happened can be extracted from quantitative data sources, but the experiential account of the incident reporter is the best available source of information about why an incident happened. This report describes a conceptual model and an approach to automated analyses of textual data sources for the subjective perspective of the reporter of the incident to aid in understanding why an incident occurred. It explores a first-generation process for routinely searching large databases of textual reports of aviation incident or accidents, and reliably analyzing them for causal factors of human behavior (the why of an incident). We have defined a generic structure of information that is postulated to be a sound basis for defining similarities between aviation incidents. Based on this structure, we have introduced the simplifying structure, which we call the Scenario as a pragmatic guide for identifying similarities of what happened based on the objective parameters that define the Context and the Outcome of a Scenario. We believe that it will be possible to design an automated analysis process guided by the structure of the Scenario that will aid aviation-safety experts to understand the systemic issues that are conducive to human error.

  17. Opto-mechanical Analyses for Performance Optimization of Lightweight Grazing-incidence Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Jacqueline M.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Odell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    New technology in grazing-incidence mirror fabrication and assembly is necessary to achieve subarcsecond optics for large-area x-ray telescopes. In order to define specifications, an understanding of performance sensitivity to design parameters is crucial. MSFC is undertaking a systematic study to specify a mounting approach, mirror substrate, and testing method. Lightweight mirrors are typically flimsy and are, therefore, susceptible to significant distortion due to mounting and gravitational forces. Material properties of the mirror substrate along with its dimensions significantly affect the distortions caused by mounting and gravity. A parametric study of these properties and their relationship to mounting and testing schemes will indicate specifications for the design of the next generation of lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors. Here we report initial results of this study.

  18. Numerical analyses of an ex-core fuel incident: Results of the OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozer, Z., E-mail: hozer@aeki.kfki.h [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Aszodi, A. [BME NTI Budapest (Hungary); Barnak, M. [IVS, Trnava (Slovakia); Boros, I. [BME NTI Budapest (Hungary); Fogel, M. [VUJE, Trnava (Slovakia); Guillard, V. [IRSN, Cadarache (France); Gyori, Cs. [ITU, EU, Karlsruhe (Germany); Hegyi, G. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Horvath, G.L. [VEIKI, Budapest (Hungary); Nagy, I. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Junninen, P. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kobzar, V. [KI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Legradi, G. [BME NTI Budapest (Hungary); Molnar, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Pietarinen, K. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Perneczky, L. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Makihara, Y. [ATMEA, Paris (France); Matejovic, P. [IVS, Trnava (Slovakia); Perez-Fero, E.; Slonszki, E. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2010-03-15

    The OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project was developed to support the understanding of fuel behaviour in accident conditions on the basis of analyses of the Paks-2 incident. Numerical simulation of the most relevant aspects of the event and comparison of the calculation results with the available data from the incident was carried out between 2006 and 2007. A database was compiled to provide input for the code calculations. The activities covered the following three areas: (a) Thermal hydraulic calculations described the cooling conditions possibly established during the incident. (b) Simulation of fuel behaviour described the oxidation and degradation mechanisms of the fuel assemblies. (c) The release of fission products from the failed fuel rods was estimated and compared to available measured data. The applied used codes captured the most important events of the Paks-2 incident and the calculated results improved the understanding of the causes and mechanisms of fuel failure. The numerical analyses showed that the by-pass flow leading to insufficient cooling amounted to 75-90% of the inlet flow rate, the maximum temperature in the tank was between 1200 and 1400 deg. C, the degree of zirconium oxidation reached 4-12% and the mass of produced hydrogen was between 3 and 13 kg.

  19. Detailed semantic analyses of human error incidents occurring at domestic nuclear power plants to fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuge, Tadashi; Hirotsu, Yuko; Takano, Kenichi; Ebisu, Mitsuhiro; Tsumura, Joji

    2003-01-01

    Analysing and evaluating observed cases of human error incidents with the emphasis on human factors and behavior involved was essential for preventing recurrence of those. CRIEPI has been conducting detailed and structures analyses of all incidents reported during last 35 year based on J-HPES, from the beginning of the first Tokai nuclear power operation till fiscal year of 2000, in which total 212 human error cases are identified. Results obtained by the analyses have been stored into the J-HPES data-base. This summarized the semantic analyses on all case-studies stored in the above data-base to grasp the practical and concrete contents and trend of more frequently observed human errors (as are called trigger actions here), causal factors and preventive measures. These semantic analyses have been executed by classifying all those items into some categories that could be considered as having almost the same meaning using the KJ method. Followings are obtained typical results by above analyses: (1) Trigger action-Those could be classified into categories of operation or categories of maintenance. Operational timing errors' and 'operational quantitative errors' were major actions in trigger actions of operation, those occupied about 20% among all actions. At trigger actions of maintenance, 'maintenance quantitative error' were major actions, those occupied quarter among all actions; (2) Causal factor- 'Human internal status' were major factors, as in concrete factors, those occupied 'improper persistence' and 'lack of knowledge'; (3) Preventive measure-Most frequent measures got were job management changes in procedural software improvements, which was from 70% to 80%. As for preventive measures of operation, software improvements have been implemented on 'organization and work practices' and 'individual consciousness'. Concerning preventive measures of maintenance, improvements have been implemented on 'organization and work practices'. (author)

  20. Workplace interpersonal conflicts among the healthcare workers: Retrospective exploration from the institutional incident reporting system of a university-affiliated medical center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Shuin Jerng

    Full Text Available There have been concerns about the workplace interpersonal conflict (WIC among healthcare workers. As healthcare organizations have applied the incident reporting system (IRS widely for safety-related incidents, we proposed that this system might provide a channel to explore the WICs.We retrospectively reviewed the reports to the IRS from July 2010 to June 2013 in a medical center. We identified the WICs and typed these conflicts according to the two foci (task content/process and interpersonal relationship and the three properties (disagreement, interference, and negative emotion, and analyzed relevant data.Of the 147 incidents with WIC, the most common related processes were patient transfer (20%, laboratory tests (17%, surgery (16% and medical imaging (16%. All of the 147 incidents with WIC focused on task content or task process, but 41 (27.9% also focused on the interpersonal relationship. We found disagreement, interference, and negative emotion in 91.2%, 88.4%, and 55.8% of the cases, respectively. Nurses (57% were most often the reporting workers, while the most common encounter was the nurse-doctor interaction (33%, and the majority (67% of the conflicts were experienced concurrently with the incidents. There was a significant difference in the distribution of worker job types between cases focused on the interpersonal relationship and those without (p = 0.0064. The doctors were more frequently as the reporter when the conflicts focused on the interpersonal relationship (34.1% than not on it (17.0%. The distributions of worker job types were similar between those with and without negative emotion (p = 0.125.The institutional IRS is a useful place to report the workplace interpersonal conflicts actively. The healthcare systems need to improve the channels to communicate, manage and resolve these conflicts.

  1. Incidence, risk factors and the healthcare cost of falls postdischarge after elective total hip and total knee replacement surgery: protocol for a prospective observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Ross-Adjie, Gail; McPhail, Steven M; Monterosso, Leanne; Bulsara, Max; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Powell, Sarah-Jayne; Hardisty, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of major joint replacement procedures continues to increase in Australia. The primary aim of this study is to determine the incidence of falls in the first 12 months after discharge from hospital in a cohort of older patients who undergo elective total hip or total knee replacement. Methods and analyses A prospective longitudinal observational cohort study starting in July 2015, enrolling patients aged ≥60 years who are admitted for elective major joint replacement (n=267 total hip replacement, n=267 total knee replacement) and are to be discharged to the community. Participants are followed up for 12 months after hospital discharge. The primary outcome measure is the rate of falls per thousand patient-days. Falls data will be collected by 2 methods: issuing a falls diary to each participant and telephoning participants monthly after discharge. Secondary outcomes include the rate of injurious falls and health-related quality of life. Patient-rated outcomes will be measured using the Oxford Hip or Oxford Knee score. Generalised linear mixed modelling will be used to examine the falls outcomes in the 12 months after discharge and to examine patient and clinical characteristics predictive of falls. An economic evaluation will be conducted to describe the nature of healthcare costs in the first 12 months after elective joint replacement and estimate costs directly attributable to fall events. Ethics and dissemination The results will be disseminated through local site networks and will inform future services to support older people undergoing hip or knee joint replacement and also through peer-reviewed publications and medical conferences. This study has been approved by The University of Notre Dame Australia and local hospital human research ethics committees. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000653561; Pre-results. PMID:27412102

  2. What Happened, and Why: Toward an Understanding of Human Error Based on Automated Analyses of Incident Reports. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferryman, Thomas A.; Posse, Christian; Rosenthal, Loren J.; Srivastava, Ashok N.; Statler, Irving C.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling project of NASA's Aviation Safety and Security Program was to develop technologies to enable proactive management of safety risk, which entails identifying the precursor events and conditions that foreshadow most accidents. Information about what happened can be extracted from quantitative data sources, but the experiential account of the incident reporter is the best available source of information about why an incident happened. In Volume I, the concept of the Scenario was introduced as a pragmatic guide for identifying similarities of what happened based on the objective parameters that define the Context and the Outcome of a Scenario. In this Volume II, that study continues into the analyses of the free narratives to gain understanding as to why the incident occurred from the reporter s perspective. While this is just the first experiment, the results of our approach are encouraging and indicate that it will be possible to design an automated analysis process guided by the structure of the Scenario that can achieve the level of consistency and reliability of human analysis of narrative reports.

  3. Personal factors affecting ethical performance in healthcare workers during disasters and mass casualty incidents in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Mehrzad; Fadavi, Mohsen; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Borhani, Fariba

    2017-09-01

    In emergencies and disasters, ethics are affected by both personal and organizational factors. Given the lack of organizational ethical guidelines in the disaster management system in Iran, the present study was conducted to explain the personal factors affecting ethics and ethical behaviors among disaster healthcare workers. The present qualitative inquiry was conducted using conventional content analysis to analyze the data collected from 21 in-depth unstructured interviews with healthcare workers with an experience of attending one or more fields of disaster. According to the data collected, personal factors can be classified into five major categories, including personal characteristics such as age and gender, personal values, threshold of tolerance, personal knowledge and reflective thinking. Without ethical guidelines, healthcare workers are intensely affected by the emotional climate of the event and guided by their beliefs. A combination of personal characteristics, competences and expertise thus form the basis of ethical conduct in disaster healthcare workers.

  4. Incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in England, 1950-2009: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Kirkbride

    Full Text Available We conducted a systematic review of incidence rates in England over a sixty-year period to determine the extent to which rates varied along accepted (age, sex and less-accepted epidemiological gradients (ethnicity, migration and place of birth and upbringing, time.To determine variation in incidence of several psychotic disorders as above.Published and grey literature searches (MEDLINE, PSycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, ASSIA, HMIC, and identification of unpublished data through bibliographic searches and author communication.Published 1950-2009; conducted wholly or partially in England; original data on incidence of non-organic adult-onset psychosis or one or more factor(s pertaining to incidence.People, 16-64 years, with first -onset psychosis, including non-affective psychoses, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychotic depression and substance-induced psychosis.Title, abstract and full-text review by two independent raters to identify suitable citations. Data were extracted to a standardized extraction form. Descriptive appraisals of variation in rates, including tables and forest plots, and where suitable, random-effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions to test specific hypotheses; rate heterogeneity was assessed by the I²-statistic.83 citations met inclusion. Pooled incidence of all psychoses (N = 9 was 31.7 per 100,000 person-years (95%CI: 24.6-40.9, 23.2 (95%CI: 18.3-29.5 for non-affective psychoses (N = 8, 15.2 (95%CI: 11.9-19.5 for schizophrenia (N = 15 and 12.4 (95%CI: 9.0-17.1 for affective psychoses (N = 7. This masked rate heterogeneity (I²: 0.54-0.97, possibly explained by socio-environmental factors; our review confirmed (via meta-regression the typical age-sex interaction in psychosis risk, including secondary peak onset in women after 45 years. Rates of most disorders were elevated in several ethnic minority groups compared with the white (British population. For example, for schizophrenia: black Caribbean (pooled

  5. Comparison of Healthcare Workers Transferring Patients Using Either Conventional Or Robotic Wheelchairs: Kinematic, Electromyographic, and Electrocardiographic Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Matsumoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare the musculoskeletal and physical strain on healthcare workers, by measuring range of motion (ROM, muscle activity, and heart rate (HR, during transfer of a simulated patient using either a robotic wheelchair (RWC or a conventional wheelchair (CWC. Methods. The subjects were 10 females who had work experience in transferring patients and another female adult as the simulated patient to be transferred from bed to a RWC or a CWC. In both experimental conditions, ROM, muscle activity, and HR were assessed in the subjects using motion sensors, electromyography, and electrocardiograms. Results. Peak ROM of shoulder flexion during assistive transfer with the RWC was significantly lower than that with the CWC. Values for back muscle activity during transfer were lower with the RWC than with the CWC. Conclusions. The findings suggest that the RWC may decrease workplace injuries and lower back pain in healthcare workers.

  6. Incidence rates and risk factor analyses for owner reported vomiting and diarrhoea in Labrador Retrievers - findings from the Dogslife Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Carys A; Bronsvoort, B Mark de C; Handel, Ian G; Querry, Damon; Rose, Erica; Summers, Kim M; Clements, Dylan N

    2017-05-01

    Dogslife collects data directly from owners of Labrador Retrievers across the UK including information regarding signs of illness irrespective of whether the signs precipitated a veterinary visit. In December 2015, the cohort comprised 6084 dogs aged up to six years and their owners had made 2687 and 2601 reports of diarrhoea and vomiting respectively. The co-occurrence of vomiting and diarrhoea with other signs was described and the frequencies and durations of the two signs were examined with reference to veterinary visitation. Age-specific illness rates were described and Cox Proportional Hazards models were used to estimate risk factors. Just 37% of diarrhoea reports were associated with a veterinary visit and the proportion was even lower for vomiting at 28%; indicating that studies of veterinary practice data miss the majority of signs of gastrointestinal upset. In terms of frequency and duration, diarrhoea typically needed to last two days before the dog would be taken to the vet but if the dog vomited at least every six hours, the owner would be more likely to take the dog to the vet after one day. The illness rates of both signs peaked when the dogs were aged between three and six months. There was also a seasonal pattern to the incidents with the lowest hazards for both in May. Diarrhoea incidents peaked in August-September each year but, while vomiting appeared to be higher in September, it peaked in February. Having another dog in the household was associated with a lower hazard for both vomiting and diarrhoea but having a cat was only associated with a reduced hazard of vomiting. In addition to the distinct seasonal patterns of reporting, there were clear differences in the geographic risks for the two signs. The hazard of diarrhoea was positively associated with human population density within Great Britain (according to home post code) whereas no significant geographical association was found with vomiting. This study is particularly relevant for dog

  7. A review of recent analyses of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Potter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this analysis is to identify, assess the quality and summarize the findings of peer-reviewed articles that used data from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS published since November 2011 and data from provincial oversamples of the CIS as well as to illustrate evolving uses of these datasets. Methods: Articles were identified from the Public Health Agency of Canada's data request records tracking access to CIS data and publications produced from that data. At least two raters independently reviewed and appraised the quality of each article. Results: A total of 32 articles were included. Common strengths of articles included clearly stated research aims, appropriate control variables and analyses, sufficient sample sizes, appropriate conclusions and relevance to practice or policy. Common problem areas of articles included unclear definitions for variables and inclusion criteria of cases. Articles frequently measured the associations between maltreatment, child, caregiver, household and agency/referral characteristics and investigative outcomes such as opening cases for ongoing services and placement. Conclusion: Articles using CIS data were rated positively on most quality indicators. Researchers have recently focussed on inadequately studied categories of maltreatment (exposure to intimate partner violence [IPV], neglect and emotional maltreatment and examined factors specific to First Nations children. Data from the CIS oversamples have been underutilized. The use of multivariate analysis techniques has increased.

  8. Population-based incidence and comparative demographics of community-associated and healthcare-associated Escherichia coli bloodstream infection in Auckland, New Zealand, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Deborah A; Lim, Alwin; Wiles, Siouxsie; Roberts, Sally A; Freeman, Joshua T

    2013-08-21

    Escherichia coli is a major human pathogen, both in community and healthcare settings. To date however, relatively few studies have defined the population burden of E. coli bloodstream infections. Such information is important in informing strategies around treatment and prevention of these serious infections. Against this background, we performed a retrospective, population-based observational study of all cases of E. coli bacteremia in patients presenting to our hospital between January 2005 and December 2011. Auckland District Health Board is a tertiary-level, university-affiliated institution serving a population of approximately 500,000, within a larger metropolitan population of 1.4 million. We identified all patients with an episode of bloodstream infection due to E. coli over the study period. A unique episode was defined as the first positive E. coli blood culture taken from the same patient within a thirty-day period. Standard definitions were used to classify episodes into community- or healthcare-associated E. coli bacteremia. Demographic information was obtained for all patients, including: age; gender; ethnicity; length of stay (days); requirement for intensive care admission and all-cause, in-patient mortality. A total of 1507 patients had a unique episode of E. coli bacteremia over the study period. The overall average annual incidence of E. coli bacteremia was 52 per 100,000 population, and was highest in the under one year and over 65-year age groups. When stratified by ethnicity, rates were highest in Pacific Peoples and Māori (83 and 62 per 100,000 population respectively). The incidence of community-onset E. coli bacteremia increased significantly over the study period. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 9% (135/1507), and was significantly higher in patients who had a hospital-onset E. coli bacteremia. Our work provides valuable baseline data on the incidence of E. coli bacteremia in our locale. The incidence was higher that that

  9. Population-based incidence and comparative demographics of community-associated and healthcare-associated Escherichia coli bloodstream infection in Auckland, New Zealand, 2005 – 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is a major human pathogen, both in community and healthcare settings. To date however, relatively few studies have defined the population burden of E. coli bloodstream infections. Such information is important in informing strategies around treatment and prevention of these serious infections. Against this background, we performed a retrospective, population-based observational study of all cases of E. coli bacteremia in patients presenting to our hospital between January 2005 and December 2011. Methods Auckland District Health Board is a tertiary-level, university-affiliated institution serving a population of approximately 500,000, within a larger metropolitan population of 1.4 million. We identified all patients with an episode of bloodstream infection due to E. coli over the study period. A unique episode was defined as the first positive E. coli blood culture taken from the same patient within a thirty-day period. Standard definitions were used to classify episodes into community- or healthcare-associated E. coli bacteremia. Demographic information was obtained for all patients, including: age; gender; ethnicity; length of stay (days); requirement for intensive care admission and all-cause, in-patient mortality. Results A total of 1507 patients had a unique episode of E. coli bacteremia over the study period. The overall average annual incidence of E. coli bacteremia was 52 per 100,000 population, and was highest in the under one year and over 65-year age groups. When stratified by ethnicity, rates were highest in Pacific Peoples and Māori (83 and 62 per 100,000 population respectively). The incidence of community-onset E. coli bacteremia increased significantly over the study period. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 9% (135/1507), and was significantly higher in patients who had a hospital-onset E. coli bacteremia. Conclusions Our work provides valuable baseline data on the incidence of E. coli bacteremia in our locale

  10. Examining inequities in incidence of catastrophic health expenditures on different healthcare services and health facilities in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinna Onwujekwe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There is limited evidence about levels of socio-economic and other differences in catastrophic health spending in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. The study estimated the level of catastrophic healthcare expenditures for different healthcare services and facilities and their distribution across socioeconomic status (SES groups. METHODS: The study took place in four Local Government Areas in southeast Nigeria. Data were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires administered to 4873 households. Catastrophic health expenditures (CHE were measured using a threshold of 40% of monthly non-food expenditure. We examined both total monthly health expenditure and disaggregated expenditure by source and type of care. RESULTS: The average total household health expenditure per month was 2354 Naira ($19.6. For outpatient services, average monthly expenditure was 1809 Naira ($15.1, whilst for inpatient services it was 610 Naira ($5.1. Higher health expenditures were incurred by urban residents and the better-off SES groups. Overall, 27% of households incurred CHE, higher for poorer socioeconomic groups and for rural residents. Only 1.0% of households had a member that was enrolled in a health insurance scheme. CONCLUSION: The worse-off households (the poorest SES and rural dwellers experienced the highest burden of health expenditure. There was almost a complete lack of financial risk protection. Health reform mechanisms are needed to ensure universal coverage with financial risk protection mechanisms.

  11. Critical analysis of major incidents risks in civil nuclear energy; Analyse critique des risques d'incidents majeurs dans l'energie nucleaire civile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The differences existing between the PWR type reactors and the RBMK type reactors are explained as well as the risk associated to each type when it exists. The Ines scale, tool to give the level of an accident gravity comprises seven levels, the number seven is the most serious and corresponds to the Chernobyl accident; The number zero is of no consequence but must be mentioned as a matter of form. The incidents from 1 to 3 concern increasing incidents, affecting the nuclear power plant but not the external public. The accidents from 4 to 7 have a nature to affect the nuclear power plant and the environment. An efficient tool exists between nuclear operators it is made of the reports on incidents encountered by close reactors. Two others type reactors are coming, the high temperature type reactors and the fast neutrons reactors. different risks are evoked, terrorism, proliferation, transport and radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  12. To what extent are adverse events found in patient records reported by patients and healthcare professionals via complaints, claims and incident reports?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wal Gerrit

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient record review is believed to be the most useful method for estimating the rate of adverse events among hospitalised patients. However, the method has some practical and financial disadvantages. Some of these disadvantages might be overcome by using existing reporting systems in which patient safety issues are already reported, such as incidents reported by healthcare professionals and complaints and medico-legal claims filled by patients or their relatives. The aim of the study is to examine to what extent the hospital reporting systems cover the adverse events identified by patient record review. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using a database from a record review study of 5375 patient records in 14 hospitals in the Netherlands. Trained nurses and physicians using a method based on the protocol of The Harvard Medical Practice Study previously reviewed the records. Four reporting systems were linked with the database of reviewed records: 1 informal and 2 formal complaints by patients/relatives, 3 medico-legal claims by patients/relatives and 4 incident reports by healthcare professionals. For each adverse event identified in patient records the equivalent was sought in these reporting systems by comparing dates and descriptions of the events. The study focussed on the number of adverse event matches, overlap of adverse events detected by different sources, preventability and severity of consequences of reported and non-reported events and sensitivity and specificity of reports. Results In the sample of 5375 patient records, 498 adverse events were identified. Only 18 of the 498 (3.6% adverse events identified by record review were found in one or more of the four reporting systems. There was some overlap: one adverse event had an equivalent in both a complaint and incident report and in three cases a patient/relative used two or three systems to complain about an adverse event. Healthcare professionals

  13. An analysis of dental patient safety incidents in a patient complaint and healthcare supervisory database in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiivala, Nora; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, Helena; Tefke, Hanna-Leena; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Few studies of patient harm and harm-prevention methods in dentistry exist. This study aimed to identify and characterize dental patient safety incidents (PSIs) in a national sample of closed dental cases reported to the Regional State Administrative Agencies (AVIs) and the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Health (Valvira) in Finland. The sample included all available fully resolved dental cases (n = 948) during 2000-2012 (initiated by the end of 2011). Cases included both patient and next of kin complaints and notifications from other authorities, employers, pharmacies, etc. The cases analyzed concerned both public and private dentistry and included incident reports lodged against dentists and other dental-care professionals. Data also include the most severe cases since these are reported to Valvira. PSIs were categorized according to common incident types and preventability and severity assessments were based on expert opinions in the decisions from closed cases. Most alleged PSIs were proven valid and evaluated as potentially preventable. PSIs were most often related to different dental treatment procedures or diagnostics. More than half of all PSIs were assessed as severe, posing severe risk or as causing permanent or long-lasting harm to patients. The risk for PSI was highest among male general dental practitioners with recurring complaints and notifications. Despite some limitations, this register-based study identifies new perspectives on improving safety in dental care. Many PSIs could be prevented through the proper and more systematic use of already available error-prevention methods.

  14. Healthcare resource consumption for intermittent urinary catheterisation: cost-effectiveness of hydrophilic catheters and budget impact analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognoni, Carla; Tarricone, Rosanna

    2017-01-17

    This study presents a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing hydrophilic coated to uncoated catheters for patients performing urinary intermittent catheterisation. A national budget impact analysis is also included to evaluate the impact of intermittent catheterisation for management of bladder dysfunctions over a period of 5 years. A Markov model (lifetime horizon, 1 year cycle length) was developed to project health outcomes (life years and quality-adjusted life years) and economic consequences related to patients using hydrophilic coated or uncoated catheters. The model was populated with catheter-related clinical efficacy data retrieved from randomised controlled trials and quality-of-life data (utility weights) from the literature. Cost data (EUR, 2015) were estimated on the basis of healthcare resource consumption derived from an e-survey addressed to key opinion leaders in the field. Italian Healthcare Service perspective. Patients with spinal cord injury performing intermittent urinary catheterisation in the home setting. Incremental cost-effectiveness and cost-utility ratios (ICER and ICUR) of hydrophilic coated versus uncoated catheters and associated healthcare budget impact. The base-case ICER and ICUR associated with hydrophilic coated catheters were €20 761 and €24 405, respectively. This implies that hydrophilic coated catheters are likely to be cost-effective in comparison to uncoated ones, as proposed Italian threshold values range between €25 000 and €66 400. Considering a market share at year 5 of 89% hydrophilic catheters and 11% uncoated catheters, the additional cost for Italy is approximately €12 million in the next 5 years (current market share scenario for year 0: 80% hydrophilic catheters and 20% uncoated catheters). Considered over a lifetime, hydrophilic coated catheters are potentially a cost-effective choice in comparison to uncoated ones. These findings can assist policymakers in evaluating intermittent

  15. Analysis of current trends in United States mesothelioma incidence; Analyse des tendances actuelles de l'incidence du mesotheliome aux Etats-Unis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, B.

    1998-03-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyze the mesotheliomas incidence in the United States and to estimate the risk of mesothelioma on the whole life by generation, as also the annual number of cases expected for the next seventy years. (N.C.)

  16. Childhood Leukaemia Incidence in Hungary, 1973-2002. Interpolation Model for Analysing the Possible Effects of the Chernobyl Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toeroek, Szabolcs; Borgulya, Gabor; Lobmayer, Peter; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Schuler, Dezsoe; Fekete, Gyoergy

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of childhood leukaemia in Hungary has yet to be reported, although data are available since the early 70s. The Hungarian data therefore cover the time before and after the Chernobyl nuclear accident (1986). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the Chernobyl accident on childhood leukaemia incidence in Hungary. A population-based study was carried out using data of the National Paediatric Cancer Registry of Hungary from 1973 to 2002. The total number of cases was 2204. To test the effect of the Chernobyl accident the authors applied a new approach called 'Hypothesized Impact Period Interpolation'-model, which takes into account the increasing trend of childhood leukaemia incidence and the hypothesized exposure and latency times. The incidence of leukaemia in the age group 0-14 varied between 33.2 and 39.4 per million person-years along the observed 30 year period, and the incidence of childhood leukaemia showed a moderate increase of 0.71% annually (p=0.0105). In the period of the hypothesized impact of the Chernobyl accident the incidence rate was elevated by 2.5% (95% CI: -8.1%; +14.3%), but this change was not statistically significant (p=0.663). The age standardised incidence, the age distribution, the gender ratio, and the magnitude of increasing trend of childhood leukaemia incidence in Hungary were similar to other European countries. Applying the presented interpolation method the authors did not find a statistically significant increase in the leukaemia incidence in the period of the hypothesized impact of the Chernobyl accident

  17. MRI-based Brain Healthcare Quotients: A bridge between neural and behavioral analyses for keeping the brain healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Kiyotaka; Oka, Hiroki; Fukuda, Hiroki; Yamakawa, Yoshinori

    2017-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric disorders are a burden on social and economic resources. Therefore, maintaining brain health and preventing these disorders are important. While the physiological functions of the brain are well studied, few studies have focused on keeping the brain healthy from a neuroscientific viewpoint. We propose a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based quotient for monitoring brain health, the Brain Healthcare Quotient (BHQ), which is based on the volume of gray matter (GM) and the fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM). We recruited 144 healthy adults to acquire structural neuroimaging data, including T1-weighted images and diffusion tensor images, and data associated with both physical (BMI, blood pressure, and daily time use) and social (subjective socioeconomic status, subjective well-being, post-materialism and Epicureanism) factors. We confirmed that the BHQ was sensitive to an age-related decline in GM volume and WM integrity. Further analysis revealed that the BHQ was critically affected by both physical and social factors. We believe that our BHQ is a simple yet highly sensitive, valid measure for brain health research that will bridge the needs of the scientific community and society and help us lead better lives in which we stay healthy, active, and sharp.

  18. MRI-based Brain Healthcare Quotients: A bridge between neural and behavioral analyses for keeping the brain healthy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Nemoto

    Full Text Available Neurological and psychiatric disorders are a burden on social and economic resources. Therefore, maintaining brain health and preventing these disorders are important. While the physiological functions of the brain are well studied, few studies have focused on keeping the brain healthy from a neuroscientific viewpoint. We propose a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based quotient for monitoring brain health, the Brain Healthcare Quotient (BHQ, which is based on the volume of gray matter (GM and the fractional anisotropy (FA of white matter (WM. We recruited 144 healthy adults to acquire structural neuroimaging data, including T1-weighted images and diffusion tensor images, and data associated with both physical (BMI, blood pressure, and daily time use and social (subjective socioeconomic status, subjective well-being, post-materialism and Epicureanism factors. We confirmed that the BHQ was sensitive to an age-related decline in GM volume and WM integrity. Further analysis revealed that the BHQ was critically affected by both physical and social factors. We believe that our BHQ is a simple yet highly sensitive, valid measure for brain health research that will bridge the needs of the scientific community and society and help us lead better lives in which we stay healthy, active, and sharp.

  19. Development of glancing-incidence and glancing-take-off X-ray fluorescence apparatus for surface and thin-film analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Yamada, Takashi; Utaka, Tadashi

    1997-01-01

    We have studied X-ray fluorescence analysis under glancing incidence and glancing take-off conditions. Recently, we have developed a third apparatus for detecting glancing-incidence and take-off X-ray fluorescence, which makes it possible to measure the incident-angle dependence, the take-off-angle dependence. X-ray reflectivity, and X-ray diffraction. Primarily, we have measured the take-off angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence using this apparatus. Glancing take-off X-ray fluorescence has some advantages in comparison with glancing-incidence X-ray fluorescence. The surface density and the absolute angles were determined by analysing the take-off angle dependence of the fluorescent X-rays emitted from identical atoms with the aid of the reciprocity theorem. (Author)

  20. Incidence and phylogenetic analyses of Armillaria spp. associated with root disease in peach orchards in the State of Mexico, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. D. Elias-Roman; R. A. Guzman-Plazola; N. B. Klopfenstein; D. Alvarado-Rosales; G. Calderon-Zavala; J. A. Mora-Aguilera; M.-S. Kim; R. Garcia-Espinosa

    2013-01-01

    Incidence of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] tree mortality attributed to Armillaria root disease was assessed from 2009 to 2011 in 15 orchards in the State of Mexico, Mexico. Incidence increased gradually every year of assessment, reaching average values of 9.7, 15.3 and 20.3% tree mortality and 23.2, 24.7 and 28.3% disease-impacted area of the orchards during 2009...

  1. Incidence of emergency contacts (red responses to Norwegian emergency primary healthcare services in 2007 – a prospective observational study

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    Hansen Elisabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The municipalities are responsible for the emergency primary health care services in Norway. These services include casualty clinics, primary doctors on-call and local emergency medical communication centres (LEMC. The National centre for emergency primary health care has initiated an enterprise called "The Watchtowers", comprising emergency primary health care districts, to provide routine information (patients' way of contact, level of urgency and first action taken by the out-of-hours services over several years based on a minimal dataset. This will enable monitoring, evaluation and comparison of the respective activities in the emergency primary health care services. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of emergency contacts (potential life-threatening situations, red responses to the emergency primary health care service. Methods A representative sample of Norwegian emergency primary health care districts, "The Watchtowers" recorded all contacts and first action taken during the year of 2007. All the variables were continuously registered in a data program by the attending nurses and sent by email to the National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care at a monthly basis. Results During 2007 the Watchtowers registered 85 288 contacts, of which 1 946 (2.3% were defined as emergency contacts (red responses, corresponding to a rate of 9 per 1 000 inhabitants per year. 65% of the instances were initiated by patient, next of kin or health personnel by calling local emergency medical communication centres or meeting directly at the casualty clinics. In 48% of the red responses, the first action taken was a call-out of doctor and ambulance. On a national basis we can estimate approximately 42 500 red responses per year in the EPH in Norway. Conclusion The emergency primary health care services constitute an important part of the emergency system in Norway. Patients call the LEMC or meet directly at casualty clinics

  2. Prevalence, incidence burden, and clinical impact of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial resistance: a national prevalent cohort study in acute care hospitals in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritsotakis EI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Evangelos I Kritsotakis,1 Flora Kontopidou,2 Eirini Astrinaki,3 Maria Roumbelaki,4 Eleni Ioannidou,5 Achilles Gikas6 1School of Health and Related Research, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK; 2Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance Office, Hellenic Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Athens, 3Infection Control Committee, University Hospital of Heraklion, 4Department of Nursing, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Rethymnon General Hospital, Rethymnon, 6Department of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Greece Background: Assessing the overall burden of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs is challenging, but imperative in evaluating the cost-effectiveness of infection control programs. This study aimed to estimate the point prevalence and annual incidence of HAIs in Greece and assess the excess length of stay (LOS and mortality attributable to HAIs, overall and for main infection sites and tracer antimicrobial resistance (AMR phenotypes and pathogens.Patients and methods: This prevalent cohort study used a nationally representative cross-section of 8,247 inpatients in 37 acute care hospitals to record active HAIs of all types at baseline and overall LOS and in-hospital mortality up to 90 days following hospital admission. HAI incidence was estimated using prevalence-to-incidence conversion methods. Excess mortality and LOS were assessed by Cox regression and multistate models correcting for confounding and time-dependent biases.Results: HAIs were encountered with daily prevalence of 9.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.8%–10.6%. The estimated annual HAI incidence was 5.2% (95% CI 4.4%–5.3%, corresponding to approximately 121,000 (95% CI 103,500–123,700 affected patients each year in the country. Ninety-day mortality risk was increased by 80% in patients

  3. Sex- and age patterns in incidence of infectious diseases in Germany: analyses of surveillance records over a 13-year period (2001-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, F; Ott, J J; Claus, H; Krause, G

    2018-02-01

    Sex differences in the incidence of infections may indicate different risk factors and behaviour but have not been analysed across pathogens. Based on 3.96 million records of 33 pathogens in Germany, notified from 2001 to 2013, we applied Poisson regression to generate age-standardised incidence rate ratios and assessed their distribution across age and sex. The following trends became apparent: (a) pathogens with male incidence preponderance at infant and child age (meningococcal disease (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.19, 95% CI 1.03-1.38, age = 0-4); influenza (IRR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.06-1.13, age = 0-4)), (b) pathogens with sex-switch in incidence preponderance at puberty (e.g. norovirus (IRR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.19 in age = 5-14, IRR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.99, age ⩾ 60), (c) pathogens with general male incidence preponderance (bacterial/parasitic infections with campylobacter, Yersinia and Giardia), (d) pathogens with male incidence preponderance at juvenile and adult age (sexually transmitted or vector-borne infections (combined-IRR = 2.53, 95% CI 2.36-2.71, age = 15-59), (e) pathogens with male preponderance at older age (tick-borne encephalitis - IRR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.21-6.24, listeriosis - IRR = 2.06, 95% CI 1.38-3.06, age ⩾ 60). Risk factor concepts only partly serve to interpret similarities of grouped infections, i.e. transmission-related explanations and sex-specific exposures not consistently explain the pattern of food-borne infections (b). Sex-specific differences in infectious disease incidence are well acknowledged regarding the sexually transmitted diseases. This has led to designing gender-specific prevention strategies. Our data suggest that for infections with other transmission routes, gender-specific approaches can also be of benefit and importance.

  4. Spatial Analyses of the Relation between Rodent’s Active Burrows and Incidence of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Golestan Province, Northeastern of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aioub Sofizadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL is one of the most important vector-borne diseases in Iran. Wild Rodents play as a reservoir. The main aim of this study was to determine spatial analyses of the relationship between rodent’s active burrows and Incidence of ZCL in Golestan Province, north east of Iran. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted in 59 rural districts in Golestan Province. Spatial distribution of rodent’s active burrows, human cases of ZCL and Incidence of disease were collected, using Geographical Infor­mation Systems (GIS. The relationship of them were analyzed by Sperman test, SPSS software version No.13.Results: The most number of rodents’ active burrows, human positive cases (100 persons and high Incidence of disease (35/1000 were observed in Korand rural district of Gonbad-e Kavoos County. There was significant corre­lation between the number of rodents active burrows with Incidence rate of disease (0.470, P< 0.001 as well as the number of cases in each districts (0.465, P< 0.001, There is high correlation between higher Incidence rate and hu­man positive cases in districts with number of rodents’ active burrows.  Conclusion: Vicinity of wild rodents’ burrows to villages plays an important role in transmission of ZCL to humans.

  5. Toward a Mechanistic Source Term in Advanced Reactors: A Review of Past U.S. SFR Incidents, Experiments, and Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, Matthew; Brunett, Acacia J.; Grabaskas, David

    2016-04-17

    In 2015, as part of a Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP) effort for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs), Argonne National Laboratory investigated the current state of knowledge of source term development for a metal-fueled, pool-type SFR. This paper provides a summary of past domestic metal-fueled SFR incidents and experiments and highlights information relevant to source term estimations that were gathered as part of the RTDP effort. The incidents described in this paper include fuel pin failures at the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) facility in July of 1959, the Fermi I meltdown that occurred in October of 1966, and the repeated melting of a fuel element within an experimental capsule at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) from November 1967 to May 1968. The experiments described in this paper include the Run-Beyond-Cladding-Breach tests that were performed at EBR-II in 1985 and a series of severe transient overpower tests conducted at the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) in the mid-1980s.

  6. EUROCONTROL-Systemic Occurrence Analysis Methodology (SOAM)-A 'Reason'-based organisational methodology for analysing incidents and accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licu, Tony; Cioran, Florin; Hayward, Brent; Lowe, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The Safety Occurrence Analysis Methodology (SOAM) developed for EUROCONTROL is an accident investigation methodology based on the Reason Model of organisational accidents. The purpose of a SOAM is to broaden the focus of an investigation from human involvement issues, also known as 'active failures of operational personnel' under Reason's original model, to include analysis of the latent conditions deeper within the organisation that set the context for the event. Such an approach is consistent with the tenets of Just Culture in which people are encouraged to provide full and open information about how incidents occurred, and are not penalised for errors. A truly systemic approach is not simply a means of transferring responsibility for a safety occurrence from front-line employees to senior managers. A consistent philosophy must be applied, where the investigation process seeks to correct deficiencies wherever they may be found, without attempting to apportion blame or liability

  7. Forensic analyses of explosion debris from the January 2, 1992 Pd/D2O electrochemistry incident at SRI International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, B.; Whipple, R.; Vandervoort, D.; Grant, P.

    1992-01-01

    The January 2, 1992 explosion in an electrochemistry laboratory at SRI International (SRI) resulted in the death of scientist Andrew Riley, and gained some notoriety due to its association with experimental work in the controversial field of cold fusion research. Selected components of explosion debris were subjected to forensic analyses at LLNL to elucidate potential causes of, or contributing factors to, the explosion. Interrogation of the debris by LLNL encompassed nuclear, chemical, physical, and materials investigations. Nuclear studies for the determination of tritium and neutron-activation products in stainless steel and brass were negative. No evidence of signature species indicative of orthodox nuclear events was detected. The inorganic and particulate analyses were likewise negative with respect to residues of unexpected chemical species. Such target compounds included conventional explosives, accelerants, propellants, or any exceptional industrial chemicals. The GC-MS analyses of trace organic components in the explosion debris provided perhaps the most interesting results obtained at LLNL. Although no evidence of organic explosives, oxidizers, or other unusual compounds was detected, the presence of a hydrocarbon oil in the interior of the electrochemical cell was established. It is likely that its source was lubricating fluid from the machining of the metal cell components. If residues of organic oils are present during electrolysis experiments, the potential exists for an explosive reaction in the increasingly enriched oxygen atmosphere within the headspace of a metal cell

  8. A review and additional post-hoc analyses of the incidence and impact of constipation observed in darifenacin clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tack J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Jan Tack,1 Jean-Jacques Wyndaele,2 Greg Ligozio,3 Mathias Egermark41University of Leuven, Gastroenterology Section, Leuven, 2University of Antwerp, Department of Urology, Antwerp, Belgium; 3Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, NJ, USA; 4Roche Diagnostics Scandinavia AB, Bromma, Sweden and formerly of Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, SwitzerlandBackground: Constipation is a common side effect of antimuscarinic treatment for overactive bladder (OAB. This review evaluates the incidence and impact of constipation on the lives of patients with OAB being treated with darifenacin.Methods: Constipation data from published Phase III and Phase IIIb/IV darifenacin studies were reviewed and analyzed. Over 4000 patients with OAB (aged 18–89 years; ≥80% female enrolled in nine studies (three Phase III [data from these fixed-dose studies were pooled and provide the primary focus for this review], three Phase IIIb, and three Phase IV. The impact of constipation was assessed by discontinuations, use of concomitant laxatives, patient-reported perception of treatment, and a bowel habit questionnaire.Results: In the pooled Phase III trials, 14.8% (50/337 of patients on darifenacin 7.5 mg/day and 21.3% (71/334 on 15 mg/day experienced constipation compared with 12.6% (28/223 and 6.2% (24/388 with tolterodine and placebo, respectively. In addition, a few patients discontinued treatment due to constipation (0.6% [2/337], 1.2% [4/334], 1.8% [4/223], and 0.3% [1/388] in the darifenacin 7.5 mg/day or 15 mg/day, tolterodine, and placebo groups, respectively, or required concomitant laxatives (3.3% [11/337], 6.6% [22/334], 7.2% [16/223], and 1.5% [6/388] in the darifenacin 7.5 mg/day or 15 mg/day, tolterodine, and placebo groups, respectively. Patient-reported perception of treatment quality was observed to be similar between patients who experienced constipation and those who did not. During the long-term extension study, a bowel habit questionnaire showed only small

  9. Detailed semantic analyses of human error incidents occurring at nuclear power plant in USA (interim report). Characteristics of human error incidents occurring in the period from 1992 to 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Yuko; Tsuge, Tadashi; Sano, Toshiaki; Takano, Kenichi; Gouda, Hidenori

    2001-01-01

    CRIEPI has been conducting detailed analyses of all human error incidents at domestic nuclear power plants (NPPs) collected from Japanese Licensee Event Reports (LERs) using J-HPES (Japanese version of HPES) as an analysis method. Results obtained by the analyses have been stored in J-HPES database. Since 1999, human error incidents have been selected from U.S. LERs, and they are analyzed using J-HPES. In this report, the results, which classified error action, cause, and preventive measure, are summarized for U.S. human error cases occurring in the period from 1992 to 1996. It was suggested as a result of classification that the categories of error action were almost the same as those of Japanese human error cases. Therefore, problems in the process of error action and checkpoints for preventing errors will be extracted by analyzing both U.S. and domestic human error cases. It was also suggested that the interrelations between error actions, causes, and organizational factors could be identified. While taking these suggestions into consideration, we will continue to analyze U.S. human error cases. (author)

  10. Detailed semantic analyses of human error incidents occurring at nuclear power plants. Extraction of periodical transition of error occurrence patterns by applying multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Yuko; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Takano, Kenichi; Kojima, Mitsuhiro

    2000-01-01

    It is essential for preventing the recurrence of human error incidents to analyze and evaluate them with the emphasis on human factor. Detailed and structured analyses of all incidents at domestic nuclear power plants (NPPs) reported during last 31 years have been conducted based on J-HPES, in which total 193 human error cases are identified. Results obtained by the analyses have been stored into the J-HPES database. In the previous study, by applying multivariate analysis to above case studies, it was suggested that there were several occurrence patterns identified of how errors occur at NPPs. It was also clarified that the causes related to each human error are different depending on age of their occurrence. This paper described the obtained results in respects of periodical transition of human error occurrence patterns. By applying multivariate analysis to the above data, it was suggested there were two types of error occurrence patterns as to each human error type. First type is common occurrence patterns, not depending on the age, and second type is the one influenced by periodical characteristics. (author)

  11. Is healthcare a 'Necessity' or 'Luxury'? an empirical evidence from public and private sector analyses of South-East Asian countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Jahangir Am; Mahumud, Rashidul Alam

    2015-01-01

    South-East Asian Regional (SEAR) countries range from low- to middle-income countries and have considerable differences in mix of public and private sector expenditure on health. This study intends to estimate the income-elasticities of healthcare expenditure in public and private sectors separately for investigating whether healthcare is a 'necessity' or 'luxury' for citizens of these countries. Panel data from 9 SEAR countries over 16 years (1995-2010) were employed. Fixed- and random-effect models were fitted to estimate income-elasticity of public, private and total healthcare expenditure. Results showed that one percent point increase in GDP per capita increased private expenditure on healthcare by 1.128%, while public expenditure increased by only 0.412%. Inclusion of three-year lagged variables of GDP per capita in the models did not have remarkable influence on the findings. The citizens of SEAR countries consider healthcare as a necessity while provided through public sector and a luxury when delivered by private sector. By increasing the public provisions of healthcare, more redistribution of healthcare resources can be ensured, which can accelerate the journey of SEAR countries towards universal health coverage.

  12. Incidence des infections du site opératoire en Afrique sub-saharienne: revue systématique et méta-analyse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaroua; Ngah, Joseph Eloundou; Bénet, Thomas; Djibrilla, Yaouba

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Les Infections du Sites Opératoire (ISO) sont à l’origine de morbi-mortalité et des dépenses supplémentaires en santé. Les pays en développement en sont les plus touchés. L’objectif était d’estimer l’incidence poolée des ISO en Afrique Sub-saharienne et décrire ses principaux facteurs de risque. Méthodes Une revue systématique et une méta-analyse ont été effectuées à partir des bases de données de l’Organisation Mondiale de la Santé pour la Région Afrique, de PubMed et par recherche standard afin de sélectionner des articles électroniquespubliés entre 2006 et 2015. Seuls les articlestraitants de l’incidence et desfacteurs de risque des ISOdans les pays del’Afrique subsaharienneétaient retenus. Résultats Sur 95 articles trouvés, 11 ont répondu aux critères d’inclusion. Seulement 9 pays sur les 45 y ont contribués avec une grandereprésentation du Nigéria (5 articles sur 11). L’incidence des ISO variaient de 6,8% à 26% avec une prédominance en chirurgie générale. L’incidence poolée des ISO était de 14.8% (IC à 95%: 15,5-16,2%), avec une importante hétérogénéité selon la spécialité et le mode de surveillance. Les facteurs de risque les plus citésétaient la longue durée d’intervention et la classe de contamination d’Altemeir 3 et 4. Les autres facteurs concernaient l’environnement hospitalier, les pratiques de soins inadéquats et les pathologies sous-jacentes. Conclusion L’incidence des ISO est élevée en Afrique subsaharienne, des études dans cette région pourrait améliorer la connaissance, laprévention et la maitrise deces multiples facteurs de risques. PMID:27795768

  13. How do healthcare professionals manage ethical challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How do healthcare professionals manage ethical challenges regarding information in healthcare professional/patient clinical interactions? A review of concept- or argument-based articles and case analyses.

  14. The 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak and primary healthcare delivery in Liberia: Time-series analyses for 2010-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Bradley H; Augusto, Orvalho; Beste, Jason; Toomay, Stephen J; Wickett, Eugene; Dunbar, Nelson; Bawo, Luke; Wesseh, Chea Sanford

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the immediate and lasting effects of the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak on public-sector primary healthcare delivery in Liberia using 7 years of comprehensive routine health information system data. We analyzed 10 key primary healthcare indicators before, during, and after the EVD outbreak using 31,836 facility-month service outputs from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2016 across a census of 379 public-sector health facilities in Liberia (excluding Montserrado County). All indicators had statistically significant decreases during the first 4 months of the EVD outbreak, with all indicators having their lowest raw mean outputs in August 2014. Decreases in outputs comparing the end of the initial EVD period (September 2014) to May 2014 (pre-EVD) ranged in magnitude from a 67.3% decrease in measles vaccinations (95% CI: -77.9%, -56.8%, p sector primary healthcare system has made strides towards recovery from the 2014-2015 EVD outbreak. All primary healthcare indicators tracked have recovered to pre-EVD levels as of November 2016. Yet, for most indicators, it took more than 1 year to recover to pre-EVD levels. During this time, large losses of essential primary healthcare services occurred compared to what would have been expected had the EVD outbreak not occurred. The disruption of malaria case management during the EVD outbreak may have resulted in increased malaria cases. Large and sustained investments in public-sector primary care health system strengthening are urgently needed for EVD-affected countries.

  15. Incidence of hip and knee replacement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis following the introduction of biological DMARDs: an interrupted time-series analysis using nationwide Danish healthcare registers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordtz, René Lindholm; Hawley, Samuel; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Højgaard, Pil; Zobbe, Kristian; Overgaard, Søren; Odgaard, Anders; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Dreyer, Lene

    2018-05-01

    To study the impact of the introduction of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) and associated rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management guidelines on the incidence of total hip (THR) and knee replacements (TKR) in Denmark. Nationwide register-based cohort and interrupted time-series analysis. Patients with incident RA between 1996 and 2011 were identified in the Danish National Patient Register. Patients with RA were matched on age, sex and municipality with up to 10 general population comparators (GPCs). Standardised 5-year incidence rates of THR and TKR per 1000 person-years were calculated for patients with RA and GPCs in 6-month periods. Levels and trends in the pre-bDMARD (1996-2001) were compared with the bDMARD era (2003-2016) using segmented linear regression interrupted by a 1-year lag period (2002). We identified 30 404 patients with incident RA and 297 916 GPCs. In 1996, the incidence rate of THR and TKR was 8.72 and 5.87, respectively, among patients with RA, and 2.89 and 0.42 in GPCs. From 1996 to 2016, the incidence rate of THR decreased among patients with RA, but increased among GPCs. Among patients with RA, the incidence rate of TKR increased from 1996 to 2001, but started to decrease from 2003 and throughout the bDMARD era. The incidence of TKR increased among GPCs from 1996 to 2016. We report that the incidence rate of THR and TKR was 3-fold and 14-fold higher, respectively among patients with RA compared with GPCs in 1996. In patients with RA, introduction of bDMARDs was associated with a decreasing incidence rate of TKR, whereas the incidence of THR had started to decrease before bDMARD introduction. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Erythrocyte omega-3 fatty acids are inversely associated with incident dementia: Secondary analyses of longitudinal data from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Eric M; Pottala, James V; Robinson, Jennifer G; Espeland, Mark A; Harris, William S

    2017-06-01

    To assess whether red blood cell (RBC) docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid (DHA+EPA) levels have a protective association with the risk of dementia in older women. RBC DHA+EPA levels were assessed at baseline, and cognitive status was evaluated annually in a cohort of 6706 women aged ≥65 years who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS). Cox regression was used to quantify the association between RBC DHA+EPA and the risk of probable dementia, independent of major dementia risk factors. During a median follow-up period of 9.8 years, 587 incident cases of probable dementia were identified. After adjusting for demographic, clinical, and behavioral risk factors, a one standard deviation increase in DHA+EPA levels was associated with a significantly lower risk of dementia (HR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.00; p < 0.05). This effect estimate did not meaningfully change after further adjustment for baseline cognitive function and APOE genotype. For women with high DHA+EPA exposure (1SD above mean) compared to low exposure (1SD below mean), the adjusted 15-year absolute risk difference for dementia was 2.1% (95% CI: 0.2%, 4.0%). In secondary analyses, we also observed a protective association with longitudinal change in Modified Mini-Mental State (3MS) Exam scores, but no significant association with incident MCI, PD/MCI, or baseline 3MS scores. Higher levels of DHA+EPA may help protect against the development of dementia. Results from prospective randomized controlled trials of DHA+EPA supplementation are needed to help clarify whether this association is causal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Equity in Health Care Financing in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of Evidence from Studies Using Benefit and Financing Incidence Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Augustine; Price, Jennifer; Hayen, Andrew; Jan, Stephen; Wiseman, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Health financing reforms in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs) over the past decades have focused on achieving equity in financing of health care delivery through universal health coverage. Benefit and financing incidence analyses are two analytical methods for comprehensively evaluating how well health systems perform on these objectives. This systematic review assesses progress towards equity in health care financing in LMICs through the use of BIA and FIA. Key electronic databases including Medline, Embase, Scopus, Global Health, CinAHL, EconLit and Business Source Premier were searched. We also searched the grey literature, specifically websites of leading organizations supporting health care in LMICs. Only studies using benefit incidence analysis (BIA) and/or financing incidence analysis (FIA) as explicit methodology were included. A total of 512 records were obtained from the various sources. The full texts of 87 references were assessed against the selection criteria and 24 were judged appropriate for inclusion. Twelve of the 24 studies originated from sub-Saharan Africa, nine from the Asia-Pacific region, two from Latin America and one from the Middle East. The evidence points to a pro-rich distribution of total health care benefits and progressive financing in both sub-Saharan Africa and Asia-Pacific. In the majority of cases, the distribution of benefits at the primary health care level favoured the poor while hospital level services benefit the better-off. A few Asian countries, namely Thailand, Malaysia and Sri Lanka, maintained a pro-poor distribution of health care benefits and progressive financing. Studies evaluated in this systematic review indicate that health care financing in LMICs benefits the rich more than the poor but the burden of financing also falls more on the rich. There is some evidence that primary health care is pro-poor suggesting a greater investment in such services and removal of barriers to care can enhance equity. The

  18. Equity in Health Care Financing in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of Evidence from Studies Using Benefit and Financing Incidence Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine Asante

    Full Text Available Health financing reforms in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs over the past decades have focused on achieving equity in financing of health care delivery through universal health coverage. Benefit and financing incidence analyses are two analytical methods for comprehensively evaluating how well health systems perform on these objectives. This systematic review assesses progress towards equity in health care financing in LMICs through the use of BIA and FIA.Key electronic databases including Medline, Embase, Scopus, Global Health, CinAHL, EconLit and Business Source Premier were searched. We also searched the grey literature, specifically websites of leading organizations supporting health care in LMICs. Only studies using benefit incidence analysis (BIA and/or financing incidence analysis (FIA as explicit methodology were included. A total of 512 records were obtained from the various sources. The full texts of 87 references were assessed against the selection criteria and 24 were judged appropriate for inclusion. Twelve of the 24 studies originated from sub-Saharan Africa, nine from the Asia-Pacific region, two from Latin America and one from the Middle East. The evidence points to a pro-rich distribution of total health care benefits and progressive financing in both sub-Saharan Africa and Asia-Pacific. In the majority of cases, the distribution of benefits at the primary health care level favoured the poor while hospital level services benefit the better-off. A few Asian countries, namely Thailand, Malaysia and Sri Lanka, maintained a pro-poor distribution of health care benefits and progressive financing.Studies evaluated in this systematic review indicate that health care financing in LMICs benefits the rich more than the poor but the burden of financing also falls more on the rich. There is some evidence that primary health care is pro-poor suggesting a greater investment in such services and removal of barriers to care can enhance

  19. Equity in Health Care Financing in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of Evidence from Studies Using Benefit and Financing Incidence Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jennifer; Hayen, Andrew; Jan, Stephen; Wiseman, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health financing reforms in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs) over the past decades have focused on achieving equity in financing of health care delivery through universal health coverage. Benefit and financing incidence analyses are two analytical methods for comprehensively evaluating how well health systems perform on these objectives. This systematic review assesses progress towards equity in health care financing in LMICs through the use of BIA and FIA. Methods and Findings Key electronic databases including Medline, Embase, Scopus, Global Health, CinAHL, EconLit and Business Source Premier were searched. We also searched the grey literature, specifically websites of leading organizations supporting health care in LMICs. Only studies using benefit incidence analysis (BIA) and/or financing incidence analysis (FIA) as explicit methodology were included. A total of 512 records were obtained from the various sources. The full texts of 87 references were assessed against the selection criteria and 24 were judged appropriate for inclusion. Twelve of the 24 studies originated from sub-Saharan Africa, nine from the Asia-Pacific region, two from Latin America and one from the Middle East. The evidence points to a pro-rich distribution of total health care benefits and progressive financing in both sub-Saharan Africa and Asia-Pacific. In the majority of cases, the distribution of benefits at the primary health care level favoured the poor while hospital level services benefit the better-off. A few Asian countries, namely Thailand, Malaysia and Sri Lanka, maintained a pro-poor distribution of health care benefits and progressive financing. Conclusion Studies evaluated in this systematic review indicate that health care financing in LMICs benefits the rich more than the poor but the burden of financing also falls more on the rich. There is some evidence that primary health care is pro-poor suggesting a greater investment in such services and removal

  20. Healthcare utilization in older patients using personal emergency response systems: an analysis of electronic health records and medical alert data : Brief Description: A Longitudinal Retrospective Analyses of healthcare utilization rates in older patients using Personal Emergency Response Systems from 2011 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, Stephen; Golas, Sara; Fischer, Nils; Nikolova-Simons, Mariana; Op den Buijs, Jorn; Schertzer, Linda; Kvedar, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal

    2017-04-18

    Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERS) are traditionally used as fall alert systems for older adults, a population that contributes an overwhelming proportion of healthcare costs in the United States. Previous studies focused mainly on qualitative evaluations of PERS without a longitudinal quantitative evaluation of healthcare utilization in users. To address this gap and better understand the needs of older patients on PERS, we analyzed longitudinal healthcare utilization trends in patients using PERS through the home care management service of a large healthcare organization. Retrospective, longitudinal analyses of healthcare and PERS utilization records of older patients over a 5-years period from 2011-2015. The primary outcome was to characterize the healthcare utilization of PERS patients. This outcome was assessed by 30-, 90-, and 180-day readmission rates, frequency of principal admitting diagnoses, and prevalence of conditions leading to potentially avoidable admissions based on Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services classification criteria. The overall 30-day readmission rate was 14.2%, 90-days readmission rate was 34.4%, and 180-days readmission rate was 42.2%. While 30-day readmission rates did not increase significantly (p = 0.16) over the study period, 90-days (p = 0.03) and 180-days (p = 0.04) readmission rates did increase significantly. The top 5 most frequent principal diagnoses for inpatient admissions included congestive heart failure (5.7%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (4.6%), dysrhythmias (4.3%), septicemia (4.1%), and pneumonia (4.1%). Additionally, 21% of all admissions were due to conditions leading to potentially avoidable admissions in either institutional or non-institutional settings (16% in institutional settings only). Chronic medical conditions account for the majority of healthcare utilization in older patients using PERS. Results suggest that PERS data combined with electronic medical records data can

  1. Incidence of clinically significant antibodies in patients and healthy blood donors: a prospective cross-sectional study from a tertiary healthcare center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Aseem K; Pandey, Prashant; Sharma, Jyoti; Shailja, Kumari; Dixit, Surbhi; Raina, Vimarsh

    2014-04-01

    Since there is scarce data available on incidence and type of irregular antibodies in patients and donors in India, a study was undertaken to find the incidence of irregular antibodies in patients and irregular antibodies and a positive Direct Antiglobulin Test (DAT) in blood donors. Antibody screening was performed using commercial pooled "O" cells and three-cell panel for donors and patients respectively and an 11-cell panel for identification using Column Agglutination Technology (CAT) with Low-Ionic-Strength Saline-Indirect Antiglobulin Test (LISS-IAT) technique (Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Johnson & Johnson, USA). The cassettes used were Anti-human Globulin (AHG) type. DAT on donors was also performed using the AHG cassettes. Cumulative incidence of irregular antibodies amongst patients (n=32,560) and donors (n=31,367) were 0.12-0.009%, respectively. In patients, the commonest antibodies were from Rh system with anti-D being the most common antibody type (14/40; 35%) while in donors it was the MNS system with anti M (2/3) being the most common. Incidence of a positive DAT amongst the healthy blood donors was 0.04% (n=13/32,560). Incidence of irregular antibodies in patients at 0.12% was slightly lower than published reports and could be because of the fact that the patient population studied comprised largely of surgical patients many of whom have never received blood transfusion. This data could also be more representative since the number of patients studied was much higher as compared to the previous Indian studies (32,560 vs. 531-2026). The report on incidence of irregular antibodies and DAT (0.009-0.04%) in blood donors was first such attempt in India. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Types of conflicts and conflict management among Hungarian healthcare workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csupor, Éva; Kuna, Ágnes; Pintér, Judit Nóra; Kaló, Zsuzsa; Csabai, Márta

    2017-04-01

    Efficient communication, conflict management and cooperation are the key factors of a successful patient care. This study is part of an international comparative research. The aim of this study is to unfold conflicts among healthcare workers. 73 healthcare workers were interviewed using a standardized interview protocol. The in-person interviews used the critical incident method. 30 interviews (15 doctors, 15 nurses) were analysed with the Atlas.ti 7 content analysis software. The sources, types, effects of conflicts and conflict management strategies were investigated. The content analysis unfolded the specificities of conflicts in healthcare based on personal experiences. Organizational hierarchy was a substantial source of conflict, especially among physicians, which originates from implicit rules. As a result of the avoiding conflict management the conflicts remain partly unresolved which has negative individual and group effect. Our conceptual framework helps to develop a proper intervention specific to healthcare. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(16), 625-632.

  3. Job Demands, Burnout, and Teamwork in Healthcare Professionals Working in a General Hospital that Was Analysed At Two Points in Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Mijakoski

    2018-04-01

    CONCLUSION: Actual longitudinal study revealed significantly higher mean values of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization in 2014 that could be explained by significantly increased job demands between analysed points in time.

  4. The 2014–2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak and primary healthcare delivery in Liberia: Time-series analyses for 2010–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beste, Jason; Toomay, Stephen J.; Dunbar, Nelson; Bawo, Luke; Wesseh, Chea Sanford

    2018-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to estimate the immediate and lasting effects of the 2014–2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak on public-sector primary healthcare delivery in Liberia using 7 years of comprehensive routine health information system data. Methods and findings We analyzed 10 key primary healthcare indicators before, during, and after the EVD outbreak using 31,836 facility-month service outputs from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2016 across a census of 379 public-sector health facilities in Liberia (excluding Montserrado County). All indicators had statistically significant decreases during the first 4 months of the EVD outbreak, with all indicators having their lowest raw mean outputs in August 2014. Decreases in outputs comparing the end of the initial EVD period (September 2014) to May 2014 (pre-EVD) ranged in magnitude from a 67.3% decrease in measles vaccinations (95% CI: −77.9%, −56.8%, p < 0.001) and a 61.4% decrease in artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) treatments for malaria (95% CI: −69.0%, −53.8%, p < 0.001) to a 35.2% decrease in first antenatal care (ANC) visits (95% CI: −45.8%, −24.7%, p < 0.001) and a 38.5% decrease in medroxyprogesterone acetate doses (95% CI: −47.6%, −29.5%, p < 0.001). Following the nadir of system outputs in August 2014, all indicators showed statistically significant increases from October 2014 to December 2014. All indicators had significant positive trends during the post-EVD period, with every system output exceeding pre-Ebola forecasted trends for 3 consecutive months by November 2016. Health system outputs lost during and after the EVD outbreak were large and sustained for most indicators. Prior to exceeding pre-EVD forecasted trends for 3 months, we estimate statistically significant cumulative losses of −776,110 clinic visits (95% CI: −1,480,896, −101,357, p = 0.030); −24,449 bacille Calmette–Guérin vaccinations (95% CI: −45,947, −2,020, p = 0.032); −9

  5. Post-event reviews: Using a quantitative approach for analysing incident response to demonstrate the value of business continuity programmes and increase planning efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    Business continuity management is often thought of as a proactive planning process for minimising impact from large-scale incidents and disasters. While this is true, and it is critical to plan for the worst, consistently validating plan effectiveness against smaller disruptions can enable an organisation to gain key insights about its business continuity readiness, drive programme improvements, reduce costs and provide an opportunity to quantitatively demonstrate the value of the programme to management. This paper describes a post mortem framework which is used as a continuous improvement mechanism for tracking, reviewing and learning from real-world events at Microsoft Customer Service & Support. This approach was developed and adopted because conducting regular business continuity exercises proved difficult and expensive in a complex and distributed operations environment with high availability requirements. Using a quantitative approach to measure response to incidents, and categorising outcomes based on such responses, enables business continuity teams to provide data-driven insights to leadership, change perceptions of incident root cause, and instil a higher level of confidence towards disaster response readiness and incident management. The scope of the framework discussed here is specific to reviewing and driving improvements from operational incidents. However, the concept can be extended to learning and evolving readiness plans for other types of incidents.

  6. Lean healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Donna

    2008-01-01

    As healthcare organizations look for new and improved ways to reduce costs and still offer quality healthcare, many are turning to the Toyota Production System of doing business. Rather than focusing on cutting personnel and assets, "lean healthcare" looks to improve patient satisfaction through improved actions and processes.

  7. Review of the Methods to Obtain Paediatric Drug Safety Information: Spontaneous Reporting and Healthcare Databases, Active Surveillance Programmes, Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Marta; Pozzi, Marco; Peeters, Gabrielle; Radice, Sonia; Carnovale, Carla

    2018-02-06

    Knowledge of drugs safety collected during the pre-marketing phase is inevitably limited because the randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are rarely designed to evaluate safety. The small and selective groups of enrolled individuals and the limited duration of trials may hamper the ability to characterize fully the safety profiles of drugs. Additionally, information about rare adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in special groups is often incomplete or not available for most of the drugs commonly used in the daily clinical practice. In the paediatric setting several highimpact safety issues have emerged. Hence, in recent years, there has been a call for improved post-marketing pharmacoepidemiological studies, in which cohorts of patients are monitored for sufficient time in order to determine the precise risk-benefit ratio. In this review, we discuss the current available strategies enhancing the post-marketing monitoring activities of the drugs in the paediatric setting and define criteria whereby they can provide valuable information to improve the management of therapy in daily clinical practice including both safety and efficacy aspects. The strategies we cover include the signal detection using international pharmacovigilance and/or healthcare databases, the promotion of active surveillance initiatives which can generate complete, informative data sets for the signal detection and systematic review/meta-analysis. Together, these methods provide a comprehensive picture of causality and risk improving the management of therapy in a paediatric setting and they should be considered as a unique tool to be integrated with post-marketing activities. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Surveillance of the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus (CoV) infection in healthcare workers after contact with confirmed MERS patients: incidence and risk factors of MERS-CoV seropositivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C-J; Choi, W S; Jung, Y; Kiem, S; Seol, H Y; Woo, H J; Choi, Y H; Son, J S; Kim, K-H; Kim, Y-S; Kim, E S; Park, S H; Yoon, J H; Choi, S-M; Lee, H; Oh, W S; Choi, S-Y; Kim, N-J; Choi, J-P; Park, S Y; Kim, J; Jeong, S J; Lee, K S; Jang, H C; Rhee, J Y; Kim, B-N; Bang, J H; Lee, J H; Park, S; Kim, H Y; Choi, J K; Wi, Y-M; Choi, H J

    2016-10-01

    Given the mode of transmission of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), healthcare workers (HCWs) in contact with MERS patients are expected to be at risk of MERS infections. We evaluated the prevalence of MERS coronavirus (CoV) immunoglobulin (Ig) G in HCWs exposed to MERS patients and calculated the incidence of MERS-affected cases in HCWs. We enrolled HCWs from hospitals where confirmed MERS patients had visited. Serum was collected 4 to 6 weeks after the last contact with a confirmed MERS patient. We performed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to screen for the presence of MERS-CoV IgG and an indirect immunofluorescence test (IIFT) to confirm MERS-CoV IgG. We used a questionnaire to collect information regarding the exposure. We calculated the incidence of MERS-affected cases by dividing the sum of PCR-confirmed and serology-confirmed cases by the number of exposed HCWs in participating hospitals. In total, 1169 HCWs in 31 hospitals had contact with 114 MERS patients, and among the HCWs, 15 were PCR-confirmed MERS cases in study hospitals. Serologic analysis was performed for 737 participants. ELISA was positive in five participants and borderline for seven. IIFT was positive for two (0.3%) of these 12 participants. Among the participants who did not use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), seropositivity was 0.7% (2/294) compared to 0% (0/443) in cases with appropriate PPE use. The incidence of MERS infection in HCWs was 1.5% (17/1169). The seroprevalence of MERS-CoV IgG among HCWs was higher among participants who did not use appropriate PPE. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. What stops hospital clinical staff from following protocols? An analysis of the incidence and factors behind the failure of bedside clinical staff to activate the rapid response system in a multi-campus Australian metropolitan healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Bill; Marshall, Stuart; Buist, Michael David; Finnigan, Monica; Kitto, Simon; Hore, Tonina; Sturgess, Tamica; Wilson, Stuart; Ramsay, Wayne

    2012-07-01

    To explore the causes of failure to activate the rapid response system (RRS). The organisation has a recognised incidence of staff failing to act when confronted with a deteriorating patient and leading to adverse outcomes. A multi-method study using the following: a point prevalence survey to determine the incidence of abnormal simple bedside observations and activation of the rapid response team by clinical staff; a prospective audit of all patients experiencing a cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care unit admission or death over an 8-week period; structured interviews of staff to explore cognitive and sociocultural barriers to activating the RRS. Southern Health is a comprehensive healthcare network with 570 adult in-patient beds across four metropolitan teaching hospitals in the south-eastern sector of Melbourne. Frequency of physiological instability and outcomes within the in-patient hospital population. Qualitative data from staff interviews were thematically coded. The incidence of physiological instability in the acute adult population was 4.04%. Nearly half of these patients (42%) did not receive an appropriate clinical response from the staff, despite most (69.2%) recognising their patient met physiological criteria for activating the RRS, and being 'quite', or 'very' concerned about their patient (75.8%). Structured interviews with 91 staff members identified predominantly sociocultural reasons for failure to activate the RRS. Despite an organisational commitment to the RRS, clinical staff act on local cultural rules within the clinical environment that are usually not explicit. Better understanding of these informal rules may lead to more appropriate activation of the RRS.

  10. Smoke-free legislation and the incidence of paediatric respiratory infections and wheezing/asthma: Interrupted time series analyses in the four UK nations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.V. Been (Jasper V.); L. Szatkowski (Lisa); T.P. van Staa (Tjeerd); H.G.M. Leufkens (Hubert); O.C.P. Schayck (Onno); A. Sheikh (Aziz); F. de Vries (Frank); P. Souverein (Patrick)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the association between introduction of smoke-free legislation in the UK (March 2006 for Scotland, April 2007 for Wales and Northern Ireland, and July 2007 for England) and the incidence of respiratory diseases among children. We extracted monthly counts of new diagnoses

  11. Smoke-free legislation and the incidence of paediatric respiratory infections and wheezing/asthma : interrupted time series analyses in the four UK nations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, Jasper V; Szatkowski, Lisa; van Staa, Tjeerd-Pieter; Leufkens, Hubert G; van Schayck, Onno C; Sheikh, Aziz; de Vries, Frank; Souverein, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association between introduction of smoke-free legislation in the UK (March 2006 for Scotland, April 2007 for Wales and Northern Ireland, and July 2007 for England) and the incidence of respiratory diseases among children. We extracted monthly counts of new diagnoses of

  12. Tuberculosis in Healthcare Workers and Infection Control Measures at Primary Healthcare Facilities in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Claassens, Mareli M.; van Schalkwyk, Cari; du Toit, Elizabeth; Roest, Eline; Lombard, Carl J.; Enarson, Donald A.; Beyers, Nulda; Borgdorff, Martien W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Challenges exist regarding TB infection control and TB in hospital-based healthcare workers in South Africa. However, few studies report on TB in non-hospital based healthcare workers such as primary or community healthcare workers. Our objectives were to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities, the smear positive TB incidence rate amongst primary healthcare workers and the association between TB infection control measures a...

  13. Incidents analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, P.

    1996-01-01

    We undertook a study programme at the end of 1991. To start with, we performed some exploratory studies aimed at learning some preliminary lessons on this type of analysis: Assessment of the interest of probabilistic incident analysis; possibility of using PSA scenarios; skills and resources required. At the same time, EPN created a working group whose assignment was to define a new approach for analysis of incidents on NPPs. This working group gave thought to both aspects of Operating Feedback that EPN wished to improve: Analysis of significant incidents; analysis of potential consequences. We took part in the work of this group, and for the second aspects, we proposed a method based on an adaptation of the event-tree method in order to establish a link between existing PSA models and actual incidents. Since PSA provides an exhaustive database of accident scenarios applicable to the two most common types of units in France, they are obviously of interest for this sort of analysis. With this method we performed some incident analyses, and at the same time explores some methods employed abroad, particularly ASP (Accident Sequence Precursor, a method used by the NRC). Early in 1994 EDF began a systematic analysis programme. The first, transient phase will set up methods and an organizational structure. 7 figs

  14. Compound-specific isotopic and congener-specific analyses of polychlorinated biphenyl in the heat medium and rice oil of the Yusho incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Takashi; Sugihara, Mari; Hirakawa, Shusaku; Hori, Tsuguhide; Kajiwara, Jumboku; Katsuki, Susumu; Mitoma, Chikage; Furue, Masutaka

    2017-09-21

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) can be used to examine the source and transformation processes of organic pollutants in the environment. We performed a carbon stable isotope analysis of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in the PCB heat-transfer medium (heat medium) and the original Kanechlor-400 (KC-400, a commercial brand of PCBs) involved in the Yusho incident. The main purpose is to investigate whether isotope fractionation occurred in the rice oil deodorization process that caused the incident. The carbon isotope ratios (δ 13 C values) of the targeted PCB congeners ranged from - 29.39 to - 27.00‰ in the heat medium and from - 28.77 to - 27.05‰ in the original KC-400. No significant differences were found in the δ 13 C values, suggesting carbon isotope fractionation did not occur for the targeted PCB congeners in the heat medium when deodorization of rice oil occurred at temperatures above 200 °C. Furthermore, we also conducted a congener-specific analysis of 64 PCB congeners found in the heat medium and rice oil contaminated by it. The total PCB congener concentrations were 503 mg/g in the heat medium and 81 μg/g in the rice oil. The concentrations of the highly chlorinated congeners were significantly lower in the heat medium than in the original KC-400, and the compositional ratios of the lowly chlorinated congeners were relatively lower in the rice oil than in the heat medium. These results suggest that the PCB congener patterns gradually changed from that of the original KC-400 in the deodorization process and subsequent contamination into the rice oil. Thus, a combination of CSIA and congener-specific analysis is a new approach for investigating the changing PCB congener profiles in samples from the Yusho incident.

  15. Forensic analyses of explosion debris from the January 2, 1992 Pd/D{sub 2}O electrochemistry incident at SRI International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, B.; Whipple, R.; Vandervoort, D.; Grant, P.

    1992-08-15

    The January 2, 1992 explosion in an electrochemistry laboratory at SRI International (SRI) resulted in the death of scientist Andrew Riley, and gained some notoriety due to its association with experimental work in the controversial field of cold fusion research. Selected components of explosion debris were subjected to forensic analyses at LLNL to elucidate potential causes of, or contributing factors to, the explosion. Interrogation of the debris by LLNL encompassed nuclear, chemical, physical, and materials investigations. Nuclear studies for the determination of tritium and neutron-activation products in stainless steel and brass were negative. No evidence of signature species indicative of orthodox nuclear events was detected. The inorganic and particulate analyses were likewise negative with respect to residues of unexpected chemical species. Such target compounds included conventional explosives, accelerants, propellants, or any exceptional industrial chemicals. The GC-MS analyses of trace organic components in the explosion debris provided perhaps the most interesting results obtained at LLNL. Although no evidence of organic explosives, oxidizers, or other unusual compounds was detected, the presence of a hydrocarbon oil in the interior of the electrochemical cell was established. It is likely that its source was lubricating fluid from the machining of the metal cell components. If residues of organic oils are present during electrolysis experiments, the potential exists for an explosive reaction in the increasingly enriched oxygen atmosphere within the headspace of a metal cell.

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program on Reducing the Incidence Rate of Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection: A Non-Randomized, Stepped Wedge, Single-Site, Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio DiDiodato

    Full Text Available The incidence rate of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection (HA-CDI is estimated at 1 in 100 patients. Antibiotic exposure is the most consistently reported risk factor for HA-CDI. Strategies to reduce the risk of HA-CDI have focused on reducing antibiotic utilization. Prospective audit and feedback is a commonly used antimicrobial stewardship intervention (ASi. The impact of this ASi on risk of HA-CDI is equivocal. This study examines the effectiveness of a prospective audit and feedback ASi on reducing the risk of HA-CDI.Single-site, 339 bed community-hospital in Barrie, Ontario, Canada. Primary outcome is HA-CDI incidence rate. Daily prospective and audit ASi is the exposure variable. ASi implemented across 6 wards in a non-randomized, stepped wedge design. Criteria for ASi; any intravenous antibiotic use for ≥ 48 hrs, any oral fluoroquinolone or oral second generation cephalosporin use for ≥ 48 hrs, or any antimicrobial use for ≥ 5 days. HA-CDI cases and model covariates were aggregated by ward, year and month starting September 2008 and ending February 2016. Multi-level mixed effect negative binomial regression analysis was used to model the primary outcome, with intercept and slope coefficients for ward-level random effects estimated. Other covariates tested for inclusion in the final model were derived from previously published risk factors. Deviance residuals were used to assess the model's goodness-of-fit.The dataset included 486 observation periods, of which 350 were control periods and 136 were intervention periods. After accounting for all other model covariates, the estimated overall ASi incidence rate ratio (IRR was 0.48 (95% 0.30, 0.79. The ASi effect was independent of antimicrobial utilization. The ASi did not seem to reduce the risk of Clostridium difficile infection on the surgery wards (IRR 0.87, 95% CI 0.45, 1.69 compared to the medicine wards (IRR 0.42, 95% CI 0.28, 0.63. The ward-level burden of

  17. Decreasing incidence rates of bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, C; Jensen, T G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have shown that the incidence rate of bacteremia has been increasing over time. However, few studies have distinguished between community-acquired, healthcare-associated and nosocomial bacteremia. METHODS: We conducted a population-based study among adults with first......-acquired, 50.0 for healthcare-associated and 66.7 for nosocomial bacteremia. During 2000-2008, the overall incidence rate decreased by 23.3% from 254.1 to 198.8 (3.3% annually, p ...) and the incidence rate of nosocomial bacteremia decreased by 28.9% from 82.2 to 56.0 (4.2% annually, p

  18. Healthcare Lean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, John C

    2003-01-01

    Lean Thinking is an integrated approach to designing, doing and improving the work of people that have come together to produce and deliver goods, services and information. Healthcare Lean is based on the Toyota production system and applies concepts and techniques of Lean Thinking to hospitals and physician practices.

  19. Safety measurement and monitoring in healthcare: a framework to guide clinical teams and healthcare organisations in maintaining safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Charles; Burnett, Susan; Carthey, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Patients, clinicians and managers all want to be reassured that their healthcare organisation is safe. But there is no consensus about what we mean when we ask whether a healthcare organisation is safe or how this is achieved. In the UK, the measurement of harm, so important in the evolution of patient safety, has been neglected in favour of incident reporting. The use of softer intelligence for monitoring and anticipation of problems receives little mention in official policy. The Francis Inquiry report into patient treatment at the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust set out 29 recommendations on measurement, more than on any other topic, and set the measurement of safety an absolute priority for healthcare organisations. The Berwick review found that most healthcare organisations at present have very little capacity to analyse, monitor or learn from safety and quality information. This paper summarises the findings of a more extensive report and proposes a framework which can guide clinical teams and healthcare organisations in the measurement and monitoring of safety and in reviewing progress against safety objectives. The framework has been used so far to promote self-reflection at both board and clinical team level, to stimulate an organisational check or analysis in the gaps of information and to promote discussion of ‘what could we do differently’. PMID:24764136

  20. Mindful Application of Aviation Practices in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Brennan, Peter A; Peerally, Mohammad Farhad; Kapur, Narinder; Hynes, Jonny M; Hodkinson, Peter D

    2017-12-01

    Evidence supports the efficacy of incorporating select recognized aviation practices and procedures into healthcare. Incident analysis, debrief, safety brief, and crew resource management (CRM) have all been assessed for implementation within the UK healthcare system, a world leader in aviation-based patient safety initiatives. Mindful application, in which aviation practices are specifically tailored to the unique healthcare setting, show promise in terms of acceptance and long-term sustainment. In order to establish British healthcare applications of aviation practices, a PubMed search of UK authored manuscripts published between 2005-2016 was undertaken using search terms 'aviation,' 'healthcare,' 'checklist,' and 'CRM.' A convenience sample of UK-authored aviation medical conference presentations and UK-authored patient safety manuscripts were also reviewed. A total of 11 of 94 papers with UK academic affiliations published between 2005-2016 and relevant to aviation modeled healthcare delivery were found. The debrief process, incident analysis, and CRM are the primary practices incorporated into UK healthcare, with success dependent on cultural acceptance and mindful application. CRM training has gained significant acceptance in UK healthcare environments. Aviation modeled incident analysis, debrief, safety brief, and CRM training are increasingly undertaken within the UK healthcare system. Nuanced application, in which the unique aspects of the healthcare setting are addressed as part of a comprehensive safety approach, shows promise for long-term success. The patient safety brief and aviation modeled incident analysis are in earlier phases of implementation, and warrant further analysis.Powell-Dunford N, Brennan PA, Peerally MF, Kapur N, Hynes JM, Hodkinson PD. Mindful application of aviation practices in healthcare. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(12):1107-1116.

  1. Tuberculosis in healthcare workers and infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareli M Claassens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Challenges exist regarding TB infection control and TB in hospital-based healthcare workers in South Africa. However, few studies report on TB in non-hospital based healthcare workers such as primary or community healthcare workers. Our objectives were to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities, the smear positive TB incidence rate amongst primary healthcare workers and the association between TB infection control measures and all types of TB in healthcare workers. METHODS: One hundred and thirty three primary healthcare facilities were visited in five provinces of South Africa in 2009. At each facility, a TB infection control audit and facility questionnaire were completed. The number of healthcare workers who had had TB during the past three years was obtained. RESULTS: The standardised incidence ratio of smear positive TB in primary healthcare workers indicated an incidence rate of more than double that of the general population. In a univariable logistic regression, the infection control audit score was significantly associated with reported cases of TB in healthcare workers (OR=1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.08, p=0.02 as was the number of staff (OR=3.78, 95%CI 1.77-8.08. In the multivariable analysis, the number of staff remained significantly associated with TB in healthcare workers (OR=3.33, 95%CI 1.37-8.08. CONCLUSION: The high rate of TB in healthcare workers suggests a substantial nosocomial transmission risk, but the infection control audit tool which was used did not perform adequately as a measure of this risk. Infection control measures should be monitored by validated tools developed and tested locally. Different strategies, such as routine surveillance systems, could be used to evaluate the burden of TB in healthcare workers in order to calculate TB incidence, monitor trends and implement interventions to decrease occupational TB.

  2. Register-based studies of healthcare costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Christiansen, Terkel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview and a few examples of how national registers are used in analyses of healthcare costs in Denmark. Research topics: The paper focuses on health economic analyses based on register data. For the sake of simplicity, the studies are divided...... into three main categories: economic evaluations of healthcare interventions, cost-of-illness analyses, and other analyses such as assessments of healthcare productivity. Conclusion: We examined a number of studies using register-based data on healthcare costs. Use of register-based data renders...... a comprehensive data material, often in the form of time series, which is very useful in health economic analyses. The disadvantage of register-based data is the use of tariffs, charges, or market prices as proxies for costs in the computation of healthcare costs....

  3. Healthcare compunetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Andy; Laxminarayan, Swamy; Bos, Lodewijk

    2004-01-01

    Changes in life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and health seeking behaviour are having an impact on the demand for care. Such changes could occur across the whole population, or for specific groups. Changes for specific groups will be particularly affected by policy initiatives, while both these and wider changes will be affected by people's levels of engagement with their health and the health service itself. Levels of education, income and media coverage of health issues are also important. These factors could also encourage an increase in people caring for themselves and their families or community. People are now expecting a patient-centred service with safe high quality treatment, comfortable accommodation services, fast access and an integrated joined-up system. The uptake of integrated Information and Communication technologies (ICT) will be crucial. Healthcare Compunetics, the combination of computing and networking customised for medical and care, will provide the common policy and framework for combined multi-disciplinary research, development, implementation and usage.

  4. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  5. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  6. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  7. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  8. CBO Richtlijn Preventie van valincidenten bij ouderen: Wat kunnen verpleeghuizen hiermee? [How can nursing homes make use of the guideline: Prevention of fall incidents in the elderly by the Dutch Institute for Healthcare Improvement (CBO)?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neyens, J.C.L.; Dijcks, B.P.J.; Kinkelder, A.de; Graafmams, W.C.; Schols, J.M.G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Fall incidents occur frequently in the community dwelling elderly and even more in the institutionalised elderly. Fall-related research data indicate positive effects of a multifactorial intervention targeted on prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. In November 2004 the guideline

  9. Wheelchair incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen AW van; Roszek B; Hilbers-Modderman ESM; Kallewaard M; Wassenaar C; LGM

    2002-01-01

    This RIVM study was performed to gain insight into wheelchair-related incidents with powered and manual wheelchairs reported to the USA FDA, the British MDA and the Dutch Center for Quality and Usability Research of Technical Aids (KBOH). The data in the databases do not indicate that incidents with

  10. Architecture Capabilities to Improve Healthcare Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Mardomi, Karim; Hassanpour Rahimabad, Kasra

    2013-01-01

    Background The physical environment of healthcare buildings has great importance in issues such as patient safety, functional efficiency, user satisfaction, healthcare outcomes, and energy and resources consumption. Objectives The present study assesses physical environments of Iranian healthcare buildings. Materials and Methods This study was performed using a descriptive-analytical method. Data collection was carried out via a written questionnaire. Results Based on the findings of this study, "functional efficiency", "user satisfaction", "environmental issues", "patient safety”, “accountability in incidents and disasters", and "flexibility" are regarded as the most issues in the country's hospitals. Also, none of the parameters is "without any problem" and has a "desirable status". Conclusions According to the responses, all of the healthcare buildings in this research had flaws in their physical environment, which require attention. Thus, it is necessary to review and pay more attention to the architecture of the country's healthcare buildings. PMID:24350145

  11. Examen d'analyses récentes portant sur l'Étude canadienne sur l'incidence des signalements de cas de violence et de négligence envers les enfants (ECI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Potter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Cette analyse a comme objectif de rassembler les articles évalués par les pairs utilisant des données tirées de l'Étude canadienne sur l'incidence des signalements de cas de violence et de négligence envers les enfants (ECI publiées depuis novembre 2011 ainsi que des suréchantillons provinciaux de l'ECI, d'évaluer la qualité de leurs conclusions, de les synthétiser et de faire le bilan des variations dans l'utilisation de ces données. Méthodologie : Nous avons sélectionné les articles au moyen du suivi des demandes d'accès aux données de l'ECI effectué par l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada et au suivi des publications produites au moyen de ces données. Deux évaluateurs au moins ont examiné de façon indépendante les articles et en ont évalué la qualité. Résultats : Nous avons conservé 32 articles. Leurs points forts étaient en général les suivants : objectifs de recherche clairement établis, variables de contrôle appropriées, analyses pertinentes, taille de l'échantillon suffisante, conclusions pertinentes et utilité pour les pratiques et politiques. Leur point problématique était le plus souvent une définition floue des variables et des critères d'inclusion des cas. La plupart du temps, les articles mesuraient les associations entre les caractéristiques des mauvais traitements et celles des enfants, des pourvoyeurs de soins, du ménage et de l'organisme ou de la personne à l'origine du signalement et ils s'intéressaient aux conséquences des signalements, par exemple l'ouverture d'un dossier pour une prestation continue de services ou le placement. Conclusion : Les articles utilisant des données de l'ECI ont obtenu des scores positifs pour la plupart des indicateurs de qualité. Dans leurs analyses les plus récentes, les chercheurs se sont concentrés sur les catégories de maltraitance insuffisamment étudiées jusqu'ici (exposition à la violence conjugale, négligence et

  12. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  13. Leadership and followership in the healthcare workplace: exploring medical trainees’ experiences through narrative inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lisi J; Rees, Charlotte E; Ker, Jean S; Cleland, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore medical trainees’ experiences of leadership and followership in the interprofessional healthcare workplace. Design A qualitative approach using narrative interviewing techniques in 11 group and 19 individual interviews with UK medical trainees. Setting Multisite study across four UK health boards. Participants Through maximum variation sampling, 65 medical trainees were recruited from a range of specialties and at various stages of training. Participants shared stories about their experiences of leadership and followership in the healthcare workplace. Methods Data were analysed using thematic and narrative analysis. Results We identified 171 personal incident narratives about leadership and followership. Participants most often narrated experiences from the position of follower. Their narratives illustrated many factors that facilitate or inhibit developing leadership identities; that traditional medical and interprofessional hierarchies persist within the healthcare workplace; and that wider healthcare systems can act as barriers to distributed leadership practices. Conclusions This paper provides new understandings of the multiple ways in which leadership and followership is experienced in the healthcare workplace and sets out recommendations for future leadership educational practices and research. PMID:26628525

  14. Measuring Value in Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A statistical description and model of individual healthcare expenditures in the US has been developed for measuring value in healthcare. We find evidence that healthcare expenditures are quantifiable as an infusion-diffusion process, which can be thought of intuitively as a steady change in the intensity of treatment superimposed on a random process reflecting variations in the efficiency and effectiveness of treatment. The arithmetic mean represents the net average annual cost of healthcare...

  15. The quality of healthcare

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of healthcare provided by a healthcare system is not always easily assessed. How can one assess the smile of reassurance from a nursing sister or the feeling of satisfaction of a patient when visiting a doctor in a resource-limited setting? There are, however, some objective measures of healthcare activity.

  16. Adapting Cognitive Task Analysis to Investigate Clinical Decision Making and Medication Safety Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Alissa L; Militello, Laura G; Glassman, Peter A; Arthur, Karen J; Zillich, Alan J; Weiner, Michael

    2017-05-03

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) can yield valuable insights into healthcare professionals' cognition and inform system design to promote safe, quality care. Our objective was to adapt CTA-the critical decision method, specifically-to investigate patient safety incidents, overcome barriers to implementing this method, and facilitate more widespread use of cognitive task analysis in healthcare. We adapted CTA to facilitate recruitment of healthcare professionals and developed a data collection tool to capture incidents as they occurred. We also leveraged the electronic health record (EHR) to expand data capture and used EHR-stimulated recall to aid reconstruction of safety incidents. We investigated 3 categories of medication-related incidents: adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug-disease interactions. Healthcare professionals submitted incidents, and a subset of incidents was selected for CTA. We analyzed several outcomes to characterize incident capture and completed CTA interviews. We captured 101 incidents. Eighty incidents (79%) met eligibility criteria. We completed 60 CTA interviews, 20 for each incident category. Capturing incidents before interviews allowed us to shorten the interview duration and reduced reliance on healthcare professionals' recall. Incorporating the EHR into CTA enriched data collection. The adapted CTA technique was successful in capturing specific categories of safety incidents. Our approach may be especially useful for investigating safety incidents that healthcare professionals "fix and forget." Our innovations to CTA are expected to expand the application of this method in healthcare and inform a wide range of studies on clinical decision making and patient safety.

  17. Architecture and implementation for a system enabling smartphones to access smart card based healthcare records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampelas, Vasilios; Pallikarakis, Nicholas; Mantas, John

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare researchers', academics' and practitioners' interest concerning the development of Healthcare Information Systems has been on a steady rise for the last decades. Fueling this steady rise has been the healthcare professional need of quality information, in every healthcare provision incident, whenever and wherever this incident may take place. In order to address this need a truly mobile health care system is required, one that will be able to provide a healthcare provider with accurate patient-related information regardless of the time and place that healthcare is provided. In order to fulfill this role the present study proposes the architecture for a Healthcare Smartcard system, which provides authenticated healthcare professionals with remote mobile access to a Patient's Healthcare Record, through their Smartphone. Furthermore the research proceeds to develop a working prototype system.

  18. An analysis of patient safety incidents associated with medications reported from critical care units in the North West of England between 2009 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A N; Taylor, R J

    2014-07-01

    Incident reporting is promoted as a key tool for improving patient safety in healthcare. We analysed 2238 patient safety incidents involving medications submitted from up to 29 critical care units each year in the North West of England between 2009 and 2012; 452 (20%) of these incidents led to harm to patients. Although 1461 (65%) incidents were judged to have been preventable, there was no reduction in the rate of incidents per 1000 days between 2009 and 2012 (5.9 in 2009, 6.6 in 2012). Furthermore, in the 2012 data, there were wide variations in the incident rates between units, the median (IQR [range]) rate per 1000 patient days for individual units being 6.8 (3.8-11.0 [1.3-37.1]). The variation in the percentage that could have been avoided was narrower, with a median (IQR [range]) of 70% (61-80% [38-100%]). The most commonly reported drugs were noradrenaline (161 incidents, 92 with harm), heparins (153 incidents, 29 with harm), morphine (131 incidents, 14 with harm) and insulin (111 incidents, 54 with harm). The administration of drugs was the stage in the process where incidents were most commonly reported; it was also the stage most likely to harm patients. We conclude that the wide range in reported rates between units, and the scope for preventing many incidents, suggest that quality improvement initiatives could improve medication safety in the units studied. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Evaluating Lean in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Nicola; Radnor, Zoe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present findings relating to how Lean is implemented in English hospitals. Lean implementation snapshots in English hospitals were conducted by content analysing all annual reports and web sites over two time periods, giving a thorough analysis of Lean's status in English healthcare. The article identifies divergent approaches to Lean implementation in English hospitals. These approaches are classified into a typology to facilitate an evaluation of how Lean is implemented. The findings suggest that implementation tends to be isolated rather than system-wide. A second dataset conveys Lean implementation trajectory across the time period. These data signal Lean's increasing use by English hospitals and shows progression towards an increasingly systemic approach. Data were collected using content analysis methods, which relies on how "Lean" methods were articulated within the annual report and/or on the organisation's web site, which indicates approaches taken by hospital staff implementing Lean. This research is the first to examine more closely "how" Lean is implemented in English hospitals. The emergent typology could prove relevant to other public sector organizations and service organisations more generally. The research also presents a first step to understanding Lean thinking in the English NHS. This article empirically analyses Lean implementation in English hospitals. It identifies divergent approaches that allow inferences about how far Lean is implemented in an organisation. Data represent a baseline for further analysis so that Lean implementation can be tracked.

  20. Sources of unsafe primary care for older adults: a mixed-methods analysis of patient safety incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alison; Edwards, Adrian; Williams, Huw; Evans, Huw P; Avery, Anthony; Hibbert, Peter; Makeham, Meredith; Sheikh, Aziz; J Donaldson, Liam; Carson-Stevens, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    older adults are frequent users of primary healthcare services, but are at increased risk of healthcare-related harm in this setting. to describe the factors associated with actual or potential harm to patients aged 65 years and older, treated in primary care, to identify action to produce safer care. a cross-sectional mixed-methods analysis of a national (England and Wales) database of patient safety incident reports from 2005 to 2013. 1,591 primary care patient safety incident reports regarding patients aged 65 years and older. we developed a classification system for the analysis of patient safety incident reports to describe: the incident and preceding chain of incidents; other contributory factors; and patient harm outcome. We combined findings from exploratory descriptive and thematic analyses to identify key sources of unsafe care. the main sources of unsafe care in our weighted sample were due to: medication-related incidents e.g. prescribing, dispensing and administering (n = 486, 31%; 15% serious patient harm); communication-related incidents e.g. incomplete or non-transfer of information across care boundaries (n = 390, 25%; 12% serious patient harm); and clinical decision-making incidents which led to the most serious patient harm outcomes (n = 203, 13%; 41% serious patient harm). priority areas for further research to determine the burden and preventability of unsafe primary care for older adults, include: the timely electronic tools for prescribing, dispensing and administering medication in the community; electronic transfer of information between healthcare settings; and, better clinical decision-making support and guidance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Salmonella bacteraemia among healthcare workers and their dependents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, A.; Sultan, F.; Mahboob, A.; Nazeer, S. H.; Nizammudin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence and resistance pattern of Salmonella infection in healthcare workers and their dependents. Methods: The retrospective analysis was conducted at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, and comprised records of employees and their dependents with bacteraemia from January 2007 to December 2011. Person-years were calculated using data from the human resources department. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analyses. Results: Of the total 2532 records available, 82(3.23%) patients were identified with Salmonella bacteraemia. Of them, 34(41.5%) patients were in age group 1-10, 15(18.3%) in 11-20, 26(31.7%) in 21-30, and 7(8.5%) were above 30 years. Besides, 48(58.5%) were males. Salmonella typhi was found in 44(53.7%) patients, Salmonella paratyphi A in 35(42.7%) and Salmonella species in 3(3.7%) patients. The yearly incidence of Salmonella infection in the study population ranged from 206 to 596 per 100000 person-years. Ciprofloxacin resistance was noted to be 56 (68.2%) followed by Ampicillin 29 (35.3%) and Co-trimoxazole 24 (29.2%). No strains were resistant to Cefiximeor Ceftriaxone. Conclusion: The yearly incidence of Salmonella bacteraemia ranged from 200 to 600 per 100000 person years. There was significant quinolone resistance among the isolates. (author)

  2. Healthcare managers' perception of economies of scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarts, Anna

    2017-05-15

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how healthcare managers perceive economies of scale and the underlying mechanisms for how scale/size affects performance. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected in 20 in-depth interviews with healthcare professionals from 13 healthcare delivery organizations and from a public authority that finances and contracts healthcare services. Data were coded and analysed using content analysis. Findings The study concludes that the impact of scale on performance is perceived by healthcare professionals to be different for different types of healthcare services: For surgery, significant scale effects related to spreading of fixed cost, the experience curve, and potential for process improvement. For inpatient care, moderate scale effects related to spreading of fixed costs and costs of doctors on on-call duty. For outpatient care, small or no scale effects. Research limitations/implications The small sample of interviewees from a single geographical region and healthcare system limits the applicability of the findings. Originality/value The paper provides insights into how healthcare managers experience scale effects and how they consider economies of scale when planning hospital configuration. Also, past studies of economies of scale in hospitals proffer mixed results and the findings in this paper indicate a possible explanation for this inconclusiveness, i.e. differences in service mix between different hospitals.

  3. Normative 3D acetabular orientation measurements by the low-dose EOS imaging system in 102 asymptomatic subjects in standing position: Analyses by side, gender, pelvic incidence and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, T; Thelen, P; Demezon, H; Aunoble, S; Le Huec, J-C

    2017-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) acetabular orientation is a fundamental topic in orthopedic surgery. Computed tomography (CT) allows 3D measurement of native acetabular orientation, but with a substantial radiation dose. The EOS imaging system was developed to perform this kind of evaluation, but has not been validated in this indication with specific attention to the acetabulum. We therefore performed a prospective study using EOS to assess: (1) the reproducibility of the 3D acetabulum orientation measures; (2) normative asymptomatic acetabular morphology in standing position, according to side and gender; and (3) the relationship between acetabular anteversion and pelvic incidence. The low-dose EOS imaging system is a reproducible method for measuring 3D acetabular orientation in standing position. In a previous prospective study of spine sagittal balance, 165 asymptomatic volunteers were examined on whole-body EOS biplanar X-ray; 102 had appropriate images for pelvic and acetabular analysis, with an equal sex-ratio (53 female, 49 male). These EOS images were reviewed using sterEOS 3D software, allowing automatic measurement of acetabular parameters (anteversion and inclination) and pelvic parameters (pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt and sacral slope) in an anatomical (anterior pelvic plane: APP) and a functional reference plane (patient vertical plane: PVP). Both intra- and inter-observer analysis showed good agreement (ICC>0.90); Bland-Altman plot distributions were good. Acetabular anatomical anteversion and inclination relative to APP (AAAPP and AIAPP, respectively) were significantly greater in women than in men, with no effect of side (right AAA: women 21.3°±3.4° vs. men 16.1°±3.3° (P62°) correlated significantly with functional acetabular orientation in standing position: PVP functional anteversion decreased by 5° relative to APP anteversion with incidence APP with incidence 44-62°, and or was greater by 4° relative to APP with incidence >62°. The use of a

  4. Improving healthcare practice behaviors: an exploratory study identifying effective and ineffective behaviors in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fleet, David D; Peterson, Tim O

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of exploratory research designed to develop an awareness of healthcare behaviors, with a view toward improving the customer satisfaction with healthcare services. It examines the relationship between healthcare providers and their consumers/patients/clients. The study uses a critical incident methodology, with both effective and ineffective behavioral specimens examined across different provider groups. The effects of these different behaviors on what Berry (1999) identified as the common core values of service organizations are examined, as those values are required to build a lasting service relationship. Also examined are categories of healthcare practice based on the National Quality Strategy priorities. The most obvious is the retrospective nature of the method used. How accurate are patient or consumer memories? Are they capable of making valid judgments of healthcare experiences (Berry and Bendapudi, 2003)? While an obvious limitation, such recollections are clearly important as they may be paramount in following the healthcare practitioners' instructions, loyalty for repeat business, making recommendations to others and the like. Further, studies have shown retrospective reports to be accurate and useful (Miller et al., 1997). With this information, healthcare educators should be in a better position to improve the training offered in their programs and practitioners to better serve their customers. The findings would indicate that the human values of excellence, innovation, joy, respect and integrity play a significant role in building a strong service relationship between consumer and healthcare provider. Berry (1999) has argued that the overriding importance in building a lasting service business is human values. This exploratory study has shown how critical incident analysis can be used to determine both effective and ineffective practices of different medical providers. It also provides guidelines as

  5. Evaluating the clinical and economic burden of healthcare-associated infections during hospitalization for surgery in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarsalle, L; Hunt, B; Schauf, M; Szwarcensztein, K; Valentine, W J

    2013-12-01

    Over 4 million patients suffer nosocomial infections annually in the European Union. This study aimed to estimate the healthcare burden associated with healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) following surgery in France, and explore the potential impact of infection control strategies and interventions on the clinical and economic burden of disease. Data on the frequency of HAIs were gathered from the 2010 Programme de Médicalisation des Systèmes d'Information (PMSI), and cost data were taken from the 2009 Echelle Nationale de Coûts à Méthodologie Commune (ENCC). It was estimated that 3% of surgical procedures performed in 2010 in France resulted in infection, resulting in an annual cost of €57 892 715. Patients experiencing a HAI had a significantly increased mortality risk (4.15-fold) and an increased length of hospital stay (threefold). Scenario analysis in which HAI incidence following surgery was reduced by 8% (based on a study of the effectiveness of triclosan-coated sutures), suggested that, annually, 20 205 hospital days and €4 588 519 could be saved. Analyses of 20% and 30% reductions in incidence (based on an estimate of the number of preventable nosocomial infections) suggested that annual savings of €11 548 057 and €17 334 696, respectively, could be made. New infection control interventions which reduce HAI incidence during hospitalization for surgery have the potential to provide valuable cost savings to healthcare providers.

  6. The US healthcare workforce and the labor market effect on healthcare spending and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Lawrence C; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Qian, Jing

    2014-06-01

    The healthcare sector was one of the few sectors of the US economy that created new positions in spite of the recent economic downturn. Economic contractions are associated with worsening morbidity and mortality, declining private health insurance coverage, and budgetary pressure on public health programs. This study examines the causes of healthcare employment growth and workforce composition in the US and evaluates the labor market's impact on healthcare spending and health outcomes. Data are collected for 50 states and the District of Columbia from 1999-2009. Labor market and healthcare workforce data are obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Mortality and health status data are collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vital Statistics program and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Healthcare spending data are derived from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Dynamic panel data regression models, with instrumental variables, are used to examine the effect of the labor market on healthcare spending, morbidity, and mortality. Regression analysis is also performed to model the effects of healthcare spending on the healthcare workforce composition. All statistical tests are based on a two-sided [Formula: see text] significance of [Formula: see text] .05. Analyses are performed with STATA and SAS. The labor force participation rate shows a more robust effect on healthcare spending, morbidity, and mortality than the unemployment rate. Study results also show that declining labor force participation negatively impacts overall health status ([Formula: see text] .01), and mortality for males ([Formula: see text] .05) and females ([Formula: see text] .001), aged 16-64. Further, the Medicaid and Medicare spending share increases as labor force participation declines ([Formula: see text] .001); whereas, the private healthcare spending share decreases ([Formula: see text] .001). Public and private healthcare spending also

  7. Cancer in British vegetarians: updated analyses of 4998 incident cancers in a cohort of 32,491 meat eaters, 8612 fish eaters, 18,298 vegetarians, and 2246 vegans1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Timothy J; Appleby, Paul N; Crowe, Francesca L; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Schmidt, Julie A; Travis, Ruth C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vegetarian diets might affect the risk of cancer. Objective: The objective was to describe cancer incidence in vegetarians and nonvegetarians in a large sample in the United Kingdom. Design: This was a pooled analysis of 2 prospective studies including 61,647 British men and women comprising 32,491 meat eaters, 8612 fish eaters, and 20,544 vegetarians (including 2246 vegans). Cancer incidence was followed through nationwide cancer registries. Cancer risk by vegetarian status was estimated by using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results: After an average follow-up of 14.9 y, there were 4998 incident cancers: 3275 in meat eaters (10.1%), 520 in fish eaters (6.0%), and 1203 in vegetarians (5.9%). There was significant heterogeneity between dietary groups in risks of the following cancers: stomach cancer [RRs (95% CIs) compared with meat eaters: 0.62 (0.27, 1.43) in fish eaters and 0.37 (0.19, 0.69) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.006], colorectal cancer [RRs (95% CIs): 0.66 (0.48, 0.92) in fish eaters and 1.03 (0.84, 1.26) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.033], cancers of the lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue [RRs (95% CIs): 0.96 (0.70, 1.32) in fish eaters and 0.64 (0.49, 0.84) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.005], multiple myeloma [RRs (95% CIs): 0.77 (0.34, 1.76) in fish eaters and 0.23 (0.09, 0.59) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.010], and all sites combined [RRs (95% CIs): 0.88 (0.80, 0.97) in fish eaters and 0.88 (0.82, 0.95) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.0007]. Conclusion: In this British population, the risk of some cancers is lower in fish eaters and vegetarians than in meat eaters. PMID:24898235

  8. Cancer in British vegetarians: updated analyses of 4998 incident cancers in a cohort of 32,491 meat eaters, 8612 fish eaters, 18,298 vegetarians, and 2246 vegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Timothy J; Appleby, Paul N; Crowe, Francesca L; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Schmidt, Julie A; Travis, Ruth C

    2014-07-01

    Vegetarian diets might affect the risk of cancer. The objective was to describe cancer incidence in vegetarians and nonvegetarians in a large sample in the United Kingdom. This was a pooled analysis of 2 prospective studies including 61,647 British men and women comprising 32,491 meat eaters, 8612 fish eaters, and 20,544 vegetarians (including 2246 vegans). Cancer incidence was followed through nationwide cancer registries. Cancer risk by vegetarian status was estimated by using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. After an average follow-up of 14.9 y, there were 4998 incident cancers: 3275 in meat eaters (10.1%), 520 in fish eaters (6.0%), and 1203 in vegetarians (5.9%). There was significant heterogeneity between dietary groups in risks of the following cancers: stomach cancer [RRs (95% CIs) compared with meat eaters: 0.62 (0.27, 1.43) in fish eaters and 0.37 (0.19, 0.69) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.006], colorectal cancer [RRs (95% CIs): 0.66 (0.48, 0.92) in fish eaters and 1.03 (0.84, 1.26) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.033], cancers of the lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue [RRs (95% CIs): 0.96 (0.70, 1.32) in fish eaters and 0.64 (0.49, 0.84) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.005], multiple myeloma [RRs (95% CIs): 0.77 (0.34, 1.76) in fish eaters and 0.23 (0.09, 0.59) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.010], and all sites combined [RRs (95% CIs): 0.88 (0.80, 0.97) in fish eaters and 0.88 (0.82, 0.95) in vegetarians; P-heterogeneity = 0.0007]. In this British population, the risk of some cancers is lower in fish eaters and vegetarians than in meat eaters. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Learning from Medication Errors in Healthcare How to Make Medication Error Reporting Systems Work?

    OpenAIRE

    Holmström, Anna-Riia

    2017-01-01

    Medication errors are one of the most common incidents leading to adverse events in healthcare worldwide. Tackling these major problems requires the implementation of a systems approach to healthcare, stating that risks should be managed proactively by improving the healthcare system. One of the recommended key strategies for learning from medication errors and risk prone processes is the establishment of local and national medication error reporting (MER) systems in healthcare. This stu...

  10. Sustainable healthcare: how to assess and improve healthcare structures' sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffoli, M; Capolongo, S; Bottero, M; Cavagliato, E; Speranza, S; Volpatti, L

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability is a broad and debated subject, often difficult to be defined and applied into real projects, especially when dealing with a complex scenario as the one of healthcare. Many research studies and evaluation systems have handled this topic from different perspectives, but many limits and criticalities still have to be overcome to properly cope with actual needs. The Sustainable Healthcare project has been developed through three main phases: a deep study of the state of the art, unraveling pros and cons of available sustainability scoring systems; an accurate analysis of the stakeholders network and their needs; the realization of an objective evaluation framework, through scientific methods, as the ANP. The newly developed evaluation system takes into consideration all the three pillars of sustainability, analyzing social, environmental and economic sustainability through a set of criteria, specified by measurable indicators. So the system identifies both global sustainability and specific critical areas, pointing out possible strategic solutions to improve sustainability. The evaluation is achieved through technical analyses and qualitative surveys, which eventually allow to quantitatively assess sustainability, through a sound scoring method. This study proposes an innovative evaluation method to determine the sustainability of a hospital, already existing or in the design phase, within the European context. The Sustainable Healthcare system overcomes some of the current evaluation systems' limits by establishing a multidisciplinary approach and being an easy-to-use tool. This protocol is intended to be of support in the identification of the main hospital's weaknesses and in setting priorities for implementation of the solutions.

  11. Device Data Protection in Mobile Healthcare Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Dasun; Rajarajan, Muttukrishnan; Rakocevic, Veselin

    The rapid growth in mobile technology makes the delivery of healthcare data and services on mobile phones a reality. However, the healthcare data is very sensitive and has to be protected against unauthorized access. While most of the development work on security of mobile healthcare today focuses on the data encryption and secure authentication in remote servers, protection of data on the mobile device itself has gained very little attention. This paper analyses the requirements and the architecture for a secure mobile capsule, specially designed to protect the data that is already on the device. The capsule is a downloadable software agent with additional functionalities to enable secure external communication with healthcare service providers, network operators and other relevant communication parties.

  12. Healthcare finance and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabish, S A

    1993-01-01

    This article is a wide-ranging overview of the field of healthcare financing, health economics and the development of financial management. It vividly demonstrates that all healthcare systems have too many demands and too few resources, and that problems can manifest themselves in different forms depending on the precise funding structure of the health service concerned.

  13. Incidence and Disability-Adjusted Life Years

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Leishmaniasis covers a range of clinical manifestations. Estimation of the burden of leishmaniasis may help guide healthcare management personnel and policy-makers in applying effective interventions. The present study aimed to calculate the incidence and burden of cutaneous and visceral.

  14. Occupational tuberculosis in healthcare workers in sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alele, Faith O; Franklin, Richard C; Emeto, Theophilus I; Leggat, Peter

    2018-04-27

    This article investigates the incidence, prevalence and factors associated with occupational tuberculosis (TB) in healthcare workers (HCWs) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Studies were extracted from MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and SCOPUS databases following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement from inception to the 2 nd of June 2017. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. The median prevalence of latent TB infection in HCWS was 62% (IQR 22%) and the median incidence of TB disease was 3871/100,000 (IQR 9314/100,000). The risk factors associated with LTBI or active TB disease were workplace, history of contact with TB patients, and longer duration of employment. The findings of this review demonstrate that the risk of acquiring TB among HCWs in SSA is high. This may impact on the recruitment, longevity and retention of HCWs.

  15. Divorce among physicians and other healthcare professionals in the United States: analysis of census survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Dan P; Seabury, Seth A; Jena, Anupam B

    2015-02-18

    To estimate the prevalence and incidence of divorce among US physicians compared with other healthcare professionals, lawyers, and non-healthcare professionals, and to analyze factors associated with divorce among physicians. Retrospective analysis of nationally representative surveys conducted by the US census, 2008-13. United States. 48,881 physicians, 10,086 dentists, 13,883 pharmacists, 159,044 nurses, 18,920 healthcare executives, 59,284 lawyers, and 6,339,310 other non-healthcare professionals. Logistic models of divorce adjusted for age, sex, race, annual income, weekly hours worked, number of years since marriage, calendar year, and state of residence. Divorce outcomes included whether an individual had ever been divorced (divorce prevalence) or became divorced in the past year (divorce incidence). After adjustment for covariates, the probability of being ever divorced (or divorce prevalence) among physicians evaluated at the mean value of other covariates was 24.3% (95% confidence interval 23.8% to 24.8%); dentists, 25.2% (24.1% to 26.3%); pharmacists, 22.9% (22.0% to 23.8%); nurses, 33.0% (32.6% to 33.3%); healthcare executives, 30.9% (30.1% to 31.8%); lawyers, 26.9% (26.4% to 27.4%); and other non-healthcare professionals, 35.0% (34.9% to 35.1%). Similarly, physicians were less likely than those in most other occupations to divorce in the past year. In multivariable analysis among physicians, divorce prevalence was greater among women (odds ratio 1.51, 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 1.63). In analyses stratified by physician sex, greater weekly work hours were associated with increased divorce prevalence only for female physicians. Divorce among physicians is less common than among non-healthcare workers and several health professions. Female physicians have a substantially higher prevalence of divorce than male physicians, which may be partly attributable to a differential effect of hours worked on divorce. © Ly et al 2015.

  16. Healthcare professionals and the ethics of healthcare marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Kevin L; Jurkus, Anthony F

    1993-01-01

    The article explores marketing ethics considerations in the application of marketing to healthcare. While we realize that acceptance of healthcare marketing by all stakeholders is important for successful marketing, we emphasize its level of acceptance by healthcare professionals. The high levels of resistance to advertising and other forms of healthcare marketing by healthcare professionals has been largely based on the grounds that the practices are unethical. The nature of the resistance thus invites this exploration of healthcare marketing (and the marketing concept), marketing ethics, and the acceptance (rejection) by healthcare professionals of healthcare marketing.

  17. New York City's healthcare transportation during a disaster: a preparedness framework for a wicked problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Ernest; Lee, George C

    2009-01-01

    During a disaster, victims with varied morbidities are located at incident sites, while healthcare facilities with varied healthcare resources are distributed elsewhere. Transportation serves an essential equilibrating role: it helps balance the patients' need for care with the supply of care. Studying the special case of New York City, this article sets out the healthcare transportation components as: (1) incident morbidity; (2) transportation assets; and (3) healthcare capacity. The relationship between these three components raises an assignment problem: the management of healthcare transportation within a dynamic and partly unpredictable incident-transportation-healthcare nexus, under urban disruption. While the routine dispatch problem can be tackled through better geographic allocation software and technical algorithms, the disaster assignment problem must be confronted through real-time, mutual adjustment between institutions. This article outlines institutional alternatives for managing the assignment problem and calls for further research on the merits of alternative institutional models.

  18. Factors Influencing Healthcare Service Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2014-01-01

    Background The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results Quality in healthcare is a production o...

  19. Apps for hearing healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglialonga, Alessia; Tognola, Gabriella; Pinciroli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The hearing healthcare scenario is rapidly evolving due to the pervasive use of m-Health solutions, in particular mobile apps. This brings along significant advantages and opportunities (e.g., accessibility, affordability, personalized healthcare, patient empowerment) as well as significant potential risks and threats (e.g., safety, misuse, quality issues, privacy). Our research aims at the identification and assessment of apps in the hearing healthcare domain. In this article we present an overview of the current availability, variety, and penetration of hearing-related apps.

  20. Migrants' access to healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norredam, Marie

    2011-01-01

    according to international human rights principles. The intention of this thesis is to increase the understanding of migrants' access to healthcare by exploring two study aims: 1) Are there differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy I and II); and 2) Why......' healthcare entitlements. Different definitions of migration and ethnicity were investigated including: country of birth and residence status. Substudy I showed a tendency towards more advanced stage at diagnosis or unknown stage among most subgroups of migrant women with a history of cancer compared to non...

  1. Turnover among healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ben D

    2009-01-01

    Turnover among healthcare professionals is a costly consequence. The existing body of knowledge on healthcare professional turnover is correlated with job satisfaction levels. A landmark study differentiated 2 areas of job satisfaction categories: satisfiers and dissatisfiers (intrinsic and extrinsic motivators). The aim of this article is to examine existing research on precursors of turnover, such as burnout behaviors experienced by healthcare professionals, job satisfaction levels, employee organizational commitment, health complications which precede turnover, some current strategies to reduce turnover, and some effects CEO turnover has on employee turnover intentions.

  2. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  3. Healthcare Associated Infections - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - state data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  4. Healthcare Associated Infections - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - national data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  5. Improving Healthcare Logistics Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feibert, Diana Cordes

    provision whilst providing high quality care. Logistics activities in hospitals provide a significant opportunity for cost containment in healthcare through the implementation of best practices. Literature provides little guidance on how to improve healthcare logistics processes. This study investigates...... logistics processes in hospitals and aims to provide theoretically and empirically based evidence for improving these processes to both expand the knowledge base of healthcare logistics and provide a decision tool for hospital logistics managers to improve their processes. Case studies were conducted...... at hospitals in Denmark and the US investigating three different types of processes: bed logistics, hospital cleaning, and pharmaceutical distribution. Based on an analysis and comparison of the case studies, a set of factors were identified influencing the decision on how to improve healthcare logistics...

  6. Norovirus in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRSA Mycobacterium abscessus Norovirus Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tracking CRPA Staphylococcus aureus Tuberculosis VISA / VRSA Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) in Healthcare Settings Preventing HAIs Targeted Assessment for Prevention (TAP) TAP CAUTI Implementation Guide TAP CDI Implementation ...

  7. Healthcare Associated Infections - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measures - provider data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  8. Healthcare Associated Infections - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - state data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  9. Customer privacy on UK healthcare websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Darren P

    2006-09-01

    Privacy has been and continues to be one of the key challenges of an age devoted to the accumulation, processing, and mining of electronic information. In particular, privacy of healthcare-related information is seen as a key issue as health organizations move towards the electronic provision of services. The aim of the research detailed in this paper has been to analyse privacy policies on popular UK healthcare-related websites to determine the extent to which consumer privacy is protected. The author has combined approaches (such as approaches focused on usability, policy content, and policy quality) used in studies by other researchers on e-commerce and US healthcare websites to provide a comprehensive analysis of UK healthcare privacy policies. The author identifies a wide range of issues related to the protection of consumer privacy through his research analysis using quantitative results. The main outcomes from the author's research are that only 61% of healthcare-related websites in their sample group posted privacy policies. In addition, most of the posted privacy policies had poor readability standards and included a variety of privacy vulnerability statements. Overall, the author's findings represent significant current issues in relation to healthcare information protection on the Internet. The hope is that raising awareness of these results will drive forward changes in the industry, similar to those experienced with information quality.

  10. Lean healthcare from a change management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossum, Lisa; Aij, Kjeld Harald; Simons, Frederique Elisabeth; van der Eng, Niels; Ten Have, Wouter Dirk

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - Lean healthcare is used in a growing number of hospitals to increase efficiency and quality of care. However, healthcare organizations encounter problems with the implementation of change initiatives due to an implementation gap: the gap between strategy and execution. From a change management perspective, the purpose of this paper is to increase scientific knowledge regarding factors that diminish the implementation gap and make the transition from the "toolbox lean" toward an actual transformation to lean healthcare. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study was executed in an operating theatre of a Dutch University Medical Centre. Transformational leadership was expected to ensure the required top-down commitment, whereas team leadership creates the required active, bottom-up behavior of employees. Furthermore, professional and functional silos and a hierarchical structure were expected to impede the workforce flexibility in adapting organizational elements and optimize the entire process flow. Findings - The correlation and regression analyses showed positive relations between the transformational leadership and team leadership styles and lean healthcare implementation. The results also indicated a strong relation between workforce flexibility and the implementation of lean healthcare. Originality/value - With the use of a recently developed change management model, the Change Competence Model, the authors suggest leadership and workforce flexibility to be part of an organization's change capacity as crucial success factor for a sustainable transformation to lean healthcare.

  11. Information Technology for Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Yazdanpanah

    2016-01-01

    The article produced below hopes to focus on the use of information technology solutions for improving healthcare delivery systems. It explains evolution of IT-Enhanced healthcare from Telemedicine to e-health, including definition and requirements of telemedical systems. It also traces the evolution of contemporary telemedical systems and the challenges faced by future technologies including legal and formal aspects of telemedicine as well as its acceptance among users. It overvi...

  12. TQM implementation for the healthcare sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Andrea; Vagnoni, Emidia

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the debate on total quality management (TQM) implementation in the healthcare sector and to evaluate how and whether leadership can affect TQM implementation. Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on findings from a literature review of TQM and leadership. The authors analysed these findings to categorise causes of a lack of leadership in TQM programme implementations. Findings The authors propose three categories of causes of a lack of leadership in TQM programme implementation. The first cause is well-known: a lack of senior managers' involvement and commitment. The second category is the "combined leadership" that occurs in large healthcare organisations; and the third category is the influence of an external "political leadership" on public healthcare. Research limitations/implications This paper presents researchers with three categories of causes of failure of leadership in TQM implementation that can be investigated. It also encourages reflections from practitioners concerning TQM leadership in the healthcare sector. Practical implications The authors request that practitioners reflect on ways to create or sustain a "monolithic" leadership, especially in large organisations, to ensure a common vision, values and attitude for unitary TQM governance. Originality/value In an original way, this paper analyses and proposes three categories of causes linked to a lack of TQM leadership in the healthcare sector.

  13. Concept analysis of safety climate in healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Siou; Lin, Yen-Chun; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2017-06-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of safety climate in healthcare providers. Compliance with safe work practices is essential to patient safety and care outcomes. Analysing the concept of safety climate from the perspective of healthcare providers could improve understanding of the correlations between safety climate and healthcare provider compliance with safe work practices, thus enhancing quality of patient care. Concept analysis. The electronic databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed and Web of Science were searched for literature published between 1995-2015. Searches used the keywords 'safety climate' or 'safety culture' with 'hospital' or 'healthcare'. The concept analysis method of Walker and Avant analysed safety climate from the perspective of healthcare providers. Three attributes defined how healthcare providers define safety climate: (1) creation of safe working environment by senior management in healthcare organisations; (2) shared perception of healthcare providers about safety of their work environment; and (3) the effective dissemination of safety information. Antecedents included the characteristics of healthcare providers and healthcare organisations as a whole, and the types of work in which they are engaged. Consequences consisted of safety performance and safety outcomes. Most studies developed and assessed the survey tools of safety climate or safety culture, with a minority consisting of interventional measures for improving safety climate. More prospective studies are needed to create interventional measures for improving safety climate of healthcare providers. This study is provided as a reference for use in developing multidimensional safety climate assessment tools and interventional measures. The values healthcare teams emphasise with regard to safety can serve to improve safety performance. Having an understanding of the concept of and interventional measures for safety climate allows healthcare providers to ensure the safety of their

  14. Healthcare leadership's diversity paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Reginald

    2017-02-06

    Purpose The purpose of this research study was to obtain healthcare executives' perspectives on diversity in executive healthcare leadership. The study focused on identifying perspectives about diversity and its potential impact on the access of healthcare services by people of color. The study also identified perspectives about factors that influence the attainment of executive healthcare roles by people of color. Design/methodology/approach A convenience sample of healthcare executives was obtained. The executives identified themselves as belonging to one of two subgroups, White healthcare executives or executives of color. Participants were interviewed telephonically in a semi-structured format. The interviews were transcribed and entered into a qualitative software application. The data were codified and important themes were identified. Findings The majority of the study participants perceive that diversity of the executive healthcare leadership team is important. There were differences in perspective among the subgroups as it relates to solutions to improve access to healthcare by people of color. There were also differences in perspective among the subgroups, as it relates to explaining the underrepresentation of people of color in executive healthcare leadership roles. Research limitations/implications This research effort benefited from the subject matter expertise of 24 healthcare executives from two states. Expansion of the number of survey participants and broadening the geographical spread of where participants were located may have yielded more convergence and/or more divergence in perspectives about key topics. Practical implications The findings from this research study serve to add to the existing body of literature on diversity in executive healthcare leadership. The findings expand on the importance of key elements in contemporary literature such as diversity, cultural competency and perspectives about the need for representation of people of

  15. Reduction of Complications of Local Anaesthesia in Dental Healthcare Setups by Application of the Six Sigma Methodology: A Statistical Quality Improvement Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akifuddin, Syed; Khatoon, Farheen

    2015-12-01

    Health care faces challenges due to complications, inefficiencies and other concerns that threaten the safety of patients. The purpose of his study was to identify causes of complications encountered after administration of local anaesthesia for dental and oral surgical procedures and to reduce the incidence of complications by introduction of six sigma methodology. DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve and Control) process of Six Sigma was taken into consideration to reduce the incidence of complications encountered after administration of local anaesthesia injections for dental and oral surgical procedures using failure mode and effect analysis. Pareto analysis was taken into consideration to analyse the most recurring complications. Paired z-sample test using Minitab Statistical Inference and Fisher's exact test was used to statistically analyse the obtained data. The p-value six sigma improvement methodology in healthcare tends to deliver consistently better results to the patients as well as hospitals and results in better patient compliance as well as satisfaction.

  16. Reporting medical device safety incidents to regulatory authorities: An analysis and classification of technology-induced errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palojoki, Sari; Saranto, Kaija; Lehtonen, Lasse

    2017-07-01

    The European Union Medical Device Directive 2007/47/EC1 defines software with a medical purpose as a medical device. The implementation of health information technology suffers from patient safety problems that require effective post-market surveillance. The purpose of this study was to review, classify and discuss the incident data submitted to a nationwide database of the Finnish National Competent Authority with other forms of data. We analysed incident reports submitted to the authority database by users of electronic health records from 2010 to 2015. We identified 138 valid reports. Adverse events associated with electronic health record vulnerabilities, clustered around certain error types, cause serious harm and occur in all types of healthcare settings. The low rate of reported incidents raises questions about not only the challenges associated with medical software oversight but also the obstacles for reporting.

  17. Constipation and Incident CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Keiichi; Molnar, Miklos Z; Potukuchi, Praveen K; Thomas, Fridtjof; Lu, Jun Ling; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2017-04-01

    Constipation is one of the most prevalent conditions in primary care settings and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, potentially through processes mediated by altered gut microbiota. However, little is known about the association of constipation with CKD. In a nationwide cohort of 3,504,732 United States veterans with an eGFR ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 , we examined the association of constipation status and severity (absent, mild, or moderate/severe), defined using diagnostic codes and laxative use, with incident CKD, incident ESRD, and change in eGFR in Cox models (for time-to-event analyses) and multinomial logistic regression models (for change in eGFR). Among patients, the mean (SD) age was 60.0 (14.1) years old; 93.2% of patients were men, and 24.7% were diabetic. After multivariable adjustments, compared with patients without constipation, patients with constipation had higher incidence rates of CKD (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.11 to 1.14) and ESRD (hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.18) and faster eGFR decline (multinomial odds ratios for eGFR slope constipation associated with an incrementally higher risk for each renal outcome. In conclusion, constipation status and severity associate with higher risk of incident CKD and ESRD and with progressive eGFR decline, independent of known risk factors. Further studies should elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Self-medication among healthcare and non-healthcare students at University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Hladnik, Ziga; Kersnik, Janko

    2010-01-01

    To determine the incidence of self-medication among University of Ljubljana students and the effect of the type of curriculum on the pattern of self-medication. The study included a sample of 1,294 students who freely accessed a self-administered web-based questionnaire in the Slovene language that consisted of a preliminary letter introducing the term 'self-treatment' and 2 sections about self-medication. The preliminary letter asked participants to report the practice of self-treatment during the past year. The main outcome measures were percentages of those reporting self-medication during the past year, which were then used to compare healthcare and non-healthcare students. A majority of students (1,195, 92.3%), both healthcare and non-healthcare, reported the use of some sort of self-medication during the study period. More healthcare students in their senior year (353, 94.1%) than those in their junior year (245, 89.4%) used self-medication (p = 0.04). Healthcare students (p = 0.05) thought that self-medication without improvement of the symptoms should last for 1 week or less. They acquired the drugs for self-medication from pharmacies; thought that previous doctors' advice in a similar situation was a more important reason for self-medication; would seek the advice of a physician or pharmacist for different ways of self-treatment, and quite interestingly thought that self-medication was not very safe. On the other hand, non-healthcare students acquired the drugs from healers and friends. The study showed that self-medication was common among all University of Ljubljana students, but that healthcare-related education in students and young adults led to more responsible use of self-medication. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Effects of blood-pressure-lowering treatment on outcome incidence in hypertension: 10 - Should blood pressure management differ in hypertensive patients with and without diabetes mellitus? Overview and meta-analyses of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomopoulos, Costas; Parati, Gianfranco; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of hypertension, and cardiovascular and renal disease, and it has been recommended that management of hypertension should be more aggressive in presence than in absence of diabetes mellitus, but the matter is controversial at present. Meta-analysing all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the effects on cardiovascular and renal outcomes of blood pressure BP lowering to different systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) levels or by different drug classes in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. The database consisted of 72 BP-lowering RCTs (260 210 patients) and 50 head-to-head drug comparison RCTs (247 006). Among these two sets, RCTs or RCT subgroups separately reporting data from patients with and without diabetes mellitus were identified, and stratified by in-treatment achieved SBP and DBP, by drug class compared with placebo, and drug class compared with all other classes. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and absolute risk reductions of six fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular outcomes, all-cause death, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were calculated (random-effects model) separately for diabetes mellitus and no diabetes mellitus, and compared by interaction analysis. We identified 41 RCTs providing data on 61 772 patients with diabetes mellitus and 40 RCTs providing data on 191 353 patients without diabetes mellitus. For achieved SBP at least 140 mmHg, relative and absolute reductions of most cardiovascular outcomes were significantly greater in diabetes mellitus than no diabetes mellitus, whereas for achieved SBP below 130 mmHg, the difference disappeared or reversed (greater outcome reduction in no diabetes mellitus). Significant ESRD reduction was found only in diabetes mellitus, but it was greatest when achieved SBP was at least 140 mmHg, and no further effect was found at SBP below 140 mmHg. All antihypertensive drug classes reduced

  20. Incidence of herpes zoster amongst adults varies by severity of immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Carsten; Enders, Dirk; Schink, Tania; Riedel, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    We examined the incidence of herpes zoster in immunocompromised adults (≥18 years) with different severities of immunosuppression and assessed the prevalence of complications and of various kinds of healthcare resource utilisation. German claims data from more than ten million adults were used to calculate annual incidence rates of herpes zoster for the years 2006-2012 and to analyse the prevalence of complications, physician visits, hospitalisations, and antiviral and analgesic treatments using a cohort design. The analyses were stratified by age, sex, and severity of immunosuppression, defined by immunocompromising conditions and drug therapies. The incidence rate per 1000 person-years of herpes zoster was almost twice as high in immunocompromised patients (11.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.4-11.6)) compared to immunocompetent subjects (5.9 (95% CI: 5.8-5.9)). The incidence rate was higher in highly immunocompromised patients (13.4 (95% CI: 13.2-13.6)) than in patients with a low severity of immunosuppression (10.0 (95% CI: 9.8-10.1)). These differences were observed for both sexes and in all age groups. Complications, outpatient physician visits, hospitalisations, and analgesic treatments occurred more frequently in immunocompromised patients as well. Our results show that immunocompromised individuals are affected by the disease in particular and that the burden of herpes zoster is highest in severely immunocompromised patients. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk of tuberculosis transmission among healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diel, Roland; Niemann, Stefan; Nienhaus, Albert

    2018-04-01

    Data from a prospective molecular-epidemiological study (1997-2015) of patients with culture-confirmed tuberculosis in Hamburg, Germany, were evaluated to assess the occupational risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex transmission in a low-incidence setting. Isolates of M. tuberculosis complex were genotyped using IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results of structured questionnaires, geographical mapping and additional patient interviews were used for confirming epidemiological links. Out of the 2393 cases, 918 (38.4%) were classified into 224 clusters comprising 2-70 patients per cluster. Among the 918 cluster members, epidemiological links could be confirmed in 340 (37.0%) patients. In total, 55 (2.3%) patients were healthcare workers; 26 healthcare workers remained unclustered, but 29 healthcare workers belonged to cluster groups. Conventional contact tracing performed before genotyping to identify sources of the reported index cases detected only 73 (3.1%) patients. Logistic regression analysis confirmed work in the healthcare sector as strongest predictor for clustering of patients with verified epidemiological links (odds ratio (OR) 3.1, 95% CI 1.6-5.9), followed by alcoholism (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.7-3.2) and sputum smear positivity (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.3). Immigrants were more likely to be cluster nonmembers (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.3-0.5). Recent transmission in Hamburg within the 19-year study period was found to be strongly associated with working in a healthcare facility. Although clusters also include many "imported" strains from abroad or regional highly prevalent M. tuberculosis strains with no evident epidemiological connection, routine molecular-epidemiological survey is indispensable to optimising and controlling the effectiveness of TB control strategies in German healthcare settings.

  2. Healthcare is primary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation.

  3. Healthcare is primary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2 nd National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care, the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation.

  4. The Cuban National Healthcare System: Characterization of primary healthcare services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Regina DAL PRÁ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a report on the experience of healthcare professionals in Florianópolis, who took the course La Atención Primaria de Salud y la Medicina Familiar en Cuba [Primary Healthcare and Family Medicine in Cuba], in 2014. The purpose of the study is to characterize the healthcare units and services provided by the Cuban National Healthcare System (SNS and to reflect on this experience/immersion, particularly on Cuba’s Primary Healthcare Service. The results found that in comparison with Brazil’s Single Healthcare System (SUS Cuba’s SNS Family Healthcare (SF service is the central organizing element of the Primary Healthcare Service. The number of SF teams per inhabitant is different than in Brazil; the programs given priority in the APS are similar to those in Brazil and the intersectorial nature and scope of the services prove to be effective in the resolution of healthcare problems.

  5. What are healthcare providers' understandings and experiences of compassion? The healthcare compassion model: a grounded theory study of healthcare providers in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Shane; Hack, Thomas F; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; McClement, Susan; Stajduhar, Kelli; Singh, Pavneet; Hagen, Neil A; Sinnarajah, Aynharan; Chochinov, Harvey Max

    2018-03-14

    Healthcare providers are considered the primary conduit of compassion in healthcare. Although most healthcare providers desire to provide compassion, and patients and families expect to receive it, an evidence-based understanding of the construct and its associated dimensions from the perspective of healthcare providers is needed. The aim of this study was to investigate healthcare providers' perspectives and experiences of compassion in order to generate an empirically derived, clinically informed model. Data were collected via focus groups with frontline healthcare providers and interviews with peer-nominated exemplary compassionate healthcare providers. Data were independently and collectively analysed by the research team in accordance with Straussian grounded theory. 57 healthcare providers were recruited from urban and rural palliative care services spanning hospice, home care, hospital-based consult teams, and a dedicated inpatient unit within Alberta, Canada. Five categories and 13 associated themes were identified, illustrated in the Healthcare Provider Compassion Model depicting the dimensions of compassion and their relationship to one another. Compassion was conceptualised as-a virtuous and intentional response to know a person, to discern their needs and ameliorate their suffering through relational understanding and action. An empirical foundation of healthcare providers' perspectives on providing compassionate care was generated. While the dimensions of the Healthcare Provider Compassion Model were congruent with the previously developed Patient Model, further insight into compassion is now evident. The Healthcare Provider Compassion Model provides a model to guide clinical practice and research focused on developing interventions, measures and resources to improve it. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  6. Incidence of anogenital warts in Germany: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolajczyk Rafael T

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papilloma virus (HPV types 6 and 11 account for 90 percent of anogenital warts (AGW. Assessment of a potential reduction of the incidence of AGW following introduction of HPV vaccines requires population-based incidence rates. The aim of this study was to estimate incidence rates of AGW in Germany, stratified by age, sex, and region. Additionally, the medical practitioner (gynaecologist, dermatologist, urologist etc. who made the initial diagnosis of AGW was assessed. Methods Retrospective cohort study in a population aged 10 to 79 years in a population-based healthcare insurance database. The database included more than 14 million insurance members from all over Germany during the years 2004-2006. A case of AGW was considered incident if a disease-free period of twelve months preceded the diagnosis. To assess regional variation, analyses were performed by federal state. Results The estimated incidence rate was 169.5/100,000 person-years for the German population aged 10 to 79 years. Most cases occurred in the 15 to 40 years age group. The incidence rate was higher and showed a peak at younger ages in females than in males. The highest incidence rates for both sexes were observed in the city-states Berlin, Hamburg and Bremen. In females, initial diagnosis of AGW was most frequently made by a gynaecologist (71.7%, whereas in males, AGW were most frequently diagnosed by a dermatologist (44.8% or urologist (25.1%. Conclusions Incidence of AGW in Germany is comparable with findings for other countries. As expected, most cases occurred in the younger age groups. The frequency of diagnoses of AGW differs between sexes and women and men receive treatment by doctors of different specialties.

  7. Leadership strategies in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaker, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare is one of the largest and most important industries in the United States because it affects every individual in the nation. Numerous parties are stakeholders in healthcare, which contributes to the complexity of change efforts. Physicians and administrators play a significant role by providing direct care and influencing other decisions that impact the delivery of patient care. Success in the healthcare industry is influenced by numerous factors, some of which are controllable and others that are not. Understanding leadership and change management will be increasingly important to overcome resistance to change and to improve relationships, the core of leadership in an environment that will become more challenging. In what follows, different approaches to understanding leadership and change management are presented along with other leadership strategies to enhance the effectiveness of leaders. Raising leader awareness regarding transformational leadership behaviors and developing strategies to increase the use of these behaviors may be helpful to enhance organizational performance.

  8. Costing Practices in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Christopher; Kern, Anja; Laguecir, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    The rising cost of healthcare is a globally pressing concern. This makes detailed attention to the way in which costing is carried out of central importance. This article offers a framework for considering the interdependencies between a dominant element of the contemporary healthcare context, i.......e., Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) systems, and costing practices. DRG-based payment systems strongly influence costing practices in multiple ways. In particular, setting DRG tariffs requires highly standardized costing practices linked with specific skill sets from management accountants and brings other...

  9. DGNB certified Healthcare Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2015-01-01

    for sustainability and wants a certification. This research investigates the decision‐making and design process (DMaDP) behind four DGNB certified Healthcare Centres (HCC) in Northern Jutland in Denmark. In general, knowledge about the DMaDP is important. However it is important to know what part DGNB plays...... a dialog about DGNB and energy concept is important even before anyone start sketching. Experiences with the different approaches will be further outlined in the paper.Future research has the intention to collect further knowledge about DGNB and DMaDP in practise. This project was limited to Healthcare...

  10. The health of healthcare, Part II: patient healthcare has cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we make the etiologic diagnosis for a sick patient named Healthcare: the cancer of greed. When we explore the two forms of this cancer--corporate and bureaucratic--we find the latter is the greater danger to We the Patients. The "treatments" applied to patient Healthcare by the Congressional "doctors" have consistently made the patient worse, not better. At the core of healthcare's woes is the government's diversion of money from healthcare services to healthcare bureaucracy. As this is the root cause, it is what we must address in order to cure, not sedate or palliate, patient Healthcare.

  11. Incidence and risk of heart failure in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang H; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Jandali, Bochra; Askari, Ali D; Zacharias, Michael; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2017-02-01

    Although case series suggest a higher burden of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with the general population, the association between SLE and heart failure (HF) remains undefined. We sought to investigate the incidence and risk of HF in patients with SLE. In April 2016, we performed a retrospective cohort analysis using the Explorys platform, which provides aggregated electronic medical record data from 26 major integrated healthcare systems across the USA from 1999 to present. Demographic and regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of SLE on HF incidence. Among 45 284 540 individuals in the database, we identified 95 400 (0.21%) with SLE and 98 900 (0.22%) with a new diagnosis of HF between May 2015 and April 2016. HF incidence was markedly higher in the SLE group compared with controls (0.97% vs 0.22%, relative risk (RR): 4.6 (95% CI 4.3 to 4.9)), as were other cardiovascular risk factors. In regression analysis, SLE was an independent predictor of HF (adjusted OR: 3.17 (2.63 to 3.83), prisk but decreasing RR with advancing age in both sexes. Renal involvement in SLE correlated with earlier and higher incidence of HF. The findings of this study suggest that patients with SLE have significantly higher risk of developing HF and a worse cardiovascular risk profile compared with the general population. These results need to be confirmed by prospective studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Disparities in healthcare utilisation rates for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Albertan residents, 1997-2006: a population database study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Chung

    Full Text Available It is widely recognised that significant discrepancies exist between the health of indigenous and non-indigenous populations. Whilst the reasons are incompletely defined, one potential cause is that indigenous communities do not access healthcare to the same extent. We investigated healthcare utilisation rates in the Canadian Aboriginal population to elucidate the contribution of this fundamental social determinant for health to such disparities.Healthcare utilisation data over a nine-year period were analysed for a cohort of nearly two million individuals to determine the rates at which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations utilised two specialties (Cardiology and Ophthalmology in Alberta, Canada. Unadjusted and adjusted healthcare utilisation rates obtained by mixed linear and Poisson regressions, respectively, were compared amongst three population groups - federally registered Aboriginals, individuals receiving welfare, and other Albertans.Healthcare utilisation rates for Aboriginals were substantially lower than those of non-Aboriginals and welfare recipients at each time point and subspecialty studied [e.g. During 2005/06, unadjusted Cardiology utilisation rates were 0.28% (Aboriginal, n = 97,080, 0.93% (non-Aboriginal, n = 1,720,041 and 1.37% (Welfare, n = 52,514, p = <0.001]. The age distribution of the Aboriginal population was markedly different [2.7%≥65 years of age, non-Aboriginal 10.7%], and comparable utilisation rates were obtained after adjustment for fiscal year and estimated life expectancy [Cardiology: Incidence Rate Ratio 0.66, Ophthalmology: IRR 0.85].The analysis revealed that Aboriginal people utilised subspecialty healthcare at a consistently lower rate than either comparatively economically disadvantaged groups or the general population. Notably, the differences were relatively invariant between the major provincial centres and over a nine year period. Addressing the causes of these discrepancies is

  13. Vaccination of healthcare workers: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviari, Skerdi; Bénet, Thomas; Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; André, Philippe; Loulergue, Pierre; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. As new vaccines are proving to be effective and as the incidence of some infections decreases, vaccination practices are changing. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are particularly exposed to and play a role in nosocomial transmission, which makes them an important target group for vaccination. Most vaccine-preventable diseases still carry a significant risk of resurgence and have caused outbreaks in recent years. While many professional societies favor vaccination of HCWs as well as the general population, recommendations differ from country to country. In turn, vaccination coverage varies widely for each microorganism and for each country, making hospitals and clinics vulnerable to outbreaks. Vaccine mandates and non-mandatory strategies are the subject of ongoing research and controversies. Optimal approaches to increase coverage and turn the healthcare workforce into an efficient barrier against infectious diseases are still being debated. PMID:26291642

  14. Accuracy of administrative data for surveillance of healthcare-associated infections : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mourik, Maaike S M; van Duijn, Pleun Joppe; Moons, Karel G M; Bonten, Marc J M; Lee, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Measuring the incidence of healthcareassociated infections (HAI) is of increasing importance in current healthcare delivery systems. Administrative data algorithms, including (combinations of) diagnosis codes, are commonly used to determine the occurrence of HAI, either to support

  15. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this

  16. Stormy Weather in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Jane; Jakobsen, Pernille Ravn; Myhre Jensen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses how the roles of patients and health professionals have changed over the years. It also explores how accelerated courses of treatment and busy staff have turned healthcare services and hospitals into “factories”, where care and relationships now exist in very cramped conditions...... a holistic approach to one another....

  17. Healthcare liquid waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D R; Pradhan, B; Pathak, R P; Shrestha, S C

    2010-04-01

    The management of healthcare liquid waste is an overlooked problem in Nepal with stern repercussions in terms of damaging the environment and affecting the health of people. This study was carried out to explore the healthcare liquid waste management practices in Kathmandu based central hospitals of Nepal. A descriptive prospective study was conducted in 10 central hospitals of Kathmandu during the period of May to December 2008. Primary data were collected through interview, observation and microbiology laboratory works and secondary data were collected by records review. For microbiological laboratory works,waste water specimens cultured for the enumeration of total viable counts using standard protocols. Evidence of waste management guidelines and committees for the management of healthcare liquid wastes could not be found in any of the studied hospitals. Similarly, total viable counts heavily exceeded the standard heterotrophic plate count (p=0.000) with no significant difference in such counts in hospitals with and without treatment plants (p=0.232). Healthcare liquid waste management practice was not found to be satisfactory. Installation of effluent treatment plants and the development of standards for environmental indicators with effective monitoring, evaluation and strict control via relevant legal frameworks were realized.

  18. Coproduction of healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Maren; Batalden, Paul; Margolis, Peter; Seid, Michael; Armstrong, Gail; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Hartung, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Efforts to ensure effective participation of patients in healthcare are called by many names-patient centredness, patient engagement, patient experience. Improvement initiatives in this domain often resemble the efforts of manufacturers to engage consumers in designing and marketing products. Services, however, are fundamentally different than products; unlike goods, services are always 'coproduced'. Failure to recognise this unique character of a service and its implications may limit our success in partnering with patients to improve health care. We trace a partial history of the coproduction concept, present a model of healthcare service coproduction and explore its application as a design principle in three healthcare service delivery innovations. We use the principle to examine the roles, relationships and aims of this interdependent work. We explore the principle's implications and challenges for health professional development, for service delivery system design and for understanding and measuring benefit in healthcare services. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Organizational excellence in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Does, R.J.M.M.; van den Heuvel, J.; Foley, K.J.; Hermel, P.

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare, as any other service operation, requires systematic innovation efforts to remain competitive, cost efficient and up to date. In this paper, we outline a methodology and present how principles of two improvement programs, i.e., Lean Thinking and Six Sigma, can be combined to provide an

  20. Social marketing in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Radha

    2011-01-01

    Social marketing is an important tool in the delivery of healthcare services. For any healthcare programme or project to be successful, community/consumer participation is required. The four principles of social marketing can guide policymakers and healthcare providers to successfully plan and implement health programmes. To review the existing literature in order to project the benefits of social marketing in healthcare. A search of periodical literature by the author involving social marketing and marketing concepts in health was carried out. Items were identified initially through health-oriented indexing services such as Medline, Health STAR and Cinahl, using the identifiers "social marketing" and "marketing in health". An extensive search was also carried out on educational database ERIC. A literature review of various studies on social marketing indicated that the selection of the right product (according to the community need) at the right place, with the right strategy for promotion and at the right price yields good results. However, along with technical sustainability (product, price, promotion and place), financial sustainability, institutional sustainability and market sustainability are conducive factors for the success of social marketing. The purpose of this literature review was to ascertain the likely effectiveness of social marketing principles and approaches and behaviour change communication towards health promotion. It is important for all healthcare workers to understand and respond to the public's desires and needs and routinely use consumer research to determine how best to help the public to solve problems and realise aspirations. Social marketing can optimise public health by facilitating relationship-building with consumers and making their lives healthier.

  1. Predictors of healthcare associated infections in heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Vieira de Andrade

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of patients with healthcare associated infections, the topographic location of those infections in the heart surgery postoperative period, and identify the risk factors associated with the occurrence of those infections. This retrospective study was performed with 460 heart surgery patients of a teaching hospital in Minas Gerais state. The data were collected from the hospital infection report forms and patients’ records. The incidence of patients with healthcare associated infections was 24.3% and respiratory tract infection had the highest rates (20.6%. Intubation time, permanence time of central venous catheter and indwelling urinary catheter were independent predictors. The findings point at the need to implement protocols for the care and maintenance of these invasive devices with the purpose of preventing and controlling healthcare associated infection in heart surgery. Descriptors: Cross Infection; Cardiac Surgical Procedures; Perioperative Nursing.

  2. Factors Influencing Healthcare Service Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results Quality in healthcare is a production of cooperation between the patient and the healthcare provider in a supportive environment. Personal factors of the provider and the patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare organisation, healthcare system, and the broader environment affect healthcare service quality. Healthcare quality can be improved by supportive visionary leadership, proper planning, education and training, availability of resources, effective management of resources, employees and processes, and collaboration and cooperation among providers. Conclusion This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework that provides policy-makers and managers a practical understanding of factors that affect healthcare service quality.

  3. Use of Healthcare Services by Patients with Non-Communicable Diseases in Nepal: A Qualitative Study with Healthcare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Saval; Veerman, Lennert; Nissen, Lisa; Hollingworth, Samantha

    2017-06-01

    The healthcare systems in many Low-and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) like Nepal have long focused on preventing and treating infectious diseases. Little is known about their preparedness to address the increasing prevalence of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs). This study aimed to investigate the use of healthcare services by patients with NCDs in Nepal. Nine healthcare providers (including health assistants, pharmacy assistants, nurse, specialised nurse, practicing pharmacists, chief hospital pharmacist, doctors and specialised doctor) from Pokhara, Nepal, were recruited using purposive sampling. In depth interviews about the magnitude of NCDs, first point of care, screening and diagnosis, prevention and management, follow-up, and healthcare system responses to NCD burden were conducted. Data were thematically analysed with a deductive approach. Although the healthcare system in Nepal is still primarily focused on communicable infectious diseases, healthcare providers are aware of the increasing burden of NCDs and NCD risk factors. The first points of care for patients with NCDs are government primary healthcare facilities and private pharmacies. NCDs are often diagnosed late and opportunistically. NCD prevention and treatment is unaffordable for many people. There are no government sponsored NCD screening programs. There are problems associated with screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with NCDs in Nepal. Healthcare providers believe that the current healthcare system in Nepal is inadequate to address the growing problem of NCDs. The health system of Nepal will face challenges to incorporate programs to prevent and treat NCDs in addition to the pre-existing communicable diseases.

  4. HEALTHCARE MARKETING - A RELATIONAL APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    CAZACU Lavinia; OPRESCU Alina Elena

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the unique characteristics of healthcare services, the challenges faced in the implementation of marketing principles into the healthcare services sector and also the behavior tendencies of the healthcare consumer. Taking into account the differences between healthcare services and other services and the importance of the doctor-patient relationship, a new marketing approach seems to be a solution for all problems and a response for all unanswered questions. A revi...

  5. Incidences and Analyses of Green Marketing Strategy in Colombian Exports Incidences and Analyses of Green Marketing Strategy in Colombian Exports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Zwerg-Villegas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As environmental awareness plays a more prominent role in purchasing decisions, as consumers demand improved corporate responsibility, and as national governments implement regulation of not just the immediate firm’s environmental impact, but instead on the impact throughout the value chain; those corporations which participate in green marketing strategies will be positioned for marketplace competitive advantage. This paper takes the reader through a literature review to define green marketing and applies the term to Colombian exporting firms recognized for their environmental practices or products. A survey of seventy-five small and medium sized Colombian exporters determines usage and perceptions of green marketing practices. Research indicates that Colombian small and medium sized firms do not yet feel market pressures to adopt green marketing strategies, but do so based on corporate level ethics.Mientras la conciencia ambiental juega un papel más importante en las decisiones decompra, los consumidores demandan mejoras en la responsabilidad corporativa y losgobiernos nacionales implementan legislación para reglamentar no solo el impactoambiental de la empresa inmediata sino también de la cadena de valor entera; lascorporaciones que participan en estrategias de mercadeo verde se posicionarán parala ventaja competitiva en el mercado. Esta obra lleva al lector por un recuento literariopara definir al mercadeo verde y después aplica el término a empresas colombianas exportadoras reconocidas por sus prácticas o productos ambientales. La encuestade setenticinco pequeñas y medianas empresas exportadoras determina el uso ypercepciones de las prácticas de mercadeo verde. La investigación demuestra queempresas pequeñas y medianas colombianas no sienten presiones del mercado poradoptar estrategias verdes sino se hace por ética corporativa.

  6. Regional comparison of cancer incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obralic, N.; Gavrankapetanovic, F.; Dizdarevic, Z.; Duric, O.; Sisic, F.; Selak, I.; Balta, S.; Nakas, B.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Due to specific war and post-war situation in Balkan region, differences in the number, type, development, biological course, treatment of malignant tumours and its outcome are possible. In order to perceive the situation realistically, it is necessary to gather continuously exact data about malignant tumours and compare them with the data from other European and world countries.The aim of the study was to collect and analyse the data on cancer incidence in the region of Sarajevo city, which represents a symbol of difficult times in the recent past, and to compare it to the incidence in the neighbouring countries. Patients and methods. Data on all newly diagnosed cancer cases, permanent residents of Sarajevo Canton, in the years 1999 and 2000 were collected. Crude incidence rate has been calculated according to the years observed, gender and localizations of the disease The data were compared to the cancer registries of Slovenia and Croatia and were observed in the light of specific local situation. Results. The crude cancer incidence of all sites but skin was the highest in both years and by both genders in Croatia. The incidence of the most common tumours (lung and breast cancer) was similar in all three countries. The differences in the incidence between both genders in the Sarajevo canton were registered in laryngeal and urinary bladder cancer, as well as in bone and cartilage sarcoma. Cervical cancer had extremely high incidence and was high up on the incidence list in the Sarajevo canton, which correlates with the data in developing countries. The incidence of other tumours in the post-war period is reaching expected numbers. Conclusions. It is difficult to identify whether the war and post-war stress, irregular and insufficient nutrition during and after the siege of the city of Sarajevo or some other factor influenced the cancer incidence among exposed population. The prevalence of smoking in the whole region is extremely high, in Bosnia and

  7. Taxonometric Applications in Radiotherapy Incident Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunscombe, Peter B.; Ekaette, Edidiong U.; Lee, Robert C.; Cooke, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent publications in both the scientific and the popular press have highlighted the risks to which patients expose themselves when entering a healthcare system. Patient safety issues are forcing us to, not only acknowledge that incidents do occur, but also actively develop the means for assessing and managing the risks of such incidents. To do this, we ideally need to know the probability of an incident's occurrence, the consequences or severity for the patient should it occur, and the basic causes of the incident. A structured approach to the description of failure modes is helpful in terms of communication, avoidance of ambiguity, and, ultimately, decision making for resource allocation. In this report, several classification schemes or taxonomies for use in risk assessment and management are discussed. In particular, a recently developed approach that reflects the activity domains through which the patient passes and that can be used as a basis for quantifying incident severity is described. The estimation of incident severity, which is based on the concept of the equivalent uniform dose, is presented in some detail. We conclude with a brief discussion on the use of a defined basic-causes table and how adding such a table to the reports of incidents can facilitate the allocation of resources

  8. Assessment of equity in healthcare financing in Fiji and Timor-Leste: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Augustine D; Price, Jennifer; Hayen, Andrew; Irava, Wayne; Martins, Joao; Guinness, Lorna; Ataguba, John E; Limwattananon, Supon; Mills, Anne; Jan, Stephen; Wiseman, Virginia

    2014-12-02

    Equitable health financing remains a key health policy objective worldwide. In low and middle-income countries (LMICs), there is evidence that many people are unable to access the health services they need due to financial and other barriers. There are growing calls for fairer health financing systems that will protect people from catastrophic and impoverishing health payments in times of illness. This study aims to assess equity in healthcare financing in Fiji and Timor-Leste in order to support government efforts to improve access to healthcare and move towards universal health coverage in the two countries. The study employs two standard measures of equity in health financing increasingly being applied in LMICs-benefit incidence analysis (BIA) and financing incidence analysis (FIA). In Fiji, we will use a combination of secondary and primary data including a Household Income and Expenditure Survey, National Health Accounts, and data from a cross-sectional household survey on healthcare utilisation. In Timor-Leste, the World Bank recently completed a health equity and financial protection analysis that incorporates BIA and FIA, and found that the distribution of benefits from healthcare financing is pro-rich. Building on this work, we will explore the factors that influence the pro-rich distribution. The study is approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of University of New South Wales, Australia (Approval number: HC13269); the Fiji National Health Research Committee (Approval # 201371); and the Timor-Leste Ministry of Health (Ref MS/UNSW/VI/218). Study outcomes will be disseminated through stakeholder meetings, targeted multidisciplinary seminars, peer-reviewed journal publications, policy briefs and the use of other web-based technologies including social media. A user-friendly toolkit on how to analyse healthcare financing equity will be developed for use by policymakers and development partners in the region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  9. Innovation Concepts in Healthcare

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today’s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the “industrialization” of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the He...

  10. [The healthcare democracy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saout, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Thirteen years after the law of 4th March 2002, known as the "Kouchner law", what is the situation regarding the much talked about healthcare democracy? Individual and collective rights have been granted to the users of the health care system. In addition, a series of actions have been promoted in order to exert them. Finally, a number of places and processes favouring consultation have been put in place. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Conization and healthcare use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Maria E.; Vázquez-Prada Baillet, Miguel; Jensen, Pernille T.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether negative psychological consequences of conization reported in questionnaire studies translated into increased use of the healthcare services that could relieve such symptoms. This was a population-based register study comparing women undergoing conizati...... a conization seemed to constitute a select group as they already used GPs and hospitals more frequently, and anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs less frequently, than other women in the years 'before' the conization event....

  12. [Healthcare value chain: a model for the Brazilian healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Marcelo Caldeira; Malik, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a model of the healthcare value chain which consists of a schematic representation of the Brazilian healthcare system. The proposed model is adapted for the Brazilian reality and has the scope and flexibility for use in academic activities and analysis of the healthcare sector in Brazil. It places emphasis on three components: the main activities of the value chain, grouped in vertical and horizontal links; the mission of each link and the main value chain flows. The proposed model consists of six vertical and three horizontal links, amounting to nine. These are: knowledge development; supply of products and technologies; healthcare services; financial intermediation; healthcare financing; healthcare consumption; regulation; distribution of healthcare products; and complementary and support services. Four flows can be used to analyze the value chain: knowledge and innovation; products and services; financial; and information.

  13. Incidence of sialolithiasis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Stine Attrup; Andersson, Mikael; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is a frequent disorder affecting the salivary glands. The incidence rate (IR) has been reported to be 2.9-5.5 per 100,000 person-years, but all previous studies have been based on selected hospital data. In this study, we conducted a population-based study evaluating the IR...... of sialolithiasis and the IR variation according to age, gender and geography in Denmark. We included data from hospitals as well as from private ear, nose and throat (ENT) clinics. The study was based on registry data on all sialolithiasis cases in Denmark between 2003 and 2009 extracted from the Danish National...... Patient Registry (hospital cohort) and the Danish Regions Centre for Healthcare Statistics (private ENT clinic cohort). To validate the diagnosis, the proportion of visually confirmed cases was estimated based on patient records from subsamples of the two cohorts. The IR was 7.27 and 14.10 per 100...

  14. Healthcare avoidance: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Sharon K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a critical review and synthesis of theoretical and research literature documenting the impact of avoidance on healthcare behaviors, identify the factors that influence healthcare avoidance and delay in the adult population, and propose a direction for future research. The Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of Planned Behavior, Theory of Care-Seeking Behavior, the Transtheoretical Model, and the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use/Utilization are utilized to elaborate on the context within which individual intention to engage in healthcare behaviors occurs. Research literature on the concept of healthcare avoidance obtained by using computerized searches of CINAHL, MEDLINE, PSYCH INFO, and HAPI databases, from 1995 to 2007, were reviewed. Studies were organized by professional disciplines. Healthcare avoidance is a common and highly variable experience. Multiple administrative, demographic, personal, and provider factors are related to healthcare avoidance, for example, distrust of providers and/or the science community, health beliefs, insurance status, or socioeconomic/income level. Although the concept is recognized by multiple disciplines, limited research studies address its impact on healthcare decision making. More systematic research is needed to determine correlates of healthcare avoidance. Such studies will help investigators identify patients at risk for avoidant behaviors and provide the basis for health-promoting interventions. Methodological challenges include identification of characteristics of individuals and environments that hinder healthcare behaviors, as well as, the complexity of measuring healthcare avoidance. Studies need to systematically explore the influence of avoidance behaviors on specific healthcare populations at risk.

  15. Patient safety in primary allied health care: what can we learn from incidents in a Dutch exploratory cohort study?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dulmen, Simone A; Tacken, Margot A J B; Staal, J Bart; Gaal, Sander; Wensing, Michel; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2011-12-01

    Research on patient safety in allied healthcare is scarce. Our aim was to document patient safety in primary allied healthcare in the Netherlands and to identify factors associated with incidents. DESIGN AND SUBJECT: A retrospective study of 1000 patient records in a representative sample of 20 allied healthcare practices was combined with a prospective incident-reporting study. All records were reviewed by trained researchers to identify patient safety incidents. The incidents were classified and analyzed, using the Prevention and Recovery Information System for Monitoring and Analysis method. Factors associated with incidents were examined in a logistic regression analysis. In 18 out of 1000 (1.8%; 95% confidence interval: 1.0-2.6) records an incident was detected. The main causes of incidents were related to errors in clinical decisions (89%), communication with other healthcare providers (67%), and monitoring (56%). The probability of incidents was higher if more care providers had been involved and if patient records were incomplete (37% of the records). No incidents were reported in the prospective study. The absolute number of incidents was low, which could imply a low risk of harm in Dutch primary allied healthcare. Nevertheless, incompleteness of the patient records and the fact that incidents were mainly caused through human actions suggest that a focus on clinical reasoning and record keeping is needed to further enhance patient safety. Improvements in record keeping will be necessary before accurate incident reporting will be feasible and valid.

  16. Safety analyses of surface facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspach, W.; Baran, A.; Dorst, H.J.; Eifert, B.; Gruen, M.; Behrendt, V.; Berkhan, W.; Dincklage, R.D. v.; Doehler, J.; Bruecher, H.

    1981-01-01

    The investigations were carried out using the example of the Gorleben waste disposal center and the planning documents established for this center. The safety analyses refer to the transport of spent fuel elements, the water-cooled interin storage and the reprocessing stage. Regarding the risk analysis of the technical systems the dynamics of the courses of incidents can be better taken into account by doing a methodical development. (DG) [de

  17. Addressing Disease-Related Malnutrition in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Isabel; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Diaz-Pizarro Graf, José Ignacio; Gomez-Morales, Gabriel; Fuentes Gutiérrez, Catalina; Goldin, Maria Fernanda; Navas, Angela; Pinzón Espitia, Olga Lucia; Tavares, Gilmária Millere

    2015-01-01

    Alarmingly high rates of disease-related malnutrition have persisted in hospitals of both emerging and industrialized nations over the past 2 decades, despite marked advances in medical care over this same interval. In Latin American hospitals, the numbers are particularly striking; disease-related malnutrition has been reported in nearly 50% of adult patients in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Uruguay. The tolls of disease-related malnutrition are high in both human and financial terms—increased infectious complications, higher incidence of pressure ulcers, longer hospital stays, more frequent readmissions, greater costs of care, and increased risk of death. In an effort to draw attention to malnutrition in Latin American healthcare, a feedM.E. Latin American Study Group was formed to extend the reach and support the educational efforts of the feedM.E. Global Study Group. In this article, the feedM.E. Latin American Study Group shows that malnutrition incurs excessive costs to the healthcare systems, and the study group also presents evidence of how appropriate nutrition care can improve patients’ clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs. To achieve the benefits of nutrition for health throughout Latin America, the article presents feedM.E.’s simple and effective Nutrition Care Pathway in English and Spanish as a way to facilitate its use. PMID:25883116

  18. Supply chain dynamics in healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Cherian; Gonapa, Kasiviswanadh; Chaudhary, P K; Mishra, Ananya

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse health service supply chain systems. A great deal of literature is available on supply chain management in finished goods inventory situations; however, little research exists on managing service capacity when finished goods inventories are absent. System dynamics models for a typical service-oriented supply chain such as healthcare processes are developed, wherein three service stages are presented sequentially. Just like supply chains with finished goods inventory, healthcare service supply chains also show dynamic behaviour. Comparing options, service reduction, and capacity adjustment delays showed that reducing capacity adjustment and service delays gives better results. The study is confined to health service-oriented supply chains. Further work includes extending the study to service-oriented supply chains with parallel processing, i.e. having more than one stage to perform a similar operation and also to study the behaviour in service-oriented supply chains that have re-entrant orders and applications. Specific case studies can also be developed to reveal factors relevant to particular service-oriented supply chains. The paper explains the bullwhip effect in healthcare service-oriented supply chains. Reducing stages and capacity adjustment are strategic options for service-oriented supply chains. The paper throws light on policy options for managing healthcare service-oriented supply chain dynamics.

  19. Ethics of mandatory vaccination for healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanakis, E; Jansen, A; Lopalco, P L; Giesecke, J

    2013-11-07

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at increased risk of contracting infections at work and further transmitting them to colleagues and patients. Immune HCWs would be protected themselves and act as a barrier against the spread of infections and maintain healthcare delivery during outbreaks, but vaccine uptake rates in HCWs have often been low. In order to achieve adequate immunisation rates in HCWs, mandatory vaccination policies are occasionally implemented by healthcare authorities, but such policies have raised considerable controversy. Here we review the background of this debate, analyse arguments for and against mandatory vaccination policies, and consider the principles and virtues of clinical, professional, institutional and public health ethics. We conclude that there is a moral imperative for HCWs to be immune and for healthcare institutions to ensure HCW vaccination, in particular for those working in settings with high-risk groups of patients. If voluntary uptake of vaccination by HCWs is not optimal, patients’ welfare, public health and also the HCW’s own health interests should outweigh concerns about individual autonomy: fair mandatory vaccination policies for HCWs might be acceptable. Differences in diseases, patient and HCW groups at risk and available vaccines should be taken into consideration when adopting the optimal policy.

  20. Are healthcare middle management jobs extreme jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, David A; Parry, Emma; Gascoigne, Charlotte; Moore, Cíara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the incidence of "extreme jobs" among middle managers in acute hospitals, and to identify individual and organizational implications. The paper is based on interviews and focus groups with managers at six hospitals, a "proof of concept" pilot with an operations management team, and a survey administered at five hospitals. Six of the original dimensions of extreme jobs, identified in commercial settings, apply to hospital management: long hours, unpredictable work patterns, tight deadlines with fast pace, broad responsibility, "24/7 availability", mentoring and coaching. Six healthcare-specific dimensions were identified: making life or death decisions, conflicting priorities, being required to do more with fewer resources, responding to regulatory bodies, the need to involve many people before introducing improvements, fighting a negative climate. Around 75 per cent of hospital middle managers have extreme jobs. This extreme healthcare management job model was derived inductively from a qualitative study involving a small number of respondents. While the evidence suggests that extreme jobs are common, further research is required to assess the antecedents, incidence, and implications of these working practices. A varied, intense, fast-paced role with responsibility and long hours can be rewarding, for some. However, multi-tasking across complex roles can lead to fatigue, burnout, and mistakes, patient care may be compromised, and family life may be adversely affected. As far as the authors can ascertain, there are no other studies exploring acute sector management roles through an extreme jobs lens.

  1. Evaluation of obesity in healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, C; Giorgianni, C; Munaò, F; Beninato, G; D'Arrigo, Graziella; D'Arrigo, Patrizia; Brecciaroli, Renato

    2006-01-01

    Obesity is an international social problem. This study was aimed at evaluating the relationship of overweight and obesity with social dynamics and correlated biological indicators. The study was carried out on a group of healthcare workers employed in a large hospital in the province of Messina (Sicily, Italy). A total of 1010 subjects (377 men and 633 women) aged between 16 and 64 years, living in the province of Messina since birth. The educational level, BMI (Body mass index), arterial blood pressure and ECG of each subject was examined. The results showed that 52% of the men and 66.5% of the women were of normal weight, while the men showed greater susceptibility to overweight (M 33.2% > F 16%). Obesity was found in both sexes (M 13.3%, F 13.6%). Moreover, it was observed that arterial blood pressure tends to increase with age and body weight, and that the incidence of overweight falls as educational level rises. The study supports the hypothesis that there is a growing incidence of overweight and obesity in subjects of working age employed in the healthcare sector.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Iceland, 1995-2008: changing incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsson, H; Gudlaugsson, O; Kristinsson, K G; Heiddal, S; Kristjansson, M

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about temporal changes in the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia. The objective of the present study was to analyse changes in the incidence and mortality of adult S. aureus bacteraemia in Iceland. Individuals 18 years or older with a positive blood culture for S. aureus between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2008 were identified, with the participation of all clinical microbiological laboratories performing blood cultures in Iceland. Infections were categorized as nosocomial, healthcare-associated or community-acquired. National population statistics and dates of death were retrieved from the National Registry. During the study period, 692 individuals from 19 institutions had 721 distinct episodes of S. aureus bacteraemia. The incidence rose from 22.7 to 28.9 per 100,000 per year during the period (p 0.012). Nosocomial infections comprised 46.3% of cases, 14.6% were healthcare-associated, and 39.1% were community-acquired. The proportion of nosocomial infections decreased during the period (p Iceland between 1995 and 2008. Concomitantly, there was a significant reduction in mortality, towards one of the lowest reported. Further studies are needed to understand the basis for these changes. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  3. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated with a study among nurses based on their conceptions about PE. Practical implications and the potential of ICT in PE in particular are discussed.

  4. MCFRS Incidents by Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains the monthly summary data indicating incident occurred in each fire station response area. The summary data is the incident count broken down by...

  5. Police Incident Reports Written

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This table contains incident reports filed with the Chapel Hill Police Department. Multiple incidents may have been reported at the same time. The most serious...

  6. Readiness of healthcare providers for eHealth: the case from primary healthcare centers in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Shadi; Khodor, Rawya; Alameddine, Mohamad; Baroud, Maysa

    2016-11-10

    eHealth can positively impact the efficiency and quality of healthcare services. Its potential benefits extend to the patient, healthcare provider, and organization. Primary healthcare (PHC) settings may particularly benefit from eHealth. In these settings, healthcare provider readiness is key to successful eHealth implementation. Accordingly, it is necessary to explore the potential readiness of providers to use eHealth tools. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of healthcare providers working in PHC centers in Lebanon to use eHealth tools. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess participants' socio-demographics, computer use, literacy, and access, and participants' readiness for eHealth implementation (appropriateness, management support, change efficacy, personal beneficence). The study included primary healthcare providers (physicians, nurses, other providers) working in 22 PHC centers distributed across Lebanon. Descriptive and bivariate analyses (ANOVA, independent t-test, Kruskal Wallis, Tamhane's T2) were used to compare participant characteristics to the level of readiness for the implementation of eHealth. Of the 541 questionnaires, 213 were completed (response rate: 39.4 %). The majority of participants were physicians (46.9 %), and nurses (26.8 %). Most physicians (54.0 %), nurses (61.4 %), and other providers (50.9 %) felt comfortable using computers, and had access to computers at their PHC center (physicians: 77.0 %, nurses: 87.7 %, others: 92.5 %). Frequency of computer use varied. The study found a significant difference for personal beneficence, management support, and change efficacy among different healthcare providers, and relative to participants' level of comfort using computers. There was a significant difference by level of comfort using computers and appropriateness. A significant difference was also found between those with access to computers in relation to personal beneficence and

  7. Incident Information Management Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  8. Script of Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser Grith Kragh; Hansen, Meiken; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many new product designs are currently being implemented in the healthcare sector, and this presents designers with challenges involved in socially innovative design. In this paper, we argue that designing assistive technologies requires focus on multiple users and use practices. We see...... the design of assistive technologies as design of socio-material assemblies , which include an analysis of the products already used in relation to multiple users, their practices and wishes. In the article we focus on the challenges in the implementation of two types of robotic beds used for disability care...

  9. Building National Healthcare Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Thorseng, Anne

    2017-01-01

    This case chapter is about the evolution of the Danish national e-health portal, sundhed.dk, which provides patient-oriented digital services. We present how the organization behind sundhed.dk succeeded in establishing a national healthcare infrastructure by (1) collating and assembling existing...... data resources, (2) repurposing and enhancing current data sources in the health sector, and (3) engaging a multiplicity of stakeholders. We argue that these activities represent three ways of capitalizing on the installed base that has led to the evolution and current situation of the e-health portal...

  10. Data mining applications in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hian Chye; Tan, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Data mining has been used intensively and extensively by many organizations. In healthcare, data mining is becoming increasingly popular, if not increasingly essential. Data mining applications can greatly benefit all parties involved in the healthcare industry. For example, data mining can help healthcare insurers detect fraud and abuse, healthcare organizations make customer relationship management decisions, physicians identify effective treatments and best practices, and patients receive better and more affordable healthcare services. The huge amounts of data generated by healthcare transactions are too complex and voluminous to be processed and analyzed by traditional methods. Data mining provides the methodology and technology to transform these mounds of data into useful information for decision making. This article explores data mining applications in healthcare. In particular, it discusses data mining and its applications within healthcare in major areas such as the evaluation of treatment effectiveness, management of healthcare, customer relationship management, and the detection of fraud and abuse. It also gives an illustrative example of a healthcare data mining application involving the identification of risk factors associated with the onset of diabetes. Finally, the article highlights the limitations of data mining and discusses some future directions.

  11. The World Trade Center attack. Helping the helpers: the role of critical incident stress management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, J; Brooks, J

    2001-12-01

    Healthcare and prehospital workers involved in disaster response are susceptible to a variety of stress-related psychological and physical sequelae. Critical incident stress management, of which critical incident stress debriefing is a component, can mitigate the response to these stressors. Critical incident stress debriefing is a peer-driven, therapist-guided, structured, group intervention designed to accelerate the recovery of personnel. The attack on the World Trade Center, and the impact it may have on rescue, prehospital, and healthcare workers, should urge us to incorporate critical incident stress management into disaster management plans.

  12. Measuring healthcare quality: the challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Jaap; Niemeijer, Gerard C; Does, Ronald J M M

    2013-01-01

    Current health care quality performance indicators appear to be inadequate to inform the public to make the right choices. The aim of this paper is to define a framework and an organizational setting in which valid and reliable healthcare information can be produced to inform the general public about healthcare quality. To improve health care quality information, the paper explores the analogy between financial accounting, which aims to produce valid and reliable information to support companies informing their shareholders and stakeholders, and healthcare aiming to inform future patients about healthcare quality. Based on this analogy, the authors suggest a measurement framework and an organizational setting to produce healthcare information. The authors suggest a five-quality element framework to structure quality reporting. The authors also indicate the best way to report each type of quality, comparing performance indicators with certification/accreditation. Health gain is the most relevant quality indicator to inform the public, but this information is the most difficult to obtain. Finally, the organizational setting, comparable to financial accounting, required to provide valid, reliable and objective information on healthcare quality is described. Framework elements should be tested in quantitative studies or case studies, such as a performance indicator's relative value compared to accreditation/certification. There are, however, elements that can be implemented right away such as third party validation of healthcare information produced by healthcare institutions. Given the money spent on healthcare worldwide, valid and reliable healthcare quality information's value can never be overestimated. It can justify delivering "expensive healthcare, but also points the way to savings by stopping useless healthcare. Valid and reliable information puts the patient in the driver's seat and enables him or her to make the right decision when choosing their healthcare

  13. Customer perceived service quality, satisfaction and loyalty in Indian private healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondasani, Rama Koteswara Rao; Panda, Rajeev Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse how perceived service quality and customer satisfaction lead to loyalty towards healthcare service providers. In total, 475 hospital patients participated in a questionnaire survey in five Indian private hospitals. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, regression and correlation statistics were employed to analyse customer perceived service quality and how it leads to loyalty towards service providers. Results indicate that the service seeker-service provider relationship, quality of facilities and the interaction with supporting staff have a positive effect on customer perception. Findings help healthcare managers to formulate effective strategies to ensure a better quality of services to the customers. This study helps healthcare managers to build customer loyalty towards healthcare services, thereby attracting and gaining more customers. This paper will help healthcare managers and service providers to analyse customer perceptions and their loyalty towards Indian private healthcare services.

  14. A nationwide medication incidents reporting system in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Bouvy, Marcel L; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A G M

    2011-01-01

    Many Dutch hospitals have established internal systems for reporting incidents. However, such internal systems do not allow learning from incidents that occur in other hospitals. Therefore a multicenter, information technology (IT) supported reporting system named central medication incidents registration (CMR) was developed. This article describes the architecture, implementation and current status of the CMR in The Netherlands and compare it with similar systems in other countries. Adequate IT is required to sufficiently support a multicenter reporting system. The CMR system consists of a website, a database, a web-based reporting form, an application to import reports generated in other reporting systems, an application to generate an overview of reported medication incidents, and a national warning system for healthcare providers. From the start of CMR 90 of all 93 (96.8%) hospitals and 872 of 1948 (44.8%) community pharmacies participated. Between March 2006 and March 2010 the CMR comprised 15,694 reports of incidents. In the period from March 2010 to March 2011, 1642 reports were submitted by community pharmacies in CMR and the hospitals submitted 2517 reports. CMR is similar to various systems in other countries, but it seems to use more IT applications. The CMR is developing into a nationwide reporting system of medication incidents in The Netherlands, in which hospitals, community pharmacies, mental healthcare organizations and general practitioners participate. The architecture of the system met the requirements of a nationwide reporting system across different healthcare providers.

  15. Patient safety incidents are common in primary care: A national prospective active incident reporting survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Michel

    Full Text Available The study objectives were to describe the incidence and the nature of patient safety incidents (PSIs in primary care general practice settings, and to explore the association between these incidents and practice or organizational characteristics.GPs, randomly selected from a national influenza surveillance network (n = 800 across France, prospectively reported any incidents observed each day over a one-week period between May and July 2013. An incident was an event or circumstance that could have resulted, or did result, in harm to a patient, which the GP would not wish to recur. Primary outcome was the incidence of PSIs which was determined by counting reports per total number of patient encounters. Reports were categorized using existing taxonomies. The association with practice and organizational characteristics was calculated using a negative binomial regression model.127 GPs (participation rate 79% reported 317 incidents of which 270 were deemed to be a posteriori judged preventable, among 12,348 encounters. 77% had no consequences for the patient. The incidence of reported PSIs was 26 per 1000 patient encounters per week (95% CI [23‰ -28‰]. Incidents were three times more frequently related to the organization of healthcare than to knowledge and skills of health professionals, and especially to the workflow in the GPs' offices and to the communication between providers and with patients. Among GP characteristics, three were related with an increased incidence in the final multivariable model: length of consultation higher than 15 minutes, method of receiving radiological results (by fax compared to paper or email, and being in a multidisciplinary clinic compared with sole practitioners.Patient safety incidents (PSIs occurred in mean once every two days in the sampled GPs and 2% of them were associated with a definite possibility for harm. Studying the association between organizational features of general practices and PSIs remains a

  16. SOA governance in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilakopoulos, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is increasingly adopted by many sectors, including healthcare. Due to the nature of healthcare systems there is a need to increase SOA adoption success rates as the non integrated nature of healthcare systems is responsible for medical errors that cause the loss of tens of thousands patients per year. Following our previous research [1] we propose that SOA governance is a critical success factor for SOA success in healthcare. Literature reports multiple SOA governance models that have limitations and they are confusing. In addition to this, there is a lack of healthcare specific SOA governance models. This highlights a literature void and thus the purpose of this paper is to proposed a healthcare specific SOA governance framework.

  17. Healthcare technology in the home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2011-01-01

    The dissertation explores through ethnographic field studies ways in which negotiations and transformations take place when healthcare technology is introduced to the home. With the increased focus on tele-medical solutions and on supporting patient self-care through new healthcare technologies...... it is relevant to examine the changes induced by this development: How is healthcare technology appropriated and domesticated by users, how does the development affect the role of the patient, and how is the relationship between home patients, family caregivers and healthcare professionals transformed? The role...... of healthcare technology extends beyond making treatment available outside the hospital. Healthcare technology is not neutral, but transforms practice and entails both challenges and possibilities....

  18. Emotions in relation to healthcare encounters affecting self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räty, Lena; Gustafsson, Barbro

    2006-02-01

    This study identifies emotions in patients with epilepsy as a result of confirming and disconfirming healthcare experiences. A discussion of emotions as a motive for patients' goal-directed actions was a further aim of this study. The critical incident method was used for data collection. Emotions occurring in confirming and disconfirming healthcare encounters were analyzed using the Belief-Desire Theory of Emotions and were categorized as basic, complex, or self-evaluating. Confirming encounters aroused emotions like hope, a feeling of security, joy, relief, and pride, while disconfirming encounters aroused emotions like despair, fear, unrest, resignation, shame, and guilt. The emotions identified in the healthcare encounters were recognized as motives for action. An emotion such as a feeling of security aroused a desire in the patients to strengthen their positive self and motivated them to have a constructive and sympathetic attitude toward the healthcare experience. An emotion such as anger caused patients to strive to maintain their self-respect either by avoiding difficult situations and ignoring the problem (patients with a low self-esteem) or by trying to re-create a positive self-image (patients with a high self-esteem). Healthcare encounters between patient and caregiver considerably affect the patient's emotional status and thereby his or her well-being. The importance of establishing healthcare encounters that evoke positive emotions that strengthen patients' resources must be addressed in future nursing care.

  19. The healthcare costs of secondhand smoke exposure in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tingting; Sung, Hai-Yen; Mao, Zhengzhong; Hu, Teh-wei; Max, Wendy

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the healthcare costs attributable to secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among non-smoking adults (age ≥ 19) in rural China. We analysed data from the 2011 National Rural Household Survey which was conducted among adults in five provinces and one municipality in China (N=12,397). Respondents reported their smoking status, health conditions and healthcare expenditures. Relative risks were obtained from published sources. Healthcare costs included annual outpatient and inpatient hospitalisation expenditures for five SHS-related diseases: asthma, breast cancer (female only), heart disease, lung cancer and tuberculosis. SHS-attributable healthcare costs were estimated using a prevalence-based annual cost approach. The total healthcare costs of SHS exposure in rural China amounted to $1.2 billion in 2011, including $559 million for outpatient visits and $612.4 million for inpatient hospitalisations. The healthcare costs for women and men were $877.1 million and $294.3 million, respectively. Heart disease was the most costly condition for both women ($701.7 million) and men ($180.6 million). The total healthcare costs of SHS exposure in rural China accounted to 0.3% of China's national healthcare expenditures in 2011. Over one-fifth of the total healthcare costs of SHS exposure in rural China were paid by health insurance. The out-of-pocket expenditures per person accounted for almost half (47%) of their daily income. The adverse health effects of SHS exposure result in a large economic burden in China. Tobacco control policies that reduce SHS exposure could have an impact on reducing healthcare costs in China. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. The Finnish healthcare services lean management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hihnala, Susanna; Kettunen, Lilja; Suhonen, Marjo; Tiirinki, Hanna

    2018-02-05

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to discuss health services managers' experiences of management in a special health-care unit and development efforts from the point of view of the Lean method. Additionally, the aim is to deepen the knowledge of the managers' work and nature of the Lean method development processes in the workplace. The research focuses on those aspects and results of Lean method that are currently being used in health-care environments. Design/methodology/approach These data were collected through a number of thematic interviews. The participants were nurse managers ( n = 7) and medical managers ( n = 7) who applied Lean management in their work at the University Hospital in the Northern Ostrobothnia Health Care District. The data were analysed with a qualitative content analysis. Findings A common set of values in specialized health-care services, development of activities and challenges for management in the use of the Lean manager development model to improve personal management skills. Practical implications Managers in specialized health-care services can develop and systematically manage with the help of the Lean method. This emphasizes assumptions, from the point of view of management, about systems development when the organization uses the Lean method. The research outcomes originate from specialized health-care settings in Finland in which the Lean method and its associated management principles have been implemented and applied to the delivery of health care. Originality/value The study shows that the research results and in-depth knowledge on Lean method principles can be applied to health-care management and development processes. The research also describes health services managers' experiences of using the Lean method. In the future, these results can be used to improve Lean management skills, identify personal professional competencies and develop skills required in development processes. Also, the research findings can be used

  1. PPEPR for Enterprise Healthcare Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ronan; Sahay, Ratnesh; Hauswirth, Manfred

    PPEPR is software to connect healthcare enterprises. Healthcare is a complex domain and any integration system that connects healthcare enterprise applications must facilitate heterogeneous healthcare systems at all levels - data, services, processes, healthcare vendors, standards, legacy systems, and new information systems, all of which must interoperate to provide healthcare services. The lack of interoperability within healthcare standards (e.g. HL7) adds complexity to the interoperability initiatives. HL7’s user base has been growing since the early 2000s. There are many interoperability issues between the widely adopted HL7 v2 and its successor, HL7 v3, in terms of consistency, data/message modeling, precision, and useability. We have proposed an integration platform called PPEPR: (Plug and Play Electronic Patient Records) which is based on a semantic Service-oriented Architecture (sSOA). PPEPR connects HL7 (v2 & v3) compliant healthcare enterprises. Our main goal is to provide seamless integration between healthcare enterprises without imposing any constraint on existing or proposed EPRs.

  2. Sequential Pattern Mining of Electronic Healthcare Reimbursement Claims: Experiences and Challenges in Uncovering How Patients are Treated by Physicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL; Hobson, Tanner C [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We examine the use of electronic healthcare reimbursement claims (EHRC) for analyzing healthcare delivery and practice patterns across the United States (US). We show that EHRCs are correlated with disease incidence estimates published by the Centers for Disease Control. Further, by analyzing over 1 billion EHRCs, we track patterns of clinical procedures administered to patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), heart disease (HD) and breast cancer (BC) using sequential pattern mining algorithms. Our analyses reveal that in contrast to treating HD and BC, clinical procedures for ASD diagnoses are highly varied leading up to and after the ASD diagnoses. The discovered clinical procedure sequences also reveal significant differences in the overall costs incurred across different parts of the US, indicating a lack of consensus amongst practitioners in treating ASD patients. We show that a data-driven approach to understand clinical trajectories using EHRC can provide quantitative insights into how to better manage and treat patients. Based on our experience, we also discuss emerging challenges in using EHRC datasets for gaining insights into the state of contemporary healthcare delivery and practice in the US.

  3. Incidence and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (Dalys) Attributable to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Leishmaniasis covers a range of clinical manifestations. Estimation of the burden of leishmaniasis may help guide healthcare management personnel and policy-makers in applying effective interventions. The present study aimed to calculate the incidence and burden of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis in ...

  4. Classification of medication incidents associated with information technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van der Veen, Willem; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Wensing, Michel; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; de Smet, Peter A. G. M.

    Introduction Information technology (IT) plays a pivotal role in improving patient safety, but can also cause new problems for patient safety. This study analyzed the nature and consequences of a large sample of IT-related medication incidents, as reported by healthcare professionals in community

  5. Healthcare in Pali Buddhism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustarini, Giuliano

    2017-05-02

    This article addresses an apparent paradox found in Pali Buddhist literature: while the "uncompounded" (asaṅkhata) is valued over and above what is "compounded" (saṅkhata), the texts also encourage careful attention to relative (or, physical) health. The mind is the laboratory and the object of a thorough work meant to lead to final liberation from mental affliction and from the cycle of existence, whereas the body is perceived as impure, limited, and intrinsically unsatisfactory. Nonetheless, a disciple of the Buddha is supposed to take care of his/her own and others' physical wellbeing, and monastic equipment includes a set of medicines. "Ultimate health" is the final goal, but conventional healthcare supports the path to nibbāna and represents a value per se. The present article will explore the intricate connection between these two dimensions.

  6. Infrastructures for healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, Tue Odd; Amstrup, Mikkel Hvid; Mørck, Peter

    2018-01-01

    of classifications, on the entire Danish population. However, in the Autumn of 2014, the system was temporarily shut down due to a lawsuit filed by two general practitioners. In this article, we ask why and identify a political struggle concerning authority, control, and autonomy related to a transformation...... adding new actors or purposes to a system without due consideration to the nature of the infrastructure. We argue that while long-term information infrastructures are dynamic by nature and constantly impacted by actors joining or leaving the project, each activity of adding new actors must take reverse...... synergy into account, if not to risk breaking down the fragile nature of otherwise successful information infrastructures supporting research on healthcare....

  7. Globalization of Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Globalization—the increasing transnational circulation of money, goods, people, ideas, and information worldwide—is generally recognized as one of the most powerful forces shaping our current and future history. How is it affecting healthcare, and in that context, what is the purpose and significance of Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHM), publisher of this journal? Our goal is not homogenization but rather to provide an opportunity for integration, convergence, and collaboration across cultures. By respecting and conserving the richness and diversity of each new medicine, we embrace globalization. Globalization is of course not new; it began in the Renaissance and particularly with the 15th- and 16th-century voyages of exploration by Columbus, Magellan, and others. Since the beginning of time, there have been interactions and exchanges among different peoples and cultures. However, the current magnitude of globalization is unprecedented and yet still expanding rapidly. PMID:24278809

  8. Globalization of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Globalization-the increasing transnational circulation of money, goods, people, ideas, and information worldwide-is generally recognized as one of the most powerful forces shaping our current and future history. How is it affecting healthcare, and in that context, what is the purpose and significance of Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHM), publisher of this journal? Our goal is not homogenization but rather to provide an opportunity for integration, convergence, and collaboration across cultures. By respecting and conserving the richness and diversity of each new medicine, we embrace globalization. Globalization is of course not new; it began in the Renaissance and particularly with the 15th- and 16th-century voyages of exploration by Columbus, Magellan, and others. Since the beginning of time, there have been interactions and exchanges among different peoples and cultures. However, the current magnitude of globalization is unprecedented and yet still expanding rapidly.

  9. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization.

  10. Healthcare Fraud Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Victor Vevera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tax healthcare fraud and tax evasion affects us all. It occurs within a country and across countries both within the EU,USA and globally. That is why a single country cannot solve the problem on its own. The EU and Member States need to work more together and internationally to combat the problem at home and abroad. Open dialogue involving the European Commission, stakeholders and interested parties helps ensure that existing rules and proposals for new rules are designed to keep pace with the reality of rapid change. This dialogue helps to achieve the regulatory efficiency we need to foster best administrative and legislative practice tailored to meet the needs of business in the European Union in the third millennium

  11. Constructing Healthcare Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harty, Chris; Holm Jacobsen, Peter; Tryggestad, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to inquire into the role of project visualisations in shaping healthcare spaces and practices. The study draws upon an ethnographic field study from a large on-going hospital construction project in Denmark, and focuses on the early phases of on-boarding the design team...... into the project organisation. The theoretical contribution concerns the ways in which project visualisations plays an active role in developing novel conceptions of space and how these are mobilized in the process of on-boarding, in terms of 1. Design space (especially the engagement of users in the design...... to a number of emergent concerns in the processes of designing and constructing the new hospital, notably concerns and tensions between innovation and control....

  12. Predictors of Healthcare Service Utilization for Mental Health Reasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Josée Fleury

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify: (1 predictors of 12-month healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons, framed by the Andersen model, among a population cohort in an epidemiological catchment area; and (2 correlates associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons among individuals with and without mental disorders respectively. Analyses comprised univariate, bivariate, and multiple regression analyses. Being male, having poor quality of life, possessing better self-perception of physical health, and suffering from major depressive episodes, panic disorder, social phobia, and emotional problems predicted healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals with mental disorders, needs factors (psychological distress, impulsiveness, emotional problems, victim of violence, and aggressive behavior and visits to healthcare professionals were associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals without mental disorders, healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons is strongly associated with enabling factors such as social support, income, environmental variables, and self-perception of the neighborhood. Interventions facilitating social cohesion and social solidarity in neighborhood settings may reduce the need to seek help among individuals without mental disorders. Furthermore, in their capacity as frontline professionals, general practitioners should be more sensitive in preventing, detecting, and treating mental disorders in routine primary care.

  13. Dissociative Tendencies and Traffic Incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the relationship between dissociative experiences and road traffic incidents (crashes and traffic tickets in drivers (n=295 from Mar del Plata (Argentina city. A self-report questionnaire was applied to assess traffic crash involvement and sociodemographic variables. Dissociative tendencies were assessed by a modified version of the DES scale. To examine differences in DES scores tests of the difference of means were applied. Drivers who reported to be previously involved in traffic incidents obtained higher puntuations in the dissociative experiences scale than drivers who did not report such events. This result is observed for the total scale and for the three sub-scales (absorption, amnesia and depersonalization. However, differences appeared mainly for minor damage collisions. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of dissociative tendencies as a risk factor in road traffic safety.

  14. Total quality management practices in Malaysia healthcare industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Md Fauzi; Nee, Phoi Soo; Nor, Nik Hisyamudin Muhd; Wei, Chan Shiau; Hassan, Mohd Fahrul; Hamid, Nor Aziati Abdul

    2017-10-01

    The aim of total quality management (TQM) is to achieve customer satisfaction. Healthcare industry is very important in Malaysia for providing good healthcare services to public. However, failure to improve quality and efficiency is a big challenge in a healthcare industry in order to increase quality healthcare services. The objectives of this research are to identify the extent level of TQM implementation; and to determine the impact of TQM implementation on business sustainable in healthcare industry. Quantitative approach has been chosen as the methodology of this study. The survey respondents targeted in this research are staffs in Malaysia private clinic. 70 respondents have participated in this research. Data were analysed by Statistical Package Social Science (SPSS). Analysis result showed that there was a positive significant relationship between TQM practices and business sustainable (r=0.774, P<0.05). All TQM factors have significant relationship with business sustainable factors. The findings of this research will help healthcare industry to understand a better and deeper valuable information on the impact of TQM implementation towards business sustainable in Malaysia healthcare industry.

  15. Serious incidents after death: content analysis of incidents reported to a national database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Iain E; Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Donaldson, Liam J

    2018-02-01

    Objectives To describe serious incidents occurring in the management of patient remains after their death. Design Incidents occurring after patient deaths were analysed using content analysis to determine what happened, why it happened and the outcome. Setting The Strategic Executive Information System database of serious incidents requiring investigation occurring in the National Health Service in England. Participants All cases describing an incident that occurred following death, regardless of the age of the patient. Main outcome measures The nature of the incident, the underlying cause or causes of the incident and the outcome of the incident. Results One hundred and thirty-two incidents were analysed; these related to the storage, management or disposal of deceased patient remains. Fifty-four incidents concerned problems with the storage of bodies or body parts. Forty-three incidents concerned problems with the management of bodies, including 25 errors in postmortem examination, or postmortems on the wrong body. Thirty-one incidents related to the disposal of bodies, 25 bodies were released from the mortuary to undertakers in error; of these, nine were buried or cremated by the wrong family. The reported underlying causes were similar to those known to be associated with safety incidents occurring before death and included weaknesses in or failures to follow protocol and procedure, poor communication and informal working practices. Conclusions Serious incidents in the management of deceased patient remains have significant implications for families, hospitals and the health service more broadly. Safe mortuary care may be improved by applying lessons learned from existing patient safety work.

  16. Improving the redistribution of the security lessons in healthcare: An evaluation of the Generic Security Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Johnson, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The recurrence of past security breaches in healthcare showed that lessons had not been effectively learned across different healthcare organisations. Recent studies have identified the need to improve learning from incidents and to share security knowledge to prevent future attacks. Generic Security Templates (GSTs) have been proposed to facilitate this knowledge transfer. The objective of this paper is to evaluate whether potential users in healthcare organisations can exploit the GST technique to share lessons learned from security incidents. We conducted a series of case studies to evaluate GSTs. In particular, we used a GST for a security incident in the US Veterans' Affairs Administration to explore whether security lessons could be applied in a very different Chinese healthcare organisation. The results showed that Chinese security professional accepted the use of GSTs and that cyber security lessons could be transferred to a Chinese healthcare organisation using this approach. The users also identified the weaknesses and strengths of GSTs, providing suggestions for future improvements. Generic Security Templates can be used to redistribute lessons learned from security incidents. Sharing cyber security lessons helps organisations consider their own practices and assess whether applicable security standards address concerns raised in previous breaches in other countries. The experience gained from this study provides the basis for future work in conducting similar studies in other healthcare organisations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychological Trauma in the Workplace: Variation of Incident Severity among Industry Settings and between Recurring vs Isolated Incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GS DeFraia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychologically traumatic workplace events (known as critical incidents occur within various work environments, with workgroups in certain industries vulnerable to multiple incidents. With the increasing prevalence of incidents in the USA, incident response is a growing practice area within occupational medicine, industrial psychology, occupational social work and other occupational health professions. Objective: To analyze a measure of incident severity based on level of disruption to the workplace and explore whether incident severity varied among different industry settings or between workgroups experiencing multiple vs single traumatic incidents. Methods: Administrative data mining was employed to examine practice data from a workplace trauma response unit in the USA. Bivariate analyses were conducted to test whether scores from an instrument measuring incident severity level varied among industry settings or between workgroups impacted by multiple vs isolated events. Results: Incident severity level differed among various industry settings. Banks, retail stores and fast food restaurants accounted for the most severe incidents, while industrial and manufacturing sites reported less severe incidents. Workgroups experiencing multiple incidents reported more severe incidents than workgroups experiencing a single incident. Conclusion: Occupational health practitioners should be alert to industry differences in several areas: pre-incident resiliency training, the content of business recovery plans, assessing worker characteristics, strategies to assist continuous operations and assisting workgroups impacted by multiple or severe incidents.

  18. Healthcare Programmes for Truck Drivers in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla-Edward, Samanta Tresha; Fobosi, Siyabulela Christopher; Hankins, Catherine; Case, Kelsey; Venter, W D Francois; Gomez, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Truck drivers have unique health needs, and by virtue of their continuous travel, experience difficulty in accessing healthcare. Currently, planning for effective care is hindered by lack of knowledge about their health needs and about the impact of on-going programmes on this population's health outcomes. We reviewed healthcare programmes implemented for sub-Saharan African truck drivers, assessed the evaluation methods, and examined impact on health outcomes. We searched scientific and institutional databases, and online search engines to include all publications describing a healthcare programme in sub-Saharan Africa where the main clients were truck drivers. We consulted experts and organisations working with mobile populations to identify unpublished reports. Forest plots of impact and outcome indicators with unadjusted risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were created to map the impact of these programmes. We performed a subgroup analysis by type of indicator using a random-effects model to assess between-study heterogeneity. We conducted a sensitivity analysis to examine both the summary effect estimate chosen (risk difference vs. risk ratio) and model to summarise results (fixed vs. random effects). Thirty-seven publications describing 22 healthcare programmes across 30 countries were included from 5,599 unique records. All programmes had an HIV-prevention focus with only three expanding their services to cover conditions other primary healthcare services. Twelve programmes were evaluated and most evaluations assessed changes in input, output, and outcome indicators. Absence of comparison groups, preventing attribution of the effect observed to the programme and lack of biologically confirmed outcomes were the main limitations. Four programmes estimated a quantitative change in HIV prevalence or reported STI incidence, with mixed results, and one provided anecdotal evidence of changes in AIDS-related mortality and social norms. Most programmes showed

  19. Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    of these systems target a specific treatment or condition and might not be sufficient to support the care management work at home. Based on a case study approach, my research investigates home-based healthcare practices and how they can inform future design of home-based healthcare technology that better account...

  20. Freeform electronics for advanced healthcare

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-02-16

    Freeform (physically flexible, stretchable and reconfigurable) electronics can be critical enabler for advanced personalized healthcare. With increased global population and extended average lifetime of mankind, it is more important than ever to integrate advanced electronics into our daily life for advanced personalized healthcare. In this paper, we discuss some critical criteria to design such electronics with enabling applications.

  1. Debate over healthcare system reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaapman, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    After 20 years of relative political inaction, pressure exerted by the recent spiralling costs of healthcare appears to have awakened broad support for fundamental reform of the Dutch system of medical expenses insurance and the organisation and structure of healthcare. In talks over the formation

  2. Cardiac misconceptions in healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Neil; Patience, Fiona; Maclean, Elizabeth; Corrigall, Helen; Bradbury, Ian; Thompson, David R; Atherton, Iain; Leslie, Stephen J

    2012-12-01

    Cardiac misconceptions are common and may have a detrimental effect on patients. Such misconceptions may be introduced or reinforced by vague and inconsistent advice from healthcare staff and can adversely affect health outcomes. To assess whether level of cardiac misconceptions significantly differs between groups of healthcare staff based on occupation. The 22-item York cardiac beliefs questionnaire (YCBQ) was administered to a convenience sample of healthcare staff (n = 263) in direct contact with cardiac patients. Data was also collected on the occupation of healthcare staff and years worked. Medical staff had the lowest mean score (17.5, CI 15.6-19.4), indicating fewest misconceptions, and unqualified healthcare workers had the highest mean score (32.1, CI 28.4-35.7). Analysis by ANOVA indicated differences between staff groups to be statistically significant (F = 17.66, p misconception score (Pearson's r = - 0.243, p misconceptions in different groups of healthcare staff. Education to correct cardiac misconceptions should be particularly targeted at unqualified healthcare staff. The importance of maintaining appropriate ratios of qualified to unqualified healthcare staff in the care of cardiac patients is supported by this study.

  3. Healthcare Systems and Other Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kasteren, T.L.M.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    This Works in Progress department discusses eight projects related to healthcare. The first project aims to aid people with mild dementia. The second project plans to simplify the delivery of healthcare services to the elderly and cognitively disabled, while the third project is developing models

  4. [Knowledge management and healthcare organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaretti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    The present scenario is characterized by a high "environmental turbulence". Healthcare professionals and organizations must increase their knowledge, skills and attitudes for choosing wisely. Healthcare organizations are complex adaptive systems which should use integrated governance systems: knowledge management should be a strategic goal. These organizations should become learning organizations: they should build and renovate their knowledge in a systematic, explicit and definite way.

  5. Injury incidence and balance in rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Jaco Ras; Puckree, Threethambal

    2014-01-01

    Objective : This study determined and correlated injury incidence and balance in rugby players. A prospective survey with balance testing was conducted on first year rugby academy players (N= 114). Injury incidence, static and dynamic balance were tested pre and post-season using a Biosway portable balance system. The data was analysed using paired and independent samples t-tests at pscrum-half (14.80%) playing position, injuries in the 2nd half of the match (57%), and during contact (67%). Conclusion : Injury incidence was related to static and dynamic balance in forward right direction only.

  6. Incidence and costs of bicycle-related traumatic brain injuries in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Annemieke C; Polinder, Suzanne; Panneman, Martien J M; van Beeck, Ed F; Haagsma, Juanita A

    2015-08-01

    The main cause of death and serious disability in bicycle accidents is traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this population-based study was to assess the incidence and costs of bicycle-related TBI across various age groups, and in comparison to all bicycle-related injuries, to identify main risk groups for the development of preventive strategies. Data from the National Injury Surveillance System and National Medical Registration were used for all patients with bicycle-related injuries and TBI who visited a Dutch emergency department (ED) between 1998 and 2012. Demographics and national, weighted estimates of injury mechanism, injury severity and costs were analysed per age group. Direct healthcare costs and indirect costs were determined using the incidence-based Dutch Burden of Injury Model. Between 1998 and 2012, the incidence of ED treatments due to bicycle-related TBI strongly increased with 54%, to 43 per 100,000 persons in 2012. However, the incidence of all bicycle-related injuries remained stable, from 444 in 1998 to 456/100,000 in 2012. Incidence of hospital admission increased in both TBI (92%) and all injuries from cycling (71%). Highest increase in incidence of both ED treatments and hospital admissions was seen in adults aged 55+. The injury rate of TBI per kilometre travelled increased (44%) except in children, but decreased (-4%) for all injuries, showing a strong decrease in children (-36%) but an increase in men aged 25+, and women aged 15+. Total costs of bicycle-related TBI were €74.5 million annually. Although bicycle-related TBI accounted for 9% of the incidence of all ED treatments due to cycling, it accounted for 18% of the total costs due to all bicycle-related injuries (€410.7 million). Children and adolescents (aged 0-24) had highest incidence of ED treatments due to bicycle-related injuries. Men in the working population (aged 15-64) had highest indirect costs following injuries from cycling, including TBI. Older cyclists (aged

  7. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Edwards, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    that different mind sets and different rationalities between different types of healthcare professionals act as a major barrier for lean management in healthcare. The hypotheses are tested and discussed through four case studies. Using empirical research from four case studies the paper will continue....... The paper concludes by discussing the implications of hypothesis two, three, and four for the successful application of lean management within healthcare. Is it concluded that this requires a transformative and contingent approach to lean management where the universal principles of the lean philosophy......The ideas and principles from lean management are now widely being adopted within the healthcare sector. The analysis in this paper shows that organizations within healthcare most often only implement a limited set of tools and methods from the lean tool-box. Departing from a theoretical analysis...

  8. Concurrence of big data analytics and healthcare: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nishita; Pandit, Anil

    2018-06-01

    The application of Big Data analytics in healthcare has immense potential for improving the quality of care, reducing waste and error, and reducing the cost of care. This systematic review of literature aims to determine the scope of Big Data analytics in healthcare including its applications and challenges in its adoption in healthcare. It also intends to identify the strategies to overcome the challenges. A systematic search of the articles was carried out on five major scientific databases: ScienceDirect, PubMed, Emerald, IEEE Xplore and Taylor & Francis. The articles on Big Data analytics in healthcare published in English language literature from January 2013 to January 2018 were considered. Descriptive articles and usability studies of Big Data analytics in healthcare and medicine were selected. Two reviewers independently extracted information on definitions of Big Data analytics; sources and applications of Big Data analytics in healthcare; challenges and strategies to overcome the challenges in healthcare. A total of 58 articles were selected as per the inclusion criteria and analyzed. The analyses of these articles found that: (1) researchers lack consensus about the operational definition of Big Data in healthcare; (2) Big Data in healthcare comes from the internal sources within the hospitals or clinics as well external sources including government, laboratories, pharma companies, data aggregators, medical journals etc.; (3) natural language processing (NLP) is most widely used Big Data analytical technique for healthcare and most of the processing tools used for analytics are based on Hadoop; (4) Big Data analytics finds its application for clinical decision support; optimization of clinical operations and reduction of cost of care (5) major challenge in adoption of Big Data analytics is non-availability of evidence of its practical benefits in healthcare. This review study unveils that there is a paucity of information on evidence of real-world use of

  9. Errors in the management of cardiac arrests: an observational study of patient safety incidents in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka M; Donaldson, Liam J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this qualitative study is to better understand the types of error occurring during the management of cardiac arrests that led to a death. All patient safety incidents involving management of cardiac arrests and resulting in death which were reported to a national patient safety database over a 17-month period were analysed. Structured data from each report were extracted and these together with the free text, were subjected to content analysis which was inductive, with the coding scheme emerged from continuous reading and re-reading of incidents. There were 30 patient safety incidents involving management of cardiac arrests and resulting in death. The reviewers identified a main shortfall in the management of each cardiac arrest and this resulted in 12 different factors being documented. These were grouped into four themes that highlighted systemic weaknesses: miscommunication involving crash number (4/30, 13%), shortfalls in staff attending the arrest (4/30, 13%), equipment deficits (11/30, 36%), and poor application of knowledge and skills (11/30, 37%). The factors identified represent serious shortfalls in the quality of response to cardiac arrests resulting in death in hospital. No firm conclusion can be drawn about how many deaths in the study population would have been averted if the emergency had been managed to a high standard. The effective management of cardiac arrests should be considered as one of the markers of safe care within a healthcare organisation.

  10. CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING IN HEALTHCARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetelina Mihaylova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The planning may be determined as prediction and prognosis making of human resources in a long-term plan, in conformity with the aims of the particular healthcare institution. It is prepared by the medical manager based on different analyses and prognoses with the purpose of ensuring the needed number of human resources. The aim of the study is an exploration of some of the reasons for the shortage of human resources in the healthcare system. In order to be achieved the realization of the aim set, a task was assigned for analysis of the main aspects of human resource planning in the healthcare system. Data from available scientific sources on the subject were used; they were published in different scientific issues. The results from the study demonstrate that the human resource planning is usually determined by the volume of work, however, due to the specificity of the activities in the health care system, it is usually determined by the type of labour functions – basic, governing, assisting. The future needs of personnel are fully determined by the mission, strategy, and aims of the organization. A conclusion may be drawn that the human resource planning is a necessary condition for effective management of human resources, and it has a significant and decisive role in the prosperity of the particular hospital.

  11. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdud, Mikel; Cabasés, Juan M; Nieto, Jorge

    It has been established in the literature that workers within public organisations are intrinsically motivated. This paper is an empirical study of the healthcare sector using methods of qualitative analysis research, which aims to answer the following hypotheses: 1) doctors are intrinsically motivated; 2) economic incentives and control policies may undermine doctors' intrinsic motivation; and 3) well-designed incentives may encourage doctors' intrinsic motivation. We conducted semi-structured interviews à-la-Bewley with 16 doctors from Navarre's Healthcare Service (Servicio Navarro de Salud-Osasunbidea), Spain. The questions were based on current theories of intrinsic motivation and incentives to test the hypotheses. Interviewees were allowed to respond openly without time constraints. Relevant information was selected, quantified and analysed by using the qualitative concepts of saturation and codification. The results seem to confirm the hypotheses. Evidence supporting hypotheses 1 and 2 was gathered from all interviewees, as well as indications of the validity of hypothesis 3 based on interviewees' proposals of incentives. The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute incidents during anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidents can occur during induction, maintenance and emergence from anaesthesia. The following acute critical incidents are discussed in this article: • Anaphylaxis. • Aspiration ..... Already used in South Africa and Malawi, a scale-up of the technique is under way in Tanzania, Rwanda and Ghana. The report found that.

  13. Trends, risk factors and outcomes of healthcare-associated infections within the Italian network SPIN-UTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, A; Auxilia, F; Barchitta, M; Brusaferro, S; D'Alessandro, D; Grillo, O C; Montagna, M T; Pasquarella, C; Righi, E; Tardivo, S; Torregrossa, V; Mura, I

    2013-05-01

    Implementing infection control measures in light of healthcare-associated infection (HAI) surveillance data can prevent HAIs. Surveillance has been associated with a reduction of HAI in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, though the reasons for this improvement remain unclear. To evaluate changes in healthcare-associated infection (HAI) rates during three surveys of the Italian Nosocomial Infections Surveillance in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) network (SPIN-UTI) six-year project and to explore sources of variation of indicators of HAI in the 65 participating ICUs. The SPIN-UTI network adopted the European protocols for patient-based HAI surveillance. Cumulative incidence, incidence density, infection rates adjusted for device-days, and device utilization ratios were calculated for each survey and compared. To identify risk factors multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Crude excess mortality was computed as the difference between the crude overall case-fatality rate of patients with and without HAI. The risk of ICU-acquired infections increased in the third survey compared with previous (relative risk: 1.215; 95% confidence interval: 1.059-1.394). Among risk factors, the number of hospitalized patients requiring ICU admission and the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II increased from 73.7% to 78.1% and from 37.9% to 40.8% respectively. Although mortality rates remained unchanged, HAIs trebled the risk of death. Acinetobacter baumannii was the most frequently reported micro-organism in the third survey (16.9%), whereas in the previous surveys it ranked third (7.6%) and second (14.3%). The study highlighted the increased risk of HAI, at least partially explained by the greater severity and number of hospitalized patients requiring ICU admission. Furthermore, the management of intubation procedures and of ventilated patients was identified as a potential target for infection control interventions to decrease the growing risk of HAI in ICUs. Copyright

  14. Modeling veterans healthcare administration disclosure processes :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyeler, Walter E; DeMenno, Mercy B.; Finley, Patrick D.

    2013-09-01

    As with other large healthcare organizations, medical adverse events at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities can expose patients to unforeseen negative risks. VHA leadership recognizes that properly handled disclosure of adverse events can minimize potential harm to patients and negative consequences for the effective functioning of the organization. The work documented here seeks to help improve the disclosure process by situating it within the broader theoretical framework of issues management, and to identify opportunities for process improvement through modeling disclosure and reactions to disclosure. The computational model will allow a variety of disclosure actions to be tested across a range of incident scenarios. Our conceptual model will be refined in collaboration with domain experts, especially by continuing to draw on insights from VA Study of the Communication of Adverse Large-Scale Events (SCALE) project researchers.

  15. Fake news in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. An article in the National Review by Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry points out that there is considerable waste in healthcare spending (1. He blames much of this on two entitlements-Medicare and employer-sponsored health insurance. He also lays much of the blame on doctors. “Doctors are the biggest villains in American health care. ... As with public-school teachers, we should be able to recognize that a profession as a whole can be pathological even as many individual members are perfectly good actors, and even if many of them are heroes. And just like public-school teachers, the medical profession as a whole puts its own interests ahead of those of the citizens it claims to be dedicated to serve.” Who is Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry and how could he say something so nasty about teachers and my profession? A quick internet search revealed that Mr. Gobry is a fellow at the Ethics & Public Policy Center …

  16. [Healthcare patient loyalty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    If the "old economy" preached standardization of products/services in order to reduce costs, the "new economy" is based on the recognition of the needs and the management of information. It is aimed at providing better and more usable services. One scenario is a national health service with regional management but based on competition between hospitals/companies.This led to a different handling of the user/patient, which has become the center of the health system: marketing seeks to retain the patient, trying to push a client-patient to not change their healthcare service provider. In costs terms, it is more economical to retain a customer rather than acquire a new one: a satisfied customer is also the best sounding board for each company. Customer equity is the management of relations with patients which can result in a greater customer value: it is possible to recognize an equity of the value, of the brand and of the report. Loyalty uses various marketing activities (basic, responsive, responsible, proactive and collaborative): each hospital/company chooses different actions depending on how many resources it plans to invest in loyalty.

  17. Unit-based incident reporting and root cause analysis: variation at three hospital unit types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Merten, H.; Zwaan, L.; Lubberding, S.; Timmermans, D.; Smits, M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To minimise adverse events in healthcare, various large-scale incident reporting and learning systems have been developed worldwide. Nevertheless, learning from patient safety incidents is going slowly. Local, unit-based reporting systems can help to get faster and more detailed insight

  18. Unit-based incident reporting and root cause analysis: variation at three hospital unit types.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Merten, H.; Lubberding, S.; Zwaan, L.; Timmermans, D.; Smits, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To minimise adverse events in healthcare, various large-scale incident reporting and learning systems have been developed worldwide. Nevertheless, learning from patient safety incidents is going slowly. Local, unit-based reporting systems can help to get faster and more

  19. MARKETING PLANNING IN HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobeica Ana Amaria

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop a perspective on what is important or critical to the discipline of healthcare marketing by analyzing the marketing plan from the institutional (or organizational perspective. This “salience issue” is complicated by the structural problems in healthcare such as new advertising programs, advances in medical technology, and the escalating costs of care in the recent economic situation of world economic crisis. Reviewing a case study, the paper examines how marketing managers face increasingly difficult management and it emphasizes one more time the importance of marketing in the internal organizational structure. Also it shows the direct connection between the marketing strategy, the Quality of Healthcare and marketing planning in the internal organization of Private Healthcare Practice in Romania. Also it concludes that marketing planning in healthcare has to be very precised in order to achieve some major objectives: customer care, financial stability, equilibrium between stakeholders and shareholders and future improvement in communication to customers. The marketing strategies and programs discussed in this paper follow the analysis of the 4Ps of Healthcare Marketing Services and propose call to action plans and possibilities that might result in a more particular case study analysis of the Romanian Healthcare Market.

  20. Canadian Potential Healthcare and Societal Cost Savings from Consumption of Pulses: A Cost-Of-Illness Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. H. Abdullah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of dietary pulses, including beans, peas and lentils, is recommended by health authorities across jurisdictions for their nutritional value and effectiveness in helping to prevent and manage major diet-related illnesses of significant socioeconomic burden. The aim of this study was to estimate the potential annual healthcare and societal cost savings relevant to rates of reduction in complications from type 2 diabetes (T2D and incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD following a low glycemic index (GI or high fiber diet that includes pulses, or 100 g/day pulse intake in Canada, respectively. A four-step cost-of-illness analysis was conducted to: (1 estimate the proportions of individuals who are likely to consume pulses; (2 evaluate the reductions in established risk factors for T2D and CVD; (3 assess the percent reduction in incidences or complications of the diseases of interest; and (4 calculate the potential annual savings in relevant healthcare and related costs. A low GI or high fiber diet that includes pulses and 100 g/day pulse intake were shown to potentially yield Can$6.2 (95% CI $2.6–$9.9 to Can$62.4 (95% CI $26–$98.8 and Can$31.6 (95% CI $11.1–$52 to Can$315.5 (95% CI $110.6–$520.4 million in savings on annual healthcare and related costs of T2D and CVD, respectively. Specific provincial/territorial analyses suggested annual T2D and CVD related cost savings that ranged from up to Can$0.2 million in some provinces to up to Can$135 million in others. In conclusion, with regular consumption of pulse crops, there is a potential opportunity to facilitate T2D and CVD related socioeconomic cost savings that could be applied to Canadian healthcare or re-assigned to other priority domains. Whether these potential cost savings will be offset by other healthcare costs associated with longevity and diseases of the elderly is to be investigated over the long term.

  1. Risk of latent TB infection in individuals employed in the healthcare sector in Germany: a multicentre prevalence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harling Melanie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare workers are still recognised as a high-risk group for latent TB infection (LTBI. Therefore, the screening of people employed in the healthcare sector for active and LTBI is fundamental to infection control programmes in German hospitals. It was the aim of the study to determine the prevalence and putative risk factors of LTBI. Methods We tested 2028 employees in the healthcare sector with the QuantiFERON-Gold In-tube (QFT-IT test between December 2005 and May 2009, either in the course of contact tracing or in serial testing of TB high-risk groups following German OSH legislation. Results A positive IGRA was found in 9.9% of the healthcare workers (HCWs. Nurses and physicians showed similar prevalence rates (9.7% to 9.6%. Analysed by occupational group, the highest prevalence was found in administration staff and ancillary nursing staff (17.4% and 16.7%. None of the individuals in the trainee group showed a positive IGRA result. In the different workplaces the observed prevalence was 14.7% in administration, 12.0% in geriatric care, 14.2% in technicians (radiology, laboratory and pathology, 6.5% in admission ward staff and 8.3% in the staff of pulmonary/infectious disease wards. Putative risk factors for LTBI were age (>55 years: OR14.7, 95% CI 5.1-42.1, being foreign-born (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.4-2.8, TB in the individual's own history (OR 4.96, 95% CI 1.99-12.3 and previous positive TST results (OR 3.5, 95% CI 2.4-4.98. We observed no statistically significant association with gender, BCG vaccination, workplace or profession. Conclusion The prevalence of LTBI in low-incidence countries depends on age. We found no positive IGRA results among trainees in the healthcare sector. Incidence studies are needed to assess the infection risk. Pre-employment screening might be helpful in this endeavour.

  2. Complexity leadership: a healthcare imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberg, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The healthcare system is plagued with increasing cost and poor quality outcomes. A major contributing factor for these issues is that outdated leadership practices, such as leader-centricity, linear thinking, and poor readiness for innovation, are being used in healthcare organizations. Complexity leadership theory provides a new framework with which healthcare leaders may practice leadership. Complexity leadership theory conceptualizes leadership as a continual process that stems from collaboration, complex systems thinking, and innovation mindsets. Compared to transactional and transformational leadership concepts, complexity leadership practices hold promise to improve cost and quality in health care. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. PUBLIC FINANCING OF HEALTHCARE SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bem

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare in Poland is mainly financed by public sector entities, among them the National Health Fund (NFZ, state budget and local government budgets. The task of the National Health Fund, as the main payer in the system, is chiefly currently financing the services. The state budget plays a complementary role in the system, and finances selected groups of services, health insurance premiums and investments in healthcare infrastructure. The basic role of the local governments is to ensure access to the services, mostly by performing ownership functions towards healthcare institutions.

  4. Improving healthcare using Lean processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, G Ross

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, healthcare organizations across Canada have been using Lean management tools to improve care processes, reduce preventable adverse events, increase patient satisfaction and create better work environments. The largest system-wide effort in Canada, and perhaps anywhere, is currently under way in Saskatchewan. The jury is still out on whether Lean efforts in that province, or elsewhere in Canada, are robust enough to transform current delivery systems and sustain new levels of performance. This issue of Healthcare Quarterly features several articles that provide a perspective on Lean methods in healthcare. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  5. The Impact of Trauma Exposure and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder on Healthcare Utilization Among Primary Care Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartha, Anand; Brower, Victoria; Saitz, Richard; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Keane, Terence M.; Liebschutz, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Background Trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increase healthcare utilization in veterans, but their impact on utilization in other populations is uncertain. Objectives To examine the association of trauma exposure and PTSD with healthcare utilization, in civilian primary care patients. Research Design Cross-sectional study. Subjects English speaking patients at an academic, urban primary care clinic. Measures Trauma exposure and current PTSD diagnoses were obtained from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Outcomes were nonmental health outpatient and emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and mental health outpatient visits in the prior year from an electronic medical record. Analyses included bivariate unadjusted and multivariable Poisson regressions adjusted for age, gender, income, substance dependence, depression, and comorbidities. Results Among 592 subjects, 80% had ≥1 trauma exposure and 22% had current PTSD. In adjusted regressions, subjects with trauma exposure had more mental health visits [incidence rate ratio (IRR), 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–14.1] but no other increased utilization. After adjusting for PTSD, this effect of trauma exposure was attenuated (IRR, 3.2; 95% CI, 0.9–11.7). Subjects with PTSD had more hospitalizations (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4–3.7), more hospital nights (IRR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4–5.0), and more mental health visits (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1–4.1) but no increase in outpatient and emergency department visits. Conclusions PTSD is associated with more hospitalizations, longer hospitalizations, and greater mental healthcare utilization in urban primary care patients. Although trauma exposure is independently associated with greater mental healthcare utilization, PTSD mediates a portion of this association. PMID:18362818

  6. Incidence and predictors of oral feeding intolerance in acute pancreatitis: A systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Melody G; Asrani, Varsha M; Bharmal, Sakina; Wu, Landy M; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-06-01

    Tolerance of oral food is an important criterion for hospital discharge in patients with acute pancreatitis. Patients who develop oral feeding intolerance have prolonged hospitalisation, use additional healthcare resources, and have impaired quality of life. This study aimed to quantify the incidence of oral feeding intolerance, the effect of confounders, and determine the best predictors of oral feeding intolerance. Clinical studies indexed in three electronic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were reviewed. Incidence and predictor data were meta-analysed and possible confounders were investigated by meta-regression analysis. A total of 22 studies with 2024 patients met the inclusion criteria, 17 of which (with 1550 patients) were suitable for meta-analysis. The incidence of oral feeding intolerance was 16.3%, and was not affected by WHO region, age, sex, or aetiology of acute pancreatitis. Nine of the 22 studies investigated a total of 62 different predictors of oral feeding intolerance. Serum lipase level prior to refeeding, pleural effusions, (peri)pancreatic collections, Ranson score, and Balthazar score were found to be statistically significant in meta-analyses. Oral feeding intolerance affects approximately 1 in 6 patients with acute pancreatitis. Serum lipase levels of more than 2.5 times the upper limit of normal prior to refeeding is a potentially useful threshold to identify patients at high risk of developing oral feeding intolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. Study of bacterial flora associated with mobile phones of healthcare workers and non-healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morubagal, Raghavendra Rao; Shivappa, Sowmya Govindanahalli; Mahale, Rashmi Padmanabha; Neelambike, Sumana Mhadevaiah

    2017-06-01

    Despite improvements in modern diagnosis and therapies, hospital acquired infections remain a leading problem of global health systems. Healthcare workers mobile phones is a reservoir for potential pathogens. Despite the high possibility of being contaminated, mobile phones are rarely clean and are often touched during or after examination of patients and handling of specimens without proper hand washing. The main objective of the present study was to isolate, identify different types of bacteria and their antibiotic sensitivity from mobile phones of healthcare workers and non-health-care workers. Samples were collected aseptically by rolling over the exposed surfaces of the mobile phones inoculated on the agar plates and incubated aerobically. After incubation, plates were examined for growth. Bacteria were identified and antibiotic sensitivity was tested as per standard microbiological procedures. In this study a total of 175 samples were examined, out of which 125 samples were from healthcare workers (HCWs), 50 samples were from non-healthcare workers (non-HCWs). Among the mobile phones of HCW's from ICUs, Acinetobacter baumannii (36.84%) was the predominant organism isolated followed by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (21.05%). Predominant organism isolated from HCW's in operation theater theater was MRSA (46.66%). Out of 50 worker's non-HCWs mobile phones samples cultured, 23 (46.00%) samples yielded growth of six different types of bacteria. Our study reveals that there is definite colonization of bacteria on mobile phones of the HCWs. It is not only capable of transferring message but also disease-producing microbes. In order to reduce incidence of nosocomial infections, there should be implementation of hand washing practices and regulations around the use of mobile telephones in hospital settings.

  8. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding dengue infection among public sector healthcare providers in Machala, Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Handel, Andrew S.; Ayala, Efra?n Beltr?n; Borbor-Cordova, Mercy J.; Fessler, Abigail G.; Finkelstein, Julia L.; Espinoza, Roberto Xavier Robalino; Ryan, Sadie J.; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is a rapidly emerging infection throughout the tropics and subtropics with extensive public health burden. Adequate training of healthcare providers is crucial to reducing infection incidence through patient education and collaboration with public health authorities. We examined how public sector healthcare providers in a dengue-endemic region of Ecuador view and manage dengue infections, with a focus on the 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) Dengue Guidelines. Metho...

  9. Importance of healthcare utilization and multimorbidity level in choosing a primary care provider in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranstad, Karin; Midlöv, Patrik; Halling, Anders

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the associations between active choice of primary care provider and healthcare utilization, multimorbidity, age, and sex, comparing data from primary care and all healthcare in a Swedish population. DESIGN: Descriptive cross-sectional study using descriptive analyses including t...

  10. Mycobacterium abscessus in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sepsis Sharps Safety - CDC Transplant Safety Vaccine Safety Mycobacterium abscessus in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Mycobacterium abscessus Recommendations and Guidelines General information about Mycobacterium abscessus Mycobacterium abscessus [mī–kō–bak–tair–ee– ...

  11. Business process modeling in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Francisco; Garcia, Felix; Calahorra, Luis; Llorente, César; Gonçalves, Luis; Daniel, Christel; Blobel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the process point of view is not restricted to a specific enterprise sector. In the field of health, as a result of the nature of the service offered, health institutions' processes are also the basis for decision making which is focused on achieving their objective of providing quality medical assistance. In this chapter the application of business process modelling - using the Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) standard is described. Main challenges of business process modelling in healthcare are the definition of healthcare processes, the multi-disciplinary nature of healthcare, the flexibility and variability of the activities involved in health care processes, the need of interoperability between multiple information systems, and the continuous updating of scientific knowledge in healthcare.

  12. Recommended Vaccines for Healthcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for vaccinating HCWs. HCW web button Place this web button on your website so HCWs can quickly access this page to see what vaccines they need. Healthcare personnel resources from Immunization ...

  13. Visioning future emergency healthcare collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2010-01-01

    physicians, nurses, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals working at large and small medical centers, and asked them to share their perspectives regarding 3DMC's potential benefits and disadvantages in emergency healthcare and its compatibility and/or lack thereof...

  14. Lean Six Sigma in Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, H.; Verver, J.P.S.; van den Heuvel, J.; Bisgaard, S.; Does, R.J.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: Cost reduction; efficiency; innovation; quality improvement; service management. Abstract Healthcare, as any other service operation, requires systematic innovation efforts to remain competitive, cost efficient and up to date. In this article, we outline a methodology and present examples

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sepsis Sharps Safety - CDC Transplant Safety Vaccine Safety Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  16. Healthcare information technology and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Thomas H; Bates, David W; Berner, Eta S; Bernstam, Elmer V; Covvey, H Dominic; Frisse, Mark E; Graf, Thomas; Greenes, Robert A; Hoffer, Edward P; Kuperman, Gil; Lehmann, Harold P; Liang, Louise; Middleton, Blackford; Omenn, Gilbert S; Ozbolt, Judy

    2013-01-01

    At the 2011 American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) Winter Symposium we studied the overlap between health IT and economics and what leading healthcare delivery organizations are achieving today using IT that might offer paths for the nation to follow for using health IT in healthcare reform. We recognized that health IT by itself can improve health value, but its main contribution to health value may be that it can make possible new care delivery models to achieve much larger value. Health IT is a critically important enabler to fundamental healthcare system changes that may be a way out of our current, severe problem of rising costs and national deficit. We review the current state of healthcare costs, federal health IT stimulus programs, and experiences of several leading organizations, and offer a model for how health IT fits into our health economic future.

  17. Narrative medicine and healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradley E

    2011-03-01

    Narrative medicine is one of medicine's most important internal reforms, and it should be a critical dimension of healthcare debate. Healthcare reform must eventually ask not only how do we pay for healthcare and how do we distribute it, but more fundamentally, what kind of healthcare do we want? It must ask, in short, what are the goals of medicine? Yet, even though narrative medicine is crucial to answering these pivotal and inescapable questions, it is not easy to describe. Many of its core claims go against the grain of common sense thinking about medicine. This article argues that the best way to understand narrative medicine is to tell a story that puts its emergence in historical context.

  18. Leveraging Digital Innovation in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Carol V.; Jensen, Tina Blegind; Aanestad, Margun

    2014-01-01

    and security concerns, fragmented markets, and misaligned incentives across stakeholders. The panel will focus on this apparent paradox and highlight the potential of big data, cloud and mobile computing for achieving better health. The panel co-chairs will introduce differences in healthcare delivery...... investments in digital infrastructures. New technologies are leveraged to achieve widespread 24x7 disease management, patients’ wellbeing, home-based healthcare and other patient-centric service innovations. Yet, digital innovations in healthcare face barriers in terms of standardization, data privacy...... landscapes in selected countries. Then panelists with expertise in digital data streams, cloud, and mobile computing will present concrete examples of healthcare service innovations that have the potential to address one or more of the global goals. ECIS attendees are invited to join a debate about...

  19. Applying lean principles in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare is charged to do more with less and improve patient satisfaction at the same time in order to balance the bottom line. Lean is a proven and effective way to remove waste, identify issues, and successfully implement change. The principle of Lean is based on the reality that there are value added and non-value added processes in every workflow. To improve quality and reduce loss, the non-value added processes need to be eliminated. In healthcare, value is determined from the perspective of the patient. While not exhaustive of the Lean processes that a healthcare system can employ, this article provides a general outline of Lean, definitions, and its benefits to any healthcare organization.

  20. Control of corruption in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal

    2015-01-01

    A recently published article on corruption in Indian healthcare in the BMJ has triggered a hot debate and numerous responses (1, 2, 3, 4). We do agree that corruption in Indian healthcare is a colossal issue and needs to be tackled urgently (5). However, we want to highlight that corruption in healthcare is not a local phenomenon confined to the Indian subcontinent, though India does serve as a good case study and intervention area due to the magnitude of the problem and the country's large population (6). Good governance, strict rules, transparency and zero tolerance are some of the strategies prescribed everywhere to tackle corruption. However, those entrusted with implementing good governance and strict rules in India need to go through a process of introspection to carry out their duties in a responsible fashion. At present, it looks like a no-win situation. In this article, we recommend education in medical ethics as the major intervention for dealing with corruption in healthcare.

  1. Exploitation of Clustering Techniques in Transactional Healthcare Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Ahmad Mahoto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare service centres equipped with electronic health systems have improved their resources as well as treatment processes. The dynamic nature of healthcare data of each individual makes it complex and difficult for physicians to manually mediate them; therefore, automatic techniques are essential to manage the quality and standardization of treatment procedures. Exploratory data analysis, patternanalysis and grouping of data is managed using clustering techniques, which work as an unsupervised classification. A number of healthcare applications are developed that use several data mining techniques for classification, clustering and extracting useful information from healthcare data. The challenging issue in this domain is to select adequate data mining algorithm for optimal results. This paper exploits three different clustering algorithms: DBSCAN (Density-Based Clustering, agglomerative hierarchical and k-means in real transactional healthcare data of diabetic patients (taken as case study to analyse their performance in large and dispersed healthcare data. The best solution of cluster sets among the exploited algorithms is evaluated using clustering quality indexes and is selected to identify the possible subgroups of patients having similar treatment patterns

  2. Perceived risk of tuberculosis infection among healthcare workers in Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hao Weng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of tuberculosis (TB in the Kingdom of Swaziland is extremely high. How healthcare workers (HCWs in Swaziland perceive infection control (IC measures for preventing TB transmission is unclear. This study aimed to determine perceived risk of TB infection in relation to IC measures among HCWs in three institutions of Swaziland. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in 2014. Demographic data and IC measures were collected from main and allied HCWs. Results In total, 186 HCWs (19 doctors, 99 nurses, and 68 allied HCWs were enrolled. The multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that nurses (OR = 39.87, 95% CI = 2.721–584.3 and other HCWs (OR =99.34, 95% CI = 7.469–1321 perceived a higher TB infection risk than did doctors. Moreover, HCWs working for <4 years at the TB department perceived a lower TB infection risk (OR = 0.099, 95% CI = 0.022–0.453. Availability of N95 respirator masks (OR = 0.055, 95% CI = 0.005–0.586 and a designated sputum collection area (OR = 0.142, 95% CI = 0.037–0.545 also carried lower TB infection risks. Conclusion This study depicts the current status of IC measures for TB infection in a high prevalence country. The results suggest that HCWs perceived a greater TB infection risk at inadequate environmental IC measures.

  3. Machine learning in healthcare informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, U; Dua, Prerna

    2014-01-01

    The book is a unique effort to represent a variety of techniques designed to represent, enhance, and empower multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional machine learning research in healthcare informatics. The book provides a unique compendium of current and emerging machine learning paradigms for healthcare informatics and reflects the diversity, complexity and the depth and breath of this multi-disciplinary area. The integrated, panoramic view of data and machine learning techniques can provide an opportunity for novel clinical insights and discoveries.

  4. Beyond patient care: the impact of healthcare reform on job satisfaction in the Ethiopian public healthcare sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyazewal, Tsegahun; Matlakala, Mokgadi C

    2017-02-03

    While healthcare reform has been a central attention for local governments, its impact on job satisfaction is poorly understood. This study aimed to determine the impact of healthcare reform on job satisfaction in the public healthcare sector in Ethiopia. The study was designed as a facility-based cross-sectional survey of healthcare professionals and carried out in all public hospitals in central Ethiopia which have been implementing healthcare reform (n = 5). All healthcare professionals in the hospitals who were involved in the reform from the inception (n = 476) were purposively sourced to complete a self-administered questionnaire adapted from a framework proposed for measuring job satisfaction of health professionals in sub-Saharan Africa. Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin and Bartlett's tests were conducted to measure sampling adequacy and sphericity for factor analysis. Likert's transformation formula was used to numerically analyse the satisfaction level of the respondents and to determine the cut-off value of satisfaction levels. Non-parametric and multiple logistic regression analysis were conducted to determine predictors of job satisfaction. A total of 410 healthcare professionals completed the survey, representing an 88% response rate. The median and mean job satisfaction scores were 50 and 49, respectively, on a scale 1-100, which was equivalent to 'Job dissatisfied' on the Likert scale. Only 25% of respondents perceived job satisfaction due to implementation of the reform. Moral satisfaction (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 177.65; 95% confidence interval (CI), 59.54-530.08), management style (aOR, 4.02; 95% CI, 1.49-10.83), workload (aOR, 2.42; 95% CI, 0.93-6.34), and task (aOR, 5.49; 95% CI, 2.31-13.07) were the most significant predictors. Job satisfaction results were significantly different among the study hospitals (χ 2  = 30.56, p healthcare reform significantly and negatively influences public healthcare professionals' job satisfaction and its

  5. Critical incident stress management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J J; Childs, J; Gonsalves, K

    2000-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated implementation of the CISM Program has impacted and reduced the cost of workers' compensation claims for stress related conditions and the number of lost work days (Ott, 1997; Western Management Consultants, 1996). Occupational health professionals need to be ready to develop and implement a comprehensive critical incident stress management process in anticipation of a major event. The ability to organize, lead, or administer critical incident stress debriefings for affected employees is a key role for the occupational health professional. Familiarity with these concepts and the ability to identify a critical incident enhances value to the business by mitigating the stress and impact to the workplace. Critical Incident Stress Management Systems have the potential for decreasing stress and restoring employees to normal life function--a win/win situation for both the employees and the organization.

  6. Marine Animal Incident Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Large whale stranding, death, ship strike and entanglement incidents are all recorded to monitor the health of each population and track anthropogenic factors that...

  7. Police Incident Blotter (Archive)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Police Blotter Archive contains crime incident data after it has been validated and processed to meet Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) standards, published on a...

  8. Prediction of Safety Incidents

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Safety incidents, including injuries, property damage and mission failures, cost NASA and contractors thousands of dollars in direct and indirect costs. This project...

  9. 2011 Japanese Nuclear Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s RadNet system monitored the environmental radiation levels in the United States and parts of the Pacific following the Japanese Nuclear Incident. Learn about EPA’s response and view historical laboratory data and news releases.

  10. Designing the future of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidsa, Gianfranco Zaccai

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a holistic design process to a variety of problems plaguing current healthcare systems. A design process for addressing complex, multifaceted problems is contrasted with the piecemeal application of technological solutions to specific medical or administrative problems. The goal of this design process is the ideal customer experience, specifically the ideal experience for patients, healthcare providers, and caregivers within a healthcare system. Holistic design is shown to be less expensive and wasteful in the long run because it avoids solving one problem within a complex system at the cost of creating other problems within that system. The article applies this approach to the maintenance of good health throughout life; to the creation of an ideal experience when a person does need medical care; to the maintenance of personal independence as one ages; and to the enjoyment of a comfortable and dignified death. Virginia Mason Medical Center is discussed as an example of a healthcare institution attempting to create ideal patient and caregiver experiences, in this case by applying the principles of the Toyota Production System ("lean manufacturing") to healthcare. The article concludes that healthcare is inherently dedicated to an ideal, that science and technology have brought it closer to that ideal, and that design can bring it closer still.

  11. Six Sigma in healthcare delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to conduct a comprehensive review and assessment of the extant Six Sigma healthcare literature, focusing on: application, process changes initiated and outcomes, including improvements in process metrics, cost and revenue. Data were obtained from an extensive literature search. Healthcare Six Sigma applications were categorized by functional area and department, key process metric, cost savings and revenue generation (if any) and other key implementation characteristics. Several inpatient care areas have seen most applications, including admission, discharge, medication administration, operating room (OR), cardiac and intensive care. About 42.1 percent of the applications have error rate as their driving metric, with the remainder focusing on process time (38 percent) and productivity (18.9 percent). While 67 percent had initial improvement in the key process metric, only 10 percent reported sustained improvement. Only 28 percent reported cost savings and 8 percent offered revenue enhancement. These results do not favorably assess Six Sigma's overall effectiveness and the value it offers healthcare. Results are based on reported applications. Future research can include directly surveying healthcare organizations to provide additional data for assessment. Future application should emphasize obtaining improvements that lead to significant and sustainable value. Healthcare staff can use the results to target promising areas. This article comprehensively assesses Six Sigma healthcare applications and impact.

  12. Healthcare Quality: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Duck, Angela; Robinson, Jennifer C; Stewart, Mary W

    2017-10-01

    Worsening quality indicators of health care shake public trust. Although safety and quality of care in hospitals can be improved, healthcare quality remains conceptually and operationally vague. Therefore, the aim of this analysis is to clarify the concept of healthcare quality. Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis, the most commonly used in nursing literature, provided the framework. We searched general and medical dictionaries, public domain websites, and 5 academic literature databases. Search terms included health care and quality, as well as healthcare and quality. Peer-reviewed articles and government publications published in English from 2004 to 2016 were included. Exclusion criteria were related concepts, discussions about the need for quality care, gray literature, and conference proceedings. Similar attributes were grouped into themes during analysis. Forty-two relevant articles were analyzed after excluding duplicates and those that did not meet eligibility. Following thematic analysis, 4 defining attributes were identified: (1) effective, (2) safe, (3) culture of excellence, and (4) desired outcomes. Based on these attributes, the definition of healthcare quality is the assessment and provision of effective and safe care, reflected in a culture of excellence, resulting in the attainment of optimal or desired health. This analysis proposes a conceptualization of healthcare quality that defines its implied foundational components and has potential to improve the provision of quality care. Theoretical and practice implications presented promote a fuller, more consistent understanding of the components that are necessary to improve the provision of healthcare and steady public trust. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. LEAN thinking in Finnish healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorma, Tapani; Tiirinki, Hanna; Bloigu, Risto; Turkki, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to evaluate how LEAN thinking is used as a management and development tool in the Finnish public healthcare system and what kind of outcomes have been achieved or expected by using it. The main focus is in managing and developing patient and treatment processes. Design/methodology/approach - A mixed-method approach incorporating the Webropol survey was used. Findings - LEAN is quite a new concept in Finnish public healthcare. It is mainly used as a development tool to seek financial savings and to improve the efficiency of patient processes, but has not yet been deeply implemented. However, the experiences from LEAN initiatives have been positive, and the methodology is already quite well-known. It can be concluded that, because of positive experiences from LEAN, the environment in Finnish healthcare is ready for the deeper implementation of LEAN. Originality/value - This paper evaluates the usage of LEAN thinking for the first time in the public healthcare system of Finland as a development tool and a management system. It highlights the implementation and achieved results of LEAN thinking when used in the healthcare environment. It also highlights the expectations for LEAN thinking in Finnish public healthcare.

  14. A prescription for Lean healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of Lean in the healthcare industry has been an important advancement, and not just for healthcare management. Evidence suggests that Lean can improve labour and capital efficiencies, reduce the throughput time for patients and enhance the quality of care. However, the adoption of Lean has generated large variations in results and even wider-ranging suggestions on how to implement Lean in a healthcare setting. In this article, the author examines three very similar hospitals that implemented Lean in the emergency department during the same time. Through an examination of longitudinal data and a collection of unstructured interviews, the author found that implementation does make a substantial difference to long-term results. Although the presence of strong and persistent leadership can have favourable results on performance in the short term, these performance improvements are not sustainable. To have a long-term impact, healthcare providers need to engage all of the stakeholders in the healthcare system and create a culture that is continuously focused on the improvement of the patient healthcare experience. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  15. Information Security Incident Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Persanov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The present report highlights the points of information security incident management in an enterprise. Some aspects of the incident and event classification are given. The author presents his view of the process scheme over the monitoring and processing information security events. Also, the report determines a few critical points of the listed process and gives the practical recommendations over its development and optimization.

  16. [Healthcare mistreatment attributed to discrimination among mapuche patients and discontinuation of diabetes care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Manuel S; Baeza-Rivera, María José; Salinas-Oñate, Natalia; Flynn, Patricia; Betancourt, Héctor

    2016-10-01

    The negative impact of perceived discrimination on health outcomes is well established. However, less attention has been directed towards understanding the effect of perceived discrimination on health behaviors relevant for the treatment of diabetes in ethnic minorities. To examine the effects of healthcare mistreatment attributed to discrimination on the continuity of Type 2 Diabetes (DM2) care among mapuche patients in a southern region of Chile. A non-probabilistic sample of 85 mapuche DM2 patients were recruited from public and private health systems. Eligibility criteria included having experienced at least one incident of interpersonal healthcare mistreatment. All participants answered an instrument designed to measure healthcare mistreatment and continuity of diabetes care. Healthcare mistreatment attributed to ethnic discrimination was associated with the discontinuation of diabetes care. Healthcare mistreatment attributed to discrimination negatively impacted the continuity of diabetes care, a fact which may provide a better understanding of health disparities in ethnic minorities.

  17. Air Force Health Care Providers Incidence of Performing Testicular Exams and Instruction of Testicular Self-Exam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Nicola

    1999-01-01

    ...) within an Air Force healthcare setting. The study is also designed to determine any significant differences among providers, Family Practice Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, and Physicians Assistants, regarding the incidence of performing...

  18. Using Balanced Scorecard on Reducing Fall Incidents and Injuries Among Elderly Cancer Patients in a Medical Center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Mei Tsai

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of present study provided references to healthcare institutes using balanced scorecard management strategies as intervention to reduce to fall incidents and injuries in elderly cancer patients and to prompt patient safety and quality of care.

  19. Health Literacy Impact on National Healthcare Utilization and Expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafia Rasu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Health literacy presents an enormous challenge in the delivery of effective healthcare and quality outcomes. We evaluated the impact of low health literacy (LHL on healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditure. Methods Database analysis used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS from 2005-2008 which provides nationally representative estimates of healthcare utilization and expenditure. Health literacy scores (HLSs were calculated based on a validated, predictive model and were scored according to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL. HLS ranged from 0-500. Health literacy level (HLL and categorized in 2 groups: Below basic or basic (HLS <226 and above basic (HLS ≥226. Healthcare utilization expressed as a physician, nonphysician, or emergency room (ER visits and healthcare spending. Expenditures were adjusted to 2010 rates using the Consumer Price Index (CPI. A Pvalue of 0.05 or less was the criterion for statistical significance in all analyses. Multivariate regression models assessed the impact of the predicted HLLs on outpatient healthcare utilization and expenditures. All analyses were performed with SAS and STATA®11.0 statistical software. Results The study evaluated 22 599 samples representing 503 374 648 weighted individuals nationally from 2005-2008. The cohort had an average age of 49 years and included more females (57%. Caucasian were the predominant racial ethnic group (83% and 37% of the cohort were from the South region of the United States of America. The proportion of the cohort with basic or below basic health literacy was 22.4%. Annual predicted values of physician visits, nonphysician visits, and ER visits were 6.6, 4.8, and 0.2, respectively, for basic or below basic compared to 4.4, 2.6, and 0.1 for above basic. Predicted values of office and ER visits expenditures were $1284 and $151, respectively, for basic or below basic and $719 and $100 for above basic (P < .05. The extrapolated national

  20. Technology-related medication errors in a tertiary hospital: a 5-year analysis of reported medication incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, N R; Cheung, S T D; Chui, W C M; Cheung, B M Y

    2012-12-01

    Healthcare technology is meant to reduce medication errors. The objective of this study was to assess unintended errors related to technologies in the medication use process. Medication incidents reported from 2006 to 2010 in a main tertiary care hospital were analysed by a pharmacist and technology-related errors were identified. Technology-related errors were further classified as socio-technical errors and device errors. This analysis was conducted using data from medication incident reports which may represent only a small proportion of medication errors that actually takes place in a hospital. Hence, interpretation of results must be tentative. 1538 medication incidents were reported. 17.1% of all incidents were technology-related, of which only 1.9% were device errors, whereas most were socio-technical errors (98.1%). Of these, 61.2% were linked to computerised prescription order entry, 23.2% to bar-coded patient identification labels, 7.2% to infusion pumps, 6.8% to computer-aided dispensing label generation and 1.5% to other technologies. The immediate causes for technology-related errors included, poor interface between user and computer (68.1%), improper procedures or rule violations (22.1%), poor interface between user and infusion pump (4.9%), technical defects (1.9%) and others (3.0%). In 11.4% of the technology-related incidents, the error was detected after the drug had been administered. A considerable proportion of all incidents were technology-related. Most errors were due to socio-technical issues. Unintended and unanticipated errors may happen when using technologies. Therefore, when using technologies, system improvement, awareness, training and monitoring are needed to minimise medication errors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sea Kayaking Incidents in Norway 2000-2014: An Issue of Bad Weather or Poor Judgement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadland, Eivind; Noer, Gunnar; Vikene, Odd Lennart

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse recreational sea kayaking and touring incidents in Norway with a specific focus on wind conditions and to elaborate on practical implications for the prevention of future incidents. We included 49 incidents reported by the media between 2000 and 2014. Incidents occurred in various wind conditions, but most…

  2. Patient safety incidents associated with obesity: a review of reports to the National Patient Safety Agency and recommendations for hospital practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, C M A; Moore, C E; Eddleston, J; Sharman, M; Atkinson, D; Moore, J A

    2011-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of obesity are increasing world wide. In the UK, obesity governmental strategy has primarily focused on prevention measures, with less focus on the demands of treating obese patients in hospital. Increasing service demand by obese patients coupled with a lack of adequate provision for care of these patients may lead to an increase in patient safety incidents. By classifying patient safety incidents associated with obesity reported to the National Patient Safety Agency, this report aims to identify areas for improvement in the quality and safety of care of the obese patient. A search of the National Reporting and Learning System database was conducted for all incidents caused by or relating to obesity for the period 1 January 2005 to 31 August 2008. The keywords 'obesity', 'overweight', 'BMI' (body mass index), and 'bariatric' were used. The relevant free text fields of the resulting set of incidents were then searched for the terms designed to isolate incidents occurring in anaesthesia, critical care, and surgery. Reported incidents were analysed and subsequently categorised to identify incident themes. Levels of harm were also established. 555 patient safety incidents were identified; 388 met inclusion criteria for analysis. 148 incidents were related to assessment, diagnosis or treatment, 213 related to infrastructure and 27 related to staffing. The majority of incidents were classified as no or low harm. Three deaths were reported, all within the domain of anaesthesia. This report identifies that the majority of safety incidents associated with obesity were related to infrastructure, suggesting that there is inadequate provision in place for the care of obese patients. While levels of harm were mostly low, the occurrence of incidents resulting in severe harm or death highlights the specific dangers associated with the care of the obese patient. A global approach to improving the safety of care delivery for obese patients is

  3. Healthcare utilization among Hispanic immigrants with diabetes: investigating the effect of US documentation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Elizabeth K; Matsuyama, Robin K

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have not examined whether documentation status has an effect on healthcare utilization among US Hispanic immigrants with diabetes. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the Pew Hispanic Center and Robert Johnson Wood Foundation's 2007 Hispanic Healthcare Survey. Hispanic immigrants diagnosed with diabetes were included in analyses. The association between documentation status and healthcare utilization was assessed using logistic regressions. Of N = 577 Hispanic immigrants with diabetes, 80 % were documented immigrants and 81% reported having visited a healthcare provider in the last 6 months. Adjusting for confounders, those who were undocumented faced higher odds of having seen a healthcare provider more than 6 months ago or never when compared to those who were documented (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.01, 3.14). Unique opportunities in addressing healthcare disparities can be found in focusing on the Hispanic immigrant population living with diabetes.

  4. Healthcare waste management research: A structured analysis and review (2005-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vikas; Ramesh, A

    2015-10-01

    The importance of healthcare waste management in preserving the environment and protecting the public cannot be denied. Past research has dealt with various issues in healthcare waste management and disposal, which spreads over various journals, pipeline research disciplines and research communities. Hence, this article analyses this scattered knowledge in a systematic manner, considering the period between January 2005 and July 2014. The purpose of this study is to: (i) identify the trends in healthcare waste management literature regarding journals published; (ii) main topics of research in healthcare waste management; (iii) methodologies used in healthcare waste management research; (iv) areas most frequently researched by researchers; and (v) determine the scope of future research in healthcare waste management. To this end, the authors conducted a systematic review of 176 articles on healthcare waste management taken from the following eight esteemed journals: International Journal of Environmental Health Research, International Journal of Healthcare Quality Assurance, Journal of Environmental Management, Journal of Hazardous Material, Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management, Resources, Conservations and Recycling, Waste Management, and Waste Management & Research. The authors have applied both quantitative and qualitative approaches for analysis, and results will be useful in the following ways: (i) results will show importance of healthcare waste management in healthcare operations; (ii) findings will give a comparative view of the various publications; (c) study will shed light on future research areas. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Healthcare waste management in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prem Ananth, A.; Prashanthini, V.; Visvanathan, C.

    2010-01-01

    The risks associated with healthcare waste and its management has gained attention across the world in various events, local and international forums and summits. However, the need for proper healthcare waste management has been gaining recognition slowly due to the substantial disease burdens associated with poor practices, including exposure to infectious agents and toxic substances. Despite the magnitude of the problem, practices, capacities and policies in many countries in dealing with healthcare waste disposal, especially developing nations, is inadequate and requires intensification. This paper looks upon aspects to drive improvements to the existing healthcare waste management situation. The paper places recommendation based on a 12 country study reflecting the current status. The paper does not advocate for any complex technology but calls for changes in mindset of all concerned stakeholders and identifies five important aspects for serious consideration. Understanding the role of governments and healthcare facilities, the paper also outlines three key areas for prioritized action for both parties - budget support, developing policies and legislation and technology and knowledge management.

  6. Healthcare experiences of the homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickasch, Bonnie; Marnocha, Suzanne K

    2009-01-01

    To explore the healthcare experiences of homeless individuals and inform providers of the barriers created by the situation of homelessness. This was a qualitative research study using a grounded theory approach. The sample included homeless individuals older than 18 years living in northeastern Wisconsin. This research provided rich insight into the healthcare experiences of the homeless. Five key conclusions were made: (a) the great majority of homeless people have an external locus of control; (b) most homeless individuals lack the necessary resources to meet their physical needs of shelter, air, water, and food; (c) most homeless individuals lack the financial resources to seek adequate health care; (d) access to resources is limited because of poor transportation, telephones, and mail; and (e) all those interviewed felt that healthcare providers lack compassion for the homeless. Healthcare providers can use the concepts discovered in this study to help improve their skills and comfort level when working with homeless individuals. A decrease in acute illnesses and an increase in the effective management of chronic disease resulting in fewer long-term complications and medical costs because of these unnecessary complications could be seen. Healthcare professionals may also volunteer to become more involved with the care of the homeless if they are confident in their skills. Improving the health of the homeless in the community will result in improvements in the overall health of the community.

  7. Healthcare waste management in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, A Prem; Prashanthini, V; Visvanathan, C

    2010-01-01

    The risks associated with healthcare waste and its management has gained attention across the world in various events, local and international forums and summits. However, the need for proper healthcare waste management has been gaining recognition slowly due to the substantial disease burdens associated with poor practices, including exposure to infectious agents and toxic substances. Despite the magnitude of the problem, practices, capacities and policies in many countries in dealing with healthcare waste disposal, especially developing nations, is inadequate and requires intensification. This paper looks upon aspects to drive improvements to the existing healthcare waste management situation. The paper places recommendation based on a 12 country study reflecting the current status. The paper does not advocate for any complex technology but calls for changes in mindset of all concerned stakeholders and identifies five important aspects for serious consideration. Understanding the role of governments and healthcare facilities, the paper also outlines three key areas for prioritized action for both parties - budget support, developing policies and legislation and technology and knowledge management.

  8. The Microbiome and Sustainable Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Dietert, Janice M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing prevalences, morbidity, premature mortality and medical needs associated with non-communicable diseases and conditions (NCDs) have reached epidemic proportions and placed a major drain on healthcare systems and global economies. Added to this are the challenges presented by overuse of antibiotics and increased antibiotic resistance. Solutions are needed that can address the challenges of NCDs and increasing antibiotic resistance, maximize preventative measures, and balance healthcare needs with available services and economic realities. Microbiome management including microbiota seeding, feeding, and rebiosis appears likely to be a core component of a path toward sustainable healthcare. Recent findings indicate that: (1) humans are mostly microbial (in terms of numbers of cells and genes); (2) immune dysfunction and misregulated inflammation are pivotal in the majority of NCDs; (3) microbiome status affects early immune education and risk of NCDs, and (4) microbiome status affects the risk of certain infections. Management of the microbiome to reduce later-life health risk and/or to treat emerging NCDs, to spare antibiotic use and to reduce the risk of recurrent infections may provide a more effective healthcare strategy across the life course particularly when a personalized medicine approach is considered. This review will examine the potential for microbiome management to contribute to sustainable healthcare. PMID:27417751

  9. Radiation incidents in dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovelock, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Most dental practitioners act as their own radiographer and radiologist, unlike their medical colleagues. Virtually all dental surgeons have a dental X-ray machine for intraoral radiography available to them and 40% of dental practices have equipment for dental panoramic tomography. Because of the low energy of X-ray equipment used in dentistry, radiation incidents tend to be less serious than those associated with other aspects of patient care. Details of 47 known incidents are given. The advent of the 1985 and 1988 Ionising Radiation Regulations has made dental surgeons more aware of the hazards of radiation. These regulations, and general health and safety legislation, have led to a few dental surgeons facing legal action. Because of the publicity associated with these court cases, it is expected that there will be a decrease in radiation incidents arising from the practice of dentistry. (author)

  10. Automatic Analysis of Critical Incident Reports: Requirements and Use Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, critical incident reports are used as a means to increase patient safety and quality of care. The entire potential of these sources of experiential knowledge remains often unconsidered since retrieval and analysis is difficult and time-consuming, and the reporting systems often do not provide support for these tasks. The objective of this paper is to identify potential use cases for automatic methods that analyse critical incident reports. In more detail, we will describe how faceted search could offer an intuitive retrieval of critical incident reports and how text mining could support in analysing relations among events. To realise an automated analysis, natural language processing needs to be applied. Therefore, we analyse the language of critical incident reports and derive requirements towards automatic processing methods. We learned that there is a huge potential for an automatic analysis of incident reports, but there are still challenges to be solved.

  11. Developing a standardized healthcare cost data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Sue L; Naessens, James M; Yawn, Barbara P; Reinalda, Megan S; Anderson, Stephanie S; Borah, Bijan J

    2017-06-12

    Research addressing value in healthcare requires a measure of cost. While there are many sources and types of cost data, each has strengths and weaknesses. Many researchers appear to create study-specific cost datasets, but the explanations of their costing methodologies are not always clear, causing their results to be difficult to interpret. Our solution, described in this paper, was to use widely accepted costing methodologies to create a service-level, standardized healthcare cost data warehouse from an institutional perspective that includes all professional and hospital-billed services for our patients. The warehouse is based on a National Institutes of Research-funded research infrastructure containing the linked health records and medical care administrative data of two healthcare providers and their affiliated hospitals. Since all patients are identified in the data warehouse, their costs can be linked to other systems and databases, such as electronic health records, tumor registries, and disease or treatment registries. We describe the two institutions' administrative source data; the reference files, which include Medicare fee schedules and cost reports; the process of creating standardized costs; and the warehouse structure. The costing algorithm can create inflation-adjusted standardized costs at the service line level for defined study cohorts on request. The resulting standardized costs contained in the data warehouse can be used to create detailed, bottom-up analyses of professional and facility costs of procedures, medical conditions, and patient care cycles without revealing business-sensitive information. After its creation, a standardized cost data warehouse is relatively easy to maintain and can be expanded to include data from other providers. Individual investigators who may not have sufficient knowledge about administrative data do not have to try to create their own standardized costs on a project-by-project basis because our data

  12. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined.

  13. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S. M. Reza; Beard, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  14. Healthcare innovation – The Epital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesseldal, Louise; Kayser, Lars

    2016-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about how best to organize healthcare innovation. This article introduces and illustrates an alternative way of doing so by studying an emerging informal and inter-organizational network (IION) in practice. Taking an ethnographic research approach, the authors propose...... the concept of a potluck feast to describethe nature of an IION and the dynamics within it. The relationship between the project andthe actors is explored by introducing Steven Brown’s reading of Michel Serres’ concept of the parasite. The unique way of organizing healthcare innovation studied in the article...... the emergence and dynamics of IIONs. In this way, this article contributes to the field of healthcare innovation and how to organize it, and may inspire those who are already in or intend to study this field....

  15. Systems design for remote healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Bonfiglio, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a multidisciplinary overview of the design and implementation of systems for remote patient monitoring and healthcare. Readers are guided step-by-step through the components of such a system and shown how they could be integrated in a coherent framework for deployment in practice. The authors explain planning from subsystem design to complete integration and deployment, given particular application constraints. Readers will benefit from descriptions of the clinical requirements underpinning the entire application scenario, physiological parameter sensing techniques, information processing approaches and overall, application dependent system integration. Each chapter ends with a discussion of practical design challenges and two case studies are included to provide practical examples and design methods for two remote healthcare systems with different needs. ·         Provides a multi-disciplinary overview of next-generation mobile healthcare system design; ·         Includes...

  16. Assessing maternal healthcare inequities among migrants: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Moreira Almeida

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering pregnancy and motherhood as periods of increased vulnerability in migrant women, to characterize the healthcare provided to this collective, we sought to identify and understand patterns of satisfaction and demand of maternal and child healthcare, assessing women’s perceptions about its quality. The study followed a qualitative methodology (semi-structured interviews for collecting and analysing data (content analysis and was conducted in Porto, the second largest city of Portugal. Participants were 25 recent immigrant mothers from Eastern European countries, Brazil, Portuguese-speaking African countries and six native Portuguese recent mothers (for comparison, contacted through social associations and institutions. Data suggests that healthcare depends not only on accessibility but especially on social opportunities. Equitable public health action must provide individuals and groups the equal opportunity to meet their needs, which may not be achieved by providing the same standard if care to all.

  17. Social media disruptive change in healthcare : responses of healthcare providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David

    Social media represent specific types of technologies that are end-user driven and end-users are able to drive disruptive change giving little time to organizations to react. With rapid and powerful emergence of social media communities in healthcare, this sector is faced with new and alternative

  18. Social media disruptive change in healthcare : Responses of healthcare providers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, E.; Boonstra, A.; Langley, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Social media represent specific types of technologies that are end-user driven and end-users are able to drive disruptive change giving little time to organizations to react. With rapid and powerful emergence of social media communities in healthcare, this sector is faced with new and alternative

  19. The Epidemiology of Pheochromocytoma: Increasing incidence and changing clinical presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehoj, A; Søndergaard, Esben; Trolle, Christian

    2017-01-01

    (population 1.75 million).Incidence rates were calculated using Poisson regression and time trends were analysed with year as a continuous explanatory variable. As incidence increased significantly in 2007–2015, we compared the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed in this time interval with patients...

  20. Incidents in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, L.F.; Wienhold, W.

    1976-09-01

    With reference to the incident list of the Ministry for the period 1971-74, Prof. Bechert has expressed a lot of questions and statements in a letter to the Government. The letter is quoted in full. Inadequate conclusions drawn by Prof. Bechert in connection with quotations from daily newspapers and other documents are put right. (HP) [de

  1. Lightning incidents in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myagmar Doljinsuren

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies that has been conducted in Mongolia on the distribution of lightning incidents. The study covers a 10-year period from 2004 to 2013. The country records a human death rate of 15.4 deaths per 10 million people per year, which is much higher than that of many countries with similar isokeraunic level. The reason may be the low-grown vegetation observed in most rural areas of Mongolia, a surface topography, typical to steppe climate. We suggest modifications to Gomes–Kadir equation for such countries, as it predicts a much lower annual death rate for Mongolia. The lightning incidents spread over the period from May to August with the peak of the number of incidents occurring in July. The worst lightning affected region in the country is the central part. Compared with impacts of other convective disasters such as squalls, thunderstorms and hail, lightning stands as the second highest in the number of incidents, human deaths and animal deaths. Economic losses due to lightning is only about 1% of the total losses due to the four extreme weather phenomena. However, unless precautionary measures are not promoted among the public, this figure of losses may significantly increase with time as the country is undergoing rapid industrialization at present.

  2. Fire Incident Reporting Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    the result of an incident that requires (or should require) treatment by a practitioner of medicine , a registered emergency medical technician, or a...UNANNOUNCED AIRCRAFT EMERGENCYS ~~PRIOR TO TAKE OFF OR AFTERLADN 5 FUEL OPERATIONS REQUIRING 1AREING G A FIRE10 ARRESTING GEAR’BARRIER FR . ENGAGEMENTS AND

  3. Automated NFC enabled rural healthcare for reliable patient record maintainance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethia, Divyashikha; Jain, Shantanu; Kakkar, Himadri

    2012-01-01

    Body sensor networks can be used for health monitoring of patients by expert medical doctors, in remote locations like rural areas in developing countries, and can also be used to provide medical aid to areas affected by natural disasters in any part of the world. An important issue to be addressed, when the number of patients is large, is to reliably maintain the patient records and have simple automated mobile applications for healthcare helpers to use. We propose an automated healthcare architecture using NFC-enabled mobile phones and patients having their patient ID on RFID tags. It utilizes NFC-enabled mobile phones to read the patient ID, followed by automated gathering of healthcare vital parameters from body sensors using Bluetooth, analyses the information and transmits it to a medical server for expert feedback. With limited hospital resources and less training requirement for healthcare helpers through simpler applications, this automation of healthcare processing can provide time effective and reliable mass health consultation from medical experts in remote locations.

  4. Deaf New Zealand Sign Language users' access to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witko, Joanne; Boyles, Pauline; Smiler, Kirsten; McKee, Rachel

    2017-12-01

    The research described was undertaken as part of a Sub-Regional Disability Strategy 2017-2022 across the Wairarapa, Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast District Health Boards (DHBs). The aim was to investigate deaf New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) users' quality of access to health services. Findings have formed the basis for developing a 'NZSL plan' for DHBs in the Wellington sub-region. Qualitative data was collected from 56 deaf participants and family members about their experiences of healthcare services via focus group, individual interviews and online survey, which were thematically analysed. Contextual perspective was gained from 57 healthcare professionals at five meetings. Two professionals were interviewed, and 65 staff responded to an online survey. A deaf steering group co-designed the framework and methods, and validated findings. Key issues reported across the health system include: inconsistent interpreter provision; lack of informed consent for treatment via communication in NZSL; limited access to general health information in NZSL and the reduced ability of deaf patients to understand and comply with treatment options. This problematic communication with NZSL users echoes international evidence and other documented local evidence for patients with limited English proficiency. Deaf NZSL users face multiple barriers to equitable healthcare, stemming from linguistic and educational factors and inaccessible service delivery. These need to be addressed through policy and training for healthcare personnel that enable effective systemic responses to NZSL users. Deaf participants emphasise that recognition of their identity as members of a language community is central to improving their healthcare experiences.

  5. Dysfunctional Effects of a Conflict in a Healthcare Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykova, Ekaterina L; Semerjieva, Mariya A; Yordanov, Georgi Y; Cherkezov, Todor D

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts in healthcare settings are quite common events because of the continuous changes and transformations today's healthcare organizations are undergoing and the vigorous interaction between the medical professionals working in them. To survey the opinions of medical professionals about the possible destructive effects of conflicts on them in the workplace. We conducted a direct individual survey of 279 medical employees at four general hospitals. We used a set of questions that reflect the negative effects and consequences of conflict on healthcare professionals as direct or indirect participants. All data were analysed using the descriptive statistics and non-parametric analysis at a significance level for the null hypothesis of p conflicts contribute a lot to the stress, psychological tension and emotional exhaustion medical professionals are exposed to. The confrontation the conflict brings the participants into acts as a catalyst of the conflict and enhances the manifestation of hostile actions. A conflict generates a situation which has an impact on the behaviour of all participants involved in it giving rise to emotional states such as anger, aggression and reproaches. The destructive consequences resulting from a conflict are seen in the reduced work satisfaction and demotivation to perform the work activity. The contradictions that arise as a result affect negatively the team cooperation and obstruct the collaborative efforts in solving the problems in the healthcare setting. A conflict in a healthcare setting exerts a considerable destructive effect on an employee, therefore it requires prompt identification and effective intervention to minimise its unfavourable outcomes.

  6. [Reality of healthcare access for migrant children in Mayotte].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillot, J; Luminet, B; Drouot, N; Corty, J F

    2012-05-01

    The implementation of the social security system in 2005 in Mayotte has resulted in the end of free healthcare for all non-affiliated residents, primarily Comorians, due to the absence of the State Medical Aid (AME) in this department. Doctors of the World France opened a paediatric clinic in December 2009. The sociomedical data were collected during 5286 consultations in 2010. Analysis of these data demonstrates a link between access to healthcare for children and the residential status of their parents. The analysis concerns 2,350 patients met during consultations held by Doctors of the World France in Mayotte in 2010. The data have been electronically recorded and analysed by the Sphinx software. The results show that there are several obstacles to healthcare resulting in non-attendance. This situation is made worse if one of the parents has an irregular residential status and all the more so if both the parents have an irregular status. Affiliation to the social security system, however, improves the situation. The results show a delay in accessing healthcare, a poor vaccination programme and disturbing data on severe acute malnutrition. The specific healthcare measures in Mayotte do not respect the International Convention on the Rights of the Child. Direct affiliation to the social security system for children would entail a reduction in health insecurity for the children of parents with irregular residential status. It would also be necessary to reduce the factors that provoke fear of displacement, which would facilitate physical access to consultations.

  7. Qualitative analysis of factors leading to clinical incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew D; Birch, Julian D; Renshaw, Mark; Ottewill, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the common themes leading or contributing to clinical incidents in a UK teaching hospital. A root-cause analysis was conducted on patient safety incidents. Commonly occurring root causes and contributing factors were collected and correlated with incident timing and severity. In total, 65 root-cause analyses were reviewed, highlighting 202 factors implicated in the clinical incidents and 69 categories were identified. The 14 most commonly occurring causes (encountered in four incidents or more) were examined as a key-root or contributory cause. Incident timing was also analysed; common factors were encountered more frequently during out-hours--occurring as contributory rather than a key-root cause. In total, 14 commonly occurring factors were identified to direct interventions that could prevent many clinical incidents. From these, an "Organisational Safety Checklist" was developed to involve departmental level clinicians to monitor practice. This study demonstrates that comprehensively investigating incidents highlights common factors that can be addressed at a local level. Resilience against clinical incidents is low during out-of-hours periods, where factors such as lower staffing levels and poor service provision allows problems to escalate and become clinical incidents, which adds to the literature regarding out-of-hours care provision and should prove useful to those organising hospital services at departmental and management levels.

  8. Moving and handling and patient safety: analysis of clinical incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Jocelyn; Jones, Anne

    The aim of this study is to identify the potential contribution of moving and handling practice to clinical incidents through an analysis of incident data. Previous studies focusing on moving and handling have highlighted potential harm to patients through poor practice, and have suggested that this might be an issue for patient safety. However, this has not been identified in studies analysing clinical incident reports, where the potential contribution of moving and handling has not been recognized. This study reports an analysis of clinical incident data from the specific perspective of moving and handling. Survey of clinical incident reports in hospital in-patient care settings Method: A random sample of 500 incident reports was analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis of qualitative data. There is an indication that some staff are not following recommended moving and handling policy through a lack of risk assessment; for example, in the selection of appropriate actions to assist patients, and in the prevention of further occurrences of incidents where patients had fallen. The limited detail within the reports affected consideration of the causes of the incidents and actions that could be taken to prevent a further occurrence. Some of the reported staff actions may contravene policy guidelines. Missing detail in the incident reports inhibited investigation of incidents that could lead to appropriate and safe systems of work being identified.

  9. Cohort monitoring of persons with diabetes mellitus in a primary healthcare clinic for Palestine refugees in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Ali; Farajallah, Loai; Shahin, Yousef; Hababeh, Majed; Abu-Zayed, Ishtaiwi; Kochi, Arata; Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Kapur, Anil; Venter, Wendy; Seita, Akihiro

    2012-12-01

    To illustrate the method of cohort reporting of persons with diabetes mellitus (DM) in a primary healthcare clinic in Amman, Jordan, serving Palestine refugees with the aim of improving quality of DM care services. A descriptive study using quarterly and cumulative case findings, as well as cumulative and 12-month analyses of cohort outcomes collected through E-Health in UNRWA Nuzha Primary Health Care Clinic. There were 55 newly registered patients with DM in quarter 1, 2012, and a total of 2851 patients with DM ever registered on E-Health because this was established in 2009. By 31 March 2012, 70% of 2851 patients were alive in care, 18% had failed to present to a healthcare worker in the last 3 months and the remainder had died, transferred out or were lost to follow-up. Cumulative and 12-month cohort outcome analysis indicated deficiencies in several components of clinical care: measurement of blood pressure, annual assessments for foot care and blood tests for glucose, cholesterol and renal function. 10-20% of patients with DM in the different cohorts had serious late complications such as blindness, stroke, cardiovascular disease and amputations. Cohort analysis provides data about incidence and prevalence of DM at the clinic level, clinical management performance and prevalence of serious morbidity. It needs to be more widely applied for the monitoring and management of non-communicable chronic diseases. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Determinants of Healthcare Utilisation and Out-of-Pocket Payments in the Context of Free Public Primary Healthcare in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Masiye

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Access to appropriate and affordable healthcare is needed to achieve better health outcomes in Africa. However, access to healthcare remains low, especially among the poor. In Zambia, poor access exists despite the policy by the government to remove user fees in all primary healthcare facilities in the public sector. The paper has two main objectives: (i to examine the factors associated with healthcare choices among sick people, and (ii to assess the determinants of the magnitude of out-of-pocket (OOP payments related to a visit to a health provider. Methods This paper employs a multilevel multinomial logistic regression to model the determinants of an individual’s choice of healthcare options following an illness. Further, the study analyses the drivers of the magnitude of OOP expenditure related to a visit to a health provider using a two-part generalised linear model. The analysis is based on a nationally representative healthcare utilisation and expenditure survey that was conducted in 2014. Results Household per capita consumption expenditure is significantly associated with increased odds of seeking formal care (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, P = .000. Living in a household in which the head has a higher level of education is associated with increased odds of seeking formal healthcare (OR = 1.54, P = .000 and (OR = 1.55, P = .01, for secondary and tertiary education, respectively. Rural residence is associated with reduced odds of seeking formal care (OR = 0.706, P = .002. The magnitude of OOP expenditure during a visit is significantly dependent on household economic wellbeing, distance from a health facility, among other factors. A 10% increase in per capita consumption expenditure was associated with a 0.2% increase in OOP health expenditure while every kilometre travelled was associated with a K0.51 increase in OOP health expenditure. Conclusion Despite the removal of user fees on public primary healthcare in Zambia, access to

  11. Incident diabetes mellitus may explain the association between sleep duration and incident coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Akiko Kishi; Svensson, Thomas; Kitlinski, Mariusz; Almgren, Peter; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Peter M; Melander, Olle

    2018-02-01

    Sleep duration is a risk factor for incident diabetes mellitus and CHD. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate, in sex-specific analyses, the role of incident diabetes as the possible biological mechanism for the reported association between short/long sleep duration and incident CHD. Considering that diabetes is a major risk factor for CHD, we hypothesised that any association with sleep duration would not hold for cases of incident CHD occurring before incident diabetes ('non-diabetes CHD') but would hold true for cases of incident CHD following incident diabetes ('diabetes-CHD'). A total of 6966 men and 9378 women aged 45-73 years from the Malmö Diet Cancer Study, a population-based, prospective cohort, who had answered questions on habitual sleep duration and did not have a history of prevalent diabetes or CHD were included in the analyses. Incident cases of diabetes and CHD were identified using national registers. Sex-specific Cox proportional hazards regression models were stratified by BMI and adjusted for known covariates of diabetes and CHD. Mean follow-up times for incident diabetes (n = 1137/1016 [men/women]), incident CHD (n = 1170/578), non-diabetes CHD (n = 1016/501) and diabetes-CHD (n = 154/77) were 14.2-15.2 years for men, and 15.8-16.5 years for women. In men, short sleep duration (< 6 h) was associated with incident diabetes (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.01, 1.80), CHD (HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.06, 1.89) and diabetes-CHD (HR 2.34, 95% CI 1.20, 4.55). Short sleep duration was not associated with incident non-diabetes CHD (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.98, 1.87). Long sleep duration (≥ 9 h) was associated with incident diabetes (HR 1.37, 95% CI 1.03, 1.83), CHD (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.01, 1.75) and diabetes-CHD (HR 2.10, 95% CI 1.11, 4.00). Long sleep duration was not associated with incident non-diabetes CHD (HR 1.33, 95% CI 0.98, 1.80). In women, short sleep duration was associated with incident diabetes (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.16, 2.01), CHD (HR 1

  12. Business intelligence in healthcare organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, Antonius A.M.; Stegwee, R.A.; Teitink, Christian J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The management of healthcare organizations is starting to recognize the relevance of the definition of care products in relation to management information. In the turmoil between costs, care results and patient satisfaction, the right balance is needed, and it can be found in upcoming information

  13. Healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgie, Sarah; Marrie, Thomas J

    2009-02-01

    Atypical pneumonia was first described in 1938, and over time, Mycoplasma, Legionella, and Chlamydophila were the agents commonly linked with community-associated atypical pneumonia. However, as technology has improved, so has our understanding of this clinical entity. It is now known that there are many agents linked with atypical pneumonia in the community, and many of these agents are also major causes of healthcare-associated pneumonia. This article discusses the history, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of infection; control of infection; clinical findings; diagnosis; and, where applicable, treatment of the agents of healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia. Bacterial agents include Legionella species, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila species, and Coxiella burnetii. Although there are over 100 viruses that can cause respiratory tract infections, only a fraction of those have been defined in the context of healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia: adenovirus and human bocavirus (HBoV); rhinovirus; human coronaviruses (HCoV), including HCoV 229E, HCoV OC43, HCoV NL63, HCoV HKU1; members of the paramyxoviridae (parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus); hantavirus; influenza; and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) Co-V. Our knowledge about healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia will continue to evolve as newer pathogens are identified and as newer diagnostic modalities such as multiplex polymerase chain reaction are introduced.

  14. Big Data for personalized healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemons, Liseth; Sieverink, Floor; Vollenbroek, Wouter; van de Wijngaert, Lidwien; Braakman-Jansen, Annemarie; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette

    2016-01-01

    Big Data, often defined according to the 5V model (volume, velocity, variety, veracity and value), is seen as the key towards personalized healthcare. However, it also confronts us with new technological and ethical challenges that require more sophisticated data management tools and data analysis

  15. Body Area Networks for Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; Bults, Richard G.A.; Konstantas, D.; Vierhout, P.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The subject of this research proposal is the design and development of novel applications and services targeting 4G wireless technologies. In previous papers [1, 2] we presented a vision of two future healthcare applications which we call Virtual Trauma Team and Virtual Homecare Team. These are two

  16. Evaluating in a Healthcare Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne Jul

    2007-01-01

    is retrospective verbalisation. To compare concurrent and retrospective verbalisation an experiment was conducted. A home healthcare application was evaluated with 15 participants using both protocols. The results of the experiment show that the two protocols have each their strengths and weaknesses...

  17. Bill Gates eyes healthcare market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, C

    1995-02-01

    The entrepreneurial spirit is still top in Bill Gates' mind as he look toward healthcare and other growth industries. Microsoft's CEO has not intention of going the way of other large technology companies that became obsolete before they could compete today.

  18. Governance mechanisms for healthcare apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Konstantinos; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Kyng, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the `app store' concept has challenged the way software is distributed and marketed: developers have easier access to customers, while customers have easy access to innovative applications. Apps today are increasingly focusing on more "mission-critical" areas like healthcare w...

  19. Healthcare priority setting in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukachi, Salome A.; Onyango-Ouma, Washington; Siso, Jared Maaka

    2014-01-01

    improves the priority setting decisions. This paper describes the healthcare priority setting processes in Malindi district, Kenya, prior to the implementation of A4R in 2008 and evaluates the process for its conformance with the conditions for A4R. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions with key...

  20. Nativity and Perceived Healthcare Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orom, Heather

    2016-06-01

    Perceptions of healthcare quality are lower among foreign- than US-born individuals. The objective of the study was to identify possible explanations for this disparity. Data were from 6202 respondents to cycles 1 and 2 of the Health Information National Trends Survey 4 conducted 2011-2013, including 5425 US-born and 777 foreign-born respondents. Perceived quality of healthcare was lower among foreign-born than US-born respondents, accounted for, to some degree (19.5 %), by foreign-born respondents experiencing relatively less patient-centered healthcare provider communication than US-born respondents. More patient-centered provider communication was associated with receiving higher quality healthcare in all respondents. Having a regular provider was associated with perceived quality of care in foreign-born but not US-born respondents, and the reverse was true for frequency of care. Patient centered provider communication and continuity of care may be key targets for improving quality of care for foreign-born individuals.

  1. Enabling Team Learning in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of learning processes within 35 healthcare therapy teams that took action to improve their services. The published research on team learning is introduced, and the paper suggests it is an activity that has similarities with action research and with those forms of action learning where teams address collective…

  2. Measuring healthcare quality: the challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, J.; Niemeijer, G.C.; Does, R.J.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - Current health care quality performance indicators appear to be inadequate to inform the public to make the right choices. The aim of this paper is to define a framework and an organizational setting in which valid and reliable healthcare information can be produced to inform the general

  3. Making Franchising in Healthcare Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J. Nijmeijer (Karlijn J.)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Business format franchising is a form of interorganizational cooperation that originates from the business sector. It is increasingly used in a variety of healthcare services to reach positive results. In a franchise system contractual arrangements are made between

  4. Entrepreneurship in agriculture and healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, Jan; Hulsink, Willem; Grin, John

    2016-01-01

    Care farming provides an interesting context of multifunctional agriculture where farmers face the challenge of having to bridge the gap between agriculture and healthcare and acquire new customers, partners and financial resources from the care sector. We compared different entry strategies of

  5. mHealth transforming healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Malvey, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Examines regulatory trends and their impact on mHealth innovations and applications Offers solutions for those in the health care industry that are attempting to engage consumers in reducing healthcare costs and in improving their health care encounters and personal health Explains what is necessary for long-term viability of mHealth as a health care delivery medium.

  6. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chyu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term “Healthcare Engineering” has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of “Healthcare Engineering” remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  7. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyu, Ming-Chien; Austin, Tony; Calisir, Fethi; Chanjaplammootil, Samuel; Davis, Mark J; Favela, Jesus; Gan, Heng; Gefen, Amit; Haddas, Ram; Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Hornero, Roberto; Huang, Yu-Li; Jensen, Øystein; Jiang, Zhongwei; Katsanis, J S; Lee, Jeong-A; Lewis, Gladius; Lovell, Nigel H; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Morales, George G; Matis, Timothy; Matthews, Judith T; Mazur, Lukasz; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Oommen, K J; Ormand, Kevin; Rohde, Tarald; Sánchez-Morillo, Daniel; Sanz-Calcedo, Justo García; Sawan, Mohamad; Shen, Chwan-Li; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Su, Chao-Ton; Sun, Lilly; Sun, Mingui; Sun, Yi; Tewolde, Senay N; Williams, Eric A; Yan, Chongjun; Zhang, Jiajie; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term "Healthcare Engineering" has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of "Healthcare Engineering" remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  8. The public's voice about healthcare quality regulation policies. A population-based survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bouwman (Renée); M.C. Bomhoff (Manja); J.D. de Jong (Judith); P.B.M. Robben (Paul); R.D. Friele (Roland)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In the wake of various high-profile incidents in a number of countries, regulators of healthcare quality have been criticised for their 'soft' approach. In politics, concerns were expressed about public confidence. It was claimed that there are discrepancies between public

  9. The public’s voice about healthcare quality regulation policies : A population-based survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, R.; Bomhoff, M.; de Jong, J.D.; Robben, P.; Friele, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the wake of various high-profile incidents in a number of countries, regulators of healthcare quality have been criticised for their ‘soft’ approach. In politics, concerns were expressed about public confidence. It was claimed that there are discrepancies between public opinions

  10. Work motivation among healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellström, Sofia; Avby, Gunilla; Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina; Andersson Gäre, Boel; Andersson Bäck, Monica

    2017-06-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore work motivation among professionals at well-functioning primary healthcare centers subject to a national healthcare reform which include financial incentives. Design/methodology/approach Five primary healthcare centers in Sweden were purposively selected for being well-operated and representing public/private and small/large units. In total, 43 interviews were completed with different medical professions and qualitative deductive content analysis was conducted. Findings Work motivation exists for professionals when their individual goals are aligned with the organizational goals and the design of the reform. The centers' positive management was due to a unique combination of factors, such as clear direction of goals, a culture of non-hierarchical collaboration, and systematic quality improvement work. The financial incentives need to be translated in terms of quality patient care to provide clear direction for the professionals. Social processes where professionals work together as cohesive groups, and provided space for quality improvement work is pivotal in addressing how alignment is created. Practical implications Leaders need to consistently translate and integrate reforms with the professionals' drives and values. This is done by encouraging participation through teamwork, time for structured reflection, and quality improvement work. Social implications The design of the reforms and leadership are essential preconditions for work motivation. Originality/value The study offers a more complete picture of how reforms are managed at primary healthcare centers, as different medical professionals are included. The value also consists of showing how a range of aspects combine for primary healthcare professionals to successfully manage external reforms.

  11. The Hazards of Data Mining in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa; Aldosari, Bakheet

    2017-01-01

    From the mid-1990s, data mining methods have been used to explore and find patterns and relationships in healthcare data. During the 1990s and early 2000's, data mining was a topic of great interest to healthcare researchers, as data mining showed some promise in the use of its predictive techniques to help model the healthcare system and improve the delivery of healthcare services. However, it was soon discovered that mining healthcare data had many challenges relating to the veracity of healthcare data and limitations around predictive modelling leading to failures of data mining projects. As the Big Data movement has gained momentum over the past few years, there has been a reemergence of interest in the use of data mining techniques and methods to analyze healthcare generated Big Data. Much has been written on the positive impacts of data mining on healthcare practice relating to issues of best practice, fraud detection, chronic disease management, and general healthcare decision making. Little has been written about the limitations and challenges of data mining use in healthcare. In this review paper, we explore some of the limitations and challenges in the use of data mining techniques in healthcare. Our results show that the limitations of data mining in healthcare include reliability of medical data, data sharing between healthcare organizations, inappropriate modelling leading to inaccurate predictions. We conclude that there are many pitfalls in the use of data mining in healthcare and more work is needed to show evidence of its utility in facilitating healthcare decision-making for healthcare providers, managers, and policy makers and more evidence is needed on data mining's overall impact on healthcare services and patient care.

  12. Big Data, Big Problems: A Healthcare Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa S; Aldosari, Bakheet; Alanazi, Abdullah; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2017-01-01

    Much has been written on the benefits of big data for healthcare such as improving patient outcomes, public health surveillance, and healthcare policy decisions. Over the past five years, Big Data, and the data sciences field in general, has been hyped as the "Holy Grail" for the healthcare industry promising a more efficient healthcare system with the promise of improved healthcare outcomes. However, more recently, healthcare researchers are exposing the potential and harmful effects Big Data can have on patient care associating it with increased medical costs, patient mortality, and misguided decision making by clinicians and healthcare policy makers. In this paper, we review the current Big Data trends with a specific focus on the inadvertent negative impacts that Big Data could have on healthcare, in general, and specifically, as it relates to patient and clinical care. Our study results show that although Big Data is built up to be as a the "Holy Grail" for healthcare, small data techniques using traditional statistical methods are, in many cases, more accurate and can lead to more improved healthcare outcomes than Big Data methods. In sum, Big Data for healthcare may cause more problems for the healthcare industry than solutions, and in short, when it comes to the use of data in healthcare, "size isn't everything."

  13. A comparative study of contemporary user involvement within healthcare systems across England, Poland and Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichon, Mateusz; Kavcic, Matic; Masterson, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how healthcare-users' engagement is perceived, how it occurs and how these perceptions differ between three European countries: England, Poland and Slovenia, using the concepts of voice, choice and coproduction. This comparative, qualitative study is based on a review of legal documents, academic literature and semi-structured interviews conducted in October and November 2011. A research sample consisted of 21 interviewees representing various stakeholders including healthcare-users, doctors and managers. Primary and secondary data were analysed using theoretical thematic analysis. Emerging themes were identified from the interviews and related to the indicators describing healthcare-users' involvement in the voice, choice and coproduction model. Results of the comparative qualitative research suggest that the healthcare-users' influence is strongly grounded in England where the healthcare system and professionals are prepared to include healthcare-users in the decision-making process. In Slovenia, cultural development of healthcare-users' involvement seems to proceed the institutional development. In Poland, institutions are ready to involve healthcare-users in decision-making process although the cultural desirability of involving users among doctors and patients is lacking. The notion of user involvement is increasingly gaining importance and research attention, yet there is still little known about the way cultural, political, historical differences between various European countries influence it. This paper explores this little known area using the original approach of user involvement (Dent et al., 2011) with input from various stakeholders including patients, healthcare representatives and academics.

  14. Factors affecting Japanese retirees' healthcare service utilisation in Malaysia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ayako; Nik Farid, Nik Daliana; Musa, Ghazali; Abdul Aziz, Norlaili; Nakayama, Takeo; Dahlui, Maznah

    2016-03-22

    While living overseas in another culture, retirees need to adapt to a new environment but often this causes difficulties, particularly among those elderly who require healthcare services. This study examines factors affecting healthcare service utilisation among Japanese retirees in Malaysia. We conducted 6 focus group discussions with Japanese retirees and interviewed 8 relevant medical services providers in-depth. Guided by the Andersen Healthcare Utilisation Model, we managed and analysed the data, using QSR NVivo 10 software and the directed content analysis method. We interviewed participants at Japan Clubs and their offices. 30 Japanese retirees who live in Kuala Lumpur and Ipoh, and 8 medical services providers. We identified health beliefs, medical symptoms and health insurance as the 3 most important themes, respectively, representing the 3 dimensions within the Andersen Healthcare Utilisation Model. Additionally, language barriers, voluntary health repatriation to Japan and psychological support were unique themes that influence healthcare service utilisation among Japanese retirees. The healthcare service utilisation among Japanese retirees in Malaysia could be partially explained by the Andersen Healthcare Utilisation Model, together with some factors that were unique findings to this study. Healthcare service utilisation among Japanese retirees in Malaysia could be improved by alleviating negative health beliefs through awareness programmes for Japanese retirees about the healthcare systems and cultural aspects of medical care in Malaysia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Cancer incidence among firefighters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pukkala, Eero; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2014-01-01

    .51), adenocarcinoma of the lung (SIR=1.90, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.62), and mesothelioma (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.24 to 4.77). By contrast with earlier studies, the incidence of testicular cancer was decreased (SIR=0.51, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: Some of these associations have been observed previously, and potential...

  16. Health-care professionals' views about safety in maternity services: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A H K; Dixon, A L; Page, L A

    2009-02-01

    to explore health-care professionals' views about safety in maternity services. This paper identifies aspects of care that are less safe than they should be, possible ways to improve safety, and potential obstacles to achieving these improvements. This study was part of the King's Fund inquiry into the safety of maternity services in England. qualitative study with a sample of health-care professionals who work in maternity services and who responded to the call for evidence. Data were collected by questionnaire and analysed using thematic content analysis. maternity professionals throughout England were invited to take part. midwives, obstetricians, student midwives, nurses, neonatal nurses, general practitioners, managers, hospital doctors and paediatricians. In total, there were 591 respondents. participants were asked to respond to open-ended questions identifying aspects of maternity care that were less safe than they should be, potential solutions to improve safety of care, and any barriers to implementing these improvements. Problems described included the increasing social and medical complexity of the pregnant population, low staffing levels, inappropriate skill mix, low staff morale, inadequate training and education, medicalisation of birth, poor management, lack of resources and reconfiguration. Proposed solutions included more staff, better teamwork and skill mix, improved training, more one-to-one care, caseloading, better management, more resources, better guidelines and learning from incidents. Barriers to implementing improvements included stressed staff who were resistant to change, inadequate management/poor staff management relationships and financial restraints. the responses of maternity professionals convey a deep sense of staff anxiety regarding how the problems they face pose a threat to safety. policy makers and professional bodies need to take the concerns expressed by staff seriously. Concerted efforts are required to improve maternity

  17. Cancer incidence among waiters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reijula, Jere; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To study cancer risk patterns among waiters in the Nordic countries. METHODS: We identified a cohort of 16,134 male and 81,838 female waiters from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. During the follow-up period from 1961 to 2005, we found that 19,388 incident cancer cases were...... diagnosed. Standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was defined as the observed number of cancer cases divided by the expected number, based on national age, time period and gender-specific cancer incidence rates in the general population. RESULTS: The SIR of all cancers in waiters, in the five countries combined......, was 1.46 (95% CI 1.41-1.51) in men and 1.09 (1.07-1.11) in women. In male waiters, the SIR decreased from 1.79 (1.63-1.96) in 1961-1975, to 1.33 (1.26-1.40) in 1991-2005, but remained stable among women. The SIR among male waiters was highest for cancers in the pharynx (6.11; 95% CI 5.02-7.37), oral...

  18. Contaminated Mexican steel incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the circumstances contributing to the inadvertent melting of cobalt 60 (Co-60) contaminated scrap metal in two Mexican steel foundries and the subsequent distribution of contaminated steel products into the United States. The report addresses mainly those actions taken by US Federal and state agencies to protect the US population from radiation risks associated with the incident. Mexico had much more serious radiation exposure and contamination problems to manage. The United States Government maintained a standing offer to provide technical and medical assistance to the Mexican Government. The report covers the tracing of the source to its origin, response actions to recover radioactive steel in the United States, and return of the contaminated materials to Mexico. The incident resulted in significant radiation exposures within Mexico, but no known significant exposure within the United States. Response to the incident required the combined efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of State, and US Customs Service (Department of Treasury) personnel at the Federal level and representatives of all 50 State Radiation Control Programs and, in some instances, local and county government personnel. The response also required a diplomatic interface with the Mexican Government and cooperation of numerous commercial establishments and members of the general public. The report describes the factual information associated with the event and may serve as information for subsequent recommendations and actions by the NRC. 8 figures

  19. Prevalence and factors associated with percutaneous injuries and splash exposures among health-care workers in a provincial hospital, Kenya, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaisi, Everline Muhonja; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Wanzala, Peter; Omolo, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Accidental occupational exposure of healthcare workers to blood and body fluids after skin injury or mucous membrane contact constitutes a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Such pathogens include Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV). We conducted a study to determine the prevalence and associated factors for percutaneous injuries and splash exposures among health-care workers in Rift Valley provincial hospital. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out from October to November 2010. Self reported incidents, circumstances surrounding occupational exposure and post-exposure management were sought by use of interviewer administered questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate and multiple logistic regression (forward stepwise procedure) analyses were performed. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results Twenty five percent of health-care workers interviewed (N = 305) reported having been exposed to blood and body fluids in the preceding 12 months. Percutaneous injuries were reported by 19% (n = 305) and splash to mucous membrane by 7.2%. Higher rates of percutaneous injuries were observed among nurses (50%), during stitching (30%), and in obstetric and gynecologic department (22%). Health workers aged below 40 years were more likely to experience percutaneous injuries (OR= 3.7; 95% CI = 1.08-9.13) while previous training in infection prevention was protective (OR= 0.52; 95% CI = 0.03-0.90). Forty eight percent (n = 83) reported the incidents with 20% (n = 83) taking PEP against HIV. Conclusion Percutaneous injuries and splashes are common in Rift Valley Provincial hospital. Preventive measures remain inadequate. Health institutions should have policies, institute surveillance for occupational risks and enhance training of health care workers. PMID:23504245

  20. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider ...

  1. Efficient healthcare logistics with a human touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vrugt, Noëlle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Despite the long experienced urgency of rapidly increasing healthcare expenditures, there is still a large potential to improve hospitals' logistical efficiency. Operations Research (OR) methodologies may support healthcare professionals in making better decisions concerning planning and capacity

  2. [Fostering LGBT-friendly healthcare services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Han-Ting; Chen, Mu-Hong; Ku, Wen-Wei

    2015-02-01

    LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) patients suffer from stigma and discrimination when seeking healthcare. A large LGBT healthcare survey revealed that 56% of gay patients and 70% of transgender patients suffered some type of discrimination while seeking healthcare in 2014. The fostering of LGBT-friendly healthcare services is not just an advanced step of gender mainstreaming but also a fulfillment of health equality and equity. Additionally, LGBT-friendly healthcare services are expected to provide new opportunities for healthcare workers. Therefore, proactive government policies, education, research, and clinical practice should all encourage the development of these healthcare services. We look forward to a well-developed LGBT-friendly healthcare system in Taiwan.

  3. Job satisfaction in health-care organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Bhatnagar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction among health-care professionals acquires significance for the purpose of maximization of human resource potential. This article is aimed at emphasizing importance of studying various aspects of job satisfaction in health-care organizations.

  4. Job satisfaction in health-care organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatnagar, Kavita; Srivastava, Kalpana

    2012-01-01

    Job satisfaction among health-care professionals acquires significance for the purpose of maximization of human resource potential. This article is aimed at emphasizing importance of studying various aspects of job satisfaction in health-care organizations.

  5. A Way Forward for Healthcare in Madagascar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Florian; Rabehanta, Nathalie; Baker, Stephen; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Se Eun; Fobil, Julius N; Meyer, Christian G; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphaël

    2016-03-15

    A healthcare utilization survey was conducted as a component of the Typhoid Fever Surveillance in Africa Program (TSAP). The findings of this survey in Madagascar contrasted with those in other sites of the program; namely, only 30% of the population sought healthcare at the government-provided healthcare facilities for fever. These findings promoted us to determine the drivers and barriers in accessing and utilizing healthcare in Madagascar. Here we review the results of the TSAP healthcare utilization initiative and place them in the context of the current organization of the Madagascan healthcare system. Our work highlights the demands of the population for access to appropriate healthcare and the need for novel solutions that can quickly provide an affordable and sustainable basic healthcare infrastructure until a government-funded scheme is in place. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Innovation in medicine and healthcare 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Torro, Carlos; Tanaka, Satoshi; Howlett, Robert; Jain, Lakhmi

    2016-01-01

    Innovation in medicine and healthcare is an interdisciplinary research area, which combines the advanced technologies and problem solving skills with medical and biological science. A central theme of this proceedings is Smart Medical and Healthcare Systems (modern intelligent systems for medicine and healthcare), which can provide efficient and accurate solution to problems faced by healthcare and medical practitioners today by using advanced information communication techniques, computational intelligence, mathematics, robotics and other advanced technologies. The techniques developed in this area will have a significant effect on future medicine and healthcare.    The volume includes 53 papers, which present the recent trend and innovations in medicine and healthcare including Medical Informatics; Biomedical Engineering; Management for Healthcare; Advanced ICT for Medical and Healthcare; Simulation and Visualization/VR for Medicine; Statistical Signal Processing and Artificial Intelligence; Smart Medic...

  7. [Healthcare for African patients provided by NGOs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    The humanitarian organisation Médecins d'Afrique works to promote access to healthcare for African patients, in France and in Africa. Through intercultural partnerships and training for healthcare professionals, it contributes to health promotion.

  8. Guidance for the national healthcare disparities report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swift, Elaine K

    2002-01-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research Quality commissioned the Institute of Medicine establish a committee to provide guidance on the National Healthcare Disparities Report is of access to health care...

  9. Healthcare professionals' perceptions of alcoholintoxicated trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Healthcare professionals' perceptions of alcoholintoxicated trauma patients: Implications for healthcare delivery at South Rand Hospital Emergency Department. ... Conclusion: HCPs experience negative emotions and develop negative attitudes in response to alcohol-intoxicated patients who have been assaulted.

  10. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project is a family of health care databases and related software tools and products developed through a Federal-State-Industry partnership and sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  11. Perceptions of healthcare quality in Ghana: Does health insurance status matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duku, Stephen Kwasi Opoku; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Janssens, Wendy; Pradhan, Menno

    2018-01-01

    This study's objective is to provide an alternative explanation for the low enrolment in health insurance in Ghana by analysing differences in perceptions between the insured and uninsured of the non-technical quality of healthcare. It further explores the association between insurance status and perception of healthcare quality to ascertain whether insurance status matters in the perception of healthcare quality. Data from a survey of 1,903 households living in the catchment area of 64 health centres were used for the analysis. Two sample independent t-tests were employed to compare the average perceptions of the insured and uninsured on seven indicators of non-technical quality of healthcare. A generalised ordered logit regression, controlling for socio-economic characteristics and clustering at the health facility level, tested the association between insurance status and perceived quality of healthcare. The perceptions of the insured were found to be significantly more negative than the uninsured and those of the previously insured were significantly more negative than the never insured. Being insured was associated with a significantly lower perception of healthcare quality. Thus, once people are insured, they tend to perceive the quality of healthcare they receive as poor compared to those without insurance. This study demonstrated that health insurance status matters in the perceptions of healthcare quality. The findings also imply that perceptions of healthcare quality may be shaped by individual experiences at the health facilities, where the insured and uninsured may be treated differently. Health insurance then becomes less attractive due to the poor perception of the healthcare quality provided to individuals with insurance, resulting in low demand for health insurance in Ghana. Policy makers in Ghana should consider redesigning, reorganizing, and reengineering the National Healthcare Insurance Scheme to ensure the provision of better quality healthcare

  12. Perceptions of healthcare quality in Ghana: Does health insurance status matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duku, Stephen Kwasi Opoku

    2018-01-01

    This study’s objective is to provide an alternative explanation for the low enrolment in health insurance in Ghana by analysing differences in perceptions between the insured and uninsured of the non-technical quality of healthcare. It further explores the association between insurance status and perception of healthcare quality to ascertain whether insurance status matters in the perception of healthcare quality. Data from a survey of 1,903 households living in the catchment area of 64 health centres were used for the analysis. Two sample independent t-tests were employed to compare the average perceptions of the insured and uninsured on seven indicators of non-technical quality of healthcare. A generalised ordered logit regression, controlling for socio-economic characteristics and clustering at the health facility level, tested the association between insurance status and perceived quality of healthcare. The perceptions of the insured were found to be significantly more negative than the uninsured and those of the previously insured were significantly more negative than the never insured. Being insured was associated with a significantly lower perception of healthcare quality. Thus, once people are insured, they tend to perceive the quality of healthcare they receive as poor compared to those without insurance. This study demonstrated that health insurance status matters in the perceptions of healthcare quality. The findings also imply that perceptions of healthcare quality may be shaped by individual experiences at the health facilities, where the insured and uninsured may be treated differently. Health insurance then becomes less attractive due to the poor perception of the healthcare quality provided to individuals with insurance, resulting in low demand for health insurance in Ghana. Policy makers in Ghana should consider redesigning, reorganizing, and reengineering the National Healthcare Insurance Scheme to ensure the provision of better quality

  13. Patient safety incidents during interhospital transport of patients: A prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyphout, Cathelijne; Bergs, Jochen; Stockman, Willem; Deschilder, Koen; Duchatelet, Christophe; Desruelles, Didier; Bronselaer, Koen

    2018-01-01

    Interhospital transport of critically ill patients is at risk of complications. The objective of the study was to prospectively record patient safety incidents that occurred during interhospital transports and to determine their risk factors. We prospectively collected data during a fifteen-month period in 2 hospitals. Patient and transport characteristics were collected using a specifically designed tool. Patient safety incidents were appraised for health-care associated harm, and categorized as technical, operational, and communication problems. Our study included 688 patients who were transferred to or from one of both hospitals by physician or nurse led transport, with complete records. A patient safety incident was reported in 16.7% of transports, health-care associated harm was noted in 3.9% of cases. In multivariate analysis, three factors remained significantly associated with an increased risk of healthcare-associated harm: operational incidents (odds ratio=144.93, 95% CI=37.55-767.50, Pincidents (odds ratio=11.05, 95% CI=3.02-52.99, Ppatient safety incidents during interhospital transfers is lower than previously reported in the literature. However, there is limited previous work done on this topic. Operational and communication incidents, and a higher M-SOFA score are significantly associated with increase odds of harmful incident. These findings call for stricter preparation of transfers, with clear and standardized communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Medication incidents related to automated dose dispensing in community pharmacies and hospitals--a reporting system study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Chun Cheung

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Automated dose dispensing (ADD is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. METHODS: The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. RESULTS: From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4% incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6% incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8% were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2% were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%. The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. CONCLUSION: A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an

  15. Healthcare Industry Improvement with Business Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela-Laura IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper highlights the advantages of big data analytics and business intelligence in the healthcare industry. In the paper are reviewed the Real-Time Healthcare Analytics Solutions for Preventative Medicine provided by SAP and the different ideas realized by possible customers for new applications in Healthcare industry in order to demonstrate that the healthcare system can and should benefit from the new opportunities provided by ITC in general and big data analytics in particular.

  16. Mental illness-related stigma in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Knaak, Stephanie; Mantler, Ed; Szeto, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Mental illness-related stigma, including that which exists in the healthcare system and among healthcare providers, creates serious barriers to access and quality care. It is also a major concern for healthcare practitioners themselves, both as a workplace culture issue and as a barrier for help seeking. This article provides an overview of the main barriers to access and quality care created by stigmatization in healthcare, a consideration of contributing factors, and a summary of Canadian-b...

  17. Incidence of constipation in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxiang; Yuan, Mengguo; Liu, Yunfang; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Jingqing; Guo, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is growing awareness of a link between the gut and cardiovascular disease. Constipation is common among individuals who have had a stroke, and it negatively affects social functioning and quality of life. However, no systematic study on the incidence of constipation in stroke patients has been reported. We selected studies included in Medline, Embase, Cochrane database, and Web of Science. Studies were included if they reported the incidence in stroke patients. Two authors selected the studies, extracted the data independently, and assessed these. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the stroke subtype and stage of stroke. After detailed evaluations, 8 studies (n  =  1385 participants) were found that contained data that were suitable for meta-analytic synthesis. A forest plot showed that the incidence of constipation was 48% (95% confidence interval [CI]  =  33%–63%). In the analysis of the type of stroke subgroup, the incidence of constipation in patients who had had a hemorrhagic stroke (66% [95% CI  =  40–91%]) was higher than that in patients who had experienced an ischemic stroke (51% [95% CI  =  27%–75%]). The incidence in the acute stage (45% [95% CI  =  36%–54%]) was lower than that in the rehabilitation stage (48% [95% CI  =  23%–73%]). Constipation after a stroke event occurs frequently. This finding may raise awareness about bowel complications to allow correct evaluation and proper management. PMID:28640117

  18. Delirium after cardiac surgery: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulter, Nina; Lingehall, Helena Claesson; Gustafson, Yngve; Olofsson, Birgitta; Engström, Karl Gunnar

    2013-11-01

    Delirium after cardiac surgery is a problem with consequences for patients and healthcare. Preventive strategies from known risk factors may reduce the incidence and severity of delirium. The present aim was to explore risk factors behind delirium in older patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients (≥70 years) scheduled for routine cardiac surgery were included (n = 142). The patients were assessed and monitored pre-/postoperatively, and delirium was diagnosed from repeated assessments with the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Organic Brain Syndrome Scale, using the DSM-IV-TR criteria. Variables were analysed by uni-/multivariable logistic regression, including both preoperative variables (predisposing) and those extracted during surgery and in the early postoperative period (precipitating). Delirium was diagnosed in 78 patients (54.9%). Delirium was independently associated with both predisposing and precipitating factors (P-value, odds ratio, upper/lower confidence interval): age (0.036, 1.1, 1.0/1.2), diabetes (0.032, 3.5, 1.1/11.0), gastritis/ulcer problems (0.050, 4.0, 1.0/16.1), volume load during operation (0.001, 2.8, 1.5/5.1), ventilator time in ICU (0.042, 1.2, 1.0/1.4), highest temperature recorded in ICU (0.044, 2.2, 1.0/4.8) and sodium concentration in ICU (0.038, 1.2, 1.0/1.4). Delirium was common among older patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Both predisposing and precipitating factors contributed to delirium. When combined, the predictive strength of the model improved. Preventive strategies may be considered, in particular among the precipitating factors. Of interest, delirium was strongly associated with an increased volume load during surgery.

  19. Socially-assigned race, healthcare discrimination and preventive healthcare services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Macintosh

    Full Text Available Race and ethnicity, typically defined as how individuals self-identify, are complex social constructs. Self-identified racial/ethnic minorities are less likely to receive preventive care and more likely to report healthcare discrimination than self-identified non-Hispanic whites. However, beyond self-identification, these outcomes may vary depending on whether racial/ethnic minorities are perceived by others as being minority or white; this perception is referred to as socially-assigned race.To examine the associations between socially-assigned race and healthcare discrimination and receipt of selected preventive services.Cross-sectional analysis of the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System "Reactions to Race" module. Respondents from seven states and the District of Columbia were categorized into 3 groups, defined by a composite of self-identified race/socially-assigned race: Minority/Minority (M/M, n = 6,837, Minority/White (M/W, n = 929, and White/White (W/W, n = 25,913. Respondents were 18 years or older, with 61.7% under age 60; 51.8% of respondents were female. Measures included reported healthcare discrimination and receipt of vaccinations and cancer screenings.Racial/ethnic minorities who reported being socially-assigned as minority (M/M were more likely to report healthcare discrimination compared with those who reported being socially-assigned as white (M/W (8.9% vs. 5.0%, p = 0.002. Those reporting being socially-assigned as white (M/W and W/W had similar rates for past-year influenza (73.1% vs. 74.3% and pneumococcal (69.3% vs. 58.6% vaccinations; however, rates were significantly lower among M/M respondents (56.2% and 47.6%, respectively, p-values<0.05. There were no significant differences between the M/M and M/W groups in the receipt of cancer screenings.Racial/ethnic minorities who reported being socially-assigned as white are more likely to receive preventive vaccinations and less likely to report

  20. Security leadership in a changing healthcare world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    In the next few years, the healthcare industry will experience rapid change, the author says. In this article, he describes how this changing healthcare landscape will provide many opportunities for the healthcare security leader willing to think about and provide security on a different scale by focusing on six key areas--mission and culture, goal alignment, value and metrics, relationships, technology, and professionalism.

  1. Individual responsibility, solidarity and differentiation in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, I.; Willems, D. L.; Dekker, E.; Bossuyt, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Access to healthcare in most western societies is based on equality. Rapidly rising costs have fuelled debates about differentiation in access to healthcare. We assessed the public's perceptions and attitudes about differentiation in healthcare according to lifestyle behaviour. A vignette study was

  2. Data mining applications in healthcare | Ogwueleka | International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data mining applications have benefited the healthcare industry in terms of fraud and abuse detection by insurers, use in customer relationship management decisions by healthcare organizations and identification of effective treatments and best practices by physicians. The enormous data generated by healthcare ...

  3. Medication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alrwisan, Adel

    2011-01-15

    AIMS: Approximately 20% of deaths from adverse events are related to medication incidents, costing the NHS an additional £500 million annually. Less than 5% of adverse events are reported. This study aims to assess the reporting rate of medication incidents in NHS facilities in the north east of Scotland, and to describe the types and outcomes of reported incidents among different services. Furthermore, we wished to quantify the proportion of reported incidents according to the reporters\\' profession. METHODS: A retrospective description was made of medication incidents reported to an online reporting system (DATIX) over a 46-month-period (July 2005 to April 2009). Reports originated from acute and community hospitals, mental health, and primary care facilities. RESULTS: Over the study period there were 2,666 incidents reported with a mean monthly reporting rate of 78.2\\/month (SD±16.9). 6.1% of all incidents resulted in harm, with insulin being the most commonly implicated medication. Nearly three-quarters (74.2%, n=1,978) of total incidents originated from acute hospitals. Administration incidents were implicated in the majority of the reported medication incidents (59%), followed by prescribing (10.8%) and dispensing (9.9%), while the nondescript "other medication incidents" accounted for 20.3% of total incidents. The majority of reports were made by nursing and midwifery staff (80%), with medical and dental professionals reporting the lowest number of incidents (n=56, 2%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of medication incidents in this study were reported by nursing and midwifery staff, and were due to administration incidents. There is a clear need to elucidate the reasons for the limited contribution of the medical and dental professionals to reporting medication incidents.

  4. Sensing behaviour in healthcare design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorpe, Julia Rosemary; Hysse Forchhammer, Birgitte; Maier, Anja

    2017-01-01

    We are entering an era of distributed healthcare that should fit and respond to individual needs, behaviour and lifestyles. Designing such systems is a challenging task that requires continuous information about human behaviour on a large scale, for which pervasive sensing (e.g. using smartphones...... and wearables) presents exciting opportunities. While mobile sensing approaches are fuelling research in many areas, their use in engineering design remains limited. In this work, we present a collection of common behavioural measures from literature that can be used for a broad range of applications. We focus...... specifically on activity and location data that can easily be obtained from smartphones or wearables. We further demonstrate how these are applied in healthcare design using an example from dementia care. Comparing a current and proposed scenario exemplifies how integrating sensor-derived information about...

  5. Strategic planning in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Perera, Francisco de Paula; Peiró, Manel

    2012-08-01

    Strategic planning is a completely valid and useful tool for guiding all types of organizations, including healthcare organizations. The organizational level at which the strategic planning process is relevant depends on the unit's size, its complexity, and the differentiation of the service provided. A cardiology department, a hemodynamic unit, or an electrophysiology unit can be an appropriate level, as long as their plans align with other plans at higher levels. The leader of each unit is the person responsible for promoting the planning process, a core and essential part of his or her role. The process of strategic planning is programmable, systematic, rational, and holistic and integrates the short, medium, and long term, allowing the healthcare organization to focus on relevant and lasting transformations for the future. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. The Cadmio XML healthcare record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Francesco; Ferri, Fernando; Ricci, Fabrizio L; Sottile, Pier Angelo

    2002-01-01

    The management of clinical data is a complex task. Patient related information reported in patient folders is a set of heterogeneous and structured data accessed by different users having different goals (in local or geographical networks). XML language provides a mechanism for describing, manipulating, and visualising structured data in web-based applications. XML ensures that the structured data is managed in a uniform and transparent manner independently from the applications and their providers guaranteeing some interoperability. Extracting data from the healthcare record and structuring them according to XML makes the data available through browsers. The MIC/MIE model (Medical Information Category/Medical Information Elements), which allows the definition and management of healthcare records and used in CADMIO, a HISA based project, is described in this paper, using XML for allowing the data to be visualised through web browsers.

  7. Targeted Learning in Healthcare Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Susan

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of Big Data in healthcare encourages investigators to seek answers to big questions. However, nonparametric approaches to analyzing these data can suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and traditional parametric modeling does not necessarily scale. Targeted learning (TL) combines semiparametric methodology with advanced machine learning techniques to provide a sound foundation for extracting information from data. Predictive models, variable importance measures, and treatment benefits and risks can all be addressed within this framework. TL has been applied in a broad range of healthcare settings, including genomics, precision medicine, health policy, and drug safety. This article provides an introduction to the two main components of TL, targeted minimum loss-based estimation and super learning, and gives examples of applications in predictive modeling, variable importance ranking, and comparative effectiveness research.

  8. Barriers to healthcare coordination in market-based and decentralized public health systems: a qualitative study in healthcare networks of Colombia and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Ingrid; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; De Paepe, Pierre; Ferreira da Silva, Maria Rejane; Unger, Jean-Pierre; Vázquez, María-Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Although integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) are promoted in Latin America in response to health system fragmentation, few analyses on the coordination of care across levels in these networks have been conducted in the region. The aim is to analyse the existence of healthcare coordination across levels of care and the factors influencing it from the health personnel' perspective in healthcare networks of two countries with different health systems: Colombia, with a social security system based on managed competition and Brazil, with a decentralized national health system. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive-interpretative study was conducted, based on a case study of healthcare networks in four municipalities. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a three stage theoretical sample of (a) health (112) and administrative (66) professionals of different care levels, and (b) managers of providers (42) and insurers (14). A thematic content analysis was conducted, segmented by cases, informant groups and themes. The results reveal poor clinical information transfer between healthcare levels in all networks analysed, with added deficiencies in Brazil in the coordination of access and clinical management. The obstacles to care coordination are related to the organization of both the health system and the healthcare networks. In the health system, there is the existence of economic incentives to compete (exacerbated in Brazil by partisan political interests), the fragmentation and instability of networks in Colombia and weak planning and evaluation in Brazil. In the healthcare networks, there are inadequate working conditions (temporary and/or part-time contracts) which hinder the use of coordination mechanisms, and inadequate professional training for implementing a healthcare model in which primary care should act as coordinator in patient care. Reforms are needed in these health systems and networks in order to modify incentives, strengthen

  9. Women's autonomy and maternal healthcare service utilization in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruneh, Fentanesh Nibret; Chuang, Kun-Yang; Chuang, Ying-Chih

    2017-11-13

    Most previous studies on healthcare service utilization in low-income countries have not used a multilevel study design to address the importance of community-level women's autonomy. We assessed whether women's autonomy, measured at both individual and community levels, is associated with maternal healthcare service utilization in Ethiopia. We analyzed data from the 2005 and 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Surveys (N = 6058 and 7043, respectively) for measuring women's decision-making power and permissive gender norms associated with wife beating. We used Spearman's correlation and the chi-squared test for bivariate analyses and constructed generalized estimating equation logistic regression models to analyze the associations between women's autonomy indicators and maternal healthcare service utilization with control for other socioeconomic characteristics. Our multivariate analysis showed that women living in communities with a higher percentage of opposing attitudes toward wife beating were more likely to use all three types of maternal healthcare services in 2011 (adjusted odds ratios = 1.21, 1.23, and 1.18 for four or more antenatal care visits, health facility delivery, and postnatal care visits, respectively). In 2005, the adjusted odds ratios were 1.16 and 1.17 for four or more antenatal care visits and health facility delivery, respectively. In 2011, the percentage of women in the community with high decision-making power was positively associated with the likelihood of four or more antenatal care visits (adjusted odds ratio = 1.14). The association of individual-level autonomy on maternal healthcare service utilization was less profound after we controlled for other individual-level and community-level characteristics. Our study shows that women's autonomy was positively associated with maternal healthcare service utilization in Ethiopia. We suggest addressing woman empowerment in national policies and programs would be the optimal solution.

  10. Healthcare study programmes in innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Mandysová, Petra; Hlaváčová, Klára; Kovářová, Veronika; Kylarová, Denisa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the three-year project (registration number CZ.1.07/2.2.00/15.0357) was to innovate three out of the existing five study programs of the Faculty of Health Studies, University of Pardubice (FHS UPa) and to enhance the professional competence of the academic staff, which would lead to the modernization of teaching methods and incorporation of new, scientific knowledge in the educational activities. The project responded to the societal demand for highly qualified healthcare personnel...

  11. Organizational change strategies within healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Claudia; Dastmalchian, Ali; Blyton, Paul; Hasselback, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This study explores ways in which healthcare organizations can improve their organizational fitness for change using Beer and Nohria's framework of Theory E (concentrating on the economic value of change) and Theory O (concentrating on the organization's long-term capabilities for change). Data were collected from senior leaders/medical directors from health regions in Alberta. The results show that even though there is a tendency for reliance on Theory E change strategies, the respondents demonstrated other preferred approaches to change.

  12. National Health-Care Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-24

    Federal Hospital Insurance (HI) Trust Fund, or Medicare Part A, called for decisive policy action to achieve long-term solvency of the trust fund. For the... insurance companies . To prevent a loss of income, these groups have used tactics such as stoking fears of socialism and communism to thwart reform.33...the next most expensive country in the world, Switzerland.9 Health-care insurance costs exceed the national average inflation. From 2000 to 2007, health

  13. Healthcare system simulation using Witness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakdaman, Masoud; Zeinahvazi, Milad; Zohoori, Bahareh; Nasiri, Fardokht; Wong, Kuan Yew

    2013-01-01

    Simulation techniques have a proven track record in manufacturing industry as well as other areas such as healthcare system improvement. In this study, simulation model of a health center in Malaysia is developed through the application of WITNESS simulation software which has shown its flexibility and capability in manufacturing industry. Modelling procedure is started through process mapping and data collection and continued with model development, verification, validation and experimentation. At the end, final results and possible future improvements are demonstrated.

  14. Healthcare Energy Metering Guidance (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    This brochure is intended to help facility and energy managers plan and prioritize investments in energy metering. It offers healthcare-specific examples of metering applications, benefits, and steps that other health systems can reproduce. It reflects collaborative input from the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories and the health system members of the DOE Hospital Energy Alliance's Benchmarking and Measurement Project Team.

  15. Healthcare costs attributable to the treatment of patients with spinal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Line Stjernholm; Bünger, Cody Eric; Wang, Miao

    2015-01-01

    for 65% and outpatient services for 31% of the healthcare costs followed by hospice placements 3% and primary care 1%. Lifetime healthcare costs accounted for €36,616 (95% CI 33,835-39,583) per T1 patients, €49,632 (95% CI 42,287-57,767) per T2 patient, €70997 (95% CI 62,244-82,354) per T3 patient...... with an average of 71% for inpatient hospitalisation and 25% for outpatient services. CONCLUSION: The index treatment accounts for almost half of lifetime health care costs from treatment initiation until death. As expected, lifetime healthcare costs are positively association with invasiveness of treatment.......BACKGROUND: Cancer treatment, and in particular end-of-life treatment, is associated with substantial healthcare costs. The purpose of this study was to analyse healthcare costs attributable to the treatment of patients with spinal metastases. METHODS: The study population (n = 629) was identified...

  16. Healthcare professionals experience with motivational interviewing in their encounter with obese pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Christina Louise; Rubak, Sune; Mogensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    with colleagues. However, most of the healthcare professionals emphasised that time was crucial and they had to be dedicated to the motivational interviewing method. The healthcare professionals further stated that it enabled them to become more professional in their daily work and made some of them feel less......OBJECTIVE: to explore and describe how healthcare professionals in the Southern Region of Denmark experienced motivational interviewing as a communication method when working with pregnant women with obesity. DESIGN: a qualitative, descriptive study based on face-to-face interviews with 11...... obstetric healthcare professionals working in a perinatal setting. METHODS: a thematic descriptive method was applied to semi-structured interviews. The healthcare professional׳s experiences were recorded verbatim during individual semi-structured qualitative interviews, transcribed, and analysed using...

  17. Healthcare costs in the Danish randomised controlled lung cancer CT-screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J.F.; Siersma, V.; Pedersen, Jesper H.

    2014-01-01

    and the secondary healthcare sector were retrieved from public registries from randomisation - September 2011 and compared between (1) the CT-screening group and the control group and, (2) the control group and each of the true-positive, false-positive and true-negative groups. RESULTS: The median annual costs per......OBJECTIVES: Low dose computerised tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer can reduce lung-cancer-specific mortality. The objective of this study was to analyse healthcare costs and healthcare utilisation of participants in the Danish lung cancer CT-screening trial (DLCST). MATERIALS AND METHODS......: This registry study was nested in a randomised controlled trial (DLCST). 4104 participants, current or former heavy smokers, aged 50-70 years were randomised to five annual low dose CT scans or usual care during 2004-2010. Total healthcare costs and healthcare utilisation data for both the primary...

  18. Workplace Bullying among Healthcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Montes, Antonio; Muniz, Noel M.; Montero-Simó, María José; Araque-Padilla, Rafael Angel

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to assess consistent predictors through the use of a sample that includes different actors from the healthcare work force to identify certain key elements in a set of job-related organizational contexts. The utilized data were obtained from the 5th European Working Conditions Survey, conducted in 2010 by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. In light of these objectives, we collected a subsample of 284 health professionals, some of them from the International Standard Classification of Occupations—subgroup 22—(ISCO-08). The results indicated that the chance of a healthcare worker referring to him/herself as bullied increases among those who work on a shift schedule, perform monotonous and rotating tasks, suffer from work stress, enjoy little satisfaction from their working conditions, and do not perceive opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes within the usual course of events that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist human resource managers in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among healthcare workers. PMID:23887621

  19. Workplace Bullying among Healthcare Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Montero-Simó

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to assess consistent predictors through the use of a sample that includes different actors from the healthcare work force to identify certain key elements in a set of job-related organizational contexts. The utilized data were obtained from the 5th European Working Conditions Survey, conducted in 2010 by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. In light of these objectives, we collected a subsample of 284 health professionals, some of them from the International Standard Classification of Occupations—subgroup 22—(ISCO-08. The results indicated that the chance of a healthcare worker referring to him/herself as bullied increases among those who work on a shift schedule, perform monotonous and rotating tasks, suffer from work stress, enjoy little satisfaction from their working conditions, and do not perceive opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes within the usual course of events that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist human resource managers in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among healthcare workers.

  20. Healthcare Workers and Workplace Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Pinar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Workplace violence is a threatening worldwide public health problem. Healthcare workers have under particular risk of workplace violence, and they are being exposed to violence 4-16 times more than other service workers. The frequency of violence in the health sector in the world has indicated in different range of results since there is no consistent definition of workplace violence and differences in research methodology (any type of violence: 22,0% - 60,0%; physical violence: 2,6% - 57,0%; verbal violence: 24,3% - 82,0%; sexual harassment: %1,9 - 10,5%. All healthcare workers have right to work in a safe working place. The safety of healthcare workers should deserve the same priority as patient safety. Various risk factors including social, cultural, environmental, organizational and personal elements play a role in the formation of workplace violence that is very important for our country. Considering all those factors, the workplace violence in health sector should be seriously handled and the strategies and policies must be developed for prevention. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 315-326

  1. Grounding information security in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana; Antunes, Luis; Chadwick, David; Correia, Ricardo

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to show that grounded theory (GT), together with mixed methods, can be used to involve healthcare professionals in the design and enhancement of access control policies to Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems. The mixed methods applied for this research included, in this sequence, focus groups (main qualitative method that used grounded theory for the data analysis) and structured questionnaires (secondary quantitative method). Results showed that the presented methodology can be used to involve healthcare professionals in the definition of access control policies to EMR systems and explore these issues in a diversified and integrated way. The methodology allowed for the generation of great amounts of data in the beginning of the study and in a short time span. Results from the applied methodology revealed a first glimpse of the theories to be generated and integrated, with future research, into access control policies. The methodological research described in this paper is very rarely, if ever, applied in developing security tools such as access control. Nevertheless, it can be an effective way of involving healthcare professionals in the definition and enhancement of access control policies and in making information security more grounded into their workflows and daily practices. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient Reporting of Safety experiences in Organisational Care Transfers (PRoSOCT): a feasibility study of a patient reporting tool as a proactive approach to identifying latent conditions within healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason; Waring, Justin; Heavey, Emily; Dawson, Pamela

    2014-05-15

    It is increasingly recognised that patients can play a role in reporting safety incidents. Studies have tended to focus on patients within hospital settings, and on the reporting of patient safety incidents as defined within a medical model of safety. This study aims to determine the feasibility of collecting and using patient experiences of safety as a proactive approach to identifying latent conditions of safety as patients undergo organisational care transfers. The study comprises three components: (1) patients' experiences of safety relating to a care transfer, (2) patients' receptiveness to reporting experiences of safety, (3) quality improvement using patient experiences of safety. (1) A safety survey and evaluation form will be distributed to patients discharged from 15 wards across four clinical areas (cardiac, care of older people, orthopaedics and stroke) over 1 year. Healthcare professionals involved in the care transfer will be provided with a regular summary of patient feedback. (2) Patients (n=36) who return an evaluation form will be sampled representatively based on the four clinical areas and interviewed about their experiences of healthcare and safety and completing the survey. (3) Healthcare professionals (n=75) will be invited to participate in semistructured interviews and focus groups to discuss their experiences with and perceptions of receiving and using patient feedback. Data analysis will explore the relationship between patient experiences of safety and other indicators and measures of quality and safety. Interview and focus group data will be thematically analysed and triangulated with all other data sources using a convergence coding matrix. The study has been granted National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee approval. Patient experiences of safety will be disseminated to healthcare teams for the purpose of organisational development and quality improvement. Results will be disseminated to study participants as well as

  3. Incident users of antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In Denmark, as well as in many other countries, consumption of antipsychotics is on the rise, partly due to increasing off-label use. The aim of this study was to analyze and quantify the extent of off-label use and polypharmacy in incident users of antipsychotic medication, and to examine...... initial antipsychotic prescribing patterns and associated use of mental health care services. METHOD: Population-based cohort study linking the following Danish national registers: the Central Psychiatric Research Register, the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, and Statistics Denmark. RESULTS...

  4. Improving freight crash incident management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the most effective way to mitigate the effect of freight : crash incidents on Louisiana freeways. Candidate incident management strategies were reviewed from : practice in other states and from those publi...

  5. Common Causes of Pesticide Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are many types of pesticide incidents. EPA staff analyze pesticide incident reports involving people (including children and farm workers), pets, domestic animals, wildlife including bees and other pollinators, and the environment.

  6. Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powered by Translate UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Facebook Twitter Instagram RSS Subscribe Search A TO Z INDEX UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Facebook Twitter Instagram RSS Subscribe Occupational Safety and Health Administration English | ...

  7. Strategic learning in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, M J

    1999-01-01

    There is no definitive blueprint for the healthcare organization involved in strategic learning. However, what distinguishes strategic learning institutions is their acknowledgment that they must discover their own paths and solutions rather than blindly follow a detailed strategic mandate from administration. Answers to their most critical implementation and adaptive questions will not flow down ready-made from above, but will be tailored to meet the requirements of their own particular situation. Strategic learning organizations have certain attributes in common in developing their own answers: They continuously experiment rather than seek final solutions. They favor improvisation over forecasts. They formulate new actions rather than defend past ones. They nurture change rather than permanence. They encourage creative conflict rather than tranquillity. They encourage questioning rather than compliance. They expose contradictions rather than hide them (Weick 1977). Most importantly, strategic learning organizations realize that successful strategic change is best undertaken as a process of learning (O'Sullivan 1999). Healthcare organizations can no longer afford the illusion of traditional strategic planning, with its emphasis on bureaucratic controls from the top to the bottom. They must embrace the fundamental truth that most change occurs through processes of learning that occur in many locations simultaneously throughout the organization. The initial step in discovering ways to improve the capability of healthcare organizations is to adapt continuously while fulfilling their mission. Healthcare leaders must create a shared vision of where an institution is heading rather than what the final destination will be, nurture a spirit of experimentation and discovery rather than close supervision and unbending control, and recognize that plans have to be continuously changed and adjusted. To learn means to face the unknown: to recognize that we do not possess all

  8. Does a medical home mediate racial disparities in unmet healthcare needs among children with special healthcare needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Amanda C; Rankin, Kristin M; Rosenberg, Deborah

    2012-12-01

    This study extends mediation analysis techniques to explore whether and to what extent differential access to a medical home explains the black/white disparity in unmet healthcare needs among children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN). Data were obtained from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, with analyses limited to non-Hispanic white and black CSHCN (n = 14,677). The counterfactual approach to mediation analysis was used to estimate odds ratios for the natural direct and indirect effects of race on unmet healthcare needs. Overall, 43.0 % of white CSHCN and 60.4 % of black CSHCN did not have a medical home. Additionally, 8.8 % of white CSHCN and 15.3 % of black CSHCN had unmet healthcare needs. The natural indirect effect indicates that the odds of unmet needs among black CSHCN are elevated by approximately 20 % as a result of their current level of access to the medical home rather than access at a level equal to white CSHCN (OR(NIE) = 1.2, 95 % CI = 1.1, 1.3). The natural direct effect indicates that even if black CSHCN had the same level of access to a medical home as white CSHCN, blacks would still have 60 % higher odds of unmet healthcare needs than whites (OR(NDE) = 1.6, 95 % CI = 1.1, 2.4). The racial disparity in unmet healthcare needs among CSHCN is only partially explained by disparities in having a medical home. Ensuring all CSHCN have equal access to a medical home may reduce the racial disparity in unmet needs, but will not completely eliminate it.

  9. The impact of HIV-associated lipodystrophy on healthcare utilization and costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Daniel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV disease itself is associated with increased healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditures. HIV-infected persons with lipodystrophy have been shown to have poor self-perceptions of health. We evaluated whether lipodystrophy in the HIV-infected population was associated with increased utilization of healthcare services and increased healthcare costs. Objective To examine utilization of healthcare services and associated costs with respect to presence of lipodystrophy among HIV-infected patients. Methods Healthcare utilization and cost of healthcare services were collected from computerized accounting records for participants in a body image study among HIV-infected patients treated at a tertiary care medical center. Lipodystrophy was assessed by physical examination, and effects of lipodystrophy were assessed via body image surveys. Demographic and clinical characteristics were also ascertained. Analysis of healthcare utilization and cost outcomes was performed via between-group analyses. Multivariate modeling was used to determine predictors of healthcare utilization and associated costs. Results Of the 181 HIV-infected participants evaluated in the study, 92 (51% had clinical evidence of HIV-associated lipodystrophy according to physician examination. Total healthcare utilization, as measured by the number of medical center visits over the study period, was notably increased among HIV-infected subjects with lipodystrophy as compared to HIV-infected subjects without lipodystrophy. Similarly, total healthcare expenditures over the study period were $1,718 more for HIV-infected subjects with lipodystrophy than for HIV-infected subjects without lipodystrophy. Multivariate modeling demonstrated strong associations between healthcare utilization and associated costs, and lipodystrophy score as assessed by a clinician. Healthcare utilization and associated costs were not related to body image survey scores among HIV

  10. Concepts in service marketing for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, C L; Kelley, S W; Schwartz, R W

    2001-01-01

    Patients are becoming increasingly involved in making healthcare choices as their burden of healthcare costs continues to escalate. At the same time, healthcare has entered a tightened market economy. For these reasons, the marketing of healthcare services has become essential for the financial survival of physicians and healthcare organizations. Physicians can successfully use the fundamental service marketing principles proven by other service industries to win patient satisfaction and loyalty and remain competitive in today's market economy. Understanding concepts such as service quality zone of tolerance, levels of consumer satisfaction, the branding of services, patient participation, and service recovery can be useful in achieving these goals.

  11. Increasing incidence of pyogenic spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehrer, Michala; Pedersen, Court; Jensen, Thøger G

    2014-01-01

    Smaller studies indicate that the incidence of pyogenic spondylodiscitis is increasing, possible related to a growing elderly population. Data supporting this is sparse, and we therefore studied patient characteristics and changes in spondylodiscitis incidence 1995-2008.......Smaller studies indicate that the incidence of pyogenic spondylodiscitis is increasing, possible related to a growing elderly population. Data supporting this is sparse, and we therefore studied patient characteristics and changes in spondylodiscitis incidence 1995-2008....

  12. Standardizing the classification of abortion incidents: the Procedural Abortion Incident Reporting and Surveillance (PAIRS) Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Diana; Upadhyay, Ushma D; Fjerstad, Mary; Battistelli, Molly F; Weitz, Tracy A; Paul, Maureen E

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate standardized criteria for assessing abortion-related incidents (adverse events, morbidities, near misses) for first-trimester aspiration abortion procedures and to demonstrate the utility of a standardized framework [the Procedural Abortion Incident Reporting & Surveillance (PAIRS) Framework] for estimating serious abortion-related adverse events. As part of a California-based study of early aspiration abortion provision conducted between 2007 and 2013, we developed and validated a standardized framework for defining and monitoring first-trimester (≤14weeks) aspiration abortion morbidity and adverse events using multiple methods: a literature review, framework criteria testing with empirical data, repeated expert reviews and data-based revisions to the framework. The final framework distinguishes incidents resulting from procedural abortion care (adverse events) from morbidity related to pregnancy, the abortion process and other nonabortion related conditions. It further classifies incidents by diagnosis (confirmatory data, etiology, risk factors), management (treatment type and location), timing (immediate or delayed), seriousness (minor or major) and outcome. Empirical validation of the framework using data from 19,673 women receiving aspiration abortions revealed almost an equal proportion of total adverse events (n=205, 1.04%) and total abortion- or pregnancy-related morbidity (n=194, 0.99%). The majority of adverse events were due to retained products of conception (0.37%), failed attempted abortion (0.15%) and postabortion infection (0.17%). Serious or major adverse events were rare (n=11, 0.06%). Distinguishing morbidity diagnoses from adverse events using a standardized, empirically tested framework confirms the very low frequency of serious adverse events related to clinic-based abortion care. The PAIRS Framework provides a useful set of tools to systematically classify and monitor abortion-related incidents for first

  13. Healthcare and healthcare systems: inspiring progress and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Hammad

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare systems globally have experienced intensive changes, reforms, developments, and improvement over the past 30 years. Multiple actors (governmental and non-governmental) and countries have played their part in the reformation of the global healthcare system. New opportunities are presenting themselves while multiple challenges still remain especially in developing countries. Better way to proceed would be to learn from historical patterns while we plan for the future in a technology-driven society with dynamic demographic, epidemiological and economic uncertainties. A structured review of both peer-reviewed and gray literature on the topic was carried out. On the whole, people are healthier, doing better financially and live longer today than 30 years ago. The number of under-5 mortality worldwide has declined from 12.7 million in 1990 to 6.3 million in 2013. Infant and maternal mortality rates have also been reduced. However, both rates are still considered high in Africa and some Asian countries. The world's population nearly doubled in these 30 years, from 4.8 billion in 1985 to 7.2 billion in 2015. The majority of the increasing population was coming from the least developed countries, i.e., 3.66 to 5.33 billion. The world will be short of 12.9 million health-care workers by 2035; today, that figure stands at 7.2 million. Health care expenditures among countries also show sharp differences. In high income countries, per person health expenditure is over USD 3,000 on average, while in poor countries, it is as low as USD 12, WHO estimate of minimum spending per person per year needed to provide basic, life-saving services is USD 44. The challenges faced by the global health system over the past 30 years have been increased in population and urbanization, behavioral changes, rise in chronic diseases, traumatic injuries, infectious diseases, specific regional conflicts and healthcare delivery security. Over the next 30 years, most of the world population

  14. Incident Management: Process into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Tornados, shootings, fires--these are emergencies that require fast action by school district personnel, but they are not the only incidents that require risk management. The authors have introduced the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) and assured that these systems can help educators plan for and…

  15. Endometriosis and fertility: women's accounts of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K; Fisher, J; Kirkman, M

    2016-03-01

    What do women with endometriosis recall being told about their fertility by their healthcare providers? Women recalled being given varied information and advice, and gave examples of empathic and individualized care from doctors but also reported opportunities for enhancing clinical practice. There is evidence of an association between endometriosis and infertility. However, the strength of this association and the mechanisms that underlie it are not yet known nor are the implications for optimum healthcare. This study used in-depth cross-sectional qualitative research methods. Women aged at least 18 years who lived in Victoria, Australia, and who had been surgically diagnosed with endometriosis were invited to participate in in-depth interviews about their experience of endometriosis. Twenty-six women of diverse backgrounds and experiences of endometriosis were interviewed from January to September 2014. Interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically using a data-driven approach. All women encountered medical professionals who were aware of the association between endometriosis and infertility, and who were proactive in ensuring fertility was addressed within endometriosis care. Women recalled being given varied, often conflicting, information about the consequences for their fertility of an endometriosis diagnosis. While some recounted positive experiences with the way their doctor communicated with them about endometriosis and fertility, all women reported adverse experiences such as receiving insufficient or inappropriate information or having their doctor prioritize their fertility over other aspects of their care, including quality of life and symptom relief, without first consulting them. The perspectives of the women's doctors were not sought. The findings may not translate to settings that differ from a predominantly Anglo-Saxon country with both universal public and private healthcare systems. Women's fertility needs and priorities differ for many

  16. Healthcare performance turned into decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to first create an overview of relevant factors directly influencing employee absence in the healthcare sector. The overview is used to further investigate the factors identified using employee satisfaction survey scores exclusively. The result of the overall objective is a management framework that allows managers to gain insight into the current status of risk factors with high influence on employee absence levels. The research consists of a quantitative literature study supported by formal and semi-formal interviews conducted at the case organisations. Employee satisfaction surveys were applied to analyse the development over time of selected factors correlated with concurrent employee absence rates. Checking for causal results, comparisons with the included published literature findings were also carried out. Four major clustered factors, three of which constitute the term "social capital", showed a high degree of connection with employee absence rates. The factors are general satisfaction, fairness, reliance and co-operation. Integrating the four elements in a management framework will provide valuable and holistic information about the determinants with regard to current levels of employee absence. The framework will be a valuable support for leaders with the authority to alter the determinants of employee absence. Since a great part of the empirical material is supplied from the healthcare sector, the results obtained could be restricted to this sector. Inclusion of data from Arbejdsmarkedets Tillaegspension (ATP) showed no deviation from the results in the healthcare sector. The product of the study is a decision support tool for leaders to cope with levels of employee absence. The framework is holistic and can prove to be a valuable tool to take a bearing of where to focus future initiatives. Gathering former observational studies in a complete overview embracing many relevant factors that influence sickness absence has not yet

  17. The making of a European healthcare union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; van de Bovenkamp, Hester M.; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    that federalism offers the most fruitful way to do so because of its sensitivity to the EU’s institutional settings and to the territorial dimension of politics. The division of competences and national diversity of healthcare systems have been major obstacles for the formation of a healthcare union. However......, the EU obtained a role in healthcare through the impact of non-healthcare legislation, voluntary co-operation, court rulings, governments’ joint-decision traps, and fiscal stress of member states. The emerging European healthcare union is a system of cooperative federalism without much cost......EU involvement in healthcare policies is growing, despite the fact that national governments prefer to keep an almost exclusive say in these policies. This article explains how this shift of authority could happen and explores whether it will lead to a European healthcare union. It argues...

  18. Bluetooth: Opening a Blue Sky for Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, there has been a blossoming of developing mobile healthcare programs. Bluetooth technology, which has the advantages of being low-power and inexpensive, whilst being able to transfer moderate amounts of data over a versatile, robust and secure radio link, has been widely applied in mobile healthcare as a replacement for cables. This paper discussed the applications of Bluetooth technology in healthcare. It started with the brief description of the history of Bluetooth technology, its technical characteristics, and the latest developments. Then the applications of Bluetooth technology in healthcare sector were reviewed. The applications are based on two basic types of links of Bluetooth technology: point-to-point link and point-to-multipoint link. The special requirements from healthcare and the challenges of successful application of Bluetooth in healthcare will be discussed. At last the future development of Bluetooth technology and its impacts on healthcare were envisioned.

  19. Venous Thromboembolism Incidence After Craniofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omesiete, Wilson I; Walker, James A; Yu, Jack C

    2018-05-01

    Current protocols for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis after craniofacial surgery (CFS) vary widely with substantial disagreements in both indications and managements. An evidence-based approach to this issue requires the following: the incidence of postoperative VTE, comorbidities associated with coagulopathy, risk reduction after VTE prophylaxis, and complications attributable to prophylaxis. This study addresses the first two. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Discharge data from 64,170 patients undergoing CFS between 2008 and 2013 extracted from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample were analyzed. The outcome measures extracted were: deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, demographic data, common comorbidities, length of stay, total cost, and discharge outcome. Diagnoses of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, collectively classified as VTE, were observed in 355 (0.55%) of 64,170 patients discharged after CFS. Other surgeries exhibited a VTE rate of 1.17%. Men exhibited nearly double the incidence of VTE relative to women (0.69% compared with 0.37% respectively, P use did not exhibit any significant association (odds ratio, 0.94; P = 0.679). Afflicted patients experienced 4.60 times longer hospital stays averaging 23.8 days (95% confidence interval, 21.4-26.2; P use of VTE chemoprophylaxis is appropriate.

  20. Cancer incidence in Italian contaminated sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Comba

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. The incidence of cancer among residents in sites contaminated by pollutants with a possible health impact is not adequately studied. In Italy, SENTIERI Project (Epidemiological study of residents in National Priority Contaminated Sites, NPCSs was implemented to study major health outcomes for residents in 44 NPCSs. METHODS. The Italian Association of Cancer Registries (AIRTUM records cancer incidence in 23 NPCSs. For each NPCSs, the incidence of all malignant cancers combined and 35 cancer sites (coded according to ICD-10, was analysed (1996-2005. The observed cases were compared to the expected based on age (5-year period,18 classes, gender, calendar period (1996-2000; 2001-2005, geographical area (North-Centre and Centre-South and cancer sites specific rates. Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIR with 90% Confidence Intervals were computed. RESULTS. In both genders an excess was observed for overall cancer incidence (9% in men and 7% in women as well as for specific cancer sites (colon and rectum, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, lung, skin melanoma, bladder and Non Hodgkin lymphoma. Deficits were observed for gastric cancer in both genders, chronic lymphoid leukemia (men, malignant thyroid neoplasms, corpus uteri and connective and soft-tissue tumours and sarcomas (women. DISCUSSION. This report is, to our knowledge, the first one on cancer risk of residents in NPCSs. The study, although not aiming to estimate the cancer burden attributable to the environment as compared to occupation or life-style, supports the credibility of an etiologic role of environmental exposures in contaminated sites. Ongoing analyses focus on the interpretation of risk factors for excesses of specific cancer types overall and in specific NPCSs in relation to the presence of carcinogenic pollutants.

  1. Differences between serious and nonserious patient safety incidents in the largest hospital district in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsä, Juho Olavi; Palojoki, Sari Hannele; Lehtonen, Lasse; Tapper, Anna-Maija

    2018-01-10

    To determine if and in what ways serious patient safety incidents differ from nonserious patient safety incidents. Statistical analysis was performed on patient safety incident reports that were reported in 2015 in Finland's largest hospital district (Helsinki and Uusimaa, HUS). Reports were divided into two groups: nonserious incidents and serious incidents. Differences between groups were studied from several types of categorically divided information. Of the total number of reports (15,863), 1% were serious incidents (175). Serious and nonserious incidents differed significantly from each other. Serious incidents concerning laboratory, imaging, or medical equipment were more common. On the other hand, incidents concerning medication, infusion, and blood transfusion were less frequent. In serious incidents, the proportion of doctors reporting was greater, and contributing factors were better recognized, the most common being working of procedures. In the future, special attention should be given to the particular aspects of serious patient safety incidents, such as safe use of medical equipment, training, and handling of procedures. Root cause analysis is an effective way to handle serious incidents and enables the prevention of their reoccurrence. However, a systematic follow-up of the root cause analysis should be developed. © 2018 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  2. Healthcare Services Managers: What Information do They Need and Use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Booth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The purpose of this research project was to gain insight into the information behaviour of healthcare services managers as they use information while engaged in decision-making unrelated to individual patient care. Methods – This small-scale, exploratory, multiple case study used the critical incident technique in nineteen semi-structured interviews. Responses were analyzed using ‘Framework,’ a matrix-based content analysis system. Results – This paper presents findings related to the internal information that healthcare services managers need and use. Their decisions are influenced by a wide variety of factors. They must often make decisions without all of the information they would prefer to have. Internal information and practical experience set the context for new research-based information, so they are generally considered first.Conclusions – Healthcare services managers support decisions with both facts and value-based information. These results may inform both delivery of health library services delivery and strategic health information management planning. They may also support librarians who extend their skills beyond managing library collections and teaching published information retrieval skills, to managing internal and external information, teaching information literacy, and supporting information sharing.

  3. [Oral healthcare for the persons with special needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Ichijiro

    The field of special care dentistry is rapidly gaining recognition as a service that should be provided to the persons with physical, mental or intellectual disabilities by general practitioner, pediatric or geriatric dentists as well as dental hygienists. Because the oral healthcare and dental treatments are given in the narrow space of oral cavity and also accompanying technical difficulties with high risk of injury, the special needs patients are treated under being controlled their behavior or body motion by applying psychological, physical or pharmacological techniques. Those persons also manifest specific oral signs and symptoms such as dental caries, periodontal diseases as well as high incidence of dental hypoplasia, oro-facial trauma or drug-induced gingival overgrowth. The children with developmental disorders especially such as autism spectrum disorder(ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(AD/HD), or specific learning disorder(LD), and those with medical care needs at all times are also increasing relatively in Japan with declining birthrate. Those children have specific dental problems and require the special oral healthcare. This article presents the current status of oral healthcare for the persons with special needs.

  4. Patterns of cancer screening, incidence and treatment disparities in China: protocol for a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nengliang; Wang, Jialin; Cai, Yuanchu; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Haipeng; Gong, Jiyong; Anderson, Roger; Sun, Xiaojie

    2016-08-04

    Cancer has become the leading cause of death in China. Several knowledge gaps exist with respect to the patterns of cancer care and disparities in China. Chinese healthcare researchers do not have access to cancer research data of high quality. Only cancer incidence and mortality rates have been analysed in China while the patterns of cancer screening and treatment and disparities have not been rigorously examined. Potential disparities in cancer care by socioeconomic status have not been analysed in the previous literature. Population-based estimates of cancer care costs remain unexamined in China. This project will depict the pattern of cancer screening, incidence and treatment in Shandong province and enhance our understanding of causes of disparities in cancer control. We will create the first linked database of cancer registry and health insurance claims in China. We obtained cancer registry data on breast, gastrointestinal and lung cancer incidence from 2011 to 2014 and their health insurance claims information from 6 cities/counties of 10.63 million population and validated it with hospital discharge data. A 1600 participant survey will be administered to collect additional information of patients' socioeconomic status, employment and cancer care costs. Frequency analysis, spatial data exploratory analysis, multivariate logistic regression with instrumental variable, generalised linear regression and subgroup analysis will be used to analyse the following: the receipt of cancer screening, stage at diagnosis, guideline-concordant treatment and cancer care costs. Patient characteristics, tumour features, hospital characteristics, patient comorbidities and county-level descriptors will be used as covariates in the multivariate analysis. The Institutional Review Board of the School of Public Health of Shandong University approved this study (20140201). Data compiled from this project will be made available to all Chinese healthcare researchers. Study results

  5. How healthcare organisations can act as institutional entrepreneurs in a context of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Mylaine; Lamothe, Lise; Denis, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate and discuss how healthcare organisations can act as institutional entrepreneurs in a context of change. The authors conducted an in-depth longitudinal case study (2005-2008) of a healthcare organisation in the province of Quebec, Canada. Data collection consisted of real-time observations of senior managers (n = 87), interviews (n = 24) with decision-makers and secondary data analysis of documents. The paper reports on the extent to which entrepreneurial healthcare organisations can be a driving force in the creation of a new practice. The authors analyse the development of a diabetes reference centre by a healthcare organisation acting as an institutional entrepreneur that illustrates the conceptualisation of an innovation and the mobilisation of resources to implement it and to influence other actors in the field. The authors discuss the case in reference to three stages of change: emergence, implementation and diffusion. The results illustrate the different strategies used by managers to advance their proposed projects. This study helps to better understand the dynamics of mandated change in a mature field such as healthcare and the roles played by organisations in this process. By adopting a proactive strategy, a healthcare organisation can play an active role and strongly influence the evolution of its field. This paper is one of only a few to analyse strategies used by healthcare organisations in the context of mandated change.

  6. Somali asylum seekers' perceptions of privacy in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklöf, Niina; Abdulkarim, Hibag; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2016-08-01

    Privacy has been recognized as a basic human right and a part of quality of care. However, little is known about the privacy of Somali asylum seekers in healthcare, even though they are one of the largest asylum seeker groups in the world. The aim of the study was to describe the content and importance of privacy and its importance in healthcare from the perspective of Somali asylum seekers. The data of this explorative qualitative study were collected by four focus group interviews with 18 Somali asylum seekers with the help of an interpreter. The data were analysed by inductive content analysis. Research permissions were obtained from the director of the reception centre and from the Department of Social Services. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of Turku University. The content of privacy includes visual privacy, physical privacy and informational privacy. All contents can be shared with healthcare professionals. The importance of privacy includes respect, dignity and freedom. Privacy is strongly connected to the collectivism of Somali culture and religion. Unlike the Western cultures, privacy is not important only for the individual; most of all, it is seen to support collectivism. Even though all contents of privacy can be shared with healthcare professionals, it is important to recognize the cultural aspect of privacy especially when using interpreters with Somali background. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Healthcare logistics in disaster planning and emergency management: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanVactor, Jerry D

    2017-12-01

    This paper discusses the role of healthcare supply chain management in disaster mitigation and management. While there is an abundance of literature examining emergency management and disaster preparedness efforts across an array of industries, little information has been directed specifically toward the emergency interface, interoperability and unconventional relationships among civilian institutions and the US Department of Defense (US DoD) or supply chain operations involved therein. To address this imbalance, this paper provides US DoD healthcare supply chain managers with concepts related to communicating and planning more effectively. It is worth remembering, however, that all disasters are local - under the auspice of tiered response involving federal agencies, the principal responsibility for responding to domestic disasters and emergencies rests with the lowest level of government equipped and able to deal with the incident effectively. As such, the findings are equally applicable to institutions outside the military. It also bears repeating that every crisis is unique: there is no such thing as a uniform response for every incident. The role of the US DoD in emergency preparedness and disaster planning is changing and will continue to do so as the need for roles in support of a larger effort also continues to change.

  8. Patient education as an information system,\\ud healthcare tool and interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated with a study among nurses based on their conceptions about PE. Practical implications and the potential of ICT in PE in particular are discussed.

  9. Periodic safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouffon, A.; Zermizoglou, R.

    1990-12-01

    The IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-S8 devoted to 'Safety Aspects of Foundations of Nuclear Power Plants' indicates that operator of a NPP should establish a program for inspection of safe operation during construction, start-up and service life of the plant for obtaining data needed for estimating the life time of structures and components. At the same time the program should ensure that the safety margins are appropriate. Periodic safety analysis are an important part of the safety inspection program. Periodic safety reports is a method for testing the whole system or a part of the safety system following the precise criteria. Periodic safety analyses are not meant for qualification of the plant components. Separate analyses are devoted to: start-up, qualification of components and materials, and aging. All these analyses are described in this presentation. The last chapter describes the experience obtained for PWR-900 and PWR-1300 units from 1986-1989

  10. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...... and finally data analysis based on the ISO approach. The device was calibrated and tested on commercially available laser systems. It showed good reproducibility. It was the target to be able to measure CW lasers with a power up to 200 W, focused down to spot diameters in the range of 10µm. In order...

  11. Healthcare professionals experience with motivational interviewing in their encounter with obese pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhardt, Christina Louise; Rubak, Sune; Mogensen, Ole; Hansen, Helle Ploug; Goldstein, Henri; Lamont, Ronald F; Joergensen, Jan Stener

    2015-07-01

    to explore and describe how healthcare professionals in the Southern Region of Denmark experienced motivational interviewing as a communication method when working with pregnant women with obesity. a qualitative, descriptive study based on face-to-face interviews with 11 obstetric healthcare professionals working in a perinatal setting. a thematic descriptive method was applied to semi-structured interviews. The healthcare professional's experiences were recorded verbatim during individual semi-structured qualitative interviews, transcribed, and analysed using a descriptive analysis methodology. motivational interviewing was found to be a useful method when communicating with obese pregnant women. The method made the healthcare professionals more aware of their own communication style both when encountering pregnant women and in their interaction with colleagues. However, most of the healthcare professionals emphasised that time was crucial and they had to be dedicated to the motivational interviewing method. The healthcare professionals further stated that it enabled them to become more professional in their daily work and made some of them feel less 'burned out', 'powerless' and 'stressed' as they felt they had a communication method in handling difficult workloads. healthcare professionals experienced motivational interviewing to be a useful method when working perinatally. The motivational interviewing method permitted heightened awareness of the healthcare professionals communication method with the patients and increased their ability to handle a difficult workload. Overall, lack of time restricted the use of the motivational interviewing method on a daily basis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence of childhood pneumonia: facility-based surveillance estimate compared to measured incidence in a South African birth cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, David M; Myer, Landon; Nicol, Mark P; Zar, Heather J

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is the leading cause of childhood mortality and a major contributor to childhood morbidity, but accurate measurement of pneumonia incidence is challenging. We compared pneumonia incidence using a facility-based surveillance system to estimates from a cohort study conducted contemporaneously in the same community in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods A surveillance system was developed in six public sector primary care clinics and in a regional referral hospital, to detect childhood pneumonia cases. Nurses recorded all children presenting to facilities who met WHO case definitions of pneumonia, and hospital records were reviewed. Estimates of pneumonia incidence and severity were compared with incidence rates based on active surveillance in the Drakenstein Child Health Study. Results From June 2012 until September 2013, the surveillance system detected 306 pneumonia episodes in children under 1 year of age, an incidence of 0.20 episodes/child-year (e/cy) (95% CI 0.17 to 0.22 e/cy). The incidence in the cohort study from the same period was 0.27 e/cy (95% CI 0.23 to 0.32 e/cy). Pneumonia incidence in the surveillance system was almost 30% lower than in the birth cohort; incidence rate ratio 0.72 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.89). In the surveillance system, 18% were severe pneumonia cases, compared to 23% in the birth cohort, rate ratio 0.81 (95% CI 0.55 to 1.18). Conclusions In this setting, facility-based pneumonia surveillance detected fewer cases of pneumonia, and fewer severe cases, compared to the corresponding cohort study. Facility pneumonia surveillance using data collected by local healthcare workers provides a useful estimate of the epidemiology of childhood pneumonia but may underestimate incidence and severity. PMID:26685027

  13. Incidence of childhood pneumonia: facility-based surveillance estimate compared to measured incidence in a South African birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, David M; Myer, Landon; Nicol, Mark P; Zar, Heather J

    2015-12-18

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of childhood mortality and a major contributor to childhood morbidity, but accurate measurement of pneumonia incidence is challenging. We compared pneumonia incidence using a facility-based surveillance system to estimates from a cohort study conducted contemporaneously in the same community in Cape Town, South Africa. A surveillance system was developed in six public sector primary care clinics and in a regional referral hospital, to detect childhood pneumonia cases. Nurses recorded all children presenting to facilities who met WHO case definitions of pneumonia, and hospital records were reviewed. Estimates of pneumonia incidence and severity were compared with incidence rates based on active surveillance in the Drakenstein Child Health Study. From June 2012 until September 2013, the surveillance system detected 306 pneumonia episodes in children under 1 year of age, an incidence of 0.20 episodes/child-year (e/cy) (95% CI 0.17 to 0.22 e/cy). The incidence in the cohort study from the same period was 0.27 e/cy (95% CI 0.23 to 0.32 e/cy). Pneumonia incidence in the surveillance system was almost 30% lower than in the birth cohort; incidence rate ratio 0.72 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.89). In the surveillance system, 18% were severe pneumonia cases, compared to 23% in the birth cohort, rate ratio 0.81 (95% CI 0.55 to 1.18). In this setting, facility-based pneumonia surveillance detected fewer cases of pneumonia, and fewer severe cases, compared to the corresponding cohort study. Facility pneumonia surveillance using data collected by local healthcare workers provides a useful estimate of the epidemiology of childhood pneumonia but may underestimate incidence and severity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Healthcare costs of pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus: retrospective observational analysis from a US health claims database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, M; Daly, R P; Pushparajah, D S

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex autoimmune disease, most frequently affecting women of childbearing age. Women with lupus are at increased risk of pregnancy complications that are exacerbated by active disease. Despite this, their use of medications and hospital resources has not been extensively studied. Retrospective analyses of the Truven Health MarketScan database (2006-2012) aimed to quantify drug and resource utilization in pregnant women with lupus, as well as the incidence of pregnancy complications in these patients. Records of women aged 12-54 were reviewed and both lupus patients and pregnancies identified. Pregnant women with lupus were matched 1:5 with either pregnant women without lupus, or non-pregnant women with lupus. Pregnancies with lupus were associated with increased complications when compared to pregnancies without lupus. During pregnancy, the use of immunosuppressants decreased in pregnant women with lupus, as did rheumatologist visits, while the number of women not treated with any immunosuppressant increased. Pregnant women with lupus showed higher overall treatment costs than controls. However, compared to non-pregnant women with lupus, medication costs actually dropped, possibly due to the withdrawal of medications from these patients or women becoming pregnant while disease activity was low. The large database analyses reported here revealed that pregnancies in women with lupus were associated with a higher risk of complications, higher healthcare costs, and fewer prescribed medications, including immunosuppressants, than the control groups. The increased risk of complications and decreased immunosuppressant use suggest that patients require additional guidance from physicians to give them the best chance of experiencing a safe pregnancy. Indeed, despite the recognized role active lupus plays in increasing pregnancy complications, women with lupus had fewer rheumatology visits during pregnancy, although their visits to their

  15. Cancer registration and healthcare access in West Bank, Palestine: a GIS analysis of childhood cancer, 1998-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailony, M Rami; Hararah, Mohammad K; Salhab, Abdel Razzaq; Ghannam, Ibrahim; Abdeen, Ziad; Ghannam, Jess

    2011-09-01

    In low and middle income countries (LMIC), high-quality disease registration is difficult to achieve in the setting of inadequate healthcare infrastructure and political or economical instability. In this article, we explore the potential of geographic information systems (GIS) to add value to the understanding of childhood cancer patterns in the West Bank, despite a variety of obstacles to disease registration. All incidence cases of childhood cancers (under the age 15) from 1998 to 2007 were collected from the West Bank Cancer Registry. Temporal, spatial and space-time analyses were performed using the SatScan software developed by Martin Kulldorff and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The analyses were categorized into the following groups: all childhood cancer, leukemias, acute lymphocytic leukemia, lymphomas, brain and central nervous system (CNS) cancers and remaining cancers (excluding leukemia, lymphoma and CNS tumors). The temporal analysis revealed that cancer registration was more complete from 1998 to 2000 (p=0.0162), and that leukemia registration was severely deficient from 2003 to 2005 (p=0.0012). The spatial analysis showed a concentration of cancer in metropolitan districts where referral hospitals are based. Under registration was detected in the northern districts of Jenin and Tulkarm (RR=0.59, p=0.0059), more prominent from 2002 to 2005 (RR=0.33, p=0.0006). The analysis for high rates found a cluster of lymphoma in town of Dura and its surrounding agricultural villages (RR=4.10, p=0.0023). Our study reveals that the application of GIS tools to registry data in LMIC can help to identify geographical patterns in cancer registration and healthcare accessibility, generating priorities for future health research and policy in resource-limited areas. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  16. Association of common mental disorder symptoms with health and healthcare factors among women in rural western India: results of a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Apurv; Fahey, Nisha; Byatt, Nancy; Prabhakaran, Anusha; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Vankar, Jagdish; Phatak, Ajay; O'Keefe, Eileen; Allison, Jeroan; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar

    2016-07-07

    Information about common mental disorders (CMD) is needed to guide policy and clinical interventions in low-income and middle-income countries. This study's purpose was to characterise the association of CMD symptoms with 3 inter-related health and healthcare factors among women from rural western India based on a representative, cross-sectional survey. Surveys were conducted in the waiting area of various outpatient clinics at a tertiary care hospital and in 16 rural villages in the Anand district of Gujarat, India. 700 Gujarati-speaking women between the ages of 18-45 years who resided in the Anand district of Gujarat, India, were recruited in a quasi-randomised manner. CMD symptoms, ascertained using WHO's Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20), were associated with self-reported (1) number of healthcare visits in the prior year; (2) health status and (3) portion of yearly income expended on healthcare. Data from 658 participants were used in this analysis; 19 surveys were excluded due to incompleteness, 18 surveys were excluded because the participants were visiting hospitalised patients and 5 surveys were classified as outliers. Overall, 155 (22·8%) participants screened positive for CMD symptoms (SRQ-20 score ≥8) with most (81.9%) not previously diagnosed despite contact with healthcare provider in the prior year. On adjusted analyses, screening positive for CMD symptoms was associated with worse category in self-reported health status (cumulative OR=9.39; 95% CI 5·97 to 14·76), higher portion of household income expended on healthcare (cumulative OR=2·31; 95% CL 1·52 to 3.52) and increased healthcare visits in the prior year (incidence rate ratio=1·24; 95% CI 1·07 to 1·44). The high prevalence of potential CMD among women in rural India that is unrecognised and associated with adverse health and financial indicators highlights the individual and public health burden of CMD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  17. Contesting Citizenship: Comparative Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Squires, Judith

    2007-01-01

    importance of particularized experiences and multiple ineequality agendas). These developments shape the way citizenship is both practiced and analysed. Mapping neat citizenship modles onto distinct nation-states and evaluating these in relation to formal equality is no longer an adequate approach....... Comparative citizenship analyses need to be considered in relation to multipleinequalities and their intersections and to multiple governance and trans-national organisinf. This, in turn, suggests that comparative citizenship analysis needs to consider new spaces in which struggles for equal citizenship occur...

  18. Five-year decreased incidence of surgical site infections following gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement surgery through active surveillance by the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H J; Adiyani, L; Sung, J; Choi, J Y; Kim, H B; Kim, Y K; Kwak, Y G; Yoo, H; Lee, Sang-Oh; Han, S H; Kim, S R; Kim, T H; Lee, H M; Chun, H K; Kim, J-S; Yoo, J D; Koo, H-S; Cho, E H; Lee, K W

    2016-08-01

    Surveillance of healthcare-associated infection has been associated with a reduction in surgical site infection (SSI). To evaluate the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (KONIS) in order to assess its effects on SSI since it was introduced. SSI data after gastrectomy, total hip arthroplasty (THA), and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between 2008 and 2012 were analysed. The pooled incidence of SSI was calculated for each year; the same analyses were also conducted from hospitals that had participated in KONIS for at least three consecutive years. Standardized SSI rates for each year were calculated by adjusting for SSI risk factors. SSI trends were analysed using the Cochran-Armitage test. The SSI rate following gastrectomy was 3.12% (522/16,918). There was a significant trend of decreased crude SSI rates over five years. This trend was also evident in analysis of hospitals that had participated for more than three years. The SSI rate for THA was 2.05% (157/7656), which decreased significantly from 2008 to 2012. The risk factors for SSI after THA included the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk index, trauma, reoperation, and age (60-69 years). The SSI rate for TKA was 1.90% (152/7648), which also decreased significantly during a period of five years. However, the risk-adjusted analysis of SSI did not show a significant decrease for all surgical procedures. The SSI incidence of gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement declined over five years as a result of active surveillance by KONIS. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  20. Improving oral healthcare: towards measurement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baâdoudi, F; Maskrey, N; Listl, S; van der Heijden, G J M G; Duijster, D

    2016-11-04

    In the last 30 years oral healthcare is increasingly being contested. Needs and expectations have evolved to a point of advanced restorative techniques, long term planning for preventative care and evidence-based practice, and patients and payers increasingly require more explicit demonstration of competence. However, relevant data are currently not routinely collected that would support approaches needed to further improve oral health and care. This paper sets out the case to collect and evaluate routinely available data. Variations in care and oral health could be described, which in turn would provide valuable insights for all wishing to further improve oral health and care.

  1. Healthcare IT and Patient Empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danholt, Peter; Bødker, Keld; Hertzum, Morten

    2004-01-01

    of type II diabetes at the clinic is characterized by team treatment, a diabetes school, standard treatment plans, and an electronic patient record system. By studying work at the clinic as well as the patients’ ‘work’ with their disease, we aim to come to grips with the complexity of treating type II......This short paper outlines a recently initiated research project that concerns healthcare information systems and patient empowerment. Drawing on various theoretical backgrounds, Participatory Design (PD), Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Computer Mediated Communication (CMC), and Science...... diabetes and with the possibilities for and barriers toward enabling patients to take active part in their treatment....

  2. Disruptive Innovation in Healthcare & Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Disruption is a powerful body of theory that describes how people interact and react, how behavior is shaped, how organizational cultures form and influence decisions. Innovation is the process of translating an idea or invention into a product or service that creates value or for which customers...... will pay. Disruptive Innovation in context of the author’s body of work in healthcare and rehabilitation relates to how development of a cloud-based converged infrastructure resource, similar to that conceived in a national (Danish) study titled Humanics, can act as an accessible data and knowledge...

  3. Dialogisk kommunikationsteoretisk analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Louise Jane

    2018-01-01

    analysemetode, der er blevet udviklet inden for dialogisk kommunikationsforskning - The Integrated Framework for Analysing Dialogic Knowledge Production and Communication (IFADIA). IFADIA-metoden bygger på en kombination af Bakhtins dialogteori og Foucaults teori om magt/viden og diskurs. Metoden er beregnet...

  4. Probabilistic safety analyses (PSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The guide shows how the probabilistic safety analyses (PSA) are used in the design, construction and operation of light water reactor plants in order for their part to ensure that the safety of the plant is good enough in all plant operational states

  5. Meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Maria A.; Luyten, Johannes W.; Scheerens, Jaap; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Scheerens, J

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter results of a research synthesis and quantitative meta-analyses of three facets of time effects in education are presented, namely time at school during regular lesson hours, homework, and extended learning time. The number of studies for these three facets of time that could be used

  6. Analysing Access Control Specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2009-01-01

    . Recent events have revealed intimate knowledge of surveillance and control systems on the side of the attacker, making it often impossible to deduce the identity of an inside attacker from logged data. In this work we present an approach that analyses the access control configuration to identify the set...

  7. Wavelet Analyses and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeianu, Cristian C.; Landau, Rubin H.; Paez, Manuel J.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how a modern extension of Fourier analysis known as wavelet analysis is applied to signals containing multiscale information. First, a continuous wavelet transform is used to analyse the spectrum of a nonstationary signal (one whose form changes in time). The spectral analysis of such a signal gives the strength of the signal in each…

  8. Filmstil - teori og analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    Filmstil påvirker på afgørende vis vores oplevelse af film. Men filmstil, måden, de levende billeder organiserer fortællingen på fylder noget mindre end filmens handling, når vi taler om film. Filmstil - teori og analyse er en rigt eksemplificeret præsentation, kritik og videreudvikling af...

  9. Risico-analyse brandstofpontons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijt de Haag P; Post J; LSO

    2001-01-01

    Voor het bepalen van de risico's van brandstofpontons in een jachthaven is een generieke risico-analyse uitgevoerd. Er is een referentiesysteem gedefinieerd, bestaande uit een betonnen brandstofponton met een relatief grote inhoud en doorzet. Aangenomen is dat de ponton gelegen is in een

  10. Community health workers: a bridge to healthcare for people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kirsty; Lee, Jessica; Sebar, Bernadette

    2015-04-01

    Although people who inject drugs (PWIDs) have increased healthcare needs, their poor access and utilisation of mainstream primary healthcare services is well documented. To address this situation, community health workers (CHWs) who have personal experience of drug injecting in addition to healthcare training or qualifications are sometimes utilised. However, the role peer workers play as members of clinical primary healthcare teams in Australia and how they manage the healthcare needs of PWID, has been poorly documented. A qualitative ethnomethodological approach was used to study the methods used by CHWs. Data was collected using participant observation of CHWs in a PWID-targeted primary healthcare centre. CHW healthcare consultations with PWID were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts along with field notes were analysed using membership categorisation and conversation analysis techniques to reveal how CHWs' personal and professional experience shapes their healthcare interactions with PWID clients. CHWs' personal experience of injecting drug use is an asset they utilise along with their knowledge of clinical practice and service systems. It provides them with specialised knowledge and language--resources that they draw upon to build trust with clients and accomplish transparent, non-judgmental interactions that enable PWID clients to be active participants in the management of their healthcare. Existing literature often discusses these principles at a theoretical level. This study demonstrates how CHWs achieve them at a micro-level through the use of indexical language and displays of the membership categories 'PWID' and 'healthcare worker'. This research explicates how CHWs serve as an interface between PWID clients and conventional healthcare providers. CHWs deployment of IDU-specific language, membership knowledge, values and behaviours, enable them to interact in ways that foster transparent communication and client participation in

  11. Romanian healthcare system at a glance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Balan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian healthcare system is facing constant challenges to produce high quality care with low costs. Objectives The paper aims to analyze the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system in terms of resources allocation. The evaluation and the dimension of healthcare system efficiency are important for identifying a balance between the resources required and the health outcomes. Prior Work Previous studies describe the Romanian healthcare system as a system in transition. This study focuses on the relationship between the inputs and outputs of the system. Approach In order to assess the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system we use Data Envelopment Analysis approach. Both input and output healthcare indicators are observed for the period 1999-2010 and the years when healthcare inputs have been used efficiently are identified. Results The results show that human, financial, and technological resources have been used at maximum capacity in 1999, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2010. Implications Though efficiency is defined differently by diverse stakeholders, healthcare policies should focus on rising the responsibility of communities and individuals for better treatments and services and better access to information on healthcare providers. Value The paper is an empirically based study of the healthcare resources allocation in Romania.

  12. Collaborative writing applications in healthcare: effects on professional practice and healthcare outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Patrick M; van de Belt, Tom H; Kuziemsky, Craig; Plaisance, Ariane; Dupuis, Audrey; McGinn, Carrie A; Francois, Rebecca; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Turgeon, Alexis F; Horsley, Tanya; Witteman, William; Poitras, Julien; Lapointe, Jean; Brand, Kevin; Lachaine, Jean; Légaré, France

    2017-05-10

    Collaborative writing applications (CWAs), such as wikis and Google Documents, hold the potential to improve the use of evidence in both public health and healthcare. Although a growing body of literature indicates that CWAs could have positive effects on healthcare, such as improved collaboration, behavioural change, learning, knowledge management, and adaptation of knowledge to local context, this has never been assessed systematically. Moreover, several questions regarding safety, reliability, and legal aspects exist. The objectives of this review were to (1) assess the effects of the use of CWAs on process (including the behaviour of healthcare professionals) and patient outcomes, (2) critically appraise and summarise current evidence on the use of resources, costs, and cost-effectiveness associated with CWAs to improve professional practices and patient outcomes, and (3) explore the effects of different CWA features (e.g. open versus closed) and different implementation factors (e.g. the presence of a moderator) on process and patient outcomes. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and 11 other electronic databases. We searched the grey literature, two trial registries, CWA websites, individual journals, and conference proceedings. We also contacted authors and experts in the field. We did not apply date or language limits. We searched for published literature to August 2016, and grey literature to September 2015. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled trials (NRCTs), controlled before-and-after (CBA) studies, interrupted time series (ITS) studies, and repeated measures studies (RMS), in which CWAs were used as an intervention to improve the process of care, patient outcomes, or healthcare costs. Teams of two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of studies. Disagreements were resolved by discussion, and when consensus was not reached, a third review author was consulted. We screened 11,993 studies identified

  13. The history of healthcare quality: The first 100 years 1860–1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Helen Sheingold

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st Century, health care systems across the world are focusing policy efforts on improving the quality of healthcare delivered to their population. In contrast, healthcare quality improvement in earlier time periods arose from a series of seemingly unrelated incidents and developments. In this paper, we sequentially review key international historical events that improved health care quality during the years 1860–1960, including innovation in health care financing, care delivery and workforce diversity. The modern nursing workforce of today continues to encounter many of these same challenges across the globe.

  14. Security practices and regulatory compliance in the healthcare industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Juhee; Johnson, M Eric

    2013-01-01

    Securing protected health information is a critical responsibility of every healthcare organization. We explore information security practices and identify practice patterns that are associated with improved regulatory compliance. We employed Ward's cluster analysis using minimum variance based on the adoption of security practices. Variance between organizations was measured using dichotomous data indicating the presence or absence of each security practice. Using t tests, we identified the relationships between the clusters of security practices and their regulatory compliance. We utilized the results from the Kroll/Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society telephone-based survey of 250 US healthcare organizations including adoption status of security practices, breach incidents, and perceived compliance levels on Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, Red Flags rules, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and state laws governing patient information security. Our analysis identified three clusters (which we call leaders, followers, and laggers) based on the variance of security practice patterns. The clusters have significant differences among non-technical practices rather than technical practices, and the highest level of compliance was associated with hospitals that employed a balanced approach between technical and non-technical practices (or between one-off and cultural practices). Hospitals in the highest level of compliance were significantly managing third parties' breaches and training. Audit practices were important to those who scored in the middle of the pack on compliance. Our results provide security practice benchmarks for healthcare administrators and can help policy makers in developing strategic and practical guidelines for practice adoption.

  15. [Plan for stroke healthcare delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Sabín, J; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Gállego, J; Gil-Peralta, A; Casado, I; Castillo, J; Díez Tejedor, E; Gil, A; Jiménez, C; Lago, A; Martínez-Vila, E; Ortega, A; Rebollo, M; Rubio, F

    2006-12-01

    All stroke patients should receive the same degree of specialized healthcare attention according to the stage of their disease, independently of where they live, their age, gender or ethnicity. To create an organized healthcare system able to offer the needed care for each patient, optimizing the use of the existing resource. A committee of 14 neurologists specialized in neurovascular diseases representing different regions of Spain evaluated the available scientific evidence according to the published literature. During the acute phase, all stroke patients must be evaluated in hospitals that offer access to specialized physicians (neurologists) and the indicated diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Hospitals that deliver care to acute stroke patients must be prepared to attend these patients and need to arrange a predefined transferring circuit coordinated with the extrahospitalary emergency service. Since resources are limited, they should be structured into different care levels according to the target population. Thus, three types of hospitals will be defined for stroke care: reference stroke hospital, hospital with stroke unit, hospital with stroke team.

  16. Trump proposes initial healthcare agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. On Friday, November 11, President-elect Trump proposed a healthcare agenda on his website greatagain.gov (1. Yesterday, November 12, he gave an interview on 60 Minutes clarifying his positions (2. Trump said that he wanted to focus on healthcare and has proposed to: •Repeal all of the Affordable Care Act; •Allow the sale of health insurance across state lines; •Make the purchase of health insurance fully tax deductible; •Expand access to the health savings accounts;•Increase price transparency; •Block grant Medicaid; •Lower entrance barriers to new producers of drugs. In his 60 Minutes interview Trump reiterated that two provisions of the ACA – prohibition of pre-existing conditions exclusion and ability for adult children to stay on parents insurance plans until age 26 – have his support (2. Other aspects of the ACA that might receive his support were not discussed. On the Department of Veterans’ Affairs ...

  17. Infrastructuring Multicultural Healthcare Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreessen, Katrien; Huybrechts, Liesbeth; Grönvall, Erik; Hendriks, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This paper stresses the need for more research in the field of Participatory Design (PD) and in particular into how to design Health Information Technology (HIT) together with care providers and -receivers in multicultural settings. We contribute to this research by describing a case study, the 'Health-Cultures' project, in which we designed HIT for the context of home care of older people with a migration background. The Health-Cultures project is located in the city of Genk, Belgium, which is known for its multicultural population, formed by three historical migration waves of people coming to work in the nowadays closed coal mines. Via a PD approach, we studied existing means of dialogue and designed HIT that both care receivers and care providers in Genk can use in their daily exchanges between cultures in home care contexts. In discussing relevant literature as well as the results of this study, we point to the need and the ways of taking spatio-historical aspects of a specific healthcare situation into account in the PD of HIT to support multicultural perspectives on healthcare.

  18. Southwest ballot measures affecting healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Modern Healthcare (1 has published an article summarizing ballot measures affecting healthcare. Those from the Southwest are listed below: States: Arizona: 1. Recreational marijuana. Proposition 205: Legalizes recreational marijuana use for people 21 and older. Opponents of the measure include the Arizona Health and Hospital Association and Insys Therapeutics, a company that makes a cannabis-based pain medication. California : 1. Medi-Cal hospital fee program. Proposition 52: Requires the legislature to get voter approval to use fee revenue for purposes other than generating federal matching funds and funding enhanced Medicaid payments and grants for hospitals. The initiative, which was written by the California Hospital Association and is supported by most state lawmakers, would also make the program permanent, requiring a supermajority in the legislature to end it. 2. Tobacco tax. Proposition 56: Increases the state's cigarette tax by $2 a pack and impose an "equivalent increase on other tobacco products and ...

  19. Risk factors for radiotherapy incidents: a single institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Shuto, Nobuaki; Terazaki, Tsuyoshi; Noda, Shigetoshi; Ishigami, Minoru; Yogo, Katsunori; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2018-01-30

    We aimed to analyze risk factors for incidents occurring during the practice of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) at a single Japanese center. Treatment data for EBRT from June 2014 to March 2017 were collected. Data from incident reports submitted during this period were reviewed. Near-miss cases were not included. Risk factors for incidents, including patient characteristics and treatment-related factors, were explored using uni- and multivariate analyses. Factors contributing to each incident were also retrospectively categorized according to the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). A total of 2887 patients were treated during the study period, and 26 incidents occurred (0.90% per patient). Previous history of radiotherapy and large fraction size were identified as risk factors for incidents by univariate analysis. Only previous history of radiotherapy was detected as a risk factor in multivariate analysis. Identified categories of contributing factors were human behavior (50.0%), communication (40.6%), and technical (9.4%). The incident rate of EBRT was 0.90% per patient in our institution. Previous history of radiotherapy and large fraction size were detected as risk factors for incidents. Human behavior and communication errors were identified as contributing factors for most incidents. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A marketing perspective to "delight" the "patient 2.0": new and challenging expectations for the healthcare provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccoliero, Luca; Bellio, Elena; Mazzola, Maria; Solinas, Elisa

    2016-02-09

    The study aims at investigating the characteristics and the satisfaction determinants of the emerging patient profile. This profile appears to be more demanding and "empowered" compared to the ones traditionally conceived, asking for unconventional healthcare services and for a closer relationship with providers. Both qualitative (semi-structured interviews and focus groups) and quantitative (survey) analyses were performed on a random sample of 2808 Italian citizens-patients. Analyses entailed descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis and linear regressions. Four relevant dimensions of patient 2.0 experience were identified through a literature review on experiential marketing in healthcare. Beta coefficients exhibited the effect that different healthcare experiential elements have on patient 2.0 satisfaction. Results allow to state that a new marketing approach, based on patient 2.0 characteristics and value drivers, should be adopted in the healthcare sector. Critical satisfaction drivers and new technological healthcare guidelines are identified in order to match the new patient profile needs.

  1. Near-misses are an opportunity to improve patient safety: adapting strategies of high reliability organizations to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Spall, Harriette; Kassam, Alisha; Tollefson, Travis T

    2015-08-01

    Near-miss investigations in high reliability organizations (HROs) aim to mitigate risk and improve system safety. Healthcare settings have a higher rate of near-misses and subsequent adverse events than most high-risk industries, but near-misses are not systematically reported or analyzed. In this review, we will describe the strategies for near-miss analysis that have facilitated a culture of safety and continuous quality improvement in HROs. Near-miss analysis is routine and systematic in HROs such as aviation. Strategies implemented in aviation include the Commercial Aviation Safety Team, which undertakes systematic analyses of near-misses, so that findings can be incorporated into Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Other strategies resulting from incident analyses include Crew Resource Management (CRM) for enhanced communication, situational awareness training, adoption of checklists during operations, and built-in redundancy within systems. Health care organizations should consider near-misses as opportunities for quality improvement. The systematic reporting and analysis of near-misses, commonplace in HROs, can be adapted to health care settings to prevent adverse events and improve clinical outcomes.

  2. HIV and tuberculosis co-infection among migrants in Europe: A systematic review on the prevalence, incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Ana Maria; Fronteira, Inês; Couto, Isabel; Machado, Diana; Viveiros, Miguel; Abecasis, Ana B; Dias, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    International human migration has been rapidly growing. Migrants coming from low and middle income countries continue to be considerably vulnerable and at higher risk for infectious diseases, namely HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and tuberculosis (TB). In Europe, the number of patients with HIV-TB co-infection has been increasing and migration could be one of the potential driving forces. This systematic review aims to improve the understanding on the burden of HIV-TB co-infection among migrants in Europe and to assess whether these populations are particularly vulnerable to this co-infection compared to nationals. MEDLINE®, Web of Science® and Scopus® databases were searched from March to April 2016 using combinations of keywords. Titles and abstracts were screened and studies meeting the inclusion criteria proceeded for full-text revision. These articles were then selected for data extraction on the prevalence, incidence and mortality. The majority of HIV-TB prevalence data reported in the analysed studies, including extrapulmonary/disseminated TB forms, was higher among migrant vs. nationals, some of the studies even showing increasing trends over time. Additionally, while HIV-TB incidence rates have decreased among migrants and nationals, migrants are still at a higher risk for this co-infection. Migrants with HIV-TB co-infection were also more prone to unsuccessful treatment outcomes, death and drug resistant TB. However, contradicting results also showed lower mortality compared to nationals. Overall, a disproportionate vulnerability of migrants to acquire the HIV-TB co-infection was observed across studies. Such vulnerability has been associated to low socioeconomic status, poor living conditions and limited access to healthcare. Adequate social support, early detection, appropriate treatment, and adequate access to healthcare are key improvements to tackle HIV-TB co-infection among these populations.

  3. Healthcare inequality issues among immigrant elders after neoliberal welfare reform: empirical findings from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Younsook

    2017-06-01

    Even with the increasing importance being placed on research into immigrant elders' healthcare use as countries change their policies to reflect their increasing immigrant and aging populations, little research has examined changes in healthcare use disparities between immigrant and native elders in relation to these policy changes. To fill this gap in the literature, this study examined healthcare disparities in relation to the welfare reform that the US implemented in 1996 and then compared significant indicators of immigrants' healthcare use during the pre- and post-reform periods. The difference-in-difference (DD) analyses and post hoc probing of the DD analyses were used in multivariate logistic regression of the National Health Information Survey data that were pooled for the pre- and post-reform periods. The results revealed that while inequalities in healthcare existed before the reform, they significantly increased after the reform. A further test showed that the changes in the inequalities were significant among relatively long-stay immigrants, but not significant among immigrants who entered the US before the reform and thus were exempted from the reform restrictions. During the pre-reform period, insurance, employment, sex, and race/ethnicity were related to healthcare use; however, the enabling factors (i.e., insurance, income, and education) and social structural factors (i.e., marital status, family structure, length of US residency, race/ethnicity, and geographical region) explained the post-reform immigrants' healthcare use, while controlling for healthcare needs factors. These findings suggest that welfare reform may be the driving force of inequalities in healthcare.

  4. Multiuser virtual worlds in healthcare education: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Sok Ying; Carpio, Guiller Augustin C; Lau, Ying; Tan, Seng Chee; Lim, Wee Shiong; Goh, Poh Sun

    2018-02-02

    The use of multiuser virtual worlds (MUVWs) for collaborative learning has generated interest among healthcare educators. Published evidence to support its use is growing, but none has synthesized the evidence to guide future work. This study sought to provide a comprehensive and systematic evaluation of MUVWs in healthcare education. A systematic review METHODS: A systematic search of five databases including CINAHL, Cochrane library, EMBASE, PubMed, and Scopus, was conducted from inception up to January 2017. Two independent researchers selected studies that met the inclusion criteria and assessed for methodological quality using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). A total of 18 studies were reviewed and their data were synthesized narratively using a 3-P model (presage-process-product). Average scores in the MERSQI for methodological quality are 10/18, which is modest. A rally by the government or professional bodies towards more collaborative working among healthcare professionals is a key driver behind implementing MUVWs. Funding is important for its development and evaluation. Team training in acute care and communication training were the most frequent learning objectives, and predominant learning activities include practice on simulation scenario and debriefing. Two-thirds of the studies did not explain their theoretical framework that underpinned their design and implementation of MUVWs. While MUVWs in healthcare education is generally well-received, learning outcomes remain inconclusive. Despite a growth of studies on the use of MUVW in healthcare education, there is a need for more understanding of the application of theories to inform the learning activities. Therefore, we suggest educators to incorporate a theoretical model to explain the learning processes behind MUVWs. To improve the quality of evidence, we call for researchers to employ a more rigorous and broader approach to evaluation that explicates longer

  5. Ethics interventions for healthcare professionals and students: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, Minna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Ruokonen, Minka; Repo, Hanna; Suhonen, Riitta

    2018-03-01

    The ethics and value bases in healthcare are widely acknowledged. There is a need to improve and raise awareness of ethics in complex systems and in line with competing needs, different stakeholders and patients' rights. Evidence-based strategies and interventions for the development of procedures and practice have been used to improve care and services. However, it is not known whether and to what extent ethics can be developed using interventions. To examine ethics interventions conducted on healthcare professionals and healthcare students to achieve ethics-related outcomes. A systematic review. Five electronic databases were searched: CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Philosopher's Index, PubMed and PsycINFO. We searched for published articles written in English without a time limit using the keywords: ethic* OR moral* AND intervention OR program OR pre-post OR quasi-experimental OR rct OR experimental AND nurse OR nursing OR health care. In the four-phased retrieval process, 23 full texts out of 4675 citations were included in the review. Data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Ethical consideration: This systematic review was conducted following good scientific practice in every phase. It is possible to affect the ethics of healthcare practices through professionals and students. All the interventions were educational in type. Many of the interventions were related to the ethical or moral sensitivity of the professionals, such as moral courage and empowerment. A few of the interventions focused on identifying ethical problems or research ethics. Patient-related outcomes followed by organisational outcomes can be improved by ethics interventions targeting professionals. Such outcomes are promising in developing ethical safety for healthcare patients and professionals.

  6. Big Data and Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S S-L; Gao, G; Koch, S

    2015-01-01

    This editorial is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Big Data and Analytics in Healthcare". The amount of data being generated in the healthcare industry is growing at a rapid rate. This has generated immense interest in leveraging the availability of healthcare data (and "big data") to improve health outcomes and reduce costs. However, the nature of healthcare data, and especially big data, presents unique challenges in processing and analyzing big data in healthcare. This Focus Theme aims to disseminate some novel approaches to address these challenges. More specifically, approaches ranging from efficient methods of processing large clinical data to predictive models that could generate better predictions from healthcare data are presented.

  7. Requirements for Interoperability in Healthcare Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Noumeir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interoperability is a requirement for the successful deployment of Electronic Health Records (EHR. EHR improves the quality of healthcare by enabling access to all relevant information at the diagnostic decision moment, regardless of location. It is a system that results from the cooperation of several heterogeneous distributed subsystems that need to successfully exchange information relative to a specific healthcare process. This paper analyzes interoperability impediments in healthcare by first defining them and providing concrete healthcare examples, followed by discussion of how specifications can be defined and how verification can be conducted to eliminate those impediments and ensure interoperability in healthcare. This paper also analyzes how Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE has been successful in enabling interoperability, and identifies some neglected aspects that need attention.

  8. Informatics for Precision Medicine and Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajia; Lin, Yuxin; Shen, Bairong

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed great advances in biomedical informatics. Biomedical informatics is an emerging field of healthcare that aims to translate the laboratory observation into clinical practice. Smart healthcare has also developed rapidly with ubiquitous sensor and communication technologies. It is able to capture the online patient-centric phenotypic variables, thus providing a rich information base for translational biomedical informatics. Biomedical informatics and smart healthcare represent two interrelated disciplines. On one hand, biomedical informatics translates the bench discoveries into bedside, and, on the other hand, it is reciprocally informed by clinical data generated from smart healthcare. In this chapter, we will introduce the major strategies and challenges in the application of biomedical informatics technology in precision medicine and healthcare. We highlight how the informatics technology will promote the precision medicine and therefore promise the improvement of healthcare.

  9. The role of institutional entrepreneurs in reforming healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Andy; Currie, Graeme; Waring, Justin; Finn, Rachael; Martin, Graham

    2012-02-01

    We draw on institutional entrepreneurship theory to analyse the dynamics of institutional change in a healthcare context. The focus of our interest is in the relationship between an institutional entrepreneur's 'subject position', defined in terms of their structural and normative legitimacy within the existing institutional landscape, and the nature of the change enacted. We develop this approach through an examination of the implementation of new pathways for cancer genetic services within the English National Health Service. Employing comparative case analysis we show that those who have limited structural legitimacy under prevailing conditions are most willing to engender change, but also least able; whereas those who have strong structural legitimacy are most able, but often least willing. However, those who are able rhetorically to combine a balance of structural and normative legitimacy are most able to produce change. In doing so, we demonstrate the importance of the concept of institutional entrepreneurship to understand healthcare reform. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomass feedstock analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The overall objectives of the project `Feasibility of electricity production from biomass by pressurized gasification systems` within the EC Research Programme JOULE II were to evaluate the potential of advanced power production systems based on biomass gasification and to study the technical and economic feasibility of these new processes with different type of biomass feed stocks. This report was prepared as part of this R and D project. The objectives of this task were to perform fuel analyses of potential woody and herbaceous biomasses with specific regard to the gasification properties of the selected feed stocks. The analyses of 15 Scandinavian and European biomass feed stock included density, proximate and ultimate analyses, trace compounds, ash composition and fusion behaviour in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The wood-derived fuels, such as whole-tree chips, forest residues, bark and to some extent willow, can be expected to have good gasification properties. Difficulties caused by ash fusion and sintering in straw combustion and gasification are generally known. The ash and alkali metal contents of the European biomasses harvested in Italy resembled those of the Nordic straws, and it is expected that they behave to a great extent as straw in gasification. Any direct relation between the ash fusion behavior (determined according to the standard method) and, for instance, the alkali metal content was not found in the laboratory determinations. A more profound characterisation of the fuels would require gasification experiments in a thermobalance and a PDU (Process development Unit) rig. (orig.) (10 refs.)

  11. Possible future HERA analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiser, Achim

    2015-12-01

    A variety of possible future analyses of HERA data in the context of the HERA data preservation programme is collected, motivated, and commented. The focus is placed on possible future analyses of the existing ep collider data and their physics scope. Comparisons to the original scope of the HERA pro- gramme are made, and cross references to topics also covered by other participants of the workshop are given. This includes topics on QCD, proton structure, diffraction, jets, hadronic final states, heavy flavours, electroweak physics, and the application of related theory and phenomenology topics like NNLO QCD calculations, low-x related models, nonperturbative QCD aspects, and electroweak radiative corrections. Synergies with other collider programmes are also addressed. In summary, the range of physics topics which can still be uniquely covered using the existing data is very broad and of considerable physics interest, often matching the interest of results from colliders currently in operation. Due to well-established data and MC sets, calibrations, and analysis procedures the manpower and expertise needed for a particular analysis is often very much smaller than that needed for an ongoing experiment. Since centrally funded manpower to carry out such analyses is not available any longer, this contribution not only targets experienced self-funded experimentalists, but also theorists and master-level students who might wish to carry out such an analysis.

  12. Aviation and healthcare: a comparative review with implications for patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parand, Anam; Soukup, Tayana; Reader, Tom; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Safety in aviation has often been compared with safety in healthcare. Following a recent article in this journal, the UK government set up an Independent Patient Safety Investigation Service, to emulate a similar well-established body in aviation. On the basis of a detailed review of relevant publications that examine patient safety in the context of aviation practice, we have drawn up a table of comparative features and a conceptual framework for patient safety. Convergence and divergence of safety-related behaviours across aviation and healthcare were derived and documented. Key safety-related domains that emerged included Checklists, Training, Crew Resource Management, Sterile Cockpit, Investigation and Reporting of Incidents and Organisational Culture. We conclude that whilst healthcare has much to learn from aviation in certain key domains, the transfer of lessons from aviation to healthcare needs to be nuanced, with the specific characteristics and needs of healthcare borne in mind. On the basis of this review, it is recommended that healthcare should emulate aviation in its resourcing of staff who specialise in human factors and related psychological aspects of patient safety and staff wellbeing. Professional and post-qualification staff training could specifically include Cognitive Bias Avoidance Training, as this appears to play a key part in many errors relating to patient safety and staff wellbeing. PMID:26770817

  13. Healthcare mergers and acquisitions: strategies for consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Alan M

    2011-01-01

    The passage of federal healthcare reform legislation, in combination with other factors, makes it likely that the next few years will be a major period of consolidation for healthcare organizations. This article examines the seven key forces reshaping healthcare delivery--from insurance industry consolidation to cost inflation to the increasing gap between financially strong and struggling providers--and provides advice for organizations on both sides of an acquisition.

  14. Contact Allergy in Danish Healthcare Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, Jakob F; Menné, Torkil; Sommerlund, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Contact dermatitis in healthcare workers is a pan-European problem. We conducted a retrospective observational study of the patch-test results of 1402 healthcare workers and 1402 matched controls with contact dermatitis who were treated at 3 hospitals departments in Denmark between 2007 and 2014....... on the use of rubber accelerators in, for example, protective gloves, which are widely used by healthcare professionals....

  15. Health coaching: adding value in healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Coral S; Russell, Craig S

    2013-05-01

    During the last decade, debate about the nation's ailing healthcare system has moved to the forefront. In 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was signed into law. This groundbreaking piece of legislation impacts every aspect of the health industry, affecting everyone from doctors and health-care facilities to insurers and benefits consultants to business owners and patients. The ultimate goal of PPACA is to decrease the number of uninsured Americans and reduce the overall costs of healthcare.

  16. Job satisfaction and retention of health-care providers in Afghanistan and Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study describes job satisfaction and intention to stay on the job among primary health-care providers in countries with distinctly different human resources crises, Afghanistan and Malawi. Methods Using a cross-sectional design, we enrolled 87 health-care providers in 32 primary health-care facilities in Afghanistan and 360 providers in 10 regional hospitals in Malawi. The study questionnaire was used to assess job satisfaction, intention to stay on the job and five features of the workplace environment: resources, performance recognition, financial compensation, training opportunities and safety. Descriptive analyses, exploratory factor analyses for scale development, bivariate correlation analyses and bivariate and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. Results The multivariate model for Afghanistan, with demographic, background and work environment variables, explained 23.9% of variance in job satisfaction (F(9,73) = 5.08; P job satisfaction. The multivariate model for intention to stay for Afghanistan explained 23.6% of variance (F(8,74) = 4.10; P job satisfaction (F(8,332) = 4.19; P job satisfaction and intention to stay on the job, differed substantially. These findings demonstrate the need for more detailed comparative human resources for health-care research, particularly regarding the relative importance of different determinants of job satisfaction and intention to stay in different contexts and the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve health-care worker performance and retention. PMID:24533615

  17. Healthcare operations management through use of simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafee, Navonil; Williams, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades healthcare organisations have grown in size and complexity and healthcare costs have outpaced economic growth. In countries where healthcare is publicly-funded, increasing costs have traditionally meant a rise in the healthcare budgets in real terms; however, the ongoing global financial and economic crisis (2007-present) has had spending implications on governmental budgets for public resources in several countries. This apparent contradiction - "provide better service at a lesser cost" - which may last for years to come therefore necessitates the careful use of the allo

  18. Promoting effective teamwork in the healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sarah

    2017-03-22

    Patients require access to various healthcare professionals to manage their healthcare needs. Most nurses work in a team established to provide optimum care for patients. This article explores the stages necessary to develop an effective healthcare team and identifies the attributes required for effective teamwork. These include: effective leadership, a shared mental approach (a common understanding of the roles and responsibilities of all members of the team), respect among team members and shared training. Scenarios involving a rheumatology team that includes the author are used to demonstrate how effective teams can be established in practice, and the benefits of effective healthcare teams to staff well-being and patient care.

  19. Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma Early

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin Cancer" Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma Early / NIH Research to Results / Skin and Sun – ...

  20. Healthcare seeking behaviour among Chinese elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Wei; Xu, Ling; Li, Zhenhong; Ding, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Yan, Fei

    2017-04-18

    Purpose The Chinese population is rapidly ageing before they are rich. The purpose of this paper is to describe healthcare seeking behaviour and the critical factors associated with healthcare seeking behaviour. Design/methodology/approach Using a purposive sampling method, the authors recruited 44 adults aged 60 years or older from three provinces, representing the developed (Shanghai), undeveloped (Ningxia) regions and the regions in between (Hubei). From July to September 2008, using a semi-structured guide, the authors interviewed participants in focus group discussions. Findings The healthcare needs for chronic and catastrophic diseases were high; however, the healthcare demands were low and healthcare utilizations were even lower owing to the limited accessibility to healthcare services, particularly, in underdeveloped rural areas. "Too expensive to see a doctor" was a prime complaint, explaining substantial discrepancies between healthcare needs, demands and use. Care seeking behaviour varied depending on insurance availability, perceived performance, particularly hospital services, and prescription medications. Participants consistently rated increasing healthcare accessibility as a high priority, including offering financial aid, and improving service convenience. Improving social security fairness was the first on the elderly's wish list. Originality/value Healthcare demand and use were lower than needs, and were influenced by multiple factors, primarily, service affordability and efficiency, perceived performance and hospital service quality.

  1. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Berdud

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated.

  2. Leading Lean: a Canadian healthcare leader's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Benjamin A; Golden, Brian; Hannam, Rosemary; Morra, Dante

    2009-01-01

    Canadian healthcare organizations are increasingly asked to do more with less, and too often this has resulted in demands on staff to simply work harder and longer. Lean methodologies, originating from Japanese industrial organizations and most notably Toyota, offer an alternative - tried and tested approaches to working smarter. Lean, with its systematic approaches to reducing waste, has found its way to Canadian healthcare organizations with promising results. This article reports on a study of five Canadian healthcare providers that have recently implemented Lean. We offer stories of success but also identify potential obstacles and ways by which they may be surmounted to provide better value for our healthcare investments.

  3. Healthcare and Social Assistance Sector (NAICS 62)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental regulations and information for the Healthcare sector, including doctor's offices, hospitals, and medical laboratories. Includes information about dental amalgam wastewater, sterilizers, and medical waste.

  4. Steering healthcare service delivery: a regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Gyan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore regulation in India's healthcare sector and makes recommendations needed for enhancing the healthcare service. The literature was reviewed to understand healthcare's regulatory context. To understand the current healthcare system, qualitative data were collected from state-level officials, public and private hospital staff. A patient survey was performed to assess service quality (QoS). Regulation plays a central role in driving healthcare QoS. India needs to strengthen market and institutional co-production based approaches for steering its healthcare in which delivery processes are complex and pose different challenges. This study assesses current healthcare regulation in an Indian state and presents a framework for studying and strengthening regulation. Agile regulation should be based on service delivery issues (pull approach) rather than monitoring and sanctions based regulatory environment (push approach). Healthcare pitfalls across the world seem to follow similar follies. India's complexity and experience is useful for emerging and developed economies. The author reviewed around 70 publications and synthesised them in healthcare regulatory contexts. Patient's perception of private providers could be a key input towards steering regulation. Identifying gaps across QoS dimensions would be useful in taking corrective measures.

  5. Web-based Service Portal in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silhavy, Petr; Silhavy, Radek; Prokopova, Zdenka

    Information delivery is one the most important task in healthcare. The growing sector of electronic healthcare has an important impact on the information delivery. There are two basic approaches towards information delivering. The first is web portal and second is touch-screen terminal. The aim of this paper is to investigate the web-based service portal. The most important advantage of web-based portal in the field of healthcare is an independent access for patients. This paper deals with the conditions and frameworks for healthcare portals

  6. Lean in healthcare from employees' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drotz, Erik; Poksinska, Bozena

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute toward a deeper understanding of the new roles, responsibilities, and job characteristics of employees in Lean healthcare organizations. The paper is based on three cases studies of healthcare organizations that are regarded as successful examples of Lean applications in the healthcare context. Data were collected by methods including interviews, observations, and document studies. The implementation of Lean in healthcare settings has had a great influence on the roles, responsibilities, and job characteristics of the employees. The focus has shifted from healthcare professionals, where clinical autonomy and professional skills have been the guarding principles of patient care, to process improvement and teamwork. Different job characteristics may make it difficult to implement certain Lean practices in healthcare. Teamwork and decentralization of authority are examples of Lean practices that could be considered countercultural because of the strong professional culture and uneven power distribution, with doctors as the dominant decision makers. Teamwork, value flow orientation, and company-wide involvement in CI were associated with positive effects on the organizations' working environment, staff development, and organizational performance. In order to succeed with Lean healthcare, it is important to understand and recognize the differences in job characteristics between Lean manufacturing and healthcare. This paper provides insights into how Lean implementation changes the roles, responsibilities, and job characteristics of healthcare staff and the challenges and implications that may follow from this.

  7. Childhood bullying and healthcare adherence in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Bohinc, R Jordan; Wiederman, Michael W

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between childhood bullying and healthcare adherence in adulthood has been rarely studied, but one published study suggests that being bullied in childhood is related to lower healthcare adherence among adolescents. This previous study examined few adherence variables and was limited to youths. In this study, we assessed five variables for childhood bullying as related to seven measures of healthcare adherence among a cohort of adult primary care outpatients. Using a cross-sectional, self-report survey methodology in a sample of 263 consecutive internal medicine outpatients, we examined five aspects of bullying and seven aspects of adherence with general healthcare. Being a victim of bullying, type of bullying (emotional, physical), number of years bullied and number of bullies each evidenced no statistical relationships with healthcare adherence. However, being a bully demonstrated several statistical relationships with healthcare adherence, indicating less adherence to instructions provided by healthcare professionals. Despite all of the deleterious psychological and physical effects of being bullied in childhood, there was no evidence that non-adherence with healthcare in adulthood is one of them. In contrast, bullies evidenced several areas of reduced healthcare adherence. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. The Rise of a European Healthcare Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2017-01-01

    -being of all people; (b) the application of the free movement principle to national healthcare systems in particular by the EU’s Court of Justice (CJEU); and (c) the austerity packages and the stricter EU surveillance of national budgets since the debt crises. The key questions of this special issue......’s budgetary surveillance deeply intrudes into healthcare policies, but here the involvement of health actors has remained limited. The European Commission and the CJEU have played an important role in the European integration of healthcare policies, but reluctance towards EU intrusion into national healthcare...

  9. Traceability in healthcare: crossing boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovis, C

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a survey on the problem of traceability in healthcare. Traceability covers many different aspects and its understanding varies among different players. In supply chains and retails, traceability usually covers aspects pertaining to logistics. The challenge is to keep trace of objects manufactured, to track their locations in a production and distribution processes. In food industry, traceability has received a lot of attention because of public health problems related to infectious diseases. For instance, in Europe, the challenge of traceability has been to build the tracking of meat, from the living animal to the shell. In the health sector, traceability has mostly been involved in patient safety around human products such as blood derivates contaminants or implanted devices and prosthesis such as mammary implants. There are growing interests involving traceability in health related to drug safety, including the problem of counterfeited drugs, and to privacy. Traceability is also increasingly seen as a mean to improve efficiency of the logistics of care and a way to better understand costs and usage of resources. This survey is reviewing the literature and proposes a discussion based on the real use and needs of traceability in a large teaching hospital. Traceability in healthcare is at the crossroads of numerous needs. It is therefore of particular complexity and raises many new challenges. Identification management and entity tracking, from serialization of consumers' good production in the supply chains, to the identification of actors, patients, care providers, locations and processes is a huge effort, tackling economical, political, ethical and technical challenges. New requirements are needed, not usually met in the supply chain, such as serialization and persistence in time. New problems arise, such as privacy and legal frameworks. There are growing needs to increase traceability for drug products, related to drug safety, counterfeited drugs

  10. Economic Disparities and Syphilis Incidence in Massachusetts, 2001-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, Laura; Caten, Evan; Hsu, Katherine; DeMaria, Alfred

    We used area-level indicators of poverty to describe economic disparities in the incidence rate of infectious syphilis in Massachusetts to (1) determine whether methods developed in earlier AIDS analyses in Massachusetts could be applied to syphilis and (2) characterize syphilis trends during a time of increased rates of syphilis incidence. Using census tract data and population counts from the US Census Bureau and Massachusetts data on syphilis, we analyzed the incidence rate of syphilis infection from 2001 to 2013 by the poverty level of the census tract in which people with syphilis resided, stratified by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. The syphilis incidence rate increased in all census tract groups in Massachusetts from 2001 to 2013, and disparities in incidence rates by area poverty level persisted over time. The overall incidence rate of syphilis increased 6.9-fold from 2001 to 2013 in all census tract poverty-level groupings (from 1.5 to 10.3 per 100 000 population), but the rise in rate was especially high in the poorest census tracts (from 5.6 to 31.0 per 100 000 population) and among men (from 2.2 to 19.4 per 100 000 population). The highest syphilis incidence rate was among non-Hispanic black people. The largest changes in incidence rate occurred after 2010. One region had a disproportionate increase in incidence rates and a disproportionate impact on the statewide trend. Census tract poverty analyses can inform the targeting of interventions that make progress toward reducing disparities in rates of syphilis incidence possible.

  11. AMS analyses at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    The major use of ANTARES is Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) with 14 C being the most commonly analysed radioisotope - presently about 35 % of the available beam time on ANTARES is used for 14 C measurements. The accelerator measurements are supported by, and dependent on, a strong sample preparation section. The ANTARES AMS facility supports a wide range of investigations into fields such as global climate change, ice cores, oceanography, dendrochronology, anthropology, and classical and Australian archaeology. Described here are some examples of the ways in which AMS has been applied to support research into the archaeology, prehistory and culture of this continent's indigenous Aboriginal peoples. (author)

  12. Imagined Potentialities of Healthcare Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on health care technologies and initiatives, particularly, Electronic Health Records (EHRs). These technologies are ascribed various potentialities, attributing them the capacity to do a wide range of things, from improving efficiency to saving medical costs and even saving...... lives. These complex and often conflicting imagined potentialities lead to inflicted burden on designers, policy makers and healthcare practitioners who are faced with different realities on the ground. The conflicting notions have real life effects as these impact our present understanding of...... an inherent capacity to produce a change. The term potentiality has a long history in Western philosophy, in particularly in Aristotle’s metaphysics where he distinguishes between potentiality and actuality. Potentiality refers to the capacity that a thing can be said to have; the capacity to come...

  13. Understanding bullying in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Belinda

    2015-12-02

    Bullying is a pervasive problem in healthcare organisations. Inquiries and reports on patient care and poor practice in the NHS have emphasised the substantial negative effects this behaviour may have on patient care. If bullying is to be addressed, it is crucial we develop clarity about what behaviours constitute bullying and how these behaviours differ from other negative behaviours in the workplace. It is important that we recognise the extent of the problem; statistics on the prevalence of bullying are likely to be an underestimate because of under-reporting of bullying. Effective interventions may only be designed and implemented if there is knowledge about what precipitates bullying and the magnitude of the changes required in organisations to tackle bullying. Individuals should also be aware of the options that are available to them should they be the target of bullying behaviour and what they should do if they witness bullying in their workplace.

  14. Legitimate Allocation of Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper; Lauridsen, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    Citizens' consent to political decisions is often regarded as a necessary condition of political legitimacy. Consequently, legitimate allocation of healthcare has seemed almost unattainable in contemporary pluralistic societies. The problem is that citizens do not agree on any single principle...... governing priorities among groups of patients. The Accountability for Reasonableness (A4R) framework suggests an ingenious solution to this problem of moral disagreement. Rather than advocating any substantive distributive principle, its advocates propose a feasible set of conditions, which, if met...... by decision makers at the institutional level, provide, so it is promised, legitimate decisions. While we agree that A4R represents an important contribution to the priority-setting debate, we challenge the framework in two respects. First, we argue that A4R, and more specifically the relevance condition of A...

  15. The importance of waste from healthcare services for teachers, students and graduates of the healthcare sector

    OpenAIRE

    Moreschi, Claudete; Rempel, Claudete; Backes, Dirce Stein; Carreno, Ioná; Siqueira, Daiana Foggiato de; Marina, Bruna

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the perception healthcare sector teachers, students and graduates from two institutions of higher learning in Rio Grande do Sul, on the generation of waste from healthcare services. It used a qualitative research approach, performed with 13 teachers, 18 students and 12 healthcare professionals, who were collected through a focus group. The main results showed there is a perception toward the importance of proper segregation and disposal of Healthcare Service Waste,...

  16. EXTERNAL AUDIT OF HEALTHCARE ORGANISATIONS AS A FACILITATOR OF QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN HEALTHCARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Robida

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Audit of quality of healthcare in healthcare organisations is described. Advantages of external audit are stressed in connection with development of management of a system of total quality. It is explicitly stated that audit of a healthcare organisation is focused on compliance with published standards and not on individual professionals or educational and training facilities. The importance of generic standards of healthcare is emphasized. A description of external audit in some other countries and plans for Slovenia is given.

  17. Grazing Incidence Optics Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian; Smith, W. Scott; Gubarev, Mikhail; McCracken, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    This project is to demonstrate the capability to directly fabricate lightweight, high-resolution, grazing-incidence x-ray optics using a commercially available robotic polishing machine. Typical x-ray optics production at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) uses a replication process in which metal mirrors are electroformed on to figured and polished mandrels from which they are later removed. The attraction of this process is that multiple copies can be made from a single master. The drawback is that the replication process limits the angular resolution that can be attained. By directly fabricating each shell, errors inherent in the replication process are removed. The principal challenge now becomes how to support the mirror shell during all aspects of fabrication, including the necessary metrology to converge on the required mirror performance specifications. This program makes use of a Zeeko seven-axis computer-controlled polishing machine (see fig. 1) and supporting fabrication, metrology, and test equipment at MSFC. The overall development plan calls for proof-of-concept demonstration with relatively thick mirror shells (5-6 mm, fig. 2) which are straightforward to support and then a transition to much thinner shells (2-3 mm), which are an order of magnitude thinner than those used for Chandra. Both glass and metal substrates are being investigated. Currently, a thick glass shell is being figured. This has enabled experience to be gained with programming and operating the polishing machine without worrying about shell distortions or breakage. It has also allowed time for more complex support mechanisms for figuring/ polishing and metrology to be designed for the more challenging thinner shells. These are now in fabrication. Figure 1: Zeeko polishing machine.

  18. Goiania incident case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petterson, J.S.

    1988-06-01

    The reasons for wanting to document this case study and present the findings are simple. According to USDOE technical risk assessments (and our own initial work on the Hanford socioeconomic study), the likelihood of a major accident involving exposure to radioactive materials in the process of site characterization, construction, operation, and closure of a high-level waste repository is extremely remote. Most would agree, however, that there is a relatively high probability that a minor accident involving radiological contamination will occur sometime during the lifetime of the repository -- for example, during transport, at an MRS site or at the permanent site itself during repacking and deposition. Thus, one of the major concerns of the Yucca Mountain Socioeconomic Study is the potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential accident scenarios have been under consideration (such as a transportation or other surface accident which results in a significant decline in tourism, the number of conventions, or the selection of Nevada as a retirement residence). The results of the work in Goiania make it clear, however, that such a significant shift in established social patterns and trends is not likely to occur as a direct outcome of a single nuclear-related accident (even, perhaps, a relatively major one), but rather, are likely to occur as a result of the enduring social interpretations of such an accident -- that is, as a result of the process of understanding, communicating, and socially sustaining a particular set of associations with respect to the initial incident

  19. Workplace violence against medical staff in healthcare facilities in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, M; Morris, E; Sobers-Grannum, N

    2016-10-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests increasing workplace violence against healthcare workers in the Caribbean, but the prevalence is largely undocumented. To determine the prevalence of workplace violence reported by medical staff at primary care clinics in Barbados. A study utilizing a modified version of the standard World Health Organization Workplace Violence Questionnaire, designed to assess the incidence, types and features of workplace violence. All nursing and physician staff on duty at the island's eight primary care clinics during the study period were invited to participate. Of the 102 respondents (72% response rate), 63% of nursing and physician staff at the polyclinics in Barbados reported at least one episode of violence in the past year. The majority reported being exposed to verbal abuse (60%) and 19% reported being exposed to bullying. Seven percent of the staff reported incidents of sexual harassment, 3% physical violence and another 3% reported racial harassment. Patients emerged as the main perpetrators of violence (64%). Logistic regression showed statistically significant associations between gender and workplace violence. Females and nurses were more predisposed to experience violent incidents than males and physicians. Over a half of medical staff surveyed reported experiencing some type of violence in the past year, female gender being a significant predictor of abuse. Adequate documentation and implementing clear policies and violence prevention programmes in health institutions are crucial steps towards addressing this issue. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Newborn healthcare in urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, J; Osrin, D; Patil, B; Neogi, S B; Chauhan, M; Khanna, R; Kumar, R; Paul, V K; Zodpey, S

    2016-12-01

    The rapid population growth in urban India has outpaced the municipal capacity to build essential infrastructures that make life in cities safe and healthy. Local and national governments alike are grappling with the challenges of urbanization with thousands migrating from villages to cities. Thus, urbanization in India has been accompanied by a concentration of poverty and urban public healthcare has emerged as one of the most pressing priorities facing our country. Newborn mortality rates in urban settings are lower than rural areas, early neonatal deaths account for greater proportion than late neonatal deaths. The available evidence suggests that socio-economic inequalities and poor environment pose major challenges for newborn health. Moreover, fragmented and weak public health system, multiplicity of actors and limited capacity of public health planning further constrain the delivery of quality and affordable health care service. Though healthcare is concentrated in urban areas, delay in deciding to seek health care, reaching a source of it and receiving appropriate care affects the health outcomes disproportionately. However, a few city initiatives and innovations piloted in different states and cities have brought forth the evidences of effectiveness of different strategies. Recently launched National Urban Health Mission (NUHM) provides an opportunity for strategic thinking and actions to improve newborn health outcomes in India. There is also an opportunity for coalescence of activities around National Health Mission (NHM) and Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health+Adolescent (RMNCH+A) strategy to develop feasible and workable models in different urban settings. Concomitant operational research needs to be carried out so that the obstacles, approaches and response to the program can be understood.