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Sample records for analysing healthcare incident

  1. A human error taxonomy for analysing healthcare incident reports: assessing reporting culture and its effects on safety perfomance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itoh, Kenji; Omata, N.; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2009-01-01

    The present paper reports on a human error taxonomy system developed for healthcare risk management and on its application to evaluating safety performance and reporting culture. The taxonomy comprises dimensions for classifying errors, for performance-shaping factors, and for the maturity...

  2. IT-support for healthcare professionals acting in major incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten; Nielsen, Esben Toftdahl

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on development of it support for healthcare professionals acting in major incidents. We introduce the participatory design approach as adequate for analysis, design and development of technologies for use in complex environments and situations, and describe the actual participa......This paper focuses on development of it support for healthcare professionals acting in major incidents. We introduce the participatory design approach as adequate for analysis, design and development of technologies for use in complex environments and situations, and describe the actual...... the BlueBio biomonitor prototype, a wireless multifunction biomonitor. BlueBio data can be accessed by the healthcare professionals independent of where they are located and displayed on different types of devices tailored to the needs of the individual professional. Finally we discuss some challenges...... regarding the prototype development process....

  3. The Incidence of Public Spending on Healthcare: Comparative Evidence from Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. O'Donnell (Owen); E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy); R.P. Rannan-Eliya (Ravi)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe article compares the incidence of public healthcare across 11 Asian countries and provinces, testing the dominance of healthcare concentration curves against an equal distribution and Lorenz curves and across countries. The analysis reveals that the distribution of public healthcare

  4. Geographic analysis of the variation in the incidence of ADHD in a country with free access to healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kathrine Bang; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Olsen, Jørn;

    2015-01-01

    . The associations between the incidence of ADHD and contextual factors were analysed using Bayesian spatial regression models. RESULTS: We found a considerable variation in the incidence of ADHD across the municipalities. Significant clustering of both high and low incidence of ADHD was identified and mapped using...... in the municipalities was observed despite tax-financed and free access to healthcare. Although not statistically significant, results indicate that accessibility to diagnostic resources might explain some of the variation in ADHD incidence. In contrast to US studies the observed variation was not statistically...

  5. What to do with healthcare Incident Reporting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Cuong Pham

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Incident Reporting Systems (IRS are and will continue to be an important influence on improving patient safety. They can provide valuable insights into how and why patients can be harmed at the organizational level. However, they are not the panacea that many believe them to be. They have several limitations that should be considered. Most of these limitations stem from inherent biases of voluntary reporting systems. These limitations include: i IRS can’t be used to measure safety (error rates; ii IRS can’t be used to compare organizations; iii IRS can’t be used to measure changes over time; iv IRS generate too many reports; v IRS often don’t generate in-depth analyses or result in strong interventions to reduce risk; vi IRS are associated with costs. IRS do offer significant value; their value is found in the following: i IRS can be used to identify local system hazards; ii IRS can be used to aggregate experiences for uncommon conditions; iii IRS can be used to share lessons within and across organizations; iv IRS can be used to increase patient safety culture. Moving forward, several strategies are suggested to maximize their value: i make reporting easier; ii make reporting meaningful to the reporter; iii make the measure of success system changes, rather than events reported; iv prioritize which events to report and investigate, report and investigate them well; v convene with diverse stakeholders to enhance the value of IRS.

  6. Human factors analyses of nuclear power plant incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human action plays vital role in occurrence and progression of many nuclear power plant incidents such as occurred in TMI-2 and Chernobyl reactors. Therefore, it is essential for ensuring safety of nuclear facilities to prevent occurrence of human error and to take proper recovery action if it occurs. It is necessary to have deep understanding of causes and mechanism of human error. For this purpose, we analysed operators behavior in seven U.S. nuclear power plant incidents from the view point of human factors. (author)

  7. International Comparative Analyses of Incidents Reporting Systems for Healthcare Risk Management%美英加澳和中国台湾地区医疗不良事件上报系统管理模式的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔小花; 袁强; 孙纽云; 李幼平; 张宗久; 王莉; 周军; 梁铭会; 成岚; 高光明

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare administration of incidence reporting systems for healthcare risk management in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia, and Taiwan, and to provide evidence and recommendations for healthcare risk management policy in China.Methods We searched the official websites of the healthcare risk management agencies of the four countries and one district for laws, regulatory documents, research reports, reviews,and evaluation forms concerned with healthcare risk management and assessment.Descriptive comparative analysis was performed on relevant documents.Results (1) A total of 142 documents were included in this study.The United States had the most relevant documents (68).(2) The type of incidents from reporting systems has expanded from medication errors and hospital-acquired infections to near-misses, and now includes all patient safety incidents.(3) The incidencereporting systems can be grouped into two models: government-led and legal/regulatory/NGO-collaborative.(4) In two cases, reporting systems were established for specific incident types: One for death or serious injury events (the sentinel events database in Britain, SIRL), and one for healthcare-associated infections (NHSN in America).(5) Compared to the four countries, Taiwan's system put more emphasis on public welfare, confidentiality, and information sharing.The contents of reporting there covered every aspect of risk management to create a more secure environment.Conclusion (1)Britain's national reporting and learning system was representative of a government-led model; (2) The United States was the earliest country to have a reporting system, which included a limited range of incident types.Management of incidents became more reliable with increased application of laws, regulations, and guidances; (3) Both the Canadian and the Australian systems drew from the American experience and are still developing; (4) The Taiwanese system was comprehensive and is an

  8. Problems and consequences in the use of professional interpreters: qualitative analysis of incidents from primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadziabdic, Emina; Heikkilä, Kristiina; Albin, Björn; Hjelm, Katarina

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore what problems are reported by healthcare professionals in primary healthcare concerning the use of interpreters and what the problems lead to. The study involved a single case in a real-life situation with qualitative content analysis of 60 incident reports written by different healthcare professionals. The main problems documented were related to language, such as lack of the interpreters with proficiency in a particular language, and to organisational routines, with difficulties in the availability of interpreters and access to the interpreter agency. The problems reported led to incorrect use of time and resources, which increased the workload and thus delayed treatment. Other consequences were limited possibilities to communicate and thus consultation was carried out without a professional interpreter, using family members instead. The results highlight the importance of developing good co-operation between the interpreter agency and the primary healthcare centre in order to fulfil the existing policy of using professional interpreters to provide the right interpreter at the right time and guarantee high-quality care. PMID:21790876

  9. Accelerate Healthcare Data Analytics: An Agile Practice to Perform Collaborative and Reproducible Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Bibo; Sun, Wen; Yu, Yiqin; Li, Jing; Hu, Gang; Xie, Guotong

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in cloud computing and machine learning made it more convenient for researchers to gain insights from massive healthcare data, while performing analyses on healthcare data in current practice still lacks efficiency for researchers. What's more, collaborating among different researchers and sharing analysis results are challenging issues. In this paper, we developed a practice to make analytics process collaborative and analysis results reproducible by exploiting and extending Jupyter Notebook. After applying this practice in our use cases, we can perform analyses and deliver results with less efforts in shorter time comparing to our previous practice. PMID:27577444

  10. Incidence of eating disorders in Danish psychiatric secondary healthcare 1970-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Carina; Jensen, Signe Ow; Plessen, Kerstin J;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Is an increased focus on eating disorders during the past few decades reflected by increasing occurrence in the psychiatric health service system. METHOD: All first-time diagnoses of eating disorders identified in the Danish Central Psychiatric Research Register 1970-2008 constitute...... the present research database. Age-standardized rates per 100,000 inhabitants were calculated and autoregressive models were fitted for males and females separately as well as for in- and outpatients. RESULTS: The incidence of eating disorders diagnosed in Danish psychiatric secondary healthcare has increased...... considerably during a nearly 40-year period of observation both within the general category of eating disorders and also specifically for anorexia nervosa. The steepest increase is seen within females aged 15-19 years, where the highest incidences are also found. Anorexia nervosa constitutes the vast majority...

  11. Analysing the Non-medical Technical Factors that Affect the Normal Operation of Our Healthcare Based on the Incident of Amniotic Fluid Embolism%从羊水栓塞事件看影响医疗正常运行的非医疗技术因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢笛; 宋治

    2015-01-01

    By analysing the treatment of the county's postpartum hemorrhage deaths ,we believe the non‐medical technical factors that affect the normal operation of our healthcare are as follows :a serious lack of understanding of the importance of science popularization in serious common medical diseases or rare complications in the society . Overhigh medical treatment expectations exist in society .Media workers failed to have sufficient knowledge and professionalism in the fields of medical news reporting undermines trust between doctors and patients .Hospitals dealing with disputes fail to arm with exact law weapons .Doctors and patients should be alliance which strives to deal with diseases and remove the body pains . There should be mutual trust ,cooperation and understanding between them .However once a medical dispute or accident takes place ,this alliance splits and they stand in opposites .The mutual distrust leads to the escalation of the conflict . These reasons become the prominent non‐medical factors in strained relationships between doctors and patients .%分析某县产妇产后大出血死亡事件处置过程,认为存在以下影响我国医疗正常运行的非医疗技术因素:当代社会对医学常见疾病的严重、少见并发症科学普及的重要性及认识严重欠缺;社会对医疗效果普遍存在过高的期望值;媒体未能真正了解医疗的特殊性并作有专业水准的报道,影响了“医患”关系发展;医方处理纠纷法理依据运用欠妥当;医患双方本是共同对付疾病、去除病痛的同盟体,本应相互信任、配合、理解,但一旦出现医疗纠纷、事故,这个共同体却分裂为对立面,互不信任导致矛盾升级。这些原因成为医患矛盾中突出的非医疗技术因素。

  12. Increasing incidence of hospital-acquired and healthcare-associated bacteremia in northeast Thailand: a multicenter surveillance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliwan Hongsuwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the epidemiology of nosocomial bloodstream infections in public hospitals in developing countries. We evaluated trends in incidence of hospital-acquired bacteremia (HAB and healthcare-associated bacteremia (HCAB and associated mortality in a developing country using routinely available databases. METHODS: Information from the microbiology and hospital databases of 10 provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand was linked with the national death registry for 2004-2010. Bacteremia was considered hospital-acquired if detected after the first two days of hospital admission, and healthcare-associated if detected within two days of hospital admission with a prior inpatient episode in the preceding 30 days. RESULTS: A total of 3,424 patients out of 1,069,443 at risk developed HAB and 2,184 out of 119,286 at risk had HCAB. Of these 1,559 (45.5% and 913 (41.8% died within 30 days, respectively. Between 2004 and 2010, the incidence rate of HAB increased from 0.6 to 0.8 per 1,000 patient-days at risk (p<0.001, and the cumulative incidence of HCAB increased from 1.2 to 2.0 per 100 readmissions (p<0.001. The most common causes of HAB were Acinetobacter spp. (16.2%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.9%, and Staphylococcus aureus (13.9%, while those of HCAB were Escherichia coli (26.3%, S. aureus (14.0%, and K. pneumoniae (9.7%. There was an overall increase over time in the proportions of ESBL-producing E. coli causing HAB and HCAB. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a high and increasing incidence of HAB and HCAB in provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand, increasing proportions of ESBL-producing isolates, and very high associated mortality.

  13. Incidence of Garlic common latent virus in Argentina, and phylogenetic and recombination analyses of isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Karina Torrico

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate the incidence and prevalence of Garlic common latent virus (GarCLV in the main production regions of garlic (Allium sativum in Argentina, and to perform phylogenetic and recombination analyses in isolates from these regions. Leaf samples (3,050 were taken from four garlic commercial types, in 13 departments of the four main garlic-producing provinces of Argentina, in a 1,175-ha sampling area. Virus infection was evaluated with DAS-Elisa test using specific antiserum, and the phylogenetic and recombination analyses were done with capsid protein (CP nucleotide sequence of seven GarCLV isolates from the provinces. The incidence of GarCLV in the evaluated provinces varied between 6.7 and 22% of the samples, whereas the prevalence varied between 52.6 and 70%. In the analysis of garlic commercial types, Morado showed the highest incidence of the virus, in the province of San Juan, whereas Rosado Paraguayo had the lowest incidence, in the province of Cordoba. Nucleotide identity in the CP sequences ranged between 80.3 and 97.6%. The phylogenetic analysis shows the presence of two main groups of GarCLV and of a possible third group that would include only a German isolate. The recombination analysis between isolates from different parts of the world evidences the presence of recombinant isolates from Poland and Australia.

  14. Incidence of adverse events among healthcare workers following H1N1 Mass immunization in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankrah, Daniel N A; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; De Bruin, Marie L;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cases of the A(H1N1) 2009 influenza were first recorded in Ghana in July 2009. In June 2010 when prioritized vaccination against the novel A(H1N1) 2009 influenza virus started in the country, health workers were among the selected groups to receive the vaccination. OBJECTIVE: The aim...... of this study was to determine the distribution and types of adverse events reported following immunization of healthcare workers at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital from the day vaccination started until 1 week after the end of vaccination. METHODS: Safety data collected during the A(H1N1) 2009 influenza...

  15. Prevalence and incidence of latent tuberculosis infection in georgian healthcare workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Whitaker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis is a major occupational hazard in low and middle-income countries. Limited data exist on serial testing of healthcare workers (HCWs with interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI, especially in low and middle-income countries. We sought to evaluate the rates of and risk factors for LTBI prevalence and LTBI test conversion among HCWs using the tuberculin skin test (TST and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube assay (QFT-GIT. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study was conducted among HCWs in the country of Georgia. Subjects completed a questionnaire, and TST and QFT-GIT tests were performed. LTBI testing was repeated 6-26 months after baseline testing. RESULTS: Among 319 HCWs enrolled, 89% reported prior BCG vaccination, and 60% worked in TB healthcare facilities (HCFs. HCWs from TB HCFs had higher prevalence of positive QFT-GIT and TST than those from non-TB HCFs: 107/194 (55% vs. 30/125 (31% QFT-GIT positive (p<0.0001 and 128/189 (69% vs. 64/119 (54% TST positive (p = 0.01. There was fair agreement between TST and QFT-GIT (kappa = 0.42, 95% CI 0.31-0.52. In multivariate analysis, frequent contact with TB patients was associated with increased risk of positive QFT-GIT (aOR 3.04, 95% CI 1.79-5.14 but not positive TST. Increasing age was associated with increased risk of positive QFT-GIT (aOR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.09 and TST (aOR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10. High rates of HCW conversion were seen: the QFT-GIT conversion rate was 22.8/100 person-years, and TST conversion rate was 17.1/100 person-years. In multivariate analysis, female HCWs had decreased risk of TST conversion (aOR 0.05, 95% CI 0.01-0.43, and older HCWs had increased risk of QFT-GIT conversion (aOR 1.07 per year, 95% CI 1.01-1.13. CONCLUSION: LTBI prevalence and LTBI test conversion rates were high among Georgian HCWs, especially among those working at TB HCFs. These data highlight the need for increased implementation of TB

  16. Serial IGRA testing of trainees in the healthcare sector in a country with low incidence for tuberculosis – a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schablon, Anja

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Healthcare workers (HCW are a risk group for tuberculosis (TB. That is why interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA serial testing is performed on HCWs repeatedly exposed to infectious patients or materials. However, the variability of IGRA in serial testing is not yet well understood. We therefore analysed the prevalence of positive IGRA results as well as conversion and reversion rates in the serial testing of healthcare trainees in a low-incidence country.Methods: In a prospective cohort study, all trainees (n=194 who began training as a nurse or healthcare worker at the Vivantes Healthcare Training Institute in Berlin on 1 October 2008 or 1 April 2009 were IGRA-tested at three different times during the three years of training. Socio-demographic data and possible risk factors (e.g., TB contacts, time spent abroad, area of work were recorded by means of a standardised questionnaire. The QuantiFERON Gold In-Tube (QFT was used as an IGRA.Results: At the beginning of the training the cohort comprised 194 trainees. 70% were female. Their average age was 23. The prevalence of positive QFT was 2.1% (4/194. In the first follow-up test, 2 out of 154 (1.3% tested IGRA-positive, 151 (98% had constantly negative results. One IGRA was constantly positive (0.6% and there was one conversion and one reversion (0.6% respectively. In the second follow-up (n=142 there was again one conversion (0.7%, one reversion and the one constantly positive test result in all three QFT. This trainee had active TB in 2002. All other test results were constantly negative (n=139; 98%. No case of active tuberculosis was diagnosed over the three-year observation period. Contact with TB patients was reported by 42 (29.6% trainees during the follow-up. The two trainees with a conversion in QFT had no known contact with TB patients. Discordant results in the three consecutive QFT were observed in three trainees (2.1%. Using a borderline zone from 0.2–0.7 IU

  17. Finite element analyses of thin film active grazing incidence x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, William N.; Reid, Paul B.; Schwartz, Daniel A.

    2010-09-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, with its sub-arc second resolution, has revolutionized X-ray astronomy by revealing an extremely complex X-ray sky and demonstrating the power of the X-ray window in exploring fundamental astrophysical problems. Larger area telescopes of still higher angular resolution promise further advances. We are engaged in the development of a mission concept, Generation-X, a 0.1 arc second resolution x-ray telescope with tens of square meters of collecting area, 500 times that of Chandra. To achieve these two requirements of imaging and area, we are developing a grazing incidence telescope comprised of many mirror segments. Each segment is an adjustable mirror that is a section of a paraboloid or hyperboloid, aligned and figure corrected in situ on-orbit. To that end, finite element analyses of thin glass mirrors are performed to determine influence functions for each actuator on the mirrors, in order to develop algorithms for correction of mirror deformations. The effects of several mirror mounting schemes are also studied. The finite element analysis results, combined with measurements made on prototype mirrors, will be used to further refine the correction algorithms.

  18. Sex- and Age-Specific Incidence of Healthcare-Register-Recorded Eating Disorders in the Complete Swedish 1979–2001 Birth Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaras, Kristin N.; Runfola, Cristin D.; Thornton, Laura M.; Agerbo, Esben; Birgegård, Andreas; Norring, Claes; Yao, Shuyang; Råstam, Maria; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the sex- and age-specific incidence of healthcare-register-recorded anorexia nervosa (AN) and other eating disorders (OED) in a complete birth cohort, and assess whether incidence varies by diagnostic period and (sub-) birth cohort. Method We used the actuarial method and Poisson models to examine the incidence of AN and OED from 1987–2009 (when individuals were 8–30 years) for a cohort of 2.3 million individuals (48.7% female) born from 1979–2001 in Sweden, identified using Swedish registers. Results For both sexes, incidences of AN and OED increased considerably for diagnostic periods after 2000, but differed little by birth cohort. In 2009, AN incidence in the peak age category was 205.9 cases/100,000 persons (95% CI: 178.2, 233.5) for females (14–15 years), versus 12.8 cases/100,000 (95% CI: 5.6, 20.1) for males (12–13 years). OED incidence in the peak age category was 372.1 cases/100,000 (95% CI: 336.4, 407.9) for females (16–17 years), versus 22.2 cases/100,000 (95% CI: 13.3, 31.1) for males (14–15 years). Discussion Our finding of an increase in healthcare register-recorded eating disorders for diagnostic periods after 2000 likely reflects improved detection and expanded register coverage in Sweden. The peak of eating disorder incidence in adolescence, which began unexpectedly early for AN in males, suggests the importance of vigilance for signs of AN in young boys and early primary prevention efforts. Waiting until later could miss critical windows for intervention that could prevent disorders from taking root. PMID:26769444

  19. Incidence, risk factors and the healthcare cost of falls postdischarge after elective total hip and total knee replacement surgery: protocol for a prospective observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Ross-Adjie, Gail; McPhail, Steven M; Monterosso, Leanne; Bulsara, Max; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Powell, Sarah-Jayne; Hardisty, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of major joint replacement procedures continues to increase in Australia. The primary aim of this study is to determine the incidence of falls in the first 12 months after discharge from hospital in a cohort of older patients who undergo elective total hip or total knee replacement. Methods and analyses A prospective longitudinal observational cohort study starting in July 2015, enrolling patients aged ≥60 years who are admitted for elective major joint replacement (n=267 total hip replacement, n=267 total knee replacement) and are to be discharged to the community. Participants are followed up for 12 months after hospital discharge. The primary outcome measure is the rate of falls per thousand patient-days. Falls data will be collected by 2 methods: issuing a falls diary to each participant and telephoning participants monthly after discharge. Secondary outcomes include the rate of injurious falls and health-related quality of life. Patient-rated outcomes will be measured using the Oxford Hip or Oxford Knee score. Generalised linear mixed modelling will be used to examine the falls outcomes in the 12 months after discharge and to examine patient and clinical characteristics predictive of falls. An economic evaluation will be conducted to describe the nature of healthcare costs in the first 12 months after elective joint replacement and estimate costs directly attributable to fall events. Ethics and dissemination The results will be disseminated through local site networks and will inform future services to support older people undergoing hip or knee joint replacement and also through peer-reviewed publications and medical conferences. This study has been approved by The University of Notre Dame Australia and local hospital human research ethics committees. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000653561; Pre-results. PMID:27412102

  20. What Happened, and Why: Toward an Understanding of Human Error Based on Automated Analyses of Incident Reports. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maille, Nicolas P.; Statler, Irving C.; Ferryman, Thomas A.; Rosenthal, Loren; Shafto, Michael G.; Statler, Irving C.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) project of NASA s Aviation Safety and Security Program was to develop technologies that will enable proactive management of safety risk, which entails identifying the precursor events and conditions that foreshadow most accidents. This presents a particular challenge in the aviation system where people are key components and human error is frequently cited as a major contributing factor or cause of incidents and accidents. In the aviation "world", information about what happened can be extracted from quantitative data sources, but the experiential account of the incident reporter is the best available source of information about why an incident happened. This report describes a conceptual model and an approach to automated analyses of textual data sources for the subjective perspective of the reporter of the incident to aid in understanding why an incident occurred. It explores a first-generation process for routinely searching large databases of textual reports of aviation incident or accidents, and reliably analyzing them for causal factors of human behavior (the why of an incident). We have defined a generic structure of information that is postulated to be a sound basis for defining similarities between aviation incidents. Based on this structure, we have introduced the simplifying structure, which we call the Scenario as a pragmatic guide for identifying similarities of what happened based on the objective parameters that define the Context and the Outcome of a Scenario. We believe that it will be possible to design an automated analysis process guided by the structure of the Scenario that will aid aviation-safety experts to understand the systemic issues that are conducive to human error.

  1. Prospective Analyses of Childhood Factors and Antisocial Behavior for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Chih; Symons, Frank J.; Reynolds, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the association between childhood factors (individual, family, and school characteristics) and later antisocial behavior (official juvenile delinquency and adult crime) for students identified with high-incidence disabilities (i.e., learning disabilities, emotional disturbance). The sample consisted…

  2. The epinet data of four Indian hospitals on incidence of exposure of healthcare workers to blood and body fluid: A multicentric prospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Sharps injury (SI and blood and body fluid exposure are occupational hazards to healthcare workers (HCWs. Although data from the developed countries have shown the enormity of the problem, data from developing countries, such as India, arelacking. Purpose : The purpose of this study was to cumulate data from fourmajor hospitals in India and analyze the incidence of SI and blood and body fluid exposure in HCWs. Materials and Methods : Four Indian hospitals (hospital A, B, C and D from major cities of India participated in this multicentric study. Data ranging from 6 to 26 months were collected from these hospitals using Exposure Prevention Information network (EPINet which is the database created by International Healthcare Worker Safety Research and Resource Center, University of Virginia. Results : Two hundred and forty-three sharp injuries and 22 incidents of blood or body fluid exposure were encountered in the cumulated 50 months of our study. The incidence of SIswas thehighestamong nurses (55% of allthe HCWs, akin to the global data. An injury rate of nearly 20% among housekeeping staff seems to be specific to the Indian data. Patient′s room followed by operation theater appeared to be common locations of injury in our study. The source of the injury was identified in majority (64% of the injuries. A major part of the group was not the primary users of the sharp (38%. Disposable needles caused nearly half of the injuries. Suture needles contributed to a reasonable number of injuries in one of the hospitals. Conclusions : The incidence of SI is the highest among nurses and the housekeeping staff (>30% each. A substantial number of injuries are avoidable.

  3. Opto-mechanical Analyses for Performance Optimization of Lightweight Grazing-incidence Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Jacqueline M.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Odell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    New technology in grazing-incidence mirror fabrication and assembly is necessary to achieve subarcsecond optics for large-area x-ray telescopes. In order to define specifications, an understanding of performance sensitivity to design parameters is crucial. MSFC is undertaking a systematic study to specify a mounting approach, mirror substrate, and testing method. Lightweight mirrors are typically flimsy and are, therefore, susceptible to significant distortion due to mounting and gravitational forces. Material properties of the mirror substrate along with its dimensions significantly affect the distortions caused by mounting and gravity. A parametric study of these properties and their relationship to mounting and testing schemes will indicate specifications for the design of the next generation of lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors. Here we report initial results of this study.

  4. The use of syndromic surveillance to monitor the incidence of arthropod bites requiring healthcare in England, 2000-2013: a retrospective ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newitt, S; Elliot, A J; Morbey, R; Durnall, H; Pietzsch, M E; Medlock, J M; Leach, S; Smith, G E

    2016-08-01

    Climate change experts predict the number of nuisance-biting arthropods in England will increase but there is currently no known surveillance system in place to monitor or assess the public health impact of arthropod bites. This retrospective ecological study utilized arthropod bites requiring healthcare from five national real-time syndromic surveillance systems monitoring general practitioner (GP) consultations (in-hours and out-of-hours), emergency department (ED) attendances and telephone calls to remote advice services to determine baseline incidence in England between 2000 and 2013 and to assess the association between arthropod bites and temperature. During summer months (weeks 20-40) we estimated that arthropod bites contribute a weekly median of ~4000 GP consultations, 750 calls to remote advice services, 700 ED and 1300 GP out-of-hours attendances. In all systems, incidence was highest during summer months compared to the rest of the year. Arthropod bites were positively associated with temperature with incidence rate ratios (IRRs) that ranged between systems from 1·03 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·01-1·06] to 1·14 (95% CI 1·11-1·16). Using syndromic surveillance systems we have established and described baseline incidence of arthropod bites and this can now be monitored routinely in real time to assess the impact of extreme weather events and climate change. PMID:27068133

  5. Analysing polystyrene-modified asphalt and its incidence in a heat-dense asphalt mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Sofía Figueroa Infante; Fredy Alberto Reyes Lizcano; Diana Hernández Barrera; Christian Jiménez; Natalia Bohórquez

    2010-01-01

    This article presents some results obtained with an MDC-2 asphalt/polystyrene-modified asphalt mixture as a result of crushing waste glass. The stone, asphalt and polystyrene materials’ were characterised for drawing up the design. The Marshal method was used for obtaining the best asphalt- stone-polystyrene percentages. The Superpave method was used for analysing the asphalt; the mixture’s dynamic behaviour was analysed using a test involving 20ºC and 30ºC trapezoidal fatigue for 90x10-6, 15...

  6. Analysing polystyrene-modified asphalt and its incidence in a heat-dense asphalt mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sofía Figueroa Infante

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some results obtained with an MDC-2 asphalt/polystyrene-modified asphalt mixture as a result of crushing waste glass. The stone, asphalt and polystyrene materials’ were characterised for drawing up the design. The Marshal method was used for obtaining the best asphalt- stone-polystyrene percentages. The Superpave method was used for analysing the asphalt; the mixture’s dynamic behaviour was analysed using a test involving 20ºC and 30ºC trapezoidal fatigue for 90x10-6, 150x10-6 and 220x10-6m deformation. The truck-wheel test was analysed for a 13-ton load, similar to that of the heaviest axle on a Transmilenio (articulated bus. The dynamic module test was analysed for 15ºC, 20ºC and 30ºC and 2.5, 5 and 10 Hz frequencies. Conventional asphalt mixture and modified asphalt results were contrasted, interesting behaviour being observed regarding plastic deformation of the modified mixture in service

  7. Detailed semantic analyses of human error incidents occurring at domestic nuclear power plants to fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysing and evaluating observed cases of human error incidents with the emphasis on human factors and behavior involved was essential for preventing recurrence of those. CRIEPI has been conducting detailed and structures analyses of all incidents reported during last 35 year based on J-HPES, from the beginning of the first Tokai nuclear power operation till fiscal year of 2000, in which total 212 human error cases are identified. Results obtained by the analyses have been stored into the J-HPES data-base. This summarized the semantic analyses on all case-studies stored in the above data-base to grasp the practical and concrete contents and trend of more frequently observed human errors (as are called trigger actions here), causal factors and preventive measures. These semantic analyses have been executed by classifying all those items into some categories that could be considered as having almost the same meaning using the KJ method. Followings are obtained typical results by above analyses: (1) Trigger action-Those could be classified into categories of operation or categories of maintenance. Operational timing errors' and 'operational quantitative errors' were major actions in trigger actions of operation, those occupied about 20% among all actions. At trigger actions of maintenance, 'maintenance quantitative error' were major actions, those occupied quarter among all actions; (2) Causal factor- 'Human internal status' were major factors, as in concrete factors, those occupied 'improper persistence' and 'lack of knowledge'; (3) Preventive measure-Most frequent measures got were job management changes in procedural software improvements, which was from 70% to 80%. As for preventive measures of operation, software improvements have been implemented on 'organization and work practices' and 'individual consciousness'. Concerning preventive measures of maintenance, improvements have been implemented on 'organization and work practices'. (author)

  8. To what extent are adverse events found in patient records reported by patients and healthcare professionals via complaints, claims and incident reports?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wal Gerrit

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient record review is believed to be the most useful method for estimating the rate of adverse events among hospitalised patients. However, the method has some practical and financial disadvantages. Some of these disadvantages might be overcome by using existing reporting systems in which patient safety issues are already reported, such as incidents reported by healthcare professionals and complaints and medico-legal claims filled by patients or their relatives. The aim of the study is to examine to what extent the hospital reporting systems cover the adverse events identified by patient record review. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using a database from a record review study of 5375 patient records in 14 hospitals in the Netherlands. Trained nurses and physicians using a method based on the protocol of The Harvard Medical Practice Study previously reviewed the records. Four reporting systems were linked with the database of reviewed records: 1 informal and 2 formal complaints by patients/relatives, 3 medico-legal claims by patients/relatives and 4 incident reports by healthcare professionals. For each adverse event identified in patient records the equivalent was sought in these reporting systems by comparing dates and descriptions of the events. The study focussed on the number of adverse event matches, overlap of adverse events detected by different sources, preventability and severity of consequences of reported and non-reported events and sensitivity and specificity of reports. Results In the sample of 5375 patient records, 498 adverse events were identified. Only 18 of the 498 (3.6% adverse events identified by record review were found in one or more of the four reporting systems. There was some overlap: one adverse event had an equivalent in both a complaint and incident report and in three cases a patient/relative used two or three systems to complain about an adverse event. Healthcare professionals

  9. Incidence rates and trends of hip/femur fractures in five European countries: Comparison using e-healthcare records databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Requena, G.; Abbing-Karahagopian, V.; Huerta, C.; De Bruin, M.L.; Alvarez, Y.; Miret, M.; Hesse, U.; Gardarsdottir, H.; Souverein, P.C.; Slattery, J.; Schneider, C.; Rottenkolber, M.; Schmiedl, S.; Gil, M.; De Groot, M.C.H.; Bate, A.; Ruigómez, A.; García Rodríguez, L.A.; Johansson, S.; De Vries, F.; Montero, D.; Schlienger, R.; Reynolds, R.; Klungel, O.H.; De Abajo, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Hip fractures represent a major public health challenge worldwide. Multinational studies using a common methodology are scarce. We aimed to estimate the incidence rates (IRs) and trends of hip/femur fractures over the period 2003-2009 in five European countries. The study was performed using seven e

  10. Incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in England, 1950-2009: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Kirkbride

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted a systematic review of incidence rates in England over a sixty-year period to determine the extent to which rates varied along accepted (age, sex and less-accepted epidemiological gradients (ethnicity, migration and place of birth and upbringing, time. OBJECTIVES: To determine variation in incidence of several psychotic disorders as above. DATA SOURCES: Published and grey literature searches (MEDLINE, PSycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, ASSIA, HMIC, and identification of unpublished data through bibliographic searches and author communication. STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Published 1950-2009; conducted wholly or partially in England; original data on incidence of non-organic adult-onset psychosis or one or more factor(s pertaining to incidence. PARTICIPANTS: People, 16-64 years, with first -onset psychosis, including non-affective psychoses, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychotic depression and substance-induced psychosis. STUDY APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS METHODS: Title, abstract and full-text review by two independent raters to identify suitable citations. Data were extracted to a standardized extraction form. Descriptive appraisals of variation in rates, including tables and forest plots, and where suitable, random-effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions to test specific hypotheses; rate heterogeneity was assessed by the I²-statistic. RESULTS: 83 citations met inclusion. Pooled incidence of all psychoses (N = 9 was 31.7 per 100,000 person-years (95%CI: 24.6-40.9, 23.2 (95%CI: 18.3-29.5 for non-affective psychoses (N = 8, 15.2 (95%CI: 11.9-19.5 for schizophrenia (N = 15 and 12.4 (95%CI: 9.0-17.1 for affective psychoses (N = 7. This masked rate heterogeneity (I²: 0.54-0.97, possibly explained by socio-environmental factors; our review confirmed (via meta-regression the typical age-sex interaction in psychosis risk, including secondary peak onset in women after 45 years. Rates of most disorders were elevated in

  11. Incidence of emergency contacts (red responses to Norwegian emergency primary healthcare services in 2007 – a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Elisabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The municipalities are responsible for the emergency primary health care services in Norway. These services include casualty clinics, primary doctors on-call and local emergency medical communication centres (LEMC. The National centre for emergency primary health care has initiated an enterprise called "The Watchtowers", comprising emergency primary health care districts, to provide routine information (patients' way of contact, level of urgency and first action taken by the out-of-hours services over several years based on a minimal dataset. This will enable monitoring, evaluation and comparison of the respective activities in the emergency primary health care services. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of emergency contacts (potential life-threatening situations, red responses to the emergency primary health care service. Methods A representative sample of Norwegian emergency primary health care districts, "The Watchtowers" recorded all contacts and first action taken during the year of 2007. All the variables were continuously registered in a data program by the attending nurses and sent by email to the National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care at a monthly basis. Results During 2007 the Watchtowers registered 85 288 contacts, of which 1 946 (2.3% were defined as emergency contacts (red responses, corresponding to a rate of 9 per 1 000 inhabitants per year. 65% of the instances were initiated by patient, next of kin or health personnel by calling local emergency medical communication centres or meeting directly at the casualty clinics. In 48% of the red responses, the first action taken was a call-out of doctor and ambulance. On a national basis we can estimate approximately 42 500 red responses per year in the EPH in Norway. Conclusion The emergency primary health care services constitute an important part of the emergency system in Norway. Patients call the LEMC or meet directly at casualty clinics

  12. Critical analysis of major incidents risks in civil nuclear energy; Analyse critique des risques d'incidents majeurs dans l'energie nucleaire civile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The differences existing between the PWR type reactors and the RBMK type reactors are explained as well as the risk associated to each type when it exists. The Ines scale, tool to give the level of an accident gravity comprises seven levels, the number seven is the most serious and corresponds to the Chernobyl accident; The number zero is of no consequence but must be mentioned as a matter of form. The incidents from 1 to 3 concern increasing incidents, affecting the nuclear power plant but not the external public. The accidents from 4 to 7 have a nature to affect the nuclear power plant and the environment. An efficient tool exists between nuclear operators it is made of the reports on incidents encountered by close reactors. Two others type reactors are coming, the high temperature type reactors and the fast neutrons reactors. different risks are evoked, terrorism, proliferation, transport and radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  13. Incidence analyses and space-time cluster detection of hepatitis C in Fujian Province of China from 2006 to 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunquan Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is limited epidemiologic information about the incidence of hepatitis C in China, and few studies have applied space-time scan statistic to detect clusters of hepatitis C and made adjustment for temporal trend and relative risk of regions. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the temporal changes and characteristics of incidence of hepatitis C in Fujian Province from 2006 through 2010. The discrete Poisson model of space-time scan statistic was chosen for cluster detection. Data on new cases of hepatitis C were obtained from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Fujian Province. Between 2006 and 2010, there was an annualized increase in the incidence of hepatitis C of 23.0 percent, from 928 cases (2.63 per 100,000 persons to 2,180 cases (6.01 per 100,000 persons. The incidence among women increased more rapidly. The cumulative incidence showed that people who were over 60 years had the highest risk to suffer hepatitis C (52.51 per 100,000 persons, and women had lower risk compared to men (OR=0.69. Putian had the highest cumulative incidence among all the regions (86.95 per 100,000 persons. The most likely cluster was identified in Putian during March to August in 2009 without adjustment, but it shifted to three contiguous cities with a two-month duration after adjustment for temporal trend and relative risk of regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The incidence of hepatitis C is increasing in Fujian Province, and women are at a more rapid pace. The space-time scan statistic is useful as a screening tool for clusters of hepatitis C, with adjustment for temporal trend and relative risk of regions recommended.

  14. Forensic analyses of explosion debris from the January 2, 1992 Pd/D2O electrochemistry incident at SRI International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The January 2, 1992 explosion in an electrochemistry laboratory at SRI International (SRI) resulted in the death of scientist Andrew Riley, and gained some notoriety due to its association with experimental work in the controversial field of cold fusion research. Selected components of explosion debris were subjected to forensic analyses at LLNL to elucidate potential causes of, or contributing factors to, the explosion. Interrogation of the debris by LLNL encompassed nuclear, chemical, physical, and materials investigations. Nuclear studies for the determination of tritium and neutron-activation products in stainless steel and brass were negative. No evidence of signature species indicative of orthodox nuclear events was detected. The inorganic and particulate analyses were likewise negative with respect to residues of unexpected chemical species. Such target compounds included conventional explosives, accelerants, propellants, or any exceptional industrial chemicals. The GC-MS analyses of trace organic components in the explosion debris provided perhaps the most interesting results obtained at LLNL. Although no evidence of organic explosives, oxidizers, or other unusual compounds was detected, the presence of a hydrocarbon oil in the interior of the electrochemical cell was established. It is likely that its source was lubricating fluid from the machining of the metal cell components. If residues of organic oils are present during electrolysis experiments, the potential exists for an explosive reaction in the increasingly enriched oxygen atmosphere within the headspace of a metal cell

  15. A review and additional post-hoc analyses of the incidence and impact of constipation observed in darifenacin clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tack J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Jan Tack,1 Jean-Jacques Wyndaele,2 Greg Ligozio,3 Mathias Egermark41University of Leuven, Gastroenterology Section, Leuven, 2University of Antwerp, Department of Urology, Antwerp, Belgium; 3Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, NJ, USA; 4Roche Diagnostics Scandinavia AB, Bromma, Sweden and formerly of Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, SwitzerlandBackground: Constipation is a common side effect of antimuscarinic treatment for overactive bladder (OAB. This review evaluates the incidence and impact of constipation on the lives of patients with OAB being treated with darifenacin.Methods: Constipation data from published Phase III and Phase IIIb/IV darifenacin studies were reviewed and analyzed. Over 4000 patients with OAB (aged 18–89 years; ≥80% female enrolled in nine studies (three Phase III [data from these fixed-dose studies were pooled and provide the primary focus for this review], three Phase IIIb, and three Phase IV. The impact of constipation was assessed by discontinuations, use of concomitant laxatives, patient-reported perception of treatment, and a bowel habit questionnaire.Results: In the pooled Phase III trials, 14.8% (50/337 of patients on darifenacin 7.5 mg/day and 21.3% (71/334 on 15 mg/day experienced constipation compared with 12.6% (28/223 and 6.2% (24/388 with tolterodine and placebo, respectively. In addition, a few patients discontinued treatment due to constipation (0.6% [2/337], 1.2% [4/334], 1.8% [4/223], and 0.3% [1/388] in the darifenacin 7.5 mg/day or 15 mg/day, tolterodine, and placebo groups, respectively, or required concomitant laxatives (3.3% [11/337], 6.6% [22/334], 7.2% [16/223], and 1.5% [6/388] in the darifenacin 7.5 mg/day or 15 mg/day, tolterodine, and placebo groups, respectively. Patient-reported perception of treatment quality was observed to be similar between patients who experienced constipation and those who did not. During the long-term extension study, a bowel habit questionnaire showed only small

  16. Projet SVRAI : Sauver des Vies par le Retour d’Analyse sur Incidents Convention de Subvention DSCR n°: 7624. Livrable 2S2 : Premier logiciel d’exploitation des incidents. OVNI : Outil de Validation des Nouveaux Incidents

    OpenAIRE

    NAUDE, Claire

    2013-01-01

    S-VRAI est décomposé en 9 Sous-Projets dont le SP2 « Production du système de recueil de données de la phase » qui a pour but de mettre à disposition 50 EMMA, de les installer sur les véhicules des flottes retenues en phase 1, et de recueillir pendant 12 mois les données des incidents/accidents qui se produiront lors de l’utilisation de ces véhicules, de vérifier et d’exploiter de façon analytique ces données. Les données complètes recueillies sont stockées dans une base « EMMA2 »...

  17. Incidence and Mortality of Solid Cancers in People Exposed In Utero to Ionizing Radiation: Pooled Analyses of Two Cohorts from the Southern Urals, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deltour, Isabelle; Krestinina, Lyudmila; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Tsareva, Yulia; Tolstykh, Evgenia; Schüz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that acute external in utero exposure to ionizing radiation can increase cancer risk. It is not known whether chronic exposure at low dose rates, including due to radionuclide intake, influences the lifetime risk of solid cancers in the offspring. The objective of this study was to investigate solid cancer risk after in utero irradiation. Methods Cancer incidence and mortality over a 60-year period (from January 1950 to December 2009) were analyzed in the Urals Prenatally Exposed Cohort (UPEC). The cohort comprised in utero exposed offspring of Mayak Production Association female workers and of female residents of Techa River villages. Some of the offspring also received postnatal exposure, either due to becoming radiation workers themselves or due to continuing to live in the contaminated areas of the Techa River. The mortality analyses comprised 16,821 subjects (601,372 person-years), and the incidence analyses comprised 15,813 subjects (554,411 person-years). Poisson regression was used to quantify the relative risk as a function of the in utero soft tissue dose (with cumulative doses up to 944.9 mGy, mean dose of 14.1 mGy in the pooled cohort) and the postnatal stomach dose for solid cancer incidence and mortality. Results When a log-linear model was used, relative risk of cancer per 10 mGy of in utero dose was 0.99 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.96 to 1.01) based on incidence data and 0.98 (CI = 0.94 to 1.01) based on mortality data. Postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation was positively associated with the solid cancer risk in members of the UPEC, with a relative risk of 1.02 per 10mGy CI = 1.00 to 1.04). Conclusions No strong evidence was found that chronic low-dose-rate exposure of the embryo and fetus increased the risk of solid cancers in childhood or in adulthood. For both incidence and mortality, a tendency towards a decreased relative risk was noted with increasing doses to soft tissues of the fetus. Further

  18. The concept of the lifeworld as a tool in analysing healthcare work: exploring professionals’ resistance to governance through subjectivity, norms and experiential knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Brown

    2011-01-01

    Health-care work is increasingly practiced within governance frameworks. These ‘softer’ forms of new public management typically seek to shape working practices and cultures around key organising principles such as risk, knowledge and performance. Yet the implementation of these control mechanisms t

  19. A qui profitent les dépenses sociales au Tchad? Une analyse d'incidence à partir des données d'enquête

    OpenAIRE

    Nakar Djindil Syntiche; Tabo Symphorien Ndang; Toinar Mogota Anatole

    2007-01-01

    Cette étude examine l'incidence des dépenses publiques dans les secteurs de l'éducation et de la santé maternelle et infantile au niveau des ménages au Tchad. Le niveau de vie a étét appréhendé par un indicateur composite de pauvreté. Les résultats montrent qu'il existe une très forte sélectivité sociale dans l'utilisation des transferts de santé et d'éducation au Tchad. L'analyse révèle qu'une expansion des transferts sanitaires et éducatifs pourrait ne pas profiter aux plus défavorisés sauf...

  20. Cost of hand hygiene and incidence of healthcare-associated infection%手卫生成本与医院感染发病率的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春华; 孙勇; 马学先; 丁丽丽; 姚华

    2016-01-01

    目的:总结分析手卫生成本对医院感染发病率的影响,探讨持续改进的方法,为医院管理提供数据支持。方法调查2013年1月—2014年6月某院手卫生推进项目所消耗费用、医院感染发病率,以及2014年上半年手卫生的依从性。结果按照半年度进行统计,2013年上半年、2013年下半年、2014年上半年手卫生推进项目的费用分别为283490、414232、522345元,2014年上半年较2013年上半年同比增长84.26%;医院感染发病率分别为3.13%、3.33%、3.03%,差异有统计学意义(χ2=10.37,P <0.001)。2014年上半年手卫生依从率由1月份的35.00%升至6月份的59.49%。影响手卫生执行居前3位的原因为:工作忙,没有时间做手卫生;手卫生设施或用品不足;手卫生相关知识不足。结论加大手卫生相关物品的投入,可以提高手卫生依从性,降低医院感染发病率。%Objective To summarize and analyze the effect of hand hygiene(HH)cost on the incidence of health-care-associated infection (HAI),evaluate continuous improvement method,and provide data for hospital manage-ment.Methods The cost of HH project and incidence of HAI in a hospital from January 2013 to June 2014,as well as HH compliance in the first half year of 2014 were investigated.Results Semiannual statistics were performed, the cost of HH project in the first half of 2013,second half of 2013,and first half of 2014 were 283 490,414 232, and 522 345 yuan respectively,compared with the first half of 2013,the cost of HH in the first half of 2014 in-creased by 84.26%;incidence of HAI were 3.13%,3.33%,and 3.03% respectively,difference was significant(χ2=10.37,P <0.001).In the first half of 2014,HH compliance rate increased from 35.00% in January to 59.49% in June.The top three factors that affecting the implementation of HH were busy work,had no time for handwashing;inadequate HH facilities or supplies

  1. Equity in Health Care Financing in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of Evidence from Studies Using Benefit and Financing Incidence Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine Asante

    Full Text Available Health financing reforms in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs over the past decades have focused on achieving equity in financing of health care delivery through universal health coverage. Benefit and financing incidence analyses are two analytical methods for comprehensively evaluating how well health systems perform on these objectives. This systematic review assesses progress towards equity in health care financing in LMICs through the use of BIA and FIA.Key electronic databases including Medline, Embase, Scopus, Global Health, CinAHL, EconLit and Business Source Premier were searched. We also searched the grey literature, specifically websites of leading organizations supporting health care in LMICs. Only studies using benefit incidence analysis (BIA and/or financing incidence analysis (FIA as explicit methodology were included. A total of 512 records were obtained from the various sources. The full texts of 87 references were assessed against the selection criteria and 24 were judged appropriate for inclusion. Twelve of the 24 studies originated from sub-Saharan Africa, nine from the Asia-Pacific region, two from Latin America and one from the Middle East. The evidence points to a pro-rich distribution of total health care benefits and progressive financing in both sub-Saharan Africa and Asia-Pacific. In the majority of cases, the distribution of benefits at the primary health care level favoured the poor while hospital level services benefit the better-off. A few Asian countries, namely Thailand, Malaysia and Sri Lanka, maintained a pro-poor distribution of health care benefits and progressive financing.Studies evaluated in this systematic review indicate that health care financing in LMICs benefits the rich more than the poor but the burden of financing also falls more on the rich. There is some evidence that primary health care is pro-poor suggesting a greater investment in such services and removal of barriers to care can enhance

  2. 医疗失效模式与效应分析在降低胃管滑脱率中的应用%Application of Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis in decreasing the incidence of gastric tube slippage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱珍; 徐波; 于媛

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of healthcare failure mode and effect analysis ( HFMEA) in decreasing the incidence of gastric tube slippage. Methods According to the process of HFMEA, the methods included determining the subject, establishing team, formulating the flow chart, analyzing the possible mode,reasons and results of failure and severity, possibility and crisis value,formulating and implementing the improvement measures. Result The incidence of gastric tube slippage decreased from 3. 52% to 0.45% (P <0.05). Conclusion Utilization of HFMEA is effective on refining gastric tube nursing process, thus to decrease the rate of gastric tube slippage.%目的 探讨医疗失效模式与效应分析在降低胃管滑脱率中的应用效果.方法 根据医疗失效模式与效应分析工作流程,确定主题,组建团队,制订流程图,分析各流程步骤中的潜在失效模式、失效原因及失效结果,进行严重度、可能性、危机值分析,根据分析结果制订相应改进措施并落实.结果 胃管脱出率由3.52%下降至0.45% (P <0.05).结论 应用医疗失效模式与效应分析有助于细化胃管护理流程,降低胃管脱出率.

  3. Healthcare use for acute gastrointestinal illness in two Inuit communities: Rigolet and Iqaluit, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherilee L. Harper

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, and Iqaluit, Nunavut, is higher than reported elsewhere in Canada; as such, understanding AGI-related healthcare use is important for healthcare provision, public health practice and surveillance of AGI. Objectives: This study described symptoms, severity and duration of self-reported AGI in the general population and examined the incidence and factors associated with healthcare utilization for AGI in these 2 Inuit communities. Design: Cross-sectional survey data were analysed using multivariable exact logistic regression to examine factors associated with individuals’ self-reported healthcare and over-the-counter (OTC medication utilization related to AGI symptoms. Results: In Rigolet, few AGI cases used healthcare services [4.8% (95% CI=1.5–14.4%]; in Iqaluit, some cases used healthcare services [16.9% (95% CI=11.2–24.7%]. Missing traditional activities due to AGI (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.18–12.4 and taking OTC medication for AGI symptoms (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.2–15.1 were associated with increased odds of using healthcare services in Iqaluit. In both communities, AGI severity and secondary symptoms (extreme tiredness, headache, muscle pains, chills were significantly associated with increased odds of taking OTC medication. Conclusions: While rates of self-reported AGI were higher in Inuit communities compared to non-Inuit communities in Canada, there were lower rates of AGI-related healthcare use in Inuit communities compared to other regions in Canada. As such, the rates of healthcare use for a given disease can differ between Inuit and non-Inuit communities, and caution should be exercised in making comparisons between Inuit and non-Inuit health outcomes based solely on clinic records and healthcare use.

  4. Higher antioxidant and lower cadmium concentrations and lower incidence of pesticide residues in organically grown crops: a systematic literature review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barański, Marcin; Srednicka-Tober, Dominika; Volakakis, Nikolaos; Seal, Chris; Sanderson, Roy; Stewart, Gavin B; Benbrook, Charles; Biavati, Bruno; Markellou, Emilia; Giotis, Charilaos; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, Joanna; Rembiałkowska, Ewa; Skwarło-Sońta, Krystyna; Tahvonen, Raija; Janovská, Dagmar; Niggli, Urs; Nicot, Philippe; Leifert, Carlo

    2014-09-14

    Demand for organic foods is partially driven by consumers' perceptions that they are more nutritious. However, scientific opinion is divided on whether there are significant nutritional differences between organic and non-organic foods, and two recent reviews have concluded that there are no differences. In the present study, we carried out meta-analyses based on 343 peer-reviewed publications that indicate statistically significant and meaningful differences in composition between organic and non-organic crops/crop-based foods. Most importantly, the concentrations of a range of antioxidants such as polyphenolics were found to be substantially higher in organic crops/crop-based foods, with those of phenolic acids, flavanones, stilbenes, flavones, flavonols and anthocyanins being an estimated 19 (95 % CI 5, 33) %, 69 (95 % CI 13, 125) %, 28 (95 % CI 12, 44) %, 26 (95 % CI 3, 48) %, 50 (95 % CI 28, 72) % and 51 (95 % CI 17, 86) % higher, respectively. Many of these compounds have previously been linked to a reduced risk of chronic diseases, including CVD and neurodegenerative diseases and certain cancers, in dietary intervention and epidemiological studies. Additionally, the frequency of occurrence of pesticide residues was found to be four times higher in conventional crops, which also contained significantly higher concentrations of the toxic metal Cd. Significant differences were also detected for some other (e.g. minerals and vitamins) compounds. There is evidence that higher antioxidant concentrations and lower Cd concentrations are linked to specific agronomic practices (e.g. non-use of mineral N and P fertilisers, respectively) prescribed in organic farming systems. In conclusion, organic crops, on average, have higher concentrations of antioxidants, lower concentrations of Cd and a lower incidence of pesticide residues than the non-organic comparators across regions and production seasons. PMID:24968103

  5. Complementary results of radioactivity analysis made in Corsica following the navigation incident of the Uss Hartford submarine; Resultats complementaires des analyses de radioactivite effectuees en Corse suite a l'incident de navigation du sous-marin USS Hartford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-01-01

    The results of analysis made by the Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety in the area of the Bonifacio estuary do not reveal any increase of artificial radioactivity following the navigation incident of the Uss Hartford submarine. They confirm the previous published results. (N.C.)

  6. Incident reporting in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, D.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim An incident reporting procedure (IRP) is an important part of patient safety management in healthcare. Currently, patient safety efforts are mainly guided by the ‘systems approach’: incidents, defined as ‘unintended or unexpected events which could have led or did lead to harm for

  7. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program on Reducing the Incidence Rate of Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection: A Non-Randomized, Stepped Wedge, Single-Site, Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio DiDiodato

    Full Text Available The incidence rate of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection (HA-CDI is estimated at 1 in 100 patients. Antibiotic exposure is the most consistently reported risk factor for HA-CDI. Strategies to reduce the risk of HA-CDI have focused on reducing antibiotic utilization. Prospective audit and feedback is a commonly used antimicrobial stewardship intervention (ASi. The impact of this ASi on risk of HA-CDI is equivocal. This study examines the effectiveness of a prospective audit and feedback ASi on reducing the risk of HA-CDI.Single-site, 339 bed community-hospital in Barrie, Ontario, Canada. Primary outcome is HA-CDI incidence rate. Daily prospective and audit ASi is the exposure variable. ASi implemented across 6 wards in a non-randomized, stepped wedge design. Criteria for ASi; any intravenous antibiotic use for ≥ 48 hrs, any oral fluoroquinolone or oral second generation cephalosporin use for ≥ 48 hrs, or any antimicrobial use for ≥ 5 days. HA-CDI cases and model covariates were aggregated by ward, year and month starting September 2008 and ending February 2016. Multi-level mixed effect negative binomial regression analysis was used to model the primary outcome, with intercept and slope coefficients for ward-level random effects estimated. Other covariates tested for inclusion in the final model were derived from previously published risk factors. Deviance residuals were used to assess the model's goodness-of-fit.The dataset included 486 observation periods, of which 350 were control periods and 136 were intervention periods. After accounting for all other model covariates, the estimated overall ASi incidence rate ratio (IRR was 0.48 (95% 0.30, 0.79. The ASi effect was independent of antimicrobial utilization. The ASi did not seem to reduce the risk of Clostridium difficile infection on the surgery wards (IRR 0.87, 95% CI 0.45, 1.69 compared to the medicine wards (IRR 0.42, 95% CI 0.28, 0.63. The ward-level burden of

  8. Decreasing incidence rates of bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, C; Jensen, T G;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have shown that the incidence rate of bacteremia has been increasing over time. However, few studies have distinguished between community-acquired, healthcare-associated and nosocomial bacteremia. METHODS: We conducted a population-based study among adults with first......-acquired, 50.0 for healthcare-associated and 66.7 for nosocomial bacteremia. During 2000-2008, the overall incidence rate decreased by 23.3% from 254.1 to 198.8 (3.3% annually, p ...) and the incidence rate of nosocomial bacteremia decreased by 28.9% from 82.2 to 56.0 (4.2% annually, p

  9. Tuberculosis in healthcare workers and infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareli M Claassens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Challenges exist regarding TB infection control and TB in hospital-based healthcare workers in South Africa. However, few studies report on TB in non-hospital based healthcare workers such as primary or community healthcare workers. Our objectives were to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities, the smear positive TB incidence rate amongst primary healthcare workers and the association between TB infection control measures and all types of TB in healthcare workers. METHODS: One hundred and thirty three primary healthcare facilities were visited in five provinces of South Africa in 2009. At each facility, a TB infection control audit and facility questionnaire were completed. The number of healthcare workers who had had TB during the past three years was obtained. RESULTS: The standardised incidence ratio of smear positive TB in primary healthcare workers indicated an incidence rate of more than double that of the general population. In a univariable logistic regression, the infection control audit score was significantly associated with reported cases of TB in healthcare workers (OR=1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.08, p=0.02 as was the number of staff (OR=3.78, 95%CI 1.77-8.08. In the multivariable analysis, the number of staff remained significantly associated with TB in healthcare workers (OR=3.33, 95%CI 1.37-8.08. CONCLUSION: The high rate of TB in healthcare workers suggests a substantial nosocomial transmission risk, but the infection control audit tool which was used did not perform adequately as a measure of this risk. Infection control measures should be monitored by validated tools developed and tested locally. Different strategies, such as routine surveillance systems, could be used to evaluate the burden of TB in healthcare workers in order to calculate TB incidence, monitor trends and implement interventions to decrease occupational TB.

  10. Smoke-free legislation and the incidence of paediatric respiratory infections and wheezing/asthma: Interrupted time series analyses in the four UK nations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.V. Been (Jasper V.); L. Szatkowski (Lisa); T.P. van Staa (Tjeerd); H.G.M. Leufkens (Hubert); O.C.P. Schayck (Onno); A. Sheikh; F. de Vries (Frank); P. Souverein (Patrick)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the association between introduction of smoke-free legislation in the UK (March 2006 for Scotland, April 2007 for Wales and Northern Ireland, and July 2007 for England) and the incidence of respiratory diseases among children. We extracted monthly counts of new diagnoses

  11. Smoke-free legislation and the incidence of paediatric respiratory infections and wheezing/asthma : interrupted time series analyses in the four UK nations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, Jasper V; Szatkowski, Lisa; van Staa, Tjeerd-Pieter; Leufkens, Hubert G; van Schayck, Onno C; Sheikh, Aziz; de Vries, Frank; Souverein, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association between introduction of smoke-free legislation in the UK (March 2006 for Scotland, April 2007 for Wales and Northern Ireland, and July 2007 for England) and the incidence of respiratory diseases among children. We extracted monthly counts of new diagnoses of wheezing/

  12. Attitudes to reporting medication error among differing healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Sarvadikar, Ajit; Prescott, Gordon; Williams, David

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aims Medication error reporting is an important measure to prevent medication error incidents in a healthcare system and can serve as an important tool for improving patient safety. This study aimed to investigate attitudes of healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, and pharmacists) in reporting medication errors. Methods Fifty-six healthcare professionals working at a 900-bed tertiary referral...

  13. Register-based studies of healthcare costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Christiansen, Terkel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview and a few examples of how national registers are used in analyses of healthcare costs in Denmark. Research topics: The paper focuses on health economic analyses based on register data. For the sake of simplicity, the studies are divided...... into three main categories: economic evaluations of healthcare interventions, cost-of-illness analyses, and other analyses such as assessments of healthcare productivity. Conclusion: We examined a number of studies using register-based data on healthcare costs. Use of register-based data renders...... a comprehensive data material, often in the form of time series, which is very useful in health economic analyses. The disadvantage of register-based data is the use of tariffs, charges, or market prices as proxies for costs in the computation of healthcare costs....

  14. Results of radioactivity analysis made in Corsica following the navigation incident of the USS Hartford submarine; Resultats des analyses de radioactivite effectuees en Corse suite a l'incident de navigation du sous-marin USS Hartford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-11-01

    No radiological impact has been revealed in relation with the navigation incident of the Uss Hartford submarine at the north of Sardinia. The analysis have been made by the Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (I.R.S.N.).The Uss Hartford submarine had hit the bottom of the sea, on the 25. of october 2003, between the islands of Sardinia at a thirty kilometers distance in the south of Bonifacio. The accident had been declared to the public only on the 12. of November 2003. (N.C.)

  15. Incidence and risk factors for healthcare-associated infection in patients with liver cirrhosis%肝硬化患者医院感染率及危险因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤国红; 蒋丹

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨肝硬化患者医院感染的特点及相关危险因素,以制定有效的策略,预防和减少医院感染的发生。方法收集某院2013年1—12月507例肝硬化住院患者的临床资料,对其医院感染现状,病原菌构成及危险因素进行分析。结果507例肝硬化患者中,48例发生医院感染,感染率为9.47%,感染部位主要以腹腔(31.25%)为主;细菌培养送检标本48份,送检率100.00%;共检出病原菌43株,其中革兰阴性(G-)菌25株(58.14%)、革兰阳性(G+)菌10株(23.26%)、真菌8株(18.60%)。危险因素单因素分析结果显示,不同年龄、住院时间、白细胞计数、清蛋白水平、肝功能分级、有无侵入性操作、有无并发症及是否预防性使用抗菌药物的肝硬化患者医院感染发生率比较,差异均有统计学意义(均 P <0.05)。结论肝硬化患者医院感染率较高,引起感染危险因素较多,应根据危险因素制定相应的干预措施,以减少肝硬化患者医院感染的发生。%Objective To evaluate the characteristics and risk factors for healthcare-associated infections(HAI)in patients with liver cirrhosis,so as to make effective strategies to prevent and control the occurrence of HAI. Methods Clinical data of hospitalized patients with liver cirrhosis in a hospital from January to December 2013 were collected,occurrence of HAI,distribution of pathogens,and risk factors were analyzed.Results Of 507 patients with liver cirrhosis,48 (9.47%)had HAI,the main infection site was intra-abdominal (31.25%);48 specimens(100.00%) were sent for bacterial culture;a total of 43 isolates of pathogens were detected,isolation rate of gram-negative bacteria, gram-positive bacteria,and fungi was 58.14% (n=25),23.26%(n=10),and 18.60% (n=8)respectively;the incidence of HAI were different among cirrhosis patients with different age,length of hospitalization

  16. Gestion des incidents en classe, pratiques professionnelles des enseignants débutants et analyse de la plateforme nationale de ressources numériques Néopass@ction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Carra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Incidents disturb schools’ everyday functioning (Barrère, 2002 and are experienced as ordeals by beginning teachers. When these incidents are analysed from a sociology of actors standpoint, the classroom appear as a polemical space; teachers engage in interpersonal power struggles by developing survival strategies (Woods, 1977. The sense of helplessness expressed by beginning teachers who are coping with critical situations show how important it is to develop training resources. Our aim is to analyse this kind of resources, namely the ones produced in the frame of the Néopass@ction project implemented in France under Luc Ria’s leadership. We will insist on the relevance, but also on the limits, of such resources.

  17. Serial murder by healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorker, Beatrice Crofts; Kizer, Kenneth W; Lampe, Paula; Forrest, A R W; Lannan, Jacquetta M; Russell, Donna A

    2008-01-01

    The prosecution of Charles Cullen, a nurse who killed at least 40 patients over a 16-year period, highlights the need to better understand the phenomenon of serial murder by healthcare professionals. The authors conducted a LexisNexis search which yielded 90 criminal prosecutions of healthcare providers that met inclusion criteria for serial murder of patients. In addition we reviewed epidemiologic studies, toxicology evidence, and court transcripts, to provide data on healthcare professionals who have been prosecuted between 1970 and 2006. Fifty-four of the 90 have been convicted; 45 for serial murder, four for attempted murder, and five pled guilty to lesser charges. Twenty-four more have been indicted and are either awaiting trial or the outcome has not been published. The other 12 prosecutions had a variety of legal outcomes. Injection was the main method used by healthcare killers followed by suffocation, poisoning, and tampering with equipment. Prosecutions were reported from 20 countries with 40% taking place in the United States. Nursing personnel comprised 86% of the healthcare providers prosecuted; physicians 12%, and 2% were allied health professionals. The number of patient deaths that resulted in a murder conviction is 317 and the number of suspicious patient deaths attributed to the 54 convicted caregivers is 2113. These numbers are disturbing and demand that systemic changes in tracking adverse patient incidents associated with presence of a specific healthcare provider be implemented. Hiring practices must shift away from preventing wrongful discharge or denial of employment lawsuits to protecting patients from employees who kill.

  18. EUROCONTROL-Systemic Occurrence Analysis Methodology (SOAM)-A 'Reason'-based organisational methodology for analysing incidents and accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licu, Tony [EUROCONTROL-European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation and Dedale Asia Pacific, Safety Team, Rue de la Fusee, 96, 1130 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: antonio.licu@eurocontrol.int; Cioran, Florin [EUROCONTROL-European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation and Dedale Asia Pacific, Safety Team, Rue de la Fusee, 96, 1130 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: florin.cioran@eurocontrol.int; Hayward, Brent [EUROCONTROL-European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation and Dedale Asia Pacific, Safety Team, Rue de la Fusee, 96, 1130 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: bhayward@dedale.net; Lowe, Andrew [EUROCONTROL-European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation and Dedale Asia Pacific, Safety Team, Rue de la Fusee, 96, 1130 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: alowe@dedale.net

    2007-09-15

    The Safety Occurrence Analysis Methodology (SOAM) developed for EUROCONTROL is an accident investigation methodology based on the Reason Model of organisational accidents. The purpose of a SOAM is to broaden the focus of an investigation from human involvement issues, also known as 'active failures of operational personnel' under Reason's original model, to include analysis of the latent conditions deeper within the organisation that set the context for the event. Such an approach is consistent with the tenets of Just Culture in which people are encouraged to provide full and open information about how incidents occurred, and are not penalised for errors. A truly systemic approach is not simply a means of transferring responsibility for a safety occurrence from front-line employees to senior managers. A consistent philosophy must be applied, where the investigation process seeks to correct deficiencies wherever they may be found, without attempting to apportion blame or liability.

  19. Stakeholders' Perceptions on Shortage of Healthcare Workers in Primary Healthcare in Botswana: Focus Group Discussions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oathokwa Nkomazana

    Full Text Available An adequate health workforce force is central to universal health coverage and positive public health outcomes. However many African countries have critical shortages of healthcare workers, which are worse in primary healthcare. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of healthcare workers, policy makers and the community on the shortage of healthcare workers in Botswana.Fifteen focus group discussions were conducted with three groups of policy makers, six groups of healthcare workers and six groups of community members in rural, urban and remote rural health districts of Botswana. All the participants were 18 years and older. Recruitment was purposive and the framework method was used to inductively analyse the data.There was a perceived shortage of healthcare workers in primary healthcare, which was believed to result from an increased need for health services, inequitable distribution of healthcare workers, migration and too few such workers being trained. Migration was mainly the result of unfavourable personal and family factors, weak and ineffective healthcare and human resources management, low salaries and inadequate incentives for rural and remote area service.Botswana has a perceived shortage of healthcare workers, which is worse in primary healthcare and rural areas, as a result of multiple complex factors. To address the scarcity the country should train adequate numbers of healthcare workers and distribute them equitably to sufficiently resourced healthcare facilities. They should be competently managed and adequately remunerated and the living conditions and rural infrastructure should also be improved.

  20. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  1. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  2. Sleep and cancer: Synthesis of experimental data and meta-analyses of cancer incidence among some 1,500,000 study individuals in 13 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erren, T C; Morfeld, P; Foster, R G; Reiter, R J; Groß, J V; Westermann, I K

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and its impact on physiology and pathophysiology are researched at an accelerating pace and from many different angles. Experiments provide evidence for chronobiologically plausible links between chronodisruption and sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD), on the one hand, and the development of cancer, on the other. Epidemiological evidence from cancer incidence among some 1 500 000 study individuals in 13 countries regarding associations with sleep duration, napping or "poor sleep" is variable and inconclusive. Combined adjusted relative risks (meta-RRs) for female breast cancer, based on heterogeneous data, were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.97-1.06). Meta-RRs for cancers of the colorectum and of the lung in women and men and for prostate cancer were 1.08 (95% CI: 1.03-1.13), 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00-1.22) and 1.05 (95% CI: 0.83-1.33), respectively. The significantly increased meta-RRs for colorectal cancer, based on homogeneous data, warrant targeted study. However, the paramount epidemiological problem inhibiting valid conclusions about the associations between sleep and cancer is the probable misclassification of the exposures to facets of sleep over time. Regarding the inevitable conclusion that more research is needed to answer How are sleep and cancer linked in humans? we offer eight sets of recommendations for future studies which must take note of the complexity of multidirectional relationships. PMID:27003385

  3. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  4. Healthcare compunetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Andy; Laxminarayan, Swamy; Bos, Lodewijk

    2004-01-01

    Changes in life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and health seeking behaviour are having an impact on the demand for care. Such changes could occur across the whole population, or for specific groups. Changes for specific groups will be particularly affected by policy initiatives, while both these and wider changes will be affected by people's levels of engagement with their health and the health service itself. Levels of education, income and media coverage of health issues are also important. These factors could also encourage an increase in people caring for themselves and their families or community. People are now expecting a patient-centred service with safe high quality treatment, comfortable accommodation services, fast access and an integrated joined-up system. The uptake of integrated Information and Communication technologies (ICT) will be crucial. Healthcare Compunetics, the combination of computing and networking customised for medical and care, will provide the common policy and framework for combined multi-disciplinary research, development, implementation and usage. PMID:15747899

  5. Architecture Capabilities to Improve Healthcare Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ebrahimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The physical environment of healthcare buildings has great importance in issues such as patient safety, functional efficiency, user satisfaction, healthcare outcomes, and energy and resources consumption.Objectives: The present study assesses physical environments of Iranian healthcare buildings.Materials and Methods: This study was performed using a descriptive-analytical method. Data collection was carried out via a written questionnaire.Results: Based on the findings of this study, "functional efficiency", "user satisfaction", "environmental issues", "patient safety”, “accountability in incidents and disasters", and "flexibility" are regarded as the most issues in the country's hospitals. Also, none of the parameters is "without any problem" and has a "desirable status".Conclusions: According to the responses, all of the healthcare buildings in this research had flaws in their physical environment, which require attention. Thus, it is necessary to review and pay more attention to the architecture of the country's healthcare buildings.

  6. An analysis of healthcare providers' online ratings

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Black; Lindsay Thompson; Heidi Saliba; Kara Dawson; Nicole Paradise Black

    2009-01-01

    Background Many websites allow consumers to evaluate their healthcare experience yet scant data exist that explore the type and content of reviews. Objective To evaluate and describe online healthcare provider reviews. Methods We analysed 16 703 ratings on 6101 providers from four US cities. Ratings spanned five categories and an overall provider score. We also performed text analyses of narrative commentary (n = 15 952). Results Providers had a high mean score for each category (3.7...

  7. Learning from defects using a comprehensive management system for incident reports in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Y M; Al Owais, S M; Al-Attas, K; Alamry, A; AlZahrani, K; Baig, B; White, D; Deeb, A M; Al-Dozri, H D; Haddad, S; Tamim, H M; Taher, S

    2016-03-01

    Incident reporting systems are often used without a structured review process, limiting their utility to learn from defects and compromising their impact on improving the healthcare system. The objective of this study is to describe the experience of implementing a Comprehensive Management System (CMS) for incident reports in the ICU. A physician-led multidisciplinary Incident Report Committee was created to review, analyse and manage the department incident reports. New protocols, policies and procedures, and other patient safety interventions were developed as a result. Information was disseminated to staff through multiple avenues. We compared the pre- and post-intervention periods for the impact on the number of incident reports, level of harm, time needed to close reports and reporting individuals. A total of 1719 incidents were studied. ICU-related incident reports increased from 20 to 36 incidents per 1000 patient days (P=0.01). After implementing the CMS, there was an increase in reporting 'no harm' from 14.2 to 28.1 incidents per 1000 patient days (Psystem. This may be important to enhance the effectiveness of incident reporting systems in highlighting system defects, increasing learning opportunities and improving patient safety. PMID:27029653

  8. Communicating with Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Change See More of Resources Communicating with Healthcare Professionals Updated:Nov 16,2015 Adapted from the National ... gained by improving communication between family caregivers and healthcare professionals. Positive outcomes include: Better care for the patient ...

  9. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  10. [Tuberculosis in healthcare workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, A

    2009-01-01

    Perception and knowledge of the TB-infection risk in healthcare workers (HCWs) changed profoundly in Germany during the past few years. Molecular-epidemiological studies and a comprehensive review of the existing evidence concerning the infection risk for HCWs lead to the conclusion that TB in HCWs is often caused by infection at the workplace. In the Hamburg Fingerprint Study, 80 % of the TB cases in HCWs were caused by infections at the workplace. In a similar Dutch study 43 % of all cases were work-related. Besides of the well-known risks in TB wards and laboratories, an increased risk for infection should be assumed for paramedics, in emergency rooms, for HCWs caring for the elderly or for workers with close contact to high-risk groups (homeless people, i. v. drug users, migrants from high-incidence countries). TB in a HCW working in these fields can be recognised as an occupational disease (OD) without identifying a particular source of infection. For all other HCWs, the German occupational disease law requires the identification of a source case before TB in an HCW can be accepted as an OD. Even though the proportion of work-related TB in HCWs is higher than was assumed before previously, the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) is lower than expected. In an ongoing evaluation study of the interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) LTBI prevalence in HCWs is 10 %. Prevention strategies in Germany should be reconsidered in the light of these new findings.

  11. Distributed cognition for evaluating healthcare technology

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkomar, A.; Blandford, A.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed Cognition (DCog) has been proposed as being a better approach to analyzing healthcare work than traditional cognitive approaches, due to the collaborative nature of healthcare work. This study sought to explore this by applying two DCog frameworks, DiCoT and the Resources Model, to the analysis of infusion pump use in an Intensive Care Unit. Data was gathered through observations and interviews, and then analysed using DiCoT and the Resources Model to construct models representing...

  12. [Results of primary healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duponchel, J L

    2004-01-01

    The concept of primary healthcare was formulated at the international conference held in Alma-Ata (USSR) on September 6 to 12, 1978. Over the past quarter-century, the term "primary healthcare" has been widely used as a basis for implementing healthcare policies in various nations, especially those considered as developing countries. However many programs initiated in the name of the primary healthcare concept have only partially complied with the spirit of the final declaration of Alma-Ata. Analysis of the healthcare in Mali shows that the system followed that evolution. Although considerable time and energy were regrettably wasted in implementing the village health agent strategy, this phase may have been a necessary step in the political development of the state at that time. Recent changes in the country's healthcare system in compliance with the original principles of primary healthcare show that the 1978 declaration is sound and remains pertinent as democracy makes further gains in the world. PMID:15816127

  13. Taiwan's healthcare report 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Chan, Willie Sai

    2010-12-01

    Times are changing. Taiwan is one of the richest countries in the Asia Pacific region. It enacted its single-payer national health insurance program in 1995: in all estimates, it has been very successful. It has a strong healthcare system and the universal health insurance ensures that all citizens have grown to expect a high level of care. Healthcare systems are designed to meet the healthcare needs of target populations. There are a wide variety of healthcare systems around the world. In some countries, healthcare system planning is distributed among market participants, whereas in others planning is made more centrally among governments, trade unions, charities, religions, or other co-ordinated bodies to deliver planned healthcare services targeted to the populations they serve. However, healthcare planning has often been evolutionary rather than revolutionary. In healthcare all work carried out must be at the highest quality, and a much higher proportion of resources must be invested in quality in healthcare. The aim of this report is to give an overview of the healthcare service provision in Taiwan. PMID:23199110

  14. The US healthcare workforce and the labor market effect on healthcare spending and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Lawrence C; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Qian, Jing

    2014-06-01

    The healthcare sector was one of the few sectors of the US economy that created new positions in spite of the recent economic downturn. Economic contractions are associated with worsening morbidity and mortality, declining private health insurance coverage, and budgetary pressure on public health programs. This study examines the causes of healthcare employment growth and workforce composition in the US and evaluates the labor market's impact on healthcare spending and health outcomes. Data are collected for 50 states and the District of Columbia from 1999-2009. Labor market and healthcare workforce data are obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Mortality and health status data are collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vital Statistics program and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Healthcare spending data are derived from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Dynamic panel data regression models, with instrumental variables, are used to examine the effect of the labor market on healthcare spending, morbidity, and mortality. Regression analysis is also performed to model the effects of healthcare spending on the healthcare workforce composition. All statistical tests are based on a two-sided [Formula: see text] significance of [Formula: see text] .05. Analyses are performed with STATA and SAS. The labor force participation rate shows a more robust effect on healthcare spending, morbidity, and mortality than the unemployment rate. Study results also show that declining labor force participation negatively impacts overall health status ([Formula: see text] .01), and mortality for males ([Formula: see text] .05) and females ([Formula: see text] .001), aged 16-64. Further, the Medicaid and Medicare spending share increases as labor force participation declines ([Formula: see text] .001); whereas, the private healthcare spending share decreases ([Formula: see text] .001). Public and private healthcare spending also

  15. Healthcare financing in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananatu, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Malaysian healthcare system and its method of financing. The development of the healthcare delivery system in Malaysia is commendable. However, the strength and weaknesses of the public healthcare system and the financing problems encountered are also discussed. Cost of healthcare and funding of both the public and private sectors were also revealed. One must optimise the advantages of operating a health financing scheme which is affordable and controllable which contribute towards cost-containment and quality assurance. Thus, there is a need for the establishment of a National Healthcare Financing, a mechanism to sustain the healthcare delivery network and operate it as a viable option. A model of the National Health Financing Scheme (NHFS) was proposed.

  16. Social marketing in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Radha Aras

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundSocial marketing is an important tool in the delivery ofhealthcare services. For any healthcare programme orproject to be successful, community/consumer participationis required. The four principles of social marketing can guidepolicymakers and healthcare providers to successfully planand implement health programmes.AimTo review the existing literature in order to project thebenefits of social marketing in healthcare.MethodA search of periodical literature by the author involvingsoc...

  17. Why healthcare providers merge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Jeroen; Roos, Anne-Fleur

    2016-04-01

    In many OECD countries, healthcare sectors have become increasingly concentrated as a result of mergers. However, detailed empirical insight into why healthcare providers merge is lacking. Also, we know little about the influence of national healthcare policies on mergers. We fill this gap in the literature by conducting a survey study on mergers among 848 Dutch healthcare executives, of which 35% responded (resulting in a study sample of 239 executives). A total of 65% of the respondents was involved in at least one merger between 2005 and 2012. During this period, Dutch healthcare providers faced a number of policy changes, including increasing competition, more pressure from purchasers, growing financial risks, de-institutionalisation of long-term care and decentralisation of healthcare services to municipalities. Our empirical study shows that healthcare providers predominantly merge to improve the provision of healthcare services and to strengthen their market position. Also efficiency and financial reasons are important drivers of merger activity in healthcare. We find that motives for merger are related to changes in health policies, in particular to the increasing pressure from competitors, insurers and municipalities. PMID:26055501

  18. Migrants' access to healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norredam, Marie

    2011-01-01

    There are strong pragmatic and moral reasons for receiving societies to address access to healthcare for migrants. Receiving societies have a pragmatic interest in sustaining migrants' health to facilitate integration; they also have a moral obligation to ensure migrants' access to healthcare...... according to international human rights principles. The intention of this thesis is to increase the understanding of migrants' access to healthcare by exploring two study aims: 1) Are there differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy I and II); and 2) Why...... are there possible differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy III and IV). The thesis builds on different methodological approaches using both register-based retrospective cohort design, cross-sectional design and survey methods. Two different measures of access were...

  19. New York City's healthcare transportation during a disaster: a preparedness framework for a wicked problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Ernest; Lee, George C

    2009-01-01

    During a disaster, victims with varied morbidities are located at incident sites, while healthcare facilities with varied healthcare resources are distributed elsewhere. Transportation serves an essential equilibrating role: it helps balance the patients' need for care with the supply of care. Studying the special case of New York City, this article sets out the healthcare transportation components as: (1) incident morbidity; (2) transportation assets; and (3) healthcare capacity. The relationship between these three components raises an assignment problem: the management of healthcare transportation within a dynamic and partly unpredictable incident-transportation-healthcare nexus, under urban disruption. While the routine dispatch problem can be tackled through better geographic allocation software and technical algorithms, the disaster assignment problem must be confronted through real-time, mutual adjustment between institutions. This article outlines institutional alternatives for managing the assignment problem and calls for further research on the merits of alternative institutional models. PMID:19591302

  20. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  1. Customer privacy on UK healthcare websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Darren P

    2006-09-01

    Privacy has been and continues to be one of the key challenges of an age devoted to the accumulation, processing, and mining of electronic information. In particular, privacy of healthcare-related information is seen as a key issue as health organizations move towards the electronic provision of services. The aim of the research detailed in this paper has been to analyse privacy policies on popular UK healthcare-related websites to determine the extent to which consumer privacy is protected. The author has combined approaches (such as approaches focused on usability, policy content, and policy quality) used in studies by other researchers on e-commerce and US healthcare websites to provide a comprehensive analysis of UK healthcare privacy policies. The author identifies a wide range of issues related to the protection of consumer privacy through his research analysis using quantitative results. The main outcomes from the author's research are that only 61% of healthcare-related websites in their sample group posted privacy policies. In addition, most of the posted privacy policies had poor readability standards and included a variety of privacy vulnerability statements. Overall, the author's findings represent significant current issues in relation to healthcare information protection on the Internet. The hope is that raising awareness of these results will drive forward changes in the industry, similar to those experienced with information quality. PMID:16954055

  2. Lean healthcare from a change management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossum, Lisa; Aij, Kjeld Harald; Simons, Frederique Elisabeth; van der Eng, Niels; Ten Have, Wouter Dirk

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - Lean healthcare is used in a growing number of hospitals to increase efficiency and quality of care. However, healthcare organizations encounter problems with the implementation of change initiatives due to an implementation gap: the gap between strategy and execution. From a change management perspective, the purpose of this paper is to increase scientific knowledge regarding factors that diminish the implementation gap and make the transition from the "toolbox lean" toward an actual transformation to lean healthcare. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study was executed in an operating theatre of a Dutch University Medical Centre. Transformational leadership was expected to ensure the required top-down commitment, whereas team leadership creates the required active, bottom-up behavior of employees. Furthermore, professional and functional silos and a hierarchical structure were expected to impede the workforce flexibility in adapting organizational elements and optimize the entire process flow. Findings - The correlation and regression analyses showed positive relations between the transformational leadership and team leadership styles and lean healthcare implementation. The results also indicated a strong relation between workforce flexibility and the implementation of lean healthcare. Originality/value - With the use of a recently developed change management model, the Change Competence Model, the authors suggest leadership and workforce flexibility to be part of an organization's change capacity as crucial success factor for a sustainable transformation to lean healthcare.

  3. Lean healthcare from a change management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossum, Lisa; Aij, Kjeld Harald; Simons, Frederique Elisabeth; van der Eng, Niels; Ten Have, Wouter Dirk

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - Lean healthcare is used in a growing number of hospitals to increase efficiency and quality of care. However, healthcare organizations encounter problems with the implementation of change initiatives due to an implementation gap: the gap between strategy and execution. From a change management perspective, the purpose of this paper is to increase scientific knowledge regarding factors that diminish the implementation gap and make the transition from the "toolbox lean" toward an actual transformation to lean healthcare. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study was executed in an operating theatre of a Dutch University Medical Centre. Transformational leadership was expected to ensure the required top-down commitment, whereas team leadership creates the required active, bottom-up behavior of employees. Furthermore, professional and functional silos and a hierarchical structure were expected to impede the workforce flexibility in adapting organizational elements and optimize the entire process flow. Findings - The correlation and regression analyses showed positive relations between the transformational leadership and team leadership styles and lean healthcare implementation. The results also indicated a strong relation between workforce flexibility and the implementation of lean healthcare. Originality/value - With the use of a recently developed change management model, the Change Competence Model, the authors suggest leadership and workforce flexibility to be part of an organization's change capacity as crucial success factor for a sustainable transformation to lean healthcare. PMID:27119398

  4. Possibilities for Healthcare Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Szolovits

    2011-01-01

    Advances in computing technology promise to aid in achieving the goals of healthcare.We review how such changes can support each of the goá1s of healthcare as identified by the U.S.Institute of Medicine:safety,effectiveness,patient-centricity,timeliness,efficiency,and equitability.We also describe current foci of computing technology research aimed at realizing the ambitious goals for health information technology that have been set by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the Health Reform Act of 2010.Finally,we mention efforts to build health information technologies to support improved healthcare delivery in developing countries.

  5. Turnover among healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ben D

    2009-01-01

    Turnover among healthcare professionals is a costly consequence. The existing body of knowledge on healthcare professional turnover is correlated with job satisfaction levels. A landmark study differentiated 2 areas of job satisfaction categories: satisfiers and dissatisfiers (intrinsic and extrinsic motivators). The aim of this article is to examine existing research on precursors of turnover, such as burnout behaviors experienced by healthcare professionals, job satisfaction levels, employee organizational commitment, health complications which precede turnover, some current strategies to reduce turnover, and some effects CEO turnover has on employee turnover intentions.

  6. Healthcare Resource Utilisation Associated with Herpes Zoster in a Prospective Cohort of Older Australian Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Surendra; Newall, Anthony T.; MacIntyre, C. Raina; Heywood, Anita E.; McIntyre, Peter; Banks, Emily; Liu, Bette

    2016-01-01

    Background Herpes zoster (HZ) is a common condition that increases in incidence with older age but vaccines are available to prevent the disease. However, there are limited data estimating the health system burden attributable to herpes zoster by age. Methods In this study, we quantified excess healthcare resource usage associated with HZ during the acute/sub-acute period of disease (21days before to 90 days after onset) in 5952 cases and an equal number of controls matched on age, sex, and prior healthcare resource usage. Estimates were adjusted for potential confounders in multivariable regression models. Using population-based estimates of HZ incidence, we calculated the age-specific excess number of health service usage events attributable to HZ in the population. Results Per HZ case, there was an average of 0.06 (95% CI 0.04–0.08) excess hospitalisations, 1.61 (95% CI 1.51–1.69) excess general practitioner visits, 1.96 (95% CI 1.86–2.15) excess prescriptions filled and 0.11 (95% CI 0.09–0.13) excess emergency department visits. The average number of healthcare resource use events, and the estimated excess per 100,000 population increased with increasing age but were similar for men and women, except for higher rates of hospitalisation in men. The excess annual HZ associated burden of hospitalisations was highest in adults ≥80 years (N = 2244, 95%CI 1719–2767); GP visits was highest in those 60–69 years (N = 50567, 95%CI 39958–61105), prescriptions and ED visits were highest in 70–79 years (N = 50524, 95%CI 40634–60471 and N = 2891, 95%CI 2319–3449 respectively). Conclusions This study provides important data to establish the healthcare utilisation associated with HZ against which detailed cost-effectiveness analyses of HZ immunisation in older adults can be conducted. PMID:27483007

  7. Cancer in British vegetarians: updated analyses of 4998 incident cancers in a cohort of 32,491 meat eaters, 8612 fish eaters, 18,298 vegetarians, and 2246 vegans 1 2 3 4

    OpenAIRE

    Key, Timothy J; Appleby, Paul N.; Crowe, Francesca L.; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Julie A Schmidt; Ruth C Travis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vegetarian diets might affect the risk of cancer. Objective: The objective was to describe cancer incidence in vegetarians and nonvegetarians in a large sample in the United Kingdom. Design: This was a pooled analysis of 2 prospective studies including 61,647 British men and women comprising 32,491 meat eaters, 8612 fish eaters, and 20,544 vegetarians (including 2246 vegans). Cancer incidence was followed through nationwide cancer registries. Cancer risk by vegetarian status was e...

  8. Healthcare Associated Infections - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measures - provider data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  9. Healthcare Associated Infections - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - national data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  10. Healthcare Associated Infections - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - state data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  11. Coproduction of healthcare service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Maren; Batalden, Paul; Margolis, Peter; Seid, Michael; Armstrong, Gail; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Hartung, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to ensure effective participation of patients in healthcare are called by many names—patient centredness, patient engagement, patient experience. Improvement initiatives in this domain often resemble the efforts of manufacturers to engage consumers in designing and marketing products. Services, however, are fundamentally different than products; unlike goods, services are always ‘coproduced’. Failure to recognise this unique character of a service and its implications may limit our success in partnering with patients to improve health care. We trace a partial history of the coproduction concept, present a model of healthcare service coproduction and explore its application as a design principle in three healthcare service delivery innovations. We use the principle to examine the roles, relationships and aims of this interdependent work. We explore the principle's implications and challenges for health professional development, for service delivery system design and for understanding and measuring benefit in healthcare services. PMID:26376674

  12. Healthcare Under Fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Tension between patients and hospital staff, insufficient health insurance coverage, and a limited supply of quality medical services are pressurizing China’s healthcare system reform Doctors and nurses, normally seen as protecting their patients, are in

  13. Coproduction of healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Maren; Batalden, Paul; Margolis, Peter; Seid, Michael; Armstrong, Gail; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Hartung, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Efforts to ensure effective participation of patients in healthcare are called by many names-patient centredness, patient engagement, patient experience. Improvement initiatives in this domain often resemble the efforts of manufacturers to engage consumers in designing and marketing products. Services, however, are fundamentally different than products; unlike goods, services are always 'coproduced'. Failure to recognise this unique character of a service and its implications may limit our success in partnering with patients to improve health care. We trace a partial history of the coproduction concept, present a model of healthcare service coproduction and explore its application as a design principle in three healthcare service delivery innovations. We use the principle to examine the roles, relationships and aims of this interdependent work. We explore the principle's implications and challenges for health professional development, for service delivery system design and for understanding and measuring benefit in healthcare services. PMID:26376674

  14. Healthcare Facility Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MAP:http://tinyurl.com/HealthcareFacilityLocationsMap The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Center for Health Care Quality, Licensing and Certification...

  15. Healthcare Software Assurance

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Jason G.; Pauley, Keith A.

    2006-01-01

    Software assurance is a rigorous, lifecycle phase-independent set of activities which ensure completeness, safety, and reliability of software processes and products. This is accomplished by guaranteeing conformance to all requirements, standards, procedures, and regulations. These assurance processes are even more important when coupled with healthcare software systems, embedded software in medical instrumentation, and other healthcare-oriented life-critical systems. The current Food and Dru...

  16. The Cuban National Healthcare System: Characterization of primary healthcare services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Regina DAL PRÁ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a report on the experience of healthcare professionals in Florianópolis, who took the course La Atención Primaria de Salud y la Medicina Familiar en Cuba [Primary Healthcare and Family Medicine in Cuba], in 2014. The purpose of the study is to characterize the healthcare units and services provided by the Cuban National Healthcare System (SNS and to reflect on this experience/immersion, particularly on Cuba’s Primary Healthcare Service. The results found that in comparison with Brazil’s Single Healthcare System (SUS Cuba’s SNS Family Healthcare (SF service is the central organizing element of the Primary Healthcare Service. The number of SF teams per inhabitant is different than in Brazil; the programs given priority in the APS are similar to those in Brazil and the intersectorial nature and scope of the services prove to be effective in the resolution of healthcare problems.

  17. Disparities in healthcare utilisation rates for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Albertan residents, 1997-2006: a population database study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Chung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is widely recognised that significant discrepancies exist between the health of indigenous and non-indigenous populations. Whilst the reasons are incompletely defined, one potential cause is that indigenous communities do not access healthcare to the same extent. We investigated healthcare utilisation rates in the Canadian Aboriginal population to elucidate the contribution of this fundamental social determinant for health to such disparities. METHODS: Healthcare utilisation data over a nine-year period were analysed for a cohort of nearly two million individuals to determine the rates at which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations utilised two specialties (Cardiology and Ophthalmology in Alberta, Canada. Unadjusted and adjusted healthcare utilisation rates obtained by mixed linear and Poisson regressions, respectively, were compared amongst three population groups - federally registered Aboriginals, individuals receiving welfare, and other Albertans. RESULTS: Healthcare utilisation rates for Aboriginals were substantially lower than those of non-Aboriginals and welfare recipients at each time point and subspecialty studied [e.g. During 2005/06, unadjusted Cardiology utilisation rates were 0.28% (Aboriginal, n = 97,080, 0.93% (non-Aboriginal, n = 1,720,041 and 1.37% (Welfare, n = 52,514, p = <0.001]. The age distribution of the Aboriginal population was markedly different [2.7%≥65 years of age, non-Aboriginal 10.7%], and comparable utilisation rates were obtained after adjustment for fiscal year and estimated life expectancy [Cardiology: Incidence Rate Ratio 0.66, Ophthalmology: IRR 0.85]. DISCUSSION: The analysis revealed that Aboriginal people utilised subspecialty healthcare at a consistently lower rate than either comparatively economically disadvantaged groups or the general population. Notably, the differences were relatively invariant between the major provincial centres and over a nine year period

  18. Healthcare is primary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation.

  19. Queueing for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palvannan, R Kannapiran; Teow, Kiok Liang

    2012-04-01

    Patient queues are prevalent in healthcare and wait time is one measure of access to care. We illustrate Queueing Theory-an analytical tool that has provided many insights to service providers when designing new service systems and managing existing ones. This established theory helps us to quantify the appropriate service capacity to meet the patient demand, balancing system utilization and the patient's wait time. It considers four key factors that affect the patient's wait time: average patient demand, average service rate and the variation in both. We illustrate four basic insights that will be useful for managers and doctors who manage healthcare delivery systems, at hospital or department level. Two examples from local hospitals are shown where we have used queueing models to estimate the service capacity and analyze the impact of capacity configurations, while considering the inherent variation in healthcare. PMID:20703697

  20. DGNB certified Healthcare Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2015-01-01

    for sustainability and wants a certification. This research investigates the decision‐making and design process (DMaDP) behind four DGNB certified Healthcare Centres (HCC) in Northern Jutland in Denmark. In general, knowledge about the DMaDP is important. However it is important to know what part DGNB plays...... a dialog about DGNB and energy concept is important even before anyone start sketching. Experiences with the different approaches will be further outlined in the paper.Future research has the intention to collect further knowledge about DGNB and DMaDP in practise. This project was limited to Healthcare...

  1. Costing Practices in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Christopher; Kern, Anja; Laguecir, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    .e., Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) systems, and costing practices. DRG-based payment systems strongly influence costing practices in multiple ways. In particular, setting DRG tariffs requires highly standardized costing practices linked with specific skill sets from management accountants and brings other......The rising cost of healthcare is a globally pressing concern. This makes detailed attention to the way in which costing is carried out of central importance. This article offers a framework for considering the interdependencies between a dominant element of the contemporary healthcare context, i...... jurisdictions (e.g., clinical coding) to bear on costing practice. These factors contribute to the fragmentation of the jurisdiction of management accounting....

  2. Advanced healthcare materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Advanced materials are attracting strong interest in the fundamental as well as applied sciences and are being extensively explored for their potential usage in a range of healthcare technological and biological applications. Advanced Healthcare Nanomaterials summarises the current status of knowledge in the fields of advanced materials for functional therapeutics, point-of-care diagnostics, translational materials, up and coming bio-engineering devices. The book highlights the key features which enable engineers to design stimuli-responsive smart nanoparticles, novel biomaterials, nan

  3. Factors Influencing Healthcare Service Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results Quality in healthcare is a production of cooperation between the patient and the healthcare provider in a supportive environment. Personal factors of the provider and the patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare organisation, healthcare system, and the broader environment affect healthcare service quality. Healthcare quality can be improved by supportive visionary leadership, proper planning, education and training, availability of resources, effective management of resources, employees and processes, and collaboration and cooperation among providers. Conclusion This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework that provides policy-makers and managers a practical understanding of factors that affect healthcare service quality.

  4. A Problematic Family Reunion of a Chinese-American in China: Issues of Face Abstract: As one of the heated topics in the intercultural communication studies, face issues have aroused world-wide attention in the academic field. This paper analyses thr...%ract: As one of the heated topics in the intercultural communication studies, face issues have aroused world-wide attention in the academic field. This paper analyses three critical incidents based on two face theories proposed by Brown and Levinson ...

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹凤琴

    2012-01-01

    As one of the heated topics in the intercultural communication studies, face issues have aroused world-wide attention in the academic field. This paper analyses three critical incidents based on two face theories proposed by Brown and Levinson (1987) and Ting-Toomey and Kurogi(1998) respectively. Lastly, by focusing on the relationship between the rapport-threatening behavior and the face, this paper intends to cultivate our awareness of face and highlight the harmonious interpersonal relationship between different cultures.

  5. Social marketing in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Aras

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSocial marketing is an important tool in the delivery ofhealthcare services. For any healthcare programme orproject to be successful, community/consumer participationis required. The four principles of social marketing can guidepolicymakers and healthcare providers to successfully planand implement health programmes.AimTo review the existing literature in order to project thebenefits of social marketing in healthcare.MethodA search of periodical literature by the author involvingsocial marketing and marketing concepts in health wascarried out. Items were identified initially through healthorientedindexing services such as Medline, Health STARand Cinahl, using the identifiers “social marketing“ and“marketing in health”. An extensive search was also carriedout on educational database ERIC.ResultsA literature review of various studies on social marketingindicated that the selection of the right product (accordingto the community need at the right place, with the rightstrategy for promotion and at the right price yields goodresults. However, along with technical sustainability(product, price, promotion and place, financialsustainability, institutional sustainability and marketsustainability are conducive factors for the success of socialmarketing.ConclusionThe purpose of this literature review was to ascertain thelikely effectiveness of social marketing principles andapproaches and behaviour change communication towardshealth promotion.It is important for all healthcare workers to understand andrespond to the public’s desires and needs and routinely useconsumer research to determine how best to help thepublic to solve problems and realise aspirations. Socialmarketing can optimise public health by facilitatingrelationship-building with consumers and making their liveshealthier.

  6. Access to effective healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Access to effective healthcare is in particular challenging for vulnerable and socially disadvantaged patients. Patients with chronic conditions are over-represented in these lower socioeconomic (LSES) groups. No generic review integrating the evidence on Self-Management support interventions in ...

  7. Untangling healthcare competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, I C; McDaniel, R R

    1993-11-01

    Traditional approaches to competition may be inappropriate for healthcare providers. Neoclassical economics makes the implicit assumption that a single actor embodies consumption, compensation, and benefit from a transaction. In healthcare, this assumption does not hold. Instead, such actions are accomplished by three separate actors--consumers (physicians), customers (third-party payers), and clients (patients). A hospital simultaneously competes in three arenas. Hospitals compete for physicians along a technological dimension. Competition for third-party payers takes on a financial dimension. Hospitals compete for patients along a marketing dimension. Because of the complex marketplace interactions among hospital, patient, physician, and third-party payer, the role of price in controlling behavior is difficult to establish. The dynamics underlying the hospital selection decision--that is, the decision maker's expectations of services and the convenience of accessing services--must also be considered. Healthcare managers must understand the interrelationships involved in the three-pronged competitive perspective for several reasons. This perspective clarifies the multiple facets of competition a hospital faces. It also disentangles the actions previously fulfilled by the traditional single buyer. It illuminates the critical skills underlying the competition for each audience. Finally, it defines the primary criterion each audience uses in sorting among hospitals. Recognition of the multifaceted nature of competition among healthcare providers will help demystify market behavior and thereby improve internal organizational communication systems, managers' ability to focus on appropriate activities, and the hospital's ability to adapt to changing market conditions.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) Share Compartir Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings On this Page What ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  9. STRESS MANAGEMENT FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS

    OpenAIRE

    Odigie, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare professionals are exposed to several job stressors that can adversely affect both their mental and physical health, decrease their efficiency at work, for a successful intervention, the causes and management of stress in any healthcare unit or among healthcare professionals must be diligently documented. The aim of this study is to explore issues on specific occupational stress related to job performance, the role of healthcare in stress management and the effects of job resourc...

  10. Lean six sigma in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Henk; Verver, John P S; van den Heuvel, Jaap; Bisgaard, Soren; Does, Ronald J M M

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare, as with any other service operation, requires systematic innovation efforts to remain competitive, cost efficient, and up-to-date. This article outlines a methodology and presents examples to illustrate how principles of Lean Thinking and Six Sigma can be combined to provide an effective framework for producing systematic innovation efforts in healthcare. Controlling healthcare cost increases, improving quality, and providing better healthcare are some of the benefits of this approach.

  11. HEALTHCARE MARKETING - A RELATIONAL APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    CAZACU Lavinia; OPRESCU, Alina Elena

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the unique characteristics of healthcare services, the challenges faced in the implementation of marketing principles into the healthcare services sector and also the behavior tendencies of the healthcare consumer. Taking into account the differences between healthcare services and other services and the importance of the doctor-patient relationship, a new marketing approach seems to be a solution for all problems and a response for all unanswered questions. A revi...

  12. Who Benefits from Public Healthcare Subsidies in Egypt?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shoukry Rashad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct subsidization of healthcare services has been widely used in many countries to improve health outcomes. It is commonly believed that the poor are the main beneficiaries from these subsidies. We test this hypothesis in Egypt by empirically analyzing the distribution of public healthcare subsidies using data from Egypt Demographic and Health Survey and Egypt National Health Accounts. To determine the distribution of public health care subsidies, we conducted a Benefit Incidence Analysis. As a robustness check, both concentration and Kakwani indices for outpatient, inpatient, and total healthcare were also calculated. Results show some degree of inequality in the benefits from public healthcare services, which varied by the type of healthcare provided. In particular, subsidies associated with University hospitals are pro-rich and have inequality increasing effect, while subsidies associated with outpatient and inpatient care provided by the Ministry of Health and Population have not been pro-poor but have inequality reducing effect (weakly progressive. Results were robust to the different analytical methods. While it is widely perceived that the poor benefit the most from health subsidies, the findings of this study refute this hypothesis in the case of Egypt. Poverty reduction measures and healthcare reforms in Egypt should not only focus on expanding the coverage of healthcare benefits, but also on improving the equity of its distribution.

  13. [Healthcare value chain: a model for the Brazilian healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Marcelo Caldeira; Malik, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a model of the healthcare value chain which consists of a schematic representation of the Brazilian healthcare system. The proposed model is adapted for the Brazilian reality and has the scope and flexibility for use in academic activities and analysis of the healthcare sector in Brazil. It places emphasis on three components: the main activities of the value chain, grouped in vertical and horizontal links; the mission of each link and the main value chain flows. The proposed model consists of six vertical and three horizontal links, amounting to nine. These are: knowledge development; supply of products and technologies; healthcare services; financial intermediation; healthcare financing; healthcare consumption; regulation; distribution of healthcare products; and complementary and support services. Four flows can be used to analyze the value chain: knowledge and innovation; products and services; financial; and information. PMID:23099762

  14. Crossing and creating boundaries in healthcare innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerslev, Karen

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - This paper reports from a qualitative case study of a change initiative undertaken in a Danish public hospital setting during national healthcare reforms. The purpose of this paper is to challenge understandings of innovations as defined by being value-adding per se. Whether the effects of attempting to innovate are positive or negative is in this paper regarded as a matter of empirical investigation. Design/methodology/approach - Narrative accounts of activities during the change initiative are analysed in order to elucidate the effects of framing the change initiative as innovation on which boundaries are created and crossed. Findings - Framing change initiatives as innovation leads to intended as well as unanticipated boundary crossings where healthcare practitioners from different organizations recognize a shared problem and task. It also leads to unintended boundary reinforcements between "us and them" that may exclude the perspectives of patients or stakeholders when confronting complex problems in healthcare. This boundary reinforcement can lead to further fragmentation of healthcare despite the stated intention to create more integrated services. Practical implications - The paper suggests that researchers as well as practitioners should not presume that intentions to innovate will by themselves enhance creativity and innovation. When analysing the intended, unintended as well as unanticipated consequences of framing change initiatives as innovation, researchers and practitioner gain nuanced knowledge about the effects of intending to innovate in complex settings such as healthcare. Originality/value - This paper suggests the need for an analytical move from studying the effects of innovation to studying the effects of framing complex problems as a call for innovation. PMID:27296877

  15. Crossing and creating boundaries in healthcare innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerslev, Karen

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - This paper reports from a qualitative case study of a change initiative undertaken in a Danish public hospital setting during national healthcare reforms. The purpose of this paper is to challenge understandings of innovations as defined by being value-adding per se. Whether the effects of attempting to innovate are positive or negative is in this paper regarded as a matter of empirical investigation. Design/methodology/approach - Narrative accounts of activities during the change initiative are analysed in order to elucidate the effects of framing the change initiative as innovation on which boundaries are created and crossed. Findings - Framing change initiatives as innovation leads to intended as well as unanticipated boundary crossings where healthcare practitioners from different organizations recognize a shared problem and task. It also leads to unintended boundary reinforcements between "us and them" that may exclude the perspectives of patients or stakeholders when confronting complex problems in healthcare. This boundary reinforcement can lead to further fragmentation of healthcare despite the stated intention to create more integrated services. Practical implications - The paper suggests that researchers as well as practitioners should not presume that intentions to innovate will by themselves enhance creativity and innovation. When analysing the intended, unintended as well as unanticipated consequences of framing change initiatives as innovation, researchers and practitioner gain nuanced knowledge about the effects of intending to innovate in complex settings such as healthcare. Originality/value - This paper suggests the need for an analytical move from studying the effects of innovation to studying the effects of framing complex problems as a call for innovation.

  16. Incidence of anogenital warts in Germany: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolajczyk Rafael T

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papilloma virus (HPV types 6 and 11 account for 90 percent of anogenital warts (AGW. Assessment of a potential reduction of the incidence of AGW following introduction of HPV vaccines requires population-based incidence rates. The aim of this study was to estimate incidence rates of AGW in Germany, stratified by age, sex, and region. Additionally, the medical practitioner (gynaecologist, dermatologist, urologist etc. who made the initial diagnosis of AGW was assessed. Methods Retrospective cohort study in a population aged 10 to 79 years in a population-based healthcare insurance database. The database included more than 14 million insurance members from all over Germany during the years 2004-2006. A case of AGW was considered incident if a disease-free period of twelve months preceded the diagnosis. To assess regional variation, analyses were performed by federal state. Results The estimated incidence rate was 169.5/100,000 person-years for the German population aged 10 to 79 years. Most cases occurred in the 15 to 40 years age group. The incidence rate was higher and showed a peak at younger ages in females than in males. The highest incidence rates for both sexes were observed in the city-states Berlin, Hamburg and Bremen. In females, initial diagnosis of AGW was most frequently made by a gynaecologist (71.7%, whereas in males, AGW were most frequently diagnosed by a dermatologist (44.8% or urologist (25.1%. Conclusions Incidence of AGW in Germany is comparable with findings for other countries. As expected, most cases occurred in the younger age groups. The frequency of diagnoses of AGW differs between sexes and women and men receive treatment by doctors of different specialties.

  17. [Coordination among healthcare levels: systematization of tools and measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terraza Núñez, Rebeca; Vargas Lorenzo, Ingrid; Vázquez Navarrete, María Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Improving healthcare coordination is a priority in many healthcare systems, particularly in chronic health problems in which a number of professionals and services intervene. There is an abundance of coordination strategies and mechanisms that should be systematized so that they can be used in the most appropriate context. The present article aims to analyse healthcare coordination and its instruments using the organisational theory. Coordination mechanisms can be classified according to two basic processes used to coordinate activities: programming and feedback. The optimal combination of mechanisms will depend on three factors: the degree to which healthcare activities are differentiated, the volume and type of interdependencies, and the level of uncertainty. Historically, healthcare services have based coordination on skills standardization and, most recently, on processes standardization, through clinical guidelines, maps, and plans. Their utilisation is unsatisfactory in chronic diseases involving intervention by several professionals with reciprocal interdependencies, variability in patients' response to medical interventions, and a large volume of information to be processed. In this case, mechanisms based on feedback, such as working groups, linking professionals and vertical information systems, are more effective. To date, evaluation of healthcare coordination has not been conducted systematically, using structure, process and results indicators. The different strategies and instruments have been applied mainly to long-term care and mental health and one of the challenges to healthcare coordination is to extend and evaluate their use throughout the healthcare continuum.

  18. The incidence and prognosis of patients with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg

    2015-01-01

    for an overall incidence rate of 215.7 per 100,000 person years including 99.0 for community-acquired, 50.0 for healthcare-associated and 66.7 for nosocomial bacteremia. The overall incidence rate decreased by 23.3% (95% CI, 17.8%-28.4%) from year 2000 to 2008 (3.3% per year, prates...... of community-acquired bacteremia (3.7% per year, p year, pincidence rate of healthcare-associated bacteremia remained more or less stable throughout the study period (p=0.17). The crude incidence rates decreased for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus......-time bacteremias per admission for an overall incidence of 14.2 per 1000 admissions and 23.6 per 10,000 bed days; highest for males, elderly individuals (> 65 years), and patients initially admitted to the Departments of Hematology, Nephrology, Internal Medicine, Urology or Oncology. The daily incidence...

  19. Innovation Concepts in Healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today’s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the “industrialization” of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the He...

  20. Healthcare in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, Nyi Nyi; Myat Cho, Su; Htun, Nang Mie Mie; Yu Mon Saw; Myint, Myat Noe Htin Aung; Aoki, Fumiko; Reyer, Joshua A; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Myanmar transitioned to a civilian government in March, 2011. Although the democratic process has accelerated since then, many problems in the field of healthcare still exist. Since there is a limited overview on the healthcare in Myanmar, this article briefly describes the current states surrounding health services in Myanmar. According to the Census 2014, the population in the Republic of the Union of Myanmar was 51,410,000. The crude birth rate in the previous one year was estimated to be 18.9 per 1,000, giving the annual population growth rate of 0.89% between 2003 and 2014. The Ministry of Health reorganized into six departments. National non-governmental organizations and community-based organizations support healthcare, as well as international non-governmental organizations. Since hospital statistics by the government cover only public facilities, the information on private facilities is limited. Although there were not enough medical doctors (61 per 100,000 population), the number of medical students was reduced from 2,400 to 1,200 in 2012 to ensure the quality of medical education. The information on causes of death in the general population could not be retrieved, but some data was available from hospital statistics. Although the improvement was marked, the figures did not reach the levels set by Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. A trial prepaid health insurance system started in July 2015, to be followed by evaluation one year later. There are many international donors, including the Japan International Cooperation Agency, supporting health in Myanmar. With these efforts and support, a marked progress is expected in the field of healthcare. PMID:27303099

  1. Social Networking Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Leigh; de Leastar, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    The world of “Social Networking”, a cultural phenomenon of recent years, has evolved an application paradigm, Instant Messaging (IM), into a feature rich, highly interactive and context sensitive service delivery environment. Terms such as buddy lists, presence and IM-bots have emerged as building blocks for services that significantly enhance the user experience. Mapping this paradigm to healthcare can deliver a highly innovative communication platform for information sharing, monitoring and...

  2. 万级层流病房对初发急性白血病患者诱导化疗期间医院感染发病率的影响%Effect of class 10000 laminar flow ward on the incidence of healthcare-as-sociated infection in patients with initial occurrence of acute leukemia dur-ing induction chemotherapy period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑宇; 李啸扬; 李军民

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of class 10000 laminar flow ward on the incidence of healthcare-asso-ciated infection (HAI)in patients with initial occurrence of acute leukemia during induction chemotherapy period. Methods Patients with initial occurrence of acute leukemia admitted to a hematological department of a hospital be-tween October 2013 and June 2014 were investigated retrospectively,patients in class 10000 laminar flow ward was as trial group,in general ward was as control group. All patients received standard induction chemotherapy and the same nursing measures,the incidence of HAI between two groups of patients,and ward air cleanliness were com-pared.Results A total of 79 patients with initial acute leukemia were received (trial group,n= 39;control group, n= 40). The average air cleanliness value in rooms and corridors of laminar flow wards were both significantly dif-ferent with general ward (3.57×106/m3 vs 149.36×106/m3 ,t= 45.80,P<0.001;24.46×106/m3 vs 15854.38 ×106/m3 ,t= 108.70,P<0.001). Incidence of HAI between trial group and control group was significantly differ-ent (23.08% [9/39]vs 45.00% [18/40],χ2= 4.219,P= 0.040). The main infection site in trial group was gastro-intestinal tract (n= 5 ),in control group was lower respiratory tract (n= 8 ). The duration of fever,duration and cost of antimicrobial use in trial group were (6.20±2.10)d,(9.35±2.12)d,and (27113.79±1559.03)yuan re-spectively,in control group were (10.20±2.90)d,(14.15±3.14)d,and (58566.29±2217.54)yuan respectively, difference in duration of fever and cost of antimicrobial use between two groups were all significant(t= 1.021, 1377.45,both P<0.05).Conclusion Laminar flow ward can reduce the incidence of HAI in patients with initial occurrence of acute leukemia,and decrease cost of antimicrobial use.%目的 探讨万级层流病房对初发急性白血病患者诱导化疗期间医院感染发病率的影响.方法 回顾性调查2013年10月—2014年6月某院血液

  3. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J

    1995-01-01

    When it comes to electronic data processing in healthcare, we offer a guarded, but hopeful, prognosis. To be sure, the age of electronic information processing has hit healthcare. Employers, insurance companies, hospitals, physicians and a host of ancillary service providers are all being ushered into a world of high speed, high tech electronic information. Some are even predicting that the health information business will grow from $20 billion to over $100 billion in a decade. Yet, out industry lags behind other industries in its overall movement to the paperless world. Selecting and installing the most advanced integrated information system isn't a simple task, as we've seen. As in life, compromises can produce less than optimal results. Nevertheless, integrated healthcare systems simply won't achieve their goals without systems designed to support the operation of a continuum of services. That's the reality! It is difficult to read about the wonderful advances in other sectors, while realizing that many trees still fall each year in the name of the health care industry. Yes, there are some outstanding examples of organizations pushing the envelop in a variety of areas. Yet from a very practical standpoint, many (like our physician's office) are still struggling or are on the sidelines wondering what to do. Given the competitive marketplace, organizations without effective systems may not have long to wonder and wait.

  4. Ethics of mandatory vaccination for healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanakis, E; Jansen, A; Lopalco, P L; Giesecke, J

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at increased risk of contracting infections at work and further transmitting them to colleagues and patients. Immune HCWs would be protected themselves and act as a barrier against the spread of infections and maintain healthcare delivery during outbreaks, but vaccine uptake rates in HCWs have often been low. In order to achieve adequate immunisation rates in HCWs, mandatory vaccination policies are occasionally implemented by healthcare authorities, but such policies have raised considerable controversy. Here we review the background of this debate, analyse arguments for and against mandatory vaccination policies, and consider the principles and virtues of clinical, professional, institutional and public health ethics. We conclude that there is a moral imperative for HCWs to be immune and for healthcare institutions to ensure HCW vaccination, in particular for those working in settings with high-risk groups of patients. If voluntary uptake of vaccination by HCWs is not optimal, patients’ welfare, public health and also the HCW’s own health interests should outweigh concerns about individual autonomy: fair mandatory vaccination policies for HCWs might be acceptable. Differences in diseases, patient and HCW groups at risk and available vaccines should be taken into consideration when adopting the optimal policy. PMID:24229791

  5. Can healthcare go from good to great?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Todd H; Wachter, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare's improvement efforts have focused on the point of care, targeting specific processes such as preventing central line infections, while paying relatively less attention to the larger issues of organizational structure and leadership. Interestingly, the business community has long recognized that poor management and structure can thwart improvement efforts. Perhaps the corporate world's best-known study of these issues is found in the book Good to Great, which identifies top-performing corporations, compares them to carefully selected organizations that failed to achieve similar levels of performance, and gleans lessons from these analyses. In this article, we analyze the feasibility of carefully applying Good to Great's methods for analyzing organizational structure and leadership to healthcare. While a few studies in healthcare have come close to emulating Good to Great's methodology, none have matched its rigor. These shortcomings highlight key information and measurement gaps that must be addressed to facilitate unbiased, rigorous studies of the organizational and leadership predictors of institutional excellence in healthcare. PMID:21997854

  6. Quality incidents in projects

    OpenAIRE

    Eren, Serkan

    2010-01-01

    A quality incident is an occurrence that has a negative consequence on time, cost and quality.These incidents are important for quality management in the projects. Similar to Health,Safety and Environment Incidents (HSE incidents) which are widely used in organizations allaround the world and in their projects, quality incidents should also be reported. For thepurpose of this, quality incident reporting systems can be used.The main purpose of this project is to define and explain the current ...

  7. Data mining applications in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hian Chye; Tan, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Data mining has been used intensively and extensively by many organizations. In healthcare, data mining is becoming increasingly popular, if not increasingly essential. Data mining applications can greatly benefit all parties involved in the healthcare industry. For example, data mining can help healthcare insurers detect fraud and abuse, healthcare organizations make customer relationship management decisions, physicians identify effective treatments and best practices, and patients receive better and more affordable healthcare services. The huge amounts of data generated by healthcare transactions are too complex and voluminous to be processed and analyzed by traditional methods. Data mining provides the methodology and technology to transform these mounds of data into useful information for decision making. This article explores data mining applications in healthcare. In particular, it discusses data mining and its applications within healthcare in major areas such as the evaluation of treatment effectiveness, management of healthcare, customer relationship management, and the detection of fraud and abuse. It also gives an illustrative example of a healthcare data mining application involving the identification of risk factors associated with the onset of diabetes. Finally, the article highlights the limitations of data mining and discusses some future directions. PMID:15869215

  8. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this

  9. Prevalence, incidence, and age at diagnosis in Marfan Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Kristian A; Hove, Hanne; Kyhl, Kasper;

    2015-01-01

    have reported a wide range of prevalence and incidence. Our aim was to study prevalence, incidence, and age at diagnosis in patients with Marfan syndrome. Method: Using unique Danish patient-registries, we identified all possible Marfan syndrome patients recorded by the Danish healthcare system (1977....... The annual median incidence was 0.19/100,000 (range: 0.0-0.7) which increased significantly with an incidence rate ratio of 1.03 (95 % CI: 1.02-1.04, p age at diagnose of 19.0 years (range: 0.0-74). The age at diagnosis increased during the study period, uninfluenced by the changes...... and physicians caring for adults....

  10. Script of Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken; Brodersen, Søsser Grith Kragh; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Many new product designs are currently being implemented in the healthcare sector, and this presents designers with challenges involved in socially innovative design. In this paper, we argue that designing assistive technologies requires focus on multiple users and use practices. We see the design...... a mutual adaptation process in their daily practice, and how this adaptation varies in different cases.The human/non-human actor perspective focuses on the relation between the designed artifact and the user in specific situations. The analysis leads to a central question: How does the scripting...

  11. Constructing Healthcare Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harty, Chris; Holm Jacobsen, Peter; Tryggestad, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to inquire into the role of project visualisations in shaping healthcare spaces and practices. The study draws upon an ethnographic field study from a large on-going hospital construction project in Denmark, and focuses on the early phases of on-boarding the design team...... into the project organisation. The theoretical contribution concerns the ways in which project visualisations plays an active role in developing novel conceptions of space and how these are mobilized in the process of on-boarding, in terms of 1. Design space (especially the engagement of users in the design...

  12. SOA governance in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilakopoulos, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is increasingly adopted by many sectors, including healthcare. Due to the nature of healthcare systems there is a need to increase SOA adoption success rates as the non integrated nature of healthcare systems is responsible for medical errors that cause the loss of tens of thousands patients per year. Following our previous research [1] we propose that SOA governance is a critical success factor for SOA success in healthcare. Literature reports multiple SOA governance models that have limitations and they are confusing. In addition to this, there is a lack of healthcare specific SOA governance models. This highlights a literature void and thus the purpose of this paper is to proposed a healthcare specific SOA governance framework. PMID:23823423

  13. Healthcare technology and technology assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, James H.; Hwang, Raymond; Bozic, K. H.

    2007-01-01

    New technology is one of the primary drivers for increased healthcare costs in the United States. Both physician and industry play important roles in the development, adoption, utilization and choice of new technologies. The Federal Drug Administration regulates new drugs and new medical devices, but healthcare technology assessment remains limited. Healthcare technology assessment originated in federal agencies; today it is decentralized with increasing private sector efforts. Innovation is ...

  14. Quality assessment of healthcare systems

    OpenAIRE

    Koubeková, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Quality assessment of healthcare systems is considered to be the basic tool of developing strategic concepts in healthcare quality improvement and has a great impact on quality of life. The thesis' main focus is on possibilities of quality assessment on international quality model level and its transformation into national structures. It includes teoretical points of quality and economic evaluation of quality in healthcare. The objective is to assess the participation of czech hospitals in he...

  15. Occupational Outlook Handbook: Healthcare Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurses ( APRNs ), coordinate patient care and may provide primary and specialty healthcare. The scope of ... Health and Safety Specialists Occupational health and safety specialists analyze many ...

  16. Healthcare regulatory concepts in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Robson Rocha de; Elias, Paulo Eduardo Mangeon

    2012-06-01

    The healthcare regulatory concepts used in Brazilian scientific publications on healthcare management were reviewed. A typo-logical classification for regulatory concepts was developed from the most current ideas in five disciplines: life sciences, law, economics, sociology and political science. Four ideas stood out: control, balance, adaptation and direction, with greatest emphasis on the technical nature of regulation. The political nature of regulation was secondary. It was considered that dis-cussion of healthcare regulatory concepts was connected with comprehension of the role that the state plays in this sector. De-finition of the forms of state intervention is the key convergence point between the different ways of conceptualizing healthcare regulation.

  17. Sequential Pattern Mining of Electronic Healthcare Reimbursement Claims: Experiences and Challenges in Uncovering How Patients are Treated by Physicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL; Hobson, Tanner C [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We examine the use of electronic healthcare reimbursement claims (EHRC) for analyzing healthcare delivery and practice patterns across the United States (US). We show that EHRCs are correlated with disease incidence estimates published by the Centers for Disease Control. Further, by analyzing over 1 billion EHRCs, we track patterns of clinical procedures administered to patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), heart disease (HD) and breast cancer (BC) using sequential pattern mining algorithms. Our analyses reveal that in contrast to treating HD and BC, clinical procedures for ASD diagnoses are highly varied leading up to and after the ASD diagnoses. The discovered clinical procedure sequences also reveal significant differences in the overall costs incurred across different parts of the US, indicating a lack of consensus amongst practitioners in treating ASD patients. We show that a data-driven approach to understand clinical trajectories using EHRC can provide quantitative insights into how to better manage and treat patients. Based on our experience, we also discuss emerging challenges in using EHRC datasets for gaining insights into the state of contemporary healthcare delivery and practice in the US.

  18. Healthcare Programmes for Truck Drivers in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Tresha Lalla-Edward

    Full Text Available Truck drivers have unique health needs, and by virtue of their continuous travel, experience difficulty in accessing healthcare. Currently, planning for effective care is hindered by lack of knowledge about their health needs and about the impact of on-going programmes on this population's health outcomes. We reviewed healthcare programmes implemented for sub-Saharan African truck drivers, assessed the evaluation methods, and examined impact on health outcomes.We searched scientific and institutional databases, and online search engines to include all publications describing a healthcare programme in sub-Saharan Africa where the main clients were truck drivers. We consulted experts and organisations working with mobile populations to identify unpublished reports. Forest plots of impact and outcome indicators with unadjusted risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were created to map the impact of these programmes. We performed a subgroup analysis by type of indicator using a random-effects model to assess between-study heterogeneity. We conducted a sensitivity analysis to examine both the summary effect estimate chosen (risk difference vs. risk ratio and model to summarise results (fixed vs. random effects.Thirty-seven publications describing 22 healthcare programmes across 30 countries were included from 5,599 unique records. All programmes had an HIV-prevention focus with only three expanding their services to cover conditions other primary healthcare services. Twelve programmes were evaluated and most evaluations assessed changes in input, output, and outcome indicators. Absence of comparison groups, preventing attribution of the effect observed to the programme and lack of biologically confirmed outcomes were the main limitations. Four programmes estimated a quantitative change in HIV prevalence or reported STI incidence, with mixed results, and one provided anecdotal evidence of changes in AIDS-related mortality and social norms. Most

  19. Designing better healthcare environments: interprofessional competencies in healthcare design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Gerri; Zimring, Craig; Chuzi, Joshua; Dutcher, Diane

    2010-07-01

    There has been considerable interest in bridging educational programs in the United States across healthcare, architecture, industrial design, and human computing disciplines to design more effective and safer healthcare environments. New combinations of professionals including those outside the traditional healthcare disciplines are coming together to solve quality and safety problems and to re-envision the physical and social design of healthcare organizations. Little is known about the knowledge and skills essential to integrate these diverse perspectives and pose innovative solutions. A set of seven interprofessional competencies were identified through review of the literature, interviews of faculty and leaders in the field, and experience of the authors teaching interprofessional courses in healthcare design. The relevance and feasibility of these competencies were assessed through expert review by faculty and consultants and implementation in multiple courses.

  20. Evaluating the organisational climate in Italian public healthcare institutions by means of a questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoli Augusta; Cinotti Renata; Wienand Ulrich; Bisagni Miriam

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background By means of the ICONAS project, the Healthcare Agency of an Italian Region developed, and used a standardised questionnaire to quantify the organisational climate. The aims of the project were (a) to investigate whether the healthcare institutions were interested in measuring climate, (b) to estimate the range of applicability and reliability of the instrument, (c) to analyse the dimensions of climate among healthcare personnel, (d) to assess the differences among employee...

  1. The three-year incidence of fracture in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Kyla L; McArthur, Eric; Leslie, William D; Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Jamal, Sophie A; Cadarette, Suzanne M; Pouget, Jennie G; Lok, Charmaine E; Hodsman, Anthony B; Adachi, Jonathan D; Garg, Amit X

    2014-10-01

    Knowing a person's fracture risk according to their kidney function, gender, and age may influence clinical management and decision-making. Using healthcare databases from Ontario, Canada, we conducted a cohort study of 679,114 adults of 40 years and over (mean age 62 years) stratified at cohort entry by estimated glomerular filtration rate ((eGFR) 60 and over, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, and under 15 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)), gender, and age (40-65 and over 65 years). The primary outcome was the 3-year cumulative incidence of fracture (proportion of adults who fractured (hip, forearm, pelvis, or proximal humerus) at least once within 3-years of follow-up). Additional analyses examined the fracture incidence per 1000 person-years, hip fracture alone, stratification by prior fracture, stratification by eGFR and proteinuria, and 3-year cumulative incidence of falls with hospitalization. The 3-year cumulative incidence of fracture significantly increased in a graded manner in adults with a lower eGFR for both genders and both age groups. The 3-year cumulative incidence of fracture in women over 65 years of age across the 5 eGFR groups were 4.3%, 5.8%, 6.5%, 7.8%, and 9.6%, respectively. Corresponding estimates for men over 65 years were 1.6%, 2.0%, 2.7%, 3.8%, and 5.0%, respectively. Similar graded relationships were found for falls with hospitalization and additional analyses. Thus, many adults with chronic kidney disease will fall and fracture. Results can be used for prognostication and guidance of sample size requirements for fracture prevention trials.

  2. [Knowledge management and healthcare organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaretti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    The present scenario is characterized by a high "environmental turbulence". Healthcare professionals and organizations must increase their knowledge, skills and attitudes for choosing wisely. Healthcare organizations are complex adaptive systems which should use integrated governance systems: knowledge management should be a strategic goal. These organizations should become learning organizations: they should build and renovate their knowledge in a systematic, explicit and definite way.

  3. Healthcare technology in the home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2011-01-01

    The dissertation explores through ethnographic field studies ways in which negotiations and transformations take place when healthcare technology is introduced to the home. With the increased focus on tele-medical solutions and on supporting patient self-care through new healthcare technologies...

  4. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization.

  5. Accountability and primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  6. [The primary healthcare centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature. PMID:24770539

  7. Technology and healthcare costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicine in the 21 st century is increasingly dependent on technology. Unlike in many other areas, the cost of medical technology is not declining and its increasing use contributes to the spiraling healthcare costs. Many medical professionals equate progress in medicine to increasing use of sophisticated technology that is often expensive and beyond the reach of the average citizen. Pediatric heart care is very technology-intensive and therefore very expensive and beyond the reach of the vast majority of children in the developing world. There is an urgent need to address this situation through development and use of appropriate technology in accordance with the needs and priorities of the society. A number of simple and inexpensive quality measures that have the potential of improving outcomes substantially without the need for expensive equipment should be instituted before embracing high-end technology. Innovations to reduce costs that are commonly used in limited resource environments should be tested systematically.

  8. A Framework for Healthcare Planning and Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Erwin W.; Houdenhoven, van Mark; Hulshof, Peter J.H.; Hall, Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Rising expenditures spur healthcare organizations to organize their processes more efficiently and effectively. Unfortunately, healthcare planning and control lags behind manufacturing planning and control. We analyze existing planning and control concepts or frameworks for healthcare operations man

  9. Who benefits from government healthcare subsidies? An assessment of the equity of healthcare benefits distribution in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsheng Chen

    Full Text Available Improving the equitable distribution of government healthcare subsidies (GHS, particularly among low-income citizens, is a major goal of China's healthcare sector reform in China.This study investigates the distribution of GHS in China between socioeconomic populations at two different points in time, examines the comparative distribution of healthcare benefits before and after healthcare reforms in Northwest China, compares the parity of distribution between urban and rural areas, and explores factors that influence equitable GHS distribution.Benefit incidence analysis of GHS progressivity was performed, and concentration and Kakwani indices for outpatient, inpatient, and total healthcare were calculated. Two rounds of household surveys that used multistage stratified samples were conducted in 2003 (13,564 respondents and 2008 (12,973 respondents. Data on socioeconomics, healthcare payments, and healthcare utilization were collected using household interviews.High-income individuals generally reap larger benefits from GHS, as reflected by positive concentration indices, which indicates a regressive system. Concentration indices for inpatient care were 0.2199 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.0829 to 0.3568 and 0.4445 (95% CI, 0.3000 to 0.5890 in 2002 (urban vs. rural, respectively, and 0.3925 (95% CI, 0.2528 to 0.5322 and 0.4084 (95% CI, 0.2977 to 0.5190 in 2007. Outpatient healthcare subsidies showed different distribution patterns in urban and rural areas following the redesign of rural healthcare insurance programs (urban vs. rural: 0.1433 [95% CI, 0.0263 to 0.2603] and 0.3662 [95% CI, 0.2703 to 0.4622] in 2002, respectively; 0.3063 [95% CI, 0.1657 to 0.4469] and -0.0273 [95% CI, -0.1702 to 0.1156] in 2007.Our study demonstrates an inequitable distribution of GHS in China from 2002 to 2007; however, the inequity was reduced, especially in rural outpatient services. Future healthcare reforms in China should not only focus on expanding the

  10. Incident Information Management Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  11. Healthcare costs in the Danish randomised controlled lung cancer CT-screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J.F.; Siersma, V.; Pedersen, Jesper H.;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Low dose computerised tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer can reduce lung-cancer-specific mortality. The objective of this study was to analyse healthcare costs and healthcare utilisation of participants in the Danish lung cancer CT-screening trial (DLCST). MATERIALS AND METHODS...

  12. MARKETING PLANNING IN HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobeica Ana Amaria

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop a perspective on what is important or critical to the discipline of healthcare marketing by analyzing the marketing plan from the institutional (or organizational perspective. This “salience issue” is complicated by the structural problems in healthcare such as new advertising programs, advances in medical technology, and the escalating costs of care in the recent economic situation of world economic crisis. Reviewing a case study, the paper examines how marketing managers face increasingly difficult management and it emphasizes one more time the importance of marketing in the internal organizational structure. Also it shows the direct connection between the marketing strategy, the Quality of Healthcare and marketing planning in the internal organization of Private Healthcare Practice in Romania. Also it concludes that marketing planning in healthcare has to be very precised in order to achieve some major objectives: customer care, financial stability, equilibrium between stakeholders and shareholders and future improvement in communication to customers. The marketing strategies and programs discussed in this paper follow the analysis of the 4Ps of Healthcare Marketing Services and propose call to action plans and possibilities that might result in a more particular case study analysis of the Romanian Healthcare Market.

  13. Healthcare worker competencies for disaster training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelen Gabor D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although training and education have long been accepted as integral to disaster preparedness, many currently taught practices are neither evidence-based nor standardized. The need for effective evidence-based disaster training of healthcare staff at all levels, including the development of standards and guidelines for training in the multi-disciplinary health response to major events, has been designated by the disaster response community as a high priority. We describe the application of systematic evidence-based consensus building methods to derive educational competencies and objectives in criteria-based preparedness and response relevant to all hospital healthcare workers. Methods The conceptual development of cross-cutting competencies incorporated current evidence through a systematic consensus building process with the following steps: (1 review of peer-reviewed literature on relevant content areas and educational theory; (2 structured review of existing competencies, national level courses and published training objectives; (3 synthesis of new cross-cutting competencies; (4 expert panel review; (5 refinement of new competencies and; (6 development of testable terminal objectives for each competency using similar processes covering requisite knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Results Seven cross-cutting competencies were developed: (1 Recognize a potential critical event and implement initial actions; (2 Apply the principles of critical event management; (3 Demonstrate critical event safety principles; (4 Understand the institutional emergency operations plan; (5 Demonstrate effective critical event communications; (6 Understand the incident command system and your role in it; (7 Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill your role during a critical event. For each of the cross-cutting competencies, comprehensive terminal objectives are described. Conclusion Cross-cutting competencies and objectives

  14. Exploitation of Clustering Techniques in Transactional Healthcare Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Ahmad Mahoto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare service centres equipped with electronic health systems have improved their resources as well as treatment processes. The dynamic nature of healthcare data of each individual makes it complex and difficult for physicians to manually mediate them; therefore, automatic techniques are essential to manage the quality and standardization of treatment procedures. Exploratory data analysis, patternanalysis and grouping of data is managed using clustering techniques, which work as an unsupervised classification. A number of healthcare applications are developed that use several data mining techniques for classification, clustering and extracting useful information from healthcare data. The challenging issue in this domain is to select adequate data mining algorithm for optimal results. This paper exploits three different clustering algorithms: DBSCAN (Density-Based Clustering, agglomerative hierarchical and k-means in real transactional healthcare data of diabetic patients (taken as case study to analyse their performance in large and dispersed healthcare data. The best solution of cluster sets among the exploited algorithms is evaluated using clustering quality indexes and is selected to identify the possible subgroups of patients having similar treatment patterns

  15. Classification of healthcare systems: Can we go further?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Federico

    2016-05-01

    This article addresses the issue of the classification of healthcare systems, with the intent to take a step further than the previously analysed models of healthcare organisation. As concerns the financing of healthcare services, the standard tripartite classification (according to which healthcare systems are divided into three groups: voluntary insurance, social health insurance and universal coverage) is enriched with two additional types: compulsory national health insurance and residual programs. With respect to the provision of services and the relationship between insurers and providers, it is important to distinguish between vertically integrated and separated systems. What differentiates this analysis from the majority of previous studies is its underlying logic. Assuming that all systems are hybrid, the article proposes to put aside the classic logic for classifying healthcare systems (according to which individual countries are pigeonholed into different classes depending on the prevailing system) in favour of the identikit logic. The concept of segmentation (of healthcare services or population) proves to be remarkably useful to this purpose. PMID:27041537

  16. Risk of latent TB infection in individuals employed in the healthcare sector in Germany: a multicentre prevalence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harling Melanie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare workers are still recognised as a high-risk group for latent TB infection (LTBI. Therefore, the screening of people employed in the healthcare sector for active and LTBI is fundamental to infection control programmes in German hospitals. It was the aim of the study to determine the prevalence and putative risk factors of LTBI. Methods We tested 2028 employees in the healthcare sector with the QuantiFERON-Gold In-tube (QFT-IT test between December 2005 and May 2009, either in the course of contact tracing or in serial testing of TB high-risk groups following German OSH legislation. Results A positive IGRA was found in 9.9% of the healthcare workers (HCWs. Nurses and physicians showed similar prevalence rates (9.7% to 9.6%. Analysed by occupational group, the highest prevalence was found in administration staff and ancillary nursing staff (17.4% and 16.7%. None of the individuals in the trainee group showed a positive IGRA result. In the different workplaces the observed prevalence was 14.7% in administration, 12.0% in geriatric care, 14.2% in technicians (radiology, laboratory and pathology, 6.5% in admission ward staff and 8.3% in the staff of pulmonary/infectious disease wards. Putative risk factors for LTBI were age (>55 years: OR14.7, 95% CI 5.1-42.1, being foreign-born (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.4-2.8, TB in the individual's own history (OR 4.96, 95% CI 1.99-12.3 and previous positive TST results (OR 3.5, 95% CI 2.4-4.98. We observed no statistically significant association with gender, BCG vaccination, workplace or profession. Conclusion The prevalence of LTBI in low-incidence countries depends on age. We found no positive IGRA results among trainees in the healthcare sector. Incidence studies are needed to assess the infection risk. Pre-employment screening might be helpful in this endeavour.

  17. Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    Sustaining daily, unsupervised healthcare activities in non-clinical settings such as the private home can challenge, among others, older adults. To support such unsupervised care activities, an increasingly number of reminders and monitoring systems are being designed. However, most...... of these systems target a specific treatment or condition and might not be sufficient to support the care management work at home. Based on a case study approach, my research investigates home-based healthcare practices and how they can inform future design of home-based healthcare technology that better account...... for the home setting and people’s everyday activities....

  18. Governance mechanisms for healthcare apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Konstantinos; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Kyng, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the `app store' concept has challenged the way software is distributed and marketed: developers have easier access to customers, while customers have easy access to innovative applications. Apps today are increasingly focusing on more "mission-critical" areas like healthcare...... with the Apple AppStore counting more than 40,000 apps under the category "health & fitness". This rapid development of healthcare apps increases the necessity of governance as, currently, healthcare apps are not thoroughly governed. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Commission only have...

  19. PUBLIC FINANCING OF HEALTHCARE SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bem

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare in Poland is mainly financed by public sector entities, among them the National Health Fund (NFZ, state budget and local government budgets. The task of the National Health Fund, as the main payer in the system, is chiefly currently financing the services. The state budget plays a complementary role in the system, and finances selected groups of services, health insurance premiums and investments in healthcare infrastructure. The basic role of the local governments is to ensure access to the services, mostly by performing ownership functions towards healthcare institutions.

  20. Modeling veterans healthcare administration disclosure processes :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyeler, Walter E; DeMenno, Mercy B.; Finley, Patrick D.

    2013-09-01

    As with other large healthcare organizations, medical adverse events at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities can expose patients to unforeseen negative risks. VHA leadership recognizes that properly handled disclosure of adverse events can minimize potential harm to patients and negative consequences for the effective functioning of the organization. The work documented here seeks to help improve the disclosure process by situating it within the broader theoretical framework of issues management, and to identify opportunities for process improvement through modeling disclosure and reactions to disclosure. The computational model will allow a variety of disclosure actions to be tested across a range of incident scenarios. Our conceptual model will be refined in collaboration with domain experts, especially by continuing to draw on insights from VA Study of the Communication of Adverse Large-Scale Events (SCALE) project researchers.

  1. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety. PMID:25078411

  2. Cancer incidence among firefighters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pukkala, Eero; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Firefighters are potentially exposed to a wide range of known and suspected carcinogens through their work. The objectives of this study were to examine the patterns of cancer among Nordic firefighters, and to compare them with the results from previous studies. METHODS: Data for this......OBJECTIVES: Firefighters are potentially exposed to a wide range of known and suspected carcinogens through their work. The objectives of this study were to examine the patterns of cancer among Nordic firefighters, and to compare them with the results from previous studies. METHODS: Data...... for this study were drawn from a linkage between the census data for 15 million people from the five Nordic countries and their cancer registries for the period 1961-2005. SIR analyses were conducted with the cancer incidence rates for the entire national study populations used as reference rates. RESULTS......: A total of 16 422 male firefighters were included in the final cohort. A moderate excess risk was seen for all cancer sites combined, (SIR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.11). There were statistically significant excesses in the age category of 30-49 years in prostate cancer (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.34 to 4...

  3. [Healthcare patient loyalty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    If the "old economy" preached standardization of products/services in order to reduce costs, the "new economy" is based on the recognition of the needs and the management of information. It is aimed at providing better and more usable services. One scenario is a national health service with regional management but based on competition between hospitals/companies.This led to a different handling of the user/patient, which has become the center of the health system: marketing seeks to retain the patient, trying to push a client-patient to not change their healthcare service provider. In costs terms, it is more economical to retain a customer rather than acquire a new one: a satisfied customer is also the best sounding board for each company. Customer equity is the management of relations with patients which can result in a greater customer value: it is possible to recognize an equity of the value, of the brand and of the report. Loyalty uses various marketing activities (basic, responsive, responsible, proactive and collaborative): each hospital/company chooses different actions depending on how many resources it plans to invest in loyalty. PMID:27374397

  4. Measuring equity in disability and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Jean-Francois; Barbou-des-Courieres, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses equity in health and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan based on a representative national household survey. Equitable access is a cornerstone of the Afghan health policy. We measured socioeconomic-related equity in access to public health care, using disability--because people with disabilities are poorer and more likely to use health care--and a concentration index (CI) and its decomposition. The socioeconomic-related equity in healthcare utilization was measured using a probit model and compared with an OLS model providing the horizontal inequity index (HI). We found a low rate of healthcare facilities utilization (25%). Disabled persons are using more healthcare facilities and have higher medical expenses. Disability is more frequently associated with older age, unemployed heads of household and lower education. The Cl of disability is 0.0221 indicating a pro-rich distribution of health. This pro-rich effect is higher in small households (CI decreases with size of the household, -0.0048) and safe (0.0059) areas. The CI of healthcare utilization is -0.0159 indicating a slightly pro-poor distribution of healthcare utilization but, overall, there is no difference in healthcare utilization by wealth status. Our study does not show major socioeconomic related inequity in disability and healthcare utilization in Afghanistan. This is due to the extreme and pervasive poverty found in Afghanistan. The absence of inequity in health access is explained by the uniform poverty of the population and the difficulty of accessing BPHS facilities (a basic package of health services), despite alarming health indicators.

  5. Healthcare transition challenges faced by young adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, T; Kriz, D; Duvall, S; Nguyen-Driver, M; Duffield, T

    2015-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that impacts communicative interactions, with patterns of repetitive and restricted behaviors, interests, and cognitive rigidity. Recent incidence rate estimates for ASD are 1 in 68, and primarily male (4:1). A major epidemiological issue in ASD is transitioning to independence in adulthood, particularly navigating the healthcare system. This commentary will focus on approaches healthcare providers can use to not overlook and support individuals with ASD. PMID:26300522

  6. Spatio-temporal information and knowledge representation of disease incidence and respective intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew; von Cavallar, Stefan; Wyres, Kelly L; Reumann, Matthias; Sepulveda, Martin J; Rogers, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    The supplementation of medical data with environmental data offers rich new insights that can improve decision-making within health systems and the healthcare profession. In this study, we simulate disease incidence for various scenarios using a mathematical model. We subsequently visualise the infectious disease spread in human populations over time and geographies. We demonstrate this for malaria, which is one of the top three causes of mortality for children under the age of 5 years in sub-Saharan Africa, and its associated interventions within Kenya. We demonstrate how information can be collected, analysed, and presented in new ways to inform key decision makers in understanding the prevalence of disease and the response to interventions.

  7. Health Literacy Impact on National Healthcare Utilization and Expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafia Rasu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Health literacy presents an enormous challenge in the delivery of effective healthcare and quality outcomes. We evaluated the impact of low health literacy (LHL on healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditure. Methods Database analysis used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS from 2005-2008 which provides nationally representative estimates of healthcare utilization and expenditure. Health literacy scores (HLSs were calculated based on a validated, predictive model and were scored according to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL. HLS ranged from 0-500. Health literacy level (HLL and categorized in 2 groups: Below basic or basic (HLS <226 and above basic (HLS ≥226. Healthcare utilization expressed as a physician, nonphysician, or emergency room (ER visits and healthcare spending. Expenditures were adjusted to 2010 rates using the Consumer Price Index (CPI. A Pvalue of 0.05 or less was the criterion for statistical significance in all analyses. Multivariate regression models assessed the impact of the predicted HLLs on outpatient healthcare utilization and expenditures. All analyses were performed with SAS and STATA®11.0 statistical software. Results The study evaluated 22 599 samples representing 503 374 648 weighted individuals nationally from 2005-2008. The cohort had an average age of 49 years and included more females (57%. Caucasian were the predominant racial ethnic group (83% and 37% of the cohort were from the South region of the United States of America. The proportion of the cohort with basic or below basic health literacy was 22.4%. Annual predicted values of physician visits, nonphysician visits, and ER visits were 6.6, 4.8, and 0.2, respectively, for basic or below basic compared to 4.4, 2.6, and 0.1 for above basic. Predicted values of office and ER visits expenditures were $1284 and $151, respectively, for basic or below basic and $719 and $100 for above basic (P < .05. The extrapolated national

  8. Leveraging Digital Innovation in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Carol V.; Jensen, Tina Blegind; Aanestad, Margun;

    2014-01-01

    and security concerns, fragmented markets, and misaligned incentives across stakeholders. The panel will focus on this apparent paradox and highlight the potential of big data, cloud and mobile computing for achieving better health. The panel co-chairs will introduce differences in healthcare delivery...... investments in digital infrastructures. New technologies are leveraged to achieve widespread 24x7 disease management, patients’ wellbeing, home-based healthcare and other patient-centric service innovations. Yet, digital innovations in healthcare face barriers in terms of standardization, data privacy...... landscapes in selected countries. Then panelists with expertise in digital data streams, cloud, and mobile computing will present concrete examples of healthcare service innovations that have the potential to address one or more of the global goals. ECIS attendees are invited to join a debate about...

  9. Healthcare IT and Patient Empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danholt, Peter; Bødker, Keld; Hertzum, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    This short paper outlines a recently initiated research project that concerns healthcare information systems and patient empowerment. Drawing on various theoretical backgrounds, Participatory Design (PD), Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Computer Mediated Communication (CMC), and Science...

  10. Business process modeling in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Francisco; Garcia, Felix; Calahorra, Luis; Llorente, César; Gonçalves, Luis; Daniel, Christel; Blobel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the process point of view is not restricted to a specific enterprise sector. In the field of health, as a result of the nature of the service offered, health institutions' processes are also the basis for decision making which is focused on achieving their objective of providing quality medical assistance. In this chapter the application of business process modelling - using the Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) standard is described. Main challenges of business process modelling in healthcare are the definition of healthcare processes, the multi-disciplinary nature of healthcare, the flexibility and variability of the activities involved in health care processes, the need of interoperability between multiple information systems, and the continuous updating of scientific knowledge in healthcare.

  11. Healthcare information technology and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Thomas H; Bates, David W; Berner, Eta S; Bernstam, Elmer V; Covvey, H Dominic; Frisse, Mark E; Graf, Thomas; Greenes, Robert A; Hoffer, Edward P; Kuperman, Gil; Lehmann, Harold P; Liang, Louise; Middleton, Blackford; Omenn, Gilbert S; Ozbolt, Judy

    2013-01-01

    At the 2011 American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) Winter Symposium we studied the overlap between health IT and economics and what leading healthcare delivery organizations are achieving today using IT that might offer paths for the nation to follow for using health IT in healthcare reform. We recognized that health IT by itself can improve health value, but its main contribution to health value may be that it can make possible new care delivery models to achieve much larger value. Health IT is a critically important enabler to fundamental healthcare system changes that may be a way out of our current, severe problem of rising costs and national deficit. We review the current state of healthcare costs, federal health IT stimulus programs, and experiences of several leading organizations, and offer a model for how health IT fits into our health economic future.

  12. Control of corruption in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal

    2015-01-01

    A recently published article on corruption in Indian healthcare in the BMJ has triggered a hot debate and numerous responses (1, 2, 3, 4). We do agree that corruption in Indian healthcare is a colossal issue and needs to be tackled urgently (5). However, we want to highlight that corruption in healthcare is not a local phenomenon confined to the Indian subcontinent, though India does serve as a good case study and intervention area due to the magnitude of the problem and the country's large population (6). Good governance, strict rules, transparency and zero tolerance are some of the strategies prescribed everywhere to tackle corruption. However, those entrusted with implementing good governance and strict rules in India need to go through a process of introspection to carry out their duties in a responsible fashion. At present, it looks like a no-win situation. In this article, we recommend education in medical ethics as the major intervention for dealing with corruption in healthcare.

  13. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Edwards, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    that different mind sets and different rationalities between different types of healthcare professionals act as a major barrier for lean management in healthcare. The hypotheses are tested and discussed through four case studies. Using empirical research from four case studies the paper will continue...... by discussing these four hypotheses. The cases where followed over a period of one year and the researchers gathered a substantial amount of data concerning the lean implementation processes. Based on an analysis of the case data hypotheses one is rejected whereas hypotheses two, three, and four are supported......The ideas and principles from lean management are now widely being adopted within the healthcare sector. The analysis in this paper shows that organizations within healthcare most often only implement a limited set of tools and methods from the lean tool-box. Departing from a theoretical analysis...

  14. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with heart failure ... good relationships with all the members of this team. Learn to talk to them openly and honestly ...

  15. Lean Six Sigma in Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. de Koning; J.P.S. Verver; J. van den Heuvel; S. Bisgaard; R.J.M.M. Does

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: Cost reduction; efficiency; innovation; quality improvement; service management. Abstract Healthcare, as any other service operation, requires systematic innovation efforts to remain competitive, cost efficient and up to date. In this article, we outline a methodology and present examples

  16. Impact of new water systems on healthcare-associated colonization or infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Annick; Quantin, Catherine; Vanhems, Philippe; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Bertrand, Xavier; Astruc, Karine; Chavanet, Pascal; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to study the impact of new water systems, which were less contaminated with P. aeruginosa, on the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases (colonizations or infections) in care units that moved to a different building between 2005 and 2014. Methods: Generalized Estimated Equations were used to compare the incidence of P. aeruginosa healthcare-associated cases according to the building. Results: Twenty-nine units moved during the study period and 2,759 cases occurred in these units. No difference was observed when the new building was compared with older buildings overall. Conclusion: Our results did not support our hypothesis of a positive association between water system contamination and the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases. These results must be confirmed by linking results of water samples and patients’ data. PMID:27274443

  17. Healthcare waste management research: A structured analysis and review (2005-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vikas; Ramesh, A

    2015-10-01

    The importance of healthcare waste management in preserving the environment and protecting the public cannot be denied. Past research has dealt with various issues in healthcare waste management and disposal, which spreads over various journals, pipeline research disciplines and research communities. Hence, this article analyses this scattered knowledge in a systematic manner, considering the period between January 2005 and July 2014. The purpose of this study is to: (i) identify the trends in healthcare waste management literature regarding journals published; (ii) main topics of research in healthcare waste management; (iii) methodologies used in healthcare waste management research; (iv) areas most frequently researched by researchers; and (v) determine the scope of future research in healthcare waste management. To this end, the authors conducted a systematic review of 176 articles on healthcare waste management taken from the following eight esteemed journals: International Journal of Environmental Health Research, International Journal of Healthcare Quality Assurance, Journal of Environmental Management, Journal of Hazardous Material, Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management, Resources, Conservations and Recycling, Waste Management, and Waste Management & Research. The authors have applied both quantitative and qualitative approaches for analysis, and results will be useful in the following ways: (i) results will show importance of healthcare waste management in healthcare operations; (ii) findings will give a comparative view of the various publications; (c) study will shed light on future research areas. PMID:26268601

  18. Machine learning in healthcare informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, U; Dua, Prerna

    2014-01-01

    The book is a unique effort to represent a variety of techniques designed to represent, enhance, and empower multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional machine learning research in healthcare informatics. The book provides a unique compendium of current and emerging machine learning paradigms for healthcare informatics and reflects the diversity, complexity and the depth and breath of this multi-disciplinary area. The integrated, panoramic view of data and machine learning techniques can provide an opportunity for novel clinical insights and discoveries.

  19. Customer relationship management in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    GHAZİ ASGAR, Mahsa; SHAHRİ, Somayeh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Background and purpose: Customer relationship management research is utilized to explain the need for a more patient-oriented support. This paper argues about customer relationship managemet in healthcare Method: the present article has utilized the valid resources in the subject under study. Conclusion: CRM tools and strategies will be implemented in the marketing and service layer. The healthcare organization should perform re-engineering process to adapt their CRM strategy and to...

  20. MARKETING PLANNING IN HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Bobeica Ana Amaria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a perspective on what is important or critical to the discipline of healthcare marketing by analyzing the marketing plan from the institutional (or organizational) perspective. This “salience issue” is complicated by the structural problems in healthcare such as new advertising programs, advances in medical technology, and the escalating costs of care in the recent economic situation of world economic crisis. Reviewing a case study, the paper examines h...

  1. [Knowledge management and healthcare organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaretti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    The present scenario is characterized by a high "environmental turbulence". Healthcare professionals and organizations must increase their knowledge, skills and attitudes for choosing wisely. Healthcare organizations are complex adaptive systems which should use integrated governance systems: knowledge management should be a strategic goal. These organizations should become learning organizations: they should build and renovate their knowledge in a systematic, explicit and definite way. PMID:24326705

  2. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin Belle; Raghuram Thiagarajan; S. M. Reza Soroushmehr; Fatemeh Navidi; Daniel A Beard; Kayvan Najarian

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is sti...

  3. Comparative Analyses of Institutions, Regulations and Administration on Healthcare Risk Management in United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia and Taiwan District%美英加澳和中国台湾地区医疗风险管理机构、法规与运行机制的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙纽云; 崔小花; 王莉; 周军; 袁强; 张宗久; 李幼平; 梁铭会; 成岚; 高光明

    2011-01-01

    Objective Interpretation of the growing body of global literature on health care risk is compromised by a lack of common understanding and language.This series of articles aims to comprehensively compare laws and regulations, institutional management, and administration of incidence reporting systems on medical risk management in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia, and Taiwan, so as to provide evidence and recommendations for health care risk management policy in China.Methods We searched the official websites of the healthcare risk management agencies of the four countries and one district for laws, regulatory documents, research reports, reviews and evaluation forms concerned with healthcare risk management and assessment.Descriptive comparative analysis was performed on relevant documents.Results A total of 146 documents were included in this study, including 2 laws (1.4%), 17 policy documents (11.6%), 41 guidance documents (28.1%), 37 reviews (25.3%), and 49 documents giving general information (33.6%).The United States government implemented one law and one rule of patient safety management, while the United Kingdom and Australia each issued professional guidances on patient safety improvement.The four countries implemented patient safety management policy on four different levels: national, state/province/district, hospital, and non-governmental organization.Conclusion The four countries and one district adopted four levels of patient safety management, and the administration modes can be divided into an “NGO-led mode” represented by the United States and Canada and a “government-led mode” represented by the United Kingdom, Australia, and Taiwan.%目的 "医疗风险无处不在"已成为全球医疗界的共识.有关病人安全的文献量和报告数都在快速增长.但对其概念的解读和比较尚缺乏共识.本研究通过比较美英加澳和我国台湾地区医疗风险管理的概念、政策法规、

  4. Unit-based incident reporting and root cause analysis: variation at three hospital unit types.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Merten, H.; Lubberding, S.; Zwaan, L.; Timmermans, D.; Smits, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To minimise adverse events in healthcare, various large-scale incident reporting and learning systems have been developed worldwide. Nevertheless, learning from patient safety incidents is going slowly. Local, unit-based reporting systems can help to get faster and more d

  5. HEALTHCARE: A COMPLEX SERVICE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James M. TIEN; Pascal J. GOLDSCHMIDT-CLERMONT

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare is indeed a complex service system, one requiring the technobiology approach of systems engineering to underpin its development as an integrated and adaptive system. In general, healthcare services are carried out with knowledge-intensive agents or components which work together as providers and consumers to create or co-produce value. Indeed, the engineering design of a healthcare system must recognize the fact that it is actually a complex integration of human-centered activities that is increasingly dependent on information technology and knowledge. Like any service system, healthcare can be considered to be a combination or recombination of three essential components-people (characterized by behaviors, values, knowledge, etc.), processes (characterized by collaboration, customization, etc.) and products (characterized by software, hardware, infrastructures, etc.). Thus, a healthcare system is an integrated and adaptive set of people, processes and products. It is, in essence, a system of systems which objectives are to enhance its efficiency (leading to greater interdependency) and effectiveness (leading to improved health). Integration occurs over the physical, temporal, organizational and functional dimensions, while adaptation occurs over the monitoring, feedback, cybernetic and learning dimensions. In sum, such service systems as healthcare are indeed complex, especially due to the uncertainties associated with the human-centered aspects of these systems. Moreover, the system complexities can only be dealt with methods that enhance system integration and adaptation.

  6. LEAN thinking in Finnish healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorma, Tapani; Tiirinki, Hanna; Bloigu, Risto; Turkki, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to evaluate how LEAN thinking is used as a management and development tool in the Finnish public healthcare system and what kind of outcomes have been achieved or expected by using it. The main focus is in managing and developing patient and treatment processes. Design/methodology/approach - A mixed-method approach incorporating the Webropol survey was used. Findings - LEAN is quite a new concept in Finnish public healthcare. It is mainly used as a development tool to seek financial savings and to improve the efficiency of patient processes, but has not yet been deeply implemented. However, the experiences from LEAN initiatives have been positive, and the methodology is already quite well-known. It can be concluded that, because of positive experiences from LEAN, the environment in Finnish healthcare is ready for the deeper implementation of LEAN. Originality/value - This paper evaluates the usage of LEAN thinking for the first time in the public healthcare system of Finland as a development tool and a management system. It highlights the implementation and achieved results of LEAN thinking when used in the healthcare environment. It also highlights the expectations for LEAN thinking in Finnish public healthcare.

  7. Incidence and costs of bicycle-related traumatic brain injuries in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Annemieke C; Polinder, Suzanne; Panneman, Martien J M; van Beeck, Ed F; Haagsma, Juanita A

    2015-08-01

    The main cause of death and serious disability in bicycle accidents is traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this population-based study was to assess the incidence and costs of bicycle-related TBI across various age groups, and in comparison to all bicycle-related injuries, to identify main risk groups for the development of preventive strategies. Data from the National Injury Surveillance System and National Medical Registration were used for all patients with bicycle-related injuries and TBI who visited a Dutch emergency department (ED) between 1998 and 2012. Demographics and national, weighted estimates of injury mechanism, injury severity and costs were analysed per age group. Direct healthcare costs and indirect costs were determined using the incidence-based Dutch Burden of Injury Model. Between 1998 and 2012, the incidence of ED treatments due to bicycle-related TBI strongly increased with 54%, to 43 per 100,000 persons in 2012. However, the incidence of all bicycle-related injuries remained stable, from 444 in 1998 to 456/100,000 in 2012. Incidence of hospital admission increased in both TBI (92%) and all injuries from cycling (71%). Highest increase in incidence of both ED treatments and hospital admissions was seen in adults aged 55+. The injury rate of TBI per kilometre travelled increased (44%) except in children, but decreased (-4%) for all injuries, showing a strong decrease in children (-36%) but an increase in men aged 25+, and women aged 15+. Total costs of bicycle-related TBI were €74.5 million annually. Although bicycle-related TBI accounted for 9% of the incidence of all ED treatments due to cycling, it accounted for 18% of the total costs due to all bicycle-related injuries (€410.7 million). Children and adolescents (aged 0-24) had highest incidence of ED treatments due to bicycle-related injuries. Men in the working population (aged 15-64) had highest indirect costs following injuries from cycling, including TBI. Older cyclists (aged

  8. Dissociative Tendencies and Traffic Incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the relationship between dissociative experiences and road traffic incidents (crashes and traffic tickets in drivers (n=295 from Mar del Plata (Argentina city. A self-report questionnaire was applied to assess traffic crash involvement and sociodemographic variables. Dissociative tendencies were assessed by a modified version of the DES scale. To examine differences in DES scores tests of the difference of means were applied. Drivers who reported to be previously involved in traffic incidents obtained higher puntuations in the dissociative experiences scale than drivers who did not report such events. This result is observed for the total scale and for the three sub-scales (absorption, amnesia and depersonalization. However, differences appeared mainly for minor damage collisions. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of dissociative tendencies as a risk factor in road traffic safety.

  9. Incidences and Analyses of Green Marketing Strategy in Colombian Exports Incidences and Analyses of Green Marketing Strategy in Colombian Exports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Zwerg-Villegas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As environmental awareness plays a more prominent role in purchasing decisions, as consumers demand improved corporate responsibility, and as national governments implement regulation of not just the immediate firm’s environmental impact, but instead on the impact throughout the value chain; those corporations which participate in green marketing strategies will be positioned for marketplace competitive advantage. This paper takes the reader through a literature review to define green marketing and applies the term to Colombian exporting firms recognized for their environmental practices or products. A survey of seventy-five small and medium sized Colombian exporters determines usage and perceptions of green marketing practices. Research indicates that Colombian small and medium sized firms do not yet feel market pressures to adopt green marketing strategies, but do so based on corporate level ethics.Mientras la conciencia ambiental juega un papel más importante en las decisiones decompra, los consumidores demandan mejoras en la responsabilidad corporativa y losgobiernos nacionales implementan legislación para reglamentar no solo el impactoambiental de la empresa inmediata sino también de la cadena de valor entera; lascorporaciones que participan en estrategias de mercadeo verde se posicionarán parala ventaja competitiva en el mercado. Esta obra lleva al lector por un recuento literariopara definir al mercadeo verde y después aplica el término a empresas colombianas exportadoras reconocidas por sus prácticas o productos ambientales. La encuestade setenticinco pequeñas y medianas empresas exportadoras determina el uso ypercepciones de las prácticas de mercadeo verde. La investigación demuestra queempresas pequeñas y medianas colombianas no sienten presiones del mercado poradoptar estrategias verdes sino se hace por ética corporativa.

  10. Lunar Tractive Forces and Renal Stone Incidence

    OpenAIRE

    Spyridon Arampatzis; Thalmann, George N.; Heinz Zimmermann; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2011-01-01

    Background. Several factors are implicated in renal stone formation and peak incidence of renal colic admissions to emergency departments (ED). Little is known about the influence of potential environmental triggers such as lunar gravitational forces. We conducted a retrospective study to test the hypothesis that the incidence of symptomatic renal colics increases at the time of the full and new moon because of increased lunar gravitational forces. Methods. We analysed 1500 patients who atten...

  11. Patient safety in primary allied health care: what can we learn from incidents in a dutch exploratory cohort study?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S.A. van; Tacken, M.A.J.B.; Staal, J.B.; Gaal, S.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: : Research on patient safety in allied healthcare is scarce. Our aim was to document patient safety in primary allied healthcare in the Netherlands and to identify factors associated with incidents. DESIGN AND SUBJECT:: A retrospective study of 1000 patient records in a representative sa

  12. Assessing maternal healthcare inequities among migrants: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Moreira Almeida

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering pregnancy and motherhood as periods of increased vulnerability in migrant women, to characterize the healthcare provided to this collective, we sought to identify and understand patterns of satisfaction and demand of maternal and child healthcare, assessing women’s perceptions about its quality. The study followed a qualitative methodology (semi-structured interviews for collecting and analysing data (content analysis and was conducted in Porto, the second largest city of Portugal. Participants were 25 recent immigrant mothers from Eastern European countries, Brazil, Portuguese-speaking African countries and six native Portuguese recent mothers (for comparison, contacted through social associations and institutions. Data suggests that healthcare depends not only on accessibility but especially on social opportunities. Equitable public health action must provide individuals and groups the equal opportunity to meet their needs, which may not be achieved by providing the same standard if care to all.

  13. Psychological Trauma in the Workplace: Variation of Incident Severity among Industry Settings and between Recurring vs Isolated Incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GS DeFraia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychologically traumatic workplace events (known as critical incidents occur within various work environments, with workgroups in certain industries vulnerable to multiple incidents. With the increasing prevalence of incidents in the USA, incident response is a growing practice area within occupational medicine, industrial psychology, occupational social work and other occupational health professions.Objective: To analyze a measure of incident severity based on level of disruption to the workplace and explore whether incident severity varied among different industry settings or between workgroups experiencing multiple vs single traumatic incidents.Methods: Administrative data mining was employed to examine practice data from a workplace trauma response unit in the USA. Bivariate analyses were conducted to test whether scores from an instrument measuring incident severity level varied among industry settings or between workgroups impacted by multiple vs isolated events.Results: Incident severity level differed among various industry settings. Banks, retail stores and fast food restaurants accounted for the most severe incidents, while industrial and manufacturing sites reported less severe incidents. Workgroups experiencing multiple incidents reported more severe incidents than workgroups experiencing a single incident.Conclusion: Occupational health practitioners should be alert to industry differences in several areas: pre-incident resiliency training, the content of business recovery plans, assessing worker characteristics, strategies to assist continuous operations and assisting workgroups impacted by multiple or severe incidents.

  14. Analysis of spatio-temporal variations in stroke incidence and case-fatality in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Pui Hing Chau; Jean Woo; Goggins, William B; Moses Wong; Kam Che Chan; Ho, Suzanne C.

    2011-01-01

    Geographical variations in stroke incidence and case-fatality have been documented worldwide. This study examines whether there are spatio-temporal variations in stroke incidence and case-fatality in Hong Kong and attempts to determine to what extent socioeconomic status (SES) and healthcare provision account for these variations. Residence-based hospital discharge data from the Hospital Authority (HA) in Hong Kong were geo-referenced and used to examine incidence rates and case-fatality rate...

  15. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitive study using cognitive interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  16. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Groenewegen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  17. Free movement of patients: Directive 2011/24 on the application of patients' rights in cross-border healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Miek

    2012-03-01

    This contribution comments on Directive 2011/24, providing a legal framework for cross border healthcare 13 years after the famous Kohll and Decker case law. The Directive contains provisions concerning the reimbursement of costs, the responsibilities of the Member States and their mutual cooperation in healthcare. Analysing the (potential) impact of the Directive 2011/24 on EU healthcare systems, patients and healthcare providers, it becomes clear that the impact of the Directives reaches far beyond patient mobility. The Directive creates patients' rights, pays attention to the quality and safety of healthcare services and creates an excessive structure of cooperation in the field of healthcare. The European Union seems ready to use its economies of scale to improve healthcare for all European patients. PMID:22428388

  18. Understanding healthcare professionals' self-efficacy to resolve interprofessional conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Martha; Orchard, Carole

    2016-05-01

    Conflict within interprofessional healthcare teams, when not effectively resolved, has been linked to detrimental consequences; however, effective conflict resolution has been shown to enhance team performance, increase patient safety, and improve patient outcomes. Alarmingly, knowledge of healthcare professionals' ability to resolve conflict has been limited, largely due to the challenges that arise when researchers attempt to observe a conflict occurring in real time. Research literature has identified three central components that seem to influence healthcare professional's perceived ability to resolve conflict: communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training on healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflicts. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that two of the three central components-conflict resolution education and training and communication competence-were found to be statistically significant predictors of healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflict. Implications include a call to action for clinicians and academicians to recognize the importance of communication competence and conflict resolution education and training as a vital area in interprofessional pre- and post-licensure education and collaborative practice. PMID:27152535

  19. Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students’ shared learning experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai-Eng Tan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. Methodology: During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients’ homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding working with other professions as part of their module assessment. Highly scored reflective journals written by students from the 2011/2012 academic session were selected for analysis. Their shared learning experiences were identified via thematic analysis. We also analysed students’ feedback regarding the module. Results: Analysis of 25 selected reflective journals revealed several important themes: ‘Understanding of impact of illness and its relation to holistic care’, ‘Awareness of the role of various healthcare professions’ and ‘Generic or soft skills for inter-professional collaboration’. Although the primary objective of the module was to expose students to comprehensive healthcare, the students learnt skills required for future collaborative practice from their experiences. Discussion: The CHC module provided early clinical exposure to community-based health issues and incorporated some elements of inter-professional education. The students learnt about the roles of other healthcare professions and acquired soft skills required for future collaborative practice during this module.

  20. Understanding healthcare professionals' self-efficacy to resolve interprofessional conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Martha; Orchard, Carole

    2016-05-01

    Conflict within interprofessional healthcare teams, when not effectively resolved, has been linked to detrimental consequences; however, effective conflict resolution has been shown to enhance team performance, increase patient safety, and improve patient outcomes. Alarmingly, knowledge of healthcare professionals' ability to resolve conflict has been limited, largely due to the challenges that arise when researchers attempt to observe a conflict occurring in real time. Research literature has identified three central components that seem to influence healthcare professional's perceived ability to resolve conflict: communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training on healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflicts. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that two of the three central components-conflict resolution education and training and communication competence-were found to be statistically significant predictors of healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflict. Implications include a call to action for clinicians and academicians to recognize the importance of communication competence and conflict resolution education and training as a vital area in interprofessional pre- and post-licensure education and collaborative practice.

  1. Systems design for remote healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Bonfiglio, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a multidisciplinary overview of the design and implementation of systems for remote patient monitoring and healthcare. Readers are guided step-by-step through the components of such a system and shown how they could be integrated in a coherent framework for deployment in practice. The authors explain planning from subsystem design to complete integration and deployment, given particular application constraints. Readers will benefit from descriptions of the clinical requirements underpinning the entire application scenario, physiological parameter sensing techniques, information processing approaches and overall, application dependent system integration. Each chapter ends with a discussion of practical design challenges and two case studies are included to provide practical examples and design methods for two remote healthcare systems with different needs. ·         Provides a multi-disciplinary overview of next-generation mobile healthcare system design; ·         Includes...

  2. Visioning future emergency healthcare collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2010-01-01

    New video technologies are emerging to facilitate collaboration in emergency healthcare. One such technology is 3D telepresence technology for medical consultation (3DMC) that may provide richer visual information to support collaboration between medical professionals to, ideally, enhance patient...... care in real time. Today only an early prototype of 3DMC exists. To better understand 3DMC's potential for adoption and use in emergency healthcare before large amounts of development resources are invested we conducted a visioning study. That is, we shared our vision of 3DMC with emergency room...... physicians, nurses, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals working at large and small medical centers, and asked them to share their perspectives regarding 3DMC's potential benefits and disadvantages in emergency healthcare and its compatibility and/or lack thereof...

  3. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  4. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Belle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined.

  5. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined.

  6. Caring for healthcare professionals: improving prevention in occupational healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Ketelaar

    2014-01-01

    How can healthcare professionals be supported to stay healthy and well-functioning at work? Working in nursing involves dealing with specific job demands which can have an impact on nurses’ health. In turn, health problems can affect their work functioning, with possible negative consequences for nu

  7. Social media disruptive change in healthcare : responses of healthcare providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David

    2016-01-01

    Social media represent specific types of technologies that are end-user driven and end-users are able to drive disruptive change giving little time to organizations to react. With rapid and powerful emergence of social media communities in healthcare, this sector is faced with new and alternative av

  8. Biological hazards and healthcare-associated infections in Italian healthcare facilities: some considerations on inspections and accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messineo, A; Marsella, L T

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections are a major clinical and public health problem that involve, in a variety of ways, healthcare professionals, hospital administrators and, above all, patients. In Italy, the incidence of infectious complications generally varies from 5-10% (hospitalized patients) to 1% (home care patients); 5-10% of such infections manifest epidemically, and infections caused by antibiotic-resistant microorganisms are becoming more and more common, with a mortality rate of 20-30%. Moreover, any "preventable deaths or serious injuries" attributable to a (concrete) causality resulting from a breach of rules, laws and regulations, as well as imprudence, incompetence or negligence by the operators will determine a possibility of a penal prosecution for manslaughter or grievous bodily harm, and also generate expenses for civil procedures and insurance compensation. The adoption of company policies covering appropriate risk assessment, epidemiological monitoring, implementation of guidelines, procedures and protocols, activity of the Hospital Infections Committee and proper communication between managers and facilities, training of healthcare personnel and medical surveillance of employees can help reduce the adverse phenomena of healthcare-associated infections. PMID:26835794

  9. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chyu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term “Healthcare Engineering” has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of “Healthcare Engineering” remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  10. Traumatic Childbirth from the Perspective of the Healthcare Professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Summary The overall purpose of this PhD project was to investigate traumatic childbirth from the perspective of midwives and obstetricians. Both professions have been described to have a high incidence of stress, burnout and depression, but only few studies have investigated whether or how the expe...... of the healthcare professional impacts upon the quality and the safety of patient care. Ill health in healthcare professionals, such as burnout, stress or depression, causes more mistakes and errors, which negatively impacts upon patient safety. Furthermore, I have dis-cussed another consequence for patient safety...... of personal support. Until we have accumulated more knowledge about this field, we should be cautious in our quest to develop guidelines for handling the aftermath of traumatic child-births. I have suggested four levels of implications for clinical practice, and further research in the form...

  11. [Healthcare-Associated Infection Control with Awareness of Patient Safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    In order to provide safe and secure medical care for patients, health care-associated infections (HAI) must not occur. HAI should be considered as incidents, and countermeasures should be viewed as a patient safety management itself. Healthcare-associated infection control (HAIC) is practiced by the infection control team (ICT), which is based on multidisciplinary cooperation. Team members have to recognize that it is the most important to make use of the expertise of each discipline. In addition, all members must try to respond quickly, to help the clinic staff. Visualized rapid information provision and sharing, environmental improvement, outbreak factor analysis, hand hygiene compliance rate improvement, proper antibiotic use (Antimicrobial Stewardship Program: ASP), and regional cooperation & leadership comprise the role of the ICT in the flagship hospital. Regarding this role, we present our hospital's efforts and the outcomes. In conclusion, for medical practice quality improvement, healthcare-associated infection control should be conducted thoroughly along with an awareness of patient safety.

  12. Large whale incident database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Large whale stranding, death, ship strike and entanglement incidents are all recorded to monitor the health of each population and track anthropogenic factors that...

  13. Police Incident Blotter (Archive)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Police Blotter Archive contains crime incident data after it has been validated and processed to meet Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) standards, published on a...

  14. Incident Report - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Incident Report is a mandatory post trip legal document observers fill out to report any enforcement related situations they have encountered on an observed...

  15. NRC Incident Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates civilian nuclear activities to protect the public health and safety and to preserve environmental quality. An Incident Response Plan had been developed and has now been revised to reflect current Commission policy. NUREG-0728, Rev. 2 assigns responsibilities for responding to any potentially threatening incident involving NRC licensed activities and for assuring that the NRC will fulfill it statutory mission. This report has also been reproduced for staff use as NRC Manual Chapter 0502

  16. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagsma, J. A.; Geenen, P. L.; Ethelberg, S.;

    2013-01-01

    on the healthcare system in seven European Union member states in relation to pathogen characteristics that influence healthcare seeking. Data on healthcare usage were obtained by harmonized cross-sectional surveys. The degree of under-diagnosis and underreporting varied by pathogen and country. Overall......, underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach...

  17. Control of corruption in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal

    2015-01-01

    A recently published article on corruption in Indian healthcare in the BMJ has triggered a hot debate and numerous responses (1, 2, 3, 4). We do agree that corruption in Indian healthcare is a colossal issue and needs to be tackled urgently (5). However, we want to highlight that corruption in healthcare is not a local phenomenon confined to the Indian subcontinent, though India does serve as a good case study and intervention area due to the magnitude of the problem and the country's large population (6). Good governance, strict rules, transparency and zero tolerance are some of the strategies prescribed everywhere to tackle corruption. However, those entrusted with implementing good governance and strict rules in India need to go through a process of introspection to carry out their duties in a responsible fashion. At present, it looks like a no-win situation. In this article, we recommend education in medical ethics as the major intervention for dealing with corruption in healthcare. PMID:26592785

  18. Performance indicators: healthcare professionals' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to capture factors behind professional views of indicator usefulness as a common structure for assessing healthcare performance and their important characteristics to design limited key performance indicators (PIs) for holistic hospital management. Design/methodology/approach - Two surveys were conducted using self-administered questionnaires, in which hospital manager/staff respondents were asked to rate the 52 PIs' usefulness. In total, 228 manager and 894 staff responses were collected. Findings - Eight factors were elicited from manager and staff responses as performance measures with 72 percent cumulative variance accounted for. Hospital managers and staff showed similar performance measure perceptions: high-utility acknowledgment on safety, operational efficiency and patient/employee satisfaction but relatively low-employee development concerns. Manager indicator usefulness perceptions were rather homogeneous and significantly higher than staff for almost all performance measures. Practical implications - Homogeneous manager views mean that a single key PI set for hospital management may be established regardless of hospital attributes. The following aspects may be measures that should be managed in a healthcare organization based on their key PIs: patient/employee safety, operational efficiency, financial effectiveness and patient/employee satisfaction. Originality/value - This is a pilot study on hospital management PIs in Japan. The eight-dimensional factor structure and findings about healthcare provider perceptions may be useful for healthcare management. PMID:27477935

  19. [Patients' increasing role in healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Cinzia

    2016-03-01

    Since the late '90s citizens have been increasingly involved in healthcare, thanks to a shift in access to healthcare information, greater patients' and citizens' awareness about their rights and needs, and a change in physicians' attitudes and behavior. At the same time, to ensure the sustainability of the national health services, patients' needs are increasingly being examined in relation to the services and interventions needed, and to foster informed demand by patients and citizens, and appropriate prescriptions by physicians. Nowadays, patients already have a section in an authoritative medical journal. Working with clinicians, they set research priorities and the outcomes to be studied. Especially in UK and USA, they are invited to participate in the design and development of trials and in deciding which trials should be funded. The situation varies widely in different countries, though involving citizens in healthcare decisions is a common mantra. Even when they consult a clinician, the patients' role has evolved. People ask for information more often and want an active part in decisions about their health. Physicians start to pay more attention to the person and the social context, feelings and emotions, and person-centered care has become a reference in the doctor-patient relationship. This article offers an overview of the changing roles of patients and citizens in healthcare.

  20. Managing healthcare information: analyzing trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Eva; Eriksson, Nomie; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyze two case studies with a trust matrix tool, to identify trust issues related to electronic health records. Design/methodology/approach - A qualitative research approach is applied using two case studies. The data analysis of these studies generated a problem list, which was mapped to a trust matrix. Findings - Results demonstrate flaws in current practices and point to achieving balance between organizational, person and technology trust perspectives. The analysis revealed three challenge areas, to: achieve higher trust in patient-focussed healthcare; improve communication between patients and healthcare professionals; and establish clear terminology. By taking trust into account, a more holistic perspective on healthcare can be achieved, where trust can be obtained and optimized. Research limitations/implications - A trust matrix is tested and shown to identify trust problems on different levels and relating to trusting beliefs. Future research should elaborate and more fully address issues within three identified challenge areas. Practical implications - The trust matrix's usefulness as a tool for organizations to analyze trust problems and issues is demonstrated. Originality/value - Healthcare trust issues are captured to a greater extent and from previously unchartered perspectives. PMID:27477934

  1. IT Support for Healthcare Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, R.; Reichert, M.U.

    2005-01-01

    Patient treatment processes require the cooperation of different organizational units and medical disciplines. In such an environment an optimal process support becomes crucial. Though healthcare processes frequently change, and therefore the separation of the flow logic from the application code se

  2. Entrepreneurship in agriculture and healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, Jan; Hulsink, Willem; Grin, John

    2016-01-01

    Care farming provides an interesting context of multifunctional agriculture where farmers face the challenge of having to bridge the gap between agriculture and healthcare and acquire new customers, partners and financial resources from the care sector. We compared different entry strategies of d

  3. Disruptive Innovation in Healthcare & Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    will pay. Disruptive Innovation in context of the author’s body of work in healthcare and rehabilitation relates to how development of a cloud-based converged infrastructure resource, similar to that conceived in a national (Danish) study titled Humanics, can act as an accessible data and knowledge...

  4. Business intelligence in healthcare organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, Ton A.M.; Stegwee, Robert A.; Teitink, Christian J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The management of healthcare organizations is starting to recognize the relevance of the definition of care products in relation to management information. In the turmoil between costs, care results and patient satisfaction, the right balance is needed, and it can be found in upcoming information an

  5. Making Franchising in Healthcare Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J. Nijmeijer (Karlijn J.)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Business format franchising is a form of interorganizational cooperation that originates from the business sector. It is increasingly used in a variety of healthcare services to reach positive results. In a franchise system contractual arrangements are made between two

  6. Enabling Team Learning in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of learning processes within 35 healthcare therapy teams that took action to improve their services. The published research on team learning is introduced, and the paper suggests it is an activity that has similarities with action research and with those forms of action learning where teams address collective…

  7. Body Area Networks for Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, V.M.; Bults, R.G.A.; Konstantas, D.; Vierhout, P.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The subject of this research proposal is the design and development of novel applications and services targeting 4G wireless technologies. In previous papers [1, 2] we presented a vision of two future healthcare applications which we call Virtual Trauma Team and Virtual Homecare Team. These are two

  8. Visualizing desirable patient healthcare experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sandra S; Kim, Hyung T; Chen, Jie; An, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    High healthcare cost has drawn much attention and healthcare service providers (HSPs) are expected to deliver high-quality and consistent care. Therefore, an intimate understanding of the most desirable experience from a patient's and/or family's perspective as well as effective mapping and communication of such findings should facilitate HSPs' efforts in attaining sustainable competitive advantage in an increasingly discerning environment. This study describes (a) the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the experience desired by patients and (b) the application of two visualization tools that are relatively new to the healthcare sector, namely the "spider-web diagram" and "promotion and detraction matrix." The visualization tools are tested with primary data collected from telephone surveys of 1,800 patients who had received care during calendar year 2005 at 6 of 61 hospitals within St. Louis, Missouri-based, Ascension Health. Five CQAs were found by factor analysis. The spider-web diagram illustrates that communication and empowerment and compassionate and respectful care are the most important CQAs, and accordingly, the promotion and detraction matrix shows those attributes that have the greatest effect for creating promoters, preventing detractors, and improving consumer's likelihood to recommend the healthcare provider.

  9. Incidence of Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in a Regional Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Kawabata, Hidenobu; Murakami, Manabu; Kisa, Kengo; Maezawa, Masaji

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective: Since the early 2000s, the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections among the community of people lacking known healthcare risk factors has increased. This MRSA infection is referred to as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infection and is distinct from hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) infection, which occurs among people with known healthcare risk factors. Understanding the epidemiology of CA-MRSA infections is critical; however...

  10. Innovation in medicine and healthcare 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Torro, Carlos; Tanaka, Satoshi; Howlett, Robert; Jain, Lakhmi

    2016-01-01

    Innovation in medicine and healthcare is an interdisciplinary research area, which combines the advanced technologies and problem solving skills with medical and biological science. A central theme of this proceedings is Smart Medical and Healthcare Systems (modern intelligent systems for medicine and healthcare), which can provide efficient and accurate solution to problems faced by healthcare and medical practitioners today by using advanced information communication techniques, computational intelligence, mathematics, robotics and other advanced technologies. The techniques developed in this area will have a significant effect on future medicine and healthcare.    The volume includes 53 papers, which present the recent trend and innovations in medicine and healthcare including Medical Informatics; Biomedical Engineering; Management for Healthcare; Advanced ICT for Medical and Healthcare; Simulation and Visualization/VR for Medicine; Statistical Signal Processing and Artificial Intelligence; Smart Medic...

  11. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project is a family of health care databases and related software tools and products developed through a Federal-State-Industry partnership and sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  12. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider ...

  13. Efficient healthcare logistics with a human touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, van de Noëlle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Despite the long experienced urgency of rapidly increasing healthcare expenditures, there is still a large potential to improve hospitals' logistical efficiency. Operations Research (OR) methodologies may support healthcare professionals in making better decisions concerning planning and capacity is

  14. [Fostering LGBT-friendly healthcare services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Han-Ting; Chen, Mu-Hong; Ku, Wen-Wei

    2015-02-01

    LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) patients suffer from stigma and discrimination when seeking healthcare. A large LGBT healthcare survey revealed that 56% of gay patients and 70% of transgender patients suffered some type of discrimination while seeking healthcare in 2014. The fostering of LGBT-friendly healthcare services is not just an advanced step of gender mainstreaming but also a fulfillment of health equality and equity. Additionally, LGBT-friendly healthcare services are expected to provide new opportunities for healthcare workers. Therefore, proactive government policies, education, research, and clinical practice should all encourage the development of these healthcare services. We look forward to a well-developed LGBT-friendly healthcare system in Taiwan. PMID:25631181

  15. Job satisfaction in health-care organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Kavita Bhatnagar; Kalpana Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Job satisfaction among health-care professionals acquires significance for the purpose of maximization of human resource potential. This article is aimed at emphasizing importance of studying various aspects of job satisfaction in health-care organizations.

  16. General Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button General Information About MRSA in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Problem? Who is at Risk, and How is MRSA Spread in Healthcare Settings? MRSA is usually spread ...

  17. Rising thyroid cancer incidence in the United States by demographic and tumor characteristics, 1980–2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enewold, Lindsey; Zhu, Kangmin; Ron, Elaine; Marrogi, Aizen J.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Peoples, George E.; Devesa, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence has been rising in the United States, and this trend has often been attributed to heightened medical surveillance and use of improved diagnostics. Thyroid cancer incidence varies by sex and race/ethnicity, and these factors also influence access to and utilization of healthcare. We therefore examined thyroid cancer incidence rates by demographic and tumor characteristics, based on 48,403 thyroid cancer patients diagnosed during 1980–2005 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program of the National Cancer Institute. Rates varied by histologic type, sex, and race/ethnicity. Papillary carcinoma was the only histologic type for which incidence rates rose consistently among all racial/ethnic groups. Subsequent analyses focused on the 39,706 papillary thyroid cancers diagnosed during this period. Papillary carcinoma rates increased most rapidly among females. Between 1992–1995 and 2003–2005, they rose nearly 100% among White Non-Hispanics and Black females, but only 20–50% among White Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Black males. Increases were most rapid for localized stage and small tumors; however, rates also rose for large tumors and tumors of regional and distant stage. Since 1992–1995, half the overall increase in papillary carcinoma rates was due to rising rates of very small (≤1.0 cm) cancers, 30% to cancers 1.1–2 cm, and 20% to cancers >2 cm. Among White females, the rate of increase for cancers >5 cm almost equaled that for the smallest cancers. Medical surveillance and more sensitive diagnostic procedures cannot completely explain the observed rises in papillary thyroid cancer rates. Thus, other possible explanations should be explored. PMID:19240234

  18. The impact of HIV-associated lipodystrophy on healthcare utilization and costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Daniel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV disease itself is associated with increased healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditures. HIV-infected persons with lipodystrophy have been shown to have poor self-perceptions of health. We evaluated whether lipodystrophy in the HIV-infected population was associated with increased utilization of healthcare services and increased healthcare costs. Objective To examine utilization of healthcare services and associated costs with respect to presence of lipodystrophy among HIV-infected patients. Methods Healthcare utilization and cost of healthcare services were collected from computerized accounting records for participants in a body image study among HIV-infected patients treated at a tertiary care medical center. Lipodystrophy was assessed by physical examination, and effects of lipodystrophy were assessed via body image surveys. Demographic and clinical characteristics were also ascertained. Analysis of healthcare utilization and cost outcomes was performed via between-group analyses. Multivariate modeling was used to determine predictors of healthcare utilization and associated costs. Results Of the 181 HIV-infected participants evaluated in the study, 92 (51% had clinical evidence of HIV-associated lipodystrophy according to physician examination. Total healthcare utilization, as measured by the number of medical center visits over the study period, was notably increased among HIV-infected subjects with lipodystrophy as compared to HIV-infected subjects without lipodystrophy. Similarly, total healthcare expenditures over the study period were $1,718 more for HIV-infected subjects with lipodystrophy than for HIV-infected subjects without lipodystrophy. Multivariate modeling demonstrated strong associations between healthcare utilization and associated costs, and lipodystrophy score as assessed by a clinician. Healthcare utilization and associated costs were not related to body image survey scores among HIV

  19. Healthcare Firms and the ERP Systems

    OpenAIRE

    A. Garefalakis; G. Mantalis; E. Vourgourakis; K. Spinthiropoulos; Ch. Lemonakis

    2016-01-01

    With the continuous and drastic changes due to the economic crisis, along with the increasing market demands, major reforms are initiated in the healthcare sector in order to improve the quality of healthcare and operational efficiency, while reducing costs and optimizing back-end operations. ERP systems have been the basic technological infrastructure to many sectors as well as healthcare. The main objective of this study is to discuss how the adoption of ERP systems in healthcar...

  20. Romanian healthcare system at a glance

    OpenAIRE

    Christiana Balan; Petronela-Simona Mantaluta

    2013-01-01

    The Romanian healthcare system is facing constant challenges to produce high quality care with low costs. Objectives The paper aims to analyze the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system in terms of resources allocation. The evaluation and the dimension of healthcare system efficiency are important for identifying a balance between the resources required and the health outcomes. Prior Work Previous studies describe the Romanian healthcare system as a system in transition. This study focu...

  1. Healthcare Industry Improvement with Business Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela-Laura IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper highlights the advantages of big data analytics and business intelligence in the healthcare industry. In the paper are reviewed the Real-Time Healthcare Analytics Solutions for Preventative Medicine provided by SAP and the different ideas realized by possible customers for new applications in Healthcare industry in order to demonstrate that the healthcare system can and should benefit from the new opportunities provided by ITC in general and big data analytics in particular.

  2. Barriers to healthcare coordination in market-based and decentralized public health systems: a qualitative study in healthcare networks of Colombia and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Ingrid; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; De Paepe, Pierre; Ferreira da Silva, Maria Rejane; Unger, Jean-Pierre; Vázquez, María-Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Although integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) are promoted in Latin America in response to health system fragmentation, few analyses on the coordination of care across levels in these networks have been conducted in the region. The aim is to analyse the existence of healthcare coordination across levels of care and the factors influencing it from the health personnel' perspective in healthcare networks of two countries with different health systems: Colombia, with a social security system based on managed competition and Brazil, with a decentralized national health system. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive-interpretative study was conducted, based on a case study of healthcare networks in four municipalities. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a three stage theoretical sample of (a) health (112) and administrative (66) professionals of different care levels, and (b) managers of providers (42) and insurers (14). A thematic content analysis was conducted, segmented by cases, informant groups and themes. The results reveal poor clinical information transfer between healthcare levels in all networks analysed, with added deficiencies in Brazil in the coordination of access and clinical management. The obstacles to care coordination are related to the organization of both the health system and the healthcare networks. In the health system, there is the existence of economic incentives to compete (exacerbated in Brazil by partisan political interests), the fragmentation and instability of networks in Colombia and weak planning and evaluation in Brazil. In the healthcare networks, there are inadequate working conditions (temporary and/or part-time contracts) which hinder the use of coordination mechanisms, and inadequate professional training for implementing a healthcare model in which primary care should act as coordinator in patient care. Reforms are needed in these health systems and networks in order to modify incentives, strengthen

  3. Barriers to healthcare coordination in market-based and decentralized public health systems: a qualitative study in healthcare networks of Colombia and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Ingrid; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; De Paepe, Pierre; Ferreira da Silva, Maria Rejane; Unger, Jean-Pierre; Vázquez, María-Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Although integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) are promoted in Latin America in response to health system fragmentation, few analyses on the coordination of care across levels in these networks have been conducted in the region. The aim is to analyse the existence of healthcare coordination across levels of care and the factors influencing it from the health personnel' perspective in healthcare networks of two countries with different health systems: Colombia, with a social security system based on managed competition and Brazil, with a decentralized national health system. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive-interpretative study was conducted, based on a case study of healthcare networks in four municipalities. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a three stage theoretical sample of (a) health (112) and administrative (66) professionals of different care levels, and (b) managers of providers (42) and insurers (14). A thematic content analysis was conducted, segmented by cases, informant groups and themes. The results reveal poor clinical information transfer between healthcare levels in all networks analysed, with added deficiencies in Brazil in the coordination of access and clinical management. The obstacles to care coordination are related to the organization of both the health system and the healthcare networks. In the health system, there is the existence of economic incentives to compete (exacerbated in Brazil by partisan political interests), the fragmentation and instability of networks in Colombia and weak planning and evaluation in Brazil. In the healthcare networks, there are inadequate working conditions (temporary and/or part-time contracts) which hinder the use of coordination mechanisms, and inadequate professional training for implementing a healthcare model in which primary care should act as coordinator in patient care. Reforms are needed in these health systems and networks in order to modify incentives, strengthen

  4. Redefining the Core Competencies of Future Healthcare Executives under Healthcare Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Dianne B.; Ayadi, M. Femi

    2015-01-01

    As the healthcare industry has evolved over the years, so too has the administration of healthcare organizations. The signing into law of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has brought additional changes to the healthcare industry that will require changes to the healthcare administration curriculum. The movement toward a…

  5. The status of TQM in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, M M; Meacham, K A; Alavi, J

    1998-01-01

    The face of the healthcare industry has changed dramatically over the last few years. This study examines the literature related to Total Quality Management (TQM) and Benchmarking (BM) applications in healthcare. Recommendations for healthcare managers and administrators, as they chart operational and strategic directions for their organization, are provided. In this context, a conceptual framework which stresses the significance of viewing the healthcare organization as an open system is provided. The framework underscores the fact that TQM and BM efforts should not be viewed in isolation. Rather, these efforts should be viewed as an integral part of the operational and strategic facets of the healthcare organization.

  6. Mobile Healthcare System using NFC Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Devendran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although primary care physicians are increasingly interested in adopting electronic medical record (EMR systems, few use such systems in practice. Mobile devices offer new ways for users to access health care data and services in a secure and user-friendly environment. Mobile healthcare (m-healthcare systems are regarded as a solution to healthcare costs without reducing the quality of patient care. We are developing a basic architecture for m-healthcare services using Near Field Communication (NFC to facilitate the provisioning of healthcare to people anywhere, anytime using mobile devices that are connected through wireless communication technologies.

  7. Public policy and healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuwer, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Public policy in healthcare affects physician and patient choices. In many ways it may limit choices. These choices present conflicts that are discussed here. Some issues depend on the laws enacted to enable either a single-payer system or that mixed with a private-payer system. In each case, the systems attain some cost controls through means such as gatekeepers, long wait lists, authorization processes, national fee schedules, complex coding schemes, or placing physicians on salary. National health systems are compared here. No one system has proven completely satisfactory, and each has its advantages. There are many factors that contribute to the escalating costs of care that lead to many healthcare public policies to constrain costs. Initiatives to incentivize preventive actions are a more positive step, but ones that are difficult to define in detail.

  8. Targeted Learning in Healthcare Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Susan

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of Big Data in healthcare encourages investigators to seek answers to big questions. However, nonparametric approaches to analyzing these data can suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and traditional parametric modeling does not necessarily scale. Targeted learning (TL) combines semiparametric methodology with advanced machine learning techniques to provide a sound foundation for extracting information from data. Predictive models, variable importance measures, and treatment benefits and risks can all be addressed within this framework. TL has been applied in a broad range of healthcare settings, including genomics, precision medicine, health policy, and drug safety. This article provides an introduction to the two main components of TL, targeted minimum loss-based estimation and super learning, and gives examples of applications in predictive modeling, variable importance ranking, and comparative effectiveness research. PMID:27441404

  9. Strategic planning in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Perera, Francisco de Paula; Peiró, Manel

    2012-08-01

    Strategic planning is a completely valid and useful tool for guiding all types of organizations, including healthcare organizations. The organizational level at which the strategic planning process is relevant depends on the unit's size, its complexity, and the differentiation of the service provided. A cardiology department, a hemodynamic unit, or an electrophysiology unit can be an appropriate level, as long as their plans align with other plans at higher levels. The leader of each unit is the person responsible for promoting the planning process, a core and essential part of his or her role. The process of strategic planning is programmable, systematic, rational, and holistic and integrates the short, medium, and long term, allowing the healthcare organization to focus on relevant and lasting transformations for the future.

  10. Multicultural healthcare: a transatlantic project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Jokinen, Pirkko

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare is increasingly multicultural, posing a challenge for nurse educators in both Europe and the United States. Nursing education faculties are responding to the challenge of internationalization, for instance, by participating in international student exchange projects to foster students' intercultural competence. The authors describe an educational model constructed during a transatlantic project between European and American universities. The benefits of the project from the Finnish partner's perspective are also reported. PMID:17496825

  11. Healthcare Energy Metering Guidance (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    This brochure is intended to help facility and energy managers plan and prioritize investments in energy metering. It offers healthcare-specific examples of metering applications, benefits, and steps that other health systems can reproduce. It reflects collaborative input from the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories and the health system members of the DOE Hospital Energy Alliance's Benchmarking and Measurement Project Team.

  12. Healthcare system simulation using Witness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation techniques have a proven track record in manufacturing industry as well as other areas such as healthcare system improvement. In this study, simulation model of a health center in Malaysia is developed through the application of WITNESS simulation software which has shown its flexibility and capability in manufacturing industry. Modelling procedure is started through process mapping and data collection and continued with model development, verification, validation and experimentation. At the end, final results and possible future improvements are demonstrated.

  13. Multicultural healthcare: a transatlantic project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Jokinen, Pirkko

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare is increasingly multicultural, posing a challenge for nurse educators in both Europe and the United States. Nursing education faculties are responding to the challenge of internationalization, for instance, by participating in international student exchange projects to foster students' intercultural competence. The authors describe an educational model constructed during a transatlantic project between European and American universities. The benefits of the project from the Finnish partner's perspective are also reported.

  14. Healthcare system simulation using Witness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakdaman, Masoud; Zeinahvazi, Milad; Zohoori, Bahareh; Nasiri, Fardokht; Yew Wong, Kuan

    2013-02-01

    Simulation techniques have a proven track record in manufacturing industry as well as other areas such as healthcare system improvement. In this study, simulation model of a health center in Malaysia is developed through the application of WITNESS simulation software which has shown its flexibility and capability in manufacturing industry. Modelling procedure is started through process mapping and data collection and continued with model development, verification, validation and experimentation. At the end, final results and possible future improvements are demonstrated.

  15. Business intelligence in healthcare organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Spil, Ton A.M.; Stegwee, Robert A.; Teitink, Christian J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The management of healthcare organizations is starting to recognize the relevance of the definition of care products in relation to management information. In the turmoil between costs, care results and patient satisfaction, the right balance is needed, and it can be found in upcoming information and communication technologies (ICT). The ICT developments are a challenge in two directions: internally towards massive data warehouses, and externally towards Internet dissemination. These new tech...

  16. Legitimate Allocation of Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper; Lauridsen, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    governing priorities among groups of patients. The Accountability for Reasonableness (A4R) framework suggests an ingenious solution to this problem of moral disagreement. Rather than advocating any substantive distributive principle, its advocates propose a feasible set of conditions, which, if met......Citizens' consent to political decisions is often regarded as a necessary condition of political legitimacy. Consequently, legitimate allocation of healthcare has seemed almost unattainable in contemporary pluralistic societies. The problem is that citizens do not agree on any single principle...

  17. Nonverbal Accommodation in Healthcare Communication

    OpenAIRE

    D’Agostino, Thomas A.; Bylund, Carma L.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study examined patterns of nonverbal accommodation within healthcare interactions and investigated the impact of communication skills training and gender concordance on nonverbal accommodation behavior. The Nonverbal Accommodation Analysis System (NAAS) was used to code the nonverbal behavior of physicians and patients within 45 oncology consultations. Cases were then placed in one of seven categories based on patterns of accommodation observed across the interaction. Results...

  18. Modelling healthcare internal service supply chains for the analysis of medication delivery errors and amplification effects

    OpenAIRE

    Banafsheh Behzad; Reinaldo J Moraga; Shi-Jie (Gary) Chen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Healthcare is a universally used service that hugely affects economies and the quality of life. The research of service supply chains has found a significant role in the past decade. The main research goal of this paper is to model and simulate the internal service supply chains of a healthcare system to study the effects of different parameters on the outputs and capability measures of the processes. The specific objectives are to analyse medication delivery errors in a community ho...

  19. Sea Kayaking Incidents in Norway 2000-2014: An Issue of Bad Weather or Poor Judgement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadland, Eivind; Noer, Gunnar; Vikene, Odd Lennart

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse recreational sea kayaking and touring incidents in Norway with a specific focus on wind conditions and to elaborate on practical implications for the prevention of future incidents. We included 49 incidents reported by the media between 2000 and 2014. Incidents occurred in various wind conditions, but most…

  20. Bluetooth: Opening a Blue Sky for Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, there has been a blossoming of developing mobile healthcare programs. Bluetooth technology, which has the advantages of being low-power and inexpensive, whilst being able to transfer moderate amounts of data over a versatile, robust and secure radio link, has been widely applied in mobile healthcare as a replacement for cables. This paper discussed the applications of Bluetooth technology in healthcare. It started with the brief description of the history of Bluetooth technology, its technical characteristics, and the latest developments. Then the applications of Bluetooth technology in healthcare sector were reviewed. The applications are based on two basic types of links of Bluetooth technology: point-to-point link and point-to-multipoint link. The special requirements from healthcare and the challenges of successful application of Bluetooth in healthcare will be discussed. At last the future development of Bluetooth technology and its impacts on healthcare were envisioned.

  1. Conflict resolution in healthcare management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipcamon, James D; Mainwaring, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    Conflict causes decided tension in the workplace and often produces poor professional outcomes. A manager dealing with conflict can experience a crisis of confidence and often ends up second-guessing himself or herself, regardless of how a situation has been handled. In some organizations, conflict is not viewed positively or as an opportunity for improvement. In these organizations, most individuals will see conflict as being unproductive, unpleasant, and a waste of time and energy. Yet, conflict provides employees with critical feedback on how things are going. When viewed in a positive context, even personality conflicts may provide information to the healthcare manager about what is not working in the organization. If conflict is not directed and controlled, it can have damaging effects in the workplace, stifling the growth of departments and deflating employee morale. Our job as healthcare managers is to deal with conflict so that it does not decrease productivity or detract from the provision of patient-centered care. There are 4 general sources for interpersonal conflict: personal differences, informational deficiency, role incompatibility, and environmental stress. There are 5 common responses used in dealing with conflict: forcing, accommodating, avoiding, compromising, and collaborating. Healthcare managers should become comfortable with using all of these approaches.

  2. Healthcare Workers and Workplace Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Pinar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Workplace violence is a threatening worldwide public health problem. Healthcare workers have under particular risk of workplace violence, and they are being exposed to violence 4-16 times more than other service workers. The frequency of violence in the health sector in the world has indicated in different range of results since there is no consistent definition of workplace violence and differences in research methodology (any type of violence: 22,0% - 60,0%; physical violence: 2,6% - 57,0%; verbal violence: 24,3% - 82,0%; sexual harassment: %1,9 - 10,5%. All healthcare workers have right to work in a safe working place. The safety of healthcare workers should deserve the same priority as patient safety. Various risk factors including social, cultural, environmental, organizational and personal elements play a role in the formation of workplace violence that is very important for our country. Considering all those factors, the workplace violence in health sector should be seriously handled and the strategies and policies must be developed for prevention. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 315-326

  3. Patient Safety and Healthcare Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Toska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to a variety of circumstances and world-wide research findings, patient safety andquality care during hospitalization have emerged as major issues. Patient safety deficits may burdenhealth systems as well as allocated resources. The international community has examined severalproposals covering general and systemic aspects in order to improve patient safety; several long-termprograms and strategies have also been implemented promoting the participation of health-relatedagents, and also government agencies and non-governmental organizations.Aim: Those factors that have negative correlations with patient safety and quality healthcare weredetermined; WHO and EU programs as well as the Greek health policy were also reviewed.Method: Local and international literature was reviewed, including EU and WHO official publications,by using the appropriate keywords.Conclusions: International cooperation on patient safety is necessary in order to improvehospitalization and healthcare quality standards. Such incentives depend heavily on establishing worldwideviable and effective health programs and planning. These improvements also require further stepson safe work procedures, environment safety, hazard management, infection control, safe use ofequipment and medication, and sufficient healthcare staff.

  4. Workplace Bullying among Healthcare Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Montero-Simó

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to assess consistent predictors through the use of a sample that includes different actors from the healthcare work force to identify certain key elements in a set of job-related organizational contexts. The utilized data were obtained from the 5th European Working Conditions Survey, conducted in 2010 by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. In light of these objectives, we collected a subsample of 284 health professionals, some of them from the International Standard Classification of Occupations—subgroup 22—(ISCO-08. The results indicated that the chance of a healthcare worker referring to him/herself as bullied increases among those who work on a shift schedule, perform monotonous and rotating tasks, suffer from work stress, enjoy little satisfaction from their working conditions, and do not perceive opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes within the usual course of events that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist human resource managers in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among healthcare workers.

  5. Automatic Analysis of Critical Incident Reports: Requirements and Use Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, critical incident reports are used as a means to increase patient safety and quality of care. The entire potential of these sources of experiential knowledge remains often unconsidered since retrieval and analysis is difficult and time-consuming, and the reporting systems often do not provide support for these tasks. The objective of this paper is to identify potential use cases for automatic methods that analyse critical incident reports. In more detail, we will describe how faceted search could offer an intuitive retrieval of critical incident reports and how text mining could support in analysing relations among events. To realise an automated analysis, natural language processing needs to be applied. Therefore, we analyse the language of critical incident reports and derive requirements towards automatic processing methods. We learned that there is a huge potential for an automatic analysis of incident reports, but there are still challenges to be solved. PMID:27139389

  6. Psychological impact and recovery after involvement in a patient safety incident: a repeated measures analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerven, Eva; Bruyneel, Luk; Panella, Massimiliano; Euwema, Martin; Sermeus, Walter; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine individual, situational and organisational aspects that influence psychological impact and recovery of a patient safety incident on physicians, nurses and midwives. Design Cross-sectional, retrospective surveys of physicians, midwives and nurses. Setting 33 Belgian hospitals. Participants 913 clinicians (186 physicians, 682 nurses, 45 midwives) involved in a patient safety incident. Main outcome measures The Impact of Event Scale was used to retrospectively measure psychological impact of the safety incident at the time of the event and compare it with psychological impact at the time of the survey. Results Individual, situational as well as organisational aspects influenced psychological impact and recovery of a patient safety incident. Psychological impact is higher when the degree of harm for the patient is more severe, when healthcare professionals feel responsible for the incident and among female healthcare professionals. Impact of degree of harm differed across clinicians. Psychological impact is lower among more optimistic professionals. Overall, impact decreased significantly over time. This effect was more pronounced for women and for those who feel responsible for the incident. The longer ago the incident took place, the stronger impact had decreased. Also, higher psychological impact is related with the use of a more active coping and planning coping strategy, and is unrelated to support seeking coping strategies. Rendered support and a support culture reduce psychological impact, whereas a blame culture increases psychological impact. No associations were found with job experience and resilience of the health professional, the presence of a second victim support team or guideline and working in a learning culture. Conclusions Healthcare organisations should anticipate on providing their staff appropriate and timely support structures that are tailored to the healthcare professional involved in the incident and to the specific

  7. Social Incidence of the General Sales Tax in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Saadia Refaqat

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyses the social incidence of the general sales tax (GST) in Pakistan. The main finding of the study is that contrary to widespread perception, the social incidence of the GST in Pakistan is slightly progressive. The main reason for this counterintuitive result is that most items heavily consumed by the poor are exempt from GST in Pakistan.

  8. Romanian healthcare system at a glance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Balan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian healthcare system is facing constant challenges to produce high quality care with low costs. Objectives The paper aims to analyze the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system in terms of resources allocation. The evaluation and the dimension of healthcare system efficiency are important for identifying a balance between the resources required and the health outcomes. Prior Work Previous studies describe the Romanian healthcare system as a system in transition. This study focuses on the relationship between the inputs and outputs of the system. Approach In order to assess the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system we use Data Envelopment Analysis approach. Both input and output healthcare indicators are observed for the period 1999-2010 and the years when healthcare inputs have been used efficiently are identified. Results The results show that human, financial, and technological resources have been used at maximum capacity in 1999, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2010. Implications Though efficiency is defined differently by diverse stakeholders, healthcare policies should focus on rising the responsibility of communities and individuals for better treatments and services and better access to information on healthcare providers. Value The paper is an empirically based study of the healthcare resources allocation in Romania.

  9. Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210 800-321-6742 (OSHA) TTY www.OSHA.gov FEDERAL GOVERNMENT White House Affordable Care Act Disaster Recovery ...

  10. Incident users of antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In Denmark, as well as in many other countries, consumption of antipsychotics is on the rise, partly due to increasing off-label use. The aim of this study was to analyze and quantify the extent of off-label use and polypharmacy in incident users of antipsychotic medication, and to exami....... As a consequence of the range of adverse effects associated with antipsychotic drug use, the documented widespread off-label prescribing practices warrant careful monitoring for adverse effects and prompt discontinuation in case of an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio.......PURPOSE: In Denmark, as well as in many other countries, consumption of antipsychotics is on the rise, partly due to increasing off-label use. The aim of this study was to analyze and quantify the extent of off-label use and polypharmacy in incident users of antipsychotic medication, and to examine...

  11. Incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Abelmann, Walter H.

    1985-01-01

    Full reliable data on the incidence and prevalence of dilated cardiomyopathy are not available. In the United States, at least 0.7% of cardiac deaths are attributable to cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy probably contributes the great majority of these cases. The mortality rate for cardiomyopathy in males is twice that of females, and for blacks it is 2.4 times that of whites. Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 0.67% of patients discharged from hospitals in 1979 with diagnoses of disease of...

  12. Contaminated Mexican steel incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the circumstances contributing to the inadvertent melting of cobalt 60 (Co-60) contaminated scrap metal in two Mexican steel foundries and the subsequent distribution of contaminated steel products into the United States. The report addresses mainly those actions taken by US Federal and state agencies to protect the US population from radiation risks associated with the incident. Mexico had much more serious radiation exposure and contamination problems to manage. The United States Government maintained a standing offer to provide technical and medical assistance to the Mexican Government. The report covers the tracing of the source to its origin, response actions to recover radioactive steel in the United States, and return of the contaminated materials to Mexico. The incident resulted in significant radiation exposures within Mexico, but no known significant exposure within the United States. Response to the incident required the combined efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of State, and US Customs Service (Department of Treasury) personnel at the Federal level and representatives of all 50 State Radiation Control Programs and, in some instances, local and county government personnel. The response also required a diplomatic interface with the Mexican Government and cooperation of numerous commercial establishments and members of the general public. The report describes the factual information associated with the event and may serve as information for subsequent recommendations and actions by the NRC. 8 figures

  13. Cancer incidence among waiters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reijula, Jere; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Lynge, Elsebeth;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To study cancer risk patterns among waiters in the Nordic countries. METHODS: We identified a cohort of 16,134 male and 81,838 female waiters from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. During the follow-up period from 1961 to 2005, we found that 19,388 incident cancer cases were...... diagnosed. Standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was defined as the observed number of cancer cases divided by the expected number, based on national age, time period and gender-specific cancer incidence rates in the general population. RESULTS: The SIR of all cancers in waiters, in the five countries combined......, was 1.46 (95% CI 1.41-1.51) in men and 1.09 (1.07-1.11) in women. In male waiters, the SIR decreased from 1.79 (1.63-1.96) in 1961-1975, to 1.33 (1.26-1.40) in 1991-2005, but remained stable among women. The SIR among male waiters was highest for cancers in the pharynx (6.11; 95% CI 5.02-7.37), oral...

  14. Validating the Danish adaptation of the World Health Organization's International Classification for Patient Safety classification of patient safety incident types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Kim Lyngby; Thommesen, Jacob; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2013-01-01

    of case descriptions; clarity of the operational definitions of the types and the instructions guiding the coding process; adequacy of the underlying classification scheme. Conclusions The incident types of the ICPS-DK are adequate, exhaustive and well suited for classifying and structuring incident......, precisely defined incident sub-types may be preferred. This evaluation of the reliability and usability of WHO's ICPS should be useful for healthcare administrations that consider or are in the process of adapting the ICPS....

  15. Aviation and healthcare: a comparative review with implications for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Narinder; Parand, Anam; Soukup, Tayana; Reader, Tom; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Safety in aviation has often been compared with safety in healthcare. Following a recent article in this journal, the UK government set up an Independent Patient Safety Investigation Service, to emulate a similar well-established body in aviation. On the basis of a detailed review of relevant publications that examine patient safety in the context of aviation practice, we have drawn up a table of comparative features and a conceptual framework for patient safety. Convergence and divergence of safety-related behaviours across aviation and healthcare were derived and documented. Key safety-related domains that emerged included Checklists, Training, Crew Resource Management, Sterile Cockpit, Investigation and Reporting of Incidents and Organisational Culture. We conclude that whilst healthcare has much to learn from aviation in certain key domains, the transfer of lessons from aviation to healthcare needs to be nuanced, with the specific characteristics and needs of healthcare borne in mind. On the basis of this review, it is recommended that healthcare should emulate aviation in its resourcing of staff who specialise in human factors and related psychological aspects of patient safety and staff wellbeing. Professional and post-qualification staff training could specifically include Cognitive Bias Avoidance Training, as this appears to play a key part in many errors relating to patient safety and staff wellbeing. PMID:26770817

  16. Healthcare succession planning: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Brian K; Muise, Melanie; Cummings, Greta; Newburn-Cook, Chris

    2009-12-01

    Succession planning is a business strategy that has recently gained attention in the healthcare literature, primarily because of nursing shortage concerns and the demand for retaining knowledgeable personnel to meet organizational needs. Little research has been conducted in healthcare settings that clearly defines best practices for succession planning frameworks. To effectively carry out such organizational strategies during these challenging times, an integrative review of succession planning in healthcare was performed to identify consistencies in theoretical approaches and strategies for chief nursing officers and healthcare managers to initiate. Selected articles were compared with business succession planning to determine whether healthcare strategies were similar to best practices already established in business contexts. The results of this integrative review will aid leaders and managers to use succession planning as a tool in their recruitment, retention, mentoring, and administration activities and also provide insights for future development of healthcare succession planning frameworks.

  17. Big Data and Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S S-L; Gao, G; Koch, S

    2015-01-01

    This editorial is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Big Data and Analytics in Healthcare". The amount of data being generated in the healthcare industry is growing at a rapid rate. This has generated immense interest in leveraging the availability of healthcare data (and "big data") to improve health outcomes and reduce costs. However, the nature of healthcare data, and especially big data, presents unique challenges in processing and analyzing big data in healthcare. This Focus Theme aims to disseminate some novel approaches to address these challenges. More specifically, approaches ranging from efficient methods of processing large clinical data to predictive models that could generate better predictions from healthcare data are presented.

  18. Requirements for Interoperability in Healthcare Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Noumeir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interoperability is a requirement for the successful deployment of Electronic Health Records (EHR. EHR improves the quality of healthcare by enabling access to all relevant information at the diagnostic decision moment, regardless of location. It is a system that results from the cooperation of several heterogeneous distributed subsystems that need to successfully exchange information relative to a specific healthcare process. This paper analyzes interoperability impediments in healthcare by first defining them and providing concrete healthcare examples, followed by discussion of how specifications can be defined and how verification can be conducted to eliminate those impediments and ensure interoperability in healthcare. This paper also analyzes how Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE has been successful in enabling interoperability, and identifies some neglected aspects that need attention.

  19. Information analytics for healthcare service discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lily; Yamin, Mohammad; Mushi, Cleopa; Liu, Kecheng; Alsaigh, Mohammed; Chen, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of being 'patient-centric' is a challenge to many existing healthcare service provision practices. This paper focuses on the issue of referrals, where multiple stakeholders, such as General Practitioners (GPs) and patients, are encouraged to make a consensual decision based on patients' needs. In this paper, we present an ontology-enabled healthcare service provision, which facilitates both patients and GPs in jointly deciding upon the referral decision. In the healthcare service provision model, we define three types of profiles which represent different stakeholders' requirements. This model also comprises a set of healthcare service discovery processes: articulating a service need, matching the need with the healthcare service offerings, and deciding on a best-fit service for acceptance. As a result, the healthcare service provision can carry out coherent analysis using personalised information and iterative processes that deal with requirements which change over time.

  20. Incidence of Remission in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The Diabetes & Aging Study

    OpenAIRE

    Karter, Andrew J.; Nundy, Shantanu; Parker, Melissa M.; Moffet, Howard H; Huang, Elbert S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the incidence of remission in adults with type 2 diabetes not treated with bariatric surgery and to identify variables associated with remission. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We quantified the incidence of diabetes remission and examined its correlates among 122,781 adults with type 2 diabetes in an integrated healthcare delivery system. Remission required the absence of ongoing drug therapy and was defined as follows: 1) partial: at least 1 year of subdiabetic hyperglyce...

  1. Decision-making in healthcare as a complex adaptive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemsky, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare transformation requires a change in how the business of healthcare is done. Traditional decision-making approaches based on stable and predictable systems are inappropriate in healthcare because of the complex nature of healthcare delivery. This article reviews challenges to using traditional decision-making approaches in healthcare and how insight from Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) could support healthcare management. The article also provides a system model to guide decision-making in healthcare as a CAS. PMID:26656389

  2. Occupational exposure of healthcare and research staff to static magnetic stray fields from 1.5-7 Tesla MRI scanners is associated with reporting of transient symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-de Vries, Yvette; Mason, Catherine K; de Vocht, Frank; Portengen, Lützen; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Limited data is available about incidence of acute transient symptoms associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners. We aimed to assess the incidence of these symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with MRI scanners, and their assoc

  3. The role of institutional entrepreneurs in reforming healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Andy; Currie, Graeme; Waring, Justin; Finn, Rachael; Martin, Graham

    2012-02-01

    We draw on institutional entrepreneurship theory to analyse the dynamics of institutional change in a healthcare context. The focus of our interest is in the relationship between an institutional entrepreneur's 'subject position', defined in terms of their structural and normative legitimacy within the existing institutional landscape, and the nature of the change enacted. We develop this approach through an examination of the implementation of new pathways for cancer genetic services within the English National Health Service. Employing comparative case analysis we show that those who have limited structural legitimacy under prevailing conditions are most willing to engender change, but also least able; whereas those who have strong structural legitimacy are most able, but often least willing. However, those who are able rhetorically to combine a balance of structural and normative legitimacy are most able to produce change. In doing so, we demonstrate the importance of the concept of institutional entrepreneurship to understand healthcare reform. PMID:21440968

  4. Process improvement in healthcare: Overall resource efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Mast, de, J.; Kemper, B; Does, R.J.M.M.; Mandjes, M.; Bijl, van der, Hans

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a unifying and quantitative conceptual framework for healthcare processes from the viewpoint of process improvement. The work adapts standard models from operation management to the specifics of healthcare processes. We propose concepts for organizational modeling of healthcare processes, breaking down work into micro processes, tasks, and resources. In addition, we propose an axiological model which breaks down general performance goals into process metrics. The co...

  5. Sustainable Healthcare - A National Swedish Innovation Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Pereno, Amina

    2015-01-01

    For the past year a constellation of different stakeholders have been working with a National Swedish Innovation Agenda on Sustainable Healthcare. Numerous meetings, workshops and interviews have been conducted to sort out what actions need to be implemented so that Sustainable Healthcare can grow and become a bigger part of the Swedish innovation, economy and export. This short English version of the Innovation Agenda summarizes the definition of sustainable healthcare, key stakeholders of s...

  6. Complexity science and leadership in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J P

    2001-10-01

    The emerging field of complexity science offers an alternative leadership strategy for the chaotic, complex healthcare environment. A survey revealed that healthcare leaders intuitively support principles of complexity science. Leadership that uses complexity principles offers opportunities in the chaotic healthcare environment to focus less on prediction and control and more on fostering relationships and creating conditions in which complex adaptive systems can evolve to produce creative outcomes. PMID:11676217

  7. Enterprise Resource Planning systems in healthcare sector

    OpenAIRE

    Mucheleka, M. (Martin)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis work was to find out how Enterprise Resource Planning systems (ERP) have been used in the healthcare sector and how ERP systems could be used to improve the healthcare services. Some findings were discussed and recommendations were made about how ERP systems could be used in the healthcare sector. The thesis was written using literature review research method. Literature is the study that involves gathering and studying earlier knowledge about a specific topic ...

  8. A proposed rural healthcare ethics agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, W.; Pomerantz, A; Howard, K; Bushy, A

    2007-01-01

    The unique context of the rural setting provides special challenges to furnishing ethical healthcare to its approximately 62 million inhabitants. Although rural communities are widely diverse, most have the following common features: limited economic resources, shared values, reduced health status, limited availability of and accessibility to healthcare services, overlapping professional–patient relationships and care giver stress. These rural features shape common healthcare ethical issues, ...

  9. Efficient healthcare logistics with a human touch

    OpenAIRE

    Vrugt, van de, Noëlle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Despite the long experienced urgency of rapidly increasing healthcare expenditures, there is still a large potential to improve hospitals' logistical efficiency. Operations Research (OR) methodologies may support healthcare professionals in making better decisions concerning planning and capacity issues and improving efficiency in the delivery of healthcare, but appears to be lacking implementation in practice. This thesis displays OR research that focuses both on theoretical results and prac...

  10. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P.; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B.

    2013-01-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the ...

  11. Applying analytic hierarchy process to assess healthcare-oriented cloud computing service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen-Hwa; Qiu, Wan-Li

    2016-01-01

    Numerous differences exist between the healthcare industry and other industries. Difficulties in the business operation of the healthcare industry have continually increased because of the volatility and importance of health care, changes to and requirements of health insurance policies, and the statuses of healthcare providers, which are typically considered not-for-profit organizations. Moreover, because of the financial risks associated with constant changes in healthcare payment methods and constantly evolving information technology, healthcare organizations must continually adjust their business operation objectives; therefore, cloud computing presents both a challenge and an opportunity. As a response to aging populations and the prevalence of the Internet in fast-paced contemporary societies, cloud computing can be used to facilitate the task of balancing the quality and costs of health care. To evaluate cloud computing service systems for use in health care, providing decision makers with a comprehensive assessment method for prioritizing decision-making factors is highly beneficial. Hence, this study applied the analytic hierarchy process, compared items related to cloud computing and health care, executed a questionnaire survey, and then classified the critical factors influencing healthcare cloud computing service systems on the basis of statistical analyses of the questionnaire results. The results indicate that the primary factor affecting the design or implementation of optimal cloud computing healthcare service systems is cost effectiveness, with the secondary factors being practical considerations such as software design and system architecture.

  12. Applying analytic hierarchy process to assess healthcare-oriented cloud computing service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen-Hwa; Qiu, Wan-Li

    2016-01-01

    Numerous differences exist between the healthcare industry and other industries. Difficulties in the business operation of the healthcare industry have continually increased because of the volatility and importance of health care, changes to and requirements of health insurance policies, and the statuses of healthcare providers, which are typically considered not-for-profit organizations. Moreover, because of the financial risks associated with constant changes in healthcare payment methods and constantly evolving information technology, healthcare organizations must continually adjust their business operation objectives; therefore, cloud computing presents both a challenge and an opportunity. As a response to aging populations and the prevalence of the Internet in fast-paced contemporary societies, cloud computing can be used to facilitate the task of balancing the quality and costs of health care. To evaluate cloud computing service systems for use in health care, providing decision makers with a comprehensive assessment method for prioritizing decision-making factors is highly beneficial. Hence, this study applied the analytic hierarchy process, compared items related to cloud computing and health care, executed a questionnaire survey, and then classified the critical factors influencing healthcare cloud computing service systems on the basis of statistical analyses of the questionnaire results. The results indicate that the primary factor affecting the design or implementation of optimal cloud computing healthcare service systems is cost effectiveness, with the secondary factors being practical considerations such as software design and system architecture. PMID:27441149

  13. Bridging a gap: the (lack of a) sociology of oral health and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Catherine

    2009-11-01

    This article provides an historical review of international research related to sociology and oral health and healthcare. I begin by considering the relevance of the mouth and oral health to social interactions and physical health, and outline existing inequalities in oral health and healthcare experiences. The paper examines critically some of the existing published research in the field - considering both what might be described as sociology of oral health and healthcare and sociology in oral healthcare - and demonstrates the dearth of sociological research related to this subject compared to other areas of interest within the field of sociology of health and illness. I conclude by suggesting some ways in which this area could be expanded and developed further. I suggest that sociological analyses of how individuals experience, understand and manage their mouth and oral health, can add to and enhance the broader field of the sociology of health and illness. Further, examining experiences and provision of oral healthcare may provide sociology with a new opportunity to explore the neglected field of private healthcare, but also to engage with health policy makers who seek to address oral healthcare needs.

  14. Contact Allergy in Danish Healthcare Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, Jakob F; Menné, Torkil; Sommerlund, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    Contact dermatitis in healthcare workers is a pan-European problem. We conducted a retrospective observational study of the patch-test results of 1402 healthcare workers and 1402 matched controls with contact dermatitis who were treated at 3 hospitals departments in Denmark between 2007 and 2014...... in healthcare workers was significantly associated with having occupational contact dermatitis, hand dermatitis and older age. In conclusion, we report here a potential problem of contact allergy to thiurams in healthcare workers with contact dermatitis. Legislative authorities may in the future focus...

  15. Value-based procurement: Canada's healthcare imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Value-based healthcare models are being adopted globally to maximize value for patients. Given that procurement is at the heart of purchasing value, value-based procurement goes hand in hand with value-based healthcare. Shifting procurement's traditional focus on short-term cost savings to a more holistic objective that includes health system performance and patient outcomes, giving preference to longer-term cost efficiencies, and working with suppliers to identify opportunities to develop more innovative products and services, is proving successful in leading jurisdictions. This article presents an overview of value within healthcare systems and how healthcare value-based procurement is being implemented across various jurisdictions. PMID:27278137

  16. Healthcare operations management through use of simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafee, Navonil; Williams, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades healthcare organisations have grown in size and complexity and healthcare costs have outpaced economic growth. In countries where healthcare is publicly-funded, increasing costs have traditionally meant a rise in the healthcare budgets in real terms; however, the ongoing global financial and economic crisis (2007-present) has had spending implications on governmental budgets for public resources in several countries. This apparent contradiction - "provide better service at a lesser cost" - which may last for years to come therefore necessitates the careful use of the allo

  17. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool. PMID:21841396

  18. Medication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alrwisan, Adel

    2011-01-15

    AIMS: Approximately 20% of deaths from adverse events are related to medication incidents, costing the NHS an additional £500 million annually. Less than 5% of adverse events are reported. This study aims to assess the reporting rate of medication incidents in NHS facilities in the north east of Scotland, and to describe the types and outcomes of reported incidents among different services. Furthermore, we wished to quantify the proportion of reported incidents according to the reporters\\' profession. METHODS: A retrospective description was made of medication incidents reported to an online reporting system (DATIX) over a 46-month-period (July 2005 to April 2009). Reports originated from acute and community hospitals, mental health, and primary care facilities. RESULTS: Over the study period there were 2,666 incidents reported with a mean monthly reporting rate of 78.2\\/month (SD±16.9). 6.1% of all incidents resulted in harm, with insulin being the most commonly implicated medication. Nearly three-quarters (74.2%, n=1,978) of total incidents originated from acute hospitals. Administration incidents were implicated in the majority of the reported medication incidents (59%), followed by prescribing (10.8%) and dispensing (9.9%), while the nondescript "other medication incidents" accounted for 20.3% of total incidents. The majority of reports were made by nursing and midwifery staff (80%), with medical and dental professionals reporting the lowest number of incidents (n=56, 2%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of medication incidents in this study were reported by nursing and midwifery staff, and were due to administration incidents. There is a clear need to elucidate the reasons for the limited contribution of the medical and dental professionals to reporting medication incidents.

  19. Congestion with incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the impact of random delays during a repeatedly occurring demand peak in a congested facility, such as an airport or an urban road. Congestion is described in the form of a dynamic queue using the Vickrey bottleneck model and assuming Nash equilibrium in departure times. Every...... period an incident may occur at a random time, temporarily reducing the bottleneck capacity to zero. The paper gives some properties of Nash equilibrium and the social optimum as well as a pretty good welfare improving tolling scheme....

  20. Viability of healthcare service delivery alternatives for the Australian mining sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patricia A H; Giles, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The changing and demanding nature of the mining workforce in rural and remote Australia brings unique challenges to the delivery of healthcare services. In an attempt to control costs whilst delivering cost effective and quality healthcare, new models of delivery must be considered. For a workforce that is fly-in/fly-out, the provision of healthcare is problematic given the lack of consistency in location. A cost-benefit framework is analysed comparing three models of service provision using travel to a major location, locum services and remote health monitoring. Ultimately, new models of care must be considered to address the issues of increasing workforce turnover, to cater for rising healthcare costs, and to improve the health of such communities. PMID:23138092

  1. Healthcare Firms and the ERP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garefalakis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the continuous and drastic changes due to the economic crisis, along with the increasing market demands, major reforms are initiated in the healthcare sector in order to improve the quality of healthcare and operational efficiency, while reducing costs and optimizing back-end operations. ERP systems have been the basic technological infrastructure to many sectors as well as healthcare. The main objective of this study is to discuss how the adoption of ERP systems in healthcare organizations improves their functionality, simplifies their business processes, assure the quality of care services and helps their management accounting and controlling. This study presents also the stages required for the implementation of ERP system in healthcare organizations. This study utilizes a literature review in order to reach the research conclusions. Specifically, through related case studies and research, it examines how ERP systems are used to evaluate the better functionality of the healthcare organizations, addressing in parallel important problems, and possible malfunctions. The implementation of ERP systems in healthcare organizations promises to evolve and align strictly to the organizations’ corporate objectives and high-levels of healthcare quality. In order to accomplish this goal, the right decisions should be made by the managers of the healthcare organization regarding the choice of the appropriate ERP system following its installation and its application. Limited research exists on the significance ERP systems implementation in healthcare organizations, while possible dysfunctions and challenges during its installation and implementation are recorded. Therefore, new evidence in the significance of ERP systems in healthcare organization is provided.

  2. Analyses on cancer incidence and mortality in Huai'an area, China, from 2009 to 2011%中国淮安地区2009年至2011年恶性肿瘤的发病率及死亡率分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangjin Yuan; Qianwen Li; Yunxiang Du; Shunlin Shan; Zhimin Wang; Enchun Pan; Yuan He; Ting Wang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the cancer incidence and mortality in Huai'an area, China, from 2009 to 2011. Methods: The data about cancer incidence and mortality were provided by Huai'an Cancer Registry, China. Incidence and mortality rates, and standardized rates were calculated by age, gender, areas (urban and rural areas of Huai'an)and cancer sites. Results: The crude incidence rate for all cancer sites was 205.60/105 and the standardized incidence rate was 166.22/105. Both the crude and standardized rates were higher in urban area than in rural area for both sexes. The incidence rates increased in people aged 40 and over, and the peak ages of incidence were between 70-75 in both males and females. The crude mortality rate for all cancer sites was 153.88/105 and the standardized mortality rate was 122.14/105. Both the crude and standardized rates were similar in urban and rural areas for both men and women. The mortality rates were at low level under the age 50 in both sexes, but increased after the age 50, reaching the peak at the ages of 80-85 in both males and females. The top 10 most common cancer sites in rank were esophagus, stomach, lung, liver, colon-rectum, breast,pancreas, cervix uteri, brain and central nervous system, and leukemia, accounting for 87.56% of all cancers. The top 10 most leading causes of cancer death in order were cancers of esophagus, lung, liver, stomach, colon-rectum, pancreas, brain and central nervous system, leukemia, breast and lymphoma, accounting for 90.53% of all cancer deaths. Conclusion: Cancer is one kind of major diseases threatening people's health in Huai'an area, China. Cancer prevention and control should be enhanced, especially for esophageal cancer.

  3. Trends in the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer in Denmark 1978-2007: Rapid incidence increase among young Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch-Johansen, Fatima; Jensen, Allan; Mortensen, Lone;

    2010-01-01

    -adjusted according to the World standard population were calculated based on combined data from the two registries. For both genders, a high increase in both BCC and SCC incidence was observed over time. Between 1978 and 2007, the age-adjusted BCC incidence increased from 27.1 to 96.6 cases per 100,000 person-years...... for women and from 34.2 to 91.2 cases for men. The SCC incidence increased from 4.6 to 12.0 cases per 100,000 person-years for women and from 9.7 to 19.1 cases for men. For both BCC and SCC, women experienced a higher average annual percentage incidence change than men. Furthermore, the average annual...... percentage change in BCC incidence among persons below 40 years was significantly higher compared to older persons, especially for women. These trends may lead to an alarming NMSC incidence increase over time as population ages and will have major implications for future healthcare services. Our findings...

  4. Critical Incidents in Internal Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Voima, PÀivi

    2000-01-01

    Critical incidents have had an important role in service quality and service management research. The focus of critical-incident studies has gradually shifted from separate acts and episodes towards relationships, and even switching from one relationship to another. The Critical Incident Technique has mainly been used when studying the service sector, concentrating on the customer's perception of critical incidents. Although some studies have considered the perceptions of employees important,...

  5. Primary Healthcare Solo Practices: Homogeneous or Heterogeneous?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raynald Pineault

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Solo practices have generally been viewed as forming a homogeneous group. However, they may differ on many characteristics. The objective of this paper is to identify different forms of solo practice and to determine the extent to which they are associated with patient experience of care. Methods. Two surveys were carried out in two regions of Quebec in 2010: a telephone survey of 9180 respondents from the general population and a postal survey of 606 primary healthcare (PHC practices. Data from the two surveys were linked through the respondent’s usual source of care. A taxonomy of solo practices was constructed (n=213, using cluster analysis techniques. Bivariate and multilevel analyses were used to determine the relationship of the taxonomy with patient experience of care. Results. Four models were derived from the taxonomy. Practices in the “resourceful networked” model contrast with those of the “resourceless isolated” model to the extent that the experience of care reported by their patients is more favorable. Conclusion. Solo practice is not a homogeneous group. The four models identified have different organizational features and their patients’ experience of care also differs. Some models seem to offer a better organizational potential in the context of current reforms.

  6. Incident Management: Process into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Tornados, shootings, fires--these are emergencies that require fast action by school district personnel, but they are not the only incidents that require risk management. The authors have introduced the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) and assured that these systems can help educators plan for and…

  7. Racist Incident-Based Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Davis, Thema; Ocampo, Carlota

    2005-01-01

    Racist incidents are potentially traumatizing forms of victimization that may lead to increased psychiatric and psychophysiological symptoms in targets. The magnitude of the problem of racist incidents in the United States is difficult to estimate; however, data from several sources permit the inference that the prevalence of racist incidents,…

  8. Developing Ethical Competence in Healthcare Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenström, Erica; Ohlsson, Jon; Höglund, Anna T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to explore what kind of ethical competence healthcare managers need in handling conflicts of interest (COI). The aim is also to highlight essential learning processes to develop healthcare managers' ethical competence. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews…

  9. Quality-driven efficiency in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky

    2012-01-01

    During the upcoming decades, healthcare organizations face the challenge to deliver more patient care, of higher quality, and with less financial and human resources. The goal of this thesis is to help and guide healthcare professionals making their organizations future-proof. Building on techniques

  10. Healthcare Practitioners' Personal and Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A.; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them…

  11. Process improvement in healthcare: Overall resource efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Mast; B. Kemper; R.J.M.M. Does; M. Mandjes; Y. van der Bijl

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a unifying and quantitative conceptual framework for healthcare processes from the viewpoint of process improvement. The work adapts standard models from operation management to the specifics of healthcare processes. We propose concepts for organizational modeling of healt

  12. Tailor-made quality systems in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bij, JD; Broekhuis, H

    2000-01-01

    At present many healthcare organizations are being pressed by national governments or client groups to develop and implement quality systems. Unfortunately, not much is known about the development and implementation of these systems in healthcare organizations. There still are definition questions t

  13. Integrating Healthcare Ethical Issues into IS Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellucci, Leigh W.; Layman, Elizabeth J.; Campbell, Robert; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Federal initiatives are encouraging the increase of IS graduates to work in the healthcare environment because they possess knowledge of datasets and dataset management that are key to effective management of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information technology (IT). IS graduates will be members of the healthcare team, and as such,…

  14. Healthcare Identifiers legislation: a whiff of fourberie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Danuta

    2010-05-01

    The Healthcare Identifiers Bill 2010 (Cth), which will establish "the national e-health Healthcare Identifiers Service to provide that patients, healthcare providers and provider organisations can be consistently identified", is in the process of being enacted by the Australian Federal Parliament. The legislation will enable the government to assign to each "healthcare recipient" a 26-digit electronic "Healthcare Identifier", which will be accessible, with or without the recipient's consent, to a broad range of health care service providers as well as other entities. The individual Healthcare Identifier file will initially contain such identifying information as, where applicable, the Medicare number and/or the Veterans' Affairs number; name; address; gender; date of birth; and "the date of birth accuracy indicator" presumably birth certificate. However, since each "service" provided by a health care provider to a health care recipient will be automatically recorded on each individual's Healthcare Identifier file, in time these electronic files should contain a full record of such services or contacts. Moreover, the Healthcare Identifiers are considered a "key" to, or a "foundation stone" for, the implementation of the shared electronic health records scheme, because they will enable linkage with and retrieval of each patient's clinical records throughout the health care service system. However, there has been virtually no discussion about the legal, ethical and social implications of this legislation. PMID:20552931

  15. Individualized Healthcare Plans (IHP). Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that students whose healthcare needs affect or have the potential to affect safe and optimal school attendance and academic performance require the professional school nurse to write an Individualized Healthcare Plan (IHP), in collaboration with the student, family, educators,…

  16. Discourse Analysis of Encouragement in Healthcare Manga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Rieko; Smith, Ian; Uchimura, Mari

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how healthcare professionals use encouragement. Focusing on GAMBARU ["to try hard"], forty-one scenes were collected from healthcare manga. Each scene of encouragement was analyzed from three perspectives; the contextual background of the communication, the relationship with the patients and the patients' response to the…

  17. The Roadside Healthcare Facility Location Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. de Vries (Harwin); J.J. van de Klundert (Joris); A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Providing African truck drivers with adequate access to healthcare is an effective way to reduce the burden and the spread of HIV and other infectious diseases. Therefore, NGO North Star Alliance builds a network of healthcare facilities along major African trucking rou

  18. Healthcare priority setting in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukachi, Salome A.; Onyango-Ouma, Washington; Siso, Jared Maaka;

    2014-01-01

    improves the priority setting decisions. This paper describes the healthcare priority setting processes in Malindi district, Kenya, prior to the implementation of A4R in 2008 and evaluates the process for its conformance with the conditions for A4R. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions with key...... players in the Malindi district health system and a review of key policy documents and national guidelines show that the priority setting process in the district relies heavily on guidelines from the national level, making it more of a vertical, top-down orientation. Multilateral and donor agencies......, national government, budgetary requirements, traditions and local culture influence the process. The four conditions of A4R are present within the priority setting process, albeit to varying degrees and referred to by different terms. There exists an opportunity for A4R to provide a guiding approach within...

  19. Study on healthcare magnetic concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yushan; DONG Faqin; FENG Jianjun

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic concrete was prepared by adding SrFe12O9 magnetic functional elementary material into concrete, and its magnetism was charged by magnetizing machine. The effect of SrFe12O9 content on magnetic field intensity and the attenuation of magnetic field intensity were investigated in different medium. The blood viscosity of rats kept in magnetic concrete was carried out. The results show that magnetic concrete can be prepared by adding SrFe12O9, and magnetic fields intensity increases with the augment of ferrite content. The attenuation of magnetic fields is mainly related with the density of medium, but it is secondary to the properties of medium. The blood viscosity of rats decreases under magnetic condition, but the blood cells remain the same as before. Experimental results support that magnetic concrete has great healthcare function.

  20. Understanding bullying in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Belinda

    2015-12-01

    Bullying is a pervasive problem in healthcare organisations. Inquiries and reports on patient care and poor practice in the NHS have emphasised the substantial negative effects this behaviour may have on patient care. If bullying is to be addressed, it is crucial we develop clarity about what behaviours constitute bullying and how these behaviours differ from other negative behaviours in the workplace. It is important that we recognise the extent of the problem; statistics on the prevalence of bullying are likely to be an underestimate because of under-reporting of bullying. Effective interventions may only be designed and implemented if there is knowledge about what precipitates bullying and the magnitude of the changes required in organisations to tackle bullying. Individuals should also be aware of the options that are available to them should they be the target of bullying behaviour and what they should do if they witness bullying in their workplace. PMID:26639294

  1. Imagined Potentialities of Healthcare Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on health care technologies and initiatives, particularly, Electronic Health Records (EHRs). These technologies are ascribed various potentialities, attributing them the capacity to do a wide range of things, from improving efficiency to saving medical costs and even saving......, and actions taken toward, these technologies. To better understand the material and discursive processes that are at play in shaping our present and future understanding of EHR technologies, the paper offers the analytical notion of imagined potentialities, whereby a technology is imagined to possess...... into existence, to produce growth, development, etc. The adjective imagined is added to convey the resources of imagination that are at play in shaping futures of healthcare technologies. These are derived from the world as it is but also as it is imagined to be. I argue that imagined potentialities can re...

  2. Integration of mental healthcare into primary healthcare in Lagos, Nigeria: the way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele O. Coker

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Lagos State Ministry of Health recently launched its Mental Health Policy aimed at addressing the mental health needs the residents of the State. The policy also aimed at reducing the mental disorders treatment gap in the state by integrating mental healthcare into the primary healthcare in order to make mental healthcare services closer and accessible for residents of the State. This paper therefore critically reviews the rationale for the integration, magnitude of problems in Lagos State with regards to mental healthcare services, available resources, challenges in providing mental healthcare services, recommendations for successful integration, the necessary advocacy needed to implement the integration and benefits of the integration.

  3. Measuring women's perceived ability to overcome barriers to healthcare seeking in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikiema Béatrice

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, women must overcome numerous barriers when they need modern healthcare. Respect of gender norms within the household and the community may still influence women's ability to obtain care. A lack of gender-sensitive instruments for measuring women's ability to overcome barriers compromises attempts to adequately quantify the burden and risk of exclusion they face when seeking modern healthcare. The aim of this study was to create and validate a synthetic measure of women's access to healthcare from a publicly available and possibly internationally comparable population-based survey. Method Seven questionnaire items from the Burkina Faso 2003 DHS were combined to create the index. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to test the reliability of the index. Exploratory factor analyses (EFA and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA were applied to evaluate the factorial structure and construct validity of the index while taking into account the hierarchical structure of the data. Results The index has a Cronbach's alpha of 0.75, suggesting adequate reliability. In EFA, three correlated factors fitted the data best. In CFA, the construct of perceived ability to overcome barriers to healthcare seeking emerged as a second-order latent variable with three domains: socioeconomic barriers, geographical barriers and psychosocial barriers. Model fit indices support the index's global validity for women of reproductive age in Burkina Faso. Evidence for construct validity comes from the finding that women's index scores increase with household living standard. Conclusion The DHS items can be combined into a reliable and valid, gender-sensitive index quantifying reproductive-age women's perceived ability to overcome barriers to healthcare seeking in Burkina Faso. The index complies conceptually with the sector-cross-cutting capability approach and enables measuring directly the perceived access to healthcare. Therefore it

  4. [Cartography of healthcare for pregnant women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Raimunda Magalhães da; Costa, Milena Silva; Matsue, Regina Yoshie; Sousa, Girliani Silva de; Catrib, Ana Maria Fontenelle; Vieira, Luiza Jane Eyre de Souza

    2012-03-01

    This work uses cartography as a method for mapping the trajectory of primary healthcare provided to pregnant women. The scope of the study comprises 9 Basic Healthcare Units located in the city of Juazeiro do Norte in the State of Ceará. In all, fifteen women in the 37th to 39th week of pregnancy were selected. Interviews were conducted with these women during the period from January to June 2010. The cartographic findings were depicted in stages in the flowchart, which exposed lacunas in prenatal healthcare, such as the low number of oncotic cytology exams conducted and the lack of educational counseling. Nevertheless, in the interviews, a significant number of pregnant women expressed satisfaction with the prenatal care provided. The good relationships developed between the healthcare professionals and the pregnant women were the main reason that led them to continue the treatment. This fact reinforces the importance of dialogue between these two actors for the success of prenatal healthcare.

  5. Guest editorial. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Ge, Ri-Li; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Valerdi, Ricardo

    2012-07-01

    The use of integrated information systems for healthcare has been started more than a decade ago. In recent years, rapid advances in information integration methods have spurred tremendous growth in the use of integrated information systems in healthcare delivery. Various techniques have been used for probing such integrated systems. These techniques include service-oriented architecture (SOA), EAI, workflow management, grid computing, and others. Many applications require a combination of these techniques, which gives rise to the emergence of enterprise systems in healthcare. Development of the techniques originated from different disciplines has the potential to significantly improve the performance of enterprise systems in healthcare. This editorial paper briefly introduces the enterprise systems in the perspective of healthcare informatics. PMID:22760931

  6. Healthcare Data Analytics on the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit Bhattacharya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Meaningful analysis of voluminous health information has always been a challenge in most healthcare organizations. Accurate and timely information required by the management to lead a healthcare organization through the challenges found in the industry can be obtained using business intelligence (BI or business analytics tools. However, these require large capital investments to implement and support the large volumes of data that needs to be analyzed to identify trends. They also require enormous processing power which places pressure on the business resources in addition to the dynamic changes in the digital technology. This paper evaluates the various nuances of business analytics of healthcare hosted on the cloud computing environment. The paper explores BI being offered as Software as a Service (SaaS solution towards offering meaningful use of information for improving functions in healthcare enterprise. It also attempts to identify the challenges that healthcare enterprises face when making use of a BI SaaS solution.

  7. Statement of nuclear incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight incidents were reported. Three mothers (two at BNFL's Sellafield Reprocessing Plant and one at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories) had been contaminated and received more than the annual dose limit. At the Winfrith Atomic Energy Establishment, Cs124 and Cs137 had been washed off the outside of a flask onto the ground. At the BNFL Springfields works a discharge of a solution of natural uranium had occurred to the site foul drain. At the Drigg storage and disposal site a leak from a storage tank was reported. In the other three cases no radioactive release occurred. There was a loose coupling on a tiebar of a fuel stringer at Heysham-I reactor, water beneath a pipeline discharging from Harwell Laboratory was found not to be contaminated and at Dungeness-B a fuel assembly was dropped to the bottom of the reactor during refuelling. (UK)

  8. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  9. Cancer incidence in Italian contaminated sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Comba

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. The incidence of cancer among residents in sites contaminated by pollutants with a possible health impact is not adequately studied. In Italy, SENTIERI Project (Epidemiological study of residents in National Priority Contaminated Sites, NPCSs was implemented to study major health outcomes for residents in 44 NPCSs. METHODS. The Italian Association of Cancer Registries (AIRTUM records cancer incidence in 23 NPCSs. For each NPCSs, the incidence of all malignant cancers combined and 35 cancer sites (coded according to ICD-10, was analysed (1996-2005. The observed cases were compared to the expected based on age (5-year period,18 classes, gender, calendar period (1996-2000; 2001-2005, geographical area (North-Centre and Centre-South and cancer sites specific rates. Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIR with 90% Confidence Intervals were computed. RESULTS. In both genders an excess was observed for overall cancer incidence (9% in men and 7% in women as well as for specific cancer sites (colon and rectum, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, lung, skin melanoma, bladder and Non Hodgkin lymphoma. Deficits were observed for gastric cancer in both genders, chronic lymphoid leukemia (men, malignant thyroid neoplasms, corpus uteri and connective and soft-tissue tumours and sarcomas (women. DISCUSSION. This report is, to our knowledge, the first one on cancer risk of residents in NPCSs. The study, although not aiming to estimate the cancer burden attributable to the environment as compared to occupation or life-style, supports the credibility of an etiologic role of environmental exposures in contaminated sites. Ongoing analyses focus on the interpretation of risk factors for excesses of specific cancer types overall and in specific NPCSs in relation to the presence of carcinogenic pollutants.

  10. Healthcare Data Gateways: Found Healthcare Intelligence on Blockchain with Novel Privacy Risk Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiao; Wang, Huiju; Jin, Dawei; Li, Mingqiang; Jiang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Healthcare data are a valuable source of healthcare intelligence. Sharing of healthcare data is one essential step to make healthcare system smarter and improve the quality of healthcare service. Healthcare data, one personal asset of patient, should be owned and controlled by patient, instead of being scattered in different healthcare systems, which prevents data sharing and puts patient privacy at risks. Blockchain is demonstrated in the financial field that trusted, auditable computing is possible using a decentralized network of peers accompanied by a public ledger. In this paper, we proposed an App (called Healthcare Data Gateway (HGD)) architecture based on blockchain to enable patient to own, control and share their own data easily and securely without violating privacy, which provides a new potential way to improve the intelligence of healthcare systems while keeping patient data private. Our proposed purpose-centric access model ensures patient own and control their healthcare data; simple unified Indicator-Centric Schema (ICS) makes it possible to organize all kinds of personal healthcare data practically and easily. We also point out that MPC (Secure Multi-Party Computing) is one promising solution to enable untrusted third-party to conduct computation over patient data without violating privacy. PMID:27565509

  11. Health insurance coverage, income distribution and healthcare quality in local healthcare markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damianov, Damian S; Pagán, José A

    2013-08-01

    We develop a theoretical model of a local healthcare system in which consumers, health insurance companies, and healthcare providers interact with each other in markets for health insurance and healthcare services. When income and health status are heterogeneous, and healthcare quality is associated with fixed costs, the market equilibrium level of healthcare quality will be underprovided. Thus, healthcare reform provisions and proposals to cover the uninsured can be interpreted as an attempt to correct this market failure. We illustrate with a numerical example that if consumers at the local level clearly understand the linkages between health insurance coverage and the quality of local healthcare services, health insurance coverage proposals are more likely to enjoy public support.

  12. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management: Experiences from the Danish healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    The ideas and principles from lean management are now widely being adopted within the healthcare sector. The analysis in this paper shows that organizations within healthcare most often only implement a limited set of tools and methods from the lean tool-box. Departing from a theoretical analysis...... of the well-known and universal lean management principles in the context of the healthcare this paper will attempt to formulate and test four hypotheses about possible barriers to the successful implementation of lean management in healthcare. The first hypothesis states that lean management in healthcare...... still is in its infancy and it is just a matter of letting sufficient time pass in order have a successful implementation of lean in all areas of healthcare. The second hypothesis states that a major barrier to lean management in healthcare simply is lacking understanding of the lean concepts leading...

  13. 76 FR 29756 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for..., Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, NCEZID, CDC, l600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop A-07,...

  14. 78 FR 62636 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... surveillance of healthcare associated infections (HAI) and antimicrobial resistance, and developing a process... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Healthcare Quality Promotion, the Director, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious...

  15. 75 FR 63844 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... healthcare infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in...

  16. The social and economic burden of stroke survivors in Italy: a prospective, incidence-based, multi-centre cost of illness study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattore Giovanni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to estimate the one-year societal costs due to a stroke event in Italy and to investigate variables associated with costs in different phases following hospital admission. Methods The patients were enrolled in 44 hospitals across the country and data on socio-demographic, clinical variables and resource consumption were prospectively surveyed for 411 stroke survivors at admission, discharge and 3, 6 and 12 months post the event. We adopted a micro-costing procedure to identify cost generating components and the attribution of appropriate unit costs for three cost categories: direct healthcare, direct non-healthcare (including informal care costs and productivity losses. The relation between costs of stroke management and socio-demographic and clinical characteristics as well as disability levels was evaluated in a series of bivariate analyses using non parametric tests (Mann Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to determine predictors of costs incurred by stroke patients during the acute phase and follow-up of 1 year. Results On average, one-year healthcare and societal costs amounted to €11,747 and € 19,953 per stroke survivor, respectively. The major cost component of societal costs was informal care accounting for € 6,656 (33.4% of total, followed by the initial hospitalisation, (€ 5,573; 27.9% of total, rehabilitation during follow up (€ 4,112; 20.6 %, readmissions (€ 439 and specialist and general practioner visits (€ 326. Mean drug costs per patient over the follow-up period was about € 50 per month. Costs associated to the provision of paid and informal care followed different pattern and were persistent over time (ranging from € 639 to € 597 per month in the first and the second part of the year, respectively. Clinical variables (presence of diabetes mellitus and hemorrhagic stroke were significant predictors of total healthcare

  17. Use of healthcare services in the region of origin among patients with an immigrant background in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lokdam, Nicoline; Kristiansen, Maria; Handlos, Line Neerup;

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Denmark, immigrants have been found to have a higher use of healthcare services abroad. Since this use may have an impact on both the individual patient and the healthcare system in the country of residence, research into underlying reasons is of increasing relevance. This study...... therefore investigates what motives patients with an immigrant background have for seeking healthcare services in their region of origin. Methods: The study was based on 10 semi-structured interviews with 10 patients who had an immigrant background, primarily originating from Turkey and the Middle East......, recruited at a clinic of immigrant medicine in Denmark. The interviews were analysed thematically to elucidate motives for seeking healthcare services abroad, with focus on identifying push and pull factors. Results: Four motives for seeking healthcare in the region of origin were salient in the material...

  18. In vivo biofilm formation on stainless steel bonded retainers during different oral health-care regimens

    OpenAIRE

    Jongsma, Marije A.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Atema-Smit, Jelly; Busscher, Henk J.; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Retention wires permanently bonded to the anterior teeth are used after orthodontic treatment to prevent the teeth from relapsing to pre-treatment positions. A disadvantage of bonded retainers is biofilm accumulation on the wires, which produces a higher incidence of gingival recession, increased pocket depth and bleeding on probing. This study compares in vivo biofilm formation on single-strand and multi-strand retention wires with different oral health-care regimens. Two-centimetre wires we...

  19. Healthcare utilization and cost of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis management in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    P Dilokthornsakul; R Sawangjit; C Inprasong; S Chunhasewee; P Rattanapan; T Thoopputra; N Chaiyakunapruk

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) are life-threatening dermatologic conditions. Although, the incidence of SJS/TEN in Thailand is high, information on cost of care for SJS/TEN is limited. This study aims to estimate healthcare resource utilization and cost of SJS/TEN in Thailand, using hospital perspective. Methods: A retrospective study using an electronic health database from a university-affiliated hospital in Thailand was undertaken. Patients ...

  20. Healthcare professionals' self-reported experiences and preferences related to direct healthcare professional communications : a survey conducted in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piening, S.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.; de Graeff, P.A.; Straus, S.M.; Mol, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Europe, Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs) are important tools to inform healthcare professionals of serious, new drug safety issues. However, this tool has not always been successful in effectively communicating the desired actions to healthcare professionals. Obje

  1. Healthcare Professionals' Self-Reported Experiences and Preferences Related to Direct Healthcare Professional Communications A Survey Conducted in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piening, Sigrid; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Graeff, Pieter A.; Straus, Sabine M. J. M.; Mol, Peter G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Europe, Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs) are important tools to inform healthcare professionals of serious, new drug safety issues. However, this tool has not always been successful in effectively communicating the desired actions to healthcare professionals. Obje

  2. Monitoring: the eyes and ears of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donabedian, A

    1988-11-01

    Society and the healthcare profession are bound by a contract, sealed with the healthcare practitioner's obligation to competence, integrity, and humaneness. Society confers privileges on the practitioner, who, in turn, accepts the obligations that society also imposes. Nevertheless, repeated assessments under all sorts of conditions have revealed unexpected, often serious defects in the quality of healthcare. The quality of healthcare depends on the performance of practitioners in a healthcare system--how much and how they improve health. The means used should be socially legitimate, acceptable to patients, and economically efficient. Some key elements and considerations in the performance of a healthcare system include patient care, population care, patient access to the system, outcomes, patient satisfaction, and the nature of the patient-practitioner encounter. Not knowing how to assess technical care, patients judge quality mainly by the attributes of the interpersonal relationship with practitioners--personal interest, empathy, responsiveness, and trust--and by whether the outcomes of care meet their expectations. Some requirements for maintaining and enhancing quality include values, human and material resources, knowledge, system design, and performance monitoring. Without a commitment to quality, healthcare practitioners betray not only those who trust them, but also themselves. PMID:10290847

  3. Knowledge Discovery from Massive Healthcare Claims Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Schryver, Jack C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The role of big data in addressing the needs of the present healthcare system in US and rest of the world has been echoed by government, private, and academic sectors. There has been a growing emphasis to explore the promise of big data analytics in tapping the potential of the massive healthcare data emanating from private and government health insurance providers. While the domain implications of such collaboration are well known, this type of data has been explored to a limited extent in the data mining community. The objective of this paper is two fold: first, we introduce the emerging domain of big"healthcare claims data to the KDD community, and second, we describe the success and challenges that we encountered in analyzing this data using state of art analytics for massive data. Specically, we translate the problem of analyzing healthcare data into some of the most well-known analysis problems in the data mining community, social network analysis, text mining, and temporal analysis and higher order feature construction, and describe how advances within each of these areas can be leveraged to understand the domain of healthcare. Each case study illustrates a unique intersection of data mining and healthcare with a common objective of improving the cost-care ratio by mining for opportunities to improve healthcare operations and reducing hat seems to fall under fraud, waste,and abuse.

  4. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2013-09-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the model of healthcare professional performance. Focused reviews on job stress and burnout, workload, interruptions, patient-centered care, health IT and medical devices, violations, and care coordination provide examples of macroergonomics contributions to healthcare quality and patient safety. Healthcare systems and processes clearly need to be systematically redesigned; examples of macroergonomic approaches, principles and methods for healthcare system redesign are described. Further research linking macroergonomics and care processes/patient outcomes is needed. Other needs for macroergonomics research are highlighted, including understanding the link between worker outcomes (e.g., safety and well-being) and patient outcomes (e.g., patient safety), and macroergonomics of patient-centered care and care coordination. PMID:24729777

  5. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  6. Board Governance: Transformational Approaches Under Healthcare Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastocki, Deborah K

    2015-01-01

    Previous successes of healthcare organizations and effective governance practices in the pre-reform environment are not predictive of future success. Healthcare has been through numerous phases of growth and development using tried-and-true strategies. The challenge is that our toolbox does not contain what is needed to build the future healthcare delivery systems required in the post-reform world. Healthcare has had a parochial focus at the local level, with some broadening of horizons at the state and national levels. But healthcare delivery is now a global issue that requires a totally different perspective, and many countries are confronting similar issues. US healthcare reform initiatives have far-reaching implications. Compounding the reform dynamics are the simultaneously occurring, gamechanging accelerants such as enabling information technologies and mobile health, new providers of healthcare, increased consumer demands, and limited healthcare dollars, to name a few. Operating in this turbulent environment requires transformational board, executive, and physician leadership because traditional ways of planning for incremental change and attempting to time those adjustments can prove disastrous. Creating the legacy healthcare system for tomorrow requires governing boards and executive leadership to act today as they would in the desired future system. Boards need to create a culture that fosters.innovation with a tolerance for risk and some failure. To provide effective governance, boards must essentially develop new skills, expertise, and ways of thinking. The rapid rate of change requires board members to possess certain capabilities, including the ability to deal with ambiguity and uncertainty while demonstrating flexibility and adaptability, all with a driving commitment to metrics and results. This requires development plans for both individual members and the overall board. In short, the board needs to function differently, particularly regarding the

  7. Attitude toward the Patient Safety Culture in healthcare systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoon Laal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient Safety Culture (PSC involves a harmonious pattern of individual and organization behaviors based on common beliefs and values. This study aimed to evaluate the attitude of healthcare providers toward PSC in the hospitals and clinics of Zabol city, Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. Sample population consisted of the physicians, nurses, and paraclinical staff (radiologists and laboratory experts engaged in different healthcare centers of Zabol city, Iran. Data were collected using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC questionnaire. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.22 at the significance level of 0.05. Results: In total, 231 healthcare practitioners were enrolled in this study. Participants were divided into three groups of physicians, nurses, and paraclinical staff (n=77, 33.33%. Mean of age and clinical experience was 29.94 and 6.23 years, respectively. Among the main aspects of PSC, “general understanding of patient safety” had the highest mean score (13.53, and the lowest mean score was achieved in “non-punitive response to error” (8.89. In the aspect of “manager expectations and actions promoting safety”, a significant difference was observed in the mean scores of the study groups (P=0.030. Moreover, our results showed a significant difference between the mean scores of physicians and nurses in the aspect of “openness and honesty in communication” (P=0.023. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, improvement of PSC is necessary for the efficient management of hospitals and clinics. This is attainable through collaborative and instructive workshops, developing educational programs, and designing incident reporting systems.

  8. Retrenchment strategies and tactics for healthcare executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, H J; Smith, H L

    1985-01-01

    Retrenchment is a problem confronting many public, private, and voluntary healthcare organizations. With budgetary restrictions in the public sector and the shift toward prospective payment systems and diagnosis-related reimbursement by third-party payors, healthcare executives must address several dilemmas and choices. Yet, retrenchment should not necessarily be viewed as a problem with limited alternatives. It may represent a time for capitalizing on opportunities and for creating innovation within healthcare institutions. Indeed, innovation may represent the only means for survival. This article evaluates the management strategies that transform retrenchment from a problem into an opportunity.

  9. E-Healthcare Supported by Big Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianqi Liu; Jiafu Wan; Shenghua He; Yanlin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The era of open information in healthcare has arrived. E-healthcare supported by big data supports the move toward greater trans-parency in healthcare by making decades of stored health data searchable and usable. This paper gives an overview the e-health-care architecture. We discuss the four layers of the architecture-data collection, data transport, data storage, and data analysis-as well as the challenges of data security, data privacy, real-time delivery, and open standard interface. We discuss the necessity of establishing an impeccably secure access mechanism and of enacting strong laws to protect patient privacy.

  10. Healthcare economics for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, Douglas A; Krubert, Christopher; Sasson, Andres

    2003-01-01

    Although the principles of healthcare economics are not usually part of the fundamental education of emergency physicians, an understanding of these elements will enhance our ability to contribute to improved health-care value. This article introduces the practical aspects of microeconomics, insurance, the supply-and-demand relationship, competition, and costs as they affect the practice of medicine on a daily basis. Being cognizant of how these elements create a dynamic interplay in the health-care industry will allow physicians to better understand the expanded role they need to assume in the ongoing cost and quality debate. PMID:12563583

  11. Innovation in healthcare: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberg, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Innovation is a frequently used buzzword in healthcare. This article will clarify innovation as a process requiring leadership, among other factors, in order to occur. The concept of innovation will be defined, as well as the precedents and consequences. This exploration will serve as the definition of healthcare innovation and provide a clearer definition for future literature and research in healthcare, especially related to leadership and change. It is the purpose for this article to allow the reader to think about innovation in a critical manner and begin to add substantive meaning related to it.

  12. Technology and the future of healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Thimbleby

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare changes dramatically because of technological developments, from anesthetics and antibiotics to magnetic resonance imaging scanners and radiotherapy. Future technological innovation is going to keep transforming healthcare, yet while technologies (new drugs and treatments, new devices, new social media support for healthcare, etc will drive innovation, human factors will remain one of the stable limitations of breakthroughs. No predictions can satisfy everybody; instead, this article explores fragments of the future to see how to think more clearly about how to get where we want to go.

  13. Modeling veterans healthcare administration disclosure processes : CY 2012 summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyeler, Walter Eugene; DeMenno, Mercy B.; Finley, Patrick D.

    2013-09-01

    As with other large healthcare organizations, medical adverse events at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities can expose patients to unforeseen negative risks. VHA leadership recognizes that properly handled disclosure of adverse events can minimize potential harm to patients and negative consequences for the effective functioning of the organization. The work documented here seeks to help improve the disclosure process by situating it within the broader theoretical framework of issues management, and to identify opportunities for process improvement through modeling disclosure and reactions to disclosure. The computational model will allow a variety of disclosure actions to be tested across a range of incident scenarios. Our conceptual model will be refined in collaboration with domain experts, especially by continuing to draw on insights from VA Study of the Communication of Adverse Large-Scale Events (SCALE) project researchers.

  14. Structure, process or outcome: which contributes most to patients' overall assessment of healthcare quality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Boer, D. de

    2011-01-01

    Research questions: The paper explores which type of quality aspects (structure, process, outcome) most strongly determines patients' overall assessment of healthcare, and whether there is a variation between different types of patient groups in this respect. Methods: Secondary analyses were underta

  15. Dependency, trust and choice? Examining agency and 'forced options' within secondary-healthcare contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.R. Brown; S.B. Meyer

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to extend understandings of the ways in which trust is integral to analysing ‘choice’ within healthcare contexts, while also reappraising choice and its salience for grasping the nature of trust. Interrogating processes of ‘choosing to trust’, the authors describe various mechanis

  16. [Healthcare-Associated Infection Control with Awareness of Patient Safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    In order to provide safe and secure medical care for patients, health care-associated infections (HAI) must not occur. HAI should be considered as incidents, and countermeasures should be viewed as a patient safety management itself. Healthcare-associated infection control (HAIC) is practiced by the infection control team (ICT), which is based on multidisciplinary cooperation. Team members have to recognize that it is the most important to make use of the expertise of each discipline. In addition, all members must try to respond quickly, to help the clinic staff. Visualized rapid information provision and sharing, environmental improvement, outbreak factor analysis, hand hygiene compliance rate improvement, proper antibiotic use (Antimicrobial Stewardship Program: ASP), and regional cooperation & leadership comprise the role of the ICT in the flagship hospital. Regarding this role, we present our hospital's efforts and the outcomes. In conclusion, for medical practice quality improvement, healthcare-associated infection control should be conducted thoroughly along with an awareness of patient safety. PMID:27363228

  17. Incidents/accidents classification and reporting in Statoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on requirements in the new petroleum regulations from Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) and the realisation of a need to improve and rationalise the routines for reporting and follow up of incidents, Statoil Exploration and Production Norway (Statoil E and P Norway) has formulated a new strategy and process for handling of incidents/accidents. The following past experiences serve as basis for the changes made to incident reporting in Statoil E and P Norway: - Too much resources were spent on a comprehensive handling and analysis of a vast amount of incidents with less importance for the safety level, taking the focus away from the more severe and important issues at hand. - The assessment of 'Risk Factor', i.e. the combination of recurrence frequency and consequence, was difficult to use. The high degree of subjectivity involved in the determination of the 'Risk Factor' (in particular the estimation of the recurrence frequency) resulted in poor data quality and lack of consistency in the data material. The new system for categorisation and handling of undesirable incidents was established in January 2002. The intention was to get a higher degree of focus on serious incidents (injuries, damages, loss and near misses), with a thorough handling and follow-up. This is reflected throughout the handling of the serious incidents, all the way from immediate notification of the incident, through investigation and follow-up of corrective and preventive actions. Simultaneously, it was also an objective to rationalise/simplify the handling of less serious incidents. These incidents are, however, subjected to analyses twice a year in order to utilize the learning opportunity that they also provide. A year after the introduction of this new system for categorisation and follow-up of undesirable incidents, Statoil's experiences are predominantly good: - The intention to get a higher degree of focus on serious incidents (injuries, damages, loss and near misses), has been

  18. Incidents/accidents classification and reporting in Statoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Rune; Holmboe, Rolf H

    2004-07-26

    Based on requirements in the new petroleum regulations from Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) and the realisation of a need to improve and rationalise the routines for reporting and follow up of incidents, Statoil Exploration & Production Norway (Statoil E&P Norway) has formulated a new strategy and process for handling of incidents/accidents. The following past experiences serve as basis for the changes made to incident reporting in Statoil E&P Norway; too much resources were spent on a comprehensive handling and analysis of a vast amount of incidents with less importance for the safety level, taking the focus away from the more severe and important issues at hand, the assessment of "Risk Factor", i.e. the combination of recurrence frequency and consequence, was difficult to use. The high degree of subjectivity involved in the determination of the "Risk Factor" (in particular the estimation of the recurrence frequency) resulted in poor data quality and lack of consistency in the data material. The new system for categorisation and handling of undesirable incidents was established in January 2002. The intention was to get a higher degree of focus on serious incidents (injuries, damages, loss and near misses), with a thorough handling and follow-up. This is reflected throughout the handling of the serious incidents, all the way from immediate notification of the incident, through investigation and follow-up of corrective and preventive actions. Simultaneously, it was also an objective to rationalise/simplify the handling of less serious incidents. These incidents are, however, subjected to analyses twice a year in order to utilize the learning opportunity that they also provide. A year after the introduction of this new system for categorisation and follow-up of undesirable incidents, Statoil's experiences are predominantly good; the intention to get a higher degree of focus on serious incidents (injuries, damages, loss and near misses), has been met, the data

  19. Championship management for healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J R

    2000-01-01

    Stakeholders will put increasing pressure on integrated health systems (IHS) for measured performance, demanding data on quality and patient satisfaction, while simultaneously pressing for lower cost. The changes to Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (Joint Commission) and the growing importance of the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) are simply forerunners of an intensifying trend. Quality of care in particular will face increasing scrutiny. Achieving competitive targets in these areas will also require measures addressing demand and worker satisfaction. "Balanced scorecard" approaches will allow IHS and their accountable work groups to track performance on several dimensions and establish integrated goals or targets. Those with consistently good scores will be labeled "champions." Champions will support the multidimensional measures with improved decision processes. About eight major processes will be central--governance/strategic management, clinical quality, clinical organization, financial planning, planning and marketing, information services, human resources, and plant services. It is possible to map these processes to the criteria of the Joint Commission, NCQA, and Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award. The processes themselves can be measured and common weaknesses identified and corrected. Champions share some common characteristics that seem to arise from the combination of processes and measures. Among these characteristics are service line orientation, extensive partnering with other organizations, and the possibility of outsourcing organizational components.

  20. Championship management for healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J R

    2000-01-01

    Stakeholders will put increasing pressure on integrated health systems (IHS) for measured performance, demanding data on quality and patient satisfaction, while simultaneously pressing for lower cost. The changes to Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (Joint Commission) and the growing importance of the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) are simply forerunners of an intensifying trend. Quality of care in particular will face increasing scrutiny. Achieving competitive targets in these areas will also require measures addressing demand and worker satisfaction. "Balanced scorecard" approaches will allow IHS and their accountable work groups to track performance on several dimensions and establish integrated goals or targets. Those with consistently good scores will be labeled "champions." Champions will support the multidimensional measures with improved decision processes. About eight major processes will be central--governance/strategic management, clinical quality, clinical organization, financial planning, planning and marketing, information services, human resources, and plant services. It is possible to map these processes to the criteria of the Joint Commission, NCQA, and Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award. The processes themselves can be measured and common weaknesses identified and corrected. Champions share some common characteristics that seem to arise from the combination of processes and measures. Among these characteristics are service line orientation, extensive partnering with other organizations, and the possibility of outsourcing organizational components. PMID:11066948

  1. A household panel as a tool for cost-effective health-related population surveys: validity of the "Healthcare Access Panel"

    OpenAIRE

    Potthoff, Peter; Heinemann, Lothar A. J.; Güther, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    Background: Random sample surveys of the population are time consuming and expensive, particularly if international sampling is planned. Method: The Healthcare Access Panel was developed as an alternative to face to face or telephone health survey interviews to estimate prevalence or even incidence rates of health-relevant variables in the population. It is the objective of this paper to demonstrate the validity of health-related data obtained with the Healthcare Access Panel compared with re...

  2. Cost-effective mammography screening in Korea. High incidence of breast cancer in young women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidemiological characteristics of breast cancer in Korean women are different from the characteristics reported in Western women. The highest incidence rate occurs in Korean women in their 40s. The purpose of this study was to determine the most cost-effective screening interval and target age range for Korean women from the perspective of the national healthcare system. A stochastic model was used to simulate breast cancer screenings by varying both the screening intervals and the age ranges. The effectiveness of mammography screening was defined as the probability of detecting breast cancer in the preclinical state and the cost was based on the direct cost of mammography screening and the confirmative tests. The age-specific mean sojourn times and the sensitivity of the mammography were applied in the stochastic model. An optimal cost-effectiveness was determined by the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio and lifetime schedule sensitivity. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess parameter uncertainty. The selected cost-effective strategies were: the current biennial mammography screenings for women who are at least 40 years old; biennial screening for women between the ages of 35 and 75 years; and a combination strategy consisting of biennial screening for women aged between 45 and 54 years, and 3-year interval screening for women aged between 40 and 44 years and 55 and 65 years. Further studies should follow to investigate the effectiveness of mammography screening in women younger than 40 years in Asia as well as in Korea. (author)

  3. Incidence of multiple myeloma in Nagasaki City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to observe the incidence of multiple myeloma in the population of Nagasaki City from 1973 to 1982, and to assess any influence caused by A-bomb exposure, 85 cases of myeloma have been collected and analysed. Informatively, 48 cases of this number were A-bomb survivors. Among the middle-aged cases, the crude incidence rates of myeloma in the exposed group were found to be higher than those in the non-exposed group. Further, the relative risk of myeloma was higher in A-bomb survivors and this tendency become more pronounced in the those who were within 2 km of the epicenter of the blast. The age-adjusted relative risk in male and female A-bomb survivors was 1.59 and 1.68 respectively, but no significant differences were noted. (author)

  4. Esophageal and gastric cancer incidence and mortality in alendronate users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Pazianas, Michael; Eiken, Pia Agnete;

    2012-01-01

    their esophageal or gastric location could be accurately distinguished. We conducted a register-based, open cohort study using national healthcare data for Denmark. Upper endoscopy frequency, cancer incidence and mortality was examined in 30,606 alendronate users (female, age 50¿+¿) and 122,424 matched controls......Recent studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the risk of esophageal cancer with oral bisphosphonates. Prior studies did not record the number of cancer deaths or endoscopy rates, which could be higher in bisphosphonate users and lead to more cancers being diagnosed at a stage when....... Primary outcomes were esophageal cancer incidence and death due to esophageal cancer. The analysis showed that alendronate users were more likely to have undergone recent upper endoscopy (4.1 vs 1.7%, p¿...

  5. The healthcare system and provision of oral healthcare in European Union member states. Part 4: Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaskinos, P; Koletsi-Kounari, H; Economou, C; Eaton, K A; Widström, E

    2016-03-11

    This paper presents a description of the healthcare system and how oral healthcare is organised and provided in Greece, a country in a deep economic and social crisis. The national health system is underfunded, with severe gaps in staffing levels and the country has a large private healthcare sector. Oral healthcare has been largely provided in the private sector. Most people are struggling to survive and have no money to spend on general and oral healthcare. Unemployment is rising and access to healthcare services is more difficult than ever. Additionally, there has been an overproduction of dentists and no development of team dentistry. This has led to under or unemployment of dentists in Greece and their migration to other European Union member states, such as the United Kingdom, where over 600 Greek dentists are currently working. PMID:26964601

  6. Preparedness for and response to a radiological or nuclear incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public health and medical planning for a nuclear or radiological incident requires a complex, multi-faceted systematic approach involving federal, state and local governments, private sector organizations, academia, industry, international partners and individual experts and volunteers. The approach developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in collaboration with other U.S. Departments is the result of efforts from government and non-government experts that connect the available capabilities, resources, guidance tools, underlying concepts and science into the Nuclear Incident Medical Enterprise (NlME). It is a systems approach that can be used to support planning for, response to, and recovery from the effects of a nuclear incident. Experience is gained in exercises specific to radiation but also from other mass casualty incidents as there are many principles and components in common. Resilience and the ability to mitigate the consequences of a nuclear incident are enhanced by effective planning, preparation and training, timely response, clear communication, and continuous improvements based on new science, technology, experience and ideas. Recognizing that preparation for a radiological or nuclear incident will be a lower priority for healthcare workers and responders due to other demands, the Radiation Emergency Medical Management website has been developed with the National Library of Medicine. This includes tools for education and training, just-in-time medical management and triage among others. Most of the components of NIME are published in the peer review medical and disaster medicine literature to help ensure high quality and accessibility. While NIME is a continuous work-in-progress, the current status of the public health and medical preparedness and response for a nuclear incident is presented. (author)

  7. The road to recovery: Egypt's healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Donald Robert; Bég, Sama A

    2012-01-01

    As many industrial and third-world countries recover from the severe economic crisis of a global recession, they continue to struggle with its negative effect on their healthcare systems. Healthcare reform has become a leading policy agenda item for most countries. This is especially true for countries in the developing world who are struggling to allocate very limited resources to meet the growing health needs of their residents and the expectations of global health. In the late 1990s, the Egyptian government, in conjunction with the United States Agency for International Development, initiated a Health Sector Reform Program (HSRP) to completely reform the way healthcare was financed, organized and delivered with the intent to extend healthcare coverage to all of its citizens. Although some successes have resulted from the HSRP, Egypt's new government leaders will need to be informed on policies that may more effectively improve the health of the Egyptian population. PMID:21638310

  8. Healthcare Quality and Disparities in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us at: https://info.ahrq.gov . Let us know the nature of the problem, the Web address of what you want, and your ... Go to Online Store Healthcare Quality and Disparities in Women Selected Findings From the ...

  9. The Rise of a European Healthcare Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare has only slowly appeared on the European Union’s (EU) policy agenda. EU involvement in policies concerning the organization, financing and the provision of diagnosis, care and cures to ill people developed along three fragmented tracks: (a) EU public health policies concerning the well...... are whether this fragmented EU involvement has now developed into a distinct European healthcare union, and if so what its driving forces have been. Thus, it explores how European integration in healthcare has moved forward despite widespread reluctance. It also examines the underexplored political dynamics...... and implementation of CJEU case law. The conclusion is that a fragile European healthcare union is emerging. A distinct area of EU health law has come into existence, whereas an institutional structure has given a voice to health expertise. A certain commonality in patients’ rights has also emerged. The EU...

  10. Environmental sustainability in European public healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Andrea; Vagnoni, Emidia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the debate concerning the influence of leadership on environmental sustainability implementation in European public healthcare organisations. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is a viewpoint. It is based on preliminary analysis of European standards dedicated to environmental sustainability and their spread across Europe in public healthcare organisations. Viewpoints concerning leadership are then discussed and asserted. Findings - This paper found a limited implementation of standards such as Green Public Procurement criteria, Eco-Management and Audit Scheme and ISO 14001 in public healthcare. Some clues indicate that the lack of implementation is related to leadership and management commitment. Originality/value - For the first time, this paper investigates relationships between leadership and environmental sustainability in European public healthcare opening further avenues of research on the subject. PMID:26764957

  11. Education for healthcare clinical support workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin; Kelly, Shona

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the current situation regarding the provision of education and training for healthcare clinical support workers (HCSWs). In the UK, there has been an increasing reliance on unqualified clinical support staff to provide a significant proportion of the direct patient care in all healthcare settings. HCSWs routinely undertake several nursing activities that were traditionally the responsibility of nursing students or junior staff nurses. There is a need for an urgent review of the training of healthcare support staff. A 'tick box' approach to training, with an emphasis on classroom-based or on-the-job learning, makes it difficult for HCSWs to integrate theory into practice, and supports a transactional approach to caring rather than a relational approach to caregiving. Lessons from the educational experiences of other healthcare groups should be applied to the training of HCSWs. An immersive, participatory teaching and learning strategy is one approach that could be used. PMID:26647705

  12. Leading ladies: women in healthcare leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Teri

    2012-01-01

    Women represent an overwhelming majority of the healthcare workforce, yet they are significantly underrepresented in leadership positions, particularly at the executive and board levels. However, women are uniquely positioned to leverage traits such as compassion, transparency, and the ability to foster teamwork to lead organizations into the next phase of contemporary healthcare delivery. In the future, the pace with which women gain access to the C-suite will accelerate as organizations embrace diversity and select the best qualified leaders in terms of both experience and leadership style that supports organizational culture. While the future for women in healthcare leadership looks bright, many women are currently struggling to reach the executive office, facing glass ceilings, competing priorities, and lack of access to support and guidance. In this article I discuss the role of women in healthcare leadership and offer practical suggestions on how women can reach the top echelon and achieve their goals and aspirations. PMID:22787907

  13. Co-constructing IT and Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tariq; Bansler, Jørgen; Bjørn, Pernille;

    The CITH project (Co-constructing IT and Healthcare) is an ongoing 4-year interdisciplinary research project, which investigates while intervenes in the collaborative practices involved in disease management of chronic heart patients with an ICD (Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator)....

  14. Evaluating CRM Implementation in Healthcare Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Anshari, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Recently, many healthcare organizations are adopting CRM as a strategy, which involves using technology to organize, automate, and coordinate business processes, in managing interactions with their patients. CRM with the Web technology provides healthcare providers the ability to broaden their services beyond usual practices, and thus offers suitable environment using latest technology to achieve superb patient care. This paper discusses and demonstrates how a new approach in CRM based on Web 2.0 will help the healthcare providers improving their customer support, avoiding conflict, and promoting better health to patient. With this new approach patients will benefit from the customized personal service with full information access to perform self managed their own health. It also helps healthcare providers retaining the right customer. A conceptual framework of the new approach will be discussed.

  15. Open Business Model Innovation in Healthcare Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Rasmussen, Ole Horn; Poulsen, Helle;

    2012-01-01

    from the European and US healthcare sectors. The paper focuses on the following research questions: • How can OBMI be defined? • How is OBMI used in the healthcare sector? The paper concludes by proposing a definition of open and close business models, and open and close business model innovations.......The Open Innovation and Open Business Model Innovation (OBMI) approach (Chesbrough 2005, 2008) has been one of the most discussed innovation frameworks in the 2000s, and probably one of the most important contributions to business model innovations (BMIs) since 2005. Managers in the healthcare...... sector responsible for innovations have also tried to adapt the OBMI approach as a tool among the numerous other innovation tools. The aim of the paper is to present an initial study of the implementation of the framework of OBMI in the European healthcare sector. The study is naturally inspired...

  16. Social Responsibility and Healthcare in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola-Launonen, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    This article examines current trends and prospects in Finnish healthcare literature and discussion. The Finnish healthcare system was long considered to manifest an equal, universal, and solidaristic welfare scheme. However, recent data reveals structural inequalities in access to healthcare that result in health differences among socioeconomic groups. The political will aims at tackling these inequalities, but the ideological trend toward responsibilization of the individual taking place across political spheres elsewhere in Europe creates potential challenges to this goal. The applications of this trend have a theoretical background in the responsibility-sensitive egalitarian-or luck egalitarian-tradition. The theory, which is unfit for real-life policy applications, has explicit appeal in considerations aiming at the responsibilization of the individual within the healthcare sector. It remains to be seen in which direction the Finnish welfare schemes will continue to develop.

  17. Social Responsibility and Healthcare in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola-Launonen, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    This article examines current trends and prospects in Finnish healthcare literature and discussion. The Finnish healthcare system was long considered to manifest an equal, universal, and solidaristic welfare scheme. However, recent data reveals structural inequalities in access to healthcare that result in health differences among socioeconomic groups. The political will aims at tackling these inequalities, but the ideological trend toward responsibilization of the individual taking place across political spheres elsewhere in Europe creates potential challenges to this goal. The applications of this trend have a theoretical background in the responsibility-sensitive egalitarian-or luck egalitarian-tradition. The theory, which is unfit for real-life policy applications, has explicit appeal in considerations aiming at the responsibilization of the individual within the healthcare sector. It remains to be seen in which direction the Finnish welfare schemes will continue to develop. PMID:27348829

  18. Environmental sustainability in European public healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Andrea; Vagnoni, Emidia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the debate concerning the influence of leadership on environmental sustainability implementation in European public healthcare organisations. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is a viewpoint. It is based on preliminary analysis of European standards dedicated to environmental sustainability and their spread across Europe in public healthcare organisations. Viewpoints concerning leadership are then discussed and asserted. Findings - This paper found a limited implementation of standards such as Green Public Procurement criteria, Eco-Management and Audit Scheme and ISO 14001 in public healthcare. Some clues indicate that the lack of implementation is related to leadership and management commitment. Originality/value - For the first time, this paper investigates relationships between leadership and environmental sustainability in European public healthcare opening further avenues of research on the subject.

  19. Structure, process or outcome: which contributes most to patients' overall assessment of healthcare quality?

    OpenAIRE

    Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Boer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Research questions: The paper explores which type of quality aspects (structure, process, outcome) most strongly determines patients' overall assessment of healthcare, and whether there is a variation between different types of patient groups in this respect. Methods: Secondary analyses were undertaken on survey data from patients who underwent hip or knee surgery, cataract surgery, patients suffering from varicose veins, spinal disc herniation or rheumatoid arthritis. In these analyses, the ...

  20. Screening for intimate partner violence in healthcare in Kano, Nigeria : Barriers and challenges for healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    John, Ime Akpan

    2010-01-01

    Background Though there has been increased advocacy for screening for Intimate partner violence (IPV) in healthcare over the past decades, data from developed country context suggest that only one in ten healthcare providers routinely screen for this phenomena suggesting barriers. Knowledge on the screening activity, with regard to IPV, and related barriers among healthcare providers in Sub-Saharan Africa is lacking. Aims The aim of this dissertation is to scrutinize ...

  1. Views of healthcare professionals to linkage of routinely collected healthcare data: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Hopf, Y.M.; Bond, C.; Francis, J.; Haughney, J; Helms, P J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on the views of healthcare professionals to the linkage of healthcare data and to identify any potential barriers and/or facilitators to participation in a data linkage system. Methods: Published papers describing the views of healthcare professionals (HCPs) to data sharing and linkage were identified by searches of Medline, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. The searches were limited to papers published in the English language from 2001 to 2011. ...

  2. Achieving compliance with healthcare waste management regulations : empirical evidence from small European healthcare units

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho, Anabela

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare units generate substantial amounts of hazardous or potentially hazardous wastes as by-products of their medical services. The inappropriate management of these wastes poses significant risks to people and the environment. In Portugal, as in other EU countries, the collection, storage, treatment and disposal of healthcare waste is regulated by law. Although legal provisions covering the safe management of healthcare waste date back to the 1990s, little is known about the compliance ...

  3. Integration of mental healthcare into primary healthcare in Lagos, Nigeria: the way forward

    OpenAIRE

    Ayodele O. Coker; Olufemi B. Olugbile; Olufemi Oluwatayo

    2015-01-01

    The Lagos State Ministry of Health recently launched its Mental Health Policy aimed at addressing the mental health needs the residents of the State. The policy also aimed at reducing the mental disorders treatment gap in the state by integrating mental healthcare into the primary healthcare in order to make mental healthcare services closer and accessible for residents of the State. This paper therefore critically reviews the rationale for the integration, magnitude of problems in Lagos Stat...

  4. Innovation for a Sustainable Healthcare: : How can patients improve their own healthcare?

    OpenAIRE

    Gabassi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    As the demographic pictures is changing across the Western world, healthcare costs are growing at unsustainable rates. In order to sustain the healthcare we’re used to in the Western world, new healthcare deliver strategies must be implemented. As the average person grows older, chronic diseases hit more people, requiring costly treatments for a growing part of the population. A successful approach could address the problem of medical adherence, together with increasing awareness among patien...

  5. Process Management Practices In Healthcare Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Şükrü Kılıç; Cumhur Aydınlı

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare institutions differ from other service businesses by their “matrix organizational structure” and “error-free output” requirement. However, the processes stay the same for all organizational activities at different levels. One of the post-modern management approach is to focus on basis of necessary processes and fundamental organizational changes. This case study aims to initially explain the characteristics of healthcare institutions and the ba...

  6. Wireless Sensor Networks for Healthcare Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dishongh, Terrance J; Kuris, Ben

    2009-01-01

    This unique reference focuses on methods of application, validation and testing based on real deployments of sensor networks in the clinical and home environments. Key topics include healthcare and wireless sensors, sensor network applications, designs of experiments using sensors, data collection and decision making, clinical deployment of wireless sensor networks, contextual awareness medication prompting field trials in homes, social health monitoring, and the future of wireless sensor networks in healthcare.

  7. Determinants of maternal healthcare utilization in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Zimbabwe and other developing countries struggle to achieve millennium development goals originally set for 2015. To assist health policy making, there was an investigation of how demographic, socioeconomic and cultural factors determine maternal healthcare services use in Zimbabwe. A logistic model for four different maternal healthcare services using data from the 2005/6 Zimbabwe Demographic Health Survey was estimated. Secondary education increases the odds of use of maternal health servic...

  8. Health-Care Reform for Childbirth

    OpenAIRE

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2010-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education discusses the current health-care crisis and the need for health-care reform to promote, support, and protect natural, safe, and healthy childbirth. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth.

  9. PRIMARY HEALTHCARE SERVICE QUALITY MEASUREMENT: SERVQUAL SCALE

    OpenAIRE

    Dijana Mečev; Ivana Kardum Goleš

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine customers’ perceptions of primary healthcare service quality in public institutions in the city of Šibenik. The research was aimed at investigating whether there is difference between customers` expectations and their satisfaction with received medical services. The findings suggest that primary healthcare public institutions need to improve all the dimensions of SERVQUAL service quality from the gap analysis carried out. Furthermore, the research analy...

  10. Business resilience: Reframing healthcare risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Cynthia L

    2015-09-01

    The responsibility of risk management in healthcare is fractured, with multiple stakeholders. Most hospitals and healthcare systems do not have a fully integrated risk management system that spans the entire organizational and operational structure for the delivery of key services. This article provides insight toward utilizing a comprehensive Business Resilience program and associated methodology to understand and manage organizational risk leading to organizational effectiveness and operational efficiencies, with the fringe benefit of realizing sustainable operational capability during adverse conditions. PMID:26418138

  11. Patient involvement and service innovation in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Engström, Jon

    2014-01-01

    This thesis adds to a stream of research suggesting that healthcare can be more patient centered and efficient by redefining the role of the patient from a passive receiver to a more active and collaborative participant. This may relate to healthcare provision (Anderson and Funnell, 2005; Berry and Bendapudi, 2007; Bitner and Brown, 2008; McColl-Kennedy et al., 2012; Nordgren, 2008) and innovation (Bate and Robert, 2006; Groene et al., 2009; Longtin et al., 2010). Through research initiative ...

  12. Wicked problems in designing healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2009-10-01

    The design process for new healthcare facilities presents many wicked problems for nurse leaders with a number of stakeholders, a myriad of opinions, and numerous options to consider. This bimonthly department expands nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enables them to lead in design efforts. In this article, the concept of wicked problems is explored with application to the healthcare design situation using examples of design decisions frequently challenging nurse leaders.

  13. Performance management in healthcare: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewko, Sarah J; Cummings, Greta G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying theoretical assumptions and implications of current micro-level performance management and evaluation (PME) practices, specifically within health-care organizations. PME encompasses all activities that are designed and conducted to align employee outputs with organizational goals. Design/methodology/approach - PME, in the context of healthcare, is analyzed through the lens of critical theory. Specifically, Habermas' theory of communicative action is used to highlight some of the questions that arise in looking critically at PME. To provide a richer definition of key theoretical concepts, the authors conducted a preliminary, exploratory hermeneutic semantic analysis of the key words "performance" and "management" and of the term "performance management". Findings - Analysis reveals that existing micro-level PME systems in health-care organizations have the potential to create a workforce that is compliant, dependent, technically oriented and passive, and to support health-care systems in which inequalities and power imbalances are perpetually reinforced. Practical implications - At a time when the health-care system is under increasing pressure to provide high-quality, affordable services with fewer resources, it may be wise to investigate new sector-specific ways of evaluating and managing performance. Originality/value - In this paper, written for health-care leaders and health human resource specialists, the theoretical assumptions and implications of current PME practices within health-care organizations are explored. It is hoped that readers will be inspired to support innovative PME practices within their organizations that encourage peak performance among health-care professionals. PMID:26764960

  14. HEALTHCARE QUALITY AND ITS EFFECTS ON GROWTH. A REGIONAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Iolanda VODA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our paper is to analyse the relation between the inequalities of the healthcare system and economic growth. With respect to methodology, we focus on the eight development regions of Romania which group counties with different development levels and complementary economies. By using descriptive and comparative analyses, we aim at highlighting the discrepancies of the Romanian system considering the following indicators: life expectancy at birth (years, standardised death rate, all causes of death per 100 000 inhabitants, infant mortality, physicians or doctors (per 100000 inhabitants, dentists (per 100000 inhabitants, number of nurses (per 100000 inhabitants, available beds in hospitals, number of hospitals available in the regions and family care units.

  15. Incidence of cancer in patients with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, Ann; Schou, Morten; Videbaek, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    -specific risk of cancer was analysed in an adjusted Poisson and Cox regression analysis. The 975 diagnoses of cancer in the HF cohort and 330 843 in the background population corresponded to incidence rates per 10 000 patient-years of 188.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 177.2-200.6] and 63.0 (95% CI 63.......0-63.4), respectively. When stratified by age, incidence rates were increased in all age groups in the HF cohort. Risk of any type of cancer was increased, with an incidence rate ratio of 1.24 (95% CI 1.15-1.33, c

  16. Depression and anxiety in Swedish primary health care: prevalence, incidence, and risk factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Lejtzén, Nadja; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina; Li, Xinjun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and incidence of mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and stress and adjustment disorders in primary health care in Sweden and to analyse the relationship between socioeconomic and demographic factors and incidence of these disorders. Prevalence and incidence data on the study population was retrieved from a Swedish primary health care database. A cohort study design was used to examine the incidence of, and risk factors for, mood disorders, ...

  17. True incidence of vestibular schwannoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Tos, Mirko; Thomsen, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging.......The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging....

  18. The development of a risk identification screening framework for healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Elizabeth; Kushniruk, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Health information systems are costly, especially when they are not used or when they impede workflow. Risk assessment is used to identify and remedy problem areas so that systems are safe. While there are discussions of design project risk management, for example, see McConnell [1], there is little information about screening the fit of a system with respect to its users, the task and the healthcare organization. Such analyses could be important in improving the fit of information systems in healthcare, thereby decreasing risk of system and project failure. A risk-screening framework for health informatics is presented. PMID:19380968

  19. Cardiovascular disease incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Agyemang, Charles; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe;

    2016-01-01

    Studies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and survival show varying results between different ethnic groups. Our aim was to add a new dimension by exploring the role of migrant status in combination with ethnic background on incidence of-and survival from-CVD and more specifically acute...... and differences in incidence were assessed by Poisson regression and stratified by sex. Survival differences were assessed by Cox regression using all-cause and cause-specific mortality as outcome. Male refugees had significantly lower incidence of CVD (RR = 0.89; 95 % CI 0.85-0.93) and stroke (IRR = 0.62; 95...... significantly lower incidence of CVD, AMI and stroke. All-cause and cause-specific survival after CVD, AMI and stroke was similar or significantly better for migrants compared to Danish-born, regardless of type of migrant (refugee vs. family-reunified) or country of origin. Refugees are disadvantaged in terms...

  20. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  1. Resources allocation in healthcare for cancer: a case study using generalised additive mixed models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Musio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to develop a method for helping resources re-allocation in healthcare linked to cancer, in order to replan the allocation of providers. Ageing of the population has a considerable impact on the use of health resources because aged people require more specialised medical care due notably to cancer. We propose a method useful to monitor changes of cancer incidence in space and time taking into account two age categories, according to healthcar general organisation. We use generalised additive mixed models with a Poisson response, according to the methodology presented in Wood, Generalised additive models: an introduction with R. Chapman and Hall/CRC, 2006. Besides one-dimensional smooth functions accounting for non-linear effects of covariates, the space-time interaction can be modelled using scale invariant smoothers. Incidence data collected by a general cancer registry between 1992 and 2007 in a specific area of France is studied. Our best model exhibits a strong increase of the incidence of cancer along time and an obvious spatial pattern for people more than 70 years with a higher incidence in the central band of the region. This is a strong argument for re-allocating resources for old people cancer care in this sub-region.

  2. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    OpenAIRE

    Naenna, Thanakorn; Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand...

  3. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    OpenAIRE

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. D...

  4. Engineering healthcare as a service system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, James M; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J

    2010-01-01

    Engineering has and will continue to have a critical impact on healthcare; the application of technology-based techniques to biological problems can be defined to be technobiology applications. This paper is primarily focused on applying the technobiology approach of systems engineering to the development of a healthcare service system that is both integrated and adaptive. In general, healthcare services are carried out with knowledge-intensive agents or components which work together as providers and consumers to create or co-produce value. Indeed, the engineering design of a healthcare system must recognize the fact that it is actually a complex integration of human-centered activities that is increasingly dependent on information technology and knowledge. Like any service system, healthcare can be considered to be a combination or recombination of three essential components - people (characterized by behaviors, values, knowledge, etc.), processes (characterized by collaboration, customization, etc.) and products (characterized by software, hardware, infrastructures, etc.). Thus, a healthcare system is an integrated and adaptive set of people, processes and products. It is, in essence, a system of systems which objectives are to enhance its efficiency (leading to greater interdependency) and effectiveness (leading to improved health). Integration occurs over the physical, temporal, organizational and functional dimensions, while adaptation occurs over the monitoring, feedback, cybernetic and learning dimensions. In sum, such service systems as healthcare are indeed complex, especially due to the uncertainties associated with the human-centered aspects of these systems. Moreover, the system complexities can only be dealt with methods that enhance system integration and adaptation. PMID:20543250

  5. Healthcare practitioners' personal and professional values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-05-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them into a single framework using Schwartz's values model. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ERIC databases for articles on personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners and students. We extracted values from included papers and synthesized them into a single framework using Schwartz's values model. We summarised the framework within the context of healthcare practice. We identified 128 values from 50 included articles from doctors, nurses and allied health professionals. A new framework for the identified values established the following broad healthcare practitioner values, corresponding to Schwartz values (in parentheses): authority (power); capability (achievement); pleasure (hedonism); intellectual stimulation (stimulation); critical-thinking (self-direction); equality (universalism); altruism (benevolence); morality (tradition); professionalism (conformity); safety (security) and spirituality (spirituality). The most prominent values identified were altruism, equality and capability. This review identified a comprehensive set of personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners. We integrated these into a single framework derived from Schwartz's values model. This framework can be used to assess personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners across professional groups, and can help improve practitioners' awareness of their values so they can negotiate more patient-centred decisions. A common values framework across professional groups can support shared education strategies on values and help improve interprofessional teamwork and decision-making. PMID:26215664

  6. The financial crisis in Italy: implications for the healthcare sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belvis, Antonio Giulio; Ferrè, Francesca; Specchia, Maria Lucia; Valerio, Luca; Fattore, Giovanni; Ricciardi, Walter

    2012-06-01

    The global economic and financial crisis is having and impact on the Italian healthcare system which is undergoing a devolution process from the central government to regions and where about one third of the regional governments (mainly in the central and southern part of the country) are facing large financial deficits. The paper briefly describes the current macro scenario and the main responses taken to face the crisis and highlights the downside risks of introducing "linear" cuts in the allocation of resources. While justified by the risk of a national debt default, present fiscal policies might increase inequalities in access to care, deteriorate overall health indicators and population wellbeing, and sharpen existing difference in the quality of care between regions. Preliminary evidence shows that the crisis is affecting the quality of nutrition and the incidence of psychiatric disorders. During this difficult financial situation Italy is also facing the risk of a major reduction in investments for preventive medicine, Evidence Based Medicine infrastructures, health information systems and physical capital renewal. This cost-cutting strategy may have negative long term consequences Also, important achievement in terms of limiting waiting lists, improving continuity of care and patients' centeredness, and promoting integration between social and health care may be negatively affected by unprecedented resources' cuts. It is essential that in such a period of public funding constraints health authorities monitor incidence of diseases and access to care of the most vulnerable groups and specifically target interventions to those who may be disproportionally hit by the crisis. PMID:22551787

  7. The financial crisis in Italy: implications for the healthcare sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belvis, Antonio Giulio; Ferrè, Francesca; Specchia, Maria Lucia; Valerio, Luca; Fattore, Giovanni; Ricciardi, Walter

    2012-06-01

    The global economic and financial crisis is having and impact on the Italian healthcare system which is undergoing a devolution process from the central government to regions and where about one third of the regional governments (mainly in the central and southern part of the country) are facing large financial deficits. The paper briefly describes the current macro scenario and the main responses taken to face the crisis and highlights the downside risks of introducing "linear" cuts in the allocation of resources. While justified by the risk of a national debt default, present fiscal policies might increase inequalities in access to care, deteriorate overall health indicators and population wellbeing, and sharpen existing difference in the quality of care between regions. Preliminary evidence shows that the crisis is affecting the quality of nutrition and the incidence of psychiatric disorders. During this difficult financial situation Italy is also facing the risk of a major reduction in investments for preventive medicine, Evidence Based Medicine infrastructures, health information systems and physical capital renewal. This cost-cutting strategy may have negative long term consequences Also, important achievement in terms of limiting waiting lists, improving continuity of care and patients' centeredness, and promoting integration between social and health care may be negatively affected by unprecedented resources' cuts. It is essential that in such a period of public funding constraints health authorities monitor incidence of diseases and access to care of the most vulnerable groups and specifically target interventions to those who may be disproportionally hit by the crisis.

  8. Healthcare @ the speed of thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, J D

    1999-05-01

    opportunity to play a leadership role. A number of the sites reviewed for this article, for example, offer the patient the ability to develop his or her own health record and maintain it on the web. It is not conceivable that a healthcare system, along with its affiliated physician, might develop a secure web site that included a combined inpatient and outpatient rcord, accessible electronically by patients and authorized providers from any telephone in the world. It is clear that armed with Internet data, consumers will play an increasingly important role in their own care. Employers are acquiescing to their demands for increasing choice. Copayments are also going up and employees are likely to vote with their feet in selecting providers. Companies like WebMd, Physicians Online, Planetrx.com, drugstore.com, Yahoo and the other mentioned above are filling a need. It should be a wakeup call for healthcare systems and physicians. According to the latest data from Medimetrix, (see medimetrix.com), the most frequently visited health sites on the web today are Intelihealth.com (Johns Hopkins), Mayohealth.org, and OnHealth.com. These sites provide a highly interactive experience for consumers and tons of news and information. They are compelling and traffic-building, have fresh news that is frequently updated and many are transaction. That's what people want. There are so many potential uses of the Internet for physicians and hospitals that it is difficult to properly cover them in this article. Why shouldn't a patient be able to check the status of their account? Has the insurance paid? Is there a patient balance? Consumers can check their bank balances on the Internet. Why not their hospital or medical office accounts? Why not let them pay their balances online? As noted above, some the the HMOs are providing account status information to patients already. Why not the hospitals and physicians? Web sites are multiplying like rabbits. It's going to take a lot of effort to

  9. Is there equity in use of healthcare services among immigrants, their descendents, and ethnic Danes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe S; Hempler, Nana F; Waldorff, Frans B;

    2012-01-01

    descendents. Data were linked to registries on healthcare utilisation. Using Poisson regression models, contacts to hospital, emergency room (ER), general practitioner (GP), specialist in private practice, and dentist were estimated. Analyses were adjusted for health symptoms, sociodemographic factors, and......BACKGROUND: Legislation in Denmark explicitly states the right to equal access to healthcare. Nevertheless, inequities may exist; accordingly evidence is needed. Our objective was to investigate whether differences in healthcare utilisation in immigrants, their descendents, and ethnic Danes could...... be explained by health status, socioeconomic factors, and integration. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide survey in 2007 with 4952 individuals aged 18-66 comprising ethnic Danes; immigrants from the former Yugoslavia, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Pakistan, Somalia, Turkey; and Turkish and Pakistani...

  10. Validation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnoses in healthcare databases: a systematic review protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimland, Joseph M; Abraha, Iosief; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Cozzolino, Francesco; Orso, Massimiliano; Cherubini, Antonio; Dell'Aquila, Giuseppina; Chiatti, Carlos; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Montedori, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Healthcare databases are useful sources to investigate the epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), to assess longitudinal outcomes in patients with COPD, and to develop disease management strategies. However, in order to constitute a reliable source for research, healthcare databases need to be validated. The aim of this protocol is to perform the first systematic review of studies reporting the validation of codes related to COPD diagnoses in healthcare databases. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases will be searched using appropriate search strategies. Studies that evaluated the validity of COPD codes (such as the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision and 10th Revision system; the Real codes system or the International Classification of Primary Care) in healthcare databases will be included. Inclusion criteria will be: (1) the presence of a reference standard case definition for COPD; (2) the presence of at least one test measure (eg, sensitivity, positive predictive values, etc); and (3) the use of a healthcare database (including administrative claims databases, electronic healthcare databases or COPD registries) as a data source. Pairs of reviewers will independently abstract data using standardised forms and will assess quality using a checklist based on the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic accuracy (STARD) criteria. This systematic review protocol has been produced in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required. Results of this study will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The results from this systematic review will be used for outcome research on COPD and will serve as a guide to identify appropriate case definitions of COPD, and reference standards, for researchers involved in validating

  11. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagsma, J A; Geenen, P L; Ethelberg, S; Fetsch, A; Hansdotter, F; Jansen, A; Korsgaard, H; O'Brien, S J; Scavia, G; Spitznagel, H; Stefanoff, P; Tam, C C; Havelaar, A H

    2013-08-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the healthcare system in seven European Union member states in relation to pathogen characteristics that influence healthcare seeking. Data on healthcare usage were obtained by harmonized cross-sectional surveys. The degree of under-diagnosis and underreporting varied by pathogen and country. Overall, underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach are adjusted for biases due to different surveillance systems and are therefore a better basis for international comparisons than reported data.

  12. [Big data in medicine and healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüping, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Healthcare is one of the business fields with the highest Big Data potential. According to the prevailing definition, Big Data refers to the fact that data today is often too large and heterogeneous and changes too quickly to be stored, processed, and transformed into value by previous technologies. The technological trends drive Big Data: business processes are more and more executed electronically, consumers produce more and more data themselves - e.g. in social networks - and finally ever increasing digitalization. Currently, several new trends towards new data sources and innovative data analysis appear in medicine and healthcare. From the research perspective, omics-research is one clear Big Data topic. In practice, the electronic health records, free open data and the "quantified self" offer new perspectives for data analytics. Regarding analytics, significant advances have been made in the information extraction from text data, which unlocks a lot of data from clinical documentation for analytics purposes. At the same time, medicine and healthcare is lagging behind in the adoption of Big Data approaches. This can be traced to particular problems regarding data complexity and organizational, legal, and ethical challenges. The growing uptake of Big Data in general and first best-practice examples in medicine and healthcare in particular, indicate that innovative solutions will be coming. This paper gives an overview of the potentials of Big Data in medicine and healthcare.

  13. PRIMARY HEALTHCARE SERVICE QUALITY MEASUREMENT: SERVQUAL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijana Mečev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine customers’ perceptions of primary healthcare service quality in public institutions in the city of Šibenik. The research was aimed at investigating whether there is difference between customers` expectations and their satisfaction with received medical services. The findings suggest that primary healthcare public institutions need to improve all the dimensions of SERVQUAL service quality from the gap analysis carried out. Furthermore, the research analyzed whether there is difference in the perception of given healthcare service between examinees considering their gender, age, employment status and frequency of using the mentioned services. It was established that demographic variables of age and gender do not generate significant differences in the perception of healthcare service quality while there is significant difference in satisfaction regarding employment status and frequency of services usage. The given results partially differ from the data acquired in other relevant and similar studies. The factor analysis which was conducted did not confirm “a priori” accepted theoretical model of Parasuraman et al. (1988 which claims that the concept of quality has five dimensions. On the contrary, it reached the conclusion that three highly reliable factors were identified regarding the perceived quality of primary healthcare services.

  14. The peacebuilding potential of healthcare training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Kyle G; Katona, Lindsay B

    2016-01-01

    Global health professionals regularly conduct healthcare trainings, such as first aid courses, in disadvantaged communities across the world. Many of these communities lack healthcare infrastructure because of war and political conflict. The authors draw on their experience conducting a first aid course in South Sudan to provide a perspective on how healthcare trainings for people with no medical background can be used to bridge ethnic, political, and religious differences. They argue that a necessary step for turning a healthcare training into a vehicle for peacebuilding is to bring people from different communities to the same physical space to learn the course material together. Importantly, simply encouraging contact between communities is unlikely to improve intergroup relations and could be detrimental if the following features are not incorporated. Buy-in from respected community leaders is essential to ensure that training participants trust that their safety during the training sessions is not at risk. Trainers should also create a supportive environment by conferring equal status and respect on all trainees. Finally, hands-on training exercises allow for positive interactions between trainees from different groups, which in turn can challenge stereotypes and facilitate cross-group friendships. These features map onto social psychological principles that have been shown to improve intergroup relations and are consistent with lessons learned from peace through health initiatives in public health and medicine. By adopting peacebuilding features, healthcare trainings can serve their primary goal of medical education and provide the added benefit of strengthening social relations. PMID:27651828

  15. The critical incident inventory: characteristics of incidents which affect emergency medical technicians and paramedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halpern Janice

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency medical technicians (EMTs and paramedics experience critical incidents which evoke distress and impaired functioning but it is unknown which aspects of incidents contribute to their impact. We sought to determine these specific characteristics by developing an inventory of critical incident characteristics and testing their relationship to protracted recovery from acute stress, and subsequent emotional symptoms. Methods EMT/paramedics (n = 223 completed a retrospective survey of reactions to an index critical incident, and current depressive, posttraumatic and burnout symptoms. Thirty-six potential event characteristics were evaluated; 22 were associated with peritraumatic distress and were retained. We assigned inventory items to one of three domains: situational, systemic or personal characteristics. We tested the relationships between (a endorsing any domain item and (b outcomes of the critical incident (peritraumatic dissociation, recovery from components of the Acute Stress Reaction and depressive, posttraumatic, and burnout symptoms. Analyses were repeated for the number of items endorsed. Results Personal and situational characteristics were most frequently endorsed. The personal domain had the strongest associations, particularly with peritraumatic dissociation, prolonged distressing feelings, and current posttraumatic symptoms. The situational domain was associated with peritraumatic dissociation, prolonged social withdrawal, and current posttraumatic symptoms. The systemic domain was associated with peritraumatic dissociation and prolonged irritability. Endorsing multiple characteristics was related to peritraumatic, acute stress, and current posttraumatic symptoms. Relationships with outcome variables were as strong for a 14-item inventory (situational and personal characteristics only as the 22-item inventory. Conclusions Emotional sequelae are associated most strongly with EMT/paramedics’ personal

  16. Analyse des besoins des usagers

    OpenAIRE

    KHOUDOUR,L; LANGLAIS,A; Charpentier, C.; MOTTE,C; PIAN,C

    2002-01-01

    Il s'agit d'étendre la surveillance vidéo de l'enceinte du métro vers l'intérieur des rames. Les images captées constituent des prises de vue des événements qui se déroulent à l'intérieur des véhicules afin notamment d'améliorer la sécurité des usagers transportes. Il est possible de mémoriser les images des quelques instants précédant un incident usager, d'analyser ces images en temps différé et de mieux appréhender en temps réel le comportement des usagers face à des événements ou des consi...

  17. Critical Study Regarding the Evolution of Incomes and Expenses of the Romanian Healthcare System in the Context of Budgetary Decentralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta ISAI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The healthcare system in Romania is continuously under a reform process, in order to make more efficient the medical care and to allow a wide access for the population to the healthcare services. The incomes of the healthcare system mainly come from the contribution to the social healthcare insurance, but also from other taxes, the system also benefits from subsidies from the state budget. The public healthcare expenses have a relatively low percentage from the total public expenses, being mainly oriented towards hospitals, subsidized drugs and primary medical assistance. The integration of Romania into the EU brought for the healthcare system opportunities as well as threats: the increase of the competence and quality of the medical act, the favourable context of decentralization but also the increase of the costs for medical services, the mobility of the patients and the pronounced migration of the qualified medical staff to other countries of the EU. The paper wants to analyse the incomes and expenses from the healthcare, taking into account all these aspects.

  18. Applying multivariate clustering techniques to health data: the 4 types of healthcare utilization in the Paris metropolitan area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lefèvre

    Full Text Available Cost containment policies and the need to satisfy patients' health needs and care expectations provide major challenges to healthcare systems. Identification of homogeneous groups in terms of healthcare utilisation could lead to a better understanding of how to adjust healthcare provision to society and patient needs.This study used data from the third wave of the SIRS cohort study, a representative, population-based, socio-epidemiological study set up in 2005 in the Paris metropolitan area, France. The data were analysed using a cross-sectional design. In 2010, 3000 individuals were interviewed in their homes. Non-conventional multivariate clustering techniques were used to determine homogeneous user groups in data. Multinomial models assessed a wide range of potential associations between user characteristics and their pattern of healthcare utilisation.We identified four distinct patterns of healthcare use. Patterns of consumption and the socio-demographic characteristics of users differed qualitatively and quantitatively between these four profiles. Extensive and intensive use by older, wealthier and unhealthier people contrasted with narrow and parsimonious use by younger, socially deprived people and immigrants. Rare, intermittent use by young healthy men contrasted with regular targeted use by healthy and wealthy women.The use of an original technique of massive multivariate analysis allowed us to characterise different types of healthcare users, both in terms of resource utilisation and socio-demographic variables. This method would merit replication in different populations and healthcare systems.

  19. Women physicians as healthcare leaders: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Virginia R; Theriault, Anne; Clement, Chris; Worthington, Jim

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the under-representation of women physicians in clinical leadership by examining the issue from their perspective. Design/methodology/approach - The authors used large group engagement methods to explore the experiences and perceptions of women physicians. In order to capture common themes across this group as a whole, participants were selected using purposeful sampling. Data were analysed using a structured thematic analysis procedure. Findings - This paper provides empirical insights into the influences affecting women physicians' decision to participate in leadership. The authors found that they often exclude themselves because the costs of leadership outweigh the benefits. Potential barriers unique to healthcare include the undervaluing of leadership by physician peers and perceived lack of support by nursing. Research limitations/implications - This study provides an in-depth examination of why women physicians are under-represented in clinical leadership from the perspective of those directly involved. Further studies are needed to confirm the generalizability of these findings and potential differences between demographic groups of physicians. Practical implications - Healthcare organizations seeking to increase the participation of women physicians in leadership should focus on modifying the perceived costs of leadership and highlighting the potential benefits. Large group engagement methods can be an effective approach to engage physicians on specific issues and mobilize grass-roots support for change. Originality/value - This exploratory study provides insights on the barriers and enablers to leadership specific to women physicians in the clinical setting. It provides a reference for healthcare organizations seeking to develop and diversify their leadership talent. PMID:27296884

  20. ‘I wouldn’t say it’s sexism, except that … It’s all these little subtle things’: Healthcare scientists’ accounts of gender in healthcare science laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We explore healthcare scientists’ accounts of men in healthcare science laboratories. By focussing on subtle masculinist actions that women find disadvantageous to them, we seek to extend knowledge about women’s under-representation in senior positions in healthcare science – despite women being in the majority at junior levels. We maintain that healthcare science continues to be dominated by taken-for-granted masculinities that marginalize women, keeping them in their ‘place’. Our aim is to make visible the subtle practices that are normally invisible by showing masculinities in action. Principally using feminist analyses, our findings show that both women and men are often unaware of taken-for-granted masculinist actions, and even when women do notice, they rarely challenge the subtle sexist behaviour.

  1. Additional renal arteries: incidence and morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyapal, K S; Haffejee, A A; Singh, B; Ramsaroop, L; Robbs, J V; Kalideen, J M

    2001-01-01

    Advances in surgical and uro-radiological techniques dictate a reappraisal and definition of renal arterial variations. This retrospective study aimed at establishing the incidence of additional renal arteries. Two subsets were analysed viz.: a) Clinical series--130 renal angiograms performed on renal transplant donors, 32 cadaver kidneys used in renal transplantation b) Cadaveric series--74 en-bloc morphologically normal kidney pairs. The sex and race distribution was: males 140, females 96; African 84, Indian 91, White 43 and "Coloured" 18, respectively. Incidence of first and second additional arteries were respectively, 23.2% (R: 18.6%; L: 27.6%) and 4.5% (R: 4.7%; L: 4.4%). Additional arteries occurred more frequently on the left (L: 32.0%; R: 23.3%). The incidence bilaterally was 10.2% (first additional arteries, only). The sex and race incidence (first and second additional) was: males, 28.0%, 5.1%; females, 16.4%, 3.8% and African 31.1%, 5.4%; Indian 13.5%, 4.5%; White 30.9%, 4.4% and "Coloured" 18.5%, 0%; respectively. Significant differences in the incidence of first additional arteries were noted between sex and race. The morphometry of additional renal arteries were lengths (cm) of first and second additional renal arteries: 4.5 and 3.8 (right), 4.9 and 3.7 (left); diameters: 0.4 and 0.3 (right), 0.3 and 0.3 (left). Detailed morphometry of sex and race were also recorded. No statistically significant differences were noted. Our results of the incidence of additional renal arteries of 27.7% compared favourably to that reported in the literature (weighted mean 28.1%). The study is unique in recording detailed morphometry of these vessels. Careful techniques in the identification of this anatomical variation is important since it impacts on renal transplantation surgery, vascular operations for renal artery stenosis, reno-vascular hypertension, Takayasu's disease, renal trauma and uro-radiological procedures.

  2. Estimation of Incident Wave Height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Helm-Petersen, J.

    1994-01-01

    The paper is the results found by Aalborg University in the calculations of the incident wave heights hm0 and the reflection coefficients α from the LIP-MAST investigations in the Vinje-Basin during May to July 1994....

  3. The NEA incident reporting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Incident Reporting System (IRS) was established in 1980 in order to exchange operating experience gained in thermal nuclear power plants and to facilitate proper feedback of this experience to benefit nuclear regulatory authorities, utilities and manufacturers as well as to provide additional guidance for safety research programmes. The purpose of the system is to collect and disseminate sufficiently detailed information on incidents of safety significance in nuclear power plants, as soon as practicable, and feed back appropriate conclusions from such incidents. The exchange of information, in the form of reports, is supplemented by a database storage system designed to facilitate the process of identifying relevant reported incidents for specific studies. The NEA-IRS is an efficient and effective way of collecting and distributing information about operational experience of nuclear power plants on an international scale. (author)

  4. Idiot Savants: Rate of Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A. Lewis

    1977-01-01

    A survey of 300 public residential facilities for the mentally retarded revealed a .06 percent incidence rate for idiot savants, persons of low intelligence who possess an unusually high skill in some special task. (CL)

  5. Reflections and unprompted observations by healthcare students of an interprofessional shadowing visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Anna; Hawkes, Gillian; Baker, Becky; Lindqvist, Susanne Marie

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports work from a Centre for Interprofessional Practice in a higher education institution in the UK that offers four levels of interprofessional learning (IPL) to all healthcare students. The second level (IPL2) integrates professional practice into the learning process, requiring students to shadow a qualified healthcare professional (from a different profession) for half a day. Students complete a reflective statement upon their learning experience on their return. A study was undertaken to analyse students' reflective statements in depth to see their observations and reflections on the shadowing visit. Using frame analysis, 160 reflective statements were analyzed, identifying common words and phrases used by students, which were then grouped together under six themes. Three of these related directly to the assignment: communication styles and techniques; communication between healthcare professionals and comparison of students' own and other healthcare professionals' roles. Three themes emerged from student's own interpretation of observations and reflections made during the shadowing of a different professional: attitudes toward other professions; power structures between professionals and patients and between professionals and impact of communication on patient care. Interprofessional shadowing gives students an opportunity to observe communication between healthcare professionals and patients and to reflect on broader issues surrounding collaborative working. PMID:22525001

  6. [In the aftermath of medical error: caring for patients, family, and the healthcare workers involved].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwappach, David L B

    2015-01-01

    Medical errors, in particular those resulting in harm, pose a serious situation for patients ("first victims") and the healthcare workers involved ("second victims") and can have long-lasting and distressing consequences. To prevent a second traumatization, appropriate and empathic interaction with all persons involved is essential besides error analysis. Patients share a nearly universal, broad preference for a complete disclosure of incidents, regardless of age, gender, or education. This includes the personal, timely and unambiguous disclosure of the adverse event, information relating to the event, its causes and consequences, and an apology and sincere expression of regret. While the majority of healthcare professionals generally support and honest and open disclosure of adverse events, they also face various barriers which impede the disclosure (e.g., fear of legal consequences). Despite its essential importance, disclosure of adverse events in practice occurs in ways that are rarely acceptable to patients and their families. The staff involved often experiences acute distress and an intense emotional response to the event, which may become chronic and increase the risk of depression, burnout and post-traumatic stress disorders. Communication with peers is vital for people to be able to cope constructively and protectively with harmful errors. Survey studies among healthcare workers show, however, that they often do not receive sufficient individual and institutional support. Healthcare organizations should prepare for medical errors and harmful events and implement a communication plan and a support system that covers the requirements and different needs of patients and the staff involved. PMID:25410745

  7. NRC Incident-Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates civilian nuclear activities to protect the public health and safety and to preserve environmental quality. An Incident Response Plan had been developed and has now been revised to reflect current Commission policy. NUREG-0728, Rev. 1 assigns responsibilities for responding to any potentially threatening incident involving NRC licensed activities and for assuring that the NRC will fulfill its statutory mission. This report has also been reproduced for staff use as NRC Manual Chapter 0502

  8. Healthcare performance turned into decision support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    has not yet been attempted. Hospital management is provided with valuable information when given insight into the factors that control employee absence behaviour. Having this insight will enable the managers to promote a healthy working environment, thus lowering employee absence rates to a minimum.......Purpose – The purpose of this study is to first create an overview of relevant factors directly influencing employee absence in the healthcare sector. The overview is used to further investigate the factors identified using employee satisfaction survey scores exclusively. The result of the overall...... from the healthcare sector, the results obtained could be restricted to this sector. Inclusion of data from Arbejdsmarkedets Tillægspension (ATP) showed no deviation from the results in the healthcare sector. Practical implications – The product of the study is a decision support tool for leaders...

  9. Integrating anatomical pathology to the healthcare enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel-Le Bozec, Christel; Henin, Dominique; Fabiani, Bettina; Bourquard, Karima; Ouagne, David; Degoulet, Patrice; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2006-01-01

    For medical decisions, healthcare professionals need that all required information is both correct and easily available. We address the issue of integrating anatomical pathology department to the healthcare enterprise. The pathology workflow from order to report, including specimen process and image acquisition was modeled. Corresponding integration profiles were addressed by expansion of the IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) initiative. Implementation using respectively DICOM Structured Report (SR) and DICOM Slide-Coordinate Microscopy (SM) was tested. The two main integration profiles--pathology general workflow and pathology image workflow--rely on 13 transactions based on HL7 or DICOM standard. We propose a model of the case in anatomical pathology and of other information entities (orders, image folders and reports) and real-world objects (specimen, tissue samples, slides, etc). Cases representation in XML schemas, based on DICOM specification, allows producing DICOM image files and reports to be stored into a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System. PMID:17108550

  10. Private health insurance and access to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    The health insurance business in India has seen a growth of over 25% per annum in the last few years with the expansion of the private health insurance sector. The premium incomes of health insurance have crossed the Rs 8,000 crore mark with the share of private companies increasing to over 41%. This is despite the fact that from the perspective of patients, health insurance is not a good deal, especially when they need it most. This raises a number of ethical issues regarding how the health insurance business runs and how medical practice adjusts to it for profiteering. This article uses the personal experience of the author to argue that health insurance in an unregulated environment can only lead to unethical practices, further victimising the patient. Further, publicly financed healthcare which operates in an environment regulating both public and private healthcare provisioning is the only way to assure access to ethical and equitable healthcare to people. PMID:22106595

  11. Process Management Practices In Healthcare Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Kılıç

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare institutions differ from other service businesses by their “matrix organizational structure” and “error-free output” requirement. However, the processes stay the same for all organizational activities at different levels. One of the post-modern management approach is to focus on basis of necessary processes and fundamental organizational changes. This case study aims to initially explain the characteristics of healthcare institutions and the basic conceptual properties of process and process management. Then the effect of the “management throughprocesses approach” over organization will be discussed. Finally; process management at healthcare institutions, scope of health care and examples of the other post-modern approaches will be examined with their outputs

  12. Human trafficking and the healthcare professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Jeffrey; Finger, Reginald

    2008-05-01

    Despite the legislation passed in the 19th century outlawing human slavery, it is more widespread today than at the conclusion of the civil war. Modern human slavery, termed human trafficking, comes in several forms. The most common type of human trafficking is sex trafficking, the sale of women and children into prostitution. Labor trafficking is the sale of men, women, and children into hard labor for which they receive little or no compensation. Other forms of trafficking include child soldiering, war brides, and organ removal. Healthcare professionals play a critical role in both finding victims of human trafficking while they are still in captivity, as well as caring for their mental and physical needs upon release. Those working in the healthcare profession need to be educated regarding how a trafficking victim may present, as well as their unique healthcare needs.

  13. The effectiveness of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation screening in asymptomatic healthcare workers in an Irish orthopaedic unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Edmundson, S P

    2012-01-31

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are associated with increased mortality, costs and length of stay compared to non-MRSA infections. This observational 4-year study analyses the impact of screening and treating orthopaedic healthcare workers for MRSA colonisation. A total of 1,011 swabs were taken from 566 healthcare workers. Positive healthcare workers were treated with topical mupirocin to both anterior nares. The prevalence of MRSA colonisation on initial testing was 4.77%. The rate of positive MRSA colonisation of those tested on more than one occasion fell from 5.88% to 2.71% (p = 0.055) on subsequent screening. All healthcare workers receiving treatment were successfully cleared of colonisation; however, some required more than one course of treatment. These results show that there could be a role for screening and treating orthopaedic staff for MRSA colonisation as part of a strategy to reduce the prevalence of MRSA infections in orthopaedic units.

  14. Learning from an early start but late end epidemics via an incidence rate restricted bivariate distribution and data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Shanmugam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: An ideal expectation of public health administrators or field medical workers is to have a late start and quick ending of any epidemic. Instead, when an epidemic starts early but ends late, it is where much can be learned from the incidences. A case in point for discussion in this article is the pattern of 2009 H1N1 epidemic. Methods: With a parameter to portray an existing health environment as a deterrent for an epidemic like H1N1 to outbreak in any location at a week, a bivariate distribution is created and is used to analyze the data for a learning so that it helps to prevent a too long prevailing future epidemic. This new distribution is named Incidence Rate Restricted Bivariate Distribution (IRRBGD. Statistical properties of IRRBGD are derived and illustrated using 2009 H1N1 incidences in all five continental regions (Africa, Asia, Europe, Americas, and Oceanic across on earth. Results: The Asian continent, compared to other four continental regions, had most vulnerability for H1N1 incidences. The odds for no H1N1 to occur is lowest only in Oceanic among the four continental regions, namely Africa, Europe, Americas, and Oceanic. Since the beginning of the year 2009 with 52 weeks, the week number, Y in which the H1N1 appeared first and the number, X of weeks the H1N1 continued on in a region are consistently highly correlated in all five continental regions. Conclusions: From the data analyses of 2009 H1N1 incidences, no continental region is risk free with respect another round of H1N1 epidemic in future. The medical community and public healthcare administrators ought to identify the common and region specific unique deterrents of the epidemic like H1N1. The impact of such deterrents to H1N1 is captured in our model and analysis. By increasing the deterrent level, the outbreak of an epidemic like H1N1 could be delayed, according to our model and data information. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(9.000: 2181-2189

  15. The role of privacy protection in healthcare information systems adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chien-Lung; Lee, Ming-Ren; Su, Chien-Hui

    2013-10-01

    Privacy protection is an important issue and challenge in healthcare information systems (HISs). Recently, some privacy-enhanced HISs are proposed. Users' privacy perception, intention, and attitude might affect the adoption of such systems. This paper aims to propose a privacy-enhanced HIS framework and investigate the role of privacy protection in HISs adoption. In the proposed framework, privacy protection, access control, and secure transmission modules are designed to enhance the privacy protection of a HIS. An experimental privacy-enhanced HIS is also implemented. Furthermore, we proposed a research model extending the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology by considering perceived security and information security literacy and then investigate user adoption of a privacy-enhanced HIS. The experimental results and analyses showed that user adoption of a privacy-enhanced HIS is directly affected by social influence, performance expectancy, facilitating conditions, and perceived security. Perceived security has a mediating effect between information security literacy and user adoption. This study proposes several implications for research and practice to improve designing, development, and promotion of a good healthcare information system with privacy protection. PMID:24014266

  16. Handbook of medical and healthcare technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2013-01-01

    This book equips readers to understand a complex range of healthcare products that are used to diagnose, monitor, and treat diseases or medical conditions affecting humans. The first part of the book presents medical technologies such as medical information retrieval, tissue engineering techniques, 3D medical imaging, nanotechnology innovations in medicine, medical wireless sensor networks, and knowledge mining techniques in medicine. The second half of the book focuses on healthcare technologies including prediction hospital readmission risk, modeling e-health framework, personal Web in healt

  17. Structuring a sound securitization of healthcare receivables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradling, Mark

    2003-02-01

    Securitization of receivables allows healthcare providers to obtain an additional funding source by selling their accounts receivables to investors. A double-lock-box structure allows providers to securitize Medicare and Medicaid receivables without violating federal laws. A 2001 revision to the Uniform Commercial Code facilitates providers' securitization of private healthcare insurance receivables by underscoring rights of a purchaser of those receivables. HIPAA privacy standards appear to permit the use and disclosure of protected health information in crafting a securitization program. The securitization should be structured to shield the value of the receivables to be transferred from the potential backruptcies of the originator and the purchaser. PMID:12602313

  18. Potato intake and incidence of hypertension: results from three prospective US cohort studies

    OpenAIRE

    Borgi, Lea; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter C.; Forman, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether higher intake of baked or boiled potatoes, French fries, or potato chips is associated with incidence of hypertension. Design Prospective longitudinal cohort studies. Setting Healthcare providers in the United States. Participants 62 175 women in Nurses’ Health Study, 88 475 women in Nurses’ Health Study II, and 36 803 men in Health Professionals Follow-up Study who were non-hypertensive at baseline. Main outcome measure Incident cases of hypertension (self repo...

  19. Creating European guidelines for Chiropractic Incident Reporting and Learning Systems (CIRLS: relevance and structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangler Martin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2009, the heads of the Executive Council of the European Chiropractors' Union (ECU and the European Academy of Chiropractic (EAC involved in the European Committee for Standardization (CEN process for the chiropractic profession, set out to establish European guidelines for the reporting of adverse reactions to chiropractic treatment. There were a number of reasons for this: first, to improve the overall quality of patient care by aiming to reduce the application of potentially harmful interventions and to facilitate the treatment of patients within the context of achieving maximum benefit with a minimum risk of harm; second, to inform the training objectives for the Graduate Education and Continuing Professional Development programmes of all 19 ECU member nations, regarding knowledge and skills to be acquired for maximising patient safety; and third, to develop a guideline on patient safety incident reporting as it is likely to be part of future CEN standards for ECU member nations. Objective To introduce patient safety incident reporting within the context of chiropractic practice in Europe and to help individual countries and their national professional associations to develop or improve reporting and learning systems. Discussion Providing health care of any kind, including the provision of chiropractic treatment, can be a complex and, at times, a risky activity. Safety in healthcare cannot be guaranteed, it can only be improved. One of the most important aspects of any learning and reporting system lies in the appropriate use of the data and information it gathers. Reporting should not just be seen as a vehicle for obtaining information on patient safety issues, but also be utilised as a tool to facilitate learning, advance quality improvement and to ultimately minimise the rate of the occurrence of errors linked to patient care. Conclusions Before a reporting and learning system can be established it has to be clear

  20. Body mass index trajectory classes and incident asthma in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rzehak, Peter; Wijga, Alet H; Keil, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    The causal link between body mass index (BMI) or obesity and asthma in children is still being debated. Analyses of large longitudinal studies with a sufficient number of incident cases and in which the time-dependent processes of both excess weight and asthma development can be validly analyzed...

  1. Perception of primary health professionals about Female Genital Mutilation: from healthcare to intercultural competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fàbregas Ma Jose

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The practice of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM, a deeply-rooted tradition in 28 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, carries important negative consequences for the health and quality of life of women and children. Migratory movements have brought this harmful traditional practice to our medical offices, with the subsequent conflicts related to how to approach this healthcare problem, involving not only a purely healthcare-related event but also questions of an ethical, cultural identity and human rights nature. Methods The aim of this study was to analyse the perceptions, degree of knowledge, attitudes and practices of the primary healthcare professionals in relation to FGM. A transversal, descriptive study was performed with a self-administered questionnaire to family physicians, paediatricians, nurses, midwives and gynaecologists. Trends towards changes in the two periods studied (2001 and 2004 were analysed. Results A total of 225 (80% professionals answered the questionnaire in 2001 and 184 (62% in 2004. Sixteen percent declared detection of some case in 2004, rising three-fold from the number reported in 2001. Eighteen percent stated that they had no interest in FGM. Less than 40% correctly identified the typology, while less than 30% knew the countries in which the practice is carried out and 82% normally attended patients from these countries. Conclusion Female genital mutilations are present in primary healthcare medical offices with paediatricians and gynaecologists having the closest contact with the problem. Preventive measures should be designed as should sensitization to promote stands against these practices.

  2. Spending more money, saving more lives? The relationship between avoidable mortality and healthcare spending in 14 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Richard; Koolman, Xander; Westert, Gert P

    2013-06-01

    Healthcare expenditures rise as a share of GDP in most countries, raising questions regarding the value of further spending increases. Against this backdrop, we assessed the value of healthcare spending growth in 14 western countries between 1996 and 2006. We estimated macro-level health production functions using avoidable mortality as outcome measure. Avoidable mortality comprises deaths from certain conditions "that should not occur in the presence of timely and effective healthcare". We investigated the relationship between total avoidable mortality and healthcare spending using descriptive analyses and multiple regression models, focussing on within-country variation and growth rates. We aimed to take into account the role of potential confounders and dynamic effects such as time lags. Additionally, we explored a method to estimate macro-level cost-effectiveness. We found an average yearly avoidable mortality decline of 2.6-5.3% across countries. Simultaneously, healthcare spending rose between 1.9 and 5.9% per year. Most countries with above-average spending growth demonstrated above-average reductions in avoidable mortality. The regression models showed a significant association between contemporaneous and lagged healthcare spending and avoidable mortality. The time-trend, representing an exogenous shift of the health production function, reduced the impact of healthcare spending. After controlling for this time-trend and other confounders, i.e. demographic and socioeconomic variables, a statistically significant relationship between healthcare spending and avoidable mortality remained. We tentatively conclude that macro-level healthcare spending increases provided value for money, at least for the disease groups, countries and years included in this study.

  3. Measuring and modelling occupancy time in NHS continuing healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millard Peter H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to increasing demand and financial constraints, NHS continuing healthcare systems seek to find better ways of forecasting demand and budgeting for care. This paper investigates two areas of concern, namely, how long existing patients stay in service and the number of patients that are likely to be still in care after a period of time. Methods An anonymised dataset containing information for all funded admissions to placement and home care in the NHS continuing healthcare system was provided by 26 (out of 31 London primary care trusts. The data related to 11289 patients staying in placement and home care between 1 April 2005 and 31 May 2008 were first analysed. Using a methodology based on length of stay (LoS modelling, we captured the distribution of LoS of patients to estimate the probability of a patient staying in care over a period of time. Using the estimated probabilities we forecasted the number of patients that are likely to be still in care after a period of time (e.g. monthly. Results We noticed that within the NHS continuing healthcare system there are three main categories of patients. Some patients are discharged after a short stay (few days, some others staying for few months and the third category of patients staying for a long period of time (years. Some variations in proportions of discharge and transition between types of care as well as between care groups (e.g. palliative, functional mental health were observed. A close agreement of the observed and the expected numbers of patients suggests a good prediction model. Conclusions The model was tested for care groups within the NHS continuing healthcare system in London to support Primary Care Trusts in budget planning and improve their responsiveness to meet the increasing demand under limited availability of resources. Its applicability can be extended to other types of care, such as hospital care and re-ablement. Further work will be geared towards

  4. Does Quality of Healthcare Service Determine Patient Adherence? Evidence from the Primary Healthcare Sector in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekoth, Nandakumar; Dalvi, Vidya

    2015-01-01

    Patient adherence is extremely important to achieve positive outcome. While quality of healthcare service has been studied as a determinant of patient satisfaction and loyalty, its impact on patient adherence has not been examined. The authors attempt to determine dimensions of quality and their impact on patient adherence in primary healthcare in India. Exploratory factor analysis resulted into seven factors. Factor scores were used for regression to identify the influence of dimensions of service quality on patient adherence. Quality of healthcare emerged as a determinant of patient adherence. PMID:26652042

  5. Anaesthesia Incident Monitoring Study in Hospital Kuala Lumpur--the second report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Y C; Lee, C Y; Inbasegaran, K

    1999-03-01

    Critical incident reporting is a useful quality improvement technique for reducing morbidity and mortality in anaesthesia. This study analyses 93 cases in Kuala Lumpur Hospital from July 1995 to January 1997. The main incidents during anaesthesia in this study were airway incidents. While human error was identified as the main factor contributing to the occurrence of adverse incidents. Critical incident monitoring plays an important role in identifying potential problems, which may lead to disaster. The findings from this report of the anaesthesia incident monitoring study continued to indicate the occurrence of similar problems seen in an earlier report. The identification of common incidents can be used to identify risk factors and minimise repetition of such incidents.

  6. Changes in the Incidence of Congenital Anomalies in Henan Province, China, from 1997 to 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xia

    Full Text Available To investigate changes in incidence and characteristics of congenital anomalies in infants in Henan Province of China over a period of 15 years.Population-based surveillance in Henan Province was conducted from 1997 to 2011 in 75 hospitals (40 urban districts and 35 rural counties, comprising about 20% of the total births. Basic population information was obtained from the healthcare network. All live births, intrauterine deaths after 28 weeks, and stillbirths were included. Congenital anomalies were diagnosed and reported to Henan Provincial Maternal and Pediatric Healthcare Hospital.Of 1,815,920 births from 1997 to 2011, 15,660 cases of congenital anomalies were identified, resulting in an average incidence of 86.2 cases per 10,000 births. The incidence of congenital anomalies showed a significant downward trend (p < 0.0001 in rural areas and the whole province (p < 0.0001, but an increase in urban areas (p = 0.003. The incidence was much higher in rural than in urban areas in 1997, but this discrepancy decreased rapidly and no difference was seen between rural and urban areas in 2003. The incidence in females was higher than in males in 1997-1999 but decreased to a similar level as that in males in 2000. Maternal age exceeding 35 years was associated with a higher incidence of congenital anomalies. Among the 23 types of congenital anomalies recorded, neural tube defects were the most common; the incidence declined from 39.3 cases per 10,000 births in 1997 to 6.1 cases per 10,000 births in 2011.The incidence of congenital anomalies has decreased in Henan Province over the past 15 years due to significant reductions in rural areas and among girls. This decrease was partly related to a reduction in neural tube defects that was likely the result of a folic acid intervention in the province.

  7. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne;

    2014-01-01

    , developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups......Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse...... migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry...

  8. Options for Healthcare Waste Management and Treatment in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare waste management and treatment is one of the national priority tasks of China's Tenth Five-Year Plan.Numerous installations disposing medical waste have already operated the project or under construction to the operation in 2006. This paper focuses on the assessment of existing and fu~re options to handle medical waste (MW). Internationally available and so far in China applied technologies and management practice are analysed, including the problems how to materials. Non-hazardous MW can be managed and treated in analogue to municipal solid waste (MSW). In most of the European countries decentralised hospital incinerators have been, because of high operation costs and pollution problems,widely banned and replaced by pre-treatment technologies at the source and centralised incineration plants for hazardous MW.Information for adapting and further developing MW management solutions and treatment technologies in China and applying the most appropriate MWM practice is provided.

  9. Does Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare Really Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Keith C.

    2002-01-01

    Outdoor behavioral healthcare (OBH), using wilderness therapy and related outdoor programming, is an emerging treatment for adolescents with behavioral, psychological, and substance abuse disorders. A literature review examining OBH outcomes related to self-concept, interpersonal skills, substance abuse, criminal recidivism, and behavioral and…

  10. Virtue Ethics and Rural Professional Healthcare Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowden, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Because rural populations are at risk not only for clinically disparate care but also ethically disparate care, there is a need to enhance scholarship, research, and teaching about rural health care ethics. In this paper an argument for the applicability of a virtue ethics framework for professionals in rural healthcare is outlined. The argument…

  11. Prevention of Healthcare Associated Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G.M. Bode (Lonneke)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ S. aureus colonizes the skin and mucosae of a proportion of the human population. Carriers of S. aureus are at increased risk of developing infections with this pathogen. The aim of this thesis was to add to the prevention of healthcare associated S. aureus infections.

  12. Lean in healthcare: the unfilled promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnor, Zoe J; Holweg, Matthias; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to improve operational efficiency, healthcare services around the world have adopted process improvement methodologies from the manufacturing sector, such as Lean Production. In this paper we report on four multi-level case studies of the implementation of Lean in the English NHS. Our results show that this generally involves the application of specific Lean 'tools', such as 'kaizen blitz' and 'rapid improvement events', which tend to produce small-scale and localised productivity gains. Although this suggests that Lean might not currently deliver the efficiency improvements desired in policy, the evolution of Lean in the manufacturing sector also reveals this initial focus on the 'tool level'. In moving to a more system-wide approach, however, we identify significant contextual differences between healthcare and manufacturing that result in two critical breaches of the assumptions behind Lean. First, the customer and commissioner in the private sector are the one and the same, which is essential in determining 'customer value' that drives process improvement activities. Second, healthcare is predominantly designed to be capacity-led, and hence there is limited ability to influence demand or make full use of freed-up resources. What is different about this research is that these breaches can be regarded as not being primarily 'professional' in origin but actually more 'organisational' and 'managerial' and, if not addressed could severely constrain Lean's impact on healthcare productivity at the systems level. PMID:21414703

  13. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    In spite of a growing recognition of the importance of doctor-patient communication, the issue of language barriers to healthcare has received very little attention in India. The Indian population speaks over 22 major languages with English used as the lingua franca for biomedicine. Large-scale internal migration has meant that health workers are encountering increasing instances of language discordance within clinical settings. Research done predominantly in the West has shown language discordance to significantly affect access to care, cause problems of comprehension and adherence, and decrease the satisfaction and quality of care. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India requires a stronger political commitment to providing non-discriminatory health services, especially to vulnerable groups such as illiterate migrant workers. Research will have to address three broad areas: the ways in which language barriers affect health and healthcare, the efficacy of interventions to overcome language barriers, and the costs of language barriers and efforts to overcome them. There is a need to address such barriers in health worker education and clinical practice. Proven strategies such as hiring multilingual healthcare workers, providing language training to health providers, employing in situ translators or using telephone interpretation services will have to be evaluated for their appropriateness to the Indian context. Internet-based initiatives, the proliferation of mobile phones and recent advances in machine translation promise to contribute to the solution. PMID:24758452

  14. Pervasive Healthcare as a Scientific Discipline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2008-01-01

    . Methods: The paper presents the research questions, approach, technologies, and methods of pervasive healthcare and discusses these in comparison to those of other related scientific disciplines. Results: A set of central research themes are presented; monitoring and body sensor networks; pervasive...

  15. [Healthcare and culture, between diversity and universality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debout, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Interrelations exist between people's behaviour and the reasons for it as explained by culture. The healthcare theory put forward by the American nurse Madeleine Leininger, at the end of the 1970s, integrates anthropology Identifying and understanding the patient's culture enables nursing care to be adapted to the patient's own view of his/her disease.

  16. The myths of benchmarking healthcare IT spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, John

    2006-10-01

    Healthcare organizations should make those IT investments that they believe can be managed to achieve an acceptable return. They should make investment decisions based on the merits of the IT proposal, not because they have to catch up to another industry, such as banking. PMID:17040031

  17. TEAMWORK IN THE FAMILY HEALTHCARE STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Pinheiro Garcia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: The healthcare evaluation aims to improve the capacity to provide adequate assistance and better healthcare to the population. Through an evaluation process, one can rethink the practices that are being offered and subsidize managers for adequacy of services. The aim of this study is to evaluate teamwork, from the perspective of professionals who work in the family health strategy. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional study was performed. The population comprised healthcare professionals working with the family health strategy in the municipalities of the state of Espirito Santo with more than 50,000 inhabitants. Data collection was performed through a semi-structured questionnaire between July 2012 and August 2013. Results: there was a positive evaluation of the professionals regarding teamwork, with most considering the professional relationship always or most of the time good and respectful; the relationships were rarely considered to be confrontational; the organization of the activities was performed jointly, with rare occurrence of difficulties regarding domestic work and the community; the work was always or most of the time based on pre-established routines, as well as the capacity to review routines and procedures and the encouragement for community participation. Conclusion: One can observe the challenge and responsibility of healthcare professionals in acknowledging teamwork and its relevance to changes in the practices of care and management of the Brazilian Unified Health System. KEYWORDS: Health Evaluation; Primary Health care; Family Health; Working Environment.

  18. Genetic risk estimation by healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Bonke (Benno); A. Tibben (Arend); D. Lindhout (Dick); A.J. Clarke (Angus); Th. Stijnen (Theo)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To assess whether healthcare professionals correctly incorporate the relevance of a favourable test outcome in a close relative when determining the level of risk for individuals at risk for Huntington's disease. DESIGN AND SETTING: Survey of clinical geneti

  19. Intelligent Healthcare Service Using Health Lifelog Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junho; Choi, Chang; Ko, Hoon; Kim, Pankoo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, there have been many studies of health services combined with smart devices, gathering a user' health lifelog and managing his or her health for the improvement of the quality of his or her life, using various sensors. However, previous works have problems in the extraction of patterns in person's complex health lifelog, the analysis of complex relations among those patterns, the extension of them to related services, and reuse of lifelog patterns. The healthcare lifelogs should search efficiently data necessary for users from big data because those gather real-time data of various types of data. The healthcare lifelogs should search efficiently data necessary for users from big data because those gather real-time data of various types of data. In this paper, we propose the intelligent healthcare service for reasoning personal health state with data extraction, pattern analysis, health life ontology modeling using health lifelog analysis based on smart devices. The proposed health information service provided more and more appropriate service with users if more reasoning rules related to more and various healthcare lifelog information gathering are included in the service. PMID:27352004

  20. Markets and Public Values in Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Zuiderent-Jerak (Teun); K.J. Grit (Kor); T.E.D. van der Grinten (Tom)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Discussions on the role of markets in healthcare easily lead to political and unfruitful polarized positions. Actors arguing in favour of markets as a solution for the quality/cost conundrum entrench themselves against others pointing out the risk of markets for the delivery a

  1. TRUSTED CLOUD COMPUTING FRAMEWORK FOR HEALTHCARE SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat Adib Bamiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is rapidly evolving due to its efficient characteristics such as cost-effectiveness, availability and elasticity. Healthcare organizations and consumers lose control when they outsource their sensitive data and computing resources to a third party Cloud Service Provider (CSP, which may raise security and privacy concerns related to data loss and misuse appealing threats. Lack of consumers’ knowledge about their data storage location may lead to violating rules and regulations of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA that can cost them huge penalty. Fear of data breach by internal or external hackers may decrease consumers’ trust in adopting cloud computing and benefiting from its promising features. We designed a Healthcare Trusted Cloud Computing (HTCC framework that maintains security, privacy and considers HIPAA regulations. HTCC framework deploys Trusted Computing Group (TCG technologies such as Trusted Platform Module (TPM, Trusted Software Stack (TSS, virtual Trusted Platform Module (vTPM, Trusted Network Connect (TNC and Self Encrypting Drives (SEDs. We emphasize on using strong multi-factor authentication access control mechanisms and strict security controls, as well as encryption for data at storage, in-transit and while process. We contributed in customizing a cloud Service Level Agreement (SLA by considering healthcare requirements. HTCC was evaluated by comparing with previous researchers’ work and conducting survey from experts. Results were satisfactory and showed acceptance of the framework. We aim that our proposed framework will assist in optimizing trust on cloud computing to be adopted in healthcare sector.

  2. Turkish healthcare professionals' views on palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay, Gulay; Kav, Sultan

    2012-01-01

    The concept of modern palliative care has been disseminating slowly in Turkey and has recently been included in the National Cancer Control Program. The aim of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' knowledge and views of palliative care. It was conducted at three hospitals with a sample of 369 healthcare professionals working in adult clinics. Data were collected via open-ended questions and 16 statements from healthcare professionals on their views of palliative care. Most respondents stated that there was a lack of in-service/continuing education in palliative care, and more than half said they had not received any education in palliative care. A majority stated that the meaning and goal of palliative care is "improving the quality of life of a patient who is in the terminal stage." Lack of awareness of palliative care and a lack of educational resources in that field are the most frequently reported barriers to the development of palliative care in Turkey. Palliative care should be included in curricula for healthcare professionals and in-service education programs should be established. PMID:23413762

  3. Global implications of China's healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Tang, Shenglan; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing healthcare reform in China has a powerful spillover effect beyond the health sector and the borders of China. A successful completion of the Chinese reform will offer a new model for social justice development, shift the global economy toward sustainability and create a new hub for science and technology in medical and health science. However, reforming the healthcare system in the most populated country is a daunting task. China will not live up to its promise, and all the potentials may end with hype not hope if coherent national strategies are not constructed and state-of-the-art navigation is not achieved with staggering domestic and global challenges. The cost of failure will be immensely high, socioeconomic costs for Chinese and an opportunity cost for the world as a whole. A full appreciation of the global implications of China's healthcare reform is crucial in keeping China receptive toward good practices evidence-approved elsewhere and open minded to fulfill its international obligations. More critically, the appreciation yields constructive engagements from global community toward a joint development and global prosperity. The current report provides a multiple disciplinary assessment on the global implications of the healthcare reform in China. PMID:24890392

  4. Indicators of quality in primary healthcare.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M.J. van den; Bakker, D.H. de

    2004-01-01

    Background: GPs play a pivotal role in the Dutch healthcare system. Since GPs have a so-called gatekeeper-function, the overwhelming majority of medical problems is served by GPs. The Inspectorate of Health Care (IHC) is charged with the supervision of public health, including the quality of care pr

  5. Analysis on energy efficiency in healthcare buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz-Calcedo, Justo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze and quantify the average healthcare centres' energy behavior and estimate the possibilities of savings through the use of concrete measures to reduce their energy demand in Extremadura, Spain. It provides the average energy consumption of 55 healthcare centres sized between 500 and 3,500 m². The analysis evaluated data of electricity and fossil fuel energy consumption as well as water use and other energy-consuming devices. The energy solutions proposed to improve the efficiency are quantified and listed. The average annual energy consumption of a healthcare centre is 86.01 kWh/m², with a standard deviation of 16.8 kWh/m². The results show that an annual savings of €4.77/m² is possible. The potential to reduce the energy consumption of a healthcare centre of size 1,000 m² is 10,801 kWh by making an average investment of €11,601, thus saving €2,961/year with an average payback of 3.92 years.

  6. Identity and moral responsibility of healthcare organizations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, M.A.M.; Gordijn, B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the moral responsibility of a Healthcare Organization (HCO) is conceived as an inextricable aspect of the identity of the HCO. We attempt to show that by exploring this relation a more profound insight in moral responsibility can be gained. Referring to Charles Taylor we explore the me

  7. Lean in healthcare: the unfilled promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnor, Zoe J; Holweg, Matthias; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to improve operational efficiency, healthcare services around the world have adopted process improvement methodologies from the manufacturing sector, such as Lean Production. In this paper we report on four multi-level case studies of the implementation of Lean in the English NHS. Our results show that this generally involves the application of specific Lean 'tools', such as 'kaizen blitz' and 'rapid improvement events', which tend to produce small-scale and localised productivity gains. Although this suggests that Lean might not currently deliver the efficiency improvements desired in policy, the evolution of Lean in the manufacturing sector also reveals this initial focus on the 'tool level'. In moving to a more system-wide approach, however, we identify significant contextual differences between healthcare and manufacturing that result in two critical breaches of the assumptions behind Lean. First, the customer and commissioner in the private sector are the one and the same, which is essential in determining 'customer value' that drives process improvement activities. Second, healthcare is predominantly designed to be capacity-led, and hence there is limited ability to influence demand or make full use of freed-up resources. What is different about this research is that these breaches can be regarded as not being primarily 'professional' in origin but actually more 'organisational' and 'managerial' and, if not addressed could severely constrain Lean's impact on healthcare productivity at the systems level.

  8. Sproglig Metode og Analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    le Fevre Jakobsen, Bjarne

    Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011......Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011...

  9. Risk - hazardous incident - communication 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terms such as 'risk', 'hazardous incident', and 'communication' have become major catchwords in discussions about present-day problems, and may be reduced to a common denominator: disaster. Such an association, however, is inappropriate, as the concept indicated by the term 'risk' for instance covers a wide scale of possible danger. Even the term 'hazardous incident' describes events or conditions that are very different in terms of possible danger, let alone disastrous effects. The discrepancy to be observed between the facts and the public perception usually is due to the fact that people have little insight into the complex of problems involved, and to insufficient communication between the world of experts and the general public. The contributions to this publication present information and discuss a variety of solution sets to improve the communication problems in the context of the problem area of 'risk - hazardous incident - communication'. (orig./CB)

  10. Risk - hazardous incident - communication 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is difficult to develop an objective approach to risks and effects of a hazardous incident that would be acceptable to the community at large. It is a matter of fact that there is great dissimilarity in the way various social groups perceive and define the risks of a particular technology, or the effects of hazardous incidents, sometimes they have even contrary opinions. Hence, open communication is seriously hampered, which in turn aggravates the problems encountered in this context. This second volume of the publication dealing with the problem area of 'risk - hazardous incident - communication' is intended to reveal patterns of the recurrent process which impedes communication, and to bridge the gaps between the various 'styles' of risk perception and definition. (orig./CB)

  11. Incidence Handling and Response System

    CERN Document Server

    Kalbande, Prof Dhananjay R; Singh, Mr Manish

    2009-01-01

    A computer network can be attacked in a number of ways. The security-related threats have become not only numerous but also diverse and they may also come in the form of blended attacks. It becomes difficult for any security system to block all types of attacks. This gives rise to the need of an incidence handling capability which is necessary for rapidly detecting incidents, minimizing loss and destruction, mitigating the weaknesses that were exploited and restoring the computing services. Incidence response has always been an important aspect of information security but it is often overlooked by security administrators. in this paper, we propose an automated system which will handle the security threats and make the computer network capable enough to withstand any kind of attack. we also present the state-of-the-art technology in computer, network and software which is required to build such a system.

  12. Recent waterway incidents around dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowat, L. [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Niagara Falls, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed recent waterway incidents around dams. Several case histories were presented, including a man who drowned when he slipped from the top of the South Idaho Power Plant Spillway in June 3 2004; 2 brothers who drowned near a spillway in Watson Minnesota, in June, 2004; a jet-skier who plunged to his death after ramping the 50 foot Brasfield Dam, in Virginia in June, 2004; a couple whose boat on Lake Austin was swept up against the sluicegate; an angler who drowned at a dam in Bridgeville, Delaware; a man who drowned swimming below a dam in San Marcos, Texas in April, 2005; and a fisherman who drowned at Logan Martin Dam in Birmingham, Alabama in April, 2005. A list of examples of fatalities at dams in 2004 and international incidents at dams from 2005 and 2006 to 2008 were also provided. Examples of Canadian incidents at dams were also listed. figs.

  13. 76 FR 63622 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for... Promotion, NCEZID, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop A- 07, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, E-mail:...

  14. Patients and Loved Ones: Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Prevent MRSA Infections? To prevent MRSA infections, doctors, nurses, and other healthcare workers: Clean their hands with ... of patients can help make sure that all doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers clean their hands with ...

  15. 75 FR 29772 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  16. 75 FR 22816 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices...), regarding the practice of hospital infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance,...

  17. Race and healthcare disparities: overcoming vulnerablity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John

    2002-01-01

    The paper summarizes recently published data and recommendations about healthcare disparities experienced by African Americans who have Medicare or other healthcare coverage. Against this background the paper addresses the ethics of such disparities and how disadvantages of vulnerable populations like African Americans are typically maintained in decision making about how to respond to such disparities. Considering how to respond to disparities reveals much that vulnerable populations would bring to the policy-making table, if they can also be heard when they get there. The paper argues that vulnerable populations like African Americans need fair representation in bodies deciding what to do about such disparities and that fairness requires proportional representation at all levels of decisions that affect healthcare--a radical change. In this decision setting, how to provide adequate protection of minorities needs much further attention. The most attractive decision-making model is deliberative democracy. The paper shows that in deliberation, fair representation requires not only having a voice in decisions, but a fair hearing of those voices. Achieving a fair hearing requires changes in norms of communication and training of all to give importance to greetings and other measures of civility and trust building, and to be open to diverse forms of expression. Decisions about how to respond to healthcare disparities would include what programs to initiate for whom, how to evaluate the programs, and what to do in response to such evaluations. Conclusions are that achieving such goals will take a sea change in how healthcare institutions and providers do their business, and that social activism at every level will be needed to effect these changes. The discussion highlights many ethical issues that need much greater attention. PMID:12546167

  18. Priority-setting in Finnish healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, P; Häkkinen, U

    1999-12-01

    The characteristics which affect priority setting in the Finnish healthcare system include strong municipal (local) administration, no clear separation between producers and purchasers, a duality in funding, and the potential for physicians in public hospitals to practice in the private sector. This system has its strengths, such as the possibility to effectively co-ordinate social and healthcare services, and a strong incentive to take care of local needs, because of municipal responsibility to finance these services largely through local taxes. However, the municipalities are typically too small to take advantage of these potentials, their knowledge is scarce especially of secondary care and their negotiating power with respect to hospitals is low. Local politicians also have a dual role: they represent the needs of the local population but simultaneously they are decision-makers in hospitals. Full-time physicians are allowed to act in a dual role as well; they can run a private practice, which is paid for on a fee-for-service basis, while the hospital pays (mostly) a fixed monthly salary. The share of financing which flows from the National Sickness Insurance system to healthcare users may have adverse effects on the local use of resources. The broad national consensus statement on patient-level priorities did not reach any general rules on priorities. Strong support was given to citizens' equal right to access all healthcare services. In healthcare practice, this general rule has some exemptions. First, the reimbursement schemes for prescribed drugs vary depending on the severity and chronic nature of the disease. Secondly, the tax-financed dental services for the young are clearly prioritised over those of older citizens. In the consensus statement, emphasis was put on improving the efficiency of producing health services in order to avoid having to impose patient-level priorities. PMID:10827305

  19. Meta-Analyses of Animal Studies: An Introduction of a Valuable Instrument to Further Improve Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Hooijmans, Carlijn R.; IntHout, Joanna; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Rovers, Maroeska M

    2014-01-01

    In research aimed at improving human health care, animal studies still play a crucial role, despite political and scientific efforts to reduce preclinical experimentation in laboratory animals. In animal studies, the results and their interpretation are not always straightforward, as no single study is executed perfectly in all steps. There are several possible sources of bias, and many animal studies are replicates of studies conducted previously. Use of meta-analysis to combine the results ...

  20. Reducing the Impact of Attacks against Healthcare by Curbing the Use of Explosive Weapons in Populated Areas: Developments at the Global Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagshaw, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Attacks against healthcare in situations of armed conflict have emerged as an issue of increasing concern with explosive weapons - such as aircraft bombs, mortars and improvised explosive devices - accounting for more deaths, injuries and damage than any other type of weapon in attacks on healthcare facilities. While this is perhaps unsurprising, it offers some insight into a possible course of action for dealing with the problem of attacks against healthcare - by curbing the use of explosive weapons in populated areas. There has been growing recognition in recent years of the humanitarian problems caused by the use of such weapons in populated areas. Steps are now being taken at the global level to curb this use which could, in time, make an important contribution to reducing the incidence and devastating impact of attacks against healthcare. PMID:27358016

  1. Reducing the Impact of Attacks against Healthcare by Curbing the Use of Explosive Weapons in Populated Areas: Developments at the Global Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagshaw, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Attacks against healthcare in situations of armed conflict have emerged as an issue of increasing concern with explosive weapons - such as aircraft bombs, mortars and improvised explosive devices - accounting for more deaths, injuries and damage than any other type of weapon in attacks on healthcare facilities. While this is perhaps unsurprising, it offers some insight into a possible course of action for dealing with the problem of attacks against healthcare - by curbing the use of explosive weapons in populated areas. There has been growing recognition in recent years of the humanitarian problems caused by the use of such weapons in populated areas. Steps are now being taken at the global level to curb this use which could, in time, make an important contribution to reducing the incidence and devastating impact of attacks against healthcare.

  2. Philips Healthcare: The purchasing process and decision-making choice criteria in public healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Liedes, Eevaleena; Liimatainen, Lotta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study purchasing processes and decision-making choice criteria in public healthcare, especially in central hospitals and municipal health centres. This thesis is made as an assignment from Philips Healthcare, which is a manufacturer and a supplier of the patient monitors studied in this thesis. The aim of this study is to ascertain how these patient monitors are bought and which criteria affect the purchasing decision. This thesis consists of theoretical ...

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with higher healthcare utilization in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Diaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is an important cause of morbidity in the elderly population. Limited data are available regarding the healthcare utilization and predisposing conditions related to OSA in the elderly. Our aim was to evaluate the healthcare utilization and the conditions associated with new and chronic diagnosis of OSA in a large cohort of elderly patients in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cohort study used inpatient and outpatient VHA data to identify the individuals diagnosed with OSA using ICD-9 codes during the fiscal years 2003-2005. Primary outcomes were emergency department (ED visits and hospitalizations. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the demographic and clinical characteristics associated with new and chronic diagnosis of OSA. Results: Of 1,867,876 elderly veterans having 2 years of care, 82,178 (4.4% were diagnosed with OSA. Individuals with OSA were younger and more likely to have chronic diseases than those without OSA. Individuals with chronic OSA were more likely to have diagnoses of congestive heart failure (CHF, pulmonary circulation disorders, COPD, and obesity and less likely to have diagnoses of hypertension, osteoarthritis, and stroke than individuals with newly diagnosed OSA. The proportion of patients with new OSA diagnosis who required at least one ED visit was higher than the proportion of chronic OSA and no OSA patients (37%, 32%, and 15%, respectively; P-value <0.05. The proportion of new OSA patients who required at least one hospitalization was also higher than the proportion of chronic OSA and no OSA patients (24%, 17%, and 7%, respectively; P-value <0.05. Conclusion: Patients with OSA had a higher incidence of healthcare utilization compared to patients without OSA. New OSA patients had a higher rate of healthcare utilization in the year of diagnosis compared to chronic patients and patients without OSA

  4. Overview on patient safety in healthcare and laboratory diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    The healthcare context is characterized by a high degree of complexity. Despite eager efforts of the healthcare personnel, sometimes things go wrong and produce unintentional harm to the patients. As such, patient safety must be considered as one of leading healthcare challenges. Some foremost studies have highlighted that serious medical errors might occur rather frequently, jeopardizing patient's health and costing a huge amount of money to the healthcare system. A medical error is traditio...

  5. Factors associated with healthcare avoidance among transgender women in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Socías, María Eugenia; Marshall, Brandon DL; Arístegui, Inés; Romero, Marcela; Cahn, Pedro; Kerr, Thomas; Sued, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Transgender (TG) women in many settings continue to contend with barriers to healthcare, including experiences of stigma and discrimination. Argentina has a universal health care system and laws designed to promote healthcare access among TG women. However, little is known about barriers to healthcare access among TG women in this setting. The aim of this study was to explore individual, social-structural and environmental factors associated with healthcare avoidance among TG wom...

  6. The Bearers of Information in Healthcare and their Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ileana G. R?ducanu;

    2010-01-01

    The need of correct and in short time information to do management and marketing decisions it is a priority and a necessity in any area of human activity today. In healthcare area the information is necessary not only to strategic decision but provide healthcare service too. The information in healthcare system is generated at local level inside healthcare organizations but it is usually inaccessible to marketers. For this reason, the identification of bearers of information, increased capaci...

  7. Healthcare providers' perceptions of diversity and cultural competence

    OpenAIRE

    Olt, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Swedish society is ethnically diverse and since the early 1960s immigrants have made significant contributions to the labour market in healthcare. Today many Swedes, including first- and second-generation immigrants, work together in a healthcare setting that serves an increasingly diverse population. Cultural competence is required of nurses, healthcare providers and healthcare organisations in order for them to provide quality service to culturally and ethnically diverse...

  8. A healthcare assistant as a member of the nursing team

    OpenAIRE

    DUŠKOVÁ, Jitka

    2011-01-01

    The Bachelor thesis deals with the profession of a healthcare assistant and acceptance of a relatively new healthcare staff category to a nursing team. The field of study of healthcare assistant has substituted the previous field of General Nurse at secondary medical schools within the changes of the nurse education conception. This change has shifted the field of general nurse to the tertiary level. The profession of a healthcare assistant should not be a marginalized part of a nursing team....

  9. Health-care data collecting, sharing, and using in Thailand, China mainland, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljunid, Syed Mohamed; Srithamrongsawat, Samrit; Chen, Wen; Bae, Seung Jin; Pwu, Raoh-Fang; Ikeda, Shunya; Xu, Ling

    2012-01-01

    This article sought to describe the health-care data situation in six selected economies in the Asia-Pacific region. Authors from Thailand, China mainland, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, and Malaysia present their analyses in three parts. The first part of the article describes the data-collection process and the sources of data. The second part of the article presents issues around policies of data sharing with the stakeholders. The third and final part of the article focuses on the extent of health-care data use for policy reform in these different economies. Even though these economies differ in their economic structure and population size, they share some similarities on issues related to health-care data. There are two main institutions that collect and manage the health-care data in these economies. In Thailand, China mainland, Taiwan, and Malaysia, the Ministry of Health is responsible through its various agencies for collecting and managing the health-care data. On the other hand, health insurance is the main institution that collects and stores health-care data in South Korea and Japan. In all economies, sharing of and access to data is an issue. The reasons for limited access to some data are privacy protection, fragmented health-care system, poor quality of routinely collected data, unclear policies and procedures to access the data, and control on the freedom on publication. The primary objective of collecting health-care data in these economies is to aid the policymakers and researchers in policy decision making as well as create an awareness on health-care issues for the general public. The usage of data in monitoring the performance of the heath system is still in the process of development. In conclusion, for the region under discussion, health-care data collection is under the responsibility of the Ministry of Health and health insurance agencies. Data are collected from health-care providers mainly from the public sector. Routinely collected data are

  10. Social Media Enabled Interactions in Healthcare : Towards a Typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David

    2015-01-01

    Social media is increasingly used by healthcare users and providers to connect and communicate with each other. Such use is changing the interactions in healthcare and it is not clear what effects this may have for healthcare provision. Although it could be beneficial to both parties, it could also

  11. Review of Semantically Interoperable Electronic Health Records for Ubiquitous Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Chung, Kyo-IL; Chung, Myung-Ae; Choi, Duckjoo

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide more effective and personalized healthcare services to patients and healthcare professionals, intelligent active knowledge management and reasoning systems with semantic interoperability are needed. Technological developments have changed ubiquitous healthcare making it more semantically interoperable and individual patient-based; however, there are also limitations to these methodologies. Based upon an extensive review of international literature, this paper describes two...

  12. An Analysis of Knowledge Management Mechanisms in Healthcare Portals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chei Sian; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian; Chua, Alton Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare portals are becoming increasingly popular with Internet users since they play an important role in supporting interaction between individuals and healthcare organizations with a Web presence. Additionally, many of these organizations make use of knowledge management mechanisms on their healthcare portals to manage the abundance of…

  13. 78 FR 61362 - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Five AHRQ Subcommittee Meetings. SUMMARY: The... remainder of the meeting) 4. Healthcare Safety and Quality Improvement Research (HSQR) Date: October...

  14. A Healthcare Project: Managing Knowledge through Electronic Medical Record -Empirical Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Rocco Reina; Teresa Cetani; Assunta Lacroce; Marzia Ventura

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims at analysing the complex relations between knowledge management and project management on an empirical case in healthcare system represented by Electronic Medical Record (EMR); the effective goal is to underline the approach and the practical methods used by the project teams to maximize the level of knowledge plugged in EMR in two selected Italian hospitals. First, the research analyzes the main references about knowledge management and project management; then, it shows the j...

  15. Awareness and Attitude of Healthcare Workers to Cosmetic Surgery in Osogbo, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Opeyemi Adeniyi Adedeji; Ganiyu Oladiran Oseni; Peter Babatunde Olaitan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at understanding the level of awareness and elucidates the attitude and disposition of healthcare workers to cosmetic surgery in Osogbo, Nigeria. A questionnaire-based survey was done at LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, in 2012. Questionnaires were administered to 213 workers and students in the hospital. These were then analysed using SPSS version 16.0 with frequencies, means, and so forth. Respondents were 33 doctors, 32 nurses, 79 medical students, 60 nursing students, 4...

  16. Serious Incident Management in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ike; Thorley-Smith, Sara

    2007-01-01

    As part of its efforts to ensure school safety, the government of New South Wales, Australia, has developed simulation exercises to better prepare principals to manage serious incidents, in collaboration with police. This article describes two initiatives implemented across NSW. The exercises provide principals in both secondary and primary…

  17. [Incidence of cancer in Navarre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardanaz, E; Moreno, C; Pérez de Rada Arístegui, M E; Ezponda, C; Navaridas, N

    2004-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2000 an annual average of 3,303 cases of invasive cancer were registered in Navarre, 58% of them in men. If we except non melanoma skin tumours, the annual number of cases was 2,495, with gross incidence rates of 559 and 372 per 100,000 in men and women, and rates adjusted to the world population of 312 and 203 per 100,000 respectively. Amongst men, the four most frequently diagnosed tumoural localisations were the prostate, lung, colorectal and bladder, accounting for 57% of all cases. The most notable due to their frequency amongst women were tumours of the breast, colorectal, uterus body and ovary, accounting for 54% of all cases. With respect to the five year period from 1993 to 1997, the global incidence of cancer in the three year period from 1998 to 2000 has increased 4.2% in men and 7.4% in women. The incidence of lung cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphomas in both sexes and of breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men are notable. There continues to be a fall in the incidence rates of stomach cancer in both sexes, following the tendency begun in the 1970s. PMID:15644889

  18. Numerical Prediction of Green Water Incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K. B.; Mayer, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Green water loads on moored or sailing ships occur when an incoming wave signigicantly exceeds the freeboard and water runs onto the deck. In this paper, a Navier-Stokes solver with a free surface capturing scheme (i.e. the VOF model; Hirt and Nichols, 1981) is used to numerically model green water...... loads on a moored FPSO exposed to head sea waves. Two cases are investigated: first, green water ona fixed vessel has been analysed, where resulting waterheight on deck, and impact pressure on a deck mounted structure have been computed. These results have been compared to experimental data obtained by...... Greco (2001) and show very favourable agreement. Second, a full green water incident, including vessel motions has been modelled. In these computations, the vertical motion has been modelled by the use of transfer functions for heave and pitch, but the rotational contribution from the pitch motion has...

  19. Levinas's ethics as a basis of healthcare - challenges and dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordtug, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Levinas's ethics has in the last decades exerted a significant influence on Nursing and Caring Science. The core of Levinas's ethics - his analyses of how our subjectivity is established in the ethical encounter with our neighbour or the Other - is applied both to healthcare practice and in the project of building an identity of Nursing and Caring Science. Levinas's analyses are highly abstract and metaphysical, and also non-normative. Thus, his analyses cannot be applied directly to practical problems and questions. Theorists in Nursing and Caring Science are generally aware of this. Nevertheless, many of them use Levinas's analyses to explore and solve questions of practical and normative character. This article focuses on the challenges and dilemmas of using Levinas in this manner. The article is divided into two parts. The first part presents some central ideas of Levinas's ethics based on the latter part of his authorship. The main focus is on the radicalism of Levinas's critique of the symbolic order (which includes concepts, categories, knowledge, etc.) - or as he puts it 'the said' - as a basis for subjectivity and responsibility. Levinas's notions of saying, anarchy, and singularity accentuate this point of view. These notions refer to conditions in the language, which counteract the symbolic order in the ethical encounter to such an extent that it becomes an incomprehensible. Levinas gives the argumentation a metaphysical frame: The encounter with the incomprehensible is an encounter with the Holy, which is not the ontological God, but a metaphysical desire. It is a mystery as to what this means, and herein lies possibly the main challenge when using Levinas's ethics in science and research: How to maintain the radicalism of his critique of the symbolic order when this is to be communicated in a scientific context that expects clarification of statements and ideas? The second part of the article explores this question by examining how some theorists use

  20. Automated validation of patient safety clinical incident classification: macro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jaiprakash; Patrick, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety is the buzz word in healthcare. Incident Information Management System (IIMS) is electronic software that stores clinical mishaps narratives in places where patients are treated. It is estimated that in one state alone over one million electronic text documents are available in IIMS. In this paper we investigate the data density available in the fields entered to notify an incident and the validity of the built in classification used by clinician to categories the incidents. Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis (WEKA) software was used to test the classes. Four statistical classifier based on J48, Naïve Bayes (NB), Naïve Bayes Multinominal (NBM) and Support Vector Machine using radial basis function (SVM_RBF) algorithms were used to validate the classes. The data pool was 10,000 clinical incidents drawn from 7 hospitals in one state in Australia. In first part of the study 1000 clinical incidents were selected to determine type and number of fields worth investigating and in the second part another 5448 clinical incidents were randomly selected to validate 13 clinical incident types. Result shows 74.6% of the cells were empty and only 23 fields had content over 70% of the time. The percentage correctly classified classes on four algorithms using categorical dataset ranged from 42 to 49%, using free-text datasets from 65% to 77% and using both datasets from 72% to 79%. Kappa statistic ranged from 0.36 to 0.4. for categorical data, from 0.61 to 0.74. for free-text and from 0.67 to 0.77 for both datasets. Similar increases in performance in the 3 experiments was noted on true positive rate, precision, F-measure and area under curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) scores. The study demonstrates only 14 of 73 fields in IIMS have data that is usable for machine learning experiments. Irrespective of the type of algorithms used when all datasets are used performance was better. Classifier NBM showed best performance. We think the