WorldWideScience

Sample records for analyses shed light

  1. Integrative analyses shed new light on human ribosomal protein gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Yiyu; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are important house-keeping genes that are well-known for their coordinated expression. Previous studies on RPGs are largely limited to their promoter regions. Recent high-throughput studies provide an unprecedented opportunity to study how human RPGs are transcriptionally modulated and how such transcriptional regulation may contribute to the coordinate gene expression in various tissues and cell types. By analyzing the DNase I hypersensitive sites under 349 experimental conditions, we predicted 217 RPG regulatory regions in the human genome. More than 86.6% of these computationally predicted regulatory regions were partially corroborated by independent experimental measurements. Motif analyses on these predicted regulatory regions identified 31 DNA motifs, including 57.1% of experimentally validated motifs in literature that regulate RPGs. Interestingly, we observed that the majority of the predicted motifs were shared by the predicted distal and proximal regulatory regions of the same RPGs, a likely general mechanism for enhancer-promoter interactions. We also found that RPGs may be differently regulated in different cells, indicating that condition-specific RPG regulatory regions still need to be discovered and investigated. Our study advances the understanding of how RPGs are coordinately modulated, which sheds light to the general principles of gene transcriptional regulation in mammals. PMID:27346035

  2. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  3. Shedding further light on late globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2016-01-01

    In his opening essay on ‘What and/or Who is Late’, Nikhilesh Dholakia delineated inter alia “stage-setting contexts” or levels of analysis which could shed light on the phenomenon of late globalization, including its causes and effects. Indeed, these, especially the effects in contemporary contex...

  4. Relative values: shedding light on Einstein's theories

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Prof. Paul Davies has analysed light from some of the most distant stellar objects in the sky. From these observations he has concluded that the speed of light was faster billions of years ago than it is today (1/2 page).

  5. Study Sheds Light on Safety of Driving with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Study Sheds Light on Safety of Driving With Epilepsy Those who had longer seizures during driving tests ... SUNDAY, Dec. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with epilepsy who experienced longer seizures during a simulated driving ...

  6. Circadian control sheds light on fungal bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson G; Stevani, Cassius V; Waldenmaier, Hans E; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2015-03-30

    Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi-only 71 species, all within the ∼ 9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order-are reported from among ∼ 100,000 described fungal species [6, 7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin "mushrooms," internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced.

  7. Shedding light on biology of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Johannes P; Basler, Marek

    2016-11-01

    To understand basic principles of living organisms one has to know many different properties of all cellular components, their mutual interactions but also their amounts and spatial organization. Live-cell imaging is one possible approach to obtain such data. To get multiple snapshots of a cellular process, the imaging approach has to be gentle enough to not disrupt basic functions of the cell but also have high temporal and spatial resolution to detect and describe the changes. Light microscopy has become a method of choice and since its early development over 300 years ago revolutionized our understanding of living organisms. As most cellular components are indistinguishable from the rest of the cellular contents, the second revolution came from a discovery of specific labelling techniques, such as fusions to fluorescent proteins that allowed specific tracking of a component of interest. Currently, several different tags can be tracked independently and this allows us to simultaneously monitor the dynamics of several cellular components and from the correlation of their dynamics to infer their respective functions. It is, therefore, not surprising that live-cell fluorescence microscopy significantly advanced our understanding of basic cellular processes. Current cameras are fast enough to detect changes with millisecond time resolution and are sensitive enough to detect even a few photons per pixel. Together with constant improvement of properties of fluorescent tags, it is now possible to track single molecules in living cells over an extended period of time with a great temporal resolution. The parallel development of new illumination and detection techniques allowed breaking the diffraction barrier and thus further pushed the resolution limit of light microscopy. In this review, we would like to cover recent advances in live-cell imaging technology relevant to bacterial cells and provide a few examples of research that has been possible due to imaging

  8. Shedding light on biology of bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    To understand basic principles of living organisms one has to know many different properties of all cellular components, their mutual interactions but also their amounts and spatial organization. Live-cell imaging is one possible approach to obtain such data. To get multiple snapshots of a cellular process, the imaging approach has to be gentle enough to not disrupt basic functions of the cell but also have high temporal and spatial resolution to detect and describe the changes. Light microscopy has become a method of choice and since its early development over 300 years ago revolutionized our understanding of living organisms. As most cellular components are indistinguishable from the rest of the cellular contents, the second revolution came from a discovery of specific labelling techniques, such as fusions to fluorescent proteins that allowed specific tracking of a component of interest. Currently, several different tags can be tracked independently and this allows us to simultaneously monitor the dynamics of several cellular components and from the correlation of their dynamics to infer their respective functions. It is, therefore, not surprising that live-cell fluorescence microscopy significantly advanced our understanding of basic cellular processes. Current cameras are fast enough to detect changes with millisecond time resolution and are sensitive enough to detect even a few photons per pixel. Together with constant improvement of properties of fluorescent tags, it is now possible to track single molecules in living cells over an extended period of time with a great temporal resolution. The parallel development of new illumination and detection techniques allowed breaking the diffraction barrier and thus further pushed the resolution limit of light microscopy. In this review, we would like to cover recent advances in live-cell imaging technology relevant to bacterial cells and provide a few examples of research that has been possible due to imaging. This

  9. Shedding Light on the Cosmic Skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Astronomers have tracked down a gigantic, previously unknown assembly of galaxies located almost seven billion light-years away from us. The discovery, made possible by combining two of the most powerful ground-based telescopes in the world, is the first observation of such a prominent galaxy structure in the distant Universe, providing further insight into the cosmic web and how it formed. "Matter is not distributed uniformly in the Universe," says Masayuki Tanaka from ESO, who led the new study. "In our cosmic vicinity, stars form in galaxies and galaxies usually form groups and clusters of galaxies. The most widely accepted cosmological theories predict that matter also clumps on a larger scale in the so-called 'cosmic web', in which galaxies, embedded in filaments stretching between voids, create a gigantic wispy structure." These filaments are millions of light years long and constitute the skeleton of the Universe: galaxies gather around them, and immense galaxy clusters form at their intersections, lurking like giant spiders waiting for more matter to digest. Scientists are struggling to determine how they swirl into existence. Although massive filamentary structures have been often observed at relatively small distances from us, solid proof of their existence in the more distant Universe has been lacking until now. The team led by Tanaka discovered a large structure around a distant cluster of galaxies in images they obtained earlier. They have now used two major ground-based telescopes to study this structure in greater detail, measuring the distances from Earth of over 150 galaxies, and, hence, obtaining a three-dimensional view of the structure. The spectroscopic observations were performed using the VIMOS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope and FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope, operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Thanks to these and other observations, the astronomers were able to make a real demographic study of this structure

  10. Flashes Shed Light on Cosmic Clashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    An international team of astronomers led by Danish astronomer Jens Hjorth [1] has for the first time observed the visible light from a short gamma-ray burst (GRB). Using the 1.5m Danish telescope at La Silla (Chile), they showed that these short, intense bursts of gamma-ray emission most likely originate from the violent collision of two merging neutron stars. The same team has also used ESO's Very Large Telescope to constrain the birthplace of the first ever short burst whose position could be pinpointed with high precision, GRB 050509B. The results are being published in the October 6 issue of the journal Nature. Gamma-ray bursts, the most powerful type of explosion known in the Universe, have been a mystery for three decades. They come in two different flavours, long and short ones. Over the past few years, international efforts have convincingly shown that long gamma-ray bursts are linked with the ultimate explosion of massive stars (hypernovae; see e.g. ESO PR 16/03). "The breakthrough in our understanding of long-duration GRBs (those lasting more than about 2 seconds), which ultimately linked them with the energetic explosion of a massive star as it collapses into a black hole, came from the discovery of their long-lived X-ray and optical afterglows," says Jens Hjorth (Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark). "Short duration GRBs have however evaded optical detection for more than 30 years," he adds. Things changed recently. In the night of July 9 to 10, 2005, the NASA HETE-2 satellite detected a burst of only 70-millisecond duration and, based on the detection of X-rays, was able to determine its position in the sky. Thirty-three hours after, Jens Hjorth and his team obtained images of this region of the sky using the Danish 1.5m telescope at ESO La Silla. The images showed the presence of a fading source, sitting on the edge of a galaxy. "We have thus discovered the first optical afterglow of a short gamma-ray burst

  11. Shedding light on restoring respiratory function after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren J Alilain

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Loss of respiratory function is one of the leading causes of death following spinal cord injury. Because of this, much work has been done in studying ways to restore respiratory function following SCI - including pharmacological and regeneration strategies. With the emergence of new and powerful tools from molecular neuroscience, new therapeutically relevant alternatives to these approaches have become available, including expression of light sensitive proteins called channelrhodopsins. In this article we briefly review the history of various attempts to restore breathing after C2 hemisection, and focus on our recent work using the activation of light sensitive channels to restore respiratory function after experimental spinal cord injury. We also discuss how such light induced activity can help shed light on the inner workings of the central nervous system respiratory circuitry that controls diaphragmatic function.

  12. Structural biology sheds light on the puzzle of genomic ORFans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Naomi; Fischer, Daniel

    2004-09-10

    Genomic ORFans are orphan open reading frames (ORFs) with no significant sequence similarity to other ORFs. ORFans comprise 20-30% of the ORFs of most completely sequenced genomes. Because nothing can be learnt about ORFans via sequence homology, the functions and evolutionary origins of ORFans remain a mystery. Furthermore, because relatively few ORFans have been experimentally characterized, it has been suggested that most ORFans are not likely to correspond to functional, expressed proteins, but rather to spurious ORFs, pseudo-genes or to rapidly evolving proteins with non-essential roles. As a snapshot view of current ORFan structural studies, we searched for ORFans among proteins whose three-dimensional structures have been recently determined. We find that functional and structural studies of ORFans are not as underemphasized as previously suggested. These recently determined structures correspond to ORFans from all Kingdoms of life, and include proteins that have previously been functionally characterized, as well as structural genomics targets of unknown function labeled as "hypothetical proteins". This suggests that many of the ORFans in the databases are likely to correspond to expressed, functional (and even essential) proteins. Furthermore, the recently determined structures include examples of the various types of ORFans, suggesting that the functions and evolutionary origins of ORFans are diverse. Although this survey sheds some light on the ORFan mystery, further experimental studies are required to gain a better understanding of the role and origins of the tens of thousands of ORFans awaiting characterization.

  13. CFTR Modulators: Shedding Light on Precision Medicine for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening monogenic disease afflicting Caucasian people. It affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, glandular and reproductive systems. The major cause of morbidity and mortality in CF is the respiratory disorder caused by a vicious cycle of obstruction of the airways, inflammation and infection that leads to epithelial damage, tissue remodeling and end-stage lung disease. Over the past decades, life expectancy of CF patients has increased due to early diagnosis and improved treatments; however, these patients still present limited quality of life. Many attempts have been made to rescue CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression, function and stability, thereby overcoming the molecular basis of CF. Gene and protein variances caused by CFTR mutants lead to different CF phenotypes, which then require different treatments to quell the patients’ debilitating symptoms. In order to seek better approaches to treat CF patients and maximize therapeutic effects, CFTR mutants have been stratified into six groups (although several of these mutations present pleiotropic defects). The research with CFTR modulators (read-through agents, correctors, potentiators, stabilizers and amplifiers) has achieved remarkable progress, and these drugs are translating into pharmaceuticals and personalized treatments for CF patients. This review summarizes the main molecular and clinical features of CF, emphasizes the latest clinical trials using CFTR modulators, sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying these new and emerging treatments, and discusses the major breakthroughs and challenges to treating all CF patients. PMID:27656143

  14. Shedding light on vampires: the phylogeny of vampyrellid amoebae revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Hess

    Full Text Available With the advent of molecular phylogenetic techniques the polyphyly of naked filose amoebae has been proven. They are interspersed in several supergroups of eukaryotes and most of them already found their place within the tree of life. Although the 'vampire amoebae' have attracted interest since the middle of the 19th century, the phylogenetic position and even the monophyly of this traditional group are still uncertain. In this study clonal co-cultures of eight algivorous vampyrellid amoebae and the respective food algae were established. Culture material was characterized morphologically and a molecular phylogeny was inferred using SSU rDNA sequence comparisons. We found that the limnetic, algivorous vampyrellid amoebae investigated in this study belong to a major clade within the Endomyxa Cavalier-Smith, 2002 (Cercozoa, grouping together with a few soil-dwelling taxa. They split into two robust clades, one containing species of the genus Vampyrella Cienkowski, 1865, the other containing the genus Leptophrys Hertwig & Lesser, 1874, together with terrestrial members. Supported by morphological data these clades are designated as the two families Vampyrellidae Zopf, 1885, and Leptophryidae fam. nov. Furthermore the order Vampyrellida West, 1901 was revised and now corresponds to the major vampyrellid clade within the Endomyxa, comprising the Vampyrellidae and Leptophryidae as well as several environmental sequences. In the light of the presented phylogenetic analyses morphological and ecological aspects, the feeding strategy and nutritional specialization within the vampyrellid amoebae are discussed.

  15. Shedding light on ethylene metabolism in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aurineide Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene metabolism in higher plants is regulated by a wide array of endogenous and environmental factors. During most physiological processes, ethylene levels are mainly determined by a strict control of the rate-limiting biosynthetic steps responsible for the production of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC and its subsequent conversion to ethylene. Responsible for these reactions, the key enzymes ACC synthase and ACC oxidase are encoded by multigene families formed by members that can be differentially regulated at the transcription and post-translational levels by specific developmental and environmental signals. Among the wide variety of environmental cues controlling plant ethylene production, light quality, duration and intensity have consistently been demonstrated to influence the metabolism of this plant hormone in diverse plant tissues, organs and species. Although still not completely elucidated, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between light signal transduction and ethylene evolution appears to involve a complex network that includes central transcription factors connecting multiple signaling pathways, which can be reciprocally modulated by ethylene itself, other phytohormones, and specific light wavelengths. Accumulating evidence has indicated particular photoreceptors as essential mediators in light-induced signaling cascades affecting ethylene levels. Therefore, this review specifically focuses on discussing the current knowledge of the potential molecular mechanisms implicated in the light-induced responses affecting ethylene metabolism during the regulation of developmental and metabolic plant responses. Besides presenting the state of the art in this research field, some overlooked mechanisms and future directions to elucidate the exact nature of the light-ethylene interplay in higher plants will also be compiled and discussed.

  16. Redox Proteomics Sheds Light on Photodynamic Treatment of Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsaytler, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death among humans in the world, exceeded only by heart disease. One of the promising modalities for the treatment of cancer is photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is based on the concept that (1) certain light-sensitive compounds (photosensitizers) can be locali

  17. Chlamydial genes shed light on the evolution of photoautotrophic eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melkonian Michael

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria of protists, invertebrates and vertebrates, but have not been found to date in photosynthetic eukaryotes (algae and embryophytes. Genes of putative chlamydial origin, however, are present in significant numbers in sequenced genomes of photosynthetic eukaryotes. It has been suggested that such genes were acquired by an ancient horizontal gene transfer from Chlamydiae to the ancestor of photosynthetic eukaryotes. To further test this hypothesis, an extensive search for proteins of chlamydial origin was performed using several recently sequenced algal genomes and EST databases, and the proteins subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Results A total of 39 proteins of chlamydial origin were retrieved from the photosynthetic eukaryotes analyzed and their identity verified through phylogenetic analyses. The distribution of the chlamydial proteins among four groups of photosynthetic eukaryotes (Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae, Glaucoplantae, Bacillariophyta was complex suggesting multiple acquisitions and losses. Evidence is presented that all except one of the chlamydial genes originated from an ancient endosymbiosis of a chlamydial bacterium into the ancestor of the Plantae before their divergence into Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae and Glaucoplantae, i.e. more than 1.1 BYA. The chlamydial proteins subsequently spread through secondary plastid endosymbioses to other eukaryotes. Of 20 chlamydial proteins recovered from the genomes of two Bacillariophyta, 10 were of rhodoplant, and 10 of viridiplant origin suggesting that they were acquired by two different secondary endosymbioses. Phylogenetic analyses of concatenated sequences demonstrated that the viridiplant secondary endosymbiosis likely occurred before the divergence of Chlorophyta and Streptophyta. Conclusion We identified 39 proteins of chlamydial origin in photosynthetic eukaryotes signaling an ancient invasion of the ancestor of the

  18. Shedding light on ovothiol biosynthesis in marine metazoans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Immacolata; Migliaccio, Oriana; D’Aniello, Salvatore; Merlino, Antonello; Napolitano, Alessandra; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Ovothiol, isolated from marine invertebrate eggs, is considered one of the most powerful antioxidant with potential for drug development. However, its biological functions in marine organisms still represent a matter of debate. In sea urchins, the most accepted view is that ovothiol protects the eggs by the high oxidative burst at fertilization. In this work we address the role of ovothiol during sea urchin development to give new insights on ovothiol biosynthesis in metazoans. The gene involved in ovothiol biosynthesis OvoA was identified in Paracentrotus lividus genome (PlOvoA). PlOvoA embryo expression significantly increased at the pluteus stage and was up-regulated by metals at concentrations mimicking polluted sea-water and by cyclic toxic algal blooms, leading to ovothiol biosynthesis. In silico analyses of the PlOvoA upstream region revealed metal and stress responsive elements. Structural protein models highlighted conserved active site residues likely responsible for ovothiol biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that OvoA evolved in most marine metazoans and was lost in bony vertebrates during the transition from the aquatic to terrestrial environment. These results highlight the crucial role of OvoA in protecting embryos released in seawater from environmental cues, thus allowing the survival under different conditions.

  19. Shedding Light on Neutrino Masses with Dark Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Batell, Brian; Shuve, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Heavy right-handed neutrinos (RHNs) provide the simplest explanation for the origin of light neutrino masses and mixings. If the RHN masses are at or below the weak scale, direct experimental discovery of these states is possible at accelerator experiments such as the LHC or new dedicated beam dump experiments; in such experiments, the RHN decays after traversing a macroscopic distance from the collision point. The experimental sensitivity to RHNs is significantly enhanced if there is a new "dark" gauge force connecting them to the Standard Model (SM), and detection of RHNs can be the primary discovery mode for the new dark force itself. We take the well-motivated example of a B-L gauge symmetry and analyze the sensitivity to displaced decays of the RHNs produced via the new gauge interaction in two experiments: the LHC and the proposed SHiP beam dump experiment. In the most favorable case in which the mediator can be produced on-shell and decays to RHNs, the sensitivity reach is controlled by the square of t...

  20. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  1. Genetic and Epigenetic Diversities Shed Light on Domestication of Cultivated Ginseng (Panax ginseng).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Rui; Shi, Feng-Xue; Zhou, Yu-Xin; Li, Ya-Ling; Wang, Xin-Feng; Zhang, Cui; Wang, Xu-Tong; Liu, Bao; Xiao, Hong-Xing; Li, Lin-Feng

    2015-11-01

    Chinese ginseng (Panax ginseng) is a medically important herb within Panax and has crucial cultural values in East Asia. As the symbol of traditional Chinese medicine, Chinese ginseng has been used as a herbal remedy to restore stamina and capacity in East Asia for thousands of years. To address the evolutionary origin and domestication history of cultivated ginseng, we employed multiple molecular approaches to investigate the genetic structures of cultivated and wild ginseng across their distribution ranges in northeastern Asia. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses revealed that the four cultivated ginseng landraces, COMMON, BIANTIAO, SHIZHU, and GAOLI (also known as Korean ginseng), were not domesticated independently and Fusong Town is likely one of the primary domestication centers. In addition, our results from population genetic and epigenetic analyses demonstrated that cultivated ginseng maintained high levels of genetic and epigenetic diversity, but showed distinct cytosine methylation patterns compared with wild ginseng. The patterns of genetic and epigenetic variation revealed by this study have shed light on the domestication history of cultivated ginseng, which may serve as a framework for future genetic improvements.

  2. Hellbender genome sequences shed light on genomic expansion at the base of crown salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2014-07-01

    Among animals, genome sizes range from 20 Mb to 130 Gb, with 380-fold variation across vertebrates. Most of the largest vertebrate genomes are found in salamanders, an amphibian clade of 660 species. Thus, salamanders are an important system for studying causes and consequences of genomic gigantism. Previously, we showed that plethodontid salamander genomes accumulate higher levels of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons than do other vertebrates, although the evolutionary origins of such sequences remained unexplored. We also showed that some salamanders in the family Plethodontidae have relatively slow rates of DNA loss through small insertions and deletions. Here, we present new data from Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, the hellbender. Cryptobranchus and Plethodontidae span the basal phylogenetic split within salamanders; thus, analyses incorporating these taxa can shed light on the genome of the ancestral crown salamander lineage, which underwent expansion. We show that high levels of LTR retrotransposons likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that disproportionate expansion of this transposable element (TE) class contributed to genomic expansion. Phylogenetic and age distribution analyses of salamander LTR retrotransposons indicate that salamanders' high TE levels reflect persistence and diversification of ancestral TEs rather than horizontal transfer events. Finally, we show that relatively slow DNA loss rates through small indels likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that a decreased DNA loss rate contributed to genomic expansion at the clade's base. Our identification of shared genomic features across phylogenetically distant salamanders is a first step toward identifying the evolutionary processes underlying accumulation and persistence of high levels of repetitive sequence in salamander genomes.

  3. Shedding light on the dark side of identity: Introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Beyers, Wim; Çok, Figen

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this special issue is to shed light in the dark side of identity formation in adolescence and emerging adulthood, that is, to provide some understanding in what exactly can go wrong in identity development. After summarizing the recent developments in identity development literature, in this introduction the main findings of all thirteen empirical papers are summarized into three overarching themes: (1) lack of identity integration as a risk factor, (2) reconsideration of commitment as a sign of identity uncertainty, and (3) ruminative exploration as another risk factor undermining healthy identity development. Finally, given that all papers in this special issue are based on conference presentations at the 14th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Adolescence (EARA), some more information on that conference is included in this introduction.

  4. Unusual modes of reproduction in social insects: shedding light on the evolutionary paradox of sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenseleers, Tom; Van Oystaeyen, Annette

    2011-12-01

    The study of alternative genetic systems and mixed modes of reproduction, whereby sexual and asexual reproduction is combined within the same lifecycle, is of fundamental importance as they may shed light on classical evolutionary issues, such as the paradox of sex. Recently, several such cases were discovered in social insects. A closer examination of these systems has revealed many amazing facts, including the mixed use of asexual and sexual reproduction for the production of new queens and workers, males that can clone themselves and the routine use of incest without deleterious genetic consequences. In addition, in several species, remarkable cases of asexually reproducing socially parasitic worker lineages have been discovered. The study of these unusual systems promises to provide insight into many basic evolutionary questions, including the maintenance of sex, the expression of sexual conflict and kin conflict and the evolution of cheating in asexual lineages.

  5. Clausius’ Disgregation: A Conceptual Relic that Sheds Light on the Second Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Marco Pellegrino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work analyzes the cognitive process that led Clausius towards the translation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics into mathematical expressions. We show that Clausius’ original formal expression of the Second Law was achieved by making extensive use of the concept of disgregation, a quantity which has subsequently disappeared from the thermodynamic language. Our analysis demonstrates that disgregation stands as a crucial logical step of such process and sheds light on the comprehension of such fundamental relation. The introduction of entropy—which occurred three years after the first formalization of the Second Law—was aimed at making the Second Law exploitable in practical contexts. The reasons for the disappearance of disgregation, as well as of other “pre-modern” quantities, from the thermodynamics language are discussed.

  6. Fossils from the Middle Jurassic of China shed light on morphology of Choristopsychidae (Insecta, Mecoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiao; Shih, Chung Kun; Petrulevičius, Julian F.; Dong, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Choristopsychidae, established by Martynov in 1937 with a single isolated forewing, is a little known extinct family in Mecoptera. Since then, no new members of this enigmatic family have been described. Based on 23 well-preserved specimens with complete body and wings from the Middle Jurassic of northeastern China, we report one new genus and three new species of Choristopsychidae, two new species of the genus Choristopsyche Martynov, 1937: Choristopsyche perfecta sp. n. and Choristopsyche asticta sp. n.; one new species of Paristopsyche gen. n.: Paristopsyche angelineae sp. n.; and re-describe Choristopsyche tenuinervis Martynov, 1937. In addition, we emend the diagnoses of Choristopsychidae and Choristopsyche. Analyzing the forewing length/width ratios of representative species in Mecoptera, we confirm that choristopsychids have the lowest ratio of forewing length/width, meaning broadest forewings. These findings, the first fossil choristopsychids with well-preserved body structure and the first record of Choristopsychidae in China, shed light on the morphology of these taxa and broaden their distribution from Tajikistan to China, while increasing the diversity of Mesozoic Mecoptera in China. PMID:23950679

  7. Navigating the gender minefield: An IPV prevention campaign sheds light on the gender gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sarah N; Honea, Joy C

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how differences in male and female views about intimate partner violence (IPV) contributed to divergent responses to a prevention campaign conducted in the western USA. The study examines focus groups (n = 22) and in-depth interview data (n = 13) collected during campaign development to shed light on quantitative results indicating that women (but not men) increased their perceived severity of domestic violence and awareness of services from pre-test to post-test, while male attitudes moved in the opposite direction. Results of the qualitative study provide the basis for the authors' conclusions about why reactions differed: (1) men's unwillingness to view abuse within a gender context limits men's ability to accept the inequity in statistically demonstrated male and female roles as perpetrators and victims; (2) male resentment of existing gender stereotypes contributed to a rejection of campaign messages that utilised gender prevalence statistics to depict images showing men as perpetrators and women as victims; and (3) victim blaming attitudes contributed to resistance to empathy for victims depicted in the campaign. The authors offer suggestions for future campaigns that foster agency among both perpetrators and survivors while confronting the structural barriers to enacting change.

  8. Fossils from the Middle Jurassic of China shed light on morphology of Choristopsychidae (Insecta, Mecoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Qiao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Choristopsychidae, established by Martynov in 1937 with a single isolated forewing, is a little known extinct family in Mecoptera. Since then, no new members of this enigmatic family have been described. Based on 23 well-preserved specimens with complete body and wings from the Middle Jurassic of northeastern China, we report one new genus and three new species of Choristopsychidae, two new species of the genus Choristopsyche Martynov, 1937: C. perfecta sp. n. and C. asticta sp. n.; one new species of Paristopsyche gen. n.: P. angelineae sp. n.; and re-describe C. tenuinervis Martynov, 1937. In addition, we emend the diagnoses of Choristopsychidae and Choristopsyche. Analyzing the forewing length/width ratios of representative species in Mecoptera, we confirm that choristopsychids have the lowest ratio of forewing length/width, meaning broadest forewings. These findings, the first fossil choristopsychids with well-preserved body structure and the first record of Choristopsychidae in China, shed light on the morphology of these taxa and broaden their distribution from Tajikistan to China, while increasing the diversity of Mesozoic Mecoptera in China.

  9. A previously undescribed organic residue sheds light on heat treatment in the Middle Stone Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Porraz, Guillaume; Bellot-Gurlet, Ludovic; February, Edmund; Ligouis, Bertrand; Paris, Céline; Texier, Pierre-Jean; Parkington, John E; Miller, Christopher E; Nickel, Klaus G; Conard, Nicholas J

    2015-08-01

    South Africa has in recent years gained increasing importance for our understanding of the evolution of 'modern human behaviour' during the Middle Stone Age (MSA). A key element in the suite of behaviours linked with modern humans is heat treatment of materials such as ochre for ritual purposes and stone prior to tool production. Until now, there has been no direct archaeological evidence for the exact procedure used in the heat treatment of silcrete. Through the analysis of heat-treated artefacts from the Howiesons Poort of Diepkloof Rock Shelter, we identified a hitherto unknown type of organic residue - a tempering-residue - that sheds light on the processes used for heat treatment in the MSA. This black film on the silcrete surface is an organic tar that contains microscopic fragments of charcoal and formed as a residue during the direct contact of the artefacts with hot embers of green wood. Our results suggest that heat treatment of silcrete was conducted directly using an open fire, similar to those likely used for cooking. These findings add to the discussion about the complexity of MSA behaviour and appear to contradict previous studies that had suggested that heat treatment of silcrete was a complex (i.e., requiring a large number of steps for its realization) and resource-consuming procedure.

  10. Zebrafish models flex their muscles to shed light on muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Berger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that specifically affect skeletal muscle and are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakening. To develop therapies and treatments for these diseases, a better understanding of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies is required. Thus, identification of causative genes mutated in specific disorders and the study of relevant animal models are imperative. Zebrafish genetic models of human muscle disorders often closely resemble disease pathogenesis, and the optical clarity of zebrafish embryos and larvae enables visualization of dynamic molecular processes in vivo. As an adjunct tool, morpholino studies provide insight into the molecular function of genes and allow rapid assessment of candidate genes for human muscular dystrophies. This unique set of attributes makes the zebrafish model system particularly valuable for the study of muscle diseases. This review discusses how recent research using zebrafish has shed light on the pathological basis of muscular dystrophies, with particular focus on the muscle cell membrane and the linkage between the myofibre cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix.

  11. Zebrafish models flex their muscles to shed light on muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joachim; Currie, Peter D

    2012-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that specifically affect skeletal muscle and are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakening. To develop therapies and treatments for these diseases, a better understanding of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies is required. Thus, identification of causative genes mutated in specific disorders and the study of relevant animal models are imperative. Zebrafish genetic models of human muscle disorders often closely resemble disease pathogenesis, and the optical clarity of zebrafish embryos and larvae enables visualization of dynamic molecular processes in vivo. As an adjunct tool, morpholino studies provide insight into the molecular function of genes and allow rapid assessment of candidate genes for human muscular dystrophies. This unique set of attributes makes the zebrafish model system particularly valuable for the study of muscle diseases. This review discusses how recent research using zebrafish has shed light on the pathological basis of muscular dystrophies, with particular focus on the muscle cell membrane and the linkage between the myofibre cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix.

  12. Trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding: a comparison of shade- and sun-adapted species in a subtropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fengqun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Dongmei; Niklas, Karl J; Sun, Shucun

    2014-01-01

    Species in high-rainfall regions have two major alternative approaches to quickly drain off water, i.e., increasing leaf inclination angles relative to the horizontal plane, or developing long leaf drip tips. We hypothesized that shade-adapted species will have more pronounced leaf drip tips but not greater inclination angles (which can reduce the ability to intercept light) compared to sun-adapted species and that length of leaf drip tips will be negatively correlated with photosynthetic capacity [characterized by light-saturated net photosynthetic rates (Amax), associated light compensation points (LCP), and light saturation points (LSP)]. We tested this hypothesis by measuring morphological and physiological traits that are associated with light-interception and water shedding for seven shade-adapted shrub species, ten sun-adapted understory shrub species, and 15 sun-adapted tree species in a subtropical Chinese rainforest, where mean annual precipitation is around 1,600 mm. Shade-adapted understory species had lower LMA, Amax, LSP, and LCP compared to understory or canopy sun-adapted species; their leaf and twig inclination angles were significantly smaller and leaf drip tips were significantly longer than those in sun-adapted species. This suggests that shade-adapted understory species tend to develop pronounced leaf drip tips but not large leaf inclination angles to shed water. The length of leaf drip tips was negatively correlated with leaf inclination angles and photosynthetic capacity. These relationships were consistent between ordinary regression and phylogenetic generalized least squares analyses. Our study illustrates the trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding and indicates that length of leaf drip tips can be used as an indicator of adaptation to shady conditions and overall photosynthetic performance of shrub species in subtropical rainforests.

  13. Shedding new light on viruses: super-resolution microscopy for studying human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Barbara; Heilemann, Mike

    2013-10-01

    For more than 70 years electron microscopy (EM) techniques have played an important role in investigating structures of enveloped viruses. By contrast, use of fluorescence microscopy (FM) methods for this purpose was limited by the fact that the size of virus particles is generally around or below the diffraction limit of light microscopy. Various super-resolution (SR) fluorescence imaging techniques developed over the past two decades bypass the diffraction limit of light microscopy, allowing visualization of subviral details and bridging the gap between conventional FM and EM methods. We summarize here findings on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) obtained using SR-FM techniques. Although the number of published studies is currently limited and some of the pioneering analyses also covered methodological or descriptive aspects, recent publications clearly indicate the potential to approach open questions in HIV-1 replication from a new angle.

  14. ITS polymorphisms shed light on hybrid evolution in apomictic plants: a case study on the Ranunculus auricomus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodač, Ladislav; Scheben, Armin Patrick; Hojsgaard, Diego; Paun, Ovidiu; Hörandl, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of reticulate evolutionary histories in plants is still a major methodological challenge. Sequences of the ITS nrDNA are a popular marker to analyze hybrid relationships, but variation of this multicopy spacer region is affected by concerted evolution, high intraindividual polymorphism, and shifts in mode of reproduction. The relevance of changes in secondary structure is still under dispute. We aim to shed light on the extent of polymorphism within and between sexual species and their putative natural as well as synthetic hybrid derivatives in the Ranunculus auricomus complex to test morphology-based hypotheses of hybrid origin and parentage of taxa. We employed direct sequencing of ITS nrDNA from 68 individuals representing three sexuals, their synthetic hybrids and one sympatric natural apomict, as well as cloning of ITS copies in four representative individuals, RNA secondary structure analysis, and landmark geometric morphometric analysis on leaves. Phylogenetic network analyses indicate additivity of parental ITS variants in both synthetic and natural hybrids. The triploid synthetic hybrids are genetically much closer to their maternal progenitors, probably due to ploidy dosage effects, although exhibiting a paternal-like leaf morphology. The natural hybrids are genetically and morphologically closer to the putative paternal progenitor species. Secondary structures of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 were rather conserved in all taxa. The observed similarities in ITS polymorphisms suggest that the natural apomict R. variabilis is an ancient hybrid of the diploid sexual species R. notabilis and the sexual species R. cassubicifolius. The additivity pattern shared by R. variabilis and the synthetic hybrids supports an evolutionary and biogeographical scenario that R. variabilis originated from ancient hybridization. Concerted evolution of ITS copies in R. variabilis is incomplete, probably due to a shift to asexual reproduction. Under the condition of

  15. ITS polymorphisms shed light on hybrid evolution in apomictic plants: a case study on the Ranunculus auricomus complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Hodač

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of reticulate evolutionary histories in plants is still a major methodological challenge. Sequences of the ITS nrDNA are a popular marker to analyze hybrid relationships, but variation of this multicopy spacer region is affected by concerted evolution, high intraindividual polymorphism, and shifts in mode of reproduction. The relevance of changes in secondary structure is still under dispute. We aim to shed light on the extent of polymorphism within and between sexual species and their putative natural as well as synthetic hybrid derivatives in the Ranunculus auricomus complex to test morphology-based hypotheses of hybrid origin and parentage of taxa. We employed direct sequencing of ITS nrDNA from 68 individuals representing three sexuals, their synthetic hybrids and one sympatric natural apomict, as well as cloning of ITS copies in four representative individuals, RNA secondary structure analysis, and landmark geometric morphometric analysis on leaves. Phylogenetic network analyses indicate additivity of parental ITS variants in both synthetic and natural hybrids. The triploid synthetic hybrids are genetically much closer to their maternal progenitors, probably due to ploidy dosage effects, although exhibiting a paternal-like leaf morphology. The natural hybrids are genetically and morphologically closer to the putative paternal progenitor species. Secondary structures of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 were rather conserved in all taxa. The observed similarities in ITS polymorphisms suggest that the natural apomict R. variabilis is an ancient hybrid of the diploid sexual species R. notabilis and the sexual species R. cassubicifolius. The additivity pattern shared by R. variabilis and the synthetic hybrids supports an evolutionary and biogeographical scenario that R. variabilis originated from ancient hybridization. Concerted evolution of ITS copies in R. variabilis is incomplete, probably due to a shift to asexual reproduction. Under the

  16. Shedding (far-red) light on phytochrome mechanisms and responses in land plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Possart, A.; Fleck, C.; Hiltbrunner, A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to monitor ambient light conditions, plants rely on functionally diversified photoreceptors. Among these, phytochromes perceive red (R) and far-red (FR) light. FR light does not constitute a photosynthetic energy source; it however influences adaptive and developmental processes. In seed pl

  17. Shedding Light on Structure-Property Relationships for Conjugated Microporous Polymers: The Importance of Rings and Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwijnenburg, Martijn A; Cheng, Ge; McDonald, Tom O; Jelfs, Kim E; Jiang, Jia-Xing; Ren, Shijie; Hasell, Tom; Blanc, Frédéric; Cooper, Andrew I; Adams, Dave J

    2013-10-08

    The photophysical properties of insoluble porous pyrene networks, which are central to their function, differ strongly from those of analogous soluble linear and branched polymers and dendrimers. This can be rationalized by the presence of strained closed rings in the networks. A combined experimental and computational approach was used to obtain atomic scale insight into the structure of amorphous conjugated microporous polymers. The optical absorption and fluorescence spectra of a series of pyrene-based materials were compared with theoretical time-dependent density functional theory predictions for model clusters. Comparison of computation and experiment sheds light on the probable structural chromophores in the various materials.

  18. The predicted secretome of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 sheds light on interactions with its environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhorst, J.; Wels, M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Siezen, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    The predicted extracellular proteins of the bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum were analysed to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying interactions of this bacterium with its environment. Extracellular proteins play important roles in processes ranging from probiotic effects in the gastrointesti

  19. The Opiliones tree of life: shedding light on harvestmen relationships through transcriptomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant P.; Tourinho, Ana Lúcia

    2017-01-01

    Opiliones are iconic arachnids with a Palaeozoic origin and a diversity that reflects ancient biogeographic patterns dating back at least to the times of Pangea. Owing to interest in harvestman diversity, evolution and biogeography, their relationships have been thoroughly studied using morphology and PCR-based Sanger approaches to infer their systematic relationships. More recently, two studies utilized transcriptomics-based phylogenomics to explore their basal relationships and diversification, but sampling was limiting for understanding deep evolutionary patterns, as they lacked good taxon representation at the family level. Here, we analysed a set of the 14 existing transcriptomes with 40 additional ones generated for this study, representing approximately 80% of the extant familial diversity in Opiliones. Our phylogenetic analyses, including a set of data matrices with different gene occupancy and evolutionary rates, and using a multitude of methods correcting for a diversity of factors affecting phylogenomic data matrices, provide a robust and stable Opiliones tree of life, where most families and higher taxa are precisely placed. Our dating analyses using alternative calibration points, methods and analytical parameters provide well-resolved old divergences, consistent with ancient regionalization in Pangea in some groups, and Pangean vicariance in others. The integration of state-of-the-art molecular techniques and analyses, together with the broadest taxonomic sampling to date presented in a phylogenomic study of harvestmen, provide new insights into harvestmen interrelationships, as well as an overview of the general biogeographic patterns of this ancient arthropod group. PMID:28228511

  20. Hippocampal formation: shedding light on the influence of sex and stress on the brain

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampus is a malleable brain region that responds to external agents such as hormones and stressors. Investigations that began in our laboratories with the Golgi technique and an appreciation of hippocampal neuroanatomy at the light and electron microscopic levels have led us down a path that has uncovered unexpected structural plasticity in the adult brain along with unanticipated cellular and molecular mechanisms of this plasticity and of hormone mediation of these effects. This cha...

  1. Shedding light on fractals: exploration of the Sierpinski carpet optical antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ting Lee

    2015-01-01

    We describe experimental and theoretical investigations of the properties of a fractal optical antenna-the Sierpinski carpet optical antenna. Fractal optical antennas are inspired by fractal antennas designed in radio frequency (RF) region. Shrinking the size of fractal optical antennas from fractal antennas in RF regions by a factor of lE-5 arises challenges of fabrication, characterization and modelling their response to incident light. The comparison between optical antennas with the Sierp...

  2. Shedding (far-red) light on phytochrome mechanisms and responses in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possart, Anja; Fleck, Christian; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    In order to monitor ambient light conditions, plants rely on functionally diversified photoreceptors. Among these, phytochromes perceive red (R) and far-red (FR) light. FR light does not constitute a photosynthetic energy source; it however influences adaptive and developmental processes. In seed plants, phytochrome A (phyA) acts as FR receptor and mediates FR high irradiance responses (FR-HIRs). It exerts a dual role by promoting e.g. germination and seedling de-etiolation in canopy shade and by antagonising shade avoidance growth. Even though cryptogam plants such as mosses and ferns do not have phyA, they show FR-induced responses. In the present review we discuss the mechanistic basis of phyA-dependent FR-HIRs as well as their dual role in seed plants. We compare FR responses in seed plants and cryptogam plants and conclude on different potential concepts for the detection of canopy shade. Scenarios for the evolution of FR perception and responses are discussed.

  3. Afterglow Observations Shed New Light on the Nature of X-ray Flashes

    CERN Document Server

    Granot, J; Perna, R; Granot, Jonathan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Perna, Rosalba

    2005-01-01

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRGRBs) share many observational characteristics with long duration GRBs, but the reason for which their prompt emission peaks at lower photon energies, $E_p$, is still under debate. Although many different models have been invoked in order to explain the lower $E_p$ values, their implications for the afterglow emission were not considered in most cases, mainly because observations of XRF afterglows have become available only recently. Here we examine the predictions of the various XRF models for the afterglow emission, and test them against the observations of XRF 030723 and XRGRB 041006, the events with the best monitored afterglow light curves in their respective class. We show that most existing XRF models are hard to reconcile with the observed afterglow light curves, which are very flat at early times. Such light curves are, however, naturally produced by a roughly uniform jet with relatively sharp edges that is viewed off-axis (i.e. from outside of ...

  4. Cerebral malaria and the hemolysis/methemoglobin/heme hypothesis: shedding new light on an old disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Ana; Hanscheid, Thomas; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Mota, Maria M; Vigário, Ana M

    2009-04-01

    Malaria causes more than 1 million deaths every year with cerebral malaria (CM) being a major cause of death in Sub-Saharan African children. The nature of the malaria-associated pathogenesis is complex and multi-factorial. A unified hypothesis involving sequestration of infected red blood cells, systemic host inflammatory response and hemostasis dysfunction has been proposed to explain the genesis of CM. In this review, we discuss the role of hemolysis, methemoglobin and free heme in CM, brought to light by our recent studies in mice as well as by other studies in humans.

  5. Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette N. Houreld

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP. In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing.

  6. Variable Ly alpha sheds light on the environment surrounding GRB 090426

    CERN Document Server

    Thöne, C C; Lazzati, D; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Fynbo, J P U; Christensen, L; Levan, A J; Aloy, M A; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Levesque, E M; Malesani, D; Milvang-Jensen, B; Roming, P W A; Tanvir, N R; Wiersema, K; Gladders, M; Wuyts, E; Dahle, H

    2011-01-01

    Long duration gamma-ray bursts are commonly associated with the deaths of massive stars. Spectroscopic studies using the afterglow as a light source provide a unique opportunity to unveil the medium surrounding it, probing the densest region of their galaxies. This material is usually in a low ionisation state and at large distances from the burst site, hence representing the normal interstellar medium in the galaxy. Here we present the case of GRB 090426 at z=2.609, whose optical spectrum indicates an almost fully ionised medium together with a low column density of neutral hydrogen. For the first time, we also observe variations in the Ly alpha absorption line. Photoionisation modeling shows that we are probing material from the vicinity of the burst (~80 pc). The host galaxy is a complex of two luminous interacting galaxies, which might suggest that this burst could have occurred in an isolated star-forming region outside its host galaxy created in the interaction of the two galaxies.

  7. Evidence of coat color variation sheds new light on ancient canids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Ollivier

    Full Text Available We have used a paleogenetics approach to investigate the genetic landscape of coat color variation in ancient Eurasian dog and wolf populations. We amplified DNA fragments of two genes controlling coat color, Mc1r (Melanocortin 1 Receptor and CBD103 (canine-β-defensin, in respectively 15 and 19 ancient canids (dogs and wolf morphotypes from 14 different archeological sites, throughout Asia and Europe spanning from ca. 12 000 B.P. (end of Upper Palaeolithic to ca. 4000 B.P. (Bronze Age. We provide evidence of a new variant (R301C of the Melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r and highlight the presence of the beta-defensin melanistic mutation (CDB103-K locus on ancient DNA from dog-and wolf-morphotype specimens. We show that the dominant K(B allele (CBD103, which causes melanism, and R301C (Mc1r, the variant that may cause light hair color, are present as early as the beginning of the Holocene, over 10,000 years ago. These results underline the genetic diversity of prehistoric dogs. This diversity may have partly stemmed not only from the wolf gene pool captured by domestication but also from mutations very likely linked to the relaxation of natural selection pressure occurring in-line with this process.

  8. Evidence of Coat Color Variation Sheds New Light on Ancient Canids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, Morgane; Tresset, Anne; Hitte, Christophe; Petit, Coraline; Hughes, Sandrine; Gillet, Benjamin; Duffraisse, Marilyne; Pionnier-Capitan, Maud; Lagoutte, Laetitia; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Balasescu, Adrian; Boroneant, Adina; Mashkour, Marjan; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Hänni, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    We have used a paleogenetics approach to investigate the genetic landscape of coat color variation in ancient Eurasian dog and wolf populations. We amplified DNA fragments of two genes controlling coat color, Mc1r (Melanocortin 1 Receptor) and CBD103 (canine-β-defensin), in respectively 15 and 19 ancient canids (dogs and wolf morphotypes) from 14 different archeological sites, throughout Asia and Europe spanning from ca. 12 000 B.P. (end of Upper Palaeolithic) to ca. 4000 B.P. (Bronze Age). We provide evidence of a new variant (R301C) of the Melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) and highlight the presence of the beta-defensin melanistic mutation (CDB103-K locus) on ancient DNA from dog-and wolf-morphotype specimens. We show that the dominant KB allele (CBD103), which causes melanism, and R301C (Mc1r), the variant that may cause light hair color, are present as early as the beginning of the Holocene, over 10 000 years ago. These results underline the genetic diversity of prehistoric dogs. This diversity may have partly stemmed not only from the wolf gene pool captured by domestication but also from mutations very likely linked to the relaxation of natural selection pressure occurring in-line with this process. PMID:24098367

  9. Shedding Light on the Controversy Surrounding the Temporal Decline in Human Sperm Counts: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Cocuzza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We systematically examined the evidence of declining sperm counts and the hypothesis that an increased exposure to environmental pollutants is responsible for such decline. Search engines, including PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and Cochrane library, were used to identify epidemiologic studies published from 1985 to 2013. We concluded that there is no enough evidence to confirm a worldwide decline in sperm counts. Also, there seems to be no scientific truth of a causative role for endocrine disruptors in the temporal decline of sperm production. Such assumptions are based on few meta-analyses and retrospective studies, while other well-conducted researches could not confirm these findings. We acknowledge that difficult-to-control confounding factors in the highly variable nature of semen, selection criteria, and comparability of populations from different time periods in secular-trend studies, the quality of laboratory methods for counting sperm, and apparently geographic variations in semen quality are the main issues that complicate the interpretation of the available evidence. Owing to the importance of this subject and the uncertainties still prevailing, there is a need not only for continuing monitoring of semen quality, reproductive hormones, and xenobiotics, but also for a better definition of fecundity.

  10. Concatenated analysis sheds light on early metazoan evolution and fuels a modern "urmetazoon" hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Schierwater

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For more than a century, the origin of metazoan animals has been debated. One aspect of this debate has been centered on what the hypothetical "urmetazoon" bauplan might have been. The morphologically most simply organized metazoan animal, the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, resembles an intriguing model for one of several "urmetazoon" hypotheses: the placula hypothesis. Clear support for a basal position of Placozoa would aid in resolving several key issues of metazoan-specific inventions (including, for example, head-foot axis, symmetry, and coelom and would determine a root for unraveling their evolution. Unfortunately, the phylogenetic relationships at the base of Metazoa have been controversial because of conflicting phylogenetic scenarios generated while addressing the question. Here, we analyze the sum of morphological evidence, the secondary structure of mitochondrial ribosomal genes, and molecular sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear genes that amass over 9,400 phylogenetically informative characters from 24 to 73 taxa. Together with mitochondrial DNA genome structure and sequence analyses and Hox-like gene expression patterns, these data (1 provide evidence that Placozoa are basal relative to all other diploblast phyla and (2 spark a modernized "urmetazoon" hypothesis.

  11. Analysis of the African coelacanth genome sheds light on tetrapod evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Chris T.; Alföldi, Jessica; Lee, Alison P.; Fan, Shaohua; Philippe, Hervé; MacCallum, Iain; Braasch, Ingo; Manousaki, Tereza; Schneider, Igor; Rohner, Nicolas; Organ, Chris; Chalopin, Domitille; Smith, Jeramiah J.; Robinson, Mark; Dorrington, Rosemary A.; Gerdol, Marco; Aken, Bronwen; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Barucca, Marco; Baurain, Denis; Berlin, Aaron M.; Blatch, Gregory L.; Buonocore, Francesco; Burmester, Thorsten; Campbell, Michael S.; Canapa, Adriana; Cannon, John P.; Christoffels, Alan; De Moro, Gianluca; Edkins, Adrienne L.; Fan, Lin; Fausto, Anna Maria; Feiner, Nathalie; Forconi, Mariko; Gamieldien, Junaid; Gnerre, Sante; Gnirke, Andreas; Goldstone, Jared V.; Haerty, Wilfried; Hahn, Mark E.; Hesse, Uljana; Hoffmann, Steve; Johnson, Jeremy; Karchner, Sibel I.; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Lara, Marcia; Levin, Joshua Z.; Litman, Gary W.; Mauceli, Evan; Miyake, Tsutomu; Mueller, M. Gail; Nelson, David R.; Nitsche, Anne; Olmo, Ettore; Ota, Tatsuya; Pallavicini, Alberto; Panji, Sumir; Picone, Barbara; Ponting, Chris P.; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Przybylski, Dariusz; Saha, Nil Ratan; Ravi, Vydianathan; Ribeiro, Filipe J.; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Searle, Stephen M. J.; Sharpe, Ted; Simakov, Oleg; Stadler, Peter F.; Stegeman, John J.; Sumiyama, Kenta; Tabbaa, Diana; Tafer, Hakim; Turner-Maier, Jason; van Heusden, Peter; White, Simon; Williams, Louise; Yandell, Mark; Brinkmann, Henner; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Tabin, Clifford J.; Shubin, Neil; Schartl, Manfred; Jaffe, David; Postlethwait, John H.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Di Palma, Federica; Lander, Eric S.; Meyer, Axel; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    It was a zoological sensation when a living specimen of the coelacanth was first discovered in 1938, as this lineage of lobe-finned fish was thought to have gone extinct 70 million years ago. The modern coelacanth looks remarkably similar to many of its ancient relatives, and its evolutionary proximity to our own fish ancestors provides a glimpse of the fish that first walked on land. Here we report the genome sequence of the African coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae. Through a phylogenomic analysis, we conclude that the lungfish, and not the coelacanth, is the closest living relative of tetrapods. Coelacanth protein-coding genes are significantly more slowly evolving than those of tetrapods, unlike other genomic features . Analyses of changes in genes and regulatory elements during the vertebrate adaptation to land highlight genes involved in immunity, nitrogen excretion and the development of fins, tail, ear, eye, brain, and olfaction. Functional assays of enhancers involved in the fin-to-limb transition and in the emergence of extra-embryonic tissues demonstrate the importance of the coelacanth genome as a blueprint for understanding tetrapod evolution. PMID:23598338

  12. Son Preference in India: Shedding Light on the North-South Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dieser Beitrag liegt nur in englischer Sprache vor. Son preference is widespread in India and deep-rooted in its history. It is a matter of concern because it produces an imbalanced juvenile sex ratio. There are far fewer girls than boys. The figures vary greatly among the Indian states suggesting a major north-south gradient in son preference accompanied by a minor west-east gradient. The aim of this paper is to explain the regional pattern. We provide an application of the value of children-approach according to which the decision to have children is made on the calculus of benefits and costs related to children. In the light of the socioeconomic and sociocultural background in India, we propose that (potential parents’ expectations of benefits and costs are biased in favour of sons. This is suggested, therefore, as the key motivation for the preference for male offspring. However, region-specifics in the level of affluence, the educational level, the mode of production, the meaning and importance of religion, and the kinship regime are assumed to produce stronger son preference in north India compared to south India. This mediation-model is tested using the Indian sub-sample of the international Value of Children-study. Data were collected in Uttar Pradesh (north-central India and Puducherry (south-east India. Mothers aged 16 to 65 were interviewed in 2002 and 2010. Based on 1,173 respondents, a structural equation model was carried out to test the hypothesised composition effects related to the region and the mediating position of sex-specific benefits and costs. Initial findings confirm that the national son preference pattern is more likely to be found among north Indian mothers than south Indian mothers. As assumed, the sex-specific balance of benefits and costs contributes to the explanation of son preference. However, there is little evidence that the benefits and costs mediate between the region-specific socioeconomic and

  13. The genomics of wild yeast populations sheds light on the domestication of man's best (micro) friend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, Chris; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Landry, Christian R

    2015-11-01

    oak trees in Europe, presumably its natural host. Using population genomics analyses, Almeida and colleagues discovered that the initial divergence between natural and domesticated wine yeasts in the Mediterranean region took place around the early days of wine production. Surprisingly, genomic regions that are key to wine production today appeared not to be derived from these natural populations but from genes gained from other yeast species.

  14. Shedding light on avian influenza H4N6 infection in mallards: modes of transmission and implications for surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaci K VanDalen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wild mallards (Anas platyrhychos are considered one of the primary reservoir species for avian influenza viruses (AIV. Because AIV circulating in wild birds pose an indirect threat to agriculture and human health, understanding the ecology of AIV and developing risk assessments and surveillance systems for prevention of disease is critical. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, mallards were experimentally infected with an H4N6 subtype of AIV by oral inoculation or contact with an H4N6 contaminated water source. Cloacal swabs, oropharyngeal swabs, fecal samples, and water samples were collected daily and tested by real-time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR for estimation of viral shedding. Fecal samples had significantly higher virus concentrations than oropharyngeal or cloacal swabs and 6 month old ducks shed significantly more viral RNA than 3 month old ducks regardless of sample type. Use of a water source contaminated by AIV infected mallards, was sufficient to transmit virus to naïve mallards, which shed AIV at higher or similar levels as orally-inoculated ducks. CONCLUSIONS: Bodies of water could serve as a transmission pathway for AIV in waterfowl. For AIV surveillance purposes, water samples and fecal samples appear to be excellent alternatives or additions to cloacal and oropharyngeal swabbing. Furthermore, duck age (even within hatch-year birds may be important when interpreting viral shedding results from experimental infections or surveillance. Differential shedding among hatch-year mallards could affect prevalence estimates, modeling of AIV spread, and subsequent risk assessments.

  15. Preparation of Kepler light curves for asteroseismic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García, R.A.; Hekker, Saskia; Stello, Dennis;

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler mission is providing photometric data of exquisite quality for the asteroseismic study of different classes of pulsating stars. These analyses place particular demands on the pre-processing of the data, over a range of time-scales from minutes to months. Here, we describe processing pr...

  16. On Correlated-noise Analyses Applied To Exoplanet Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Cubillos, Patricio; Loredo, Thomas J; Lust, Nate B; Blecic, Jasmina; Stemm, Madison

    2016-01-01

    Time-correlated noise is a significant source of uncertainty when modeling exoplanet light-curve data. A correct assessment of correlated noise is fundamental to determine the true statistical significance of our findings. Here we review three of the most widely used correlated-noise estimators in the exoplanet field, the time-averaging, residual-permutation, and wavelet-likelihood methods. We argue that the residual-permutation method is unsound in estimating the uncertainty of parameter estimates. We thus recommend to refrain from this method altogether. We characterize the behavior of the time averaging's rms-vs.-bin-size curves at bin sizes similar to the total observation duration, which may lead to underestimated uncertainties. For the wavelet-likelihood method, we note errors in the published equations and provide a list of corrections. We further assess the performance of these techniques by injecting and retrieving eclipse signals into synthetic and real Spitzer light curves, analyzing the results in...

  17. Can the genetics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes shed light on the genetics of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Struan F A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Schwartz, Stanley

    2010-04-01

    The pathophysiology of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is considered less understood than its much better characterized counterparts of type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1D and T2D), where its clinical presentation exhibits some features of each of these two main diseases, earning it a reputation as being "type 1.5 diabetes". The etiology of LADA remains unknown, but a genetic component has been implicated from recent reports of T1D and T2D genes playing a role in its pathogenesis. One way to shed much needed light on the classification of LADA is to determine the discrete genetic factors conferring risk to the pathogenesis of this specific phenotype and to determine to what extent LADA shares genetic similarities with T1D and T2D. For instance, no conclusive support for a role of the T1D-associated INS gene has been reported in T2D; conversely, but similarly, no evidence has been found for the role of the T2D-associated genes IDE/HHEX, SLC30A8, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, FTO, and TCF7L2 in T1D. However, and somewhat at odds with current thinking, TCF7L2, the most strongly associated gene with T2D to date, is strongly associated with LADA, a disorder considered by the World Health Organization to be a slowly progressing form of T1D. In this review, we address recent advances in the genetics of T1D and T2D and how such discoveries have in turn shed some light on the genetics of LADA as being potentially at the "genetic intersection" of these two major diseases.

  18. Data Covariances from R-Matrix Analyses of Light Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, G.M., E-mail: ghale@lanl.gov; Paris, M.W.

    2015-01-15

    After first reviewing the parametric description of light-element reactions in multichannel systems using R-matrix theory and features of the general LANL R-matrix analysis code EDA, we describe how its chi-square minimization procedure gives parameter covariances. This information is used, together with analytically calculated sensitivity derivatives, to obtain cross section covariances for all reactions included in the analysis by first-order error propagation. Examples are given of the covariances obtained for systems with few resonances ({sup 5}He) and with many resonances ({sup 13}C ). We discuss the prevalent problem of this method leading to cross section uncertainty estimates that are unreasonably small for large data sets. The answer to this problem appears to be using parameter confidence intervals in place of standard errors.

  19. On Correlated-noise Analyses Applied to Exoplanet Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Loredo, Thomas J.; Lust, Nate B.; Blecic, Jasmina; Stemm, Madison

    2017-01-01

    Time-correlated noise is a significant source of uncertainty when modeling exoplanet light-curve data. A correct assessment of correlated noise is fundamental to determine the true statistical significance of our findings. Here, we review three of the most widely used correlated-noise estimators in the exoplanet field, the time-averaging, residual-permutation, and wavelet-likelihood methods. We argue that the residual-permutation method is unsound in estimating the uncertainty of parameter estimates. We thus recommend to refrain from this method altogether. We characterize the behavior of the time averaging’s rms-versus-bin-size curves at bin sizes similar to the total observation duration, which may lead to underestimated uncertainties. For the wavelet-likelihood method, we note errors in the published equations and provide a list of corrections. We further assess the performance of these techniques by injecting and retrieving eclipse signals into synthetic and real Spitzer light curves, analyzing the results in terms of the relative-accuracy and coverage-fraction statistics. Both the time-averaging and wavelet-likelihood methods significantly improve the estimate of the eclipse depth over a white-noise analysis (a Markov-chain Monte Carlo exploration assuming uncorrelated noise). However, the corrections are not perfect when retrieving the eclipse depth from Spitzer data sets, these methods covered the true (injected) depth within the 68% credible region in only ∼45%–65% of the trials. Lastly, we present our open-source model-fitting tool, Multi-Core Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (MC3). This package uses Bayesian statistics to estimate the best-fitting values and the credible regions for the parameters for a (user-provided) model. MC3 is a Python/C code, available at https://github.com/pcubillos/MCcubed.

  20. From museums to genomics: old herbarium specimens shed light on a C3 to C4 transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Guillaume; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Malé, Pierre-Jean G; Lhuillier, Emeline; Lauzeral, Christine; Coissac, Eric; Vorontsova, Maria S

    2014-12-01

    Collections of specimens held by natural history museums are invaluable material for biodiversity inventory and evolutionary studies, with specimens accumulated over 300 years readily available for sampling. Unfortunately, most museum specimens yield low-quality DNA. Recent advances in sequencing technologies, so called next-generation sequencing, are revolutionizing phylogenetic investigations at a deep level. Here, the Illumina technology (HiSeq) was used on herbarium specimens of Sartidia (subfamily Aristidoideae, Poaceae), a small African-Malagasy grass lineage (six species) characteristic of wooded savannas, which is the C3 sister group of Stipagrostis, an important C4 genus from Africa and SW Asia. Complete chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal sequences were assembled for two Sartidia species, one of which (S. perrieri) is only known from a single specimen collected in Madagascar 100 years ago. Partial sequences of a few single-copy genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases (ppc) and malic enzymes (nadpme) were also assembled. Based on these data, the phylogenetic position of Malagasy Sartidia in the subfamily Aristidoideae was investigated and the biogeographical history of this genus was analysed with full species sampling. The evolutionary history of two genes for C4 photosynthesis (ppc-aL1b and nadpme-IV) in the group was also investigated. The gene encoding the C4 phosphoenolpyruvate caroxylase of Stipagrostis is absent from S. dewinteri suggesting that it is not essential in C3 members of the group, which might have favoured its recruitment into a new metabolic pathway. Altogether, the inclusion of historical museum specimens in phylogenomic analyses of biodiversity opens new avenues for evolutionary studies.

  1. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  2. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    KAUST Repository

    Jahn, Martin T.

    2016-10-31

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  3. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T; Markert, Sebastian M; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-10-31

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  4. Transcriptome comparisons shed light on the pre-condition and potential barrier for C4 photosynthesis evolution in eudicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yimin; Lyu, Ming-Ju Amy; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    C4 photosynthesis evolved independently from C3 photosynthesis in more than 60 lineages. Most of the C4 lineages are clustered together in the order Poales and the order Caryophyllales while many other angiosperm orders do not have C4 species, suggesting the existence of biological pre-conditions in the ancestral C3 species that facilitate the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in these lineages. To explore pre-adaptations for C4 photosynthesis evolution, we classified C4 lineages into the C4-poor and the C4-rich groups based on the percentage of C4 species in different genera and conducted a comprehensive comparison on the transcriptomic changes between the non-C4 species from the C4-poor and the C4-rich groups. Results show that species in the C4-rich group showed higher expression of genes related to oxidoreductase activity, light reaction components, terpene synthesis, secondary cell synthesis, C4 cycle related genes and genes related to nucleotide metabolism and senescence. In contrast, C4-poor group showed up-regulation of a PEP/Pi translocator, genes related to signaling pathway, stress response, defense response and plant hormone metabolism (ethylene and brassinosteroid). The implications of these transcriptomic differences between the C4-rich and C4-poor groups to C4 evolution are discussed.

  5. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology. PMID:27796326

  6. Bone histology sheds light on the nature of the "dermal armor" of the enigmatic sauropod dinosaur Agustinia ligabuei Bonaparte, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellardini, Flavio; Cerda, Ignacio A.

    2017-02-01

    Agustinia ligabuei is an Early Cretaceous sauropod dinosaur from the northwest of Patagonia that is currently the topic of debate with respect to its phylogenetic position and atypical dermal armor. The presence of four morphotypes of laminar and transversely elongated putative osteoderms was used to consider Agustinia as an armored sauropod. Regarding the different hypotheses about the identity of the bony structures of Agustinia (e.g., osteoderms, cervical or dorsal ribs, hypertrophied elements), a comparative histological analysis has been carried out. Histological evidence is presented herein and reveals that none of the morphotypes of Agustinia shows a primary bone tissue formed by structural fiber bundles as in other sauropod dinosaur osteoderms. Furthermore, on the basis of their gross morphology and microstructure, the bony structures originally classified as types 1 + 4 and 3 are more comparable respectively with dorsal and cervical ribs than any other kind of dermal or bony element. Due to poor preservation, the nature of the type 2 cannot be assessed but is here tentatively assigned to a pelvic girdle element. Although a phylogenetic reassessment of Agustinia is not the purpose of this paper, our paleohistological analyses have broader implications: by not supporting the dermal armor hypothesis for Agustinia, its inclusion in Lithostrotia is not justified in the absence of other diagnostic features.

  7. Transcriptomic Profiling of Egg Quality in Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Sheds Light on Genes Involved in Ubiquitination and Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żarski, Daniel; Nguyen, Thaovi; Le Cam, Aurélie; Montfort, Jérôme; Dutto, Gilbert; Vidal, Marie Odile; Fauvel, Christian; Bobe, Julien

    2017-02-01

    Variable and low egg quality is a major limiting factor for the development of efficient aquaculture production. This stems from limited knowledge on the mechanisms underlying egg quality in cultured fish. Molecular analyses, such as transcriptomic studies, are valuable tools to identify the most important processes modulating egg quality. However, very few studies have been devoted to this aspect so far. Within this study, the microarray-based transcriptomic analysis of eggs (of different quality) of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) was performed. An Agilent oligo microarray experiment was performed on labelled mRNA extracted from 16 batches of eggs (each batch obtained from a different female) of sea bass, in which over 24,000 published probe arrays were used. We identified 39 differentially expressed genes exhibiting a differential expression between the groups of low (fertilization rate  60 %) quality. The mRNA levels of eight genes were further analyzed by quantitative PCR. Seven genes were confirmed by qPCR to be differentially expressed in eggs of low and high quality. This study confirmed the importance of some of the genes already reported to be potential molecular quality indicators (mainly rnf213 and irf7), but we also found new genes (mainly usp5, mem-prot, plec, cenpf), which had not yet been reported to be quality-dependent in fish. These results suggest the importance of genes involved in several important processes, such as protein ubiquitination, translation, DNA repair, and cell structure and architecture; these probably being the mechanisms that contribute to egg developmental competence in sea bass.

  8. The genome sequence of Brucella pinnipedialis B2/94 sheds light on the evolutionary history of the genus Brucella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the discovery of the Malta fever agent, Brucella melitensis, in the 19th century, six terrestrial mammal-associated Brucella species were recognized over the next century. More recently the number of novel Brucella species has increased and among them, isolation of species B. pinnipedialis and B. ceti from marine mammals raised many questions about their origin as well as on the evolutionary history of the whole genus. Results We report here on the first complete genome sequence of a Brucella strain isolated from marine mammals, Brucella pinnipedialis strain B2/94. A whole gene-based phylogenetic analysis shows that five main groups of host-associated Brucella species rapidly diverged from a likely free-living ancestor close to the recently isolated B. microti. However, this tree lacks the resolution required to resolve the order of divergence of those groups. Comparative analyses focusing on a genome segments unshared between B. microti and B. pinnipedialis, b gene deletion/fusion events and c positions and numbers of Brucella specific IS711 elements in the available Brucella genomes provided enough information to propose a branching order for those five groups. Conclusions In this study, it appears that the closest relatives of marine mammal Brucella sp. are B. ovis and Brucella sp. NVSL 07-0026 isolated from a baboon, followed by B. melitensis and B. abortus strains, and finally the group consisting of B. suis strains, including B. canis and the group consisting of the single B. neotomae species. We were not able, however, to resolve the order of divergence of the two latter groups.

  9. A New Titanosaurian Braincase from the Cretaceous "Lo Hueco" Locality in Spain Sheds Light on Neuroanatomical Evolution within Titanosauria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Knoll

    Full Text Available Despite continuous improvements, our knowledge of the neurocranial anatomy of sauropod dinosaurs as a whole is still poor, which is especially true for titanosaurians even though their postcranial remains are common in many Upper Cretaceous sites worldwide. Here we describe a braincase from the uppermost Cretaceous locality of ''Lo Hueco" in Spain that is one of the most complete titanosaurian braincases found so far in Europe. Although the titanosaurian Ampelosaurus sp. is known from the same locality, this specimen is clearly a distinct taxon and presents a number of occipital characters found in Antarctosaurus and Jainosaurus, which are approximately coeval taxa from southern Gondwana. The specimen was subjected to X-ray computed tomographic (CT scanning, allowing the generation of 3D renderings of the endocranial cavity enclosing the brain, cranial nerves, and blood vessels, as well as the labyrinth of the inner ear. These findings add considerable knowledge to the field of sauropod paleoneuroanatomy in general and titanosaurian endocast diversity in particular. Compared with that of many sauropodomorphs, the endocast appears only slightly flexed in lateral view and bears similarities (e.g., reduction of the rostral dural expansion with Gondwanan titanosaurians such as Jainosaurus, Bonatitan, and Antarctosaurus. The vestibular system of the inner ear is somewhat contracted (i.e., the radius of the semicircular canals is small, but less so than expected in derived titanosaurians. However, as far as the new specimen and Jainosaurus can be contrasted, and with the necessary caution due to the small sample of comparative data currently available, the two taxa appear more similar to one another in endocast morphology than to other titanosaurians. Recent phylogenetic analyses of titanosaurians have not included virtually any of the taxa under consideration here, and thus the phylogenetic position of the new Spanish titanosaurian--even its generic

  10. Shedding light on the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, A. P. J.; Friedman, E. S.; Wilkinson, T. J.; Alp, E. E.; Yener, K. A.

    2001-07-01

    The Amuq valley in southern Turkey is an important and interesting area in the Near East forming a space-time bridge for archaeologists and scientists to ancient and modern civilizations. The Lake of Antioch which evolved during the mid-late Holocene appears to have been located nearby some of the largest human settlements existing during this period. By documenting the conditions of the lake in time, using classical and modern approaches, the climate and geomorphology of the basin may be reconstructed. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence measurements were performed on sections of a sedimentary core from the lake, representing an estimated 7500 yr of history. Analysis yielded the distribution of elemental masses spanning Ca to Mo as a function of depth from the surface. We find that the elemental concentrations measured follow a number of distinct patterns that may be related to local geomorphology, climate and human activities.

  11. A Crystallographic Study of the Role of Sequence Context in Thymine Glycol Bypass by a Replicative DNA Polymerase Serendipitously Sheds Light on the Exonuclease Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Pierre; Duclos, Stéphanie; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie (Vermont)

    2012-06-27

    Thymine glycol (Tg) is the most common oxidation product of thymine and is known to be a strong block to replicative DNA polymerases. A previously solved structure of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69 gp43) in complex with Tg in the sequence context 5'-G-Tg-G shed light on how Tg blocks primer elongation: The protruding methyl group of the oxidized thymine displaces the adjacent 5'-G, which can no longer serve as a template for primer elongation [Aller, P., Rould, M. A., Hogg, M, Wallace, S. S. and Doublie S. (2007). A structural rationale for stalling of a replicative DNA polymerase at the most common oxidative thymine lesion, thymine glycol. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 104, 814-818.]. Several studies showed that in the sequence context 5'-C-Tg-purine, Tg is more likely to be bypassed by Klenow fragment, an A-family DNA polymerase. We set out to investigate the role of sequence context in Tg bypass in a B-family polymerase and to solve the crystal structures of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with Tg-containing DNA in the three remaining sequence contexts: 5'-A-Tg-G, 5'-T-Tg-G, and 5'-C-Tg-G. A combination of several factors - including the associated exonuclease activity, the nature of the 3' and 5' bases surrounding Tg, and the cis-trans interconversion of Tg - influences Tg bypass. We also visualized for the first time the structure of a well-ordered exonuclease complex, allowing us to identify and confirm the role of key residues (Phe123, Met256, and Tyr257) in strand separation and in the stabilization of the primer strand in the exonuclease site.

  12. Studies of Human 2,4-Dienoyl CoA Reductase Shed New Light on Peroxisomal β-Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Tian; Wu, Dong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Jiangyun; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie [Nankai; (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2012-10-15

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in maintaining fatty acid homeostasis. Although mitochondria are also known to participate in the catabolism of fatty acids via β-oxidation, differences exist between the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation. Only peroxisomes, but not mitochondrion, can shorten very long chain fatty acids. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a ternary complex of peroxisomal 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductases (pDCR) with hexadienoyl CoA and NADP, as a prototype for comparison with the mitochondrial 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase (mDCR) to shed light on the differences between the enzymes from the two organelles at the molecular level. Unexpectedly, the structure of pDCR refined to 1.84 Å resolution reveals the absence of the tyrosine-serine pair seen in the active site of mDCR, which together with a lysine and an asparagine have been deemed a hallmark of the SDR family of enzymes. Instead, aspartate hydrogen-bonded to the Cα hydroxyl via a water molecule seems to perturb the water molecule for protonation of the substrate. Our studies provide the first structural evidence for participation of water in the DCR-catalyzed reactions. Biochemical studies and structural analysis suggest that pDCRs can catalyze the shortening of six-carbon-long substrates in vitro. However, the Km values of pDCR for short chain acyl CoAs are at least 6-fold higher than those for substrates with 10 or more aliphatic carbons. Unlike mDCR, hinge movements permit pDCR to process very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  13. The Statistical Analyses of the White-Light Flares: Two Main Results About Flare Behaviours

    CERN Document Server

    Dal, H A

    2012-01-01

    We present two main results, based on the models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviours of the white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with the flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti type stars, we examine the behaviour of optical flare processes along the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data,to analyse the flare time-scales in respect to some results obtained from the X-ray observations. Using the SPSS V17.0 and the GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function and analysed with t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of the white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that the white-light flares behave in a similar way as th...

  14. Methyl mercury exposure from fish consumption in vulnerable racial/ethnic populations: probabilistic SHEDS-Dietary model analyses using 1999-2006 NHANES and 1990-2002 TDS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G; Liu, Shi V; Geller, Andrew M

    2012-01-01

    NHANES subjects self-identified as "Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, or multiracial" (A/P/N/M) have higher levels of blood organic mercury than other racial/ethnic groups; however, the reasons for this have been unclear. This research uses exposure modeling to determine the reasons for elevated blood methylmercury (MeHg) levels, and also extends previous analyses of observed NHANES blood levels. The probabilistic SHEDS-Dietary model was applied, using MeHg fish residue data from FDA's Total Diet Study (1990-2002) combined with NHANES/WWEIA (1999-2006) fish consumption data, to generate exposure estimates by race/ethnicity, age group, and fish type. Statistical analyses of blood methylmercury levels in the (6 times larger) 1999-2006 NHANES data were compared against previous published results for 1999-2002 data. The A/P/N/M group has higher fish intake, modeled MeHg exposures, and blood levels than the general population and other racial/ethnic groups. Tuna, other saltwater fish, and other freshwater fish are key food types driving dietary MeHg exposure. The 1-consumption is an important route for methylmercury intake by the general population, and especially for racial/ethnic groups with higher fish consumption. These probabilistic dietary modeling approaches could be applied for local populations (e.g., tribes) and other chemicals and foods, if data are available.

  15. Infrared High-Resolution Integrated Light Spectral Analyses of M31 Globular Clusters from APOGEE

    CERN Document Server

    Sakari, Charli M; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Beers, Timothy C; Caldwell, Nelson; Garcia-Hernandez, Domingo Anibal; Lucatello, Sara; Majewski, Steven; O'Connell, Robert W; Pan, Kaike; Strader, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Chemical abundances are presented for 25 M31 globular clusters (GCs), based on moderately high resolution (R = 22, 500) H-band integrated light spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). Infrared spectra offer lines from new elements, of different strengths, and at higher excitation potentials compared to the optical. Integrated abundances of C, N, and O are derived from CO, CN, and OH molecular features, while Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, and Ti abundances are derived from atomic features. These abundances are compared to previous results from the optical, demonstrating the validity and value of infrared integrated light analyses. The CNO abundances are consistent with typical tip of the red giant branch stellar abundances, but are systematically offset from optical, Lick index abundances. With a few exceptions, the other abundances agree between the optical and the infrared within the 1{\\sigma} uncertainties. The first integrated K abundances are also presented, and demo...

  16. Computational Neutronics Methods and Transmutation Performance Analyses for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Asgari; B. Forget; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; S. Bays

    2007-03-01

    The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One obvious path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCm, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu.

  17. Elucidation of phenotypic adaptations: Molecular analyses of dim-light vision proteins in vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Tada, Takashi; Zhang, Huan; Britt, Lyle

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate ancestors appeared in a uniform, shallow water environment, but modern species flourish in highly variable niches. A striking array of phenotypes exhibited by contemporary animals is assumed to have evolved by accumulating a series of selectively advantageous mutations. However, the experimental test of such adaptive events at the molecular level is remarkably difficult. One testable phenotype, dim-light vision, is mediated by rhodopsins. Here, we engineered 11 ancestral rhodopsins and show that those in early ancestors absorbed light maximally (λmax) at 500 nm, from which contemporary rhodopsins with variable λmaxs of 480–525 nm evolved on at least 18 separate occasions. These highly environment-specific adaptations seem to have occurred largely by amino acid replacements at 12 sites, and most of those at the remaining 191 (≈94%) sites have undergone neutral evolution. The comparison between these results and those inferred by commonly-used parsimony and Bayesian methods demonstrates that statistical tests of positive selection can be misleading without experimental support and that the molecular basis of spectral tuning in rhodopsins should be elucidated by mutagenesis analyses using ancestral pigments. PMID:18768804

  18. Low power proximity electronics for dust analysers based on light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfese, C.; Esposito, F.; Cortecchia, F.; Cozzolino, F.

    2012-04-01

    The present paper focuses on the development of an optimized version of the Proximity Electronics (PE) for dust analysers based on static light scattering. This kind of instruments, aimed to the systematic measurement of the size of dust grains in Martian atmosphere, was developed by the Cosmic Physics and Planetology Group at the INAF Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte (OAC) and University Parthenope (LFC group), in Naples, Italy. One of these instruments, the MEDUSA Experiment, was selected for the Humboldt Payload of the ExoMars mission, the first mission to Mars of the ESA Aurora Programme. Thereafter, this mission was revised because of increasing costs and lack of funds and the MEDUSA experiment has been completely re-engineered to meet more demanding constraints of mass and power consumption. The dust analyser under development is named MicroMED, as it is a lighter and more compact version of MEDUSA. MicroMED is provided with an Optical System (OS) based on the same concept of the one present in MEDUSA, but with a low power PE and low power laser source. This paper reports the features and the tests results of three versions of low power PE developed for MicroMED, and also compares two basic approaches, one based on a linear amplifier, derived from the solution implemented in two different MEDUSA breadboards (B/Bs), and the other one based on a logarithmic amplifier, with better performance in terms of compactness and low power consumption.

  19. Complementing DIGE proteomics and DNA subarray analyses to shed light on Oenococcus oeni adaptation to ethanol in wine-simulated conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costantini, Antonella; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Majumder, Avishek

    2015-01-01

    Direct addition of Oenococcus oeni starters into wine can cause viability problems. In the present study, the influence of ethanol in wine-simulated conditions on O. oeni has been evaluated by complementing microarray techniques and DIGE proteomics. Two different ethanol concentrations were studied....... In 12% ethanol, pyrimidine anabolism was stimulated, but in 8% ethanol some energy-consuming biosynthetic pathways were limited. The most significant result was the stress response induced by alcohol that concerned both the cell-envelope and specific stress proteins. Interestingly, 8% and 12% ethanol...... triggered different stress responses: in mild ethanol stress (8%), chaperones with prevalent refolding activity (like HSP20) were over-expressed, whereas at higher alcohol concentration (12%), together with HSP20 and the refolding DNAJ/K, also chaperones having proteolytic activity (like ClpP) were induced...

  20. Balancing medicine prices and business sustainability: analyses of pharmacy costs, revenues and profit shed light on retail medicine mark-ups in rural Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddix Jason

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous not-for-profit pharmacies have been created to improve access to medicines for the poor, but many have failed due to insufficient financial planning and management. These pharmacies are not well described in health services literature despite strong demand from policy makers, implementers, and researchers. Surveys reporting unaffordable medicine prices and high mark-ups have spurred efforts to reduce medicine prices, but price reduction goals are arbitrary in the absence of information on pharmacy costs, revenues, and profit structures. Health services research is needed to develop sustainable and "reasonable" medicine price goals and strategic initiatives to reach them. Methods We utilized cost accounting methods on inventory and financial information obtained from a not-for-profit rural pharmacy network in mountainous Kyrgyzstan to quantify costs, revenues, profits and medicine mark-ups during establishment and maintenance periods (October 2004-December 2007. Results Twelve pharmacies and one warehouse were established in remote Kyrgyzstan with 100%, respectively. Annual mark-ups increased dramatically each year to cover increasing recurrent costs, and by 2007, only 19% and 46% of products revealed mark-ups of 100%. 2007 medicine mark-ups varied substantially across these products, ranging from 32% to 244%. Mark-ups needed to sustain private pharmacies would be even higher in the absence of government subsidies. Conclusion Pharmacy networks can be established in hard-to-reach regions with little funding using public-private partnership, resource-sharing models. Medicine prices and mark-ups must be interpreted with consideration for regional costs of business. Mark-ups vary dramatically across medicines. Some mark-ups appear "excessive" but are likely necessary for pharmacy viability. Pharmacy financial data is available in remote settings and can be used towards determination of "reasonable" medicine price goals. Health systems researchers must document the positive and negative financial experiences of pharmacy initiatives to inform future projects and advance access to medicines goals.

  1. Rainfall simulation experiments and Water Drop Penetration Time measurements shed light on the impact of water repellency on soils under organic farming management in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González, Óscar; León, Javier; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Water repellency is a well-know soil property since the research of professor Stefan Helmut Doerr recovered and powered the research developed by professor DeBano (Atanassova and Doerr, 2011; ; Jordán et al., 2011; Bodí et al., 2012; González Peñaloza et al., 2012 Bodí et al., 2013; García Moreno et al., 2013; Jordán et al., 2013; Badía-Villas et al., 2014; Jordán et al., 2013; Jiménez Morillo et al., 2015). However, little is known about the impact of water repellency in surface runoff generation, although usually is accepted that when more soil water repellent is a soil, higher will be the surface runoff discharge (Stoff et al., 2011; Madsen et al., 2011; León et al., 2013; Lozano et al., 2013; Mataix-Solera et al., 2013; Santos et al., 2015). And the impact of the water repellency and then the higher surface wash discharge can trigger high erosion rates (Kröpfl et al., 2013; Mandal and Sharda 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). However these relationships were not demonstrated as the most water repellent soils are the one with high organic contents, and those soils do not have soil losses, probably due to the high infiltration rates due to the macropore flow. Rainfall simulation experiments can shed light in the runoff generation mechanism as they can control the rainfall intensity (Bodí et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2013), and inform about the main mechanism of the soil erosion process Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011; Daugherty et al., 2011; Podwojewski et al., 2011; Dunkerley, 2012; Garel et al., 2012; Jouquet et al., 2012; Kibet et al., 2013; Butzen et al., 2014; Ma et al., 2014; Martínez Murillo et al., 2013). To determine the relationship between surface runoff generated under simulated rainfall (Cerdà, 1988a; 1988b; Cerdà et al., 1998; Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013) with a small rainfall simulator (0.25 m2) and water repellency measurements with the Water Drop Penetration time methods were done (Bodí et al., 2012). The results show that

  2. Analyses of the Light Variations of OJ 287, 0716+714 and BL Lacertae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-tao; Pan, Yan-ping

    2013-01-01

    OJ 287 is a BL Lac object which exhibits intense activities of low peak-frequencies. Its energy spectrum in low frequency band is quite similar with those of two other TeV BL Lac objects (i.e., 0716+714 and BL Lacertae). However, the Cerenkov telescope did not detect its TeV rays. By using the observational data of these three heavenly bodies and comparing the discrepan- cies of their minimal periods of light variations and delays at 22 GHz, 37 GHz and B-waveband, we have further investigated the possible reason why the TeV gamma-rays of OJ 287 have not been observed. The results of analyses are as fol- lows. (1) For the minimal periods of light variations, the periods of OJ 287 at 37 GHZ and B-waveband are short. At 22 GHz the results of OJ 287 and 0716+714 are comparable, but the period of OJ 287 is much shorter in comparison with that of BL Lacertae, and this shows that its activity is more intense. However, the TeV gamma-rays of OJ 287 have not been detected, which implies that the radiation of OJ 287 in TeV waveband may have no connection with the minimal periods of light variations in these three low-energy wavebands. (2) In respect of delays, the delay of OJ 287 in the B waveband with respect to 37 GHz is longer than that of 0716+714, but shorter than that of BL Lacertae. Its delay at 37 GHz in respect to 22 GHz is shorter than that of 0716+714. Meanwhile, the delay of BL Lacertae at 37 GHz in respect to 22 GHz is negative, which implies that 22 GHz precedes 37 GHz. Via the comparison and analysis of delays, no obvious differences between OJ 287 and 0716+714 as well as BL Lacertae have been found. On the side of energy spectra, it is quite possible that due to the steep energy spectrum of OJ 287 in TeV waveband, the Cerenkov telescope has not detected the gamma radiation of OJ 287. However, nowadays it is still not clear whether the steep energy spectrum in TeV energy range has some influence on the light variations in low energy realm.

  3. Shedding Light on the 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System in the Era of Radiomics and Radiogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, Rivka R; Hassan, Islam; Elshafeey, Nabil; Zinn, Pascal O

    2016-11-01

    The new World Health Organization classification of brain tumors depends on combining the histologic light microscopy features of central nervous system (CNS) tumors with canonical genetic alterations. This integrated diagnosis is redrawing the pedigree chart of brain tumors with rearrangement of tumor groups on the basis of geno-phenotypical behaviors into meaningful groups. Multiple radiogenomic studies provide a bridge between imaging features and tumor microenvironment. An overlap that can be integrated within the genophenotypical classification of CNS tumors for a better understanding of different clinically relevant entities.

  4. Infrared High-resolution Integrated Light Spectral Analyses of M31 Globular Clusters from APOGEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakari, Charli M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Beers, Timothy C.; Caldwell, Nelson; Aníbal García-Hernández, Domingo; Lucatello, Sara; Majewski, Steven; O'Connell, Robert W.; Pan, Kaike; Strader, Jay

    2016-10-01

    Chemical abundances are presented for 25 M31 globular clusters (GCs), based on moderately high resolution (R = 22,500) H-band integrated light (IL) spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). Infrared (IR) spectra offer lines from new elements, lines of different strengths, and lines at higher excitation potentials compared to the optical. Integrated abundances of C, N, and O are derived from CO, CN, and OH molecular features, while Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, and Ti abundances are derived from atomic features. These abundances are compared to previous results from the optical, demonstrating the validity and value of IR IL analyses. The CNO abundances are consistent with typical tip of the red giant branch stellar abundances but are systematically offset from optical Lick index abundances. With a few exceptions, the other abundances agree between the optical and the IR within the 1σ uncertainties. The first integrated K abundances are also presented and demonstrate that K tracks the α elements. The combination of IR and optical abundances allows better determinations of GC properties and enables probes of the multiple populations in extragalactic GCs. In particular, the integrated effects of the Na/O anticorrelation can be directly examined for the first time.

  5. Novel barite chimneys at the Loki´s Castle Vent Field shed light on key factors shaping microbial communities and functions in hydrothermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Helene eSteen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to fully understand the cycling of elements in hydrothermal systems it is critical to understand intra-field variations in geochemical and microbiological processes in both focused, high-temperature and diffuse, low-temperature areas. To reveal important causes and effects of this variation, we performed an extensive chemical and microbiological characterization of a low-temperature venting area in the Loki’s Castle Vent Field (LCVF. This area, located at the flank of the large sulfide mound, is characterized by numerous chimney-like barite (BaSO4 structures (≤ 1m high covered with white cotton-like microbial mats. Results from geochemical analyses, microscopy (FISH, SEM, 16S rRNA gene amplicon-sequencing and metatranscriptomics were compared to results from previous analyses of biofilms growing on black smoker chimneys at LCVF. Based on our results, we constructed a conceptual model involving the geochemistry and microbiology in the LCVF. The model suggests that CH4 and H2S are important electron donors for microorganisms in both high-temperature and low-temperature areas, whereas the utilization of H2 seems restricted to high-temperature areas. This further implies that sub-seafloor processes can affect energy-landscapes, elemental cycling, and the metabolic activity of primary producers on the seafloor. In the cotton-like microbial mats on top of the active barite chimneys, a unique network of single cells of Epsilonproteobacteria interconnected by threads of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS was seen, differing significantly from the long filamentous Sulfurovum filaments observed in biofilms on the black smokers. This network also induced nucleation of barite crystals and is suggested to play an essential role in the formation of the microbial mats and the chimneys. Furthermore, it illustrates variations in how different genera of Epsilonproteobacteria colonize and position cells in different vent fluid mixing zones within

  6. Novel Barite Chimneys at the Loki's Castle Vent Field Shed Light on Key Factors Shaping Microbial Communities and Functions in Hydrothermal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Ida H; Dahle, Håkon; Stokke, Runar; Roalkvam, Irene; Daae, Frida-Lise; Rapp, Hans Tore; Pedersen, Rolf B; Thorseth, Ingunn H

    2015-01-01

    In order to fully understand the cycling of elements in hydrothermal systems it is critical to understand intra-field variations in geochemical and microbiological processes in both focused, high-temperature and diffuse, low-temperature areas. To reveal important causes and effects of this variation, we performed an extensive chemical and microbiological characterization of a low-temperature venting area in the Loki's Castle Vent Field (LCVF). This area, located at the flank of the large sulfide mound, is characterized by numerous chimney-like barite (BaSO4) structures (≤ 1 m high) covered with white cotton-like microbial mats. Results from geochemical analyses, microscopy (FISH, SEM), 16S rRNA gene amplicon-sequencing and metatranscriptomics were compared to results from previous analyses of biofilms growing on black smoker chimneys at LCVF. Based on our results, we constructed a conceptual model involving the geochemistry and microbiology in the LCVF. The model suggests that CH4 and H2S are important electron donors for microorganisms in both high-temperature and low-temperature areas, whereas the utilization of H2 seems restricted to high-temperature areas. This further implies that sub-seafloor processes can affect energy-landscapes, elemental cycling, and the metabolic activity of primary producers on the seafloor. In the cotton-like microbial mats on top of the active barite chimneys, a unique network of single cells of Epsilonproteobacteria interconnected by threads of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was seen, differing significantly from the long filamentous Sulfurovum filaments observed in biofilms on the black smokers. This network also induced nucleation of barite crystals and is suggested to play an essential role in the formation of the microbial mats and the chimneys. Furthermore, it illustrates variations in how different genera of Epsilonproteobacteria colonize and position cells in different vent fluid mixing zones within a vent field

  7. Proteomic investigation of embryonic rat heart-derived H9c2 cell line sheds new light on the molecular phenotype of the popular cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenčo, Juraj; Lenčová-Popelová, Olga; Link, Marek; Jirkovská, Anna; Tambor, Vojtěch; Potůčková, Eliška; Stulík, Jiří; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Štěrba, Martin

    2015-12-10

    Due to their cardiac origin, H9c2 cells rank among the most popular cell lines in current cardiovascular research, yet molecular phenotype remains elusive. Hence, in this study we used proteomic approach to describe molecular phenotype of H9c2 cells in their undifferentiated (i.e., most frequently used) state, and its functional response to cardiotoxic drug doxorubicin. Of 1671 proteins identified by iTRAQ IEF/LC-MSMS analysis, only 12 proteins were characteristic for striated muscle cells and none was cardiac phenotype-specific. Targeted LC-SRM and western blot analyses confirmed that undifferentiated H9c2 cells are phenotypically considerably different to both primary neonatal cardiomyocytes and adult myocardium. These cells lack proteins essential for formation of striated muscle myofibrils or they express only minor amounts thereof. They also fail to express many proteins important for metabolism of muscle cells. The challenge with clinically relevant concentrations of doxorubicin did not induce a proteomic signature that has been previously noted in primary cardiomyocytes or adult hearts. Instead, several alterations previously described in other cells of mesodermal origin, such as fibroblasts, were observed (e.g., severe down-regulation of collagen synthesis pathway). In conclusion, the molecular phenotype of H9c2 cells resembles very immature myogenic cells with skeletal muscle commitment upon differentiation and thus, translatability of findings obtained in these cells deserves caution.

  8. Shedding skin and tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammlerschlag, Carl A

    2007-06-01

    I am a purported expert in change and personal growth; that's the work I do with patients, and what I lecture and write about. I say that growth has nothing to do with adding on; it's always about letting go. Alas, it's always easier to tell others how to welcome shedding their skins than it is for me to do it myself. Letting go of the old and familiar is a necessary prerequisite for growth, but it's hard to do because no matter how much we may know, we have to move on. It always makes us feel vulnerable, which can inspire fear.

  9. Structural and functional characterization of salmon STAT1, STAT2 and IRF9 homologs sheds light on interferon signaling in teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Sobhkhez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian IRF9 and STAT2, together with STAT1, form the ISGF3 transcription factor complex, which is critical for type I interferon (IFN-induced signaling, while IFNγ stimulation is mediated by homodimeric STAT1 protein. Teleost fish are known to possess most JAK and STAT family members, however, description of their functional activity in lower vertebrates is still scarce. In the present study we have identified two different STAT2 homologs and one IRF9 homolog from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar. Both proteins have domain-like structures with functional motifs that are similar to higher vertebrates, suggesting that they are orthologs to mammalian STAT2 and IRF9. The two identified salmon STAT2s, named STAT2a and STAT2b, showed high sequence identity but were divergent in their transactivation domain (TAD. Like STAT1, ectopically expressed STAT2a and b were shown to be tyrosine phosphorylated by type I IFNs and, interestingly, also by IFNγ. Microscopy analyses demonstrated that STAT2 co-localized with STAT1a in the cytoplasm of unstimulated cells, while IFNa1 and IFNγ stimulation seemed to favor their nuclear localization. Overexpression of STAT2a or STAT2b together with STAT1a activated a GAS-containing reporter gene construct in IFNγ-stimulated cells. The highest induction of GAS promoter activation was found in IFNγ-stimulated cells transfected with IRF9 alone. Taken together, these data suggest that salmon STAT2 and IRF9 may have a role in IFNγ-induced signaling and promote the expression of GAS-driven genes in bony fish. Since mammalian STAT2 is primarily an ISGF3 component and not involved in IFNγ signaling, our finding features a novel role for STAT2 in fish.

  10. The Chloroplast Genome of Utricularia reniformis Sheds Light on the Evolution of the ndh Gene Complex of Terrestrial Carnivorous Plants from the Lentibulariaceae Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Saura R.; Diaz, Yani C. A.; Penha, Helen Alves; Pinheiro, Daniel G.; Fernandes, Camila C.; Miranda, Vitor F. O.; Michael, Todd P.

    2016-01-01

    Lentibulariaceae is the richest family of carnivorous plants spanning three genera including Pinguicula, Genlisea, and Utricularia. Utricularia is globally distributed, and, unlike Pinguicula and Genlisea, has both aquatic and terrestrial forms. In this study we present the analysis of the chloroplast (cp) genome of the terrestrial Utricularia reniformis. U. reniformis has a standard cp genome of 139,725bp, encoding a gene repertoire similar to essentially all photosynthetic organisms. However, an exclusive combination of losses and pseudogenization of the plastid NAD(P)H-dehydrogenase (ndh) gene complex were observed. Comparisons among aquatic and terrestrial forms of Pinguicula, Genlisea, and Utricularia indicate that, whereas the aquatic forms retained functional copies of the eleven ndh genes, these have been lost or truncated in terrestrial forms, suggesting that the ndh function may be dispensable in terrestrial Lentibulariaceae. Phylogenetic scenarios of the ndh gene loss and recovery among Pinguicula, Genlisea, and Utricularia to the ancestral Lentibulariaceae cladeare proposed. Interestingly, RNAseq analysis evidenced that U. reniformis cp genes are transcribed, including the truncated ndh genes, suggesting that these are not completely inactivated. In addition, potential novel RNA-editing sites were identified in at least six U. reniformis cp genes, while none were identified in the truncated ndh genes. Moreover, phylogenomic analyses support that Lentibulariaceae is monophyletic, belonging to the higher core Lamiales clade, corroborating the hypothesis that the first Utricularia lineage emerged in terrestrial habitats and then evolved to epiphytic and aquatic forms. Furthermore, several truncated cp genes were found interspersed with U. reniformis mitochondrial and nuclear genome scaffolds, indicating that as observed in other smaller plant genomes, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, and the related and carnivorous Genlisea nigrocaulis and G. hispidula, the

  11. Shedding light on bioactivity of botanical by-products: neem cake compounds deter oviposition of the arbovirus vector Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Conti, Barbara; Garreffa, Rita; Nicoletti, Marcello

    2014-03-01

    Industrial plant-borne by-products can be sources of low-cost chemicals, potentially useful to build eco-friendly control strategies against mosquitoes. Neem cake is a cheap by-product of neem oil extraction obtained by pressing the seeds of Azadirachta indica. Neem products are widely used as insecticides since rarely induce resistance because their multiple mode of action against insect pests and low-toxicity rates have been detected against vertebrates. In this research, we used field bioassays to assess the effective oviposition repellence of neem cake fractions of increasing polarity [n-hexane (A), methanol (B), ethyl acetate (C), n-butanol (D), and aqueous (E) fraction] against Aedes albopictus, currently the most invasive mosquito worldwide. These fractions, already characterized for low nortriterpenoids contents by HPLC analyses, were analyzed for their total content by HPTLC, highlighting striking differences in their chemical composition. Field results showed that B, A, and C tested at 100 ppm exerted higher effective repellence over the control (71.33, 88.59, and 73.49% of ER, respectively), while E and D did not significantly deter A. albopictus oviposition (17.06 and 22.72% of ER, respectively). The highest oviposition activity index was achieved by A (-0.82), followed by C (-0.63), and B (-0.62). Lower OAIs were achieved by D (-0.14) and E (-0.09). On the basis of our results, we believe that A, B, and C are very promising as oviposition deterrents against the arbovirus vector A. albopictus since they are proved as rich in active metabolites, cheap, and really effective at low doses.

  12. A New Titanosaurian Braincase from the Cretaceous “Lo Hueco” Locality in Spain Sheds Light on Neuroanatomical Evolution within Titanosauria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Fabien; Witmer, Lawrence M.; Ridgely, Ryan C.; Ortega, Francisco; Sanz, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Despite continuous improvements, our knowledge of the neurocranial anatomy of sauropod dinosaurs as a whole is still poor, which is especially true for titanosaurians even though their postcranial remains are common in many Upper Cretaceous sites worldwide. Here we describe a braincase from the uppermost Cretaceous locality of ‘‘Lo Hueco” in Spain that is one of the most complete titanosaurian braincases found so far in Europe. Although the titanosaurian Ampelosaurus sp. is known from the same locality, this specimen is clearly a distinct taxon and presents a number of occipital characters found in Antarctosaurus and Jainosaurus, which are approximately coeval taxa from southern Gondwana. The specimen was subjected to X-ray computed tomographic (CT) scanning, allowing the generation of 3D renderings of the endocranial cavity enclosing the brain, cranial nerves, and blood vessels, as well as the labyrinth of the inner ear. These findings add considerable knowledge to the field of sauropod paleoneuroanatomy in general and titanosaurian endocast diversity in particular. Compared with that of many sauropodomorphs, the endocast appears only slightly flexed in lateral view and bears similarities (e.g., reduction of the rostral dural expansion) with Gondwanan titanosaurians such as Jainosaurus, Bonatitan, and Antarctosaurus. The vestibular system of the inner ear is somewhat contracted (i.e., the radius of the semicircular canals is small), but less so than expected in derived titanosaurians. However, as far as the new specimen and Jainosaurus can be contrasted, and with the necessary caution due to the small sample of comparative data currently available, the two taxa appear more similar to one another in endocast morphology than to other titanosaurians. Recent phylogenetic analyses of titanosaurians have not included virtually any of the taxa under consideration here, and thus the phylogenetic position of the new Spanish titanosaurian—even its generic, let alone

  13. Neptune's Dynamic Atmosphere from Kepler K2 Observations: Implications for Brown Dwarf Light Curve Analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Amy A; Gaulme, Patrick; Hammel, Heidi B; Casewell, Sarah L; Fortney, Jonathan J; Gizis, John E; Lissauer, Jack J; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Orton, Glenn S; Wong, Michael H; Marley, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Observations of Neptune with the Kepler Space Telescope yield a 49-day light curve with 98% coverage at a 1-minute cadence. A significant signature in the light curve comes from discrete cloud features. We compare results extracted from the light curve data with contemporaneous disk-resolved imaging of Neptune from the Keck 10-meter telescope at 1.65 microns and Hubble Space Telescope visible imaging acquired 9 months later. This direct comparison validates the feature latitudes assigned to the K2 light curve periods based on Neptune's zonal wind profile, and confirms observed cloud feature variability. Although Neptune's clouds vary in location and intensity on short and long time scales, a single large discrete storm seen in Keck imaging dominates the K2 and Hubble light curves; smaller or fainter clouds likely contribute to short-term brightness variability. The K2 Neptune light curve, in conjunction with our imaging data, provides context for the interpretation of current and future brown dwarf and extras...

  14. LHCf sheds new light on cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the single photon obtained using data from the LHCf experiment has turned out to be very different from that predicted by the theoretical models used until now to describe the interactions between very high-energy cosmic rays and the earth's atmosphere. The consequences of this discrepancy for cosmic ray studies could be significant.   Artistic impression of cosmic rays entering Earth's atmosphere. (Credit: Asimmetrie/Infn). It took physicists by surprise when analysis of the data collected by the two LHCf calorimeters in 2010 showed that high-energy cosmic rays don't interact with the atmosphere in the manner predicted by theory. The LHCf detectors, set up 140 metres either side of the ATLAS interaction point, are dedicated to the study of the secondary particles emitted at very small angles during proton-proton collisions in the LHC, with energies comparable to cosmic rays entering the earth's atmosphere at 2.5x1016 eV. The aim of the experiment is to r...

  15. Clinical Trials Shed Light on Minority Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas Cosméticos Dispositivos Médicos Dispositivos que Emiten Radiación Fraude en la Salud Medicamentos Nutrición Productos Veterinarios Productos de Tabaco Salud ...

  16. Research sheds light on treatment of inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The latest research breakthrough on the molecular mechanism and treatment of inflammation, contributed by scientists from the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS) under the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their American collaborators, was reported online by Nature Immunology on July 16, 2007.

  17. Shedding light on disulfide bond formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, H; Henriksen, A; Hansen, F G;

    2001-01-01

    in the intrinsic fluorescence. Inter conversion between the two redox states could thus be followed in vitro as well as in vivo by non-invasive fluorimetric measurements. The 1.5 A crystal structure of the oxidized protein revealed a disulfide bond-induced distortion of the beta-barrel, as well as a structural...

  18. ATLAS helps shed light on the retina

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Technology developed for high-energy physics has led to the discovery of a retinal cell that eluded biologists for 40 years. The 512 electrode array, inspired by silicon microstrip detector technology in ATLAS, records the electrical activity of retinal neurones.ATLAS expertise have crossed over to biology enabling the discovery of a retinal cell type that may help humans see motion. The research, carried out by ATLAS collaborators at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and by neurobiologists at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, appeared in the 10 October issue of the Journal of Neuroscience and may help open biologists’ eyes to the uses of techniques developed in high-energy physics. At least 22 different types of primate retinal output cell are known from anatomical studies, but the functions of only a handful of these have been determined. The cells discovered have been ca...

  19. Shedding light on some common dietetic misconceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virag Ganesh Gokhale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain misconceptions in dietetics are so deeply ingrained in the minds of people that it is difficult to convince them as to what the truth is. Busy family physicians often skip queries on such topics or give some casual replies that may further support the misunderstanding. Some of these misconceptions can even be harmful. A few such misconceptions like - that ghee is harmful or that beetroot is good for treating iron deficiency, that Sunflower oil is heart friendly, that a patient of hepatitis should avoid fatty food, or that vegetarian proteins are poor quality proteins are some such beliefs. That the truth is contrary to such beliefs is pointed out with scientific evidence.

  20. Research progresses shed light on superconductivity mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The spring of 2008 saw substantial breakthroughs in superconductivity research. Four groups of physicists, one after another, achieved remarkable progresses in the study of iron-based materials after the breakthrough made by H. Hosono's group in Japan, providing renewed insights into the fundamental mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC), a perplexing enigma on the frontier of condensed matter physics.

  1. Shedding light on canine pituitary dwarfism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, A.M.W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary dwarfism, associated with growth hormone deficiency, is an autosomal, recessively inherited disorder in shepherd dogs. Due to the serious nature of pituitary dwarfism and lack of efficient treatment, it is preferable to prevent dwarfs from being born by applying a correct breeding policy.

  2. Snapshots to shed light on LHC performance

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the impressive size and unprecedented power of the LHC, it is all too easy to overlook the smaller devices that have the difficult task of monitoring the new accelerator. You don't have to stand too far back from the big picture to see examples of clever technology inside the LHC. One of the undulators installed in the LHC tunnel can be seen on the right of the photo. From right to left, back row: Lucio Rossi (group leader, MCS), Davide Tommasini (conceptual design, MCS), Thierry Tenaglia (integration design,TS-MME), Remo Maccaferri (project leader, MCS) and Hans Kummer (MCS/ME); front row: Gilles Trachez (MCS-ME) and Bruno Meunier (FSU-AT12). In contrast to the usual articles about the LHC's big number statistics, examples of clever problem-solving found in beam monitoring machinery show that smaller things can be beautiful too. The design of the LHC accelerator brought new challenges for monitoring the shape of the particle beam, known as the beam profile. The size of the beam shrinks as higher energi...

  3. Shedding a new light on hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, N.

    1991-02-01

    The sun's ability to detoxify waterborne chemicals has long been known; polluted streams, for example, become cleaner as they flow through sunlit areas. Solar detoxification harnesses this natural degradation process for beneficial ends, producing simple, nonhazardous substances from hazardous organic chemicals. Solar detoxification systems now being developed break down these chemicals without using the fossil fuels required by conventional technologies. Sunlight destroys hazardous waste because of the distinctive properties of photons, the packets of energy that make up sunlight. Low-energy photons add thermal energy that will heat toxic chemicals; high-energy photons add the energy needed to break the chemical bonds of these chemicals. The detoxification process discussed here takes advantage of this latter group of photons found in the ultraviolet portion of the solar spectrum. 4 figs.

  4. Researchers Shed More Light on Bird Flu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Brown; 于德江

    2006-01-01

    最近科学家们对禽流感有了进一步的认识。他们发现,普通流感病毒位于人类上呼吸道内,当人们咳嗽或者打喷嚏时,这些病毒会轻而易举地被喷出体外,使得其他人极易受到感染;而H5N1型禽流感病毒则大多位于人体的肺部细胞中,由于在人类呼吸道中聚集的位置太过靠下,所以很难在人们咳嗽或打喷嚏的过程中离开人体进入空气中,这就为H5N1难于人际传染找到了最新依据。尽管如此,我们不能排除这种病毒发生变异的可能性,所以应继续对其保持警惕,绝不能掉以轻心。

  5. Black Holes Shed Light on Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This videotape is comprised of several segments of animations on black holes and galaxy formation, and several segments of an interview with Dr. John Kormendy. The animation segments are: (1) a super massive black hole, (2) Centarus A active black hole found in a collision, (3) galaxy NGC-4261 (active black hole and jet model), (4) galaxy M-32 (orbits of stars are effected by the gravity of the black hole), (5) galaxy M-37 (motion of stars increases as mass of black hole increases), (6) Birth of active galactic nuclei, (7) the collision of two galaxy leads to merger of the black holes, (8) Centarus A and simulation of the collision of 2 galaxies. There are also several segments of an interview with John Kormendy. In these segments he discusses the two most important aspects of his recent black hole work: (1) the correlations between galaxies speed and the mass of the black holes, and (2) the existence of black holes and galactic formation. He also discusses the importance of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to the study of black holes. He also shows the methodology of processing images from the spectrograph in his office.

  6. Shedding light on antibacterial activities of cathelicidins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, V.A.F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is continuously increasing and has a tremendous impact on human and animal well-being. Attractive alternatives to conventional antibiotics are host defense peptides (HDP), such as chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2) and porcine proline-rich PR-39. HDPs are small cationic molecules

  7. International trends in solid-state lighting : analyses of the article and patent literature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Huey, Mark C. (Strategic Perspectives, Incorporated, McLean, VA); Boyack, Kevin W.; Miksovic, Ann E. (Strategic Perspectives, Incorporated, McLean, VA)

    2008-07-01

    We present an analysis of the literature of solid-state lighting, based on a comprehensive dataset of 35,851 English-language articles and 12,420 U.S. patents published or issued during the years 1977-2004 in the foundational knowledge domain of electroluminescent materials and phenomena. The dataset was created using a complex, iteratively developed search string. The records in the dataset were then partitioned according to: whether they are articles or patents, their publication or issue date, their national or continental origin, whether the active electroluminescent material was inorganic or organic, and which of a number of emergent knowledge sub-domains they aggregate into on the basis of bibliographic coupling. From these partitionings, we performed a number of analyses, including: identification of knowledge sub-domains of historical and recent importance, and trends over time of the contributions of various nations and continents to the knowledge domain and its sub-domains. Among the key results: (1) The knowledge domain as a whole has been growing quickly: the average growth rates of the inorganic and organic knowledge sub-domains have been 8%/yr and 25%/yr, respectively, compared to average growth rates less than 5%/yr for English-language articles and U.S. patents in other knowledge domains. The growth rate of the organic knowledge sub-domain is so high that its historical dominance by the inorganic knowledge sub-domain will, at current trajectories, be reversed in the coming decade. (2) Amongst nations, the U.S. is the largest contributor to the overall knowledge domain, but Japan is on a trajectory to become the largest contributor within the coming half-decade. Amongst continents, Asia became the largest contributor during the past half-decade, overwhelmingly so for the organic knowledge sub-domain. (3) The relative contributions to the article and patent datasets differ for the major continents: North America contributing relatively more patents

  8. Comparative analyses of light-induced anthocyanin accumulation and gene expression between the ray florets and leaves in chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yan; Yang, Li-Wen; Li, Meng-Ling; Dai, Si-Lan

    2016-06-01

    Light is one of the key environmental factors that affect anthocyanin biosynthesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear, and many problems regarding phenotypic change and corresponding gene regulation have not been solved. In the present study, comparative analyses of light-induced anthocyanin accumulation and gene expression between the ray florets and leaves were performed in Chrysanthemum × morifolium 'Purple Reagan'. After contrasting the variations in the flower color phenotype and relative pigment content, as well as expression patterns of structural and regulator genes responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis and photoreceptor between different plant organs under light and dark conditions, we concluded that (1) both the capitulum and foliage are key organs responding to light for chrysanthemum coloration; (2) compared with flavones, shading makes a greater decrease on the anthocyanins accumulation; (3) most of the structural and regulatory genes in the light-induced anthocyanin pathway specifically express in the ray florets; and (4) CmCHS, CmF3H, CmF3'H, CmANS, CmDFR, Cm3GT, CmMYB5-1, CmMYB6, CmMYB7-1, CmbHLH24, CmCOP1 and CmHY5 are key genes for light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in chrysanthemum ray florets, while on the transcriptional level, the expressions of CmPHYA, CmPHYB, CmCRY1a, CmCRY1b and CmCRY2 are insignificantly changed. Moreover, the inferred comprehensive effect of multiple signals on the accumulation of anthocyanins and transmission channel of light signal that exist between the leaves and ray florets were further discussed. These results further our understanding of the relationship between the gene expression and light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis, and lay foundations for the promotion of the molecular breeding of novel flower colors in chrysanthemums.

  9. Stellar abundance analyses in the light of 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Asplund, M

    2003-01-01

    I describe recent progress in terms of 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres and 3D line formation and their applications to stellar abundance analyses of late-type stars. Such 3D studies remove the free parameters inherent in classical 1D investigations (mixing length parameters, macro- and microturbulence) yet are highly successful in reproducing a large arsenal of observational constraints such as detailed line shapes and asymmetries. Their potential for abundance analyses is illustrated by discussing the derived oxygen abundances in the Sun and in metal-poor stars, where they seem to resolve long-standing problems as well as significantly alter the inferred conclusions.

  10. Recovering star formation histories: Integrated-light analyses vs stellar colour-magnitude diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Lara, T; Gallart, C; Alloin, D; Monelli, M; Koleva, M; Pompei, E; Beasley, M; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Florido, E; Aparicio, A; Fleurence, E; Hardy, E; Hidalgo, S; Raimann, D

    2015-01-01

    Accurate star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies are fundamental for understanding the build-up of their stellar content. However, the most accurate SFHs - those obtained from colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of resolved stars reaching the oldest main sequence turnoffs (oMSTO) - are presently limited to a few systems in the Local Group. It is therefore crucial to determine the reliability and range of applicability of SFHs derived from integrated light spectroscopy, as this affects our understanding of unresolved galaxies from low to high redshift. To evaluate the reliability of current full spectral fitting techniques in deriving SFHs from integrated light spectroscopy by comparing SFHs from integrated spectra to those obtained from deep CMDs of resolved stars. We have obtained a high signal--to--noise (S/N $\\sim$ 36.3 per \\AA) integrated spectrum of a field in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using EFOSC2 at the 3.6 meter telescope at La Silla Observatory. For this same field, resolved stella...

  11. Economic and social analyses at a regional level in the light of competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Maria Gogâltan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In most economic studies, competitiveness is considered a key issue of the political success failure. A major element which contributes to regional inequalities is the level of competitiveness. This element has been the subject of numerous studies over the past years, even though more attention was given to the national level and less to the regional one. Moreover, the purpose of these regional analyses is the correlation of territorial objectives and problems with possible sources of financing, seeing to ensure optimal combinations between regional demand and supply, the optimal distribution of the income and of the results obtained, regional competitiveness, the location of clusters, etc.

  12. Optimal load shedding and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ding

    Load shedding is an emergency control action in power systems that can save systems from a wide-area blackout. Underfrequency load shedding, steady state load shedding, and voltage load shedding are widely used in power systems. These methods utilize either the steady state model or a simplified dynamic model to represent a power systems. In this dissertation, a general optimal load shedding method that considers both the dynamic process and load distribution is proposed. The unfavorable load shedding is then formulated as an optimization problem with the objective function of cost minimization. This objective function is subjected to system, security, and operation constraints. The entire problem becomes a question of optimization with differential and nonlinear equations as constraints. To solve this problem, discretization is used to change the differential equations into algebraic equations. The original problem is thus reformulated as an optimization problem and can be solved by a standard mathematical program. The general idea is then applied to traditional power systems, deregulated power systems, power systems with distributed generation, and load restoration. In the traditional power system, the method shows that governor action, generation dynamic, disturbance location, and economic factors can be taken into consideration. In the deregulated power system, two power market models are developed and incorporated into the load shedding scheme. In power systems with multiple distributed generations, the different cases of disturbances are analyzed and models of different distributed generation developed. The general idea is then applied. Finally, the load restoration problem is studied, and it is proposed that an optimization method be applied to it. This dissertation provides a comprehensive solution for load shedding problem in power systems. The models developed in this research can also be used to study other power system problems.

  13. Crab shedding-system designs

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    There are as many ways to build and arrange crab shedding setups as there are people who make them. The following drawings are suggestions based on the experiencesof successful shedders. You may find changes that suit your operation better. (8pp.)

  14. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  15. Analyse géochimique des hydrocarbures légers par thermovaporisation Geochemical Analysis of Light Hydrocarbons by Thermovaporization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le procédé de thermovaporisation est utilisé pour l'extraction et l'analyse des hydrocarbures à point d'ébullition situé à l'intérieur de l'intervalle correspondant aux alcanes C6 à C15; il s'applique également aux roches et aux huiles. La mise en ceuvre est simple et rapide, ce qui rend cette technique utilisable dans certains laboratoires de chantiers d'exploration. Les chromatogrammes de vapeurs montrent une succession de pics, chaque pic correspondant théoriquement à un composant défini, alcane, cyclane ou aromatique; la portion située entre les alcanes n-C, et n-C8 est très typée, mais le reste du chromatogramme apporte également des informations importantes ; l'ensemble donne une définition chimique très fine des hydrocarbures légers présents dans l'échantillon. L'exploitation de ces informations en interprétation géochimique est multiple (pouvoir pétroligène de sédiments, état de maturation, etc.. La faible masse de la prise d'essai nécessaire constitue un intérêt essentiel de la méthode. The method called thermovaporization is used to extract and analyse low boiling point hydrocarbons in the range corresponding to C6-C15; alcanes. Sediments and oils ore examined in the same way. This method is simple and fast to utilize, and for this reason it can be applied in some field exploration laboratories. Chromatograms show a sertes of peaks, each of them theoretically corresponding to a particular composant : alkane, cyclone, arcmatics. The part of the chromatogram between n-C7 n-C8 is very characteristic, but other parts also provide a great deal of information. The total chromatogram gives a very fine chemical definition of the light hydrocarbons in the sample. This information can be used for many geochemical interpretations (hydrocarbon yield potential, state of maturation, etc.. Moreover, the tiny amount of sample thot is necessary is of major interest.

  16. Coupled optical-thermal-fluid and structural analyses of novel light-trapping tubular panels for concentrating solar power receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Jesus D.; Christian, Joshua M.; Yellowhair, Julius E.; Ho, Clifford K.

    2015-09-01

    Traditional tubular receivers used in concentrating solar power are formed using tubes connected to manifolds to form panels; which in turn are arranged in cylindrical or rectangular shapes. Previous and current tubular receivers, such as the ones used in Solar One, Solar Two, and most recently the Ivanpah solar plants, have used a black paint coating to increase the solar absorptance of the receiver. However, these coatings degrade over time and must be reapplied, increasing the receiver maintenance cost. This paper presents the thermal efficiency evaluation of novel receiver tubular panels that have a higher effective solar absorptance due to a light-trapping effect created by arranging the tubes in each panel into unique geometric configurations. Similarly, the impact of the incidence angle on the effective solar absorptance and thermal efficiency is evaluated. The overarching goal of this work is to achieve effective solar absorptances of ~90% and thermal efficiencies above 85% without using an absorptance coating. Several panel geometries were initially proposed and were down-selected based on structural analyses considering the thermal and pressure loading requirements of molten salt and supercritical carbon-dioxide receivers. The effective solar absorptance of the chosen tube geometries and panel configurations were evaluated using the ray-tracing modeling capabilities of SolTrace. The thermal efficiency was then evaluated by coupling computational fluid dynamics with the ray-tracing results using ANSYS Fluent. Compared to the base case analysis (flat tubular panel), the novel tubular panels have shown an increase in effective solar absorptance and thermal efficiency by several percentage points.

  17. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  18. Shedding of immature germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariagno, J; Curi, S; Mendeluk, G; Grinspon, D; Repetto, H; Chenlo, P; Pugliese, N; Sardi, M; Blanco, A M

    2002-01-01

    The immature germ cells (IGC) constitute the highest percentage (90%) of nonsperm cells (NSpC) in ejaculates from fertile or infertile men. The objective of this study was to evaluate IGC concentration and the IGC/(IGC + Sp) ratio, in normozoospermia and dispermia. Normozoospermia from men with proven fertility (NPF). nonproven fertility (NNPF). dispermia (D) and semen samples with excessive shedding of immature germ cells (GI 1.7 x 10(6) to 5 x 10(6) IGC/mL and GII > 5.0 x 10(6) IGC/mL) were used in this study. The mean value +2 SD for the NNPF (1.7 x 10(6)/mL) and the value proposed by WHO (5 x 10(6)/mL) were employed to define GI and GII groups. IGC concentration is statistically different in the studied groups. The IGC/Sp ratio showed a significant difference only between the NNPF and the D. When comparing semen parameters (Sp/ejaculate. grade (a) motility and morphology) there was a highly significant difference between NNPF and GI and GII: no difference was found between GI and GII. While studying 200 cases of dispermias 83% showed a high shedding of immature germ cells. The cytological study of nonsperm cells and the count and identification of the immature germ cells could be used to evaluate the dispermic disorders.

  19. NEPTUNE’S DYNAMIC ATMOSPHERE FROM KEPLER K2 OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BROWN DWARF LIGHT CURVE ANALYSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Jason F.; Gaulme, Patrick; Hammel, Heidi B.; Casewell, Sarah L.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gizis, John E.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Orton, Glenn S.; Wong, Michael H.; Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Observations of Neptune with the Kepler Space Telescope yield a 49 day light curve with 98% coverage at a 1 minute cadence. A significant signature in the light curve comes from discrete cloud features. We compare results extracted from the light curve data with contemporaneous disk-resolved imaging of Neptune from the Keck 10-m telescope at 1.65 microns and Hubble Space Telescope visible imaging acquired nine months later. This direct comparison validates the feature latitudes assigned to the K2 light curve periods based on Neptune’s zonal wind profile, and confirms observed cloud feature variability. Although Neptune’s clouds vary in location and intensity on short and long timescales, a single large discrete storm seen in Keck imaging dominates the K2 and Hubble light curves; smaller or fainter clouds likely contribute to short-term brightness variability. The K2 Neptune light curve, in conjunction with our imaging data, provides context for the interpretation of current and future brown dwarf and extrasolar planet variability measurements. In particular we suggest that the balance between large, relatively stable, atmospheric features and smaller, more transient, clouds controls the character of substellar atmospheric variability. Atmospheres dominated by a few large spots may show inherently greater light curve stability than those which exhibit a greater number of smaller features. PMID:28127087

  20. Applying FBD-power theory to analysing effective lighting devices’ impact on power quality and electric grid efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Pavas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently the impact of high efficient lighting devices such as compact fluorescent lamps (CFL and light emitting diodes (LED is an important concern for the electrotechnical community. This paper makes a contribution towards determining the impact of these devices on electric grid power quality and efficiency, proposed by means of applying FBD-power theory to the currents absorbed by CFLs and LEDs. An analysis of the waveform distortion regarding IEEE standard 519 and efficiency detriment quantification are presented.

  1. Synchrotron radiation structure analyses of the light-induced radical pair of a hexaarylbiimidazolyl derivative. Origin of the spin-multiplicity change

    CERN Document Server

    Kawano, M; Matsubara, K; Imabayashi, H; Mitsumi, M; Toriumi, K; Ohashi, Y

    2002-01-01

    In situ synchrotron radiation structure analyses of a light-induced radical pair from o-Cl-HABI were performed by using an X-ray vacuum camera at 23-70K at the BL02B1 station of SPring-8. The combined results of X-ray analysis with theoretical calculation, IR, and UV-vis spectroscopy reveal that a slight conformational change of the radical pair causes the drastic spin-multiplicity change during 2-140K. (author)

  2. Variability in Proto-Planetary Nebulae: IV. Light Curve Analyses of Four Oxygen-Rich, F Spectral-Type Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Hrivnak, Bruce J; Nault, Kristie A

    2015-01-01

    We present new light curves covering 14 to 19 years of observations of four bright proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs), all O-rich and of F spectral type. They each display cyclical light curves with significant variations in amplitude. All four were previously known to vary in light. Our data were combined with published data and searched for periodicity. The results are as follows: IRAS 19475+3119 (HD 331319; 41.0 days), 17436+5003 (HD 161796; 45.2 days), 19386+0155 (101.8 days), and 18095+2704 (113.3 days). The two longer periods are in agreement with previous studies while the two shorter periods each reveal for the first time reveal a dominant period over these long observing intervals. Multiple periods were also found for each object. The secondary periods were all close to the dominant periods, with P2/P1 ranging from 0.86 to 1.06. The variations in color reveal maximum variations in T(eff) of 400 to 770 K. These variations are due to pulsations in these post-AGB objects. Maximum seasonal light variations a...

  3. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  4. Analysing adjustment factors for using lanes at traffic-light-controlled intersections in Bogotá, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo José Peña Lindarte

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article was focused on analyzing the lane use adjustment factor (fLU forming one of the eleven adjustment factors proposed in the current calculation methodology contained in the 2000 version of the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB Highway Capacity Manual (HCM for analyzing traffic-light-controlled intersection capacity in terms of saturation intensity. A methodology was established when analyzing the fLU factor that considered operational conditions regarding traffic-light-controlled intersections in Bogota. Road traffic flows were analyzed, including characterizing road traffic based on statistical sampling, field data collection and analysis. The project proposed equations allowing reference values to be gathered for determining adjustment factors regarding lane use on roads in Bogota in relation to existing access typologies and road traffic volume for analyzing traffic-light- controlled intersections. For example, in the specific case of roads having direct double-lane access (2CCD, the basic equation was determined to be y=-3,03E-08X2+3,44E-05X+0,888988, having a 1.0 coefficient of correlation. The dependent variable y referred to the fLU factor and the independent variable X was the volume of road traffic in mixed vehicles/hour. This equation was considered to be statistically relevant. A comparative analysis of the lane use adjustment factors estimated in the project is also presented and compared to the values recommended by the US Highway Capacity Manual. The project’s conclusions and re- commendations were thus sustained, validating the recommended factors summarized by the HCM and recommending that the results obtained from the project should be used in traffic-light-controlled design and planning projects.

  5. Ud af hjemløshed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pico Geerdsen, Lars; Koch-Nielsen, Inger; Vinther, Henrik

    Hjemløshed er ofte forbundet med en række problemer som misbrug, psykisk sygdom, vold i parforholdet, ringe arbejdsmarkedstilknytning og levevilkår, kriminalitet, gæld og manglende sociale netværk. Det er alle problemer, der kan udløse hjemløshed og potentielt fastholde personer i en hjemløshedst...

  6. Phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses reveal the evolution of bioluminescence and light detection in marine deep-sea shrimps of the family Oplophoridae (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Juliet M; Pérez-Moreno, Jorge L; Chan, Tin-Yam; Frank, Tamara M; Bracken-Grissom, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    Bioluminescence is essential to the survival of many organisms, particularly in the deep sea where light is limited. Shrimp of the family Oplophoridae exhibit a remarkable mechanism of bioluminescence in the form of a secretion used for predatory defense. Three of the ten genera possess an additional mode of bioluminescence in the form of light-emitting organs called photophores. Phylogenetic analyses can be useful for tracing the evolution of bioluminescence, however, the few studies that have attempted to reconcile the relationships within Oplophoridae have generated trees with low-resolution. We present the most comprehensive phylogeny of Oplophoridae to date, with 90% genera coverage using seven genes (mitochondrial and nuclear) across 30 oplophorid species. We use our resulting topology to trace the evolution of bioluminescence within Oplophoridae. Previous studies have suggested that oplophorid visual systems may be tuned to differentiate the separate modes of bioluminescence. While all oplophorid shrimp possess a visual pigment sensitive to blue-green light, only those bearing photophores have an additional pigment sensitive to near-ultraviolet light. We attempt to characterize opsins, visual pigment proteins essential to light detection, in two photophore-bearing species (Systellaspis debilis and Oplophorus gracilirostris) and make inferences regarding their function and evolutionary significance.

  7. Shedding of cell membrane-bound proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Eon Jeong; Park, Pyong Woo

    2012-01-01

    Membrane-bound proteoglycans function primarily as coreceptors for many glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding ligands at the cell surface. The majority of membrane-bound proteoglycans can also function as soluble autocrine or paracrine effectors as their extracellular domains, replete with all GAG chains, are enzymatically cleaved and released from the cell surface by ectodomain shedding. In particular, the ectodomain shedding of syndecans, a major family of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is an important posttranslational mechanism that modulates diverse pathophysiological processes. Syndecan shedding is a tightly controlled process that regulates the onset, progression, and resolution of various infectious and noninfectious inflammatory diseases. This review describes methods to induce and measure the shedding of cell membrane-bound proteoglycans, focusing on syndecan shedding as a prototypic example.

  8. An expanded genetic linkage map of an intervarietal Agaricus bisporus var. bisporusxA. bisporus var. burnettii hybrid based on AFLP, SSR and CAPS markers sheds light on the recombination behaviour of the species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Spataro, Cathy; Cathalot, Vincent; Monllor, Sarah; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2010-03-01

    A genetic linkage map for the edible basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus was constructed from 118 haploid homokaryons derived from an intervarietal A. bisporus var. bisporus x A. bisporus var. burnettii hybrid. Two hundred and thirty-one AFLP, 21 SSR, 68 CAPS markers together with the MAT, BSN, PPC1 loci and one allozyme locus (ADH) were evenly spread over 13 linkage groups corresponding to the chromosomes of A. bisporus. The map covers 1156cM, with an average marker spacing of 3.9cM and encompasses nearly the whole genome. The average number of crossovers per chromosome per individual is 0.86. Normal recombination over the entire genome occurs in the heterothallic variety, burnettii, contrary to the homothallic variety, bisporus, which showed adaptive genome-wide suppressed recombination. This first comprehensive genetic linkage map for A. bisporus provides foundations for quantitative trait analyses and breeding programme monitoring, as well as genome organisation studies.

  9. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    2011-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  10. Dynamic Optimization for Vortex Shedding Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonis Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flows around structures exhibiting vortex shedding induce vibrations that can potentially damage the structure. A way to avoid it is to suppress vortex shedding by controlling the wake. Wake control of laminar flow behind a rotating cylinder is formulated herein as a dynamic optimization problem. Angular cylinder speed is the manipulated variable that is adjusted to suppress vortex shedding by minimizing lift coefficient variation. The optimal angular speed is assumed to be periodic like wake formation. The control problem is solved for different time horizons tH. The impact of tH to control is evaluated and the need for feedback is assessed.

  11. Integrated Light Chemical Tagging Analyses of Seven M31 Outer Halo Globular Clusters from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sakari, Charli M; Mackey, Dougal; Shetrone, Matthew D; Dotter, Aaron; Ferguson, Annette M N; Huxor, Avon

    2015-01-01

    Detailed chemical abundances are presented for seven M31 outer halo globular clusters (with projected distances from M31 greater than 30 kpc), as derived from high resolution integrated light spectra taken with the Hobby Eberly Telescope. Five of these clusters were recently discovered in the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS)---this paper presents the first determinations of integrated Fe, Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, and Eu abundances for these clusters. Four of the target clusters (PA06, PA53, PA54, and PA56) are metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1.5), alpha-enhanced (though they are possibly less alpha-enhanced than Milky Way stars at the 1 sigma level), and show signs of star-to-star Na and Mg variations. The other three globular clusters (H10, H23, and PA17) are more metal rich, with metallicities ranging from [Fe/H] = -1.4 to -0.9. While H23 is chemically similar to Milky Way field stars, Milky Way globular clusters, and other M31 clusters, H10 and PA17 have moderately low [Ca/Fe], compared to Milky Way fi...

  12. Adaptive load shedding and regional protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, J.J.; Ledwich, G. [School of Engineering Systems, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4001 (Australia); Bevrani, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kurdistan Sanandaj, Kurdistan (Iran)

    2009-11-15

    The requirement for improved efficiency whilst maintaining system security necessitates the development of improved system analysis approaches and the development of advanced emergency control technologies. Load shedding is a type of emergency control that is designed to ensure system stability by curtailing system load to match generation supply. This paper presents a new adaptive load shedding scheme that provides emergency protection against excess frequency decline, whilst minimizing the risk of line overloading. The proposed load shedding scheme uses the local frequency rate information to adapt the load shedding behaviour to suit the size and location of the experienced disturbance. The proposed scheme is tested in simulation on a 3-region, 10-generator sample system and shows good performance. (author)

  13. Vortex shedding by a Savonius rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrini, M.; Beguier, C.; Chauvin, A.; Brun, R.

    1984-05-01

    A series of flow visualizations was performed to characterize the wake vortices of a Savonius rotor. The trials were undertaken in an attempt to account for discrepancies between theoretical and experimentally-derived power coefficients. The Savonius examined was two-bladed with a center offset. All tests were made in a water tunnel. Dye injection provided the visualization, and average velocities and velocity fluctuations were measured using a laser Doppler anemometer. A system of three vortices was found to be periodically shed by the rotor. Flow velocity fluctuation intensity peaked as a vortex was shed. The vortex shedding alternated from blade to blade, so that one was shed from a blade moving upstream.

  14. Vortex Shedding From a Flexible Hydrofoil

    OpenAIRE

    Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Video of vortex shedding in the wake of a Naca0009 hydrofoil made of polyoxymethylene type C (POM C). This video was submitted as part of the Gallery of Fluid Motion 2011 which is showcase of fluid dynamics videos.

  15. Meta-Analyses of Human Cell-Based Cardiac Regeneration Therapies: Controversies in Meta-Analyses Results on Cardiac Cell-Based Regenerative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Navarese, Eliano P; Moye, Lemuel À

    2016-04-15

    In contrast to multiple publication-based meta-analyses involving clinical cardiac regeneration therapy in patients with recent myocardial infarction, a recently published meta-analysis based on individual patient data reported no effect of cell therapy on left ventricular function or clinical outcome. A comprehensive review of the data collection, statistics, and the overall principles of meta-analyses provides further clarification and explanation for this controversy. The advantages and pitfalls of different types of meta-analyses are reviewed here. Each meta-analysis approach has a place when pivotal clinical trials are lacking and sheds light on the magnitude of the treatment in a complex healthcare field.

  16. Novel technique sheds new light on protein colocalization patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The potential of MELC, a brand-new and highly efficient technique for studying the temporal and spatial distribution of proteins in living tissue,has been explored jointly over the last years by Walter Schubert, its inventor from the Molecular Pattern-Recognition Research Group at the Institute of Medical Neurobiology, Otto-von-Guericke University (Magdeburg, Germany),and his collaborators including Andreas Dress from the CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology (PICB), the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS).

  17. Research Sheds Light on Mechanism of Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM) under the CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences have made significant progress in suggesting a possible mechanism for the accumulation of amyloid β-peptides (Aβs), which are believed to cause Alzheimer's disease. Aβs are fragments of a protein that is snipped from another protein called amyloid precursor protein (APP). In a healthy brain, these protein fragments would be broken down and eliminated. In Alzheimer's disease, unfortunately, the fragments accumulate to form hard, insoluble plaques, which are the characteristic lesions found in Alzheimer's patients and could dramatically inhibit several genes critical to memory and learning.

  18. Absorbent Mind Update: Research Sheds New Light on Montessori Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Annette M.

    1993-01-01

    Explores Maria Montessori's notion that a young child's brain is significantly different from an adult's and that young children develop according to a series of predictable "sensitive periods." Cites numerous empirical studies that support these and other ideas Montessori postulated without the advantage of sophisticated scientific…

  19. Experiments shed new light on nickel-fluorine reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J.; Gunther, W.; Jarry, R. L.

    1967-01-01

    Isotopic tracer experiments and scale-impingement experiments show fluorine to be the migrating species through the nickel fluoride scale formed during the fluorination of nickel. This is in contrast to nickel oxide scales, where nickel is the migrating species.

  20. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  1. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Andrew; Aelterman, Bart; Alves, Jose A.; Azijn, Kevin; Bernstein, Garrett; Branco, Sérgio; Desmet, Peter; Dokter, Adriaan M.; Horton, Kyle; Kelling, Steve; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Leijnse, Hidde; Rong, Jingjing; Sheldon, Daniel; Van den Broeck, Wouter; Van Den Meersche, Jan Klaas; Van Doren, Benjamin Mark; van Gasteren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals’ life cycles difficult. Remote sensing, therefore, has played an important role in our understanding of large-scale nocturnal bird migrations. Weather surveillance radar networks in Europe and North America have great potential for long-term low-cost monitoring of bird migration at scales that have previously been impossible to achieve. Such long-term monitoring, however, poses a number of challenges for the ornithological and ecological communities: how does one take advantage of this vast data resource, integrate information across multiple sensors and large spatial and temporal scales, and visually represent the data for interpretation and dissemination, considering the dynamic nature of migration? We assembled an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, meteorologists, computer scientists, and graphic designers to develop two different flow visualizations, which are interactive and open source, in order to create novel representations of broad-front nocturnal bird migration to address a primary impediment to long-term, large-scale nocturnal migration monitoring. We have applied these visualization techniques to mass bird migration events recorded by two different weather surveillance radar networks covering regions in Europe and North America. These applications show the flexibility and portability of such an approach. The visualizations provide an intuitive representation of the scale and dynamics of these complex systems, are easily accessible for a broad interest group, and are biologically insightful. Additionally, they facilitate fundamental ecological research, conservation, mitigation of human–wildlife conflicts, improvement of meteorological products, and public outreach, education, and engagement. PMID:27557096

  2. Studies Shed Light on Origin of New Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Although scientists are certain that genomes of various organisms differ greatly in terms of numbers of genes contained, until recently they know little about process of origin of new genes. So gene genesis mechanism has become a major issue puzzling researchers in the field of evolutionary biology.

  3. Shedding Light on Lithium Evolution: The Globular Cluster Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, A J

    2012-01-01

    I shall review what has been learnt during 20 years of lithium observations in stars belonging to metal-poor globular clusters. The focus will be on little evolved main-sequence, turnoff-point (TOP) and subgiant-branch (SGB) stars expected to display Spite-plateau lithium abundances like those found in the majority of field stars of similar metallicities. But is the Spite plateau of globular clusters the same as those of field stars? What effect does, e.g., cluster-internal pollution have on lithium abundances in the now dominant second generation of stars? It will be shown that it is primarily our incomplete knowledge of the temperature scale of Population II stars which currently limits the diagnostic power of globular clusters as regards the stellar-surface evolution of lithium.

  4. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Fablet

    Full Text Available Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves.

  5. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, R.; Pecquerie, L.; de Pontual, H.;

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosys...... simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  6. Study Sheds Light on Effects of Hate Crimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan, N.; Harper, Shaun R.; Hildebrand, Emily S.; Burns, Shannon L.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of effects of hate crime on college campuses reports findings of a survey taken three months after a fatal hate crime. The study found that students in the targeted group, especially females and organizational leaders, had increased extracurricular involvement in campus organizations. Also provides statistics on racist acts on campus…

  7. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; de Pontual, Hélène; Høie, Hans; Millner, Richard; Mosegaard, Henrik; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves.

  8. Chlamydial genes shed light on the evolution of photoautotrophic eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria of protists, invertebrates and vertebrates, but have not been found to date in photosynthetic eukaryotes (algae and embryophytes). Genes of putative chlamydial origin, however, are present in significant numbers in sequenced genomes of photosynthetic eukaryotes. It has been suggested that such genes were acquired by an ancient horizontal gene transfer from Chlamydiae to the ancestor of photosynthetic eukaryotes. To further tes...

  9. FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas Cosméticos Dispositivos Médicos Dispositivos que Emiten Radiación Fraude en la Salud Medicamentos Nutrición Productos Veterinarios Productos de Tabaco Salud ...

  10. The last diadectomorph sheds light on Late Palaeozoic tetrapod biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Bever, G S

    2015-05-01

    Diadectomorpha is a clade of Late Palaeozoic vertebrates widely recognized as the sister group of crown-group Amniota and the first tetrapod lineage to evolve high-fibre herbivory. Despite their evolutionary importance, diadectomorphs are restricted stratigraphically and geographically, with all records being from the Upper Carboniferous and Lower Permian of North America and Germany. We describe a new diadectomorph, Alveusdectes fenestralis, based on a partial skull from the Upper Permian of China. The new species exhibits the derived mechanism for herbivory and is recovered phylogenetically as a deeply nested diadectid. Approximately 16 Myr younger than any other diadectomorph, Alveusdectes is the product of at least a 46 Myr ghost lineage. How much of this time was probably spent in Russia and/or central Asia will remain unclear until a specimen is described that subdivides this cryptic history, but the lineage assuredly crossed this region before entering the relatively isolated continent of North China. The discovery of Alveusdectes raises important questions regarding diadectomorph extinction dynamics including what, if any, ecological factors limited the diversity of this group in eastern Pangea. It also suggests that increased sampling in Asia will likely significantly affect our views of clade and faunal insularity leading up to the Permo-Triassic extinction.

  11. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  12. Trace elements in quartz shed light on sediment provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Michael R.; Tailby, Nicholas D.; Watson, E. Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Quartz is one of the most common minerals on the surface of the earth, and is a primary rock-forming mineral across the rock cycle. These two factors make quartz an obvious target for sediment provenance studies. Observations from experimental and natural samples demonstrate that the trace element content of quartz often reflects the conditions of quartz formation. When quartz is weathered from its primary crystallization setting (i.e., quartz from a granitoid) it can retain many chemical signatures of formation throughout the sedimentation processes. These geochemical signatures can be used to understand the primary source of individual quartz grains within a sediment. Here we present a case study from the Bega River catchment to demonstrate that quartz grains in sediments at the mouth of the Bega River are sourced from granitoids within the drainage basin. Data presented here also indicate that a portion of the beach sediment is also derived from either (i) sedimentary rocks within the basin or; (ii) mixing with sediments at the mouth of the river. The Bega River catchment was selected for this study because it is both small and has a well-constrained bedrock lithology, making it an ideal location to test the utility of this provenance technique. However, quartz trace element provenance has broad applications to modern and ancient sediments and can be used in lieu of, or in conjunction with, other provenance techniques to elucidate sediment transport through time.

  13. Principles of Food Science Class Sheds Light on Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Many students are curious about the steps in food preparation. As a result of such experiences, the author of this article began to incorporate science demonstrations into food preparation classes. She conducted research, developed resources, and piloted the "Principles of Food Science" class over the next 6 years. "Principles of Food Science"…

  14. Shedding Light on Filovirus Infection with High-Content Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha G. Panchal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  15. Forest Carbon Offsets Revisited: Shedding Light on Darkwoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.; Bogle, T.; Vries, de F.P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the viability of carbon offset credits created through forest conservation and preservation. A detailed forest management model based on a case study of a forest estate in southeastern British Columbia, owned by The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is used to demonstrate th

  16. Shedding Light on the Nature of Seminal Round Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianpiero D Palermo

    Full Text Available In this investigation we assess the incidence of round cells (RCs in semen samples in our infertile patient population and their significance on intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI cycle outcomes. We also evaluate the usefulness of RCs as indicators of bacterial infection and highlight the origin of this cell-type, as well as its role in the human ejaculate.In a prospective fashion, a total of 4,810 ejaculated samples were included in the study during a period of 24 months. RCs were characterized for white blood cell (WBC components versus exfoliated germ cells by testing for multiple markers of ploidy as well as protamine assays. Cases displaying ≥ 2 x 106/ml RCs were screened for bacteria. Raw specimens containing RC were processed by peroxidase and other leukocyte assays, specific stains for protamines were used to identify spermiogenic stage, aneuploidy (FISH assessment was carried out, and the presence of various Sertoli-cell cytoplasmic remnants was analyzed to identify and characterize immature germ cells. The effect of RC on clinical outcome was assessed in specimens used for ICSI.The average age of the men involved was 39.2 ± 7 years. Semen samples had a mean concentration of 40.7 ± 31 x 106/ml, motility of 42.6 ± 35%, and morphology of 2.3 ± 2%. RCs were identified in 261 specimens, representing a proportion of 5.4%. Men with RCs had comparable age but lower sperm concentration and morphology than the control group (P<0.001. The aneuploidy rate of 4.3% in RCs group was remarkably higher than the control group (2.3%; P<0.001. Sperm aneuploidy rate positively correlated with the number of RCs (P<0.001. Of 44 men, 17 of them in 18 cycles had up to 1.9 x 106/ml RCs without affecting fertilization and clinical pregnancy rates when compared to controls (n = 365 cycles. In 27 men undergoing 33 ICSI cycles with ≥ 2 x 106/ml RCs, the fertilization rate trended lower and the miscarriage rate was significantly increased (P = 0.05. There was lack of correlation between RC and bacteriological growth. Specific markers indicated that seminal RCs are mostly immature germ cells encased in the remnants of Sertoli cell cytoplasm. Moreover, their modest protamine content and their haploid status confirm that they are post-meiotic. Sequential observation in the same man showed that RC episodes were followed by an amelioration of semen parameters, and interestingly, the episodic occurrence of RCs often coincides with flu season peaks.Seminal RCs are not a marker of infectiousness but rather a transient indicator of spermatogenic insult that possibly occurs in most men following a mild and transient ailment such as the flu.

  17. Research Sheds New Light on the Peopling of South Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), a circular molecule with 16,569 base pair length, encodes 13 proteins, 22tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs. In the past few years, complete sequencing mtDNA genome has become a powerful tool to determine the matrilineal components and their evolutionary relationships (viz. phylogeny) and thus to gain some detailed insights into the past of modern humans.

  18. Proteomics Approaches Shed New Light on Traditional Iranian Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahhed, Mina; Poursaleh, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Until now, Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) had been extensively based on Iranian philosophy in theoretical approach in diagnosis and treatment, with doubts on academic medicine. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of temperaments, herbal standardization, and quality control had been with the obscurity of functional molecules and their action mechanisms. Proteomics is a potent board to the mechanistic investigation of ITM and has been comprehensively applied profile drug-regulated proteins. In this review, we assessed the application of this modern molecular biological method in the identification of temperaments and drug targets of ITM. Methods: All available studies related to proteomics in traditional medicine, alternative and complementary medicine, including books, journals, and other references were studied and assessed. Results: The present review showed the phenotypes of the various temperaments in healthy individuals, that is to say, same proteins with different dynamic properties. Therefore, the usefulness of proteomics seems authoritative to understand the means by which the molecular pathways protected in ITM. This might be also the key clinical viewpoint on this new approach for enabling the integration of Iranian traditional medicine and modern biological science and technology, as well for upholding the internationalization of ITM. Conclusion: Proteomics, as a powerful tool for systems biology, is an essential research methodology for understanding the mechanisms of traditional medicine. Further investigation on the applications of advanced proteomics in temperaments, herbal standardization, and quality control in ITM is recommended. PMID:27516684

  19. Subsurface Images Shed Light on Past Tsunamis in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rajesh R.; Buynevich, Ilya; Goble, Ronald J.; Srinivasan, P.; Murthy, S. G. N.; Kandpal, S. C.; Lakshmi, C. S. Vijaya; Trivedi, D.

    2010-12-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami caused massive devastation and left a lasting impact along many of the major coastal regions in South Asia, including the coast of Tamil Nadu, a state in the southeastern tip of India. Following the event, sand deposits draped the low-lying areas and buried the muddy sediments of the coastal plain [Babu et al., 2007; Srinivasalu et al., 2007]. In addition, erosional features related to the tsunami, such as channels and scarps, have been observed along many parts of the coast (Figure 1a). This tsunami, along with a recorded history of intense monsoons, has highlighted the need for focused research on the role of extreme events in shaping the geological character of India's coastal plains.

  20. Studies Shed Light on How Cheating Impedes Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on new research which shows that, when students succeed at cheating on tests, they get duped into thinking they're smarter than they really are. In four experiments detailed in the March "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences", researchers from the Harvard Business School and Duke University found that cheaters pay…

  1. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamoun-Baranes, J.; Farnsworth, A.; Aelterman, B.; Alves, J.A.; Azijn, K.; Bernstein, G.; Branco, S.; Desmet, P.; Dokter, A.M.; Horton, K.; Kelling, S.; Kelly, J.F.; Leijnse, H.; Rong, J.; Sheldon, D.; van den Broeck, W.; Van Den Meersche, J.K.; Van Doren, B.M.; van Gasteren, H.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals’ lif

  2. Shedding Light on Fish Otolith Biomineralization Using a Bioenergetic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; de Pontual, Hélène; Høie, Hans; Millner, Richard; Mosegaard, Henrik; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves. PMID:22110601

  3. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Liang [Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Ji, Hong-Fang, E-mail: jhf@sdut.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. {yields} Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. {yields} The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc}. -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP{sup Sc}). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP{sup C} conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  4. Photons shedding light on electron capture by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Romke Anne

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis charge transfer is studied in collisions of highly charged ions (Aq+) with neutral particles (B). Because the electron is captured resonantly (i.e. without its binding energy) by the ion, a limited number of highly excited states (characterized by the quantum numbers nlm) is preferent

  5. Shedding light on the black hole mass spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Spera, Mario; Mapelli, Michela

    2016-01-01

    The mass spectrum of stellar black holes (BHs) is highly uncertain. Theoretical models of BH formation strongly depend on the efficiency of stellar winds of the progenitor star and on the supernova (SN) explosion mechanism. We discuss the BH mass spectrum we obtain using SEVN, a new public population-synthesis code that includes up-to-date stellar-wind prescriptions and several SN explosion models. Our models indicate a sub-solar metallicity environment for the progenitors of the gravitational wave source GW150914. We show that our models predict substantially larger BH masses (up to ~100 Msun) than other population synthesis codes, at low metallicity. In this proceeding, we also discuss the impact of pair-instability SNe on our previously published models.

  6. Common peptides shed light on evolution of Olfactory Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lancet Doron

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory Receptors (ORs form the largest multigene family in vertebrates. Their evolution and their expansion in the vertebrate genomes was the subject of many studies. In this paper we apply a motif-based approach to this problem in order to uncover evolutionary characteristics. Results We extract deterministic motifs from ORs belonging to ten species using the MEX (Motif Extraction algorithm, thus defining Common Peptides (CPs characteristic to ORs. We identify species-specific CPs and show that their relative abundance is high only in fish and frog, suggesting relevance to water-soluble odorants. We estimate the origins of CPs according to the tree of life and track the gains and losses of CPs through evolution. We identify major CP gain in tetrapods and major losses in reptiles. Although the number of human ORs is less than half of the number of ORs in other mammals, the fraction of lost CPs is only 11%. By examining the positions of CPs along the OR sequence, we find two regions that expanded only in tetrapods. Using CPs we are able to establish remote homology relations between ORs and non-OR GPCRs. Selecting CPs according to their evolutionary age, we bicluster ORs and CPs for each species. Clean biclustering emerges when using relatively novel CPs. Evolutionary age is used to track the history of CP acquisition in the collection of mammalian OR families within HORDE (Human Olfactory Receptor Data Explorer. Conclusion The CP method provides a novel perspective that reveals interesting traits in the evolution of olfactory receptors. It is consistent with previous knowledge, and provides finer details. Using available phylogenetic trees, evolution can be rephrased in terms of CP origins. Supplementary information is also available at http://adios.tau.ac.il/ORPS

  7. Shedding light on filovirus infection with high-content imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G

    2012-08-01

    Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI) has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  8. Chemical communication: a jewel sheds light on signal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassance, Jean-Marc; Löfstedt, Christer

    2013-05-06

    When others show sexy tails or sing elaborate songs, many animals use the language of chemistry to attract potential mates. A study provides insights into the evolutionary conundrum of how new chemical signals can evolve in an established communication system.

  9. Shedding light on the growth of gold nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbeck, Christian; Haderlein, Michael; Schürer, Benedikt; Braunschweig, Björn; Peukert, Wolfgang; Klupp Taylor, Robin N

    2014-03-25

    Nanostructured particles containing noble metals can have highly tunable localized surface plasmon resonances and are therefore of particular interest for numerous applications. Nanoshells comprising a dielectric core and gold or silver shell are a widely researched systems because of the strong dependence of their optical properties on the ratio of core diameter to shell thickness. Although seeded-growth procedures have been developed to produce these particles, the many reported studies show significant variation in the nanoshell morphologies and hence optical properties. In order to establish processes that reproducibly synthesize nanoshells with high optical quality, it is necessary to develop techniques that monitor changes at the core particle surface during shell growth. For that purpose, we have carried out in situ nonlinear second-harmonic scattering (SHS) and linear vis-NIR extinction spectroscopy simultaneously during the seeded growth of gold nanoshells on silica core particles. Our SHS measurements show a striking variation in the nonlinear optical properties of the growing gold nanoshells. In comparison with linear optical measurements and with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images made of gold nanoshells produced with varying shell completenesses, the SHS signal was observed to reach a peak intensity at a stage prior to shell closure. We attribute this high sensitivity of the SHS signal to the incomplete nanoshell surface morphology to the generation and subsequent degeneration of regions of electric field enhancement at gaps between isolated gold islands, which grow and coalesce. This conclusion is corroborated by finite-difference time-domain simulations of incomplete nanoshells. We suggest that the in situ analytical approach demonstrated here offers significant promise for future activities regarding the in-process optimization of the morphology and optical properties of metal nanoshells and other nanostructured plasmonic particles.

  10. [Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding - endoscopy sheds light in the darkness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, A

    2014-08-01

    Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as a bleeding of the small bowel and is the most common indication for small bowel endoscopy. Intraoperative enteroscopy has been regarded as gold standard for a long time. With the introduction of different endoscopy techniques, they play now the central role, whereas intraoperative enteroscopy has become a reserve method for selected patients. Actually, there are, beside capsule endoscopy, five non-surgical, flexible enteroscopy techniques available. In Germany and Europe balloon-assisted enteroscopy (double balloon and single balloon enteroscopy) is mainly used. Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is the "oldest" flexible enteroscopy technique and has become established throughout the world for diagnostic and therapeutic examinations of the small bowel. The majority of the studies have been performed with DBE and it provides the highest rate of complete enteroscopy. Nevertheless, technical improvements to make enteroscopy easier and faster are still required. In patients with chronic MGI or problematic situations capsule endoscopy is an ideal screening option. In case of acute MGI the flexible enteroscopy techniques should be preferred because of the high diagnostic yield combined with the possibility of endoscopic therapeutic interventions. In difficult cases with unsuccessful enteroscopy, CT angiography and conventional angiography with the option of embolisation had proved their value.

  11. Shedding light on surface-assembled photosynthetic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magis, Johan Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The interfacing of biomolecules to nanostructures, electrode surfaces and/or optical components constitutes the new discipline of bioelectronics. It is based on electron transfer between a protein and an electrode, and can be monitored by amperometric techniques. The integration of biomolecules with

  12. Finding Florence: Shedding Light on Nurse Practitioners' Professional Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. ter Maten-Speksnijder (Ada)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe new professional role ‘nurse practitioner’ (in Dutch: verpleegkundig specialist) challenges nurses to distuinguish themselves from nurses educated at the Bacher level by the criteria: independency, expertise, and an active attitude to role development. A crucial aspect of their r

  13. Shear driven droplet shedding and coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtadernejad, S.; Tembely, M.; Jadidi, M.; Esmail, N.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The interest on shedding and coalescence of sessile droplets arises from the importance of these phenomena in various scientific problems and industrial applications such as ice formation on wind turbine blades, power lines, nacelles, and aircraft wings. It is shown recently that one of the ways to reduce the probability of ice accretion on industrial components is using superhydrophobic coatings due to their low adhesion to water droplets. In this study, a combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate droplet shedding and coalescence phenomena under the influence of air shear flow on a superhydrophobic surface. Droplets with a size of 2 mm are subjected to various air speeds ranging from 5 to 90 m/s. A numerical simulation based on the Volume of Fluid method coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation turbulent model is carried out in conjunction with the validating experiments to shed more light on the coalescence of droplets and detachment phenomena through a detailed analysis of the aerodynamics forces and velocity vectors on the droplet and the streamlines around it. The results indicate a contrast in the mechanism of two-droplet coalescence and subsequent detachment with those related to the case of a single droplet shedding. At lower speeds, the two droplets coalesce by attracting each other with successive rebounds of the merged droplet on the substrate, while at higher speeds, the detachment occurs almost instantly after coalescence, with a detachment time decreasing exponentially with the air speed. It is shown that coalescence phenomenon assists droplet detachment from the superhydrophobic substrate at lower air speeds.

  14. Itaalia maalikooli shedöövrid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    I8. detsembrist Rüütelkonna hoones näitus "Itaalia maalikooli shedöövreid Eesti Kunstimuuseumi kogust" sarjast "Kadrioru lossi aarded", mis kajastab ka teoste restaureerimist ja uurimistööd. Maali "Püha Joosepi surm" ümberatribueerimisest XVII sajandi Veneetsia meistrile Giovanni Battista Piazzettale

  15. Characterization of shed medicinal leech mucus reveals a diverse microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Maree Ott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial transmission through mucosal-mediated mechanisms is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. One example of this occurs with Hirudo verbana, the medicinal leech, where host attraction to shed conspecific mucus facilitates horizontal transmission of a predominant gut symbiont, the Gammaproteobacterium Aeromonas veronii. However, whether this mucus may harbor other bacteria has not been examined. Here, we characterize the microbiota of shed leech mucus through Illumina deep sequencing of the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Additionally, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP typing with subsequent Sanger Sequencing of a 16S rRNA gene clone library provided qualitative confirmation of the microbial composition. Phylogenetic analyses of full-length 16S rRNA sequences were performed to examine microbial taxonomic distribution. Analyses using both technologies indicate the dominance of the Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria phyla within the mucus microbiota. We determined the presence of other previously described leech symbionts, in addition to a number of putative novel leech-associated bacteria. A second predominant gut symbiont, the Rikenella-like bacteria, was also identified within mucus and exhibited similar population dynamics to A. veronii, suggesting persistence in syntrophy beyond the gut. Interestingly, the most abundant bacterial genus belonged to Pedobacter, which includes members capable of producing heparinase, an enzyme that degrades the anticoagulant, heparin. Additionally, bacteria associated with denitrification and sulfate cycling were observed, indicating an abundance of these anions within mucus, likely originating from the leech excretory system. A diverse microbiota harbored within shed mucus has significant potential implications for the evolution of microbiomes, including opportunities for gene transfer and utility in host capture of a diverse group of symbionts.

  16. Superhydrophobic porous networks for enhanced droplet shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahua; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-09-01

    Recent research has shown that the use of submillimeter-scale tapered post arrays could generate the so-called pancake bouncing, which is characterized by the fast shedding of impinging drops from the surface in a pancake shape without undergoing the retraction stage as observed on conventional superhydrophobic surfaces. Despite this exciting discovery, the fabrication of this unique superhydrophobic surface with tapered post arrays involves complex processes, hindering its wide applications in practical sectors. Here, we report on the facile strategy to prepare a new hierarchical multilayered superhydrophobic surface directly from commercially available porous matrix that allows for efficient drop shedding. Further study shows that the enhanced drop mobility observed on such a surface is attributed to the synergistic cooperation of hierarchical structures endowing an adequate energy storage and effective energy release. The facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with enhanced drop mobility may find many practical applications including anti-icing, dropwise condensation and self-cleaning.

  17. CAD Instructor Designs Eco-Friendly Shed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendau, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-friendly shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…

  18. On Load Shedding in Complex Event Processing

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Complex Event Processing (CEP) is a stream processing model that focuses on detecting event patterns in continuous event streams. While the CEP model has gained popularity in the research communities and commercial technologies, the problem of gracefully degrading performance under heavy load in the presence of resource constraints, or load shedding, has been largely overlooked. CEP is similar to "classical" stream data management, but addresses a substantially different class of queries. Thi...

  19. Genetic factors controlling wool shedding in a composite Easycare sheep flock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matika, O; Bishop, S C; Pong-Wong, R; Riggio, V; Headon, D J

    2013-12-01

    Historically, sheep have been selectively bred for desirable traits including wool characteristics. However, recent moves towards extensive farming and reduced farm labour have seen a renewed interest in Easycare breeds. The aim of this study was to quantify the underlying genetic architecture of wool shedding in an Easycare flock. Wool shedding scores were collected from 565 pedigreed commercial Easycare sheep from 2002 to 2010. The wool scoring system was based on a 10-point (0-9) scale, with score 0 for animals retaining full fleece and 9 for those completely shedding. DNA was sampled from 200 animals of which 48 with extreme phenotypes were genotyped using a 50-k SNP chip. Three genetic analyses were performed: heritability analysis, complex segregation analysis to test for a major gene hypothesis and a genome-wide association study to map regions in the genome affecting the trait. Phenotypes were treated as a continuous or binary variable and categories. High estimates of heritability (0.80 when treated as a continuous, 0.65-0.75 as binary and 0.75 as categories) for shedding were obtained from linear mixed model analyses. Complex segregation analysis gave similar estimates (0.80 ± 0.06) to those above with additional evidence for a major gene with dominance effects. Mixed model association analyses identified four significant (P wool shedding, demonstrated the possibility of a single putative dominant gene controlling this trait and identified four SNPs that may be in partial linkage disequilibrium with gene(s) controlling shedding.

  20. This pineal gland does not mediate phase shifts in the disc shedding rhythm of the rat retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Albino rats were subjected to pinealectomy, superior cervical ganglionectomy, or the appropriate sham preparation and were placed in lighting conditions so that light onset was advanced by 10 hr. After 6 days of this regimen, all animals exhibited a complete shift in their outer segment disc shedding rhythm, indicating that the pineal gland is not a factor in mediating such a shift.

  1. Hair shedding score may affect body temperature more than hair coat color during heat stress in weaned beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hair shedding score and hair coat color on the vaginal temperature (VT) of calves during heat stress. Weaned Bos taurus beef heifers (n = 32; BW = 282 ± 6.4 kg) were assigned to a hair coat color class (BLACK; RED; or LIGHT, where LIGHT = yel...

  2. Life-long shedding of Puumala hantavirus in wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, Liina; Sironen, Tarja; Tonteri, Elina; Bäck, Anne Tuiskunen; Razzauti, Maria; Karlsson, Malin; Wahlström, Maria; Niemimaa, Jukka; Henttonen, Heikki; Lundkvist, Åke

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge of viral shedding patterns and viraemia in the reservoir host species is a key factor in assessing the human risk of zoonotic viruses. The shedding of hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae) by their host rodents has widely been studied experimentally, but rarely in natural settings. Here we present the dynamics of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) shedding and viraemia in naturally infected wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus). In a monthly capture-mark-recapture study, we analysed 18 bank voles for the presence and relative quantity of PUUV RNA in the excreta and blood from 2 months before up to 8 months after seroconversion. The proportion of animals shedding PUUV RNA in saliva, urine and faeces peaked during the first month after seroconversion, but continued throughout the study period with only a slight decline. The quantity of shed PUUV in reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) positive excreta was constant over time. In blood, PUUV RNA was present for up to 7 months but both the probability of viraemia and the virus load declined with time. Our findings contradict the current view of a decline in virus shedding after the acute phase and a short viraemic period in hantavirus infection - an assumption widely adopted in current epidemiological models. We suggest the life-long shedding as a means of hantaviruses to survive over host population bottlenecks, and to disperse in fragmented habitats where local host and/or virus populations face temporary extinctions. Our results indicate that the kinetics of pathogens in wild hosts may differ considerably from those observed in laboratory settings.

  3. Numerical simulation of icing, deicing, and shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, W. B.; Dewitt, K. J.; Keith, T. G., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to numerically model the concurrent phenomena of two-dimensional transient heat transfer, ice accretion, ice shedding and ice trajectory which arise from the use of electrothermal pad. The Alternating Direction Implicit method is used to simultaneously solve the heat transfer and accretion equations occurring in the multilayered body covered with ice. In order to model the phase change between ice and water, a technique was used which assumes a phase for each node. This allows the equations to be linearized such that a direct solution is possible. This technique requires an iterative procedure to find the correct phase at each node. The computer program developed to find this solution has been integrated with the NASA-Lewis flow/trajectory code LEWICE.

  4. Estimating heritability of wool shedding in a cross-bred ewe population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Jurado, N; Leymaster, K A; Kuehn, L A; Lewis, R M

    2016-10-01

    Low wool prices and high production costs in sheep systems have resulted in the introduction of genotypes that shed wool into flocks to reduce shearing costs. Wool shedding occurs naturally in a few breeds and can be incorporated by cross-breeding. The opportunity to enhance shedding through selection depends on the extent of genetic variability present. Genetic and environmental parameters for wool shedding for ewes from a three-breed composite population were estimated using Bayesian inference. Data on 2025 cross-bred ewes, including 3345 wool shedding scores (WS) and 1647 breeding weight (BW) records, were analysed using bivariate and, for WS, univariate animal repeatability models. Breeding weight was included to account for possible selection bias. Breeding weight was moderately heritable and highly repeatable with means of 0.317 and 0.724, respectively. Under both models, WS was found to be moderately heritable and repeatable with means of 0.256 and 0.399, respectively. Based on a cumulative link model and contingency table analysis, age and reproductive activity influenced the extent of WS (p < 0.05). Given that WS is moderately heritable, selective gain in WS can be achieved.

  5. 浅析光与色在餐饮空间中的作用%Analyses the Role of Light and Color in the Dining Room

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳甜甜

    2014-01-01

    Light and color are all objective existence, but people can only be seen with light color, no light, no way to carry out normal visual activities, and you can’t have the feeling of color, of course. So light and color influence each other, interact with each other. In catering space, light and color is more important. According to the different dining environment space used by the light of the different color lighting, not only can reflect the nature of the dining space can also pay attention to people’s psychological feeling to the space environment. The color of the light environment for space, want to consider many factors of lighting, such as illumination, brightness, color rendering, color temperature and other factors.%光与色都是客观存在的,但是人们只能凭借光才能看到任何色彩的存在,没有光就没有办法进行正常的视觉活动,当然也就无所谓色彩的感觉。因此光和色相互影响,相互作用。在餐饮空间中,光照与色彩显得更为重要。根据不同的餐饮环境空间所采用不同的光色照明,不仅能够体现出餐饮空间的性质还可以关注人们对空间环境的心理感受。对于空间的光色环境,要考虑到照明当中的很多因素,例如照度、亮度、显色性、色温等因素。

  6. STUDIES OF VARIABILITY IN PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULAE. II. LIGHT AND VELOCITY CURVE ANALYSES OF IRAS 22272+5435 AND 22223+4327

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); Sperauskas, Julius; Zacs, Laimons [Vilnius University Observatory, Ciurlionio 29 Vilnius 2009 (Lithuania); Van Winckel, Hans [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, K. U. Leuven University, B-3001 Leuven (Heverlee) (Belgium); Bohlender, David, E-mail: bruce.hrivnak@valpo.edu, E-mail: wen.lu@valpo.edu, E-mail: julius.sperauskas@ff.vu.lt, E-mail: Hans.VanWinckel@ster.kuleuven.be, E-mail: David.Bohlender@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: zacs@latnet.lv [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    We have carried out a detailed observational study of the light, color, and velocity variations of two bright, carbon-rich proto-planetary nebulae, IRAS 22223+4327 and 22272+5435. The light curves are based upon our observations from 1994 to 2011, together with published data by Arkhipova and collaborators. They each display four significant periods, with primary periods for IRAS 22223+4327 and 22272+5435 being 90 and 132 days, respectively. For each of them, the ratio of secondary to primary period is 0.95, a value much different from that found in Cepheids, but which may be characteristic of post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Fewer significant periods are found in the smaller radial velocity data sets, but they agree with those of the light curves. The color curves generally mimic the light curves, with the objects reddest when faintest. A comparison in seasons when there exist contemporaneous light, color, and velocity curves reveals that the light and color curves are in phase, while the radial velocity curves are {approx}0.25 P out of phase with the light curves. Thus they differ from what is seen in Cepheids, in which the radial velocity curve is 0.50 P out of phase with the light curve. Comparison of the observed periods and amplitudes with those of post-AGB pulsation models shows poor agreement, especially for the periods, which are much longer than predicted. These observational data, particularly the contemporaneous light, color, and velocity curves, provide an excellent benchmark for new pulsation models of cool stars in the post-AGB, proto-planetary nebula phase.

  7. Diversification of Educational Provision and School-to-Work Transitions in Rural Mali: Analysing a Reconfiguration of Inequalities in Light of Justice Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Frederique

    2011-01-01

    Based on an approach focusing on actors and in particular on educational trajectories, this paper analyses the effects of diversification of educational provision on inequalities in rural Mali. It shows that there are considerable gaps in the skills acquired by students, including within formal education. These gaps are perceived as illegitimate…

  8. Analysing, Interpreting, and Testing the Invariance of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareau, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although in recent years researchers have begun to utilize dyadic data analyses such as the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM, certain limitations to the applicability of these models still exist. Given the complexity of APIMs, most researchers will often use observed scores to estimate the model's parameters, which can significantly limit and underestimate statistical results. The aim of this article is to highlight the importance of conducting a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA of equivalent constructs between dyad members (i.e. measurement equivalence/invariance; ME/I. Different steps for merging CFA and APIM procedures will be detailed in order to shed light on new and integrative methods.

  9. Correlates of HIV-1 genital shedding in Tanzanian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Tanton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the correlates of HIV shedding is important to inform strategies to reduce HIV infectiousness. We examined correlates of genital HIV-1 RNA in women who were seropositive for both herpes simplex virus (HSV-2 and HIV-1 and who were enrolled in a randomised controlled trial of HSV suppressive therapy (aciclovir 400 mg b.i.d vs. placebo in Tanzania. METHODOLOGY: Samples, including a cervico-vaginal lavage, were collected and tested for genital HIV-1 and HSV and reproductive tract infections (RTIs at randomisation and 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. Data from all women at randomisation and women in the placebo arm during follow-up were analysed using generalised estimating equations to determine the correlates of cervico-vaginal HIV-1 RNA detection and load. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cervico-vaginal HIV-1 RNA was detected at 52.0% of 971 visits among 482 women, and was independently associated with plasma viral load, presence of genital ulcers, pregnancy, bloody cervical or vaginal discharge, abnormal vaginal discharge, cervical ectopy, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, an intermediate bacterial vaginosis score and HSV DNA detection. Similar factors were associated with genital HIV-1 RNA load. CONCLUSIONS: RTIs were associated with increased presence and quantity of genital HIV-1 RNA in this population. These results highlight the importance of integrating effective RTI treatment into HIV care services.

  10. In Depth Analyses of LEDs by a Combination of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Light Microscopy (LM) Correlated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jörg; Thomas, Christian; Tappe, Frank; Ogbazghi, Tekie

    2016-06-16

    In failure analysis, device characterization and reverse engineering of light emitting diodes (LEDs), and similar electronic components of micro-characterization, plays an important role. Commonly, different techniques like X-ray computed tomography (CT), light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used separately. Similarly, the results have to be treated for each technique independently. Here a comprehensive study is shown which demonstrates the potentials leveraged by linking CT, LM and SEM. In depth characterization is performed on a white emitting LED, which can be operated throughout all characterization steps. Major advantages are: planned preparation of defined cross sections, correlation of optical properties to structural and compositional information, as well as reliable identification of different functional regions. This results from the breadth of information available from identical regions of interest (ROIs): polarization contrast, bright and dark-field LM images, as well as optical images of the LED cross section in operation. This is supplemented by SEM imaging techniques and micro-analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  11. Kvalitative analyser ..

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boolsen, Merete Watt

    bogen forklarer de fundamentale trin i forskningsprocessen og applikerer dem på udvalgte kvalitative analyser: indholdsanalyse, Grounded Theory, argumentationsanalyse og diskursanalyse......bogen forklarer de fundamentale trin i forskningsprocessen og applikerer dem på udvalgte kvalitative analyser: indholdsanalyse, Grounded Theory, argumentationsanalyse og diskursanalyse...

  12. Technical note: concentration and composition of airborne aerobic bacteria inside an enclosed rabbit shed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have been conducted to analyse bacterial aerosols in animal houses, which is beneficial for the control of animal diseases. However, little information on aerosols in enclosed rabbit sheds was available. An FA-1 sampler was employed to collect air samples in an enclosed rabbit house in the Qingdao region of China. Concentration, composition, and aerodynamics of bacterial aerosols inside the enclosed rabbit shed were systematically analysed. The concentration of airborne bacteria inside the rabbit shed was 2.11-6.36×104 colony forming unit/m3 (CFU/m3. Seventeen species of bacteria belonging to eight genera were identified. Among these, there were 11 species belonging to 4 genera of gram-positive bacteria, and 6 species belonging to 4 genera of gram-negative bacteria. The dominant species of bacteria were, in descending order, Micrococcus luteus (49.4%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (25.5%, and Alcaligenes odorans (10.2%. A total of about 76.3% of airborne bacteria was distributed in stages C-F of the FA-1 sampler (that ranges from A to F, with aerodynamic radii <3.3 μm in diameter. These particulates could enter lower respiratory tracks and even alveoli, posing a potential threat to the health of both animals and breeders.

  13. Particle filters on light diesel vehicles - a socio-economic analysis on the introduction of particle filters; Partikelfiltre pae lette dieselkoeretoejer - en samfundsoekonomisk analyse af fremskyndelse af partikelfiltre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, M.; Larsen, Thommy; Carlsen, Kirsten; Mulvad Jeppesen, L.

    2006-09-15

    Emission of particles into the atmosphere is one of the biggest air pollution problems of our times. The emission of particles causes severe health problems such as respiratory and circulatory diseases, lung cancer, asthma, bronchitis and even causes premature deaths. The emission of particles comes from a number of different sources, where traffic is a considerable contributor. The effects of particle emissions from the traffic on the population are substantial, as the emission comes from mobile sources which create a high local pollution in city areas and in consequence high exposure of the local population. Exhaust particle emissions come mainly from diesel engines, and the introduction of particle filters would have a considerable impact on particle emissions. Vehicle emissions regulation is controlled by the EU. The coming emission regulation, EURO 5, is expected to be put into effect by the beginning of 2010. The current suggestions for the EURO 5 restrictions on particles are set so strict that they will be impossible to fulfil without a particle filter. This report performs a socio-economic analysis on the introduction of particle filters on all light vehicles (<3,500 kg). The analysis assumes that all newly registered diesel powered cars and vans should have a factory installed particle filter from the beginning of 2007. This thereby gives a period of three years before implementation of the EURO 5. (au)

  14. Limiting steps of hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Synechocystis PCC 6803 as analysed by light-induced gas exchange transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournac, L.; Mus, F.; Bernard, L.; Guedeney, G.; Peltier, G. [CEA Cadarache, Lab. d' Ecophysiologie de la Photosynthese, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Vignais, P. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. de Biochimie er Biophysique des Systemes Integres (France)

    2002-12-01

    In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and in the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, transient hydrogen photo-production is observed when cells are exposed to light in anoxia. We measured changes in H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} concentrations using time-resolved mass spectrometry in wild-type and mutant strains of Chlamydomonas and Synechocystis. In both organisms, non-photochemical reduction of the plastoquinone pool is shown to contribute to the initial H{sub 2} photo-production. This pathway, which does not produce O{sub 2}, exhibits a low rate in normal conditions. From the effect of the uncoupler FCCP, we conclude that PS II-independent H{sub 2} production in Chlamydomonas is limited by the trans-thylakoidal proton gradient. In Synechocystis, from the study of a mutant deficient in the NDH-1 complex (M55), we conclude that PS II-independent H{sub 2} production is limited by recycling of NAD(P)H through the NDH-1 complex. Based on these conclusions, we propose strategies for optimising H{sub 2} photo-production in these organisms. (Author)

  15. Stochastic oscillations induced by vortex shedding in wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus

    1997-01-01

    As a fluid flows past a circular cylinder,vortices are shed alternately from each side at most values of the Reynolds number. Over a certain range of windspeeds, the periodicity in the wake is synchronized or captured by the mechanical system. The shedding abruptly deviates from the linear Strouhal...... for the vortex shedding load during lock-in are obtained and discussed. Due to the complexity of the problem, the models give an idealized phenomenological description of the "lock-in" phenomenon, but for engineering analysis, especially a fatigue analysis, such simple model may be sufficient. All the results...... in the wake is synchronized or captured by the mechanical system. The shedding abruptly deviates from the linear Strouhal dependence and stays constant at the mechanical natural frequency. This coupling between the velocity field and the motion of the mechanical system is referred to as the lock-in phenomenon...

  16. Guam Power Authority automatic underfrequency load shedding study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, H.H. [Hawaiian Electric Co., Honolulu, HI (United States); Flores, J.C.; Fang, Y.; Baldevia, R.P. Jr. [Guam Power Authority, Agana (Guam)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development of a new automatic underfrequency load shedding scheme on the Guam Power Authority`s (GPA) system using a transient stability simulation program. The new scheme strives to minimize the amount of load shed by selecting frequency settings based on the severity of generation or load unbalance and the availability of spinning reserves. The fast speed of frequency decay due to loss of generation is shown to be particularly pronounced in an island system, requiring more careful design of any load shedding scheme than large interconnected systems. The use of a well-prepared transient stability study model allows the simulation of specific contingencies and the fine-tuning of load shedding strategies for optimality. The trade-off between equipment protection, customer service availability, and practical operating issues, such as, synchronization of generators to the grid, are discussed.

  17. Guam Power Authority automatic underfrequency load shedding study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, H.H. [Hawaiian Electric Co., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States); Flores, J.C.; Fang, Y.; Baldevia, R.P. [Guam Power Authority, Agana (Guam)

    1995-12-31

    Guam Power Authority (GPA) has developed an automatic underfrequency load shedding scheme using a transient stability simulation program. This scheme strives to minimize the amount of load shed by selecting frequency settings based on the severity of generation or load imbalance and the availability of spinning reserves. The fast speed of frequency decay due to loss of generation is shown to be particularly pronounced in an island system, requiring more careful design of any load shedding scheme than large interconnected systems. The use of a well prepared transient stability study model allows the simulation of specific contingencies and the fine-tuning of load shedding strategies for optimality. The development of the scheme is described, and trade-off between equipment protection, customer service availability, and practical operating issues, such as synchronization of generators to the grid, are discussed. (author). 9 figs., 6 refs.

  18. Insulation Characteristics of Bushing Shed at Cryogenic Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    In the development of high-Tc superconducting(HTS) devices, the bushing for HTS devices (HTS bushing) is the core technology, the need to because of supply high voltage to the cable or the winding of the transformer. The lower part of the bushing is exposed to the liquid nitrogen (LN2), and it has many sheds. In particular, the insulation body with sheds and electrical insulation at cryogenic temperature have attracted a great deal of interest from the view point of the size, weight and efficiency of bushing. This study has mainly investigated the shed and insulation body by comparing glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) in LN2. We investigated the surface discharge characteristics according to insulating materials, width and height of the shed.

  19. Oral shedding of herpes simplex virus type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Wald, A; Ericsson, M.; Krantz, E; Selke, S; Corey, L

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 reactivate preferentially in the oral and genital area, respectively. We aimed to define frequency and characteristics associated with oral shedding of HSV-2.

  20. Vortex shedding effects in grid-generated turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melina, G.; Bruce, P. J. K.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    The flow on the centerline of grid-generated turbulence is characterized via hot-wire anemometry for three grids with different geometry: a regular grid (RG60), a fractal grid (FSG17), and a single-square grid (SSG). Due to a higher value of the thickness t0 of its bars, SSG produces greater values of turbulence intensity Tu than FSG17, despite SSG having a smaller blockage ratio. However, the higher Tu for SSG is mainly due to a more pronounced vortex shedding contribution. The effects of vortex shedding suppression along the streamwise direction x are studied by testing a three-dimensional configuration, formed by SSG and a set of four splitter plates detached from the grid (SSG+SP). When vortex shedding is damped, the centerline location of the peak of turbulence intensity xpeak moves downstream and Tu considerably decreases in the production region. For FSG17 the vortex shedding is less intense and it disappears more quickly, in terms of x /xpeak , when compared to all the other configurations. When vortex shedding is attenuated, the integral length scale Lu grows more slowly in the streamwise direction, this being verified both for FSG17 and for SSG+SP. In the production region, there is a correlation between the vortex shedding energy and the skewness and the flatness of the velocity fluctuations. When vortex shedding is not significant, the skewness is highly negative and the flatness is much larger than 3. On the opposite side, when vortex shedding is prominent, the non-Gaussian behavior of the velocity fluctuations becomes masked.

  1. Comparative analyses of three Chlorella species in response to light and sugar reveal distinctive lipid accumulation patterns in the Microalga C. sorokiniana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian N Rosenberg

    Full Text Available While photosynthetic microalgae, such as Chlorella, serve as feedstocks for nutritional oils and biofuels, heterotrophic cultivation can augment growth rates, support high cell densities, and increase triacylglycerol (TAG lipid content. However, these species differ significantly in their photoautotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics. In this study, the phylogeny of thirty Chlorella strains was determined in order to inform bioprospecting efforts and detailed physiological assessment of three species. The growth kinetics and lipid biochemistry of C. protothecoides UTEX 411, C. vulgaris UTEX 265, and C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 were quantified during photoautotrophy in Bold's basal medium (BBM and heterotrophy in BBM supplemented with glucose (10 g L-1. Heterotrophic growth rates of UTEX 411, 265, and 1230 were found to be 1.5-, 3.7-, and 5-fold higher than their respective autotrophic rates. With a rapid nine-hour heterotrophic doubling time, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 maximally accumulated 39% total lipids by dry weight during heterotrophy compared to 18% autotrophically. Furthermore, the discrete fatty acid composition of each strain was examined in order to elucidate lipid accumulation patterns under the two trophic conditions. In both modes of growth, UTEX 411 and 265 produced 18:1 as the principal fatty acid while UTEX 1230 exhibited a 2.5-fold enrichment in 18:2 relative to 18:1. Although the total lipid content was highest in UTEX 411 during heterotrophy, UTEX 1230 demonstrated a two-fold increase in its heterotrophic TAG fraction at a rate of 28.9 mg L(-1 d(-1 to reach 22% of the biomass, corresponding to as much as 90% of its total lipids. Interestingly, UTEX 1230 growth was restricted during mixotrophy and its TAG production rate was suppressed to 18.2 mg L-1 d-1. This constraint on carbon flow raises intriguing questions about the impact of sugar and light on the metabolic regulation of microalgal lipid biosynthesis.

  2. Comparative analyses of three Chlorella species in response to light and sugar reveal distinctive lipid accumulation patterns in the Microalga C. sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Julian N; Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnes, Austin; Noel, Eric A; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Oyler, George A

    2014-01-01

    While photosynthetic microalgae, such as Chlorella, serve as feedstocks for nutritional oils and biofuels, heterotrophic cultivation can augment growth rates, support high cell densities, and increase triacylglycerol (TAG) lipid content. However, these species differ significantly in their photoautotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics. In this study, the phylogeny of thirty Chlorella strains was determined in order to inform bioprospecting efforts and detailed physiological assessment of three species. The growth kinetics and lipid biochemistry of C. protothecoides UTEX 411, C. vulgaris UTEX 265, and C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 were quantified during photoautotrophy in Bold's basal medium (BBM) and heterotrophy in BBM supplemented with glucose (10 g L-1). Heterotrophic growth rates of UTEX 411, 265, and 1230 were found to be 1.5-, 3.7-, and 5-fold higher than their respective autotrophic rates. With a rapid nine-hour heterotrophic doubling time, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 maximally accumulated 39% total lipids by dry weight during heterotrophy compared to 18% autotrophically. Furthermore, the discrete fatty acid composition of each strain was examined in order to elucidate lipid accumulation patterns under the two trophic conditions. In both modes of growth, UTEX 411 and 265 produced 18:1 as the principal fatty acid while UTEX 1230 exhibited a 2.5-fold enrichment in 18:2 relative to 18:1. Although the total lipid content was highest in UTEX 411 during heterotrophy, UTEX 1230 demonstrated a two-fold increase in its heterotrophic TAG fraction at a rate of 28.9 mg L(-1) d(-1) to reach 22% of the biomass, corresponding to as much as 90% of its total lipids. Interestingly, UTEX 1230 growth was restricted during mixotrophy and its TAG production rate was suppressed to 18.2 mg L-1 d-1. This constraint on carbon flow raises intriguing questions about the impact of sugar and light on the metabolic regulation of microalgal lipid biosynthesis.

  3. Asymptomatic Herpes Simplex Virus Shedding in STI Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶兴东; 颜景兰; 朱慧兰; 张莉; 佟菊贞

    2002-01-01

    Objective: This study examined Herpes Simplex Virus(HSV) subclinical shedding in the genital tract of patients withgenital herpes (GH) or non-gonoccal urethritis (NGU). Method: Swabs were collected after exposure to rash andgenital tract during GH relapse or remission on a weekly basisfor four to six weeks. NGU patients with negative chlamydiaand mycoplasma tests were also swabbed for a similarduration. All swabs underwent HSV DNA detection withquantitative PCR. Result: There was a significant difference in the rate ofasymptomatic HSV shedding in urinary tracts comparing GHand the control group and comparing NGU and the controlgroup (P<0.05). The rate of HSV shedding was 22%, 9.8%and 3.3% for GH, NGU and control groups respectively. Therate of HSV shedding was 21.7% (20/92) for patients withactive GH and 23% for those in remission. The HSV positiverate was significantly higher in the group with patients whohad more than six relapses within one year compared to thegroup of patients with less than six GH relapses. Conclusion: There is HSV subclinical shedding in theirgenital tract during active GH and remission. SubclinicalHSV shedding is more common in patients with more than sixGH relapses per year compared to GH patients with fewerrelapses. Approximately 9.9% of NGU patients with negativechlamydia, mycoplasma testing was found to have subclinicalHSV infection.

  4. Analysing degeneracies in networks spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Marrec, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks exhibit a high degeneracy at few eigenvalues. We show that a simple transformation of the network's adjacency matrix provides an understanding of? the origins of occurrence of high multiplicities in the networks spectra. We find that the eigenvectors associated with the degenerate eigenvalues shed light on the structures contributing to the degeneracy. Since these degeneracies are rarely observed in model graphs, we present results for various cancer networks. This approach gives an opportunity to search for structures contributing to degeneracy which might have an important role in a network.

  5. Relational Human Rights: Shed-DNA and the Identification of the Living Disappeared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaisman, Noa

    2014-01-01

    Through an ethnographic reading of an Argentine Supreme Court decision I explore the changing nature of the legal subject of human rights in light of emerging technologies. Guillermo Gabriel Prieto was suspected of being a ` living disappeared', one of the estimated 500infants or young children...... forcibly abducted by the last military dictatorship in Argentina. They were raised by the perpetrators of the crime or their accomplices and kept unaware of their birth origins. TheCourt's deliberations focused on Guillermo's appeal of a lower-court decision to carry out an identity test based on his shed...

  6. An implementation of particle swarm optimization to evaluate optimal under-voltage load shedding in competitive electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Bioki, M. M.; Rashidinejad, M.; Abdollahi, A.

    2013-11-01

    Load shedding is a crucial issue in power systems especially under restructured electricity environment. Market-driven load shedding in reregulated power systems associated with security as well as reliability is investigated in this paper. A technoeconomic multi-objective function is introduced to reveal an optimal load shedding scheme considering maximum social welfare. The proposed optimization problem includes maximum GENCOs and loads' profits as well as maximum loadability limit under normal and contingency conditions. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) as a heuristic optimization technique, is utilized to find an optimal load shedding scheme. In a market-driven structure, generators offer their bidding blocks while the dispatchable loads will bid their price-responsive demands. An independent system operator (ISO) derives a market clearing price (MCP) while rescheduling the amount of generating power in both pre-contingency and post-contingency conditions. The proposed methodology is developed on a 3-bus system and then is applied to a modified IEEE 30-bus test system. The obtained results show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology in implementing the optimal load shedding satisfying social welfare by maintaining voltage stability margin (VSM) through technoeconomic analyses.

  7. Suppression of vortex shedding around a square cylinder using blowing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun K Saha; Ankit Shrivastava

    2015-05-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of flow past a square cylinder at a Reynolds number of 100 has been carried out to explore the effect of blowing in the form of jet(s) on vortex shedding. Higher order spatial as well as temporal discretization has been employed for the discretization of governing equations. The varying number of jets, jet velocity profiles and different blowing velocities are studied to investigate the characteristics of vortex shedding. The parabolic velocity profile has been found to be more effective in suppressing the vortex shedding as compared to the uniform velocity. Complete suppression of vortex shedding along with remarkable reduction in drag coefficient has been achieved for both jet velocity profiles but at different velocities. The corresponding values for uniform and parabolic jet profiles are 0.87 and 0.6, respectively at a mass flux of 0.120. The study also reveals that there is considerable effect of the number of jets on the vortex shedding phenomena.

  8. On aerodynamic noise generation from vortex shedding in rotating blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, B. T.; Bies, D. A.

    1992-06-01

    The interaction of the shed wakes of plates in a cascade with each following plate is investigated in a water tunnel and shown to provide an explanation for an observed very powerful aerodynamic noise source. In particular, the noise generation of an idling circular saw may be explained as due to the interaction of the wake shed by an upstream tooth with the leading edge of the following downstream tooth. When a vortex travelling downstream in the gullet between teeth encounters the leading edge of the downstream tooth it is deflected out of the gullet into the main stream. The associated impulses which the teeth encounter give rise to the radiated noise.

  9. Distributed Load Shedding over Directed Communication Networks with Time Delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tao; Wu, Di

    2016-07-25

    When generation is insufficient to support all loads under emergencies, effective and efficient load shedding needs to be deployed in order to maintain the supply-demand balance. This paper presents a distributed load shedding algorithm, which makes efficient decision based on the discovered global information. In the global information discovery process, each load only communicates with its neighboring load via directed communication links possibly with arbitrarily large but bounded time varying communication delays. We propose a novel distributed information discovery algorithm based on ratio consensus. Simulation results are used to validate the proposed method.

  10. Accounting for rate variation among lineages in comparative demographic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Andrew G.; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Malaney, Jason L.; Cook, Joseph A.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic analyses of contemporary populations can be used to estimate the demographic histories of species within an ecological community. Comparison of these demographic histories can shed light on community responses to past climatic events. However, species experience different rates of molecular evolution, and this presents a major obstacle to comparative demographic analyses. We address this problem by using a Bayesian relaxed-clock method to estimate the relative evolutionary rates of 22 small mammal taxa distributed across northwestern North America. We found that estimates of the relative molecular substitution rate for each taxon were consistent across the range of sampling schemes that we compared. Using three different reference rates, we rescaled the relative rates so that they could be used to estimate absolute evolutionary timescales. Accounting for rate variation among taxa led to temporal shifts in our skyline-plot estimates of demographic history, highlighting both uniform and idiosyncratic evolutionary responses to directional climate trends for distinct ecological subsets of the small mammal community. Our approach can be used in evolutionary analyses of populations from multiple species, including comparative demographic studies.

  11. Developing of the EV charging and parking shed of BIPV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Shaobo; Wei Chuanchuan; Yu Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) is an important application way of solar photovoltaic power. The electric vehicle (EV) charging and parking shed of BIPV is the regeneration energy intellectual integration demonstration application system collection of photovoltaic (PV) grid power,PV off-grid power,EV charging and parking shed,and any part of the functions and their combination will be engaged in practical application on demand. The paper describes the PV shed system structure and design in detail with the present of its actual photos. The shed is 50 m long and 5.5 m wide and capable of parking 18 cars. Under the control of system intellectual con-troller,the power produced by PV from sunlight will charge the parking EV car prior to charging the storage bat-tery,charging the storage battery prior to grid power,grid power at last,and charge the EV by utility grid when it is a cloudy or rainy day.

  12. Older Men as Learners: Irish Men's Sheds as an Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragher, Lucia; Golding, Barry

    2015-01-01

    To date, little attention has been placed on older men (aged 50+ years) as learners, with much of the literature on adult learning concerned with younger age-groups and issues around gender equity directed mainly at women. This article examines the impact of community-based men's sheds on informal and nonformal learning by older men in Ireland. It…

  13. Heritage Conservation in the "Back Shed" of the Learning City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshier, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Describes Back Shed, a group of New Zealand heritage conservationists who center their work in lifelong learning. Situates their activities in the context of the learning city, a community development concept that mobilizes learning resources across many sectors. Discusses heritage conservation as a process of meaning making. (Contains 29…

  14. The transmembrane domain of TACE regulates protein ectodomain shedding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojin Li; Liliana Pérez; Zui Pan; Huizhou Fan

    2007-01-01

    Numerous membrane proteins are cleaved by tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE), which causes the release of their ectodomains. An ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain) family member, TACE contains several noncatalytic domains whose roles in ectodomain shedding have yet to be fully resolved. Here, we have explored the function of the transmembrane domain (TM) of TACE by coupling molecular engineering and functional analysis. A TM-free TACE construct that is anchored to the plasma membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylino-sitol (GPI)-binding polypeptide failed to restore shedding of transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and L-selectin in cells lacking endogenous TACE activity. Substitution of the TACE TM with that of the prolactin receptor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) also resulted in severe loss of TGF-α shedding, but had no effects on the cleavage of TNF-α and L-selectin. Replacement of the TM in TGF-a with that of L-selectin enabled TGF-a shedding by the TACE mutants carrying the TM of prolactin receptor and PDGFR. Taken together, our observations suggest that anchorage of TACE to the lipid bilayer through a TM is required for efficient cleavage of a broad spectrum of substrates, and that the amino-acid sequence of TACE TM may play a role in regulatory specificity among TACE substrates.

  15. Weight-Loss Surgery Sheds Pounds Long Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160719.html Weight-Loss Surgery Sheds Pounds Long Term 10-year follow- ... 31, 2016 WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Weight-loss surgery helps people drop a significant amount of ...

  16. Shedding Phenomenon of Ventilated Partial Cavitation around an Underwater Projectile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi-Wei; HUANG Chen-Guang; DU Te-Zhuan; WU Xian-Qian; FANG Xin; LIANG Nai-Gang; WEI Yan-Peng

    2012-01-01

    A new shedding phenomenon of ventilated partial cavitations is observed around an axisymmetric projectile in a horizontal launching experiment. The experiment system is established based on SHPB launching and high speed photography. A numerical simulation is carried out based on the homogeneous mixture approach, and its predicted evolutions of cavities are compared with the experimental results. The cavity breaks off by the interaction between the gas injection and the re-entry jet at the middle location of the projectile, which is obviously different from natural cavitation. The mechanism of cavity breaking and shedding is investigated, and the influences of important factors are also discussed.%A new shedding phenomenon of ventilated partial cavitations is observed around an axisymmetric projectile in a horizontal launching experiment.The experiment system is established based on SHPB launching and high speed photography.A numerical simulation is carried out based on the homogeneous mixture approach,and its predicted evolutions of cavities are compared with the experimental results.The cavity breaks off by the interaction between the gas injection and the re-entry jet at the middle location of the projectile,which is obviously different from natural cavitation.The mechanism of cavity breaking and shedding is investigated,and the influences of important factors are also discussed.

  17. A Robust Load Shedding Strategy for Microgrid Islanding Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Xiao, Bailu [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Ceylan, Oguzhan [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2016-01-01

    A microgrid is a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources. It can operate in either gridconnected mode to exchange energy with the main grid or run autonomously as an island in emergency mode. However, the transition of microgrid from grid-connected mode to islanded mode is usually associated with excessive load (or generation), which should be shed (or spilled). Under this condition, this paper proposes an robust load shedding strategy for microgrid islanding transition, which takes into account the uncertainties of renewable generation in the microgrid and guarantees the balance between load and generation after islanding. A robust optimization model is formulated to minimize the total operation cost, including fuel cost and penalty for load shedding. The proposed robust load shedding strategy works as a backup plan and updates at a prescribed interval. It assures a feasible operating point after islanding given the uncertainty of renewable generation. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on a simulated microgrid consisting of a wind turbine, a PV panel, a battery, two distributed generators (DGs), a critical load and a interruptible load. Numerical simulation results validate the proposed algorithm.

  18. USEPA SHEDS MODEL: METHODOLOGY FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physically-based, Monte Carlo probabilistic model (SHEDS-Wood: Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives) has been applied to assess the exposure and dose of children to arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) from contact with chromated copper arsenat...

  19. Fungal recognition enhances mannose receptor shedding through dectin-1 engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazi, Umut; Rosas, Marcela; Singh, Sonali; Heinsbroek, Sigrid; Haq, Imran; Johnson, Simon; Brown, Gordon D; Williams, David L; Taylor, Philip R; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa

    2011-03-11

    The mannose receptor (MR) is an endocytic type I membrane molecule with a broad ligand specificity that is involved in both hemostasis and pathogen recognition. Membrane-anchored MR is cleaved by a metalloproteinase into functional soluble MR (sMR) composed of the extracellular domains of intact MR. Although sMR production was initially considered a constitutive process, enhanced MR shedding has been observed in response to the fungal pathogen Pneumocystis carinii. In this work, we have investigated the mechanism mediating enhanced MR shedding in response to fungi. We show that other fungal species, including Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus, together with zymosan, a preparation of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mimic the effect of P. carinii on sMR production and that this effect takes place mainly through β-glucan recognition. Additionally, we demonstrate that MR cleavage in response to C. albicans and bioactive particulate β-glucan requires expression of dectin-1. Our data, obtained using specific inhibitors, are consistent with the canonical Syk-mediated pathway triggered by dectin-1 being mainly responsible for inducing MR shedding, with Raf-1 being partially involved. As in the case of steady-state conditions, MR shedding in response to C. albicans and β-glucan particles requires metalloprotease activity. The induction of MR shedding by dectin-1 has clear implications for the role of MR in fungal recognition, as sMR was previously shown to retain the ability to bind fungal pathogens and can interact with numerous host molecules, including lysosomal hydrolases. Thus, MR cleavage could also impact on the magnitude of inflammation during fungal infection.

  20. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    KAUST Repository

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004–2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  1. Incidence of Latent Virus Shedding during Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Donald H.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of immune parameters of both cellular and innate immunity indicate alterations in immune function in astronauts. Immune changes are due to stress and perhaps other factors associated with launch, flight, and landing phases. Medical relevance of observed changes is not known. The reactivation of latent viruses has been identified as an important in vivo indicator of clinically relevant immune changes. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of specific viral DNA in body fluids. Initial studies demonstrated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation during all 3 mission phases. EBV is shed in saliva following reactivation from B-cells. Incidence of EBV in saliva was higher than control subjects during all 3 mission phases. However, quantitative PCR revealed 10-fold higher levels of EBV DNA present in saliva collected during flight than found in pre- and post flight specimens. To determine if other latent viruses showed similar effects, cytomegalovirus (CMV), another herpes virus, shed in urine following reactivation was studied. A very low incidence (less than 2%) of CMV in urine is found in healthy, lowstressed individuals. However, 25-50% of astronauts shed CMV in their urine before, during, or after flight. Our studies are now focused on varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the etiological agent of chicken-pox during childhood and shingles later in life. We demonstrated reactivation of VZV and shedding of the virus during and after spaceflight in saliva of astronauts with no sign of active infection or symptoms. The maximum shedding of VZV occurred during the flight phase and diminishes rapidly during the first five days after landing. We have utilized the same PCR assay for VZV in a clinical study of shingles patients. Generally, shingles patients shed much more VZV in saliva than astronauts. However, the VZV levels in astronauts overlap with the lower range of VZV numbers in shingles patients. Saliva from shingles patients and

  2. Control of Vortex Shedding at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵传平; 鄂学全; 魏庆鼎; 朱凤荣

    2002-01-01

    The suppression method of vortex shedding from a circular cylinder has been studied experimentally in the Reynoldsnumber range from 300 to 1600. The test is performed in a water channel. The model cylinder is 1 cm in diameter and 38cm in length. A row of small rods of 0. 18 cm in diameter and 1.5 cm in length are perpendicularly connected to the surfaceof the model cylinder and distributed along the meridian. The distance between the neighboring rods and the angle of attackof the rods can be changed so that the suppression effect on vortex shedding can be adjusted. The results show that vortexshedding can be suppressed effectively if the distance between the neighboring rods is smaller than 3 times and the cylinderdiameter and the angle of attack is in the range of 30°≤β < 90°.

  3. Vortex shedding noise of a cylinder with hairy flaps

    OpenAIRE

    Kamps, L.; Geyer, T. F.; Sarradj, E.; Brücker, C.

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the modification of acoustic noise emitted from cylinders in a stationary subsonic flow for a cylinder equipped with flexible hairy flaps at the aft part as a passive way to manipulate the flow and acoustics. The study was motivated by the results from previous water tunnel measurements, which demonstrated that hairy flaps can modify the shedding cycle behind the cylinder and can reduce the wake deficit. In the present study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted on such...

  4. Birds shed RNA-viruses according to the pareto principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Jankowski

    Full Text Available A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand the role of individual variation of infection load on disease transmission dynamics and how this influences the evolution of resistance or tolerance mechanisms. Such information will improve our capacity to understand, predict, and mitigate pathogen-associated disease in all organisms. In many host-pathogen systems, particularly macroparasites and sexually transmitted diseases, it has been found that approximately 20% of the population is responsible for approximately 80% of the transmission events. Although host contact rates can account for some of this pattern, pathogen transmission dynamics also depend upon host infectiousness, an area that has received relatively little attention. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of pathogen shedding rates of 24 host (avian - pathogen (RNA-virus studies, including 17 bird species and five important zoonotic viruses. We determined that viral count data followed the Weibull distribution, the mean Gini coefficient (an index of inequality was 0.687 (0.036 SEM, and that 22.0% (0.90 SEM of the birds shed 80% of the virus across all studies, suggesting an adherence of viral shedding counts to the Pareto Principle. The relative position of a bird in a distribution of viral counts was affected by factors extrinsic to the host, such as exposure to corticosterone and to a lesser extent reduced food availability, but not to intrinsic host factors including age, sex, and migratory status. These data provide a quantitative view of heterogeneous virus shedding in birds that may be used to better parameterize epidemiological models and understand transmission dynamics.

  5. Birds shed RNA-viruses according to the pareto principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Mark D; Williams, Christopher J; Fair, Jeanne M; Owen, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand the role of individual variation of infection load on disease transmission dynamics and how this influences the evolution of resistance or tolerance mechanisms. Such information will improve our capacity to understand, predict, and mitigate pathogen-associated disease in all organisms. In many host-pathogen systems, particularly macroparasites and sexually transmitted diseases, it has been found that approximately 20% of the population is responsible for approximately 80% of the transmission events. Although host contact rates can account for some of this pattern, pathogen transmission dynamics also depend upon host infectiousness, an area that has received relatively little attention. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of pathogen shedding rates of 24 host (avian) - pathogen (RNA-virus) studies, including 17 bird species and five important zoonotic viruses. We determined that viral count data followed the Weibull distribution, the mean Gini coefficient (an index of inequality) was 0.687 (0.036 SEM), and that 22.0% (0.90 SEM) of the birds shed 80% of the virus across all studies, suggesting an adherence of viral shedding counts to the Pareto Principle. The relative position of a bird in a distribution of viral counts was affected by factors extrinsic to the host, such as exposure to corticosterone and to a lesser extent reduced food availability, but not to intrinsic host factors including age, sex, and migratory status. These data provide a quantitative view of heterogeneous virus shedding in birds that may be used to better parameterize epidemiological models and understand transmission dynamics.

  6. Vortex Shedding from Tapered Cylinders at high Reynolds Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Jens; Andersen, Michael Styrk; Christensen, Silas Sverre;

    2015-01-01

    percent for strakes of circular cross section. The present paper argues that this height can be reduced for structures where the critical wind velocity for vortex shedding is in the Supercritical Reynolds number regime. The present investigations are aimed for suppressing VIV on offshore wind turbine......^5 (Supercritical). Results indicate that circular strakes with a diameter corresponding to 3 percent of the structures mean diameter can be used to efficiently reduce VIV in the Supercritical Reynolds number regime....

  7. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements; Contribution a l'analyse des elements legers par fluorescence x excitee au moyen de radioelements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, {beta} and {alpha} emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K{sub {alpha}} lines of 3. period elements excited by {sup 55}Fe, {sup 3}H/Zr and {sup 210}Po sources; for the 2. period the K{sub {alpha}} spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the {alpha} particles of {sup 210}Po. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier les possibilites d'emploi de sources radioactives a l'analyse par fluorescence X des elements legers, on presente apres rappel de notions generales sur la fluorescence X, le principe de l'excitation de ce phenomene par emission X, {beta}, {alpha} de radioelements. Le fonctionnement et l'utilisation du compteur proportionnel a gaz a la detection du rayonnement X est developpe. Un dispositif permettant l'analyse des elements des 2eme et 3eme periodes de la classification de Mendeleev est etudie. Il permet l'excitation de la fluorescence par source radioactive emettrice de rayons X ou de particules {alpha}; le rayonnement X de fluorescence penetre dans un compteur proportionnel depourvu de fenetre, ceci est rendu possible en creant un champ electrique auxiliaire au voisinage de l'echantillon. On definit une pression du gaz de detection

  8. Autotransfusion of shed mediastinal blood after open heart surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵康丽; 许建屏; 胡盛寿; 吴清玉; 魏以桢; 刘迎龙

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety and effectiveness of autotransfusion of shed mediastinal blood after open heart surgery. Methods Sixty patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were selected randomly to receive either nonwashed shed mediastinal blood (Group 1, n=30) or banked blood (Group 2, n=30). Drainage and transfusion volume were determined after the operation. Hb, RBC, HCT and PLT were detected immediately before and after the operation, as well as 24 hours and 7 days after the operation. Data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. A P0.05). In the two groups, no significant difference in the mean blood loss was observed during 24 hours after the operation (660±300 ml in Group 1 and 655±280 ml in Group 2, P>0.05). In Group 1, the mean volume autotransfused was 280±160 ml, and the patients required 360±80 ml banked blood compared with 660±120 ml in Group 2. In other words, the banked blood requirement in Group 1 was 40% lower. Conclusions Autotransfusion of shed mediastinal blood after an open heart operation is safe and effective.

  9. Laminar vortex shedding behind a cooled circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Wang, An-Bang; Tu, Wen-Yun

    2014-02-01

    This paper addresses the functional demonstration of a hot air flow generator driven by convective heat transfer and the airflow behind a cooled circular cylinder in cross flow in the low velocity range. The wake flow was investigated experimentally using flow visualization, hot-wire anemometry, and laser Doppler anemometry. An evaluation of the free-stream velocity from the vortex shedding frequency was derived for the isothermal and non-isothermal cases and demonstrated using simple stroboscope measurements. The results confirm that cylinder cooling destabilizes the wake flow in air, i.e., the laminar steady regime can be changed into the vortex shedding regime, and the vortex shedding frequency increases as the cylinder temperature decreases. This thermal effect of cylinder cooling is consistent with its counterpart, the known effect of flow stabilization by cylinder heating. The effective temperature and effective Reynolds number concept have been further quantitatively evaluated, and the extension of their validity to the case of cooled cylinders has been confirmed.

  10. A corrective load shedding scheme to mitigate voltage collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echavarren, F.M.; Lobato, E.; Rouco, L. [School of Engineering, Universidad Pontificia Comillas, C/Alberto Aguilera, 23, 28015 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    Voltage stability is concerned with the ability of a power system to maintain acceptable voltages at all buses. A measure of the power system voltage stability is the distance to the saddle node bifurcation of the power flow equations, which is called the load margin. When the power system load is very high, and/or there exists a large generation-demand imbalance in the power system areas the load margin to the saddle node bifurcation may be too low, and the power system may become close to voltage collapse. In case that active and reactive power generation resources in the importing areas are exhausted, corrective load shedding may become the last option. This paper presents a LP-based optimization load shedding algorithm to improve the load margin. The objective function consists of minimizing the total system demand decrease. First order sensitivities of the load margin with respect to the load to be shed are considered. The performance of the method is illustrated with a scenario of the Spanish power system. (author)

  11. HSV oropharyngeal shedding among HIV-infected children in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Richard; Manji, Karim; Matee, Mecky; Naburi, Helga; Bisimba, Jema; Martinez, Raquel; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Kim, Faith; von Reyn, C Fordham; Palumbo, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) oral shedding has not been studied among HIV-positive children in Africa. We sought to evaluate longitudinal oral HSV reactivation in HIV-positive and -negative children. Twenty HIV-positive antiretroviral-naive and 10 HIV-negative children aged 3-12 years in Tanzania were followed prospectively for 14 days. Oral swabs were collected daily and submitted for HSV DNA PCR analysis. Clinical data were collected via chart review and daily diaries. HSV DNA was detected in 10 (50%) of HIV-positive and 4 (40%) of HIV-negative children. Children who shed HSV had virus detected in a median of 21.4% of samples; shedding was intermittent. Median CD4 count among HIV-infected children was 667 cells/µL in those with positive HSV DNA and 886 cells/µL in those who were negative (p = 0.6). Of the HIV-positive children reporting prior sores, five (83%) had positive HSV swabs, whereas the one HIV-negative child with prior sores did not have a PCR-positive swab. HSV is detected frequently in children with and without HIV. HIV-infected children reporting oral sores have a high rate of HSV detection. Given the proven strong interactions between HIV and HSV, further study of co-infection with these viruses is warranted in children.

  12. [Current state of digestive system robotic surgery in the light of evidence based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Oshiro, Elena; Fernández-Represa, Jesús Alvarez

    2009-03-01

    The incorporation of robotics in minimally invasive surgery has had mixed reception in the different fields of digestive surgery. Nowadays we are exposed to a continuous stream of publications on robotic approach techniques and outcomes, which do not always provide objective criteria and whose value, through scientific evidence analysis, is sometimes arguable. With the aim of shedding light on current knowledge on digestive robotic surgery and giving an update of its possibilities, the authors analyse the abundant literature available on the different digestive robotic surgery procedures, and sum up their own experience.

  13. Vortex shedding noise of a cylinder with hairy flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Laura; Geyer, Thomas F.; Sarradj, Ennes; Brücker, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    This study describes the modification of acoustic noise emitted from cylinders in a stationary subsonic flow for a cylinder equipped with flexible hairy flaps at the aft part as a passive way to manipulate the flow and acoustics. The study was motivated by the results from previous water tunnel measurements, which demonstrated that hairy flaps can modify the shedding cycle behind the cylinder and can reduce the wake deficit. In the present study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted on such a modified cylinder and the results were compared to the reference case of a plain cylinder. The acoustic spectrum was measured using two microphones while simultaneously recording the flap motion. To further examine the flow structures in the downstream vicinity of the cylinder, constant temperature anemometry measurements as well as flow visualizations were also performed. The results show that, above a certain Reynolds number, the hairy flaps lead to a jump in the vortex shedding frequency. This phenomenon is similarly observed in the water flow experiments as a jump in the non-dimensional Strouhal number that is related to the change of the shedding cycle. This jump appears to be coupled to a resonant excitation of the flaps. The specific Reynolds number at which the jump occurs is higher in the present case, which is attributed to the lower added mass in air as compared with the one in water. The flow visualizations confirmed that such action of the flaps lead to a more slender elongated shape of the time-averaged separation bubble. In addition, the hairy flaps induce a noticeable reduction of the tonal noise as well as broadband noise as long as the flaps do not touch each other.

  14. Micromechanical photothermal analyser of microfluidic samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a micromechanical photothermal analyser of microfluidic samples comprising an oblong micro-channel extending longitudinally from a support element, the micro-channel is made from at least two materials with different thermal expansion coefficients, wherein......, or infrared light, the specific light radiates into the channel through said light transparent material, the second material has a second thermal expansion coefficient being different from the first thermal expansion coefficient. The micromechanical photothermal analyser also comprises an irradiation source...

  15. Prediction models for 90Sr in shed deciduous teeth and infant bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Asker

    1971-01-01

    Shed deciduous teeth were collected in 1966-69 in Denmark, the Faroes and Greenland from children born in the period 1953-63. 235 samples of crowns were analysed for 90Sr. The 90Sr levels in deciduous tooth crowns were related to the fall-out rate and the accumulated fall-out. The tooth levels...... in children born in 1950-62 could be described with the same equation as the 90Sr bone levels in 1-yr-old infants born in 1962-68. The prediction models for 90Sr in teeth and bones showed that for given amount of fall-out the Faroese levels became nearly twice as high as the Danish. The maximum teeth and bone...

  16. Changes in Coaching Study Design Shed Light on How Features Impact Teacher Practice. Lessons from Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Joellen

    2016-01-01

    Teacher coaching is a powerful form of professional learning that improves teaching practices and student achievement, yet little is known about the specific aspects of coaching programs that are more effective. Researchers used a blocked randomized experiment to study the effects of one-to-one coaching on teacher practice. When pooled across all…

  17. Sex differences in animal models of schizophrenia shed light on the underlying pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rachel Anne

    2016-08-01

    Sex differences in schizophrenia are apparent in almost all features of the illness, from incidence and mean age of onset to symptomatology, course of illness and response to pharmacological treatments. Understanding how men and women with schizophrenia differ provides significant clues into the pathophysiology of the disorder. Animal models are powerful tools when dissecting the molecular biology which underlies behavioural disturbances, and allow structured comparisons of biological sex differences without the social environmental gender influence that so often confounds human sex comparison studies. This review will provide a summary of sex differences described in developmental, genetic and drug-induced animal models of schizophrenia and will link sex-specific molecular and behavioural phenotypes of these models in an attempt to unravel the role that sex plays in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Both sex and stress hormones interact to shape the developing brain and behaviour and animal models of schizophrenia that include both sexes provide significant insight into the complexities of these interactions and can direct toward novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. Metabolomics investigation to shed light on cheese as a possible piece in the French paradox puzzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Yde, Christian C; Clausen, Morten R;

    2015-01-01

    and TMAO levels and increased fecal excretion of acetate, propionate and lipid. Compared with milk intake, cheese consumption significantly reduced urinary citrate, creatine and creatinine levels and significantly increased the microbial-related metabolites butyrate, hippurate and malonate. Correlation...

  19. Shedding a New Light on the Universe: An Information and Activity Booklet. Grades 9-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetti, Maggie

    This activity booklet is divided into two parts. Part One presents basic information about the electromagnetic spectrum and multiwavelength astronomy with an emphasis on X-ray astronomy. Part Two describes X-ray detectors at a more advanced level. An introduction to the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and its contributions to science is…

  20. Can sea quark asymmetry shed light on the orbital angular momentum of the proton?

    CERN Document Server

    Nocera, Emanuele R

    2016-01-01

    A striking prediction of several extensions of the constituent quark model, including the unquenched quark model, the pion cloud model and the chiral quark model, is a proportionality relationship between the quark sea asymmetry and the orbital angular momentum of the proton. We investigate to which extent a relationship of this kind is corroborated by the experiment, through a systematic comparison between expectations based on models and predictions obtained from a global analysis of hard-scattering data in perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. We find that the data allows the angular momentum of the proton to be proportional to its sea asymmetry, though with a rather large range of the optimal values of the proportionality coefficient. Typical values do not enable us to discriminate among expectations based on different models. In order to make our comparison conclusive, the extrapolation uncertainties on the proportionality coefficient should be reduced, hopefully by means of accurate measurements in the r...

  1. Shedding light onto topological insulator beads: perspectives for optical tweezing application

    CERN Document Server

    Muller, Yuri G; Fonseca, Jakson M

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with a spheric-type three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) bead is described within classical optics framework. By virtue of the topological magnetoelectric effect (TMEE) experienced by reflected and transmitted rays at the TI surface, there appears a net constant force on the spherical bead which is proportional to the fine structure constant times the incident radiation power. Such an uniform dynamics (constant acceleration) may be particularly useful for optical tweeezing techniques, for instance, to investigate a DNA strip or a membrane piece under stretching as well as to displace a tiny object by means of purely optical control.

  2. Physicochemical Control of Adult Stem Cell Differentiation: Shedding Light on Potential Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    skin [4], retina [5], pancreas [6], intestinal crypt [7], and liver [8] as well as in skeletal muscle [9]. Depending on the origin, these adult stem...and nuclear elements [126, 143]. This model has gained much attention due to the fact that it provides an architectural description of...Niemeyer, and H. J. Baker, “Isolation and characterization of multipotential mesenchymal stem cells from feline bone marrow,” Experi- mental

  3. Shedding Light on the Grey Zone of Speciation along a Continuum of Genomic Divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Camille; Fraïsse, Christelle; Romiguier, Jonathan; Anciaux, Yoann; Galtier, Nicolas; Bierne, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Speciation results from the progressive accumulation of mutations that decrease the probability of mating between parental populations or reduce the fitness of hybrids-the so-called species barriers. The speciation genomic literature, however, is mainly a collection of case studies, each with its own approach and specificities, such that a global view of the gradual process of evolution from one to two species is currently lacking. Of primary importance is the prevalence of gene flow between diverging entities, which is central in most species concepts and has been widely discussed in recent years. Here, we explore the continuum of speciation thanks to a comparative analysis of genomic data from 61 pairs of populations/species of animals with variable levels of divergence. Gene flow between diverging gene pools is assessed under an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) framework. We show that the intermediate "grey zone" of speciation, in which taxonomy is often controversial, spans from 0.5% to 2% of net synonymous divergence, irrespective of species life history traits or ecology. Thanks to appropriate modeling of among-locus variation in genetic drift and introgression rate, we clarify the status of the majority of ambiguous cases and uncover a number of cryptic species. Our analysis also reveals the high incidence in animals of semi-isolated species (when some but not all loci are affected by barriers to gene flow) and highlights the intrinsic difficulty, both statistical and conceptual, of delineating species in the grey zone of speciation.

  4. Amnesia in frontotemporal dementia: shedding light on the Geneva historical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Beratis, Ion N; Horvath, Judit; Herrmann, François R; Bouras, Constantin; Kövari, Enikö

    2016-04-01

    Recent accumulated evidence indicates that episodic memory impairments could be part of the initial clinical expression of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). An early study on this issue was carried out by Constantinidis and colleagues in 1974, but it was subsequently overlooked for a long period of time. The scope of the present research was: (a) to explore the presence of early episodic memory impairments in the entire population of neuropathologically confirmed FTD patients from the Geneva brain collection; and (b) to expand the present insight on the association between the initial symptomatology and various characteristics, namely gender, age at onset, disease duration, and presence of Pick body neuropathology. A careful review of the records of 50 FTD patients hospitalized at the Department of Psychiatry of the Bel-Air Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland, from 1929 to 1999, was conducted. Further in-depth neuropathological analysis with novel immunohistological methods was carried out in 37 of the cases. The data showed that memory impairments were the first clinical symptom in several of the patients. In addition, this specific phenotypic expression of FTD was associated with the female gender, advanced age, and positive Pick body neuropathology. The current findings give the opportunity to historically vindicate the early work of Constantinidis and colleagues. In addition, the novel observations about the association of episodic memory impairments with the female gender and positive Pick body neuropathology add to the existing knowledge about this phenotypic expression of FTD.

  5. Shedding Light on the Dark Continent: A Historical Perspective for U.S. Army Regional Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Auxiliary Pioneer Corps; and the East African Military Labour Service in the British Army. These units saw combat in Ethiopia, Somaliland, Madagascar...and labor strikes to communicate dissatisfaction with the status quo. There are numerous other Senegalese practices with roots in the French colonial

  6. Algorithmic handwriting analysis of Judah's military correspondence sheds light on composition of biblical texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum-Golovin, Shira; Shaus, Arie; Sober, Barak; Levin, David; Na'aman, Nadav; Sass, Benjamin; Turkel, Eli; Piasetzky, Eli; Finkelstein, Israel

    2016-04-26

    The relationship between the expansion of literacy in Judah and composition of biblical texts has attracted scholarly attention for over a century. Information on this issue can be deduced from Hebrew inscriptions from the final phase of the first Temple period. We report our investigation of 16 inscriptions from the Judahite desert fortress of Arad, dated ca 600 BCE-the eve of Nebuchadnezzar's destruction of Jerusalem. The inquiry is based on new methods for image processing and document analysis, as well as machine learning algorithms. These techniques enable identification of the minimal number of authors in a given group of inscriptions. Our algorithmic analysis, complemented by the textual information, reveals a minimum of six authors within the examined inscriptions. The results indicate that in this remote fort literacy had spread throughout the military hierarchy, down to the quartermaster and probably even below that rank. This implies that an educational infrastructure that could support the composition of literary texts in Judah already existed before the destruction of the first Temple. A similar level of literacy in this area is attested again only 400 y later, ca 200 BCE.

  7. Shedding Light on Feedback: The Interaction of YSO Outflows in L1551

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Adam

    2007-07-01

    Energetic outflows are an ubiquitous phenomena associated with young stellar objects and are believed to exert a strong effect on their parent molecular clouds. In most young clusters the density of newly forming stars implies that parsec scale outflows may sweep over a significant fraction of the cluster volume and interact with each other. The nature and dynamics of these interactions in an environmental context has yet to be investigated in detail. Thus the time is ripe to push forward the construction of detailed ecological studies of star formation where the cloud, stars and outflows are seen as a coherent interacting system. Such a perspective is however hampered by the complexity of the problem. Proceeding forward will require isolation of key components of an overarching theory. Finding relatively clean examples of outflow feedback is critical to exploring more general issues star formation ecology. We seek to carry forward a well focused study of outflow feedback in the L1551 region. Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement MHD code we propose a computational study of multiple jets interacting with their environment and their role in altering the properties of their parent cloud. The questions to be addressed are: What is the combined effect of jets oriented at different angles on the overall turbulent motions in the cloud; How effective is the coupling between outflows atndcloud material; How effective are the combined outflows at disrupting and dispersing the cloud material; How effective are the combined outflows at seeding turbulence into the cloud.

  8. Emotional Abuse: How the Concept Sheds Light on the Understanding of Psychological Harassment (in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Harvey

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the concept of emotional abuse in the workplace and applies relevant findings and concepts to psychological harassment as defined in the legislation enacted in Quebec beginning June 1, 2004. It is noted that the terms are highly related by definition and that a clear similarity exists. Accordingly, a prospective look is taken at the challenges involved in the understanding and application of psychological harassment based on seven dimensions commonly studied and referred to in the academic literature on emotional abuse. The conclusion is that the determination of psychological harassment involves a multidimensional consideration of factors and that this gives rise to several challenges in applying the new legislation.Cet article s’intéresse au concept d’abus émotif au travail et à son application à des problèmes de harcèlement psychologique, tel que défini par la législation promulguée au Québec en juin 2004. Les définitions des deux termes sont rapprochées ce qui suggère qu’il s’agit de problèmes similaires. À des fins de prospective, l’article étudie les implications pratiques de l’application au harcèlement psychologique des sept dimensions associées à l’abus émotif dans la littérature scientifique. L’article arrive à la conclusion qu’un diagnostic de harcèlement psychologique requiert la prise en compte de facteurs multidimensionnels, ce qui soulève des difficultés multiples en ce qui a trait à l’application de la législation récente.Este artículo se interesa al concepto de abuso emotivo en el trabajo y a su aplicación a los problemas de acoso psicológico, según la definición que figura en la legislación promulgada en Québec en junio del 2004. Las definiciones de los dos términos son próximas lo que sugiere que se trata de problemas similares. Con fines prospectivos, el artículo estudia las implicaciones prácticas de la aplicación de siete dimensiones asociadas al abuso emotivo en la literatura científica. El artículo concluye que un diagnóstico de acoso psicológico requiere tomar en cuenta factores multidimensionales, lo que plantea dificultades múltiples sobre la aplicación legislativa reciente.

  9. New Structure Sheds Light on Selective HIV-1 Genomic RNA Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erik D; Cantara, William A; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2015-08-24

    Two copies of unspliced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genomic RNA (gRNA) are preferentially selected for packaging by the group-specific antigen (Gag) polyprotein into progeny virions as a dimer during the late stages of the viral lifecycle. Elucidating the RNA features responsible for selective recognition of the full-length gRNA in the presence of an abundance of other cellular RNAs and spliced viral RNAs remains an area of intense research. The recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure by Keane et al. [1] expands upon previous efforts to determine the conformation of the HIV-1 RNA packaging signal. The data support a secondary structure wherein sequences that constitute the major splice donor site are sequestered through base pairing, and a tertiary structure that adopts a tandem 3-way junction motif that exposes the dimerization initiation site and unpaired guanosines for specific recognition by Gag. While it remains to be established whether this structure is conserved in the context of larger RNA constructs or in the dimer, this study serves as the basis for characterizing large RNA structures using novel NMR techniques, and as a major advance toward understanding how the HIV-1 gRNA is selectively packaged.

  10. New Structure Sheds Light on Selective HIV-1 Genomic RNA Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik D. Olson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two copies of unspliced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA are preferentially selected for packaging by the group-specific antigen (Gag polyprotein into progeny virions as a dimer during the late stages of the viral lifecycle. Elucidating the RNA features responsible for selective recognition of the full-length gRNA in the presence of an abundance of other cellular RNAs and spliced viral RNAs remains an area of intense research. The recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR structure by Keane et al. [1] expands upon previous efforts to determine the conformation of the HIV-1 RNA packaging signal. The data support a secondary structure wherein sequences that constitute the major splice donor site are sequestered through base pairing, and a tertiary structure that adopts a tandem 3-way junction motif that exposes the dimerization initiation site and unpaired guanosines for specific recognition by Gag. While it remains to be established whether this structure is conserved in the context of larger RNA constructs or in the dimer, this study serves as the basis for characterizing large RNA structures using novel NMR techniques, and as a major advance toward understanding how the HIV-1 gRNA is selectively packaged.

  11. Shedding light on a dark state: The energetically lowest quintet state of C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhauser, P.; Sych, Y.; Knopp, G.; Gerber, T.; Radi, P. P.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a deperturbation study of the d ^3Π _g, v=6 state of C2 by double-resonant four-wave mixing spectroscopy. Accurate line positions of perturbed transitions are unambiguously assigned by intermediate level labeling. In addition, extra lines are accessible by taking advantage of the sensitivity and high dynamic range of the technique. These weak spectral features originate from nearby-lying dark states that gain transition strength through the perturbation process. The deperturbation analysis of the complex spectral region in the (6,5) and (6,4) bands of the Swan system (d^3Π _g-a ^3Π _u) unveils the presence of the energetically lowest high-spin state of C2 in the vicinity of the d ^3Π _g, v=6 state. The term energy curves of the three spin components of the d state cross the five terms of the 1^5Π _g state at rotational quantum numbers N ⩽ 11. The spectral complexity for transitions to the v = 6 level of d ^3Π _g state is further enhanced by an additional perturbation at N = 19 and 21 owing to the b ^3Σ _g^-, v=19 state. The spectroscopic characterization of both dark states is accessible by the measurement of 122 "window" levels. A global fit of the positions to a conventional Hamiltonian for a linear diatomic molecule yields accurate molecular constants for the quintet and triplet perturber states for the first time. In addition, parameters for the spin-orbit and L-uncoupling interaction between the electronic levels are determined. The detailed deperturbation study unravels major issues of the so-called high-pressure bands of C2. The anomalous nonthermal emission initially observed by Fowler in 1910 [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 70, 484 (1910)] and later observed in numerous experimental environments are rationalized by taking into account "gateway" states, i.e., rotational levels of the d ^3Π _g, v=6 state that exhibit significant ^5Π _g character through which all population flows from one electronic state to the other.

  12. Shedding light on the role of photosynthesis in pathogen colonization and host defense

    KAUST Repository

    Garavaglia, Betiana S.

    2010-09-01

    The role of photosynthesis in plant defense is a fundamental question awaiting further molecular and physiological elucidation. To this end we investigated host responses to infection with the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the pathogen responsible for citrus canker. This pathogen encodes a plant-like natriuretic peptide (XacPNP) that is expressed specifically during the infection process and prevents deterioration of the physiological condition of the infected tissue. Proteomic assays of citrus leaves infected with a XacPNP deletion mutant (DeltaXacPNP) resulted in a major reduction in photosynthetic proteins such as Rubisco, Rubisco activase and ATP synthase as a compared with infection with wild type bacteria. In contrast, infiltration of citrus leaves with recombinant XacPNP caused an increase in these host proteins and a concomitant increase in photosynthetic efficiency as measured by chlorophyll fluorescence assays. Reversion of the reduction in photosynthetic efficiency in citrus leaves infected with DeltaXacPNP was achieved by the application of XacPNP or Citrus sinensis PNP lending support to a case of molecular mimicry. Finally, given that DeltaXacPNP infection is less successful than infection with the wild type, it appears that reducing photosynthesis is an effective plant defense mechanism against biotrophic pathogens.

  13. Shedding light on the role of lipid flippases in the secretory pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    A fundamental feature of eukaryotic cells is the presence of distinct organelles surrounded by lipid bilayers. Assembly and maintenance of the various organellar membranes requires translocation of lipids from one leaflet of the bilayer to the other. Specific membrane proteins, termed lipid flipp...

  14. SINTEF Project Sheds Light on Mechanics of Reservoir Compaction and Subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokstad, Ketil; Wulff, Angelika; Mjaaland, Svein; Paramichos, Euripides

    2000-07-01

    The seabed of the Ekofisk oil field in the North Sea is now eight metres lower than it used to be before production started in 1971. The article deals very briefly with work done at SINTEF Petroleum Research on the physics and mechanisms of reservoir compaction and subsidence.

  15. Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis Can Shed New Light on Walking in Patients with Haemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Lobet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with haemophilia (PWH (from Greek “blood love”, the long-term consequences of repeated haemarthrosis include cartilage damage and irreversible arthropathy, resulting in severe impairments in locomotion. Quantifying the extent of joint damage is therefore important in order to prevent disease progression and compare the efficacy of treatment strategies. Musculoskeletal impairments in PWH may stem from structural and functional abnormalities, which have traditionally been evaluated radiologically or clinically. However, these examinations are performed in a supine position (i.e., non-weight-bearing condition. We therefore suggest three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA as an innovative approach designed to focus on the functional component of the joint during the act of walking. This is of the utmost importance, as pain induced by weight-bearing activities influences the functional performance of the arthropathic joints significantly. This review endeavors to improve our knowledge of the biomechanical consequences of multiple arthropathies on gait pattern in adult patients with haemophilia using 3DGA. In PWH with arthropathy, the more the joint function was altered, the more the metabolic energy was consumed. 3DGA analysis could highlight the effect of an orthopedic disorder in PWH during walking. Indeed, mechanical and metabolic impairments were correlated to the progressive loss of active mobility into the joints.

  16. Palaeoecology of triassic stem turtles sheds new light on turtle origins.

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce, Walter G.; Gauthier, Jacques Armand

    2004-01-01

    Competing hypotheses of early turtle evolution contrast sharply in implying very different ecological settings-aquatic versus terrestrial-for the origin of turtles. We investigate the palaeoecology of extinct turtles by first demonstrating that the forelimbs of extant turtles faithfully reflect habitat preferences, with short-handed turtles being terrestrial and long-handed turtles being aquatic. We apply this metric to the two successive outgroups to all living turtles with forelimbs preserv...

  17. A Jurassic stem pleurodire sheds light on the functional origin of neck retraction in turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anquetin, Jérémy; Tong, Haiyan; Claude, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Modern turtles are composed of two monophyletic groups, notably diagnosed by divergent neck retraction mechanisms. Pleurodires (side-necked turtles) bend their neck sideways and protect their head under the anterior margin of the carapace. Cryptodires (hidden-necked turtles) withdraw their neck and head in the vertical plane between the shoulder girdles. These two mechanisms of neck retraction appeared independently in the two lineages and are usually assumed to have evolved for protective reasons. Here we describe the neck of Platychelys oberndorferi, a Late Jurassic early stem pleurodire, and find remarkable convergent morphological and functional similarities with modern cryptodires. Partial vertical neck retraction in this taxon is interpreted to have enabled fast forward projection of the head during underwater prey capture and offers a likely explanation to the functional origin of neck retraction in modern cryptodires. Complete head withdrawal for protection may therefore have resulted from an exaptation in that group. PMID:28206991

  18. Specialized proteinine rove beetles shed light on insect-fungal associations in the Cretaceous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenyang; Newton, Alfred F; Thayer, Margaret K; Leschen, Richard A B; Huang, Diying

    2016-12-28

    Insects and fungi have a long history of association in shared habitats. Fungus-feeding, or mycophagy, is remarkably widespread in beetles (Coleoptera) and appears to be a primitive feeding habit that preceded feeding on plant tissues. Numerous Mesozoic beetles belonging to extant fungus-associated families are known, but direct fossil evidence elucidating mycophagy in insects has remained elusive. Here, we report a remarkable genus and species, Vetuproteinus cretaceus gen. et sp. nov., belonging to a new tribe (Vetuproteinini trib. nov.) of the extant rove beetle subfamily Proteininae (Staphylinidae) in Mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. The mouthparts of this beetle have a markedly enlarged protruding galea bearing an apparent spore brush, a specialized structure we infer was used to scrape spores off surfaces and direct them into the mouth, as in multiple modern spore-feeding beetles. Considering the long evolutionary history of Fungi, the Mid-Cretaceous beetles likely fed on ancient Basidiomycota and/or Ascomycota fungi or spore-producing organisms such as slime moulds (Myxomycetes). The discovery of the first Mesozoic proteinine illustrates the antiquity of the subfamily, and suggests that ancestral Proteininae were already diverse and widespread in Pangaea before the supercontinent broke up.

  19. Osteogenesis imperfecta: recent findings shed new light on this once well-understood condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Donald; Steiner, Robert D

    2009-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a systemic heritable disorder of connective tissue whose cardinal manifestation is bone fragility. In approximately 90% of individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta, mutations in either of the genes encoding the pro-alpha1 or pro-alpha2 chains of type I collagen (COL1A1 or COL1A2) can be identified. Of those without collagen mutations, a number of them will have mutations involving the enzyme complex responsible for posttranslational hydroxylation of the position 3 proline residue of COL1A1. Two of the genes encoding proteins involved in that enzyme complex, LEPRE1 and cartilage-associated protein, when mutated have been shown to cause autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta, which has a moderate to severe clinical phenotype, often indistinguishable from osteogenesis imperfecta types II or III. Mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2 which result in an abnormal protein still capable of forming a triple helix cause a more severe phenotype than mutations that lead to decreased collagen production as a result of the dominant negative effect mediated by continuous protein turnover. The current standard of care includes a multidisciplinary approach with surgical intervention when necessary, proactive physiotherapy, and consideration for the use of bisphosphonates all in attempts to improve quality of life.

  20. Efficient event-driven simulations shed new light on microtubule organization in the plant cortical array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindemans, Simon H.; Deinum, Eva E.; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Mulder, Bela M.

    2014-04-01

    The dynamics of the plant microtubule cytoskeleton is a paradigmatic example of the complex spatiotemporal processes characterising life at the cellular scale. This system is composed of large numbers of spatially extended particles, each endowed with its own intrinsic stochastic dynamics, and is capable of non-equilibrium self-organisation through collisional interactions of these particles. To elucidate the behaviour of such a complex system requires not only conceptual advances, but also the development of appropriate computational tools to simulate it. As the number of parameters involved is large and the behaviour is stochastic, it is essential that these simulations be fast enough to allow for an exploration of the phase space and the gathering of sufficient statistics to accurately pin down the average behaviour as well as the magnitude of fluctuations around it. Here we describe a simulation approach that meets this requirement by adopting an event-driven methodology that encompasses both the spontaneous stochastic changes in microtubule state as well as the deterministic collisions. In contrast with finite time step simulations this technique is intrinsically exact, as well as several orders of magnitude faster, which enables ordinary PC hardware to simulate systems of ˜ 10^3 microtubules on a time scale ˜ 10^{3} faster than real time. In addition we present new tools for the analysis of microtubule trajectories on curved surfaces. We illustrate the use of these methods by addressing a number of outstanding issues regarding the importance of various parameters on the transition from an isotropic to an aligned and oriented state.

  1. Efficient event-driven simulations shed new light on microtubule organisation in the plant cortical array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H. Tindemans

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the plant microtubule cytoskeleton is a paradigmatic example of the complex spatiotemporal processes characterising life at the cellular scale. This system is composed of large numbers of spatially extended particles, each endowed with its own intrinsic stochastic dynamics, and is capable of non-equilibrium self-organisation through collisional interactions of these particles. To elucidate the behaviour of such a complex system requires not only conceptual advances, but also the development of appropriate computational tools to simulate it. As the number of parameters involved is large and the behaviour is stochastic, it is essential that these simulations be fast enough to allow for an exploration of the phase space and the gathering of sufficient statistics to accurately pin down the average behaviour as well as the magnitude of fluctuations around it. Here we describe a simulation approach that meets this requirement by adopting an event-driven methodology that encompasses both the spontaneous stochastic changes in microtubule state as well as the deterministic collisions. In contrast with finite time step simulations this technique is intrinsically exact, as well as several orders of magnitude faster, which enables ordinary PC hardware to simulate systems of $sim 10^3$ microtubules on a time scale $sim 10^{3}$ faster than real time. In addition we present new tools for the analysis of microtubule trajectories on curved surfaces. We illustrate the use of these methods by addressing a number of outstanding issues regarding the importance of various parameters on the transition from an isotropic to an aligned and oriented state.

  2. Shedding light on the relative DNA contribution of two persons handling the same object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldoni, F; Castella, V; Hall, D

    2016-09-01

    Traces collected on crime scene objects frequently result in challenging DNA mixtures from several contributors in different DNA proportions. Understanding how the relative proportion of DNA deposited by different persons who handled the same object evolves through time has important bearings. For instance, this information may help determine whether the major contributor in a mixed DNA profile is more likely to correspond to the object owner or to the person who may have stolen this object. In this perspective, a simulation-based protocol was designed where randomly paired participants were asked to act either as first (object owner) or second (last) users. The first user was asked to handle/wear 9 different plastic-, metal-, nitrile- and fabric-made objects, commonly found at burglary/robbery crime scenes, for a minimum of 20min during 8 or 10 consecutive days. The second user subsequently used them for 5, 30 or 120min in three distinct simulation sessions. The analysis of the relative DNA contribution on the resulting 234 mock DNA traces revealed a large variability in the contribution depending on the time, substrate and pairs of participants. Despite this, a progressive increase of the second user's DNA contribution, relative to the first user, was observed over time in 93% of the traces. The second user was shown to become the major contributor in approximately 15%, 33% and 55% of the traces recovered from objects used for 5, 30 and 120min, respectively. Single-source DNA profiles were shown to represent only 1% of the traces. In addition, the DNA profiles of 165 out of 234 (71%) simulated traces displayed extra alleles. Most of these occurred in the minor fraction of mixed DNA profiles and were interpreted as artefacts. Nevertheless, DNA profiles of known participants either involved or not in the simulations were observed in 9 cases (4%). This confirms that indirect DNA transfer should be taken into account when interpreting "touch" DNA evidence.

  3. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: when rare diseases shed light on immune system functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eSieni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The human immune system depends on the activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, Natural Killer cells, and NKT cells in order to fight off a viral infection. Understanding the molecular mechanisms during this process and the role of individual proteins was greatly improved by the study of Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (FHL. Since 1999, genetic sequencing is the gold standard to classify patients into different subgroups of FHL. The diagnosis, once based on a clinical constellation of abnormalities, is now strongly supported by the results of a functional flow-cytometry screening, which directs the genetic study. A few additional congenital immune deficiencies can also cause a resembling or even identical clinical picture to FHL. As in many other rare human disorders, the collection and analysis of a relatively large number of cases in registries is crucial to draw a complete picture of the disease. The conduction of prospective therapeutic trials allows investigators to increase the awareness of the disease and to speed up the diagnostic process, but also provides important functional and genetic confirmations. Children with confirmed diagnosis may undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is the only cure known to date. Moreover, detailed characterization of these rare patients helped to understand the function of individual proteins within the exocytic machinery of CTL, NK and NKT cells. Moreover, identification of these genotypes also provides valuable information on variant phenotypes, other than FHL, associated with biallelic and monoallelic mutations in the FHL-related genes.In this review we describe how detailed characterization of patients with genetic HLH has resulted in improvement in knowledge regarding contribution of individual proteins to the functional machinery of cytotoxic T-cells and NK cells. The review also details how identification of these genotypes has provided valuable information on variant phenotypes.

  4. Shedding a Little (Sun)light on Data Analysis and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We present background and an activity meant to show both instructors and students that mere button pushing with technology is insufficient for success, but that additional thought and preparation will permit the technology to serve as an excellent tool in the understanding and learning of mathematics. (Contains 5 figures.)

  5. Shedding Light on Three-Body Recombination in an Ultracold Atomic Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Härter, Arne; Deiß, Markus; Drews, Björn; Tiemann, Eberhard; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2013-01-01

    Three-body recombination is a prime example of the fundamental interaction between three particles and it is of importance to the physics of ultracold gases. Due to the complexity of this process it has resisted a comprehensive theoretical description. Experimental investigations have mainly focussed on the observation of corresponding loss rates without revealing information on the reaction products. Here, we provide the first general experimental study on the population distribution of molecular quantum states after three-body recombination. We utilize a novel detection scheme which combines photoionization of the molecules with subsequent ion trapping. By analyzing the ionization spectrum, we identify the population of energy levels with binding energies up to $h\\times750$ GHz. We find a broad population of electronic and nuclear spin states and determine a range of populated vibrational and rotational states. The method presented here can be expanded to provide a full survey of the products of the recombi...

  6. Pharos: Collating protein information to shed light on the druggable genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Mathias, Stephen; Bologa, Cristian; Brunak, Soren; Fernandez, Nicolas; Gaulton, Anna; Hersey, Anne; Holmes, Jayme; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Karlsson, Anneli; Liu, Guixia; Ma'ayan, Avi; Mandava, Geetha; Mani, Subramani; Mehta, Saurabh; Overington, John; Patel, Juhee; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Schürer, Stephan; Sheils, Timothy; Simeonov, Anton; Sklar, Larry A.; Southall, Noel; Ursu, Oleg; Vidovic, Dusica; Waller, Anna; Yang, Jeremy; Jadhav, Ajit; Oprea, Tudor I.; Guha, Rajarshi

    2017-01-01

    The ‘druggable genome’ encompasses several protein families, but only a subset of targets within them have attracted significant research attention and thus have information about them publicly available. The Illuminating the Druggable Genome (IDG) program was initiated in 2014, has the goal of developing experimental techniques and a Knowledge Management Center (KMC) that would collect and organize information about protein targets from four families, representing the most common druggable targets with an emphasis on understudied proteins. Here, we describe two resources developed by the KMC: the Target Central Resource Database (TCRD) which collates many heterogeneous gene/protein datasets and Pharos (https://pharos.nih.gov), a multimodal web interface that presents the data from TCRD. We briefly describe the types and sources of data considered by the KMC and then highlight features of the Pharos interface designed to enable intuitive access to the IDG knowledgebase. The aim of Pharos is to encourage ‘serendipitous browsing’, whereby related, relevant information is made easily discoverable. We conclude by describing two use cases that highlight the utility of Pharos and TCRD. PMID:27903890

  7. Soft X-rays shedding light on thin-film solar cell surfaces and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bär, M., E-mail: marcus.baer@helmholtz-berlin.de [Solar Energy Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Chemie, Brandenburgische Technische Universität Cottbus, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Pookpanratana, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Weinhardt, L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); ANKA Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Wilks, R.G.; Schubert, B.A.; Marsen, B.; Unold, T. [Solar Energy Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Blum, M.; Krause, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Zhang, Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ranasinghe, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Ramanathan, K.; Repins, I.; Contreras, M.A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Nishiwaki, S. [Institute for Energy Conversion (IEC), University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); and others

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► S/Se gradient-driven chemical interaction at the CdS/CIG(S)Se interface. ► Depth-dependent band gap in chalcopyrites. ► Band alignment at the CdS/Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} solar cell heterojunction. ► Post-deposition treatment induces intermixing in the CdTe/CdS solar cell structure. -- Abstract: Thin-film solar cells based on compound semiconductors consist of a multilayer structure with various interfaces and contain a multitude of elements and impurities, etc. A rapid progress of these photovoltaic technologies can only be achieved by an insight-driven optimization/development. Hence it is crucial to characterize and understand the relationship between the chemical and electronic properties of these components. This paper reviews some examples of our recent work characterizing compound semiconductor thin films using laboratory- and synchrotron-based electron and soft X-ray spectroscopic characterization methods. It is demonstrated how these different analytical techniques are extraordinarily powerful to reveal the material characteristics from many different perspectives, ultimately resulting in a comprehensive picture of the related electronic and chemical properties. As examples, the paper will discuss the electronic surface structure of chalcopyrite thin-film solar cell absorbers, the chemical structure of the CdS/chalcopyrite interface, present the band alignment at the CdS/kesterite interface, and report on how post-deposition treatments cause chemical interaction/interdiffusion processes in CdTe/CdS thin-film solar cell structures.

  8. Out of Africa: Fossils shed light on the origin of the hoatzin, an iconic Neotropic bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Gerald; Alvarenga, Herculano; Mourer-Chauviré, Cécile

    2011-11-01

    We describe the earliest fossils of the enigmatic avian taxon Opisthocomiformes (hoatzins) from the Oligo-Miocene (22-24 mya) of Brazil. The bones, a humerus, scapula and coracoid, closely resemble those of the extant hoatzin, Opisthocomus hoazin. The very similar osteology of the pectoral girdle in the new Brazilian fossil compared to the extant O. hoazin, in which it reflects peculiar feeding adaptations, may indicate that hoatzins had already evolved their highly specialized feeding behavior by the mid-Cenozoic. We further show that Namibiavis senutae from the early Miocene of Namibia is another, previously misclassified representative of Opisthocomiformes, which documents that the extant Neotropic distribution of hoatzins is relictual. Because of the weak flight capabilities of hoatzins, their occurrence on both sides of the South Atlantic is of particular biogeographic interest. We detail that this distribution pattern is best explained by dispersal from Africa to South America, and that Opisthocomiformes provide the first example of transatlantic rafting among birds.

  9. Plants from Chernobyl zone could shed light on genome stability in radioactive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Galina; Talalaiev, Oleksandr; Doonan, John

    2016-07-01

    For nearly 30 years, despite of chronic radiation, flora in Chernobyl zone continue to flourish, evidencing the adaptation of plants to such an environment. Keeping in mind interplanetary missions, this phenomenon is a challenge for plant space research since it highlights the possible mechanisms of genome protection and stabilization in harmful environment. Plants are sessile organisms and, contrary to animals, could not escape the external impact. Therefore, plants should evolve the robust system allowing DNA-protection against damage, which is of special interest. Our investigations show that Arabidopsis thaliana from Chernobyl zone tolerate radiomimetics and heavy metals better than control plants from non-polluted areas. Besides, its genome is less affected by such mutagens. qPCR investigations have revealed up-regulation of some genes involved in DNA damage response. In particular, expression of ATR is increased slightly and downstream expression of CycB1:1 gene is increased significantly after bleomycin treatment suggesting role of ATR-dependent pathway in genome stabilization. Several DNA repair pathways are known to exist in plants. We continue investigations on gene expression from different DNA repair pathways as well as cell cycle regulation and investigation of PCD hallmarks in order to reveal the mechanism of plant tolerance to radiation environment. Our investigations provide unique information for space researchers working on biotechnology of radiation tolerant plants.

  10. Process based model sheds light on climate sensitivity of Mediterranean tree-ring width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Touchan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We use the process-based VS (Vaganov-Shashkin model to investigate whether a regional Pinus halepensis tree-ring chronology from Tunisia can be simulated as a function of climate alone by employing a biological model linking day length and daily temperature and precipitation (AD 1959–2004 from a climate station to ring-width variations. We check performance of the model on independent data by a validation exercise in which the model's parameters are tuned using data for 1982–2004 and the model is applied to generate tree-ring indices for 1959–1981. The validation exercise yields a highly significant positive correlation between the residual chronology and estimated growth curve (r=0.76 p<0.0001, n=23. The model shows that the average duration of the growing season is 191 days, with considerable variation from year to year. On average, soil moisture limits tree-ring growth for 128 days and temperature for 63 days. Model results depend on chosen values of parameters, in particular a parameter specifying a balance ratio between soil moisture and precipitation. Future work in the Mediterranean region should include multi-year natural experiments to verify patterns of cambial-growth variation suggested by the VS model.

  11. Process based model sheds light on climate signal of mediterranean tree rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Touchan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We use the process-based VS (Vaganov-Shashkin model to investigate whether a regional Pinus halapensis tree-ring chronology from Tunisia can be simulated as a function of climate alone by employing a biological model linking day length and daily temperature and precipitation (AD 1959–2004 from a climate station to ring-width variations. We use two periods to calibrate (1982–2004 and verify (1959–1981 the model. We have obtained highly significant positive correlation between the residual chronology and estimated growth curve (r = 0.76 p < 0.001. The model shows that the average duration of the growing season is 191 days. On average, soil moisture limits tree-ring growth for 128 days and temperature for 63 days.

  12. Shedding light on protein folding, structural and functional dynamics by single molecule studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavishi, Krutika; Hatzakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    The advent of advanced single molecule measurements unveiled a great wealth of dynamic information revolutionizing our understanding of protein dynamics and behavior in ways unattainable by conventional bulk assays. Equipped with the ability to record distribution of behaviors rather than the mean...... property of a population, single molecule measurements offer observation and quantification of the abundance, lifetime and function of multiple protein states. They also permit the direct observation of the transient and rarely populated intermediates in the energy landscape that are typically averaged out...... in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Single molecule studies have thus provided novel insights about how the dynamic sampling of the free energy landscape dictates all aspects of protein behavior; from its folding to function. Here we will survey some of the state of the art contributions...

  13. Cygnus X-1: shedding light on the spectral variability of a black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Grinberg, V; Wilms, J; Rodriguez, J; Pottschmidt, K; Nowak, M A; Böck, M; Bodaghee, A; Bel, M Cadolle; Fürst, F; Hanke, M; Kühnel, M; Laurent, P; Markoff, S B; Markowitz, A; Marcu, D M; Pooley, G G; Popp, A; Rothschild, R E; Tomsick, J A

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the spectral state of a black hole is essential for the interpretation of data from black holes in terms of their emission models. Based on pointed observations of Cyg X-1 with the Rossi X-ray timing Explorer (RXTE) that are used to classify simultaneous RXTE-ASM observations, we develop a scheme based on RXTE -ASM colors and count rates that can be used to classify all observations of this canonical black hole that were performed between 1996 and 2011. We show that a simple count rate criterion, as used previously, leads to a significantly higher fraction of misclassified observations. This scheme enables us to classify single INTEGRAL-IBIS science windows and to obtain summed spectra for the soft, intermediate and hard state with low contamination by other states.

  14. Survey sheds new light on marriage and sexuality in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenos, P

    1997-07-01

    The Young Adults Fertility and Sexuality Study (YAFS-II) was conducted in 1994 by interviewing 10,879 men and women aged 15-24 years in households on dating, marriage, and onset of sexual activity in the Philippines. In addition, screening data were collected on all households visited and on the 959 sampled local communities. Direct questions on premarital sex revealed that at least 52% of married women had sex before marriage. Among married respondents, 57% of men and 51% of women reported having had sex with their spouse before they were married. Only 3% of the women had additional premarital partners vs. 37% of the men. Questions on premarital sex and social patterns showed that about 20% of the single women and 28% of the single men had been in a serious relationship by the time they were 17. By age 20, 44% of the single women and 63% of the single men had been in a serious relationship, while the respective figures by age 24 were 60% and 68%. Altogether 24% of the women and 10% of the men described themselves as married. 34% of all women who either eloped or lived with their spouses had been married in church by the time of the survey, 23% had had civil ceremonies, and 41% designated their marital status as cohabitation. With regard to the risk of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, 25% of the 24-year old men who never had a girlfriend reported sexual experience and 22% of those still single at age 24 reported that they had visited a commercial sex worker. Marital status was not the best basis for providing family planning services, and the provision of reproductive health services to young people living in consensual union would reduce accidental pregnancy.

  15. Brain Resilience: Shedding Light into the Black Box of Adventure Procesess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, John F.; McKenna, Jim; Hind, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the active beneficial processes of adventure learning remains elusive. Resilience may provide one foundation for understanding the positive adaptation derived from Outdoor Adventure Education (OAE) and Adventure Therapy (AT) programming. From a neurological perspective, resilience may be explained by the brain's innate capability…

  16. Super-Resolution Microscopy: Shedding Light on the Cellular Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Matthew B; Shelby, Sarah A; Veatch, Sarah L

    2017-02-17

    Lipids and the membranes they form are fundamental building blocks of cellular life, and their geometry and chemical properties distinguish membranes from other cellular environments. Collective processes occurring within membranes strongly impact cellular behavior and biochemistry, and understanding these processes presents unique challenges due to the often complex and myriad interactions between membrane components. Super-resolution microscopy offers a significant gain in resolution over traditional optical microscopy, enabling the localization of individual molecules even in densely labeled samples and in cellular and tissue environments. These microscopy techniques have been used to examine the organization and dynamics of plasma membrane components, providing insight into the fundamental interactions that determine membrane functions. Here, we broadly introduce the structure and organization of the mammalian plasma membrane and review recent applications of super-resolution microscopy to the study of membranes. We then highlight some inherent challenges faced when using super-resolution microscopy to study membranes, and we discuss recent technical advancements that promise further improvements to super-resolution microscopy and its application to the plasma membrane.

  17. New complete genome sequences of human rhinoviruses shed light on their phylogeny and genomic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdobnov Evgeny M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (HRV, the most frequent cause of respiratory infections, include 99 different serotypes segregating into two species, A and B. Rhinoviruses share extensive genomic sequence similarity with enteroviruses and both are part of the picornavirus family. Nevertheless they differ significantly at the phenotypic level. The lack of HRV full-length genome sequences and the absence of analysis comparing picornaviruses at the whole genome level limit our knowledge of the genomic features supporting these differences. Results Here we report complete genome sequences of 12 HRV-A and HRV-B serotypes, more than doubling the current number of available HRV sequences. The whole-genome maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis suggests that HRV-B and human enteroviruses (HEV diverged from the last common ancestor after their separation from HRV-A. On the other hand, compared to HEV, HRV-B are more related to HRV-A in the capsid and 3B-C regions. We also identified the presence of a 2C cis-acting replication element (cre in HRV-B that is not present in HRV-A, and that had been previously characterized only in HEV. In contrast to HEV viruses, HRV-A and HRV-B share also markedly lower GC content along the whole genome length. Conclusion Our findings provide basis to speculate about both the biological similarities and the differences (e.g. tissue tropism, temperature adaptation or acid lability of these three groups of viruses.

  18. Studies Shed Light on Cross-modal Memory Facilitation of Fruit Flies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ As a result of their threeyear studies in Drosophilae (fruit flies),CAS scientists reveal that the memory and learning in the insect could be enhanced by stimuli combining olfactory (or smell) and visual signals.

  19. Seasonal bone growth and physiology in endotherms shed light on dinosaur physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Meike; Marín-Moratalla, Nekane; Jordana, Xavier; Aanes, Ronny

    2012-07-19

    Cyclical growth leaves marks in bone tissue that are in the forefront of discussions about physiologies of extinct vertebrates. Ectotherms show pronounced annual cycles of growth arrest that correlate with a decrease in body temperature and metabolic rate; endotherms are assumed to grow continuously until they attain maturity because of their constant high body temperature and sustained metabolic rate. This apparent dichotomy has driven the argument that zonal bone denotes ectotherm-like physiologies, thus fuelling the controversy on dinosaur thermophysiology and the evolution of endothermy in birds and mammal-like reptiles. Here we show, from a comprehensive global study of wild ruminants from tropical to polar environments, that cyclical growth is a universal trait of homoeothermic endotherms. Growth is arrested during the unfavourable season concurrently with decreases in body temperature, metabolic rate and bone-growth-mediating plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, forming part of a plesiomorphic thermometabolic strategy for energy conservation. Conversely, bouts of intense tissue growth coincide with peak metabolic rates and correlated hormonal changes at the beginning of the favourable season, indicating an increased efficiency in acquiring and using seasonal resources. Our study supplies the strongest evidence so far that homeothermic endotherms arrest growth seasonally, which precludes the use of lines of arrested growth as an argument in support of ectothermy. However, high growth rates are a distinctive trait of mammals, suggesting the capacity for endogenous heat generation. The ruminant annual cycle provides an extant model on which to base inferences regarding the thermophysiology of dinosaurs and other extinct taxa.

  20. Shedding Light on District Issues. 1991-92 Surveys of Students, Staff, and Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Sedra G.

    In 1991-92, over 50,000 surveys were administered to high school students, elementary school and secondary school teachers and administrators, elementary school students' parents, and graduates from the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD). Parent responses are not published in this report, which discusses the following parameters:…

  1. Shedding light on the specificity of school-aged children's attachment narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, Jessica L; Somers, Jennifer A; West, Jessica L; Coffey, John K; Shmueli-Goetz, Yael

    2016-01-01

    A prominent research tradition within the field of attachment involves analyzing relationship narratives for qualities thought to reveal important information regarding the organization of attachment, and the different ways in which attachment insecurity presents. Researchers increasingly use this method to assess attachment in middle childhood, but further work needs to be conducted with respect to the divergent validity of attachment narratives in this age range. Thus, the current study examined differential associations between children's discursive style and linguistic behavior when completing an attachment interview (Child Attachment Interview [CAI]) and Non-Relational Interview (NRI). In addition, the discriminant validity of attachment narratives was assessed in predicting children's physiological reactivity to a relational challenge. Children (N = 125) completed the NRI and the CAI at Time 1. A subset of the original sample (n = 64) completed another assessment 1.5 years later involving simulated non-relational and relational challenges. While narrative coherence was moderately associated across the two interviews, CAI narrative coherence uniquely predicted reactivity to a relational probe. We discuss implications for understanding children's narrative styles across discourse topics as well as the significance of the results for using attachment interviews in this age range.

  2. Field warming experiments shed light on the wheat yield response to temperature in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuang; Piao, Shilong; Huang, Yao; Wang, Xuhui; Ciais, Philippe; Huang, Mengtian; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Peng, Shushi

    2016-11-01

    Wheat growth is sensitive to temperature, but the effect of future warming on yield is uncertain. Here, focusing on China, we compiled 46 observations of the sensitivity of wheat yield to temperature change (SY,T, yield change per °C) from field warming experiments and 102 SY,T estimates from local process-based and statistical models. The average SY,T from field warming experiments, local process-based models and statistical models is -0.7+/-7.8(+/-s.d.)% per °C, -5.7+/-6.5% per °C and 0.4+/-4.4% per °C, respectively. Moreover, SY,T is different across regions and warming experiments indicate positive SY,T values in regions where growing-season mean temperature is low, and water supply is not limiting, and negative values elsewhere. Gridded crop model simulations from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project appear to capture the spatial pattern of SY,T deduced from warming observations. These results from local manipulative experiments could be used to improve crop models in the future.

  3. Drug Elucidation: Invertebrate Genetics Sheds New Light on the Molecular Targets of CNS Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donard S. Dwyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many important drugs approved to treat common human diseases were discovered by serendipity, without a firm understanding of their modes of action. As a result, the side effects and interactions of these medications are often unpredictable, and there is limited guidance for improving the design of next-generation drugs. Here, we review the innovative use of simple model organisms, especially Caenorhabditis elegans, to gain fresh insights into the complex biological effects of approved CNS medications. Whereas drug discovery involves the identification of new drug targets and lead compounds/biologics, and drug development spans preclinical testing to FDA approval, drug elucidation refers to the process of understanding the mechanisms of action of marketed drugs by studying their novel effects in model organisms. Drug elucidation studies have revealed new pathways affected by antipsychotic drugs, e.g., the insulin signaling pathway, a trace amine receptor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Similarly, novel targets of antidepressant drugs and lithium have been identified in C. elegans, including lipid-binding/transport proteins and the SGK-1 signaling pathway, respectively. Elucidation of the mode of action of anesthetic agents has shown that anesthesia can involve mitochondrial targets, leak currents and gap junctions. The general approach reviewed in this article has advanced our knowledge about important drugs for CNS disorders and can guide future drug discovery efforts.

  4. Shed a light in fatigue detection with near-infrared spectroscopy during long-lasting driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Pan, Boan; Li, Kai; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Fatigue driving is one of the leading roles to induce traffic accident and injury, which urgently desires a novel technique to monitor the fatigue level at driving. Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is capable of noninvasive monitoring brain-activities-related hemodynamic responses. Here, we developed a fINRS imager and setup a classic psychological experiment to trigger visual divided attention which varied responding to driving fatigue, and attempted to record the drive-fatigue-level correlated hemodynamic response in the prefrontal cortex. 7 volunteers were recruited to take 7 hours driving and the experimental test was repeated every 1 hour and 8 times in total. The hemodynamic response were extracted and graphed with pseudo image. The analysis on the relationship between the fNIRS-measured hemodynamic response and fatigue level finally displayed that the oxyhemoglobin concentration in one channel of left prefrontal lobe increased with driving duration in significant correlation. And the spatial pattern of hemodynamic response in the prefrontal lobe varied with driving duration as well. The findings indicated the potential of fNIRSmeasured hemodynamic index in some sensitive spot of prefrontal lobe as a driving fatigue indicator and the promising use of fNIRS in traffic safety field.

  5. Shedding Some Light on RFID Distance Bounding Protocols and Terrorist Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Tapiador, J M E; van der Lubbe, Jan C A

    2009-01-01

    During the last years, researchers have focused on designing secure and efficient RFID authentication protocols. The vast majority of these protocols assume proximity between readers and tags due to the limited range of the radio channel. However, in real scenarios, an intruder can be located between the prover (tag) and the verifier (reader) and trick the latter into thinking that the prover is in close proximity. This attack is globally known as a relay attack, a kind that includes others such as distance fraud, mafia fraud and terrorist attacks. Distance bounding protocols represent a promising countermeasure to hinder relay attacks. Several protocols have been proposed in the last years, but vulnerabilities of major or minor relevance have been identified in all of them. In 2008, Kim et al. [10] proposed a new distance bounding protocol with the objective of being the best one in terms of security, privacy, tag computational overhead and fault tolerance - as claimed by their authors. The study of this rec...

  6. Differentiation and cancer in the mammary gland: shedding light on an old dichotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Rønnov-Jessen, L; Weaver, V M;

    1998-01-01

    In this brief review, the development of breast cancer is discussed from the vantage of phenotypic differentiation, similar to what has been considered over the years for leukemias and melanomas, both of which express easily visible differentiation markers (Hart and Easty, 1991; Clarke et al., 1995......; Lynch, 1995; Sachs, 1996; Sledge, 1996). The review is divided into a theoretical background for human breast differentiation and a discussion of recent experimental results in our laboratories with differentiation of breast epithelial cells. In the theoretical background, in situ markers...... of differentiation of normal breast and carcinomas are discussed with emphasis on their possible implications for tumor therapy. So far, most of the emphasis regarding differentiation therapy of tumors has been focused on the possible action of soluble factors, such as colony-stimulating factors in leukemias...

  7. Shedding new light on the K-Pg extinction event: application of modern fire science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Rory; Rein, Guillermo; Belcher, Claire

    2016-04-01

    The impact on fire on the earth system is a key component to understand the long term evolutionary history of our planet. However, in order to fully explore the role of fire, it is essential to draw on the significant existing literature and methods available to both palaeontologists and fire scientists if we are to better interpret the fossil record of life. A novel cross-disciplinary approach was developed to investigate the extent to which forest materials may have been ignited by the thermal radiation delivered by the collision of an extra-terrestrial body on the Yucatán Peninsula at the end of the Cretaceous period. A novel experimental approach was developed through close collaboration between earth scientists and fire safety engineers that drew on well established procedures for assessing material flammability. Through close working in both experimental design and interpretation, a new method to rapidly and effectively assess the expected ignition behaviour resulting from this event was developed. Prior modelling of the impact indicated that the impact resulted in a range of heat flux pulses, dependent on the angle of impact and melt spherule distribution and was shown to vary as a function of geographical location. These data were used as an input to a series of laboratory experiments undertaken at the Rushbrook Fire Laboratory at the University of Edinburgh. Building on existing material flammability assessment methods, modifications were made to the operation of the FM Global Fire Propagation Apparatus to allow these time-dependent heat flux pulses to be reproduced in the laboratory under controlled conditions of thermal input and burning environment. The results indicate that the ignition propensity of a particular biome is strongly dependent on both the fuel available and the heat pulse. It was observed that thin, dry fuels could be ignited easily under almost every condition but that live fuels could not. Live fuels could only be ignited by the less intense, long duration pulse that occurred at locations far from the impact site. Not only has this resulted in new insights into building our understanding of the end Cretaceous mass extinction, but it has also yielded a simple experimental method that rapidly allows investigation of the ignition propensity of specific ecosystems of utility to the fossil record. Finally, by applying fire science techniques to this problem, the underlying physical phenomena can be investigated allowing greater confidence in extrapolation of data to other scenarios. It is clear that such collaborative approaches in developing new experimental procedures drawing on existing knowledge from diverse research fields has allowed for rapid progress in interpreting the fossil evidence of fire through earth history. In addition to advancing the state of the art in palaeontology, this work has resulted in new developments in fire safety science clearly indicating the benefits of cross-disciplinary experimental research methods.

  8. From Insect to Man: Photorhabdus Sheds Light on the Emergence of Human Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Mulley

    Full Text Available Photorhabdus are highly effective insect pathogenic bacteria that exist in a mutualistic relationship with Heterorhabditid nematodes. Unlike other members of the genus, Photorhabdus asymbiotica can also infect humans. Most Photorhabdus cannot replicate above 34°C, limiting their host-range to poikilothermic invertebrates. In contrast, P. asymbiotica must necessarily be able to replicate at 37°C or above. Many well-studied mammalian pathogens use the elevated temperature of their host as a signal to regulate the necessary changes in gene expression required for infection. Here we use RNA-seq, proteomics and phenotype microarrays to examine temperature dependent differences in transcription, translation and phenotype of P. asymbiotica at 28°C versus 37°C, relevant to the insect or human hosts respectively. Our findings reveal relatively few temperature dependant differences in gene expression. There is however a striking difference in metabolism at 37°C, with a significant reduction in the range of carbon and nitrogen sources that otherwise support respiration at 28°C. We propose that the key adaptation that enables P. asymbiotica to infect humans is to aggressively acquire amino acids, peptides and other nutrients from the human host, employing a so called "nutritional virulence" strategy. This would simultaneously cripple the host immune response while providing nutrients sufficient for reproduction. This might explain the severity of ulcerated lesions observed in clinical cases of Photorhabdosis. Furthermore, while P. asymbiotica can invade mammalian cells they must also resist immediate killing by humoral immunity components in serum. We observed an increase in the production of the insect Phenol-oxidase inhibitor Rhabduscin normally deployed to inhibit the melanisation immune cascade. Crucially we demonstrated this molecule also facilitates protection against killing by the alternative human complement pathway.

  9. Shedding new light on lipid functions with CARS and SRS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong; Ramachandran, Prasanna V; Wang, Meng C

    2014-08-01

    Modern optical microscopy has granted biomedical scientists unprecedented access to the inner workings of a cell, and revolutionized our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying physiological and disease states. In spite of these advances, however, visualization of certain classes of molecules (e.g. lipids) at the sub-cellular level has remained elusive. Recently developed chemical imaging modalities - Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy - have helped bridge this gap. By selectively imaging the vibration of a specific chemical group, these non-invasive techniques allow high-resolution imaging of individual molecules in vivo, and circumvent the need for potentially perturbative extrinsic labels. These tools have already been applied to the study of fat metabolism, helping uncover novel regulators of lipid storage. Here we review the underlying principle of CARS and SRS microscopy, and discuss the advantages and caveats of each technique. We also review recent applications of these tools in the study of lipids as well as other biomolecules, and conclude with a brief guide for interested researchers to build and use CARS/SRS systems for their own research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions.

  10. Shedding light on inflammatory pseudotumor in children: spotlight on inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Lillian M.; Kao, Simon C.S.; Moritani, Toshio; Clark, Eve; Ishigami, Kousei; Sato, Yutaka [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); McCarville, M.B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Kirby, Patricia [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Pathology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bahrami, Armita [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Inflammatory pseudotumor is a generic term used to designate a heterogeneous group of inflammatory mass-forming lesions histologically characterized by myofibroblastic proliferation with chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Inflammatory pseudotumor is multifactorial in etiology and generally benign, but it is often mistaken for malignancy given its aggressive appearance. It can occur throughout the body and is seen in all age groups. Inflammatory pseudotumor has been described in the literature by many organ-specific names, resulting in confusion. Recently within this generic category of inflammatory pseudotumor, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor has emerged as a distinct entity and is now recognized as a fibroblastic/myofibroblastic neoplasm with intermediate biological potential and occurring mostly in children. We present interesting pediatric cases of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors given this entity's tendency to occur in children. Familiarity and knowledge of the imaging features of inflammatory pseudotumor can help in making an accurate diagnosis, thereby avoiding unnecessary radical surgery. (orig.)

  11. Cambrian cinctan echinoderms shed light on feeding in the ancestral deuterostome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Imran A; Zamora, Samuel; Falkingham, Peter L; Phillips, Jeremy C

    2015-11-07

    Reconstructing the feeding mode of the latest common ancestor of deuterostomes is key to elucidating the early evolution of feeding in chordates and allied phyla; however, it is debated whether the ancestral deuterostome was a tentaculate feeder or a pharyngeal filter feeder. To address this, we evaluated the hydrodynamics of feeding in a group of fossil stem-group echinoderms (cinctans) using computational fluid dynamics. We simulated water flow past three-dimensional digital models of a Cambrian fossil cinctan in a range of possible life positions, adopting both passive tentacular feeding and active pharyngeal filter feeding. The results demonstrate that an orientation with the mouth facing downstream of the current was optimal for drag and lift reduction. Moreover, they show that there was almost no flow to the mouth and associated marginal groove under simulations of passive feeding, whereas considerable flow towards the animal was observed for active feeding, which would have enhanced the transport of suspended particles to the mouth. This strongly suggests that cinctans were active pharyngeal filter feeders, like modern enteropneust hemichordates and urochordates, indicating that the ancestral deuterostome employed a similar feeding strategy.

  12. Shedding light on fractals: exploration of the Sierpinski carpet optical antenna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Ting Lee

    2015-01-01

    We describe experimental and theoretical investigations of the properties of a fractal optical antenna-the Sierpinski carpet optical antenna. Fractal optical antennas are inspired by fractal antennas designed in radio frequency (RF) region. Shrinking the size of fractal optical antennas from fracta

  13. Shedding light on the $b\\to s$ anomalies with a dark sector

    CERN Document Server

    Sierra, D Aristizabal; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration has recently reported on some anomalies in $b\\to s$ transitions. In addition to discrepancies with the Standard Model (SM) predictions in some angular observables and branching ratios, an intriguing hint for lepton universality violation was found. Here we propose a simple model that extends the SM with a dark sector charged under an additional $U(1)$ gauge symmetry. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry gives rise to a massive $Z^\\prime$ boson, which communicates the SM particles with a valid dark matter candidate, while solving the $b\\to s$ anomalies with contributions to the relevant observables.

  14. Phylogenomic analysis of secondary metabolism genes sheds light on their evolution in Aspergilli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theobald, Sebastian; Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo

    .In the aspMine project, we are sequencing and analyzing over 300 species of Aspergilli, agroup of filamentous fungi rich in natural compounds. The vast amount of data obtained from these species challenges the way we were mining for products and requires new pipelines for secondary metabolite analysis.......Natural products are encoded by genes located in close proximity, called secondary metabolic gene clusters, which makes them interesting targets for genomic analysis. We use a modified version of the Secondary Metabolite Unique Regions Finder (SMURF) algorithm, combined with InterPro annotations to create...... approximate maximum likelihood trees of conserved domains from secondary metabolic genes across 56 species, giving insights into the secondary metabolism gene diversity and evolution.In this study we can describe the evolution of non ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), polyketide synthases (PKS) and hybrids...

  15. A primitive placoderm sheds light on the origin of the jawed vertebrate face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupret, Vincent; Sanchez, Sophie; Goujet, Daniel; Tafforeau, Paul; Ahlberg, Per E

    2014-03-27

    Extant vertebrates form two clades, the jawless Cyclostomata (lampreys and hagfishes) and the jawed Gnathostomata (all other vertebrates), with contrasting facial architectures. These arise during development from just a few key differences in the growth patterns of the cranial primordia: notably, the nasal sacs and hypophysis originate from a single placode in cyclostomes but from separate placodes in gnathostomes, and infraoptic ectomesenchyme migrates forward either side of the single placode in cyclostomes but between the placodes in gnathostomes. Fossil stem gnathostomes preserve cranial anatomies rich in landmarks that provide proxies for developmental processes and allow the transition from jawless to jawed vertebrates to be broken down into evolutionary steps. Here we use propagation phase contrast synchrotron microtomography to image the cranial anatomy of the primitive placoderm (jawed stem gnathostome) Romundina, and show that it combines jawed vertebrate architecture with cranial and cerebral proportions resembling those of cyclostomes and the galeaspid (jawless stem gnathostome) Shuyu. This combination seems to be primitive for jawed vertebrates, and suggests a decoupling between ectomesenchymal growth trajectory, ectomesenchymal proliferation, and cerebral shape change during the origin of gnathostomes.

  16. Shedding light on the nature of ESO 243-49 HLX-1

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, M; Zampieri, L

    2013-01-01

    The point-like X-ray source HLX-1, close to the S0 galaxy ESO 243-49, is one of the strongest intermediate-mass black hole candidates. We discuss the hypothesis that ESO 243-49 is undergoing a minor merger with a gas-rich disc galaxy. We propose that the counterpart of HLX-1 coincides with the nucleus of the secondary galaxy. We re-analyze the available photometric HST data, and we compare them with the results of N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. In particular, we derive synthetic surface brightness profiles for the simulated counterpart of HLX-1 in six HST filters, ranging from far ultraviolet (FUV) to infrared wavelengths. Such synthetic profiles include a contribution from the stellar population associated with the simulated disrupted satellite and a contribution from an irradiated disc model. These are in agreement with the observed surface brightness profiles of the HLX-1 counterpart, provided that the merger is at sufficiently late stage (>~2.5 Gyr since the first pericentre passage)....

  17. Chile shadow report to the United Nations sheds light on women's rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, A

    1999-07-01

    Three Chilean women's rights organizations and CRLP presented a Shadow Report to the UN Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). The 25-page Shadow Report indicates in summary the disappointment of the Chilean women in their government. Although Chile has emerged from its history of military dictatorship and is taking its first steps toward returning to a democratic-style of government, the military and the Catholic Church still exert a very strong influence, especially when it comes to policy making. Chilean people especially women, continue to be tyrannized by repressive attitudes, laws, and policies. This tyrannization is exemplified by the rampant discrimination against women in the prisons and the punishment of those undergoing illegal abortions. In short, women have no rights in Chile, and the government has not done enough to eliminate discrimination against them.

  18. Experiments designed to shed light on the mysterious phenomenon of neutrino oscillation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The delivery of the neutrino beam (CNGS) from Cern and the beginning of a new generation of experiments were officially celebrated today at Infn (Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics) national laboratories of Gran Sasso with the participation of Fabio Mussi, Minster of Universities and Research." (2 pages)

  19. Are viruses alive? The replicator paradigm sheds decisive light on an old but misguided question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V; Starokadomskyy, Petro

    2016-10-01

    The question whether or not "viruses are alive" has caused considerable debate over many years. Yet, the question is effectively without substance because the answer depends entirely on the definition of life or the state of "being alive" that is bound to be arbitrary. In contrast, the status of viruses among biological entities is readily defined within the replicator paradigm. All biological replicators form a continuum along the selfishness-cooperativity axis, from the completely selfish to fully cooperative forms. Within this range, typical, lytic viruses represent the selfish extreme whereas temperate viruses and various mobile elements occupy positions closer to the middle of the range. Selfish replicators not only belong to the biological realm but are intrinsic to any evolving system of replicators. No such system can evolve without the emergence of parasites, and moreover, parasites drive the evolution of biological complexity at multiple levels. The history of life is a story of parasite-host coevolution that includes both the incessant arms race and various forms of cooperation. All organisms are communities of interacting, coevolving replicators of different classes. A complete theory of replicator coevolution remains to be developed, but it appears likely that not only the differentiation between selfish and cooperative replicators but the emergence of the entire range of replication strategies, from selfish to cooperative, is intrinsic to biological evolution.

  20. Shedding light on disulfide bond formation: engineering a redox switch in green fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, H.; Henriksen, A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2001-01-01

    To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease in the i......To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease...

  1. Shedding Light on Words and Sentences: Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Language Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sonja; Telkemeyer, Silke; Wartenburger, Isabell; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the neuronal network underlying language processing may contribute to a better understanding of how the brain masters this complex cognitive function with surprising ease and how language is acquired at a fast pace in infancy. Modern neuroimaging methods permit to visualize the evolvement and the function of the language network. The…

  2. Resolving phenylalanine metabolism sheds light on natural synthesis of penicillin G in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Tânia; Solis-Escalante, Daniel; Romagnoli, Gabriele; ten Pierick, Angela; Hanemaaijer, Mark; Deshmukh, Amit T; Deshmuhk, Amit; Wahl, Aljoscha; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-02-01

    The industrial production of penicillin G by Penicillium chrysogenum requires the supplementation of the growth medium with the side chain precursor phenylacetate. The growth of P. chrysogenum with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source resulted in the extracellular production of phenylacetate and penicillin G. To analyze this natural pathway for penicillin G production, chemostat cultures were switched to [U-(13)C]phenylalanine as the nitrogen source. The quantification and modeling of the dynamics of labeled metabolites indicated that phenylalanine was (i) incorporated in nascent protein, (ii) transaminated to phenylpyruvate and further converted by oxidation or by decarboxylation, and (iii) hydroxylated to tyrosine and subsequently metabolized via the homogentisate pathway. The involvement of the homogentisate pathway was supported by the comparative transcriptome analysis of P. chrysogenum cultures grown with phenylalanine and with (NH(4))(2)SO(4) as the nitrogen source. This transcriptome analysis also enabled the identification of two putative 2-oxo acid decarboxylase genes (Pc13g9300 and Pc18g01490). cDNAs of both genes were cloned and expressed in the 2-oxo-acid-decarboxylase-free Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CEN.PK711-7C (pdc1 pdc5 pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ). The introduction of Pc13g09300 restored the growth of this S. cerevisiae mutant on glucose and phenylalanine, thereby demonstrating that Pc13g09300 encodes a dual-substrate pyruvate and phenylpyruvate decarboxylase, which plays a key role in an Ehrlich-type pathway for the production of phenylacetate in P. chrysogenum. These results provide a basis for the metabolic engineering of P. chrysogenum for the production of the penicillin G side chain precursor phenylacetate.

  3. Shedding light on anti-estrogen resistance and antigen presentation through biophysical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, Willem Teunis

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is composed of two parts part one: The study on anti-estrogen resistance and defining criteria a cell has to meet in order to become resistant to anti-estrogenic compounds. part two: the study of antigen-loading, vesicle positioning and costimulation.

  4. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert Were; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2017-01-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans. PMID:27694931

  5. Longitudinal prevalence and faecal shedding of Chlamydia pecorum in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rongchang; Jacobson, Caroline; Gardner, Graham; Carmichael, Ian; Campbell, Angus J D; Ryan, Una

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence and faecal shedding of Chlamydia spp. in sheep in Australia has not been well described. Two species-specific quantitative PCRs (qPCRs) targeting the chlamydial outer membrane protein cell surface antigen gene (ompA) were validated and used to determine the prevalence and faecal shedding of C. abortus and C. pecorum from faecal samples of lambs at three sampling times (weaning, post-weaning and pre-slaughter) from eight farms in South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Western Australia. A total of 3412 faecal samples were collected and screened from approximately 1189 lambs across the four states. C. abortus was not detected in any of the samples screened. The overall prevalence of C. pecorum was 1027/3412 (30.1%) and median bacterial concentrations at weaning, post-weaning and pre-slaughter were 1.8 × 10(7), 1.2 × 10(7) and 9.6 × 10(5)/g faeces, respectively. A subset of C. pecorum positive samples from each farm, (n = 48) was sequenced to confirm their identity. The present study demonstrates that C. pecorum is prevalent in Australian sheep, highlighting a need for further research on the impact of this bacterium on production.

  6. On the accuracy of population analyses based on fitted densities().

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Clavaguéra, Carine; Köster, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Population analyses are part of the theoretical chemist's toolbox. They provide means to extract information about the repartition of the electronic density among molecules or solids. The values of atomic multipoles in a molecule can shed light on its electrostatic properties and may help to predict how different molecules could interact or to rationalize chemical reactivity for instance. Not being physical observables to which a quantum mechanical operator can be associated, atomic charges and higher order atomic multipoles cannot be defined unambiguously in a molecule, and therefore, several population schemes (PS) have been devised in the last decades. In the context of density functional theory (DFT), PS based on the electron density seem to be best grounded. In particular, some groups have proposed various iterative schemes the outcomes of which are very encouraging. Modern implementations of DFT that are for example based on density fitting techniques permit the investigation of molecular systems comprising of hundreds of atoms. However, population analyses following iterative schemes may become very CPU time consuming for such large systems. In this article, we investigate if the computationally less expensive analyses of the variationally fitted electronic densities can be safely carried out instead of the Kohn-Sham density. It is shown that as long as flexible auxiliary function sets including f and g functions are used, the multipoles extracted from the fitted densities are extremely close to those obtained from the KS density. We further assess if the multipoles obtained through the Hirshfeld's approach, in its standard or iterative form, can be a useful approach to calculate interaction energies in non-covalent complexes. Relative energies computed with the AMOEBA polarizable forced field combined to iterative Hirshfeld multipoles are encouraging.

  7. Vortex shedding from slender cones at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papangelou, A.

    1992-09-01

    Wind-tunnel experiments on the flows created by a number of slightly tapered models of circular cross-section have shown the presence of spanwise cells (regions of constant shedding frequency) at Reynolds numbers of the order of 100. The experiments have also shown a number of other interesting features of these flows: the cellular flow configuration is dependent on the base Reynolds number and independent of the tip Reynolds number, the frequency jump between adjacent cells is a function of flow speed, taper angle and kinematic viscosity, but is constant along a cone's span, and the unsteady hot-wire anemometer signal is both amplitude and phase modulated. A mathematical model is proposed based on the complex Landau-Stuart equation with a spanwise diffusive coupling term. Numerical solutions of this equation have shown many of the qualitative features observed in the experiments.

  8. Leading-edge vortex shedding from rotating wings

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Schneider, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical investigation of the leading-edge vortices generated by rotating triangular wings at Reynolds number $Re=250$. A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations have been carried out using a Fourier pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. The transition from stable attachment of the leading-edge vortex to periodic vortex shedding is explored, as a function of the wing aspect ratio and the angle of attack. It is found that, in a stable configuration, the spanwise flow in the recirculation bubble past the wing is due to the centrifugal force, incompressibility and viscous stresses. For the flow outside of the bubble, an inviscid model of spanwise flow is presented.

  9. Persistent parainfluenza virus shedding during isolation at the South Pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchmore, H G; Parkinson, A J; Humphries, J E; Scott, E N; McIntosh, D A; Scott, L V; Cooney, M K; Miles, J A

    1981-01-15

    Persistent parainfluenza virus shedding in healthy young adults occurred throughout the 8 1/2-month winter isolation period at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during 1978. Two episodes of respiratory illness were observed after 10 and 29 weeks of complete social isolation. Throat swabs collected both routinely, and during each outbreak of respiratory illness, were directly inoculated into cell cultures. Parainfluenza virus types 1 and 3 were recovered from both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects throughout the winter. No other viruses were obtained by these efforts. The presence of parainfluenza virus in these subjects long after the accepted incubation period for viral upper respiratory illness, and when the introduction of new virus to this community was impossible, suggests its persistence in man.

  10. Nocturnal drainage wind characteristics in two converging air sheds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gedayloo, T.; Clements, W.E.; Barr, S.; Archuleta, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    During the short experimental period in the Grants Basin of Northeastern New Mexico a survey was conducted on the complex meteorology of this area. Emphasis was placed on the nocturnal drainage flow because of the potential hazards to the populated areas of Milan and Grants from the effluents of the uranium mining and milling operation in this area. This investigation has shown that the nocturnal drainage flow patterns agree with the winds predicted on the basis of the complex terrain of the area. Because of the surface cooling at night (over 25/sup 0/C during summer and about 20/sup 0/C during winter), air from elevated surrounding areas flows to the low lying regions consequently setting up a nocturnal drainage flow. This regime exists over 60% of the time during summer months and over 65% of the time during winter months with a depth generally less than 200 m. In the San Mateo air shed the drainage flow is east northeast, and in the Ambrosia Lake air shed it is from northwest. The confluence of these two air flows contributes mainly to the drainage flow through the channel formed by La Ja Mesa and Mesa Montanosa. The analysis of data collected by the recording Flats Station confirms the prediction that although the area south of the channel region broadens considerably causing a reduction in flow speed, contributions from the southside of La Jara Mesa and Mesa Montanosa partly compensate for this reduction. The position of this recording station is 15 to 20 km from the populated towns of Milan and Grants. A drainage flow speed of approximately 2.2 m s/sup -1/ and the duration of over 11 hours as recorded by this station indicates that air from the San Mateo and Ambrosia Lake regions may be transported southwards to these population centers during a nocturnal period. In order to test this prediction, a series of multi-atmospheric tracer experiments were conducted in the Grants Basin.

  11. Lighting Retrofitting: improving energy efficiency and lighting quality

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In order to minimize energy consumption for lighting and increasing lighting quality in existing offices old lighting systems can be retrofitted with more efficient luminaires. Additional savings can be achieved by installing a lighting control system. Installation time and costs can be reduced by installing LED luminaires equipped with inbuilt lighting controls. In the case study six rooms were analysed: in two rooms the old lighting system has been retrofitted with LED luminaires with inbui...

  12. Analysis and Prediction of Ice Shedding for a Full-Scale Heated Tail Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreeger, Richard E.; Work, Andrew; Douglass, Rebekah; Gazella, Matthew; Koster, Zakery; Turk, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    When helicopters are to fly in icing conditions, it is necessary to consider the possibility of ice shed from the rotor blades. In 2013, a series of tests were conducted on a heated tail rotor at NASA Glenn's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The tests produced several shed events that were captured on camera. Three of these shed events were captured at a sufficiently high frame rate to obtain multiple images of the shed ice in flight that had a sufficiently long section of shed ice for analysis. Analysis of these shed events is presented and compared to an analytical Shedding Trajectory Model (STM). The STM is developed and assumes that the ice breaks off instantly as it reaches the end of the blade, while frictional and viscous forces are used as parameters to fit the STM. The trajectory of each shed is compared to that predicted by the STM, where the STM provides information of the shed group of ice as a whole. The limitations of the model's underlying assumptions are discussed in comparison to experimental shed events.

  13. Carbonate shedding and sedimentary cyclicities of a distally steepened carbonate ramp (Miocene, Great Bahama Bank)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzler, C.; Pfeiffer, M.; Saxena, S.

    Depositional geometries as imaged in seismic lines, logging data, and quantitative petrographic data were used to analyse the slope and toe of slope deposits of the Miocene distally steepened carbonate ramp of Great Bahama Bank. The shedding pattern along the slope of this ramp is more complex than it is along the slope of the Pliocene-Pleistocene flat-topped carbonate platform. Compositional changes and compositional trends of periplatform sediments correlate with the positions of geophysically-defined sequence boundaries. Two types of depositional sequences occur. The first sequence is characterised by laterally traceable sequence-internal reflections, whereas the second type contains major intrasequential incisions. Erosional incisions and sedimentary infills of these canyons by turbidites formed during sea-level lowstands, as is indicated by the composition of the turbidites having a mixture of shallow-water and pelagic particles. Highstand turbidites are characterised by more extensive, laterally traceable geometries and by the occurrence of abundant shallow-water particles. In contrast to highstand turbidites shed from the Pliocene-Pleistocene flat-topped platform, shallow-water components in highstand turbidites of the Miocene ramp are of skeletal origin. The stacking pattern of the periplatform deposits is controlled by sea-level fluctuations. Four orders of sea-level changes are distinguished. Third-order cycles are delimited by sequence boundaries, and fourth (100,000a) order cycles govern the bundling of turbidites into packages. Fifth (40,000a) and sixth (23,000a) order cycles are recorded in the background sediments and resolvable with spectral analysis.

  14. Subclinical Shed of Infectious Varicella zoster Virus in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Randall J.; Mehta, Satish K.; Schmid, D. Scott; Gilden, Donald H.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Aerosol borne varicella zoster virus (VZV) enters the nasopharynx and replicates in tonsillar T-cells, resulting in viremia and varicella (chickenpox). Virus then becomes latent in cranial nerve, dorsal root and autonomic nervous system ganglia along the entire neuraxis (1). Decades later, as cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines (4), latent VZV can reactivate to produce zoster (shingles). Infectious VZV is present in patients with varicella or zoster, but shed of infectious virus in the absence of disease has not been shown. We previously detected VZV DNA in saliva of astronauts during and shortly after spaceflight, suggesting stress induced subclinical virus reactivation (3). We show here that VZV DNA as well as infectious virus in present in astronaut saliva. VZV DNA was detected in saliva during and after a 13-day spaceflight in 2 of 3 astronauts (Fig. panel A). Ten days before liftoff, there was a rise in serum anti-VZV antibody in subjects 1 and 2, consistent with virus reactivation. In subject 3, VZV DNA was not detected in saliva, and there was no rise in anti-VZV antibody titer. Subject 3 may have been protected from virus reactivation by having zoster boost in cell-medicated immunity to VZV (2). No VZV DNA was detected in astronaut saliva months before spaceflight, or in saliva of 10 age/sex-matched healthy control subjects sampled on alternate days for 3 weeks (88 saliva samples). Saliva taken 2-6 days after landing from all 3 subjects was cultured on human fetal lung cells (Fig. panel B). Infectious VZV was recovered from saliva of subjects 1 and 2 on the second day after landing. Virus specificity was confirmed by antibody staining and DNA analysis which showed it to be VZV of European descent, common in the US (5). Further, both antibody staining and DNA PCR demonstrated that no HSV-1 was detected in any infected culture. This is the first report of infectious VZV shedding in the absence of clinical disease. Spaceflight presents a uniquely stressful

  15. Epstein-Barr virus shedding by astronauts during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D. L.; Stowe, R. P.; Phillips, T. M.; Lugg, D. J.; Mehta, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in 32 astronauts and 18 healthy age-matched control subjects were characterized by quantifying EBV shedding. Saliva samples were collected from astronauts before, during, and after 10 space shuttle missions of 5-14 days duration. At one time point or another, EBV was detected in saliva from each of the astronauts. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA. Examination by flight phase showed that 29% of the saliva specimens collected from 28 astronauts before flight were positive for EBV DNA, as were 16% of those collected from 25 astronauts during flight and 16% of those collected after flight from 23 astronauts. The mean number of EBV copies from samples taken during the flights was 417 per mL, significantly greater (pEBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and mean number of EBV copies of 40 per mL of saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, titers of antibody to EBV viral capsid antigen were significantly (pEBV-specific antibody were consistent with EBV reactivation before, during, and after space flight.

  16. Increased EBV Shedding in Astronaut Saliva During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D. L.; Stowe, R. P.; Phillips, T.; Lugg, D. J.; Mehta, S. K.

    2003-01-01

    Shedding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by astronauts before, during, and after space shuttle missions was quantified. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA by PCR analysis. Of the saliva specimens collected before flight, 29% were positive for EBV DNA and of those collected during or after flight, 16% were EBV-positive. The number of EBV DNA copies from samples taken during the flight was 417+/-31, significantly higher (P EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and a copy number of 40+/-2 per ml saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, antibody titers to EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than baseline levels. On landing day, urinary level of cortiso1 and catecholamines, and plasma levels of substance P and other neuropeptides, were increased over their preflight value. Results suggested that stress associated with spaceflight decreases cellular immunity and thereby leads to increased viral reactivation.

  17. Vortex Shedding in the Wake of a Dual Step Cylinder

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, Chris

    2012-01-01

    A dual-step cylinder is comprised of a large diameter cylinder (D) with low aspect ratio (L/D) attached co-axially to the mid-span of a small diameter cylinder (d). The fluid dynamics video presented in this investigation is used to illustrate the effect of aspect ratio on dual step cylinder wake development for Re = 2100, D/d = 2, and 0.2 < L/D < 3. In addition, the video provides visualization of such flow phenomena as interaction of spanwise vortices, development of streamwise vortex filaments, and formation of Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers. The experiments were performed in a water flume at the University of Waterloo. A hydrogen bubble flow visualization technique was employed to visualize vortical structures downstream of each cylinder model. High-resolution images of the flow were obtained with a high speed Photron camera and post-processed using Adobe Photoshop CS4. The results show a plethora of vortices developing in the wake of the dual step cylinder. For 1 < L/D < 3, spanwise vortex shedding...

  18. Demand Response an Alternative Solution to Prevent Load Shedding Triggering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mollah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates an alternative solution to prevent Load Shedding (LS triggering during underfrequency and proposes a new technique to restore the frequency during emergency events. Demand response (DR is considered as one of the most promising Smart Grid concepts that can be used to support the peak demand, whereas, LS is an existing last resort method during emergency grid situations. Both schemes aim to balance the load and generation in real-time and restore the frequency very quickly. This paper incorporates integrating Incentive based Demand Response (IDR with spinning reserve for smaller underfrequency events to manage the system peak demand. It also introduces a new frequency band for an Emergency Demand Response (EDR as an alternative inexpensive solution that can replace costly spinning reserves and help to prevent LS. An energy index factor is used to identify the consumption pattern of consumers to enable them to participate in IDR. An illustrative example of the performance of the proposed scheme on a modified 15 bus test system is shown. Simulation results on different scenarios confirm that the proposed method is effective to improve the frequency restoration process along with enabling participation of new services.

  19. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy nanostructural study of shed microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Issman

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs are sub-micron membrane vesicles (100-1000 nm shed from normal and pathologic cells due to stimulation or apoptosis. MPs can be found in the peripheral blood circulation of healthy individuals, whereas elevated concentrations are found in pregnancy and in a variety of diseases. Also, MPs participate in physiological processes, e.g., coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis. Since their clinical properties are important, we have developed a new methodology based on nano-imaging that provides significant new data on MPs nanostructure, their composition and function. We are among the first to characterize by direct-imaging cryogenic transmitting electron microscopy (cryo-TEM the near-to-native nanostructure of MP systems isolated from different cell types and stimulation procedures. We found that there are no major differences between the MP systems we have studied, as most particles were spherical, with diameters from 200 to 400 nm. However, each MP population is very heterogeneous, showing diverse morphologies. We investigated by cryo-TEM the effects of standard techniques used to isolate and store MPs, and found that either high-g centrifugation of MPs for isolation purposes, or slow freezing to -80 °C for storage introduce morphological artifacts, which can influence MP nanostructure, and thus affect the efficiency of these particles as future diagnostic tools.

  20. Rotavirus vaccines: viral shedding and risk of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Evan J

    2008-10-01

    Rotavirus causes gastroenteritis in almost all children by 5 years of age. Immunity to rotavirus is incomplete, with potential for recurrent infections occurring throughout life. Live rotavirus vaccines have been developed for the protection of children from severe wildtype rotavirus infections. Transmission of vaccine virus strains from vaccinated children to unvaccinated contacts harbours the potential for herd immunity, but also the risk of vaccine-derived disease in immunocompromised contacts. A review of rotavirus vaccine prelicensure studies shows that viral shedding and transmission were higher with the old tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine than with the current human attenuated monovalent rotavirus vaccine and the pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine. Immunocompromised contacts should be advised to avoid contact with stool from the immunised child if possible, particularly after the first vaccine dose for at least 14 days. Since the risk of vaccine transmission and subsequent vaccine-derived disease with the current vaccines is much less than the risk of wildtype rotavirus disease in immunocompromised contacts, vaccination should be encouraged.

  1. Community-based Men's Sheds: promoting male health, wellbeing and social inclusion in an international context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Reinie; Wilson, Nathan J

    2014-09-01

    Males experience greater mortality and morbidity than females in most Western countries. The Australian and Irish National Male Health Policies aim to develop a framework to address this gendered health disparity. Men's Sheds have a distinct community development philosophy and are thus identified in both policies as an ideal location to address social isolation and positively impact the health and wellbeing of males who attend. The aim of this international cross-sectional survey was to gather information about Men's Sheds, the people who attend Men's Sheds, the activities at Men's Sheds, and the social and health dimensions of Men's Sheds. Results demonstrate that Men's Sheds are contributing a dual health and social role for a range of male subgroups. In particular, Men's Sheds have an outward social focus, supporting the social and mental health needs of men; health promotion and health literacy are key features of Men's Sheds. Men's Sheds have an important role to play in addressing the gendered health disparity that males face. They serve as an exemplar to health promotion professionals of a community development context where the aims of male health policy can be actualized as one part of a wider suite of global initiatives to reduce the gendered health disparity.

  2. Smallpox vaccine, ACAM2000: Sites and duration of viral shedding and effect of povidone iodine on scarification site shedding and immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Phillip R; Garman, Patrick M; Kim, Sung-Han; Schmader, Trevor J; Nieding, William J; Pike, Jason G; Knight, Ryan; Johnston, Sara C; Huggins, John W; Kortepeter, Mark G; Korman, Lawrence; Ranadive, Manmohan; Quinn, Xiaofei; Meyers, Mitchell S

    2015-06-12

    The U.S. Department of Defense vaccinates personnel deployed to high-risk areas with the vaccinia virus (VACV)-based smallpox vaccine. Autoinoculations and secondary and tertiary transmissions due to VACV shedding from the vaccination site continue to occur despite education of vaccinees on the risks of such infections. The objectives of this study were to investigate, in naïve smallpox vaccinees, (a) whether the vaccination site can remain contagious after the scab separates and (b) whether the application of povidone iodine ointment (PIO) to the vaccination site inactivates VACV without affecting the immune response. These objectives were tested in 60 individuals scheduled to receive smallpox vaccine. Thirty individuals (control) did not receive PIO; 30 subjects (treatment) received PIO starting on post-vaccination day 7. Counter to current dogma, this study showed that VACV continues to shed from the vaccination site after the scab separates. Overall viral shedding levels in the PIO group were significantly lower than those in the control group (p=0.0045), and PIO significantly reduced the duration of viral shedding (median duration 14.5 days and 21 days in the PIO and control groups, respectively; p=0.0444). At least 10% of control subjects continued to shed VACV at day 28, and 3.4% continued to shed the virus at day 42. PIO reduced the proportion of subjects shedding virus from the vaccination site from day 8 until days 21-23 compared with control subjects. Groups did not differ significantly in the proportion of subjects mounting an immune response, as measured by neutralizing antibodies, IgM, IgG, and interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay. When applied to the vaccination site starting on day 7, PIO reduced viral shedding without altering the immune response. The use of PIO in addition to a semipermeable dressing may reduce the rates of autoinoculation and contact transmission originating from the vaccination site in smallpox-vaccinated individuals.

  3. Profiling the gastrointestinal microbiota in response to Salmonella: low versus high Salmonella shedding in the natural porcine host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Shawn M D; Allen, Heather K; Bearson, Bradley L; Looft, Torey; Brunelle, Brian W; Kich, Jalusa D; Tuggle, Christopher K; Bayles, Darrell O; Alt, David; Levine, Uri Y; Stanton, Thaddeus B

    2013-06-01

    Controlling Salmonella in the food chain is complicated by the ability of Salmonella to colonize livestock without causing clinical symptoms/disease. Salmonella-carrier animals are a significant reservoir for contamination of naïve animals, the environment, and our food supply. Salmonella carriage and shedding in pigs varies greatly both experimentally and on-farm. To investigate the dynamics between the porcine intestinal microbiota and Salmonella shedding, we temporally profiled the microbiota of pigs retrospectively classified as low and high Salmonella-shedders. Fifty-four piglets were collectively housed, fed and challenged with 10(9)Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Bacterial quantitation of Salmonella in swine feces was determined, and total fecal DNA was isolated for 16S rRNA gene sequencing from groups of high-shedder, low-shedder, and non-inoculated pigs (n=5/group; 15 pigs total). Analyses of bacterial community structures revealed significant differences between the microbiota of high-shedder and low-shedder pigs before inoculation and at 2 and 7 days post-inoculation (d.p.i.); microbiota differences were not detected between low-shedder and non-inoculated pigs. Because the microbiota composition prior to Salmonella challenge may influence future shedding status, the "will-be" high and low shedder phylotypes were compared, revealing higher abundance of the Ruminococcaceae family in the "will-be" low shedders. At 2d.p.i., a significant difference in evenness for the high shedder microbiota compared to the other two groups was driven by decreases in Prevotella abundance and increases in various genera (e.g. Catenibacterium, Xylanibacter). By 21 d.p.i., the microbial communities of high-shedder and low-shedder pigs were no longer significantly different from one another, but were both significantly different from non-inoculated pigs, suggesting a similar Salmonella-induced alteration in maturation of the swine intestinal microbiota regardless of

  4. Replication and shedding kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in juvenile rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Andrew R; Scott, Robert J; Kerr, Benjamin; Kurath, Gael

    2017-01-02

    Viral replication and shedding are key components of transmission and fitness, the kinetics of which are heavily dependent on virus, host, and environmental factors. To date, no studies have quantified the shedding kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), or how they are associated with replication, making it difficult to ascertain the transmission dynamics of this pathogen of high agricultural and conservation importance. Here, the replication and shedding kinetics of two M genogroup IHNV genotypes were examined in their naturally co-evolved rainbow trout host. Within host virus replication began rapidly, approaching maximum values by day 3 post-infection, after which viral load was maintained or gradually dropped through day 7. Host innate immune response measured as stimulation of Mx-1 gene expression generally followed within host viral loads. Shedding also began very quickly and peaked within 2days, defining a generally uniform early peak period of shedding from 1 to 4days after exposure to virus. This was followed by a post-peak period where shedding declined, such that the majority of fish were no longer shedding by day 12 post-infection. Despite similar kinetics, the average shedding rate over the course of infection was significantly lower in mixed compared to single genotype infections, suggesting a competition effect, however, this did not significantly impact the total amount of virus shed. The data also indicated that the duration of shedding, rather than peak amount of virus shed, was correlated with fish mortality. Generally, the majority of virus produced during infection appeared to be shed into the environment rather than maintained in the host, although there was more retention of within host virus during the post-peak period. Viral virulence was correlated with shedding, such that the more virulent of the two genotypes shed more total virus. This fundamental understanding of IHNV shedding

  5. Acceleration of epithelial cell syndecan-1 shedding by anthrax hemolytic virulence factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandhoke Vikas

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been recently reported that major pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa accelerate a normal process of cell surface syndecan-1 (Synd1 ectodomain shedding as a mechanism of host damage due to the production of shedding-inducing virulence factors. We tested if acceleration of Synd1 shedding takes place in vitro upon treatment of epithelial cells with B. anthracis hemolysins, as well as in vivo during anthrax infection in mice. Results The isolated anthrax hemolytic proteins AnlB (sphingomyelinase and AnlO (cholesterol-binding pore-forming factor, as well as ClnA (B. cereus homolog of B. anthracis phosphatidyl choline-preferring phospholipase C cause accelerated shedding of Synd1 and E-cadherin from epithelial cells and compromise epithelial barrier integrity within a few hours. In comparison with hemolysins in a similar range of concentrations, anthrax lethal toxin (LT also accelerates shedding albeit at slower rate. Individual components of LT, lethal factor and protective antigen are inactive with regard to shedding. Inhibition experiments favor a hypothesis that activities of tested bacterial shedding inducers converge on the stimulation of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases of the Syk family, ultimately leading to activation of cellular sheddase. Both LT and AnlO modulate ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways, while JNK pathway seems to be irrelevant to accelerated shedding. Accelerated shedding of Synd1 also takes place in DBA/2 mice challenged with Bacillus anthracis (Sterne spores. Elevated levels of shed ectodomain are readily detectable in circulation after 24 h. Conclusion The concerted acceleration of shedding by several virulence factors could represent a new pathogenic mechanism contributing to disruption of epithelial or endothelial integrity, hemorrhage, edema and abnormal cell signaling during anthrax infection.

  6. The toxicology of ion-shedding zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Wei, Limin; Chen, Liangjiao; Song, Bin; Shao, Longquan

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are nanomaterials that are widely used in many fields. ZnO NPs are ion-shedding particles, and zinc ions produce important and potent effects that differ from those of other metal or metal oxide NPs. Several studies have reported the toxicological effects of ZnO NPs administered via several different routes, including orally, dermally, by pulmonary absorption, intraperitoneally, and intravenously. Some potential routes for human exposure have produced various toxic effects in animal models. Moreover, several in vitro studies using a range of cell lines have reported the mechanisms underlying ZnO NP toxicity. Zinc ions play a very important role in ZnO NP toxicity, although the effects of the particulate form cannot be excluded. A crucial determinant of toxicity is the solubility of ZnO NPs, which is influenced by various factors, including the pH of the environment in tissues, cells, and organelles. In addition to the inflammatory responses and oxidative stress known to be induced by ZnO NPs, these NPs also exhibit some positive anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and pro-coagulant effects at sub-toxic doses; these effects are probably induced by zinc ions, which are an essential element in cell homeostasis. It is highly likely that there are additional distinct mechanisms at sub-toxic doses and concentrations, which may be concealed or altered by the toxic effects observed at higher levels of ZnO NPs. Furthermore, many signaling pathway molecules associated with necrosis and apoptosis can be activated, leading to cell death. This review presents the status of ZnO NP toxicology and highlights areas requiring further investigation.

  7. A study on the frictional response of reptilian shed skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; Vargiolu, R.; Zahouani, H.; El Mansori, M.

    2011-08-01

    Deterministic surfaces are constructs of which profile, topography and textures are integral to the function of the system they enclose. They are designed to yield a predetermined tribological response. Developing such entities relies on controlling the structure of the rubbing interface so that, not only the surface is of optimized topography, but also is able to self-adjust its tribological behaviour according to the evolution of sliding conditions. In seeking inspirations for such designs, many engineers are turning toward the biological world to study the construction and behaviour of bio-analogues, and to probe the role surface topography assumes in conditioning of frictional response. That is how a bio-analogue can self-adjust its tribological response to adapt to habitat constraints. From a tribological point of view, Squamate Reptiles, offer diverse examples where surface texturing, submicron and nano-scale features, achieves frictional regulation. In this paper, we study the frictional response of shed skin obtained from a snake (Python regius). The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakes. The coefficient of friction depends on the direction of sliding: the value in forward motion is lower than that in the backward direction. Diagonal and side winding motion induces a different value of the friction coefficient. We discuss the origin of such a phenomenon in relation to surface texturing and study the energy constraints, implied by anisotropic friction, on the motion of the reptile.

  8. Shedding the Stereotypes: Librarians in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Pixey Anne

    2002-01-01

    Identifies several areas of the library profession that will need to adapt to changing expectations in the future. Discusses librarian stereotypes; role redefinition in light of changing technology and electronic resources; greater diversity of user needs; technology literacy; generational issues, including retirement rates; and diversity and…

  9. Entangled light from white noise

    CERN Document Server

    Plenio, M B

    2002-01-01

    An atom that couples to two distinct leaky optical cavities is driven by an external optical white noise field. We describe how entanglement between the light fields sustained by two optical cavities arises in such a situation. The entanglement is maximized for intermediate values of the cavity damping rates and the intensity of the white noise field, vanishing both for small and for large values of these parameters and thus exhibiting a stochastic-resonance-like behaviour. This example illustrates the possibility of generating entanglement by exclusively incoherent means and sheds new light on the constructive role noise may play in certain tasks of interest for quantum information processing.

  10. Entangled light from white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenio, M B; Huelga, S F

    2002-05-13

    An atom that couples to two distinct leaky optical cavities is driven by an external optical white noise field. We describe how entanglement between the light fields sustained by two optical cavities arises in such a situation. The entanglement is maximized for intermediate values of the cavity damping rates and the intensity of the white noise field, vanishing both for small and for large values of these parameters and thus exhibiting a stochastic-resonancelike behavior. This example illustrates the possibility of generating entanglement by exclusively incoherent means and sheds new light on the constructive role noise may play in certain tasks of interest for quantum information processing.

  11. Making evident and the analysis of correlations between light particles by means of multidetector INDRA; Mise en oeuvre et analyse de corelations entre particules legeres avec le multidetecteur INDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourio, D. [Nantes Univ., 44 (France)

    1997-10-30

    This thesis reports an light particle interferometric study carried out for the first time by means of an 4{pi} detector. This enabled to extract the proton and deuteron emission time for correctly selected sources. These measurements are extremely worth in the study of hot nuclear matter, particularly for its decaying modes. In this way a clear image of the production chronology of light particles in the heavy ion collision is obtained. In addition, it was possible to make evident the production of fast unstable fragments associated to the decay through pre-equilibrium particles contributing to the very low relative momentum correlation function. This work is the result of a successful event: the association of the 4{pi} INDRA multidetector to the analysis function of the light particle correlation. The real breakthrough achieved by this study was to demonstrate the possibility of full phase space exploration by building the light particle 4 {pi} correlation. In the case of the Xe + Sn system at 45 MeV/u we were able to characterize the collision violence and and to isolate three sources of particle emission. Thus, it was possible to characterize the proton and deuterons emission time for the quasi-target as well as for the quasi-projectile. An important decrease in the characteristic deuteron emission time was observed according as the central collision was approached. Other important results were obtained concerning the proton-proton and proton-deuteron correlation functions as well as the presence of an independent particle dynamical emission of mid-rapidity quasi-targets and quasi- projectiles. Finally, the observation of correlation functions allowed to demonstrate structures at very low relative momentum which can not be understood by the final state interaction only. An explanation could be obtained by a theoretical code taking into account the reaction dynamics, the particle interaction in the final state and the decay of primary excited fragments 74 refs.

  12. Vortex shedding noise control in idling circular saws using air ejection at the teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimoto, K.; Mote, C. D.; Ichimiya, R.

    1994-04-01

    Aerodynamically induced noise from an idling circular saw can be very intense. The purpose of the present investigation is noise reduction through vortex shedding control in idling circular saws. Reduction of aerodynamic noise in idling circular saws may be possible by controlling the shed vortices and flow structures in the space between teeth, based on the earlier observations.

  13. Influence of thermal inhibitor position and temperature on vortex-shedding-driven pressure oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Wanxing; Li Shipeng; Zhang Qiao; Li Junwei; Ye Qingqing; Wang Ningfei

    2013-01-01

    Vortex-acoustic coupling is one of the most important potential sources of combustion instability in solid rocket motors (SRMs).Based on the Von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics (VKI) experimental motor,the influence of the thermal inhibitor position and temperature on vortex-shedding-driven pressure oscillations is numerically studied via the large eddy simulation (LES)method.The simulation results demonstrate that vortex shedding is a periodic process and its accurate frequency can be numerically obtained.Acoustic modes could be easily excited by vortex shedding.The vortex shedding frequency and second acoustic frequency dominate the pressure oscillation characteristics in the chamber.Thermal inhibitor position and gas temperature have little effect on vortex shedding frequency,but have great impact on pressure oscillation amplitude.Pressure amplitude is much higher when the thermal inhibitor locates at the acoustic velocity anti-nodes.The farther the thermal inhibitor is to the nozzle head,the more vortex energy would be dissipated by the turbulence.Therefore,the vortex shedding amplitude at the second acoustic velocity antinode near 3/4L (L is chamber length) is larger than those of others.Besides,the natural acoustic frequencies increase with the gas temperature.As the vortex shedding frequency departs from the natural acoustic frequency,the vortex-acoustic feedback loop is decoupled.Consequently,both the vortex shedding and acoustic amplitudes decrease rapidly.

  14. Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses for Cardiology Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Munes; Alahdab, Fares; Alsaied, Tarek

    2016-07-01

    Participating in a scholarly activity is one of the training requirements for cardiology fellows. However, it can be very challenging to complete a research project during such a busy period of clinical training. To help the cardiology fellows in choosing and starting off a research project, a light has been shed on the process of conducting a systematic review, and the importance of this research activity, as well as its limitations.

  15. Prolonged shedding of rhinovirus and re-infection in adults with respiratory tract illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlateva, Kalina T; de Vries, Jutte J C; Coenjaerts, Frank E J; van Loon, Anton M; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul; Butler, Christopher C; Goossens, Herman; Ieven, Margareta; Claas, Eric C J

    2014-07-01

    Rhinovirus infections occur frequently throughout life and have been reported in about one-third of asymptomatic cases. The clinical significance of sequential rhinovirus infections remains unclear. To determine the incidence and clinical relevance of sequential rhinovirus detections, nasopharyngeal samples from 2485 adults with acute cough/lower respiratory illness were analysed. Patients were enrolled prospectively by general practitioners from 12 European Union countries during three consecutive years (2007-2010). Nasopharyngeal samples were collected at the initial general practitioner consultation and 28 days thereafter and symptom scores were recorded by patients over that period. Rhinovirus RNA was detected in 444 (18%) out of 2485 visit one samples and in 110 (4.4%) out of 2485 visit two respiratory samples. 21 (5%) of the 444 patients had both samples positive for rhinovirus. Genotyping of both virus detections was successful for 17 (81%) out of 21 of these patients. Prolonged rhinovirus shedding occurred in six (35%) out of 21 and re-infection with a different rhinovirus in 11 (65%) out of 21. Rhinovirus re-infections were significantly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (p=0.04) and asthma (p=0.02) and appeared to be more severe than prolonged infections. Our findings indicate that in immunocompetent adults rhinovirus re-infections are more common than prolonged infections, and chronic airway comorbidities might predispose to more frequent rhinovirus re-infections.

  16. Varicella-Zoster Virus Keratitis with Asymptomatic Conjunctival Viral Shedding in the Contralateral Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Miyakoshi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of varicella-zoster virus (VZV keratitis with detection of VZV DNA in the tear fluid of not only the symptomatic eye but also the contralateral asymptomatic eye by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Methods: This is a case report. A 63-year-old otherwise healthy woman presented with circular corneal ulcer and stromal opacity with infiltration accompanied by mild conjunctival and ciliary injections in the left eye. Bacterial cultures of the corneal scrapings and virus PCR analyses of tear fluid from both eyes were performed. Results: No pathogen was found by bacterial cultures. PCR was negative for Acanthamoeba, herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus, but positive for VZV. VZV DNA was also detected in the unaffected eye. Based on the diagnosis of VZV keratitis, oral valacyclovir and acyclovir eye ointment were administered to the corneal infected eye. The infected eye was healed and VZV DNA turned negative in the tear fluid of the treated eye after 6 months of treatment; however, VZV DNA was still positive in the tear fluid of the contralateral eye. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first case report of the detection of VZV DNA in the tear fluid of both affected and unaffected eyes in a patient with VZV keratitis. Asymptomatic conjunctival shedding of VZV may continue in the healthy unaffected eye in VZV keratitis patients.

  17. Experimental Investigation on Cavitating Flow Shedding over an Axisymmetric Blunt Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Changli; WANG Guoyu; HUANG Biao

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, most researchers focus on the cavity shedding mechanisms of unsteady cavitating flows over different objects, such as 2D/3D hydrofoils, venturi-type section, axisymmetric bodies with different headforms, and so on. But few of them pay attention to the differences of cavity shedding modality under different cavitation numbers in unsteady cavitating flows over the same object. In the present study, two kinds of shedding patterns are investigated experimentally. A high speed camera system is used to observe the cavitating flows over an axisymmetric blunt body and the velocity fields are measured by a particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique in a water tunnel for different cavitation conditions. The U-type cavitating vortex shedding is observed in unsteady cavitating flows. When the cavitation number is 0.7, there is a large scale cavity rolling up and shedding, which cause the instability and dramatic fluctuation of the flows, while at cavitation number of 0.6, the detached cavities can be conjunct with the attached part to induce the break-off behavior again at the tail of the attached cavity, as a result, the final shedding is in the form of small scale cavity and keeps a relatively steady flow field. It is also found that the interaction between the re-entrant flow and the attached cavity plays an important role in the unsteady cavity shedding modality. When the attached cavity scale is insufficient to overcome the re-entrant flow, it deserves the large cavity rolling up and shedding just as that at cavitation number of 0.7. Otherwise, the re-entrant flow is defeated by large enough cavity to induce the cavity-combined process and small scale cavity vortexes shedding just as that of the cavitation number of 0.6. This research shows the details of two different cavity shedding modalities which is worthful and meaningful for the further study of unsteady cavitation.

  18. Salmonella fecal shedding and immune responses are dose- and serotype- dependent in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ivanek

    Full Text Available Despite the public health importance of Salmonella infection in pigs, little is known about the associated dynamics of fecal shedding and immunity. In this study, we investigated the transitions of pigs through the states of Salmonella fecal shedding and immune response post-Salmonella inoculation as affected by the challenge dose and serotype. Continuous-time multistate Markov models were developed using published experimental data. The model for shedding had four transient states, of which two were shedding (continuous and intermittent shedding and two non-shedding (latency and intermittent non-shedding, and one absorbing state representing permanent cessation of shedding. The immune response model had two transient states representing responses below and above the seroconversion level. The effects of two doses [low (0.65×10(6 CFU/pig and high (0.65×10(9 CFU/pig] and four serotypes (Salmonella Yoruba, Salmonella Cubana, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Derby on the models' transition intensities were evaluated using a proportional intensities model. Results indicated statistically significant effects of the challenge dose and serotype on the dynamics of shedding and immune response. The time spent in the specific states was also estimated. Continuous shedding was on average 10-26 days longer, while intermittent non-shedding was 2-4 days shorter, in pigs challenged with the high compared to low dose. Interestingly, among pigs challenged with the high dose, the continuous and intermittent shedding states were on average up to 10-17 and 3-4 days longer, respectively, in pigs infected with S. Cubana compared to the other three serotypes. Pigs challenged with the high dose of S. Typhimurium or S. Derby seroconverted on average up to 8-11 days faster compared to the low dose. These findings highlight that Salmonella fecal shedding and immune response following Salmonella challenge are dose- and serotype-dependent and that the detection of

  19. The Transition from Thick to Thin Plate Wake Physics: Whither Vortex Shedding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2016-01-01

    The near and very near wake of a flat plate with a circular trailing edge is investigated with data from direct numerical simulations. Computations were performed for six different combinations of the Reynolds numbers based on plate thickness (D) and boundary layer momentum thickness upstream of the trailing edge (theta). Unlike the case of the cylinder, these Reynolds numbers are independent parameters for the flat plate. The separating boundary layers are turbulent in all the cases investigated. One objective of the study is to understand the changes in the wake vortex shedding process as the plate thickness is reduced (increasing theta/D). The value of D varies by a factor of 16 and that of theta by approximately 5 in the computations. Vortex shedding is vigorous in the low theta/D cases with a substantial decrease in shedding intensity in the large theta/D cases. Other shedding characteristics are also significantly altered with increasing theta/D. A visualization of the shedding process in the different cases is provided and discussed. The basic shedding mechanism is explored in depth. The effect of changing theta/D on the time-averaged, near-wake velocity statistics is also discussed. A functional relationship between the shedding frequency and the Reynolds numbers mentioned above is obtained.

  20. Numerical simulation of terrain-induced vortex/wave shedding at the Hong Kong International Airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Li-Jie; Mao, Hui [Shenzhen National Climate Observatory, Meteorological Bureau of Shenzhen Municipality (China); Chan, P.W. [Hong Kong Observatory (China)

    2013-10-15

    The present study aims at simulating the shedding of vortex/wave from a mountain nearby the Hong Kong International Airport using a computational fluid dynamics model by employing high resolution terrain data without smoothing. The successful simulation of this shedding would have an important application in the short-term forecasting of the chance of occurrence of terrain-induced windshear at an operating airport. Two typical cases of vortex/wave shedding are considered, namely, in neutral atmosphere associated with the passage of a typhoon, and in stably stratified atmosphere in spring-time easterly flow with continental origin. The model is found to successfully capture the salient features of the shedding. The simulated radial velocity fields of weather radar/LIDAR compare well with actual observations. In particular, the creation and the propagation of the vortex/wave through shedding from a mountain nearby the airport are captured well in the model simulation. The shedding periods are also reproduced. From the limited number of cases studied in this paper, it appears that the model has the capability of forecasting the occurrence of vortex/wave shedding by coupling with a mesoscale meteorological model. (orig.)

  1. RhoB/ROCK mediates oxygen-glucose deprivation-stimulated syncytiotrophoblast microparticle shedding in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Yang, Bo-Ping; Li, Yi-Lin; Li, Hong-Mei; Zheng, Xiu-Hui; Yu, Li-Li; Zhang, Qiong; Zheng, Ying-Ru; Yi, Ping; Li, Li; Guo, Jian-Xin; Zhou, Yuan-Guo

    2016-11-01

    Increased circulating syncytiotrophoblast microparticles (STBMs) are often associated with preeclampsia (PE) but the molecular mechanisms regulating STBM shedding remain elusive. Experimental evidence has shown that actin plays a key role in STBM shedding and that Rho/ROCK is important in regulating actin rearrangement. To investigate the role of RhoB/ROCK-regulated actin arrangement in STBM shedding in PE, chorionic villous explants were prepared from placenta of patients with normotensive or PE pregnancies and BeWo cells were fused to imitate syncytiotrophoblasts. The oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions were applied to imitate the pathophysiology of PE in vitro. The results showed that RhoB and ROCK were activated in the preeclamptic placenta, accompanied by increased actin polymerization and decreased outgrowing microvilli. In villous tissue cultures or BeWo cells, OGD activated RhoB, ROCK1 and ROCK2 and promoted STBM shedding and actin stress fibers formation. In BeWo cells, RhoB overexpression activated ROCK1 and ROCK2, leading to F-actin redistribution and STBM shedding and the OGD-induced actin polymerization and STBM shedding could be reversed by RhoB or ROCK knockdown. These results reveal that RhoB and ROCK play a key role in PE by targeting STBM shedding through actin rearrangement and that RhoB/ROCK intervention may be a potential therapeutic strategy for PE.

  2. Kinetics of viral shedding provide insights into the epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Winton, James R.; Grady, Courtney; Collins, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    Losses from infectious diseases are an important component of natural mortality among marine fish species, but factors controlling the ecology of these diseases and their potential responses to anthropogenic changes are poorly understood. We used viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to investigate the kinetics of viral shedding and its effect on disease transmission and host mortality. Outbreaks of acute disease, accompanied by mortality and viral shedding, were initiated after waterborne exposure of herring to concentrations of VHSV as low as 101 plaque-forming units (pfu) ml–1. Shed virus in flow-through tanks was first detected 4 to 5 d post-exposure, peaked after 6 to 10 d, and was no longer detected after 16 d. Shedding rates, calculated from density, flow and waterborne virus titer reached 1.8 to 5.0 × 108 pfu fish–1 d–1. Onset of viral shedding was dose-dependent and preceded initial mortality by 2 d. At 21 d, cumulative mortality in treatment groups ranged from 81 to 100% and was dependent not on challenge dose, but on the kinetics and level of viral shedding by infected fish in the tank. Possible consequences of the viral shedding and disease kinetics are discussed in the context of epizootic initiation and perpetuation among populations of wild Pacific herring.

  3. Numerical simulation of terrain-induced vortex/wave shedding at the Hong Kong International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at simulating the shedding of vortex/wave from a mountain nearby the Hong Kong International Airport using a computational fluid dynamics model by employing high resolution terrain data without smoothing. The successful simulation of this shedding would have an important application in the short-term forecasting of the chance of occurrence of terrain-induced windshear at an operating airport. Two typical cases of vortex/wave shedding are considered, namely, in neutral atmosphere associated with the passage of a typhoon, and in stably stratified atmosphere in spring-time easterly flow with continental origin. The model is found to successfully capture the salient features of the shedding. The simulated radial velocity fields of weather radar/LIDAR compare well with actual observations. In particular, the creation and the propagation of the vortex/wave through shedding from a mountain nearby the airport are captured well in the model simulation. The shedding periods are also reproduced. From the limited number of cases studied in this paper, it appears that the model has the capability of forecasting the occurrence of vortex/wave shedding by coupling with a mesoscale meteorological model.

  4. Intrinsic repair protects cells from pore-forming toxins by microvesicle shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Matthew; Keyel, Michelle; Shi, Guilan; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E; Keyel, Peter A

    2017-02-10

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are used by both the immune system and by pathogens to disrupt cell membranes. Cells attempt to repair this disruption in various ways, but the exact mechanism(s) that cells use are not fully understood, nor agreed upon. Current models for membrane repair include (1) patch formation (e.g., fusion of internal vesicles with plasma membrane defects), (2) endocytosis of the pores, and (3) shedding of the pores by blebbing from the cell membrane. In this study, we sought to determine the specific mechanism(s) that cells use to resist three different cholesterol-dependent PFTs: Streptolysin O, Perfringolysin O, and Intermedilysin. We found that all three toxins were shed from cells by blebbing from the cell membrane on extracellular microvesicles (MVs). Unique among the cells studied, we found that macrophages were 10 times more resistant to the toxins, yet they shed significantly smaller vesicles than the other cells. To examine the mechanism of shedding, we tested whether toxins with engineered defects in pore formation or oligomerization were shed. We found that oligomerization was necessary and sufficient for membrane shedding, suggesting that calcium influx and patch formation were not required for shedding. However, pore formation enhanced shedding, suggesting that calcium influx and patch formation enhance repair. In contrast, monomeric toxins were endocytosed. These data indicate that cells use two interrelated mechanisms of membrane repair: lipid-dependent MV shedding, which we term 'intrinsic repair', and patch formation by intracellular organelles. Endocytosis may act after membrane repair is complete by removing inactivated and monomeric toxins from the cell surface.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 10 February 2017; doi:10.1038/cdd.2017.11.

  5. Evaluation and Comparison of High-Resolution (HR) and High-Light (HL) Phosphors in the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) using Generalized Linear Systems Analyses (GMTF, GDQE) that include the Effect of Scatter, Magnification and Detector Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandesh K; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the imaging characteristics of the high-resolution, high-sensitivity micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) with 35-micron pixel-pitch when used with different commercially-available 300 micron thick phosphors: the high resolution (HR) and high light (HL) from Hamamatsu. The purpose of this evaluation was to see if the HL phosphor with its higher screen efficiency could be replaced with the HR phosphor to achieve improved resolution without an increase in noise resulting from the HR's decreased light-photon yield. We designated the detectors MAF-HR and MAF-HL and compared them with a standard flat panel detector (FPD) (194 micron pixel pitch and 600 micron thick CsI(Tl)). For this comparison, we used the generalized linear-system metrics of GMTF, GNNPS and GDQE which are more realistic measures of total system performance since they include the effect of scattered radiation, focal spot distribution, and geometric un-sharpness. Magnifications (1.05-1.15) and scatter fractions (0.28 and 0.33) characteristic of a standard head phantom were used. The MAF-HR performed significantly better than the MAF-HL at high spatial frequencies. The ratio of GMTF and GDQE of the MAF-HR compared to the MAF-HL at 3(6) cycles/mm was 1.45(2.42) and 1.23(2.89), respectively. Despite significant degradation by inclusion of scatter and object magnification, both MAF-HR and MAF-HL provide superior performance over the FPD at higher spatial frequencies with similar performance up to the FPD's Nyquist frequency of 2.5 cycles/mm. Both substantially higher resolution and improved GDQE can be achieved with the MAF using the HR phosphor instead of the HL phosphor.

  6. Hot-Wire Calibration at Low Velocities: Revisiting the Vortex Shedding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab S. Sattarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity to calibrate hot-wire probes against a known velocity causes problems at low velocities, due to the inherent inaccuracy of pressure transducers at low differential pressures. The vortex shedding calibration method is in this respect a recommended technique to obtain calibration data at low velocities, due to its simplicity and accuracy. However, it has mainly been applied in a low and narrow Reynolds number range known as the laminar vortex shedding regime. Here, on the other hand, we propose to utilize the irregular vortex shedding regime and show where the probe needs to be placed with respect to the cylinder in order to obtain unambiguous calibration data.

  7. Endothelial glycocalyx shedding and vascular permeability in severely injured trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Cardenas, Jessica C; Baimukanova, Gyulnar;

    2015-01-01

    of syndecan-1 during hemorrhagic shock, little is known about the shedding of other EGL components, and their effects on altered permeability and coagulation. We characterized shedding of all four primary components of the EGL, as well as the plasma's effect on permeability and thrombin generation in a cohort...... of trauma patients. METHODS: Plasma samples were collected from 5 healthy consented volunteers and 22 severely injured trauma patients upon admission to the emergency department. ELISA assays were performed to quantify shed HA, HS, CS and syndecan-1 in plasma. A colloid osmometer and Electric Cell...

  8. Children's residential exposure to chlorpyrifos: Application of CPPAES field measurements of chlorpyrifos and TCPy within MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hore, Paromita [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States)]|[New York City Department of Health, 253 Broadway New York, New York 10007 (United States); Zartarian, Valerie; Xue Jianping; Ozkaynak, Haluk [National Exposure Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, 109 TW Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Wang, S.-W.; Yang, Y.-C.; Chu, P.-Ling; Robson, Mark; Georgopoulos, Panos [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States); Sheldon, Linda [National Exposure Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, 109 TW Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Needham, Larry Barr, Dana [Contemporary Pesticide Laboratory, Centers for Disease Control, 4770 Buford Highway, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Freeman, Natalie [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States)]|[University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Lioy, Paul J. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States)]. E-mail: plioy@eohsi.rutgers.edu

    2006-08-01

    The comprehensive individual field-measurements on non-dietary exposure collected in the Children's-Post-Pesticide-Application-Exposure-Study (CPPAES) were used within MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides, a physically based stochastic human exposure and dose model. In this application, however, the model was run deterministically. The MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides employed the CPPAES as input variables to simulate the exposure and the dose profiles for seven children over a 2-week post-application period following a routine residential and professional indoor crack-and-crevice chlorpyrifos application. The input variables were obtained from a personal activity diary, microenvironmental measurements and personal biomonitoring data obtained from CPPAES samples collected from the individual children and in their homes. Simulation results were compared with CPPAES field measured values obtained from the children's homes to assess the utility of the different microenvironmental data collected in CPPAES, i.e. indicator toys and wipe samplers to estimate aggregate exposures that can be result from one or more exposure pathways and routes. The final analyses of the database involved comparisons of the actual data obtained from the individual biomarker samples of a urinary metabolite of chlorpyrifos (TCPy) and the values predicted by MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides using the CPPAES-derived variables. Because duplicate diet samples were not part of the CPPAES study design, SHEDs-Pesticides simulated dose profiles did not account for the dietary route. The research provided more confidence in the types of data that can be used in the inhalation and dermal contact modules of MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides to predict the pesticide dose received by a child. It was determined that we still need additional understanding about: (1) the types of activities and durations of activities that result in non-dietary ingestion of pesticides and (2) the influence of dietary exposures on the levels of TCPy found

  9. Understanding the Greenhouse Effect by Embodiment - Analysing and Using Students' and Scientists' Conceptual Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebert, Kai; Gropengießer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, science education studies have reported that there are very different understandings among students of science regarding the key aspects of climate change. We used the cognitive linguistic framework of experientialism to shed new light on this valuable pool of studies to identify the conceptual resources of understanding climate change. In our study, we interviewed 35 secondary school students on their understanding of the greenhouse effect and analysed the conceptions of climate scientists as drawn from textbooks and research reports. We analysed all data by metaphor analysis and qualitative content analysis to gain insight into students' and scientists' resources for understanding. In our analysis, we found that students and scientists refer to the same schemata to understand the greenhouse effect. We categorised their conceptions into three different principles the conceptions are based on: warming by more input, warming by less output, and warming by a new equilibrium. By interrelating students' and scientists' conceptions, we identified the students' learning demand: First, our students were afforded with experiences regarding the interactions of electromagnetic radiation and CO2. Second, our students reflected about the experience-based schemata they use as source domains for metaphorical understanding of the greenhouse effect. By uncovering the-mostly unconscious-deployed schemata, we gave students access to their source domains. We implemented these teaching guidelines in interventions and evaluated them in teaching experiments to develop evidence-based and theory-guided learning activities on the greenhouse effect.

  10. Framing Light Rail Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    In Europe, there has been a strong political will to implement light rail. This article contributes to the knowledge concerning policies around light rail by analysing how local actors frame light rail projects and which rationalities and arguments are present in this decision-making process....... The article draws on the socio-technical approach to mobilities studies in order to reassemble the decision-making process in three European cases: Bergen, Angers, and Bern. This article provides insights into the political, discursive and material production of light rail mobilities in a European context....... It identifies the planning rationales behind the systems and the policies that have been supportive of this light rail vision. Finally, the article identifies the practical challenges and potentials that have been connected to the different local frames of light rail mobility which can be used in future...

  11. INVESTIGATION OF DOMINANT FREQUENCIES IN TRANSITION REYNOLDS NUMBER RANGE OF FLOW AROUND A CIRCULAR CYLINDER Ⅰ: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE RELATION BETWEEN VORTEX SHEDDING AND TRANSITION FREQUENCIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AHMED N A

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive hot wire investigation of the flow around a circular cylinder is carried out in an 18" × 18" wind tunnel to look into the dominant frequencies at the stagnation, separation and separated shear layers in the transition Reynolds number range. The majority of the experiments are carried out at Reynolds number of 4.5 × 104, with additional transition frequency tests at Reynolds numbers of 2.9 × 104, 3.3 × 104 and 9.7 × 104 respectively. The results are analysed in terms of power spectral density. While the frequency associated with stagnation is found to be essentially due to vortex shedding, frequency doubling of vortex shedding is also evident in the separated shear layers.Two peaks associated with transition frequencies are detected and their possible implications are presented.

  12. Prevalence of human herpesvirus-8 salivary shedding in HIV increases with CD4 count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, M; Koelle, D M; Ameli, N; Bacchetti, P; Greenspan, J S; Navazesh, M; Anastos, K; Greenblatt, R M

    2004-08-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), which occurs in epidemic form in human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)-infected individuals. Saliva is the only mucosal fluid in which infectious HHV-8 has been identified, although factors associated with HHV-8 salivary shedding remain unclear. Our study performed PCR analysis for HHV-8 DNA in saliva (and other body fluids) in 66 HIV- and HHV-8-co-infected women without KS so that we could examine predictors for HHV-8 DNA detection. CD4 count was the most significant predictor of HHV-8 salivary shedding, with increased prevalence of HHV-8 salivary DNA at higher CD4 counts. The odds of salivary HHV8 shedding at CD4 counts > = 350 cells/microL was 63 times the odds of shedding at CD4 200. Analysis of these data suggests an increased potential for HHV-8 transmission early in HIV infection, with implications for HHV-8 prevention.

  13. Effect of steady rotation on low Reynolds number vortex shedding behind a circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, Paluri; Patwardhan, Saurabh S.; Ramesh, O. N.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper control of oblique vortex shedding in the wake behind a straight circular cylinder is explored experimentally and computationally. Towards this, steady rotation of the cylinder about its axis is used as a control device. Some limited studies are also performed with a stepped circular cylinder, where at the step the flow is inevitably three-dimensional irrespective of the rotation rate. When there is no rotation, the vortex shedding pattern is three dimensional as described in many previous studies. With a non-zero rotation rate, it is demonstrated experimentally as well as numerically that the shedding pattern becomes more and more two-dimensional. At sufficiently high rotation rates, the vortex shedding is completely suppressed.

  14. Structural requirements for inducible shedding of the p55 tumor necrosis factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brakebusch, C; Varfolomeev, E E; Batkin, M

    1994-01-01

    Induced shedding of the p55 tumor necrosis factor receptor (p55-R) was previously shown to be independent of the amino acid sequence properties of the intracellular domain of this receptor. We now find it also independent of the sequence properties of the transmembrane domain and of the cysteine......-rich region that constitutes most of the extracellular domain of the receptor. The shedding is shown to depend solely on the sequence properties of a small region within the spacer that links the cysteine-rich region in the extracellular domain to the transmembrane domain. Detailed tests of effects......, however, by some mutations that seem to change the conformation of the spacer region. These findings suggest that a short amino acid sequence in the p55-R is essential and sufficient for its shedding and that the shedding is mediated either by a protease with limited sequence specificity or by several...

  15. Vortex shedding experiment with flat and curved bluff plates in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D.; Nesman, T.; Howard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Vortex shedding experiments were conducted in a water flow facility in order to simulate the strong discrete 4000-Hz vibration detected in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) which is thought to be associated with the SSME LOX inlet tee splitter vanes on the Main Injector. For the case of a flat vane with a blunt trailing edge excited by flow induced vortex shedding, lock-in with the first bending mode of the plate was observed. A curved vane displayed similar behavior, with the lock-in being a more discrete higher amplitude response. Aluminum vanes were employed to decouple the first vane bending mode from the vortex shedding mode. The application of an asymmetric 30-deg trailing edge bevel to both the flat and curved vanes was found to greatly reduce the strength of the shed vortices.

  16. Hot-Wire Calibration at Low Velocities: Revisiting the Vortex Shedding Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sattarzadeh, Sohrab S.; Athanasia Kalpakli; Ramis Örlü

    2013-01-01

    The necessity to calibrate hot-wire probes against a known velocity causes problems at low velocities, due to the inherent inaccuracy of pressure transducers at low differential pressures. The vortex shedding calibration method is in this respect a recommended technique to obtain calibration data at low velocities, due to its simplicity and accuracy. However, it has mainly been applied in a low and narrow Reynolds number range known as the laminar vortex shedding regime. Here, on the other ha...

  17. Modulation of statin-activated shedding of Alzheimer APP ectodomain by ROCK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Pedrini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statins are widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs that act by inhibiting HMGCoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. Recent evidence suggests that statin use may be associated with a decreased risk for Alzheimer disease, although the mechanisms underlying this apparent risk reduction are poorly understood. One popular hypothesis for statin action is related to the drugs' ability to activate alpha-secretase-type shedding of the alpha-secretase-cleaved soluble Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein ectodomain (sAPP(alpha. Statins also inhibit the isoprenoid pathway, thereby modulating the activities of the Rho family of small GTPases-Rho A, B, and C-as well as the activities of Rac and cdc42. Rho proteins, in turn, exert many of their effects via Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCKs. Several cell-surface molecules are substrates for activated alpha-secretase-type ectodomain shedding, and regulation of shedding typically occurs via activation of protein kinase C or extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinases, or via inactivation of protein phosphatase 1 or 2A. However, the possibility that these enzymes play a role in statin-stimulated shedding has been excluded, leading us to investigate whether the Rho/ROCK1 protein phosphorylation pathway might be involved. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We found that both atorvastatin and simvastatin stimulated sAPP(alpha shedding from a neuroblastoma cell line via a subcellular mechanism apparently located upstream of endocytosis. A farnesyl transferase inhibitor also increased sAPP(alpha shedding, as did a dominant negative form of ROCK1. Most conclusively, a constitutively active ROCK1 molecule inhibited statin-stimulated sAPP(alpha shedding. CONCLUSION: Together, these data suggest that statins exert their effects on shedding of sAPP(alpha from cultured cells, at least in part, by modulation of the isoprenoid pathway and ROCK1.

  18. Concurrent oral shedding of feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1 in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommer, M J; Verstraete, F J M

    2003-04-01

    Oral mucosal salivary samples were collected from 25 cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and 24 cats with periodontal disease. Viral culture and isolation of feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1 were performed. Eighty-eight per cent of cats with chronic gingivostomatitis were shedding both viruses, compared to 21% of cats without chronic oral inflammatory disease. Cats with chronic gingivostomatitis are significantly more likely to concurrently shed both feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1 than are cats with classical periodontal disease.

  19. Cylindrical shed construction: the shell roof on the Jamin factory at Oosterhout, Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    García García, Rafael; Valcarce Labrador, María Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of cylindrical shed reinforced concrete shells, a type of construction used primarily in industrial buildings. Like other types of shells, most cylindrical sheds were built between the end of World War II and the early nineteen sixties. The article reviews their characteristics and construction parameters based on contemporary studies and briefly documents some of the most prominent structures. The final chapter contains a detailed analysis of the design and con...

  20. Numerical Investigation on Vortex Shedding from a Hydrofoil with a Beveled Trailing Edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Jae Lee

    2015-01-01

    study, we numerically investigated vortex shedding from various beveled trailing edges at a Reynolds number of 106. We then compared the numerical results with the experimental data, which show good agreement. We also conducted numerical simulations of wakes behind the hydrofoil at rest in periodically varying flows. Results reveal that vortex shedding is affected by the periodicity of a free-stream flow, as well as the trailing-edge shape.

  1. Super-Shed Escherichia coli O157:H7 have potential for increased pathogen persistence and antibiotic resistance dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle are primary reservoirs of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), and super-shedding cattle shed O157 at greater than or equal to 10,000 colony-forming units/g feces. Host, bacteria, and/or the environment reportedly influence the super-shedding phenomenon. We recently demonstrated that a super-she...

  2. Genetic Algorithm Used for Load Shedding Based on Sensitivity to Enhance Voltage Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titare, L. S.; Singh, P.; Arya, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to calculate optimum load shedding with voltage stability consideration based on sensitivity of proximity indicator using genetic algorithm (GA). Schur's inequality based proximity indicator of load flow Jacobian has been selected, which indicates system state. Load flow Jacobian of the system is obtained using Continuation power flow method. If reactive power and active rescheduling are exhausted, load shedding is the last line of defense to maintain the operational security of the system. Load buses for load shedding have been selected on the basis of sensitivity of proximity indicator. The load bus having large sensitivity is selected for load shedding. Proposed algorithm predicts load bus rank and optimum load to be shed on load buses. The algorithm accounts inequality constraints not only in present operating conditions, but also for predicted next interval load (with load shedding). Developed algorithm has been implemented on IEEE 6-bus system. Results have been compared with those obtained using Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization (TLBO), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and its variant.

  3. WOW: light print, light propel, light point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    anywhere in a sample at any orientation using real-time 3D optical micromanipulation with six degrees of freedom. One of the key aspects of our demonstrated WOWs is the change in direction of in-coupled light and the marked increase in numerical aperture of the out-coupled light. Hence, each light...... propelled WOW can tap from a relatively broad incident beam and generate a much more tightly confined light at its tip. The presentation contains both numerical simulations related to the propagation of light through a WOW and preliminary experimental demonstrations on our BioPhotonics Workstation...

  4. Mentoring at Men's Sheds: an international survey about a community approach to health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Reinie; Wilson, Nathan J

    2014-05-01

    Men's Sheds are named within the Australian and Irish National Male Health Policies as an exemplar of male health and well-being and offer a range of formal and informal mentoring to counter the known consequences of social exclusion. The study aimed to report on whether Men's Sheds undertake mentoring programmes, and if so, who is being mentored; are mentors being trained, and if so by whom; and the perceived effectiveness of the mentoring programme. Furthermore, the study aimed to explore associations between sheds with a mentoring programme and factors that reflect an inclusive and a health-focused environment. All known Men's Sheds were invited to participate in the survey; of those, 324 (42.8%) Men's Sheds in Australia and 59 (48.0%) International sheds participated in the study between April and August 2012. Overall, 39.2% (n = 127) of Australian sheds and 23.7% (n = 14) of International sheds undertook formal mentoring. Youth was the most common group being mentored in both Australia (60.6%; n = 77) and Internationally (71.4%; n = 10). Over half of Australian shed co-ordinators rated their mentoring programme as moderately effective (52.8%; n = 67) and over a third as highly effective (36.2%; n = 46), while half of International shed co-ordinators rated theirs as highly effective (50.0%; n = 7). The findings from this paper support the notion that a large number of Men's Sheds offer formal mentoring programmes targeting a range of disadvantaged sub-populations, thus supporting social inclusion. Inter-generational mentoring is the most frequently occurring type of mentoring programme. While training mentors occurs at some sheds, the efficacy of this training and programme outcomes are unknown. A typology of shed types appears to be emerging based on a divergence of sheds with a more utilitarian focus and sheds that appear to embrace a health and well-being focus.

  5. Longitudinal study on oral shedding of herpes simplex virus 1 and varicella-zoster virus in individuals infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Monique; Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Selke, Stacy; Pas, Suzan D; van Loenen, Freek B; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Wald, Anna; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2013-09-01

    Primary herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection leads to a life-long latent infection of ganglia innervating the oral mucosa. HSV-1 and VZV reactivation is more common in immunocompromised individuals and may result in viral shedding in saliva. We determined the kinetics and quantity of oral HSV-1 and VZV shedding in HSV-1 and VZV seropositive individuals infected with HIV and to assess whether HSV-1 shedding involves reactivation of the same strain intra-individually. HSV-1 and VZV shedding was determined by real-time PCR of sequential daily oral swabs (n = 715) collected for a median period of 31 days from 22 individuals infected with HIV. HSV-1 was genotyped by sequencing the viral thymidine kinase gene. Herpesvirus shedding was detected in 18 of 22 participants. Shedding of HSV-1 occurred frequently, on 14.3% of days, whereas solely VZV shedding was very rare. Two participants shed VZV. The median HSV-1 load was higher compared to VZV. HSV-1 DNA positive swabs clustered into 34 shedding episodes with a median duration of 2 days. The prevalence, duration and viral load of herpesvirus shedding did not correlate with CD4 counts and HIV load. The genotypes of the HSV-1 viruses shed were identical between and within shedding episodes of the same person, but were different between individuals. One-third of the individuals shed an HSV-1 strain potentially refractory to acyclovir therapy. Compared to HSV-1, oral VZV shedding is rare in individuals infected with HIV. Recurrent oral HSV-1 shedding is likely due to reactivation of the same latent HSV-1 strain.

  6. Sproglig Metode og Analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    le Fevre Jakobsen, Bjarne

    Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011......Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011...

  7. Coagulation-induced shedding of platelet glycoprotein VI mediated by factor Xa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tamimi, Mohammad; Grigoriadis, George; Tran, Huy; Paul, Eldho; Servadei, Patricia; Berndt, Michael C; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated shedding of the platelet collagen receptor, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) in human plasma. Collagen or other ligands induce metalloproteinase-mediated GPVI ectodomain shedding, generating approximately 55-kDa soluble GPVI (sGPVI) and approximately 10-kDa platelet-associated fragments. In the absence of GPVI ligands, coagulation of platelet-rich plasma from healthy persons induced GPVI shedding, independent of added tissue factor, but inhibitable by metalloproteinase inhibitor, GM6001. Factor Xa (FXa) common to intrinsic and tissue factor-mediated coagulation pathways was critical for sGPVI release because (1) shedding was strongly blocked by the FXa-selective inhibitor rivaroxaban but not FIIa (thrombin) inhibitors dabigatran or hirudin; (2) Russell viper venom that directly activates FX generated sGPVI, with complete inhibition by enoxaparin (inhibits FXa and FIIa) but not hirudin; (3) impaired GPVI shedding during coagulation of washed platelets resuspended in FX-depleted plasma was restored by adding purified FX; and (4) purified FXa induced GM6001-inhibitable GPVI shedding from washed platelets. In 29 patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation, mean plasma sGPVI was 53.9 ng/mL (95% confidence interval, 39.9-72.8 ng/mL) compared with 12.5 ng/mL (95% confidence interval, 9.0-17.3 ng/mL) in thrombocytopenic controls (n = 36, P coagulation-induced GPVI shedding via FXa down-regulates GPVI under procoagulant conditions. FXa inhibitors have an unexpected role in preventing GPVI down-regulation.

  8. Duration of shedding of respiratory syncytial virus in a community study of Kenyan children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngama Mwanajuma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the transmission dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection will be better informed with improved data on the patterns of shedding in cases not limited only to hospital admissions. Methods In a household study, children testing RSV positive by direct immunofluorescent antibody test (DFA were enrolled. Nasal washings were scheduled right away, then every three days until day 14, every 7 days until day 28 and every 2 weeks until a maximum of 16 weeks, or until the first DFA negative RSV specimen. The relationship between host factors, illness severity and viral shedding was investigated using Cox regression methods. Results From 151 families a total of 193 children were enrolled with a median age of 21 months (range 1-164 months, 10% infants and 46% male. The rate of recovery from infection was 0.22/person/day (95% CI 0.19-0.25 equivalent to a mean duration of shedding of 4.5 days (95%CI 4.0-5.3, with a median duration of shedding of 4 days (IQR 2-6, range 1-14. Children with a history of RSV infection had a 40% increased rate of recovery i.e. shorter duration of viral shedding (hazard ratio 1.4, 95% CI 1.01-1.86. The rate of cessation of shedding did not differ significantly between males and females, by severity of infection or by age. Conclusion We provide evidence of a relationship between the duration of shedding and history of infection, which may have a bearing on the relative role of primary versus re-infections in RSV transmission in the community.

  9. Dynamics of virus shedding and in situ confirmation of chelonid herpesvirus 5 in Hawaiian green turtles with Fibropapillomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Schettle, Nelli; Ackermann, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Cancers in humans and animals can be caused by viruses, but virus-induced tumors are considered to be poor sites for replication of intact virions (lytic replication). Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease associated with a herpesvirus, chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5), that affects green turtles globally. ChHV5 probably replicates in epidermal cells of tumors, because epidermal intranuclear inclusions (EIIs) contain herpesvirus-like particles. However, although EIIs are a sign of herpesvirus replication, they have not yet been firmly linked to ChHV5. Moreover, the dynamics of viral shedding in turtles are unknown, and there are no serological reagents to confirm actual presence of the specific ChHV5 virus in tissues. The investigators analyzed 381 FP tumors for the presence of EIIs and found that overall, about 35% of green turtles had lytic replication in skin tumors with 7% of tumors showing lytic replication. A few (11%) turtles accounted for more than 30% cases having lytic viral replication, and lytic replication was more likely in smaller tumors. To confirm that turtles were actively replicating ChHV5, a prerequisite for shedding, the investigators used antiserum raised against F-VP26, a predicted capsid protein of ChHV5 that localizes to the host cell nucleus during viral replication. This antiserum revealed F-VP26 in EIIs of tumors, thus confirming the presence of replicating ChHV5. In this light, it is proposed that unlike other virus-induced neoplastic diseases, FP is a disease that may depend on superspreaders, a few highly infectious individuals growing numerous small tumors permissive to viral production, for transmission of ChHV5.

  10. Oral and systemic health correlates of HIV-1 shedding in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, M; Mulligan, R; Kono, N; Kumar, S K S; Nowicki, M; Alves, M; Mack, W J

    2010-10-01

    The relationship among oral and systemic health and HIV shedding in saliva is not well-understood. We hypothesized that oral and systemic health are associated with HIV shedding in saliva of HIV-infected women. Saliva from 127 participants enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) was collected at repeated visits over a 5½-year study period (October 1998 through March 2004) and was evaluated for HIV-1 RNA. Demographic, lifestyle, and systemic and oral health characteristics were evaluated as possible correlates of salivary HIV-1 shedding. Multivariate models showed significantly increased risk of HIV-1 shedding in saliva as blood levels of CD4 cell counts decreased (p < 0.0001) and HIV RNA increased (p < 0.0001). Diabetes (p = 0.002) and a high proportion of gingival bleeding sites (p = 0.01) were associated with increased likelihood, while anti-retroviral therapy (p = 0.0003) and higher levels of stimulated saliva flow rates (p = 0.02) were associated with a lower likelihood of HIV-1 RNA shedding in saliva.

  11. The Influence of Load Shedding on the Productivity of Hotel Staff in Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriëtte STEENKAMP

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa, ESCOM is the country’s main electricity supplier. Since 2008, Eskom has implemented load shedding on an ongoing basis as a result of insufficient electricity supply to meet the demands of all its customers. Owing to the fact that many organisations across South Africa are depended on electricity in order to function, previous research studies show that the wide-spread impact of load shedding has had an adverse on the sustainability of many of these organisations. Among these organisations are those based in the hospitality industry – imperative in relation to the stimulation of the national economy; directly related to tourism. Albeit the aforementioned, the sustainability of organisations in the hospitality industry is also heavily dependent on the productivity of their employees. For this research study the influence of load shedding on the productivity of the staff in the hospitality industry was investigated within one particular hotel (Hotel X based in Cape Town. Empirical research was deployed, making use of a mixed methods approach to obtain both quantitative data and qualitative data from respondents. Stemming from the findings it was found that load shedding did have an adverse influence on the productivity of staff in Hotel X, despite the fact that affordable measures were put in place to mitigate the disruptions caused by load shedding. Moreover, the latter dispensation was found to have an inadvertently adverse influence on the overall sustainability of Hotel X on the long run.

  12. General relativistic considerations of the field shedding model of fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian; Bini, Donato

    2016-06-01

    Popular models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) involve the gravitational collapse of neutron star progenitors to black holes. It has been proposed that the shedding of the strong neutron star magnetic field (B) during the collapse is the power source for the radio emission. Previously, these models have utilized the simplicity of the Schwarzschild metric which has the restriction that the magnetic flux is magnetic `hair' that must be shed before final collapse. But neutron stars have angular momentum and charge and a fully relativistic Kerr-Newman solution exists in which B has its source inside of the event horizon. In this Letter, we consider the magnetic flux to be shed as a consequence of the electric discharge of a metastable collapsed state of a Kerr-Newman black hole. It has also been argued that the shedding model will not operate due to pair creation. By considering the pulsar death line, we find that for a neutron star with B = 1011-1013 G and a long rotation period, >1s this is not a concern. We also discuss the observational evidence supporting the plausibility of magnetic flux shedding models of FRBs that are spawned from rapidly rotating progenitors.

  13. Proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of vortex shedding behind a rotating circular cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dol Sharul Sham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence studies were made in the wake of a rotating circular cylinder in a uniform free stream with the objective of describing the patterns of the vortex shedding up to suppression of the periodic vortex street at high velocity ratios, λ. The results obtained in the present study establish that shedding of Kármán vortices in a rotating circular cylinder-generated wake is modified by rotation of the cylinder. Alternate vortex shedding is highly visible when λ < 2.0 although the strength of the separated shear layers differ due to the rotation of the cylinder. The spectral density in the wakes indicate significant changes at λ = 2.0. The results indicate that the rotation of the cylinder causes significant disruption in the structure of the flow. Alternate vortex shedding is weak, distorted and close to being suppressed at λ = 2.0. It is clear that flow asymmetries will weaken vortex shedding, and when the asymmetries are significant enough, total suppression of a periodic street occurs. Particular attention was paid to the decomposition of the flow using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD. By analyzing this decomposition with the help of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV data, it was found that large scales contribute to the coherent motion. Vorticity structures in the modes become increasingly irregular with downstream distance, suggesting turbulent interactions are occurring at the more downstream locations, especially when the cylinder rotates.

  14. Interaction between leading and trailing edge vortex shedding: effects of bluff body geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Zachary; Kopp, Gregory; Gurka, Roi

    2011-11-01

    Elongated bluff bodies are distinguished from shorter bluff bodies (e.g., circular cylinders) by the fact that they have separating-reattaching flow at the leading edge as well as having vortex shedding at the trailing edge. Engineering examples of these bodies include heat exchanger fins and long-span suspension bridges. We have performed experiments on elongated bluff bodies of varying geometry. These experiments have been performed at Reynolds numbers O(104) based on the thickness of the model. Both surface pressure measurements (using 512 simultaneously sampled pressure taps) and PIV are used to quantify the flow fields of these bodies. The leading edge separation angle is controlled by changing the leading edge geometry. It is observed that the size of the leading edge separation bubble increases with increasing leading edge separation angle. As the size of the leading edge separation bubble increases, it is shown to continually decrease the shedding frequency for a given elongation ratio. It is suggested that the shedding frequency is diminished because the trailing edge vortex shedding is affected by the structures being shed from the leading edge separation bubble. The implications of this competition between leading and trailing edge flows will be explored.

  15. An Experimental Study of the Effect of Vortex Shedding on Solar Collector Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaulddin Abdulqader Kadim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effect of vortex shedding on the solar collector performance of the parabolic trough solar collector (PTSC was estimated experimentally. The effect of structure oscillations due to wind vortex shedding on solar collector performance degradation was estimated. The performance of PTSC is evaluated by using the useful heat gain and the thermal instantaneous efficiency. Experimental work to simulate the vortex shedding excitation was done. The useful heat gain and the thermal efficiency of the parabolic trough collector were calculated from experimental measurements with and without vortex loading. The prototype of the collector was fabricated for this purpose. The effect of vortex shedding at different operation conditions was examined. The variation of angles of attack and wind velocity leads to different values of vortex loading coefficients and shedding frequencies. The relation between the dynamic characteristics and solar collector performance was evaluated. The finite element method was used to estimate the dynamic characteristic of the solar collector in addition to experimental work to evaluate the relation between the dynamic behavior of the collector and its performance.

  16. A bankruptcy problem approach to load-shedding in multiagent-based microgrid operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Man; Kinoshita, Tetsuo; Lim, Yujin; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    A microgrid is composed of distributed power generation systems (DGs), distributed energy storage devices (DSs), and loads. To maintain a specific frequency in the islanded mode as an important requirement, the control of DGs' output and charge action of DSs are used in supply surplus conditions and load-shedding and discharge action of DSs are used in supply shortage conditions. Recently, multiagent systems for autonomous microgrid operation have been studied. Especially, load-shedding, which is intentional reduction of electricity use, is a critical problem in islanded microgrid operation based on the multiagent system. Therefore, effective schemes for load-shedding are required. Meanwhile, the bankruptcy problem deals with dividing short resources among multiple agents. In order to solve the bankruptcy problem, division rules, such as the constrained equal awards rule (CEA), the constrained equal losses rule (CEL), and the random arrival rule (RA), have been used. In this paper, we approach load-shedding as a bankruptcy problem. We compare load-shedding results by above-mentioned rules in islanded microgrid operation based on wireless sensor network (WSN) as the communication link for an agent's interactions.

  17. Quantitative profiling of the shedding rate of the three Marek's disease virus (MDV) serotypes reveals that challenge with virulent MDV markedly increases shedding of vaccinal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Aminul; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W

    2007-08-01

    The shedding profile of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1, virulent), serotype 2 (MDV2, vaccinal) and herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT, vaccinal) in commercial broiler chickens was determined by measuring the daily rate of production of feather dander from chickens housed in isolators and by quantifying the viral load of each of these serotypes in the dander using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). MDV1 and HVT viruses were detectable in dander filtered from isolator exhaust air from day 7 and MDV2 from day 12 after infection and thereafter until the end of the experiment at 61 days of age of the chickens. There was no difference in shedding rate among the three MDV1 isolates. Daily shedding of MDV1 increased sharply between days 7 and 28 and stabilized thereafter at about 10(9) virus copies per chicken per day, irrespective of vaccination status. Challenge with the three different MDV1 isolates markedly increased shedding of the vaccinal viruses HVT and MDV2 in dander by 38- and 75-fold, respectively. These results demonstrate the utility of qPCR for the differentiation and quantification of different MDV serotypes in feather dander and have significant implications for the routine monitoring of Marek's disease using qPCR assays of dust, for epidemiological modelling of the behaviour and spread of MDVs in chicken populations and for studies into the evolution of virulence in MDV1 in the face of blanket vaccination with imperfect vaccines that ameliorate disease but do not prevent infection and replication of virulent virus.

  18. "Tangible Lights"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tor; Merritt, Timothy; Andersen, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    While there has been much focus on tangible lighting interfaces embedded in physical objects and smartphones as remote control, there has not been sufficient attention on how the expressivity of bodily movement can be used when designing interactions with light. Therefore, we investigate interact...... knowledge from the tangible world. Tangible Lights has been subject to initial evaluations.......While there has been much focus on tangible lighting interfaces embedded in physical objects and smartphones as remote control, there has not been sufficient attention on how the expressivity of bodily movement can be used when designing interactions with light. Therefore, we investigate...... interaction with lighting technology beyond the smartphone and physical controllers. We examine the usefulness of the in-air gestural interaction style for lighting control. We bring forward "Tangible Lights", which serves as a novel interface for in-air interaction with lighting, drawing on existing...

  19. Neural net based determination of generator-shedding requirements in electric power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M. (Electrical Engineering Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Sobajic, D.J.; Pao, Y.-H. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Computer Engineering and Science AI WARE Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This paper presents an application of artificial neural networks (ANN) in support of a decision-making process by power system operators directed towards the fast stabilisation of multi-machine systems. The proposed approach considers generator shedding as the most effective discrete supplementary control for improving the dynamic performance of faulted power systems and preventing instabilities. The sensitivity of the transient energy function (TEF) with respect to changes in the amount of dropped generation is used during the training phase of ANNs to assess the critical amount of generator shedding required to prevent the loss of synchronism. The learning capabilities of neural nets are used to establish complex mappings between fault information and the amount of generation to be shed, suggesting it as the control signal to the power system operator. (author)

  20. Herpes Simplex [corrected] Virus Type 2 Shedding From Male Circumcision Wounds in Rakai, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Mary K; Kigozi, Godfrey; Gray, Ronald H; Armour, Benjamin; Manucci, Jordyn; Serwadda, David; Redd, Andrew D; Nalugoda, Fred; Patel, Eshan U; Wawer, Maria J; Quinn, Thomas C; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2015-11-15

    A prospective observational study of 176 men coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was conducted to assess whether their sexual partners may be at an increased risk of HSV-2 from male circumcision (MC) wounds. Preoperative and weekly penile lavage samples were tested for penile HSV-2 shedding. Prevalence risk ratios (PRRs) were estimated using Poisson regression. Detectable penile HSV-2 shedding was present in 9.7% of men (17 of 176) before MC, compared with 12.9% (22 of 170) at 1 week (PRR, 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], .74-2.38) and 14.8% (23 of 155) at 2 weeks (PRR, 1.50; 95% CI, .86-2.62) after MC. HSV-2 shedding was lower among men with healed MC wounds (adjusted PRR, 0.62; 95% CI, .35-1.08). Men undergoing MC should be counseled on sexual abstinence and condom use.

  1. Dynamic Analysis of Overhead Power Lines after Ice-Shedding Using Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murín, Justín; Hrabovský, Juraj; Gogola, Roman; Janíček, František

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the analysis of ice-shedding from ACSR conductors to its swing up height and vibration using Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented. For the numerical simulations the effective material properties of the ACSR conductor are calculated using the homogenisation method. Numerical analysis concerning vibration of one and triple-bundle conductors with icing for a whole range or on their certain parts are performed. The impact of ice-shedding to the mechanical tension in the conductors at the points of attachment is investigated and evaluated. Identification of the impact of ice-shedding from the ACSR conductors on its mechanical state may contribute to increasing the safety and quality of an electrical transmission system.

  2. Exploring the mechanisms of weight loss in the SHED-IT intervention for overweight men: a mediation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Clare E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical mediation analysis can be used to improve the design of obesity prevention and treatment programs by identifying the possible mechanisms through which an intervention achieved its effects. The aim of this study was to identify mediators of weight loss in an Internet-based weight-loss program specifically designed for overweight men. Methods The Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT program was a 3-month randomized controlled trial (Internet-based intervention group vs information only control group that was implemented in 2007 with baseline and 6-month follow-up assessment of weight, physical activity and dietary behaviors. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol mediation analyses were conducted using a product-of-coefficients test. Results Participants (N = 65 were overweight and obese male academic (n = 10 and non-academic (n = 27 staff and students (n = 28 from the University of Newcastle, Australia. Mean (SD age = 35.9 (11.1 years and mean (SD BMI = 30.6 (2.8. In the intention-to-treat analysis, both groups lost weight, but relative to the control group, the intervention did not have a statistically significant 'total effect' on weight, τ = -.507, p = .716 (95% CI = -3.277 to 2.263. In the per-protocol analysis, the intervention had a statistically significant 'total effect' on weight, τ = -4.487, p Conclusion Few studies have examined the mediators of weight loss in obesity treatment interventions. While none of the hypothesized mediators satisfied the criteria for mediation in the current study, there was some evidence to suggest that overweight men in the SHED-IT intervention reduced their fat intake over the study period. Future obesity treatment and prevention programs should explore behavioral mediators of weight loss using appropriate statistical methods. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ANZCTRN12607000481471.

  3. Assessment of Chlamydia psittaci Shedding and Environmental Contamination as Potential Sources of Worker Exposure throughout the Mule Duck Breeding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulin, V; Bernard, P; Vorimore, F; Aaziz, R; Cléva, D; Robineau, J; Durand, B; Angelis, L; Siarkou, V I; Laroucau, K

    2015-12-28

    Chlamydia psittaci is an obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for avian chlamydiosis, otherwise known as psittacosis, a zoonotic disease that may lead to severe atypical pneumonia. This study was conducted on seven mule duck flocks harboring asymptomatic birds to explore the circulation and persistence of C. psittaci during the entire breeding process and assess the potential sources of worker exposure. Cloacal swabs and air samples were taken on each occasion requiring humans to handle the birds. In parallel, environmental samples, including dust, water, and soil, were collected. Specific real-time PCR analyses revealed the presence of C. psittaci in all flocks but with three different shedding patterns involving ducks about the age of 4, 8, and 12 weeks with heavy, moderate, and low excretion levels, respectively. Air samples were only positive in flocks harboring heavy shedders. Dust in flocks with heavy or moderate shedders carried chlamydial loads strongly associated with the loads detected in avian and soil samples. Environmental contamination, significantly correlated with shedding dynamics, was considered to be the most probable source of exposure. The high prevalence of bacteriophage Chp1 in all flocks, mostly jointly present with chlamydia, suggests an important factor in C. psittaci persistence, thus creating a greater risk for humans. A survey conducted in these flocks regarding farming practices and activities showed that disinfection seems to be the most promising practice for reducing C. psittaci prevalence in ducks and that the place and the duration of action during operations seem to be potential risk factors. Strict adherence to good practices is strongly recommended.

  4. Shedding of foodborne pathogens by Caenorhabditis elegans in compost-amended and unamended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gary L; Kenney, Stephen J; Millner, Patricia D; Beuchat, Larry R; Williams, Phillip L

    2006-04-01

    A study was done to characterize the shedding of foodborne pathogenic bacteria by Caenorhabditis elegans, evaluate the persistence of worm populations cocultured with foodborne pathogens, and determine if C. elegans disperses ingested pathogens in soil as a result of shedding. Escherichia. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serotype Poona, and Listeria monocytogenes, as well as E. coli OP50, a non-pathogenic strain, were studied. Synchronous populations of C. elegans were fed for 24 h on confluent lawns of nalidixic acid-adapted bacteria. C. elegans shed viable cells of ingested bacteria on tryptic soy agar supplemented with nalidixic acid (50 microg ml(-1)) (TSAN) throughout a 5-h post-feeding period. C. elegans persisted for up to 10 days by feeding on bacteria that had been shed and grew on TSAN. Eggs harvested from C. elegans cultured on shed foodborne pathogens had the same level of viability as those collected from C. elegans grown on shed E. coli OP50. After 6-7 days, 78%, 64%, 64%, and 76% of eggs laid by C. elegans that had fed on E. coli O157:H7, S. Poona, L. monocytogenes, and E. coli OP50, respectively, were viable. Worms fed on E. coli O157:H7 were inoculated into soil and soil amended with turkey manure compost. Populations of C. elegans persisted in compost-amended soil for at least 7 days but declined in unamended soil. E. coli O157:H7 was detected at 4 and 6 days post inoculation in compost-amended and unamended soil, and in unamended soil inoculated with E. coli OP50. Populations of E. coli O157:H7 in soil amended with turkey manure compost were significantly(alpha = 0.05) higher than those in unamended soil. Results indicate that C. elegans can act as a vector to disperse foodborne pathogens in soil, potentially resulting in increased risk of contaminating the surface of pre-harvest fruits and vegetables.

  5. Application of active power sensitivity to frequency and voltage variations on load shedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girgis, Adly A. [Clemson University, 303 Riggs Hall, Clemson, SC 29634-0915 (United States); Mathure, Shruti [ITC Holdings, MI (United States)

    2010-03-15

    The occurrence of a large disturbance in a power system can lead to a decline in the system frequency and bus voltages due to a real and reactive power deficiency or due to the formation of islands with generation-load imbalance. Load shedding is an emergency control action that can prevent a blackout in the power system by relieving the overload in some parts of the system. This paper shows that rate of change of frequency can be utilized to determine the magnitude of generation-load imbalance, while the rate of change of voltage with respect to active power can be utilized to identify the sensitive bus for load shedding. The frequency, voltages and their rate of change can be obtained by means of measurements in real-time from various devices such as digital recorders or phasor measurement units or these parameters can be estimated from the voltage data by other means such as an optimal estimation method like Kalman filtering. The rate of change of system frequency, along with the equivalent system inertia may be used to estimate the magnitude of the disturbance prior to each load shedding step. The buses with a higher rate of change of voltage may be identified as the critical ones for load shedding and load can be first shed at these buses, depending on the change in the power flow at each bus. This application is tested on the IEEE 30 bus system and the preliminary results demonstrate that it is feasible to be used in load shedding to restore system voltage and frequency. (author)

  6. N-glycosylation is required for matriptase-2 autoactivation and ectodomain shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiang; Yang, Jianfeng; Feng, Ping; Zuo, Bin; Dong, Ningzheng; Wu, Qingyu; He, Yang

    2014-07-11

    Matriptase-2 is a hepatic membrane serine protease that regulates iron homeostasis. Defects in matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency anemia. In cells, matriptase-2 is synthesized as a zymogen. To date, how matriptase-2 expression and activation are regulated remains poorly understood. Here we expressed human matriptase-2 in HEK293 and hepatic BEL-7402, SMMC-7721, and QGY-7703 cells. By labeling cell surface proteins and Western analysis, we examined matriptase-2 cell surface expression, zymogen activation, and ectodomain shedding. Our results show that matriptase-2 was activated on the cell surface but not intracellularly. Activated matriptase-2 underwent ectodomain shedding, producing soluble fragments in the conditioned medium. By testing inactive mutants, R576A and S762A, we found that matriptase-2 activation and shedding were mediated by its own catalytic activity and that the one-chain form of matriptase-2 had little activity in ectodomain shedding. We made additional matriptase-2 mutants, N136Q, N184Q, N216Q, N338Q, N433Q, N453Q, and N518Q, in which each of the predicted N-glycosylation sites was mutated. All of these mutants were expressed on the cell surface. However, mutants N216Q, N453Q, and N518Q, but not the other mutants, had impaired zymogen activation and ectodomain shedding. Our results indicate that N-glycans at specific sites are critical for matriptase-2 activation. Together, these data provide new insights into the cell surface expression, zymogen activation, and ectodomain shedding of matriptase-2.

  7. Light Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Light Robotics - Structure-Mediated Nanobiophotonics covers the latest means of sculpting of both light and matter for achieving bioprobing and manipulation at the smallest scales. The synergy between photonics, nanotechnology and biotechnology spans the rapidly growing field of nanobiophotonics...

  8. Suppression of vortex-shedding noise via derivative-free shape optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison L.; Wang, Meng; Dennis, J. E.; Moin, Parviz

    2004-10-01

    In this Letter we describe the application of a derivative-free optimization technique, the surrogate management framework (SMF), for designing the shape of an airfoil trailing edge which minimizes the noise of vortex shedding. Constraints on lift and drag are enforced within SMF using a filter. Several optimal shapes have been identified for the case of laminar vortex shedding with reasonable computational cost using several shape parameters, and results show a significant reduction in acoustic power. Physical mechanisms for noise reduction are discussed.

  9. Underfrequency Load Shedding for an Islanded Distribution System With Distributed Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahat, Pukar; Chen, Zhe; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Significant penetration of distributed generation in many distribution systems has opened an option of operating distribution systems in island mode for economical and technical reasons. However, balancing frequency of the islanded system is still an issue to be solved, especially when the demand...... exceeds the generation in the power island. This paper presents a strategy to shed an optimal number of loads in the island to stabilize the frequency. The load shedding strategy is based on frequency information, rate of change of frequency, customers' willingness to pay, and loads histories. Different...

  10. Effect of Map-vaccination in ewes on body condition score, weight and Map-shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttner, Klim; Krämer, Ulla; Kleist, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) in sheep receives growing attention worldwide, particularly in countries with national Map control strategies. A field study was conducted, investigating the effect of GUDAIR on body condition, weight and Map-shedding in a professionally managed but largely Map-affected suffolk flock prior and after vaccination. For this, 80 ewes out of 1000 animals were randomly sampled. In the univariate analysis body condition scores of ewes twelve months after vaccination improved significantly compared to those sampled prior to vaccination. At the same time the rate of ewes shedding Map was reduced by 37%.

  11. Injures onomasti et public : éléments pour une analyse interactionnelle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Saetta Cottone

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Cet article se propose de mettre en lumière les dynamiques interactionnelles mises en œuvre par la pratique comique de l’onomasti kômôidein, à travers le recours à certaines instruments théoriques fournis par la socio-linguistique (analyse interactionnelle et conversationnelle. En soulignant l’analogie existante entre les injures que les acteurs adressent contre des citoyens réels appelés par leur nom et la calomnie, la diabolè,  il propose de nuancer l’opposition, qui domine la critique aristophanienne, entre les interprétations « ritualistes » et les interprétations « politiques » de ce phénomène dramatique.This article aims to shed light on the interactional dynamics created by the comic practice of onomasti kômôidein, making use of some theoretical tools provided by sociolinguistics (interactional and conversational analysis in particular. By illuminating the analogy that exists between the insults aimed by actors at actual citizens called by their real names on the one hand, and slander (diabolè on the other hand, this paper seeks to give nuance to an opposition which dominates Aristophanic criticism: between "ritualist" and "political" interpretations of the dramatic phenomenon in question.

  12. Analyses of domains and domain fusions in human proto-oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Ping

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the constituent domains of oncogenes, their origins and their fusions may shed new light about the initiation and the development of cancers. Results We have developed a computational pipeline for identification of functional domains of human genes, prediction of the origins of these domains and their major fusion events during evolution through integration of existing and new tools of our own. An application of the pipeline to 124 well-characterized human oncogenes has led to the identification of a collection of domains and domain pairs that occur substantially more frequently in oncogenes than in human genes on average. Most of these enriched domains and domain pairs are related to tyrosine kinase activities. In addition, our analyses indicate that a substantial portion of the domain-fusion events of oncogenes took place in metazoans during evolution. Conclusion We expect that the computational pipeline for domain identification, domain origin and domain fusion prediction will prove to be useful for studying other groups of genes.

  13. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative description of laser beam characteristics is important for process implementation and optimisation. In particular, a need for quantitative characterisation of beam diameter was identified when using fibre lasers for micro manufacturing. Here the beam diameter limits...... the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...

  14. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    the investigations of lighting scenarios carried out in two test installations: White Cube and White Box. The test installations are discussed as large-scale experiential instruments. In these test installations we examine what could potentially occur when light using LED technology is integrated and distributed...... to be static, and no longer acts as a kind of spatial constancy maintaining stability and order? Moreover, what new potentials open in lighting design? This book is one of four books that is published in connection with the research project entitled LED Lighting; Interdisciplinary LED Lighting Research...

  15. Shedding Light on the Eccentricity Valley: Gap Heating and Eccentricity Excitation of Giant Planets in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang, David; Cumming, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We show that the first order (non co-orbital) corotation torques are significantly modified by entropy gradients in a non-barotropic protoplanetary disk. Such non-barotropic torques can dramatically alter the balance that, for barotropic cases, results in the net eccentricity damping for giant gap-clearing planets embedded in the disk. We demonstrate that stellar illumination can heat the gap enough for the planet's orbital eccentricity to instead be excited. We also discuss the "Eccentricity Valley" noted in the known exoplanet population, where low-metallicity stars have a deficit of eccentric planets between $\\sim 0.1$ and $\\sim 1$ AU compared to metal-rich systems (Dawson & Murray-Clay 2013). We show that this feature in the planet distribution may be due to the self-shadowing of the disk by a rim located at the dust sublimation radius $\\sim 0.1$ AU, which is known to exist for several T Tauri systems. In the shadowed region between $\\sim 0.1$ and $\\sim 1$ AU lack of gap insolation allows disk interac...

  16. Shedding Light on the Roots of Dissatisfaction with Health Care Services in the State of Qatar An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with health care performance is an important source of information about health system quality as perceived by the public. It has long term negative impacts on: *Relationship between health care users and health care providers *Health related behaviors *Health outcomes Fund by SESRI and the Supreme Council of Health (SCH)

  17. Novel parvoviruses in reptiles and genome sequence of a lizard parvovirus shed light on Dependoparvovirus genus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pénzes, Judit J; Pham, Hanh T; Benkö, Mária; Tijssen, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Here, we report the detection and partial genome characterization of two novel reptilian parvoviruses derived from a short-tailed pygmy chameleon (Rampholeon brevicaudatus) and a corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) along with the complete genome analysis of the first lizard parvovirus, obtained from four bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). Both homology searches and phylogenetic tree reconstructions demonstrated that all are members of the genus Dependoparvovirus. Even though most dependoparvoviruses replicate efficiently only in co-infections with large DNA viruses, no such agents could be detected in one of the bearded dragon samples, hence the possibility of autonomous replication was explored. The alternative ORF encoding the full assembly activating protein (AAP), typical for the genus, could be obtained from reptilian parvoviruses for the first time, with a structure that appears to be more ancient than that of avian and mammalian parvoviruses. All three viruses were found to harbour short introns as previously observed for snake adeno-associated virus, shorter than that of any non-reptilian dependoparvovirus. According to the phylogenetic calculations based on full non-structural protein (Rep) and AAP sequences, the monophyletic cluster of reptilian parvoviruses seems to be the most basal out of all lineages of genus Dependoparvovirus. The suspected ability for autonomous replication, results of phylogenetic tree reconstruction, intron lengths and the structure of the AAP suggested that a single Squamata origin instead of the earlier assumed diapsid (common avian-reptilian) origin is more likely for the genus Dependoparvovirus of the family Parvoviridae.

  18. A taxonomy-based approach to shed light on the babel of mathematical models for rice simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Confalonieri, Roberto; Bregaglio, Simone; Adam, Myriam; Ruget, Françoise; Li, Tao; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Yin, Xinyou; Zhu, Yan; Boote, Kenneth; Buis, Samuel; Fumoto, Tamon; Gaydon, Donald; Lafarge, Tanguy; Marcaida, Manuel; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Ruane, Alex C.; Singh, Balwinder; Singh, Upendra; Tang, Liang; Tao, Fulu; Fugice, Job; Yoshida, Hiroe; Zhang, Zhao; Wilson, Lloyd T.; Baker, Jeff; Yang, Yubin; Masutomi, Yuji; Wallach, Daniel; Acutis, Marco; Bouman, Bas

    2016-01-01

    For most biophysical domains, differences in model structures are seldom quantified. Here, we used a taxonomy-based approach to characterise thirteen rice models. Classification keys and binary attributes for each key were identified, and models were categorised into five clusters using a binary

  19. EFFECTS OF LOCAL NERVE COOLING ON CONDUCTION IN VAGAL FIBERS SHED LIGHT UPON RESPIRATORY REFLEXES IN THE RABBIT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PATBERG, WR; NIJMEIJER, A; VERSPRILLE, A; ZOCK, JP; ZIJLSTRA, WG; Schut, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    In ten vagus nerves the effect of local cooling on the compound action potential was studied in the temperature range of 34 to 0-degrees-C in spontaneously breathing, anaesthetized rabbits. The mean temperature at which the myelinated (A) fibres were completely blocked, was 10.2 +/- 2.4-degrees-C (m

  20. Effects of local nerve cooling on conduction in vagal fibres shed light upon respiratory reflexes in the rabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.R. Patberg (Wiebe); A. Nijmeijer (Arie); J.K. Schut (Jan); A. Versprille (Adrian); J.P. Zock; W.G. Zijlstra

    1992-01-01

    textabstractIn ten vagus nerves the effect of local cooling on the compound action potential was studied in the temperature range of 34 to 0 °C in spontaneously breathing, anaesthetized rabbits. The mean temperature at which the myelinated (A) fibres were completely blocked, was 10.2±2.4 °C (mean ±

  1. Katoite under pressure: an ab initio investigation of its structural, elastic and vibrational properties sheds light on the phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erba, Alessandro; Navarrete-López, Alejandra M; Lacivita, Valentina; D'Arco, Philippe; Zicovich-Wilson, Claudio M

    2015-01-28

    The evolution under pressures up to 65 GPa of structural, elastic and vibrational properties of the katoite hydrogarnet, Ca3Al2(OH)12, is investigated with an ab initio simulation performed at the B3LYP level of theory, by using all-electron basis sets with the Crystal periodic program. The high-symmetry Ia3d phase of katoite, stable under ambient conditions, is shown to be destabilized, as pressure increases, by interactions involving hydrogen atoms and their neighbors which weaken the hydrogen bonding network of the structure. The corresponding thermodynamical instability is revealed by anomalous deviations from regularity of its elastic constants and by numerous imaginary phonon frequencies, up to 50 GPa. Interestingly, as pressure is further increased above 50 GPa, the Ia3d structure is shown to become stable again (all positive phonon frequencies and regular elastic constants). However, present calculations suggest that, above about 15 GPa and up to at least 65 GPa, a phase of I4[combining macron]3d symmetry (a non-centrosymmetric subgroup of Ia3d) becomes more stable than the Ia3d one, being characterized by strengthened hydrogen bonds. At low-pressures (between about 5 GPa and 15 GPa), both phases show some instabilities (more so for I4[combining macron]3d than for Ia3d), thus suggesting either the existence of a third phase or a possible phase transition of second order.

  2. The velocity width function of galaxies from the 40% ALFALFA survey: shedding light on the CDM overabundance problem

    CERN Document Server

    Papastergis, Emmanouil; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey is a wide-area, extragalactic HI-line survey conducted at the Arecibo Observatory. Sources have so far been extracted over ~3,000 sq.deg of sky (40% of its final area), resulting in the largest HI-selected sample to date. We measure the space density of HI-bearing galaxies as a function of their observed velocity width (uncorrected for inclination) down to w = 20 km/s, a factor of 2 lower than the previous generation HIPASS survey. We confirm previous results that indicate a substantial discrepancy at low widths between the observational distribution and the theoretical one expected in a CDM Universe. In particular, a comparison with synthetic galaxy samples populating state-of-the-art CDM simulations imply a factor of ~8 difference in the abundance of galaxies with w = 50 km/s (increasing to a factor of ~100 when extrapolated to the ALFALFA limit of w = 20 km/s). We furthermore identify possible solutions, including a ~keV WDM scenario and the fact that H...

  3. A taxonomy-based approach to shed light on the babel of mathematical analogies for rice simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    For most biophysical domains, different models are available and the extent to which their structures differ with respect to differences in outputs was never quantified. We use a taxonomy-based approach to address the question with thirteen rice models. Classification keys and binary attributes for ...

  4. A Taxonomy-Based Approach to Shed Light on the Babel of Mathematical Models for Rice Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confalonieri, Roberto; Bregaglio, Simone; Adam, Myriam; Ruget, Francoise; Li, Tao; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Yin, Xinyou; Zhu, Yan; Boote, Kenneth; Buis, Samuel; Ruane, Alex C.

    2016-01-01

    For most biophysical domains, differences in model structures are seldom quantified. Here, we used a taxonomy-based approach to characterise thirteen rice models. Classification keys and binary attributes for each key were identified, and models were categorised into five clusters using a binary similarity measure and the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean. Principal component analysis was performed on model outputs at four sites. Results indicated that (i) differences in structure often resulted in similar predictions and (ii) similar structures can lead to large differences in model outputs. User subjectivity during calibration may have hidden expected relationships between model structure and behaviour. This explanation, if confirmed, highlights the need for shared protocols to reduce the degrees of freedom during calibration, and to limit, in turn, the risk that user subjectivity influences model performance.

  5. Isotopic microanalysis sheds light on the magmatic endmembers feeding volcanic eruptions: The Astroni 6 case study (Campi Flegrei, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arienzo, I.; D'Antonio, M.; Di Renzo, V.; Tonarini, S.; Minolfi, G.; Orsi, G.; Carandente, A.; Belviso, P.; Civetta, L.

    2015-10-01

    Sr-isotopic microanalysis has been performed on selected minerals from the Campi Flegrei caldera, together with Sr and Nd isotopic ratio determinations on bulk mineral and glass fractions. The aim was a better characterization of the chemically homogeneous, but isotopically distinct magmatic components which fed volcanic eruptions of the caldera over the past 5 ka, in order to enhance our knowledge about one of the most dangerous volcanoes on Earth. Information on the involved magmatic endmembers, unobtainable by analyzing the isotopic composition of whole rock samples and bulk mineral fractions, has been acquired through high-precision determination of 87Sr/86Sr on single crystals and microdrilled mineral powders. We focused our investigations on the products emplaced during the Astroni 6 eruption (4.23 cal ka BP), assumed representative of the expected event in case of renewed volcanic activity in the Campi Flegrei caldera. Data on single crystals and microdrilled mineral powders have been compared with Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of bulk mineral fractions from products emplaced during the whole Astroni activity, which included seven distinct eruptions. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of single crystals and microdrilled mineral powders are in the 0.7060 to 0.7076 range, much wider than that of bulk mineral fractions, which range from 0.7066 to 0.7076. Moreover, the Sr isotopic ratios are inversely correlated to 143Nd/144Nd. The new data allow us to better define the magmatic endmembers involved in mingling/mixing processes that occurred prior to/during the Astroni activity. One magmatic endmember, characterized by average 87Sr/86Sr ratio of ~ 0.70750, was quite common in the past 15 ka activity of the Campi Flegrei caldera; the other, as evidenced by the isotopic composition of single feldspar and clinopyroxene crystals, is less enriched in radiogenic Sr (87Sr/86Sr ~ 0.70724). The latter is interpreted to represent a new magmatic component that entered the Campi Flegrei caldera feeding system in the past 5 ka, the previously recognized Astroni 6 component. However, diopside crystals in Astroni 6 are characterized by even lower 87Sr/86Sr, in the range of 0.7060-0.7068 and by the highest 143Nd/144Nd ratios measured in the products of Astroni activity. These diopsides may represent another common magmatic component, as they have been found in most of the Phlegrean Volcanic District products emplaced over the past 75 ka. These diopsides, crystallized in a mantle-derived mafic magma, were entrapped by the Astroni 6 magma during ascent, before it mingled/mixed with the more differentiated and enriched in radiogenic Sr resident magma, thus attaining an intermediate Sr-Nd isotopic fingerprint. These results have an important outcome on the understanding of the volcano behavior, as renewed activity can be triggered by the arrival of fresh magma in the feeding system that would mingle/mix with the resident magma. Such an event may be able to start an unrest phase at the volcano that could last for years or decades, perhaps culminating in a new eruption.

  6. Recently evolved diversity and convergent radiations of rainforest mahoganies (Meliaceae) shed new light on the origins of rainforest hyperdiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, E.J.M.; Clarkson, J.J.; Pennington, T.D.; Chatrou, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    •Tropical rainforest hyperdiversity is often suggested to have evolved over a long time-span (the ‘museum’ model), but there is also evidence for recent rainforest radiations. The mahoganies (Meliaceae) are a prominent plant group in lowland tropical rainforests world-wide but also occur in all othe

  7. Shedding Light on a Pervasive Problem: A Review of Research on Bullying Experiences among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jessica H.; Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Bebko, James M.; Pepler, Debra J.; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by difficulties with social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and the development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. As a result, individuals with ASD are at an increased risk of bullying victimization, compared to typically developing peers. This paper reviews the…

  8. Hindsight Is 20/20: A Case Study of Vision and Reading Issues Sheds Light for Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Kristie B.; Box, Jean A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case study designed to educate students in pre-service teacher education programs about the importance of a comprehensive eye exam. The case study chronicles a family's multi-year search for solutions to their child's reading difficulties. The research supporting the case study explores the connection between vision…

  9. Shedding light on LMA-Dark solar neutrino solution by medium baseline reactor experiments: JUNO and RENO-50

    CERN Document Server

    Bakhti, Pouya

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of Non-Standard neutral current Interactions (NSI) a new solution to solar neutrino anomaly with $\\cos 2\\theta_{12}<0$ appears. We show that this solution can be tested by upcoming intermediate baseline reactor experiments JUNO and RENO-50.

  10. Shedding light on microbial dark matter: a TM6 bacterium as natural endosymbiont of a free-living amoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafont, Vincent; Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Bouchon, Didier; Moulin, Laurent; Héchard, Yann

    2015-12-01

    The TM6 phylum belongs to the so-called microbial dark matter that gathers uncultivated bacteria detected only via DNA sequencing. Recently, the genome sequence of a TM6 bacterium (TM6SC1) has led to suggest that this bacterium would adopt an endosymbiotic life. In the present paper, free-living amoebae bearing a TM6 strain were isolated from a water network. The amoebae were identified as Vermamoeba vermiformis and the presence of a TM6 strain was detected by polymerase chain reaction and microscopy. The partial sequence of its 16S rRNA gene showed this strain to be closely related to the sequenced TM6SC1 strain. These bacteria displayed a pyriform shape and were found within V. vermiformis. Therefore, these bacteria were named Vermiphilus pyriformis. Interactions studies showed that V. pyriformis was highly infectious and that its relation with V. vermiformis was specific and highly stable. Finally, it was found that V. pyriformis inhibited the encystment of V. vermiformis. Overall, this study describes for the first time an endosymbiotic relationship between a TM6 bacterium and a free-living amoeba in the environment. It suggests that other bacteria of the TM6 phylum might also be endosymbiotic bacteria and may be found in other free-living amoebae or other organisms.

  11. Patients with schizophrenia do not preserve automatic grouping when mentally re-grouping figures: shedding light on an ignored difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eGiersch

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Looking at a pair of objects is easy when automatic grouping mechanisms bind these objects together, but visual exploration can also be more flexible. It is possible to mentally ‘re-group’ two objects that are not only separate but belong to different pairs of objects. ‘Re-grouping’ is in conflict with automatic grouping, since it entails a separation of each item from the set it belongs to. This ability appears to be impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Here we check if this impairment is selective, which would suggest a dissociation between grouping and ‘re-grouping’, or if it impacts on usual, automatic grouping, which would call for a better understanding of the interactions between automatic grouping and ‘re-grouping’. Sixteen outpatients with schizophrenia and healthy controls had to identify two identical and contiguous target figures within a display of circles and squares alternating around a fixation point. Eye-tracking was used to check central fixation. The target pair could be located in the same or separate hemifields. Identical figures were grouped by a connector (grouped automatically or not (to be re-grouped. Attention modulation of automatic grouping was tested by manipulating the proportion of connected and unconnected targets, thus prompting subjects to focalize on either connected or unconnected pairs. Both groups were sensitive to automatic grouping in most conditions, but patients were unusually slowed down for connected targets while focalizing on unconnected pairs. In addition, this unusual effect occurred only when target were presented within the same hemifield. Patients and controls differed on this asymmetry between within- and across-hemifield presentation, suggesting that patients with schizophrenia do not re-group figures in the same way as controls do. We discuss possible implications on how ‘re-grouping’ ties in with ongoing, automatic perception in healthy volunteers.

  12. Shedding light on the black hole: the roll-out of broadband access networks by private operators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijnvandraat, M. L.

    2009-01-01

    Several market studies have indicated that the roll-out of broadband has significant economic and social relevance. The investments in broadband infrastructures needed to realise these economic and social benefits are, however, high-risk. This is firstly caused by the fact that the roll-out of acces

  13. Ancient mitochondrial DNA from the northern fringe of the Neolithic farming expansion in Europe sheds light on the dispersion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Helena; Linderholm, Anna; Skoglund, Pontus;

    2015-01-01

    ). If migration was a substantial part of the Neolithization, even the northerly TRB community would display a closer genetic affinity to other farmer populations than to hunter–gatherer populations. We deep-sequenced the mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 from seven farmers (six TRB and one Battle Axe complex...

  14. The medaka mutation tintachina sheds light on the evolution of V-ATPase B subunits in vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Claudia; Maeso, Ignacio; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Martínez-Morales, Juan R.

    2013-11-01

    Vacuolar-type H+ ATPases (V-ATPases) are multimeric protein complexes that play a universal role in the acidification of intracellular compartments in eukaryotic cells. We have isolated the recessive medaka mutation tintachina (tch), which carries an inactivating modification of the conserved glycine residue (G75R) of the proton pump subunit atp6v1Ba/vatB1. Mutant embryos show penetrant pigmentation defects, massive brain apoptosis and lethality before hatching. Strikingly, an equivalent mutation in atp6v1B1 (G78R) has been reported in a family of patients suffering from distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), a hereditary disease that causes metabolic acidosis due to impaired kidney function. This poses the question as to how molecularly identical mutations result in markedly different phenotypes in two vertebrate species. Our work offers an explanation for this phenomenon. We propose that, after successive rounds of whole-genome duplication, the emergence of paralogous copies allowed the divergence of the atp6v1B cis-regulatory control in different vertebrate groups.

  15. Biochemical measurements on single erythroid progenitor cells shed light on the combinatorial regulation of red blood cell production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijia; Akbarian, Vahe; Audet, Julie

    2013-02-02

    Adult bone marrow (BM) erythrocyte colony-forming units (CFU-Es) are important cellular targets for the treatment of anemia and also for the manufacture of red blood cells (RBCs) ex vivo. We obtained quantitative biochemical measurements from single and small numbers of CFU-Es by isolating and analyzing c-Kit(+)CD71(high)Ter119(-) cells from adult mouse BM and this allowed us to identify two mechanisms that can be manipulated to increase RBC production. As expected, maximum RBC output was obtained when CFU-Es were stimulated with a combination of Stem Cell Factor (SCF) and Erythropoietin (EPO) mainly because SCF supports a transient CFU-E expansion and EPO promotes the survival and terminal differentiation of erythroid progenitors. However, we found that one of the main factors limiting the output in RBCs was that EPO induces a downregulation of c-Kit expression which limits the transient expansion of CFU-Es. In the presence of SCF, the EPO-mediated downregulation of c-Kit on CFU-Es is delayed but still significant. Moreover, treatment of CFU-Es with 1-Naphthyl PP1 could partially inhibit the downregulation of c-Kit induced by EPO, suggesting that this process is dependent on a Src family kinase, v-Src and/or c-Fyn. We also found that CFU-E survival and proliferation was dependent on the level of time-integrated extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in these cells, all of which could be significantly increased when SCF and EPO were combined with mouse fetal liver-derived factors. Taken together, these results suggest two novel molecular strategies to increase RBC production and regeneration.

  16. Shedding New Light on the 18th Dynasty Mummies of the Royal Architect Kha and His Spouse Merit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Bianucci

    Full Text Available The mummies of Kha and his wife Merit were found intact in an undisturbed tomb in western Thebes near the ancient workers' village of Deir el-Medina. Previous MDCT (this abbreviation needs spelling out investigations showed that the bodies of Kha and Merit did not undergo classical royal 18th Dynasty artificial mummification, which included removal of the internal organs. It was, therefore, concluded that the retention of the viscera in the body, combined with an absence of canopic jars in the burial chamber, meant the couple underwent a short and shoddy funerary procedure, despite their relative wealth at death. Nevertheless, all internal organs - brain, ocular bulbs/ocular nerves, thoracic and abdominal organs - showed a very good state of preservation, which contradicts the previous interpretation above. In order to better understand the type of mummification used to embalm these bodies, both wrapped mummies were reinvestigated using new generation X-ray imaging and chemical microanalyses Here we provide evidence that both individuals underwent a relatively high quality of mummification, fundamentally contradicting previous understanding. Elucidated "recipes", whose components had anti-bacterial and anti-insecticidal properties, were used to treat their bodies. The time and effort undoubtedly employed to embalm both Kha and Merit and the use of imported costly resins, notably Pistacia, do not support the previously held view that the two individuals were poorly mummified. Despite a lack of evisceration, the approach clearly allowed their in situ preservation as well as affording a fairly successful mummification.

  17. Shedding New Light on the 18th Dynasty Mummies of the Royal Architect Kha and His Spouse Merit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianucci, Raffaella; Habicht, Michael E; Buckley, Stephen; Fletcher, Joann; Seiler, Roger; Öhrström, Lena M; Vassilika, Eleni; Böni, Thomas; Rühli, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    The mummies of Kha and his wife Merit were found intact in an undisturbed tomb in western Thebes near the ancient workers' village of Deir el-Medina. Previous MDCT (this abbreviation needs spelling out) investigations showed that the bodies of Kha and Merit did not undergo classical royal 18th Dynasty artificial mummification, which included removal of the internal organs. It was, therefore, concluded that the retention of the viscera in the body, combined with an absence of canopic jars in the burial chamber, meant the couple underwent a short and shoddy funerary procedure, despite their relative wealth at death. Nevertheless, all internal organs - brain, ocular bulbs/ocular nerves, thoracic and abdominal organs - showed a very good state of preservation, which contradicts the previous interpretation above. In order to better understand the type of mummification used to embalm these bodies, both wrapped mummies were reinvestigated using new generation X-ray imaging and chemical microanalyses Here we provide evidence that both individuals underwent a relatively high quality of mummification, fundamentally contradicting previous understanding. Elucidated "recipes", whose components had anti-bacterial and anti-insecticidal properties, were used to treat their bodies. The time and effort undoubtedly employed to embalm both Kha and Merit and the use of imported costly resins, notably Pistacia, do not support the previously held view that the two individuals were poorly mummified. Despite a lack of evisceration, the approach clearly allowed their in situ preservation as well as affording a fairly successful mummification.

  18. Of glaciers and refugia: a decade of study sheds new light on the phylogeography of northwestern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Aaron B A; Cullingham, Catherine I; Côté, Steeve D; Coltman, David W

    2010-11-01

    Glacial cycles have played a dominant role in shaping the genetic structure and distribution of biota in northwestern North America. The two major ice age refugia of Beringia and the Pacific Northwest were connected by major mountain chains and bordered by the Pacific Ocean. As a result, numerous refugial options were available for the regions taxa during glacial advances. We reviewed the importance of glaciations and refugia in shaping northwestern North America's phylogeographic history. We also tested whether ecological variables were associated with refugial history. The recurrent phylogeographic patterns that emerged were the following: (i) additional complexity, i.e. refugia within refugia, in both Beringia and the Pacific Northwest; and (ii) strong evidence for cryptic refugia in the Alexander Archipelago and Haida Gwaii, the Canadian Arctic and within the ice-sheets. Species with contemporary ranges that covered multiple refugia, or those with high dispersal ability, were significantly more likely to have resided in multiple refugia. Most of the shared phylogeographic patterns can be attributed to multiple refugial locales during the last glacial maximum or major physiographic barriers like rivers and glaciers. However, some of the observed patterns are much older and appear connected to the orogeny of the Cascade-Sierra chain or allopatric differentiation during historic glacial advances. The emergent patterns from this review suggest we should refine the classic Beringian-southern refugial paradigm for northwestern North American biota and highlight the ecological and evolutionary consequences of colonization from multiple refugia.

  19. Characterization of a nuclear pore protein sheds light on the roles and composition of the Toxoplasma gondii nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courjol, Flavie; Mouveaux, Thomas; Lesage, Kevin; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Bonabaud, Maurine; Rohmer, Marine; Slomianny, Christian; Lafont, Franck; Gissot, Mathieu

    2017-01-30

    The nuclear pore is a key structure in eukaryotes regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic transport as well as a wide range of cellular processes. Here, we report the characterization of the first Toxoplasma gondii nuclear pore protein, named TgNup302, which appears to be the orthologue of the mammalian Nup98-96 protein. We produced a conditional knock-down mutant that expresses TgNup302 under the control of an inducible tetracycline-regulated promoter. Under ATc treatment, a substantial decrease of TgNup302 protein in inducible knock-down (iKD) parasites was observed, causing a delay in parasite proliferation. Moreover, the nuclear protein TgENO2 was trapped in the cytoplasm of ATc-treated mutants, suggesting that TgNup302 is involved in nuclear transport. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that TgNup302 is essential for 18S RNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, while global mRNA export remains unchanged. Using an affinity tag purification combined with mass spectrometry, we identified additional components of the nuclear pore complex, including proteins potentially interacting with chromatin. Furthermore, reverse immunoprecipitation confirmed their interaction with TgNup302, and structured illuminated microscopy confirmed the NPC localization of some of the TgNup302-interacting proteins. Intriguingly, facilitates chromatin transcription complex (FACT) components were identified, suggesting the existence of an NPC-chromatin interaction in T. gondii. Identification of TgNup302-interacting proteins also provides the first glimpse at the NPC structure in Apicomplexa, suggesting a structural conservation of the NPC components between distant eukaryotes.

  20. Ecological venomics: How genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics can shed new light on the ecology and evolution of venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagar, Kartik; Morgenstern, David; Reitzel, Adam M; Moran, Yehu

    2016-03-01

    Animal venom is a complex cocktail of bioactive chemicals that traditionally drew interest mostly from biochemists and pharmacologists. However, in recent years the evolutionary and ecological importance of venom is realized as this trait has direct and strong influence on interactions between species. Moreover, venom content can be modulated by environmental factors. Like many other fields of biology, venom research has been revolutionized in recent years by the introduction of systems biology approaches, i.e., genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. The employment of these methods in venom research is known as 'venomics'. In this review we describe the history and recent advancements of venomics and discuss how they are employed in studying venom in general and in particular in the context of evolutionary ecology. We also discuss the pitfalls and challenges of venomics and what the future may hold for this emerging scientific field.

  1. Synchrotron-Based Techniques Shed Light on Mechanisms of Plant Sensitivity and Tolerance to High Manganese in the Root Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant species differ in response to high available manganese (Mn), but the mechanisms of sensitivity and tolerance are poorly understood. In solution culture, greater than or equal to 30 µM Mn decreased the growth of soybean (Glycine max), but white lupin (Lupinus albu...

  2. Cytogenetic data on Ancistrus sp. (Siluriformes, Loricariidae) of the Paraguay River basin (MS) sheds light on intrageneric karyotype diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prizon, Ana Camila; Borin-Carvalho, Luciana Andreia; Bruschi, Daniel Pacheco; Ribeiro, Marcos Otávio; Barbosa, Ligia Magrinelli; Ferreira, Greicy Ellen de Brito; Cius, Andréa; Zawadzki, Claudio Henrique; Portela-Castro, Ana Luiza de Brito

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ancistrus Kner, 1854 is a diverse catfish genus, currently comprising 66 valid species, but karyotype data were recorded for 33 species, although only ten have their taxonomic status defined. Considerable karyotype diversity has been found within this genus, with 2n varying from 34 to 54 and structural variability including heteromorphic sex chromosomes. In many cases, uncertainty on the taxonomic status of the study populations hampers reliable interpretation of the complex chromosomal evolutionary history of the group. This study aims to present the first karyotype data for a population of the Ancistrus sp. collected in Criminoso stream (tributary of the Paraguay River Basin, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil) in which a combination of different chromosomal markers was used and results integrated in broad discussion on karyotype evolution in the genus. The specimens presented 2n=42 with 18m+16sm+8st and a single NOR revealed by silver nitrate and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA probe, located in pair No. 10. Clusters of 5S rDNA were located in the pericentromeric region of three chromosomes: pair No. 1 (metacentric) and one of the homologues of the nucleolar pair No. 10. Heterogeneity in the molecular composition of the heterochromatin was confirmed by the association of C-banding and fluorochrome CMA3/DAPI-staining. Exploring the differential composition of constitutive heterochromatin in Ancistrus may provide an important perspective to understand genome organization and evolution within this group. Our data reinforce the chromosomal diversity present in Ancistrus genus and we discuss the potential sources these variation. The karyotype structure of Ancistrus sp. “Criminoso stream” appears to be consistent with the existence of a new candidate species. PMID:28123683

  3. Wavelet Analyses and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeianu, Cristian C.; Landau, Rubin H.; Paez, Manuel J.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how a modern extension of Fourier analysis known as wavelet analysis is applied to signals containing multiscale information. First, a continuous wavelet transform is used to analyse the spectrum of a nonstationary signal (one whose form changes in time). The spectral analysis of such a signal gives the strength of the signal in each…

  4. Report sensory analyses veal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, M.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    On behalf of a client of Animal Sciences Group, different varieties of veal were analyzed by both instrumental and sensory analyses. The sensory evaluation was performed with a sensory analytical panel in the period of 13th of May and 31st of May, 2005. The three varieties of veal were: young bull,

  5. Contesting Citizenship: Comparative Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Squires, Judith

    2007-01-01

    . Comparative citizenship analyses need to be considered in relation to multipleinequalities and their intersections and to multiple governance and trans-national organisinf. This, in turn, suggests that comparative citizenship analysis needs to consider new spaces in which struggles for equal citizenship occur...

  6. Meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.A.; Luyten, J.W.; Scheerens, J.; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Scheerens, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter results of a research synthesis and quantitative meta-analyses of three facets of time effects in education are presented, namely time at school during regular lesson hours, homework, and extended learning time. The number of studies for these three facets of time that could be used

  7. Polish in the light of grammaticalization theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Hansen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polish in the light of grammaticalization theory The paper is concerned with grammaticalization, a type of language change whereby lexical items, in specifi contexts, come to serve grammatical functions, and grammatical items acquire new grammatical functions. The aim is twofold: to shed light at the main properties of grammaticalization, and to demonstrate its applicability to Polish data. Some prominent examples in Polish are discussed: the grammaticalization of modals, imperative and avertive constructions. The paper closes with a non-exhaustive list of leads for further research into grammaticalization in Polish.

  8. General Relativistic Considerations of the Field Shedding Model of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Popular models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) involve the gravitational collapse of neutron star progenitors to black holes. It has been proposed that the shedding of the strong neutron star magnetic field ($B$) during the collapse is the power source for the radio emission. Previously, these models have utilized the simplicity of the Schwarzschild metric which has the restriction that the magnetic flux is magnetic "hair" that must be shed before final collapse. But, neutron stars have angular momentum and charge and a fully relativistic Kerr Newman solution exists in which $B$ has its source inside of the event horizon. In this letter, we consider the magnetic flux to be shed as a consequence of the electric discharge of a metastable collapsed state of a Kerr Newman black hole. It has also been argued that the shedding model will not operate due to pair creation. By considering the pulsar death line, we find that for a neutron star with $B = 10^{11} - 10^{13}$ G and a long rotation period, $>1$ s this is not a ...

  9. Adaptive Tuning of Frequency Thresholds Using Voltage Drop Data in Decentralized Load Shedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseinzadeh, Bakhtyar; Faria Da Silva, Filipe Miguel; Bak, Claus Leth

    2015-01-01

    Load shedding (LS) is the last firewall and the most expensive control action against power system blackout. In the conventional under frequency LS (UFLS) schemes, the load drop locations are already determined independently of the event location. Furthermore, the frequency thresholds of LS relays...

  10. EPA's SHEDS-multimedia model: children's cumulative pyrethroid exposure estimates and evaluation against NHANES biomarker data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's SHEDS-Multimedia model was applied to enhance the understanding of children's exposures and doses to multiple pyrethroid pesticides, including major contributing chemicals and pathways. This paper presents combined dietary and residential exposure estimates and cum...

  11. Fatigue of threaded rods in cable anchorages due to Vortex shedding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Snijder, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The 'Hovenring' is a bicycle roundabout flyover built as a signature bridge with a central steel pylon carrying a circular bridge deck suspended through stay-cables. Shortly after installation of the bridge, the stay-cables turned out to vibrate in the wind due to vortex shedding. These vibrations h

  12. Salmonella spp. fecal shedding detected by real-time PCR in competing endurance horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, C Langdon; Meier, Chloe A; Magdesian, K Gary; Pusterla, Nicola

    2013-09-01

    Fecal shedding of Salmonella spp. was recently documented in 8% of endurance horses presented to equine referral centers for colic. Previous studies have documented fecal shedding of Salmonella spp. in as few as 0.8% of the general horse population, although horses with colic appear to be at higher risk. Fecal Salmonella spp. shedding before and after endurance horse competitions has not been evaluated. Fecal samples were collected from 204 horses during three separate 100 mile endurance competitions. Following incubation in selenite broth, 289 fecal samples were tested by real-time PCR analysis for Salmonella spp. Only one post-race sample (0.5% tested positive for Salmonella spp. in this study and no pre-race sample was available from this horse. Results suggest that fecal shedding of Salmonella spp. is uncommon in endurance horses during competitions. Further research is needed to confirm and identify the source of Salmonella spp. infection in endurance horses with colic requiring treatment at referral centers.

  13. The Gamma-Ray Burst ToolSHED is Open for Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Timothy W.; Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.

    2004-09-01

    The GRB ToolSHED, a Gamma-Ray Burst SHell for Expeditions in Data-Mining, is now online and available via a web browser to all in the scientific community. The ToolSHED is an online web utility that contains pre-processed burst attributes of the BATSE catalog and a suite of induction-based machine learning and statistical tools for classification and cluster analysis. Users create their own login account and study burst properties within user-defined multi-dimensional parameter spaces. Although new GRB attributes are periodically added to the database for user selection, the ToolSHED has a feature that allows users to upload their own burst attributes (e.g. spectral parameters, etc.) so that additional parameter spaces can be explored. A data visualization feature using GNUplot and web-based IDL has also been implemented to provide interactive plotting of user-selected session output. In an era in which GRB observations and attributes are becoming increasingly more complex, a utility such as the GRB ToolSHED may play an important role in deciphering GRB classes and understanding intrinsic burst properties.

  14. Prioritization of pesticides based on daily dietary exposure potential as determined from the SHEDS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major pathway for exposure to many pesticides is through diet. The objectives were to rank pesticides by comparing their calculated daily dietary exposure as determined by EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) to single pesticides for different age groups ...

  15. Optimized Load Shedding Approach for Grid-Connected DC Microgrid Systems under Realistic Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Trigueiro dos Santos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The microgrid system is an answer to the necessity of increasing renewable energy penetration and also works as a bridge for the future smart grid. Considering the microgrid system applied to commercial building equipped with photovoltaic sources, the usage of a DC microgrid architecture can improve the efficiency of the system, while ensuring robustness and reducing the overall energy cost. Given the power grid stress and the intermittency of the DC microgrid power production, backup power provision and load shedding operations may occur to stabilize the DC bus voltage. Based on the knapsack problem formulation, this paper presents a realistic optimization approach to shedding a building’s appliances, considering the priority of each appliance, and also considering a minimum amount of load that must be attended. The problem is solved by mixed integer linear programming and the CPLEX solver. The proposed architecture ensures critical load supply and voltage stabilization through the real-time operation of the operational algorithm allowing the load shedding optimization approach to be applied without compromising the robustness of the system. The results obtained by simulation prove that the DC microgrid is able to supply the building power network by applying the load shedding optimization program to overcome, mainly, the renewable energy intermittency.

  16. INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF ASTEROIDS HAVING SURFACE SHEDDING DUE TO ROTATIONAL INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi [Research Associate, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder (United States); Sánchez, Diego Paul [Senior Research Associate, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder (United States); Scheeres, Daniel J., E-mail: masatoshi.hirabayashi@colorado.edu [Richard Seebass Chair, Professor, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Surface shedding of an asteroid is a failure mode where surface materials fly off due to strong centrifugal forces beyond the critical spin period, while the internal structure does not deform significantly. This paper proposes a possible structure of an asteroid interior that leads to surface shedding due to rapid rotation rates. A rubble pile asteroid is modeled as a spheroid composed of a surface shell and a concentric internal core, the entire assembly called the test body. The test body is assumed to be uniformly rotating around a constant rotation axis. We also assume that while the bulk density and the friction angle are constant, the cohesion of the surface shell is different from that of the internal core. First, developing an analytical model based on limit analysis, we provide the upper and lower bounds for the actual surface shedding condition. Second, we use a Soft-sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) to study dynamical deformation of the test body due to a quasi-static spin-up. In this paper we show the consistency of both approaches. Additionally, the SSDEM simulations show that the initial failure always occurs locally and not globally. In addition, as the core becomes larger, the size of lofted components becomes smaller. These results imply that if there is a strong core in a progenitor body, surface shedding is the most likely failure mode.

  17. Emergency Load Shedding Strategy Based on Sensitivity Analysis of Relay Operation Margin against Cascading Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Haishun Sun;

    2012-01-01

    In order to prevent long term voltage instability and induced cascading events, a load shedding strategy based on the sensitivity of relay operation margin to load powers is discussed and proposed in this paper. The operation margin of critical impedance backup relay is defined to identify the ru...... into account to compensate load shedding amount calculation. And the multi-agent technology is applied for the whole strategy implementation. A test system is built in real time digital simulator (RTDS) and has demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.......In order to prevent long term voltage instability and induced cascading events, a load shedding strategy based on the sensitivity of relay operation margin to load powers is discussed and proposed in this paper. The operation margin of critical impedance backup relay is defined to identify...... the runtime emergent states of related system component. Based on sensitivity analysis between the relay operation margin and power system state variables, an optimal load shedding strategy is applied to adjust the emergent states timely before the unwanted relay operation. Load dynamics is also taken...

  18. Flavobacterium psychrophilum, invasion into and shedding by rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madetoja, J.; Nyman, P.; Wiklund, T.

    2000-01-01

    a long time period compared to the numbers of cells shed by Live fish. The results emphasise the importance of removing dead and moribund fish from rearing tanks in order to diminish the infection pressure against uninfected fish in commercial fish farms. In immunohistochemical examinations of organs...

  19. Dynamic Response of Rub Caused by a Shedding Annular Component Happening in a Steam Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rub caused by a shedding annular component is a severe fault happening in a steam turbine, which could result in a long-term wearing effect on the shaft. The shafting abrasion defects shortened the service life and damaged the unit. To identify the fault in time, the dynamic response of rub caused by a shedding annular component was studied as follows: (I a rotor-bearing model was established based on the structural features of certain steam turbines; node-to-node contact constraint and penalty method were utilized to analyze the impact and friction; (II dynamic response of the rotor-bearing system and the shedding component was simulated with the development of rub after the component was dropping; (III fault features were extracted from the vibration near the bearing position by time-domain and frequency-domain analysis. The results indicate that the shedding annular component would not only rotate pivoting its axis but also revolve around the shaft after a period of time. Under the excitation of the contact force, the peak-peak vibration fluctuates greatly. The frequency spectrum contains two main components, that is, the working rotating frequency and revolving frequency. The same phenomenon was observed from the historical data in the field.

  20. A probiotic is ineffective in reducing Salmonela shedding in orally-inoculated weaned pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella shedding proximal to harvest is a significant issue for the swine and meat industries. Probiotic supplementation prior to transport, lairage, and harvest has been suggested as a possible intervention to reduce Salmonella carcass contamination. In this study, a bolus dose of probiotic pr...

  1. Power System Stability Using Decentralized Under Frequency and Voltage Load Shedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseinzadeh, Bakhtyar; Silva, Filipe Faria Da; Bak, Claus Leth

    2014-01-01

    of disturbance location. In this paper, to aim adaptive performance of the relays, the amount of load shed in each stage is determined proportional to the measured Rate of Change of Frequency (ROCOF). In order to localize the LS scheme close to the disturbance place, this scheme utilizes the voltage drop...

  2. The Time-Varying Characteristics of Overhead Electric Transmission Lines Considering the Induced-Ice-Shedding Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunpeng Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More ice deposits accreted on conductors or ground wires may be shed off when an overhead electric transmission line is responding to shocks initiated by natural ice shedding. Ice shedding causes the global mass, stiffness, and damping of the tower-line system to vary with time, and the successive shedding effect beyond a trigger event has not been taken into account in previous studies due to the lack of an adequate ice detachment model. In this paper, the ice shedding effect induced by initial shocks was considered in finite element (FE analysis. An ice detachment criterion, in the way of user-defined element rupture subroutine, was implemented into the main commercial nonlinear FE program ADINA, making it possible to consider the induced-ice-shedding effect numerically. The incremental FE form of the system’s governing equations of motion is presented where the variations in the mass and stiffness matrices of the system are taken into consideration. Taking a transmission line section following natural ice shedding as a case study, the results indicate that neglecting successive ice shedding underestimates the adverse influence of natural ice shedding. The proposed method can help to improve the design and evaluation of transmission lines in cold regions and to ensure their mechanical security.

  3. Poliovirus shedding after the first and second doses of trivalent polio vaccines in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viramitha K. Rusmil

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The trivalent oral polio vaccine (tOPV produced by Bio Farma consists of three live, attenuated poliovirus serotypes (1, 2, and 3. The tOPV stimulates the formation of secretory IgA (sIgA on the intestinal wall and lumen. The existence of sIgA is considered giving immunity in the intestines, it could prevent the spread of viral replication and thus inhibit the transmission of the polio virus. Objective To determine the differences in shedding after each of the first two tOPV immunizations in newborns. Methods This one-way repeated measure study was conducted in newborns from three primary health centers in Bandung, West Java. After administering tOPV to newborns, we assessed the shedding of poliovirus in their stool specimens at 30 days after the first dose and 7 days after the second dose. Data was analyzed using McNemar test with 95% confidence intervals (CI to differentiate the shedding of poliovirus after the first and second doses. Results Of 150 children, 128 subjects completed the study. At 30 days after the first tOPV dose, 26 subjects (20.3% were negative for shedding of poliovirus in stool specimens. Of the 102 subjects who had poliovirus isolated from their stools, the serotypes comprised of polio 1: 10.9%, polio 2: 14.8%, polio 3: 45.3%, polio 1 and 3: 3.1%, polio 2 and 3: 4.7%, and polio 1,2, and 3: 0.8%. At 7 days after the second tOPV dose, there was a significant increase in subjects negative for shedding of poliovirus (78 subjects; 60.9%. Statistical analysis revealed significantly decreased shedding of poliovirus in stool specimens between the first and second doses of tOPV (P<0.05 . Conclusion There is a significantly decreased number of subjects with shedding of poliovirus in stool specimens 7 days after the second tOPV dose than at 30 days after the first tOPV dose

  4. Poliovirus shedding after the first and second doses of trivalent polio vaccines in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viramitha K. Rusmil

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The trivalent oral polio vaccine (tOPV produced by Bio Farma consists of three live, attenuated poliovirus serotypes (1, 2, and 3. The tOPV stimulates the formation of secretory IgA (sIgA on the intestinal wall and lumen. The existence of sIgA is considered giving immunity in the intestines, it could prevent the spread of viral replication and thus inhibit the transmission of the polio virus.Objective To determine the differences in shedding after each of the first two tOPV immunizations in newborns.Methods This one-way repeated measure study was conducted in newborns from three primary health centers in Bandung, West Java. After administering tOPV to newborns, we assessed the shedding of poliovirus in their stool specimens at 30 days after the first dose and 7 days after the second dose. Data was analyzed using McNemar test with 95% confidence intervals (CI to differentiate the shedding of poliovirus after the first and second doses.Results Of 150 children, 128 subjects completed the study. At 30 days after the first tOPV dose, 26 subjects (20.3% were negative for shedding of poliovirus in stool specimens. Of the 102 subjects who had poliovirus isolated from their stools, the serotypes comprised of polio 1: 10.9%, polio 2: 14.8%, polio 3: 45.3%, polio 1 and 3: 3.1%, polio 2 and 3: 4.7%, and polio 1,2, and 3: 0.8%. At 7 days after the second tOPV dose, there was a significant increase in subjects negative for shedding of poliovirus (78 subjects; 60.9%. Statistical analysis revealed significantly decreased shedding of poliovirus in stool specimens between the first and second doses of tOPV (P<0.05 .Conclusion There is a significantly decreased number of subjects with shedding of poliovirus in stool specimens 7 days after the second tOPV dose than at 30 days after the first tOPV dose.

  5. Avian influenza shedding patterns in waterfowl: implications for surveillance, environmental transmission, and disease spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviane Henaux,; Samuel, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the recognized importance of fecal/oral transmission of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) via contaminated wetlands, little is known about the length, quantity, or route of AI virus shed by wild waterfowl. We used published laboratory challenge studies to evaluate the length and quantity of low pathogenic (LP) and highly pathogenic (HP) virus shed via oral and cloacal routes by AI-infected ducks and geese, and how these factors might influence AI epidemiology and virus detection. We used survival analysis to estimate the duration of infection (from virus inoculation to the last day virus was shed) and nonlinear models to evaluate temporal patterns in virus shedding. We found higher mean virus titer and longer median infectious period for LPAI-infected ducks (10–11.5 days in oral and cloacal swabs) than HPAI-infected ducks (5 days) and geese (7.5 days). Based on the median bird infectious dose, we found that environmental contamination is two times higher for LPAI- than HPAI-infectious ducks, which implies that susceptible birds may have a higher probability of infection during LPAI than HPAI outbreaks. Less environmental contamination during the course of infection and previously documented shorter environmental persistence for HPAI than LPAI suggest that the environment is a less favorable reservoir for HPAI. The longer infectious period, higher virus titers, and subclinical infections with LPAI viruses favor the spread of these viruses by migratory birds in comparison to HPAI. Given the lack of detection of HPAI viruses through worldwide surveillance, we suggest monitoring for AI should aim at improving our understanding of AI dynamics (in particular, the role of the environment and immunity) using long-term comprehensive live bird, serologic, and environmental sampling at targeted areas. Our findings on LPAI and HPAI shedding patterns over time provide essential information to parameterize environmental transmission and virus spread in predictive

  6. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial lighting ceases...

  7. Analysing Access Control Specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2009-01-01

    . Recent events have revealed intimate knowledge of surveillance and control systems on the side of the attacker, making it often impossible to deduce the identity of an inside attacker from logged data. In this work we present an approach that analyses the access control configuration to identify the set......When prosecuting crimes, the main question to answer is often who had a motive and the possibility to commit the crime. When investigating cyber crimes, the question of possibility is often hard to answer, as in a networked system almost any location can be accessed from almost anywhere. The most...... of credentials needed to reach a certain location in a system. This knowledge allows to identify a set of (inside) actors who have the possibility to commit an insider attack at that location. This has immediate applications in analysing log files, but also nontechnical applications such as identifying possible...

  8. Possible future HERA analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Geiser, Achim

    2015-01-01

    A variety of possible future analyses of HERA data in the context of the HERA data preservation programme is collected, motivated, and commented. The focus is placed on possible future analyses of the existing $ep$ collider data and their physics scope. Comparisons to the original scope of the HERA programme are made, and cross references to topics also covered by other participants of the workshop are given. This includes topics on QCD, proton structure, diffraction, jets, hadronic final states, heavy flavours, electroweak physics, and the application of related theory and phenomenology topics like NNLO QCD calculations, low-x related models, nonperturbative QCD aspects, and electroweak radiative corrections. Synergies with other collider programmes are also addressed. In summary, the range of physics topics which can still be uniquely covered using the existing data is very broad and of considerable physics interest, often matching the interest of results from colliders currently in operation. Due to well-e...

  9. The Application of Lights-Conversed Polyethylene Film for Agriculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Lanthanum-rhodamine (6G and B) complexes were synthesized by Rheological Phase Reaction Method. Lanthanum-rhodamine (6G and B) complexes doped polyethylene films which have a function of lights-conversion were prepared. The emission and excitation spectra were measured. The experiments of growing seedling and culture were carried out in the shed built with doped and undoped polyethylene films. Lanthanum-rhodamine doped polyethylene films which have a function of lights-conversion can efficiently convert the green light in the sunlight to the red light for photosynthesis of crops, to promote the maturing of crops and raise the yield of crops.

  10. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Chen; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  11. Brassinosteroids, gibberellins and light-mediated signalling are the three-way controls of plant sprouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillais, Yvon; Vert, Grégory

    2012-08-01

    The steroid hormones found in plants, the brassinosteroids, were originally genetically identified about 15 years ago as critical regulators of seedling photomorphogenesis. Two studies now shed light on the molecular mechanisms behind this observation. Brassinosteroids control seedling morphogenesis through direct interaction with master transcriptional regulators downstream of growth-promoting hormones and light signalling.

  12. Possible future HERA analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiser, Achim

    2015-12-15

    A variety of possible future analyses of HERA data in the context of the HERA data preservation programme is collected, motivated, and commented. The focus is placed on possible future analyses of the existing ep collider data and their physics scope. Comparisons to the original scope of the HERA pro- gramme are made, and cross references to topics also covered by other participants of the workshop are given. This includes topics on QCD, proton structure, diffraction, jets, hadronic final states, heavy flavours, electroweak physics, and the application of related theory and phenomenology topics like NNLO QCD calculations, low-x related models, nonperturbative QCD aspects, and electroweak radiative corrections. Synergies with other collider programmes are also addressed. In summary, the range of physics topics which can still be uniquely covered using the existing data is very broad and of considerable physics interest, often matching the interest of results from colliders currently in operation. Due to well-established data and MC sets, calibrations, and analysis procedures the manpower and expertise needed for a particular analysis is often very much smaller than that needed for an ongoing experiment. Since centrally funded manpower to carry out such analyses is not available any longer, this contribution not only targets experienced self-funded experimentalists, but also theorists and master-level students who might wish to carry out such an analysis.

  13. Biomass feedstock analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The overall objectives of the project `Feasibility of electricity production from biomass by pressurized gasification systems` within the EC Research Programme JOULE II were to evaluate the potential of advanced power production systems based on biomass gasification and to study the technical and economic feasibility of these new processes with different type of biomass feed stocks. This report was prepared as part of this R and D project. The objectives of this task were to perform fuel analyses of potential woody and herbaceous biomasses with specific regard to the gasification properties of the selected feed stocks. The analyses of 15 Scandinavian and European biomass feed stock included density, proximate and ultimate analyses, trace compounds, ash composition and fusion behaviour in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The wood-derived fuels, such as whole-tree chips, forest residues, bark and to some extent willow, can be expected to have good gasification properties. Difficulties caused by ash fusion and sintering in straw combustion and gasification are generally known. The ash and alkali metal contents of the European biomasses harvested in Italy resembled those of the Nordic straws, and it is expected that they behave to a great extent as straw in gasification. Any direct relation between the ash fusion behavior (determined according to the standard method) and, for instance, the alkali metal content was not found in the laboratory determinations. A more profound characterisation of the fuels would require gasification experiments in a thermobalance and a PDU (Process development Unit) rig. (orig.) (10 refs.)

  14. Formula for Upstream Pressure, Nozzle Geometry and Frequency Correlation in Shedding/Discharging Cavitation Clouds Determined by Visualization of Submerged Cavitating Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutli, E. A. F.; Nedeljkovic, M. S.

    Visualization of high-submerged cavitating water jet was done by a high-speed camera photography in order to study and understand the jet structure and the behaviour of cloud cavitation within the time and space. The influencing parameters, such as: injection pressure, nozzle diameter and geometry, nozzle direction (convergent and divergent) were experimentally proven to be very significant. Periodical shedding and discharging of cavitation clouds has been also analysed and corresponding frequency was determined by clouds shape analysis. Additionally, dependence of this frequency on injection pressure and nozzle geometry has been analysed and a simple formula of correspondence has been proposed. The formula has been tested on self-measured and literature data.

  15. Rac1 regulates platelet shedding of CD40L in abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwaiz, Rundk; Rahman, Milladur; Zhang, Enming; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) regulates platelet shedding of CD40L in abdominal sepsis. However, the signaling mechanisms controlling sepsis-induced shedding of CD40L from activated platelets remain elusive. Rac1 has been reported to regulate diverse functions in platelets; we hypothesized herein that Rac1 might regulate platelet shedding of CD40L in sepsis. The specific Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (N6-[2-[[4-(diethylamino)-1-methylbutyl] amino]-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl]-2 methyl-4, 6-quinolinediamine trihydrochloride) was administered to mice undergoing cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Levels of CD40L and MMP-9 in plasma, platelets, and neutrophils were determined by use of ELISA, western blot, and confocal microscopy. Platelet depletion abolished the CLP-induced increase in plasma levels of CD40L. Rac1 activity was significantly increased in platelets from septic animals. Administration of NSC23766 abolished the CLP-induced enhancement of soluble CD40L levels in the plasma. Moreover, Rac1 inhibition completely inhibited proteinase-activated receptor-4-induced surface mobilization and secretion of CD40L in isolated platelets. CLP significantly increased plasma levels of MMP-9 and Rac1 activity in neutrophils. Treatment with NSC23766 markedly attenuated MMP-9 levels in the plasma from septic mice. In addition, Rac1 inhibition abolished chemokine-induced secretion of MMP-9 from isolated neutrophils. Finally, platelet shedding of CD40L was significantly reduced in response to stimulation with supernatants from activated MMP-9-deficient neutrophils compared with supernatants from wild-type neutrophils, indicating a direct role of neutrophil-derived MMP-9 in regulating platelet shedding of CD40L. Our novel data suggest that sepsis-induced platelet shedding of CD40L is dependent on Rac1 signaling. Rac1 controls surface mobilization of CD40L on activated platelets and MMP-9 secretion from neutrophils. Thus, our findings indicate that targeting Rac1 signaling might be a

  16. Synthetic sex pheromone attracts the leishmaniasis vector Lutzomyia longipalpis to experimental chicken sheds treated with insecticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brazil Reginaldo P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current strategies for controlling American visceral leishmaniasis (AVL have been unable to prevent the spread of the disease across Brazil. With no effective vaccine and culling of infected dogs an unpopular and unsuccessful alternative, new tools are urgently needed to manage populations of the sand fly vector, Lutzomyia longipalpis Lutz and Neiva (Diptera: Psychodidae. Here, we test two potential strategies for improving L. longipalpis control using the synthetic sand fly pheromone (±-9-methylgermacrene-B: the first in conjunction with spraying of animal houses with insecticide, the second using coloured sticky traps. Results Addition of synthetic pheromone resulted in greater numbers of male and female sand flies being caught and killed at experimental chicken sheds sprayed with insecticide, compared to pheromone-less controls. Furthermore, a ten-fold increase in the amount of sex pheromone released from test sheds increased the number of females attracted and subsequently killed. Treating sheds with insecticide alone resulted in a significant decrease in numbers of males attracted to sheds (compared to pre-spraying levels, and a near significant decrease in numbers of females. However, this effect was reversed through addition of synthetic pheromone at the time of insecticide spraying, leading to an increase in number of flies attracted post-treatment. In field trials of commercially available different coloured sticky traps, yellow traps caught more males than blue traps when placed in chicken sheds. In addition, yellow traps fitted with 10 pheromone lures caught significantly more males than pheromone-less controls. However, while female sand flies showed a preference for both blue and yellow pheromone traps sticky traps over white traps in the laboratory, neither colour caught significant numbers of females in chicken sheds, either with or without pheromone. Conclusions We conclude that synthetic pheromone could

  17. Blown Away: The Shedding and Oscillation of Sessile Drops by Cross Flowing Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew James Barnabas

    For drops sessile on a solid surface, cross flowing air can drive drop oscillation or shedding, based on the balance and interaction of aerodynamic drag force (based on drop size/shape and air speed) and adhesion/capillary forces (based on surface tension and drop size/shape). Better understanding of the above has applications to, e.g., fuel cell flooding, airfoil icing, and visibility in rain. To understand the basic physics, experiments studying individual sessile drops in a low speed wind tunnel were performed in this thesis. Analysis of high speed video gave time resolved profiles and airspeed for shedding. Testing 0.5 mul to 100 mul drops of water and hexadecane on poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS) yielded a master curve describing critical airspeed for shedding for water drops on all surface tested. This curve predicts behavior for new surfaces, and explains experimental results published previously. It also indicates that the higher contact angle leads to easier shedding due to decreased adhesion and increased drag. Developing a novel floating element differential drag sensor gave the first measurements of the microNewton drag force experienced by drops. Forces magnitude is comparable to gravitational shedding from a tilted plate and to simplified models for drop adhesion, with deviations that suggest effects due to the air flow. Fluid properties are seen to have little effect on drag versus airspeed, and decreased adhesion is seen to be more important than increased drag for easing shedding. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number increases slightly with liquid-solid contact angle, and with drop volume. Results suggest that the drop experiences increased drag compared to similarly shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillations aeroelasticly coupling into the otherwise laminar flow. The bulk and surface oscillations of sessile drops in cross flow was also studied, using a full profile analysis

  18. A narrative review of Men's Sheds literature: reducing social isolation and promoting men's health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Cordier, Reinie

    2013-09-01

    Men's Sheds are community-based organisations that typically provide a space for older men to participate in meaningful occupation such as woodwork. Men's Sheds are considered an exemplar for the promotion of men's health and well-being by health and social policy-makers. The objective of this literature review was to determine the state of the science about the potential for Men's Sheds to promote male health and well-being. Between October 2011 and February 2012, we conducted searches of databases, the grey literature and manual searches of websites and reference lists. In total, we found 5 reports and 19 articles about Men's Sheds. The majority of the literature has emanated from Australian academics and is about older men's learning in community contexts. There is a limited body of research literature about Men's Sheds; the literature consists of either descriptive surveys or small qualitative studies. The range of variables that might contribute towards best practice in Men's Sheds has not yet been adequately conceptualised, measured, tested or understood. Future research should be focussed on the health and well-being benefits of Men's Sheds; it needs to incorporate social determinants of health and well-being within the study designs to enable comparison against other health promotion research. Without this research focus, there is a danger that the potential health and well-being benefits of Men's Sheds as supportive and socially inclusive environments for health will not be incorporated into future male health policy and practice.

  19. PKCa and PKCd regulate ADAM17-mediated ectodomain shedding of heparin binding-EGF through separate pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Instrell, Rachael; Rowlands, Christina;

    2011-01-01

    -EGF. We identified PKCa as the key participant in the activation of ADAM17 and suggest that it acts in parallel with a pathway linking PKCd and ERK activity. While PKCa specifically regulated PMA-induced shedding, PKCd and ERK influenced both constitutive and inducible shedding by apparently affecting...

  20. Baking Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin

    2005-01-01

    decisions. Display quality, comfortable navigation and realistic illumination are crucial ingredients here. Light is one of the principal elements in architectural design, so design reviews must enable the architect to judge the quality of his design in this respect. Realistic light simulations, e.g. via...... radiosity algorithms, are no longer the domain of high-end graphic workstations. Today’s off-the-shelf hardware and 3D-software provide the architect with high-quality tools to simulate physically correct light distributions. But the quality and impression of light is hard to judge by looking at still...... practical experiences with global-light-simulations. We share results which we think are helpful to others, and we highlight areas where further research is necessary....

  1. Lightness functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campi, Stefano; Gardner, Richard; Gronchi, Paolo;

    2012-01-01

    Variants of the brightness function of a convex body K in n-dimensional Euclidean are investigated. The Lambertian lightness function L(K; v , w ) gives the total reflected light resulting from illumination by a light source at infinity in the direction w that is visible when looking...... in the direction v . The partial brightness function R( K ; v , w ) gives the area of the projection orthogonal to v of the portion of the surface of K that is both illuminated by a light source from the direction w and visible when looking in the direction v . A class of functions called lightness functions...... is introduced that includes L(K;.) and R(K;.) as special cases. Much of the theory of the brightness function like uniqueness, stability, and the existence and properties of convex bodies of maximal and minimal volume with finitely many function values equal to those of a given convex body, is extended...

  2. AMS analyses at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, E.M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Physics Division

    1998-03-01

    The major use of ANTARES is Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) with {sup 14}C being the most commonly analysed radioisotope - presently about 35 % of the available beam time on ANTARES is used for {sup 14}C measurements. The accelerator measurements are supported by, and dependent on, a strong sample preparation section. The ANTARES AMS facility supports a wide range of investigations into fields such as global climate change, ice cores, oceanography, dendrochronology, anthropology, and classical and Australian archaeology. Described here are some examples of the ways in which AMS has been applied to support research into the archaeology, prehistory and culture of this continent`s indigenous Aboriginal peoples. (author)

  3. [Bright light therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, R; Cambron, L

    2007-01-01

    Bright light therapy is a treatment that emerged in the eighties of the last century. It can be used in different pathologies such as seasonal affective disorders, major depressions, and many disorders of the wake-sleep rhythm, whether they are of primary or secondary origin. Important progress made at the basic neuroscience levels, allows today a sound understanding of the bright light mode of action. Moreover, the main indications are now the subject of consensus reports and meta-analyses which show good levels of evidence-based medicine. Bright light therapy constitutes a first choice indication in seasonal affective disorder. It is also perfectly possible to prescribe bright light therapy in the major depression disorders. It has been demonstrated that the effect size is the same as with antidepressants of reference. It is admitted nowadays that bright light therapy may be at least, an adjunct to pharmacotherapy, in order to accelerate the antidepressant effect onset, or to prolong this effect after withdrawal of the drug. Bright light therapy can also be viewed as an alternative to the pharmacological approach especially when this one is impossible, not tolerated or not accepted by the patient. The contraindications are rare.

  4. GSO based optimization of steady state load shedding in power systems to mitigate blackout during generation contingencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mageshvaran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Load shedding is considered as a last alternative to avoid the cascaded tripping and blackout in power systems during generation contingencies. It is essential to optimize the amount of load to be shed in order to prevent excessive load shedding. To minimize load shedding, this paper proposes the implementation of nature inspired optimization algorithm known as glowworm swarm optimization (GSO algorithm. The optimal solution of steady state load shedding is carried out by squaring the difference between the connected and supplied power (active and reactive. The proposed algorithm is tested on IEEE 14, 30, 57, 118 and Northern Regional Power Grid (NRPG-(India 246 bus test systems. The viability of the proposed method in terms of solution quality and convergence properties is compared with the conventional methods, namely, projected augmented Lagrangian method (PALM, gradient technique based on Kuhn–Tucker theorem (GTBKTT and second order gradient technique (SOGT.

  5. A New Optimal Under Frequency Load Shedding in Micro Grids in Presence of Wind Turbines by using ANFIS Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Amooshahi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of renewable energy have led to the high penetration of Distributed Generators (DG in the distribution systems. Besides the technical, economical and environmental benefits, Microgrids can operate in islanded (autonomous modes. Microgrids need an effective load shedding system for the control of system frequency and voltage profile in an autonomous operation mode. The generation uncertainty of wind turbines in microgrids is analyzed in this paper and a new load shedding criteria has been proposed. Reactive power balance is an important problem with considering short electrical distances in microgrids and considering this basic fact, the proposed load shedding method uses a combination of frequency and voltage criteria. The total load shedding amount is determined by using transient stability analysis. This method is implemented by using ANFIS network in microgrids. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed load shedding method.

  6. A systematic study of modulation of ADAM-mediated ectodomain shedding by site-specific O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goth, Christoffer K; Halim, Adnan; Khetarpal, Sumeet A;

    2015-01-01

    -glycosylation is often found and examples of crosstalk between shedding and O-glycosylation have been reported. Here, we systematically investigated the potential of site-specific O-glycosylation mediated by distinct polypeptide GalNAc-transferase (GalNAc-T) isoforms to coregulate ectodomain shedding mediated...... by the A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM) subfamily of proteases and in particular ADAM17. We analyzed 25 membrane proteins that are known to undergo ADAM17 shedding and where the processing sites included Ser/Thr residues within ± 4 residues that could represent O-glycosites. We used in vitro GalNAc-T enzyme...... and ADAM cleavage assays to demonstrate that shedding of at least 12 of these proteins are potentially coregulated by O-glycosylation. Using TNF-α as an example, we confirmed that shedding mediated by ADAM17 is coregulated by O-glycosylation controlled by the GalNAc-T2 isoform both ex vivo in isogenic cell...

  7. Numerical evaluation of cavitation shedding structure around 3D Hydrofoil: Comparison of PANS, LES and RANS results with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, B.; Peng, X. X.; Long, X. P.; Luo, X. W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Results of cavitating turbulent flow simulation around a twisted hydrofoil were presented in the paper using the Partially-Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method (Ji et al. 2013a), Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) (Ji et al. 2013b) and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The results are compared with available experimental data (Foeth 2008). The PANS and LES reasonably reproduce the cavitation shedding patterns around the twisted hydrofoil with primary and secondary shedding, while the RANS model fails to simulate the unsteady cavitation shedding phenomenon and yields an almost steady flow with a constant cavity shape and vapor volume. Besides, it is noted that the predicted shedding vapor cavity by PANS is more turbulent and the shedding vortex is stronger than that by LES, which is more consistent with experimental photos.

  8. Understanding the Greenhouse Effect by Embodiment--Analysing and Using Students' and Scientists' Conceptual Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebert, Kai; Gropengießer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, science education studies have reported that there are very different understandings among students of science regarding the key aspects of climate change. We used the cognitive linguistic framework of experientialism to shed new light on this valuable pool of studies to identify the conceptual resources of understanding…

  9. LIGHT*HOUSE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjamin; Madsen, Jesper V;

    Med udgangspunkt i det konkrete byggeprojekt Light*house, der skal opføres på Århus havn, er der i projektet foretaget en række analyser til bestemmelse af de geotekniske egenskaber for den fede tertiære ler fra søvindmergel-formationen, som findes på lokaliteten til stor dybde. Søvindmerglens...

  10. Oral shedding of Marburg virus in experimentally infected Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amman, Brian R; Jones, Megan E B; Sealy, Tara K; Uebelhoer, Luke S; Schuh, Amy J; Bird, Brian H; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2015-01-01

    Marburg virus (Marburg marburgvirus; MARV) causes sporadic outbreaks of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF) in Africa. The Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) has been identified as a natural reservoir based most-recently on the repeated isolation of MARV directly from bats caught at two locations in southwestern Uganda where miners and tourists separately contracted MHF from 2007-08. Despite learning much about the ecology of MARV through extensive field investigations, there remained unanswered questions such as determining the primary routes of virus shedding and the severity of disease, if any, caused by MARV in infected bats. To answer these questions and others, we experimentally infected captive-bred R. aegyptiacus with MARV under high (biosafety level 4) containment. These experiments have shown infection profiles consistent with R. aegyptiacus being a bona fide natural reservoir host for MARV and demonstrated routes of viral shedding capable of infecting humans and other animals.

  11. A Policy Switching Approach to Consolidating Load Shedding and Islanding Protection Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, Rich; Fern, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there have been many improvements in the reliability of critical infrastructure systems. Despite these improvements, the power systems industry has seen relatively small advances in this regard. For instance, power quality deficiencies, a high number of localized contingencies, and large cascading outages are still too widespread. Though progress has been made in improving generation, transmission, and distribution infrastructure, remedial action schemes (RAS) remain non-standardized and are often not uniformly implemented across different utilities, ISOs, and RTOs. Traditionally, load shedding and islanding have been successful protection measures in restraining propagation of contingencies and large cascading outages. This paper proposes a novel, algorithmic approach to selecting RAS policies to optimize the operation of the power network during and after a contingency. Specifically, we use policy-switching to consolidate traditional load shedding and islanding schemes. In order to model and...

  12. Cessation of feline calicivirus shedding coincident with resolution of chronic gingivostomatitis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addie, D D; Radford, A; Yam, P S; Taylor, D J

    2003-04-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) shedding and oral bacterial flora were monitored over a period of 22 months in a case of feline gingivostomatitis (FGS). The cat was treated daily with 50 mg thalidomide capsules by mouth, and 200 mg lactoferrin powder was applied directly to the lesions. Clinical signs began to resolve after 11 months when, in addition to treatment, the diet had been changed to an additive-free cat food supplemented with antioxidant vitamins A, D3 and E. Resolution of clinical signs of FGS coincided with the cessation of FCV shedding, and this is the first report documenting such an association. Which part of the treatment, if any, contributed to the cure requires further investigation.

  13. On the origins of vortex shedding in two-dimensional incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, M. E.; Cassel, K. W.

    2016-12-01

    An exegesis of a novel mechanism leading to vortex splitting and subsequent shedding that is valid for two-dimensional incompressible, inviscid or viscous, and external or internal or wall-bounded flows, is detailed in this research. The mechanism, termed the vortex shedding mechanism (VSM) is simple and intuitive, requiring only two coincident conditions in the flow: (1) the existence of a location with zero momentum and (2) the presence of a net force having a positive divergence. Numerical solutions of several model problems illustrate causality of the VSM. Moreover, the VSM criteria is proved to be a necessary and sufficient condition for a vortex splitting event in any two-dimensional, incompressible flow. The VSM is shown to exist in several canonical problems including the external flow past a circular cylinder. Suppression of the von Kármán vortex street is demonstrated for Reynolds numbers of 100 and 400 by mitigating the VSM.

  14. Further validation of the hybrid particle-mesh method for vortex shedding flow simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Seung-Jae

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is the continuation of a numerical study on vortex shedding from a blunt trailing-edge of a hydrofoil. In our previous work (Lee et al., 2015, numerical schemes for efficient computations were successfully implemented; i.e. multiple domains, the approximation of domain boundary conditions using cubic spline functions, and particle-based domain decomposition for better load balancing. In this study, numerical results through a hybrid particle-mesh method which adopts the Vortex-In-Cell (VIC method and the Brinkman penalization model are further rigorously validated through comparison to experimental data at the Reynolds number of 2 × 106. The effects of changes in numerical parameters are also explored herein. We find that the present numerical method enables us to reasonably simulate vortex shedding phenomenon, as well as turbulent wakes of a hydrofoil.

  15. Frequent Zika Virus Sexual Transmission and Prolonged Viral RNA Shedding in an Immunodeficient Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha K. Duggal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Circulation of Zika virus (ZIKV was first identified in the Western hemisphere in late 2014. Primarily transmitted through mosquito bite, ZIKV can also be transmitted through sex and from mother to fetus, and maternal ZIKV infection has been associated with fetal malformations. We assessed immunodeficient AG129 mice for their capacity to shed ZIKV in semen and to infect female mice via sexual transmission. Infectious virus was detected in semen between 7 and 21 days post-inoculation, and ZIKV RNA was detected in semen through 58 days post-inoculation. During mating, 73% of infected males transmitted ZIKV to uninfected females, and 50% of females became infected, with evidence of fetal infection in resulting pregnancies. Semen from vasectomized mice contained significantly lower levels of infectious virus, though sexual transmission still occurred. This model provides a platform for studying the kinetics of ZIKV sexual transmission and prolonged RNA shedding also observed in human semen.

  16. Model-based control of vortex shedding at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Simon J.

    2016-10-01

    Model-based feedback control of vortex shedding at low Reynolds numbers is considered. The feedback signal is provided by velocity measurements in the wake, and actuation is achieved using blowing and suction on the cylinder's surface. Using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations and reduced-order modelling techniques, linear models of the wake are formed at Reynolds numbers between 45 and 110. These models are used to design feedback controllers using {H}_∞ loop-shaping. Complete suppression of shedding is demonstrated up to Re = 110—both for a single-sensor arrangement and for a three-sensor arrangement. The robustness of the feedback controllers is also investigated by applying them over a range of off-design Reynolds numbers, and good robustness properties are seen. It is also observed that it becomes increasingly difficult to achieve acceptable control performance—measured in a suitable way—as Reynolds number increases.

  17. Shedding Rates and SeroPrevalence of Brucella melitensis in Lactating Goats of Shahrekord, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Milan, Jalal Sheykh kanluye; Mahzoonieh, Mohamad Reza; Khaksar, Khadijeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis remains a major worldwide zoonosis. Caprine brucellosis is a significant problem for both public health and animal production. Brucella melitensis causes disease in goats, sheep, humans, and occasionally cattle. Transmission is by ingestion or contact with infected materials, vaginal discharge, or milk. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the rate of B. melitensis seropositives and its probable shedding in lactating goats from flocks in Shahrekord district...

  18. Increased Epstein-Barr virus in breast milk occurs with subclinical mastitis and HIV shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanosyan, Armen; Rutagwera, David G; Molès, Jean-Pierre; Bollore, Karine; Peries, Marianne; Kankasa, Chipepo; Mwiya, Mwiya; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Nagot, Nicolas; Van De Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in breast milk and subclinical mastitis (SCM) are both associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) shedding and possibly with postnatal HIV transmission. The objective of this nested case-control study was to investigate the interplay between SCM and EBV replication in breast milk of HIV-infected mothers.The relationships between EBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) shedding, HIV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) level, and SCM were explored in breast milk samples of Zambian mothers participating in the ANRS 12174 trial. Mammary gland inflammation was defined as a breast milk sodium to potassium ratio (Na/K) greater than 0.6 and further subclassified as either "possible SCM" (Na/K ratio 0.6-1.0) or SCM (Na/K ratio ≥ 1.0). Breast milk interleukin 8 (IL-8) was measured as a surrogate marker of mammary gland inflammation.EBV DNA was detected in breast milk samples from 42 out of 83 (51%) participants and was associated with HIV-1 shedding in breast milk (P = 0.006). EBV DNA levels were higher in samples with SCM and "possible SCM" compared to non-SCM breast milk samples (P = 0.06; P = 0.007). An EBV DNA level of >200 copies/mL was independently associated with SCM and "possible SCM" (OR: 2.62; 95%: 1.13-6.10). In patients with SCM, higher EBV replication in the mammary gland was associated with a lower induction of IL-8 (P = 0.013). Resistance to DNase treatment suggests that EBV DNA in lactoserum is encapsidated.SCM and decreased IL-8 responses are associated with an increased EBV shedding in breast milk which may in turn facilitate HIV replication in the mammary gland.

  19. Characterization of the Lassa virus GP1 ectodomain shedding: implications for improved diagnostic platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branco Luis M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a significant requirement for the development and acquisition of reagents that will facilitate effective diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Lassa fever. In this regard, detection of early markers of Lassa virus (LASV infection may improve diagnosis and ultimately successful treatment with antivirals. Characterization of LASV GP1 ectodomain shedding is an important step toward developing sensitive diagnostics to detect circulating levels of this viral glycoprotein in infected patient sera. Results Secretion of GP1 from mammalian cells expressing a native LASV GPC gene was not mediated by proteolytic cleavage, as determined by treatment with a panel of matrix metalloprotease (MMP inhibitors. The shedding of GP1 was also not the result of over-expression of GPC under the control of a strong intron-A containing CMV promoter, as the soluble component could be immunoprecipitated from supernatants of cells expressing low levels of GPC under the control of an intronless promoter. Cells transfected with GPC retained surface membrane-associated expression of GP1 as determined by immunofluorescence assay, in addition to secreting the glycoprotein. Secreted GP1 derived from GPC expression has a higher content of high mannose N-linked glycosylation than sGP1 expressed independently from the GP2 portion of the protein. Neither GP1 isoform contains sialylated N-glycans, O-linked carbohydrate chains, or galactose-β(1-4-N-acetylglucosamine commonly present in complex and hybrid N-glycan structures. Conclusion These results demonstrate the non-proteolytic secretory nature of GP1 shedding during expression of the arenaviral glycoprotein complex. This phenomenon parallels shedding of a secretory glycoprotein component in filovirus replication. The glycosylation pattern of soluble GP1 resulting from expression of GPC was different from that of a soluble GP1 construct (sGP1-RRAA-FLAG, highlighting the intricately orchestrated post

  20. Preventing noise caused by vortex shedding in gate valves and orifices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.A.W.; Luloff, B.V.; Tromp, J.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Gate valves and high-energy orifices can both act as sources of noise. This noise can represent a simple environmental problem or, in severe cases, can cause piping failures within hours. This paper presents the results of two studies, one to eliminate noise in the main steam lines of a new reactor, and, the other, to develop design guidelines for preventing noise in multi-stage, high-energy orifices. Both the valves and orifices were found to have a common noise generation mechanism, namely, an unstable fluid shear layer (e.g., vortex shedding) coupled with a fluid-resonant condition (i.e., an acoustic resonance). The main steam line noise was round to be caused by periodic vortex shedding across the seat cavities of the main steam isolation valves. The orifice noise is thought to be due to vortex shedding within the orifice holes themselves. This paper reviews the findings of both studies and presents measures that can be taken to eliminate noise problems. (author)

  1. Internal Structure of Asteroids Having Surface Shedding due to Rotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Scheeres, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Surface shedding of an asteroid is a failure mode where surface materials fly off due to strong centrifugal forces beyond the critical spin period, while the internal structure does not deform significantly. This paper proposes a possible structure of an asteroid interior that leads to such surface shedding due to rapid rotation rates. A rubble pile asteroid is modeled as a spheroid composed of a surface shell and a concentric internal core, the entire assembly called the test body. The test body is assumed to be uniformly rotating around a constant rotation axis. We also assume that while the bulk density and the friction angle are constant, the cohesion of the surface shell is different from that of the internal core. First, developing an analytical model based on limit analysis, we provide the upper and lower bounds for the actual surface shedding condition. Second, we use a Soft-Sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) to study dynamical deformation of the test body due to a quasi-static spin-up. In this pa...

  2. Individual Subject Meta-Analysis of Parameters for Giardia duodenalis Shedding in Animal Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Adell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis is a zoonotic protozoan parasite with public health importance worldwide. While articles about animal model infectivity have been published for G. duodenalis, the studies have used diverse protocols and parameters to evaluate the infectivity of this protozoan parasite. Hence, the objectives of this study were to (1 conduct a meta-analysis of published literature for cyst shedding and diarrhea outcomes in animal models and (2 develop recommendations to help standardize experimental dose response studies. Results showed that, for the outcome of cyst shedding in faeces, the covariates of infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite, Giardia dose, and the interactions between doses and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, were all significant (P value ≤ 0.05. This study suggests inoculation of the experimental host with cysts rather than trophozoites and administration of higher doses of Giardia will most likely result in cyst shedding. Based on the results of this meta-analysis, the infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite, parasite dose, and the interactions between dose and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, should be considered when designing experimental dose response studies that will assist in the study of zoonotic neglected tropical diseases globally.

  3. Parametric CFD study of micro-energy harvesting in a flow channel exploiting vortex shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koubogiannis, Dimitrios G.

    2016-05-01

    Miniature energy harvesting devices are increasingly used in various fields. For example, Wireless Sensor Networks have recently made great progress in many applications. However, their main drawback, i.e. the limited duration of operation, poses the requirement for an effective way to recharge their batteries. In this context, the presentwork focuses on the study of micro-energy harvesting from flow by exploiting vortex shedding behind bluff bodies, in order to cause oscillations to a piezoelectric film and generate the required electrical power. To this end, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool is validated on a particular miniature device configuration proposed in the literature and implemented for the numerical simulations of flow around bluff micro-bodies in a very small channel. Aiming to enhance vortex shedding, parametric studies corresponding to different bluff body shapes and arrangements for a fixed Reynolds number are performed, the main parameters involved in the phenomenon are highlighted and the potential for vortex shedding exploitation is qualitatively assessed.

  4. The effect of acceleration on the growth and shedding of laminar separation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Samik; Rival, David

    2015-11-01

    It has been observed that when a laminar boundary layer separates, the shear layer undergoes transition to turbulence and subsequently reattaches to form a laminar separation bubble (LSB). In this work, a SD7003 airfoil, held at an angle of attack of 8 degree, is towed with different acceleration profiles starting from rest. The separation region is then analyzed with time-resolved, planar PIV at short convective times during the initial acceleration phase. The aim of this work is to characterize the variation in size and shedding frequency of the laminar separation bubble with increasing acceleration. We show that the formation and shedding process in the LSB depends on the rate of vorticity-containing mass transported by the separated shear layer. Consequently, any changes in the structure of the shear layer affect the formation of the LSB downstream. Finally, attempts are also made to characterize the shedding frequency of the bubble with increasing acceleration. Here the unsteadiness of the LSB is found to be closely linked to the degree of boundary-layer acceleration on the airfoil surface.

  5. IL-8-induced L-selectin shedding regulates its binding kinetics to PSGL-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA XiaoLing; CHEN Juan; LONG Mian

    2009-01-01

    L-selectin plays a crucial role in inflammation cascade by initiating the tethering and rolling of leukocytes on endothelium wall.While many L-selectin molecules are rapidly shed from the cell surface upon activation,the remaining membrane-anchored L-selectin may still play an important role in regulating leukocyte rolling and adhesion with different binding kinetics.Here we developed an in vitro model to activate Jurkat cells via interlukin-8 (IL-8) and quantified the two-dimensional (2D) binding kinetics,using a micropipette aspiration assay,of membrane-anchored L-selectin to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) ligand coupled onto human red blood cells (RBCs).The data indicated that L-selectin shedding reduced the amount of membrane-anchored L-selecUn and lowered both its reverse and forward rates.These results suggested that the rolling dynamics of activated leukocytes was determined by two opposite impacts:reducing the surface presentation would enhance the rolling but lowering the kinetic rates would decrease the rolling.This finding provides a new insight into understanding how L-selectin shedding regulates leukocyte rolling and adhesion.

  6. Numerical Study of Eddy Shedding By The Loop Current With Ogcm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahara, S.; Crèpon, M.

    The high resolution CLIPPER model for the Atlantic Ocean running at 1/6o was used to study the dynamic of the Gulf of Mexico. The model was daily forced with the ECMWF re-analysis air-sea fluxes during 20 years. A spin-up phase of 10 years is done in the experience. The results show the formation of the Loop Current in the interior of the Gulf of Mexico. This loop detach an anticyclonic eddy northward to Yucatan shelf Peninsula. The size of the eddy is close to 290 Km and 1000 m depth. The eddy shedding periodicity is between 7 to 9 months for the 5 first years of numer- ical forcing simulation. After that, the eddy shedding is blocked and an intensification and deepening of the loop happens. It is found that barotropic transport through Yu- catan channel and vertical structure of cross velocity's Yucatan current are important for eddy shedding process. A hypothesis for the generation and blocking of westward propagation of eddies in the Gulf of Mexico is proposed according to the numerical results.

  7. Long-term viremia and fecal shedding in pups after modified-live canine parvovirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Desario, Costantina; Cavalli, Alessandra; Losurdo, Michele; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Ventrella, Gianpiero; Rizzi, Stefania; Aulicino, Stefano; Lucente, Maria Stella; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2014-06-24

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) modified live virus vaccines are able to infect vaccinated dogs replicating in the bloodstream and enteric mucosa. However, the exact duration and extent of CPV vaccine-induced viremia and fecal shedding are not known. With the aim to fill this gap, 26 dogs were administered two commercial vaccines containing a CPV-2 or CPV-2b strain and monitored for 28 days after vaccination. By using real-time PCR, vaccine-induced viremia and shedding were found to be long lasting for both vaccinal strains. Vaccinal CPV-2b shedding was detected for a shorter period than CPV-2 (12 against 19 mean days) but with greater viral loads, whereas viremia occurred for a longer period (22 against 19 mean days) and with higher titers for CPV-2b. Seroconversion appeared as early as 7 and 14 days post-vaccination for CPV-2b and CPV-2 vaccines, respectively. With no vaccine there was any diagnostic interference using in-clinic or hemagglutination test, since positive results were obtained only by fecal real-time PCR testing. The present study adds new insights into the CPV vaccine persistence in the organism and possible interference with diagnostic tests.

  8. Periodical shedding of cloud cavitation from a single hydrofoil in high-speed cryogenic channel flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka ITO; Koichi SETO; Takao NAGASAKI

    2009-01-01

    In order to explain criteria for periodical shedding of the cloud cavitation, flow patterns of cavitation around a piano-convex hydrofoil were observed using a cryogenic cavitation tunnel of a blowdown type. Two hydrofoils of similarity of 20 and 60 mm in chord length with two test sections of 20 and 60 mm in width were prepared. Working fluids were water at ambient temperature, hot water and liquid nitrogen. The parameter range was varied between 0.3 and 1.4 for cavitation number, 9 and 17 m/sec for inlet flow velocity, and -8° and 8° for the flow in-cidence angle, respectively. At incidence angle 8°, that is, the convex surface being suction surface, periodical shedding of the whole cloud cavitation was observed on the convex surface under the specific condition with cavitation number and inlet flow velocity, respectively, 0.5, 9 m/sec for liquid nitrogen at 192℃ and 1.4, 11 m/sec for water at 88℃, whereas under the supercavitation condition, it was not observable. Periodical shedding of cloud cavitation occurs only in the case that there are both the adverse pressure gradient and the slow flow region on the hydrofoil.

  9. Study of Cavitation Shedding Dynamics on a NACA0015 Hydrofoil Using X-Ray Densitometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Harish; Wu, Juliana; Ceccio, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation dynamics on the NACA0015 hydrofoil at several attack angles are found to be spectrally rich, being multi-modal with abrupt changes in Strouhal number with change in cavitation number. Present study focusses on identifying the physical mechanisms responsible for the change in cavitation dynamics on a NACA0015 hydrofoil in a re-circulating water tunnel using time resolved X-ray densitometry. Time-resolved void fraction flow fields obtained using X-ray densitometry, synchronized with acoustic noise measurements using a hydrophone, are used to identify different flow features and mechanisms that are responsible for the change in the observed spectral behavior. It is shown that under higher cavitation numbers, the shedding mechanism is predominantly re-entrant liquid flow based, but as the cavitation number drops many different processes are at play. At lower cavitation numbers, the shed cavity cloud collapse arrests cavity growth and this results in altered cycle dynamics and hence the Strouhal number. In addition, propagation bubbly shock waves are also found to be a dominant mechanism of shedding for certain conditions. The multi-modal nature of the acoustic pressure signature is explained by presence of different flow features, which could be concurrent or alternating. Office of Naval Research.

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) generates soluble HLA-G1 by cell surface proteolytic shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Trentini, Alessandro; Bortolotti, Daria; Manfrinato, Maria C; Rotola, Antonella; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Melchiorri, Loredana; Di Luca, Dario; Dallocchio, Franco; Fainardi, Enrico; Bellini, Tiziana

    2013-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules are non-classical HLA class I antigens with an important role in pregnancy immune regulation and inflammation control. Soluble HLA-G proteins can be generated through two mechanisms: alternative splicing and proteolytic release, which is known to be metalloprotease mediated. Among this class of enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) might be involved in the HLA-G1 membrane cleavage. Of particular interest are MMP-2 and MMP-9, which regulate the inflammatory process by cytokine and chemokine modulation. We evaluated the effect of MMP-9 and MMP-2 on HLA-G1 membrane shedding. In particular, we analyzed the in vitro effect of these two gelatinases on the secretion of HLA-G1 via proteolytic cleavage in 221-G1-transfected cell line, in JEG3 cell line, and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results obtained by both cell lines showed the role of MMP-2 in HLA-G1 shedding. On the contrary, MMP-9 was not involved in this process. In addition, we identified three possible highly specific cleavage sites for MMP-2, whereas none were detected for MMP-9. This study suggests an effective link between MMP-2 and HLA-G1 shedding, increasing our knowledge on the regulatory machinery beyond HLA-G regulation in physiological and pathological conditions.

  11. Inhibitory role of TACE/ADAM17 cytotail in protein ectodomain shedding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liliana; Pérez

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To determine if the cytotail of the principal sheddase tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE;ADAM17) controls protein ectodomain shedding.METHODS:Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to derive TACE variants. The resulting TACE expression plasmids with amino acid substitutions in the extracel-lular,cysteine-rich disintegrin domain (CRD) and/or deleted cytotail,along with an expression vector for the enhanced green fluorescence protein were transfected into shedding-defective M1 mutants stably expressing transmembrane L-selectin or transforming growth factor (TGF)-α. The expression levels of the TACE substrates at the cell surface were determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS:Consistent with published data,a single point mutation (C600Y) in the CRD led to shedding defi-ciency. However,removal of the cytotail from the C600Y TACE variant partially restored ectodomain cleavage of TGF-α and L-selectin. Cytotail-deleted mutants with any other substituting amino acid residues in place of Cys600 displayed similar function compared with tail-less C600Y TACE.CONCLUSION:The cytotail plays an inhibitory role,which becomes evident when it is removed from an enzyme with another mutation that affects the enzyme function.

  12. A new-type flexible rock-shed under the impact of rock block: experimental investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main disadvantage of conventional concrete rock-shed is the need for a massive foundation due to the deadweight of the structure. In order to overcome such construction difficulty and to reduce costs, a new concept of flexible rock-shed is proposed in this paper. The flexible rock-shed is made of flexible nets held up by specially designed steel vaulted structure. An 1:1 prototype is manufactured and tested for functional evaluation with impact experiment. It is shown that the structure can stand for an impact energy of about 250 kJ without observable rupture of the flexible nets or cables and can be put into service again with some maintenances on the steel vaulted structure. Expermental data such as local strains, peak loads and impact times are recorded by dynamic strain gauges, load cells and high speed camera for structural analysis and some complementary suggestions of improving and designing are offered with respect to the joints and components.

  13. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  14. Network class superposition analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A B Pearson

    Full Text Available Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30 for the yeast cell cycle process, considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses.

  15. Fly proof net shed for livestock: A novel concept of physical barrier for integrated management of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Narladkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An age old and time tested technique of mosquito net requiring no energy, used by humans since prehistoric period was the inspiration behind this novel technique of fly proof net shed for livestock. With the aim to develop similar type of net shed for animals, which will protect them at night from biting of range of insects from Culicoides midges to mosquitoes, research was undertaken. Materials and Methods: Net shed with pitch roof (gable type was erected for use of livestock. The open inlet area was covered with 40 mesh size wire net. The roof at attic level was fitted with hurricane type of ventilator. Shed was used for animals at night hours only. vane anemometer was used for estimation of temperature and wind related parameters. Thermal humidity index (THI and air changes were calculated as per the standard formulas. Based on these parameters suitability of shed was judged. Results: It was observed that, due to netting of the shed population of Culicoides and other flies and incidences of their bites at night hours were considerably lowered. As a result, animals were found comfortable, and their body movements undertaken for wiping off these flies were significantly reduced from 196.50 to 22.16. All it accrued to increased milk yield to the tune of 18.97% in the net shed buffaloes as against control shed. Studies on suitability and comfort to animals were tested by estimating THI and air changes per hour in the net shed, which also revealed the estimates in comfortable regimen and ventilation, remained not much affected despite of netting. Other parameters studied for testing its more accuracy by taking other species of animals as kids, for them also, shed was found suitable through estimation of various physiological and behavioral parameters. Finally, the efficacy of shed was judged on the basis of cost effectiveness. Highly encouraging results on the above said parameters endorsed the effectiveness of the technique. Conclusion: A

  16. Combination Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The Rayovac TANDEM is an advanced technology combination work light and general purpose flashlight that incorporates several NASA technologies. The TANDEM functions as two lights in one. It features a long range spotlight and wide angle floodlight; simple one-hand electrical switching changes the beam from spot to flood. TANDEM developers made particular use of NASA's extensive research in ergonomics in the TANDEM's angled handle, convenient shape and different orientations. The shatterproof, water resistant plastic casing also draws on NASA technology, as does the shape and beam distance of the square diffused flood. TANDEM's heavy duty magnet that permits the light to be affixed to any metal object borrows from NASA research on rare earth magnets that combine strong magnetic capability with low cost. Developers used a NASA-developed ultrasonic welding technique in the light's interior.

  17. Viral shedding in Chinese young adults with mild 2009 H1N1 influenza

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Ning; GAO Yan; SUO Ji-jiang; XIE Li-jun; YAN Zhong-qiang; XING Yu-bin; HE Lei; LIU Yun-xi

    2011-01-01

    Background The duration of viral shedding and the transmission of 2009 H1N1 influenza among individuals, especially among the younger population with mild illness, are not well understood now. The aim of this study was to determine the viral shedding of the young adult patients with mild 2009 H1N1 influenza in China.Methods From September 2009 to January 2010, the clinical data and serial nasopharyngeal swabs of 67 patients with 2009 H1N1 influenza and 37 patients with seasonal influenza aged from 18 years to 35 years were collected. The nasopharyngeal swab samples were detected by real time RT-PCR to determine the viral shedding. All the patients did not receive the antiviral therapy but Chinese medicine for detoxicating.Results Among the patients with H1N1 virus infection, 82.1% (55/67) patients presented with fever symptom, while more patients with high fever (≥39℃) were found in seasonal influenza patients (P<0.05). For the H1N1 patients, the median interval between the symptom onset and the undetectable RNA was six days (4-10 days). But viral shedding was still found in 31.3% patients after 7 days following illness onset. The median interval between disappearance of fever and an undetectable viral RNA level was three days (2-8 days), and 17.9% patients were found to be viral shedding 6 days later after normalization of body temperature. For the seasonal influenza patients, 94.6% patients were detected out viral RNA within 7 days. The median interval of seasonal influenza between the symptom onset and the undetectable RNA was four days (3-8 days). The median interval between disappearance of fever and an undetectable viral RNA level was three days (2-6 days).Conclusion It suggests that 7 days isolation period from the illness onset or 24 hours after the resolution of fever and respiratory symptoms are not long enough to cut off the transmission among Chinese young adults with mild illness.

  18. Maintaining the Body's Immune System: Incidence of Latent Virus Shedding During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Your body protects you from illness with its own security system - the immune system. This system keeps illness at bay not only by mounting a defense against foreign organisms, but also by controlling the population of bacteria and viruses that normally live in your body. But there's no need to panic: certain microbes can actually exist in your body without causing illness. Some bacteria are even beneficial - like the E. coli in the large intestine that are an important source of vitamin K. While viruses are not exactly considered beneficial, they can also inhabit the human body without causing immediate harm or infection. A good example is the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), more commonly known as cold sores or fever blisters. This virus infects 70 to 80 percent of all adults but remains latent much of the time. While latent, the virus within cells remains dormant. Activation of the dormant virus causes it to make copies of itself (known as replication) constantly detectable in body fluids such as urine or saliva in a process called shedding. When a person becomes sick or stressed, however, this weakened condition allows the virus to reactivate and multiply. These elevated levels may be enough to produce symptoms, but shedding can also occur without symptoms. This ability to shed without showing signs of infection, or asymptomatic shedding, is of great interest, as it increases the chances of infecting others. The stresses associated with space flight - adapting to microgravity, isolation from family and friends, living and working in a confined space, sleep deprivation, and busy schedules, to name but a few - may weaken astronauts' immune systems, leaving them at greater risk of viral reactivation. Members of the STS-107 crew will participate in this experiment, Incidence of Latent Viral Shedding in Space Flight, to help scientists understand how reactivation works in space, and at what level replication reaches before symptoms begin to show. This study also

  19. Objective measures of sleep and dim light melatonin onset in adolescents and young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxvig, Ingvild W; Wilhelmsen-Langeland, Ane; Pallesen, Ståle; Vedaa, Oystein; Nordhus, Inger H; Sørensen, Eli; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2013-08-01

    Delayed sleep phase disorder is characterized by a delay in the timing of the major sleep period relative to conventional norms. The sleep period itself has traditionally been described as normal. Nevertheless, it is possible that sleep regulatory mechanism disturbances associated with the disorder may affect sleep duration and/or architecture. Polysomnographic data that may shed light on the issue are scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine polysomnographic measures of sleep in adolescents and young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder, and to compare findings to that of healthy controls. A second aim was to estimate dim light melatonin onset as a marker of circadian rhythm and to investigate the phase angle relationship (time interval) between dim light melatonin onset and the sleep period. Data from 54 adolescents and young adults were analysed, 35 diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder and 19 healthy controls. Results show delayed timing of sleep in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder, but once sleep was initiated no group differences in sleep parameters were observed. Dim light melatonin onset was delayed in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder, but no difference in phase angle was observed between the groups. In conclusion, both sleep and dim light melatonin onset were delayed in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder. The sleep period appeared to occur at the same circadian phase in both groups, and once sleep was initiated no differences in sleep parameters were observed.

  20. Light rail project in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas Lohmann Elkjær; Landex, Alex; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2006-01-01

    The need for high class public transport service of the increasing travel across the radial urban structure of the greater Copenhagen region was examined through planning of a light rail. The exact corridor (defined as the Ring 2½ corridor) and alignment of the light rail were documented...... and the locations of stops were examined through analyses of catchment areas. The timetable of the light rail was determined through travel time and correspondences with other high class public transport lines/corridors. The justification of the light rail was examined through factors like traffic impacts......, operation economy, socioeconomics and strategic impacts. The light rail shows a good result on most factors. But it displays socioeconomic non-viability. However, this was expected when using the standard procedures. But the Ring 2½ light rail shows a better socioeconomic result than many other examined...