WorldWideScience

Sample records for analogue casimir radiation

  1. Casimir Effect and Black Hole Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbardehghan, S.

    2018-03-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole intrinsically creates a potential barrier consisted of two reflecting boundaries; the first one far from the hole and the second one in the vicinity of its horizon. With respect to this fact and assuming the boundaries as good conductors (in view of an observer near the horizon just outside the second boundary), in a series of papers, R.M. Nugayev by considering a conformally coupled massless scalar field and based on the calculations of Candelas and Deutsch (the accelerated-mirror results) has claimed that " ...the existence of the potential barrier is as crucial for Hawking evaporation as the existence of the horizon". In this paper, by taking the same assumptions, through straightforward reasonings, we explicitly show that contrary to this claim, the effects of the first boundary on the black hole radiation are quite negligible. Moreover, the inclusion of the second boundary makes the situation more complicated, because the induced Casimir energy-momentum tensor by this boundary in its vicinity is divergent of order δ ^{-4} ( δ is the distance to the boundary).

  2. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  3. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fosco, Cesar D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.

    2015-01-01

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation. (orig.)

  4. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, Cesar D. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C. [Ciudad Universitaria, Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA y IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation. (orig.)

  5. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, César D. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, R8402AGP, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C., E-mail: lombardo@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física Juan José Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA and IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation.

  6. Casimir friction and near-field radiative heat transfer in graphene structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volokitin, A.I.; Samara State Technical Univ.

    2017-01-01

    The dependence of the Casimir friction force between a graphene sheet and a (amorphous) SiO 2 substrate on the drift velocity of the electrons in the graphene sheet is studied. It is shown that the Casimir friction is strongly enhanced for the drift velocity above the threshold velocity when the friction is determined by the resonant excitation of the surface phonon-polaritons in the SiO 2 substrate and the electron-hole pairs in graphene. The theory agrees well with the experimental data for the current-voltage dependence for unsuspended graphene on the SiO 2 substrate. The theories of the Casimir friction and the near-field radiative energy transfer are used to study the heat generation and dissipation in graphene due to the interaction with phonon-polaritons in the (amorphous) SiO 2 substrate and acoustic phonons in graphene. For suspended graphene, the energy transfer coefficient at nanoscale gap is ∝ three orders of magnitude larger than the radiative heat transfer coefficient of the blackbody radiation limit.

  7. Casimir torque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Guzman, Jose C [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Mochan, W Luis [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2006-05-26

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of the flow of angular momentum carried by the fluctuating electromagnetic field within a cavity bounded by two flat anisotropic materials. By generalizing a procedure employed recently for the calculation of the Casimir force between arbitrary materials, we obtain an expression for the torque between anisotropic plates in terms of their reflection amplitude matrices. We evaluate the torque in 1D for ideal and dispersive model materials.

  8. Casimir Forces and Quantum Friction from Ginzburg Radiation in Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Jamir; Recati, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-27

    We theoretically propose an experimentally viable scheme to use an impurity atom in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to realize condensed-matter analogs of quantum vacuum effects. In a suitable atomic level configuration, the collisional interaction between the impurity atom and the density fluctuations in the condensate can be tailored to closely reproduce the electric-dipole coupling of quantum electrodynamics. By virtue of this analogy, we recover and extend the paradigm of electromagnetic vacuum forces to the domain of cold atoms, showing in particular the emergence, at supersonic atomic speeds, of a novel power-law scaling of the Casimir force felt by the atomic impurity, as well as the occurrence of a quantum frictional force, accompanied by the Ginzburg emission of Bogoliubov quanta. Observable consequences of these quantum vacuum effects in realistic spectroscopic experiments are discussed.

  9. Analogue Hawking radiation from astrophysical black-hole accretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Tapas K

    2004-01-01

    We show that spherical accretion onto astrophysical black holes can be considered as a natural example of an analogue system. We provide, for the first time, an exact analytical scheme for calculating the analogue Hawking temperature and surface gravity for general relativistic accretion onto astrophysical black holes. Our calculation may bridge the gap between the theory of transonic astrophysical accretion and the theory of analogue Hawking radiation. We show that the domination of the analogue Hawking temperature over the actual Hawking temperature may be a real astrophysical phenomenon, though observational tests of this fact will at best be difficult and at worst might prove to be impossible. We also discuss the possibilities of the emergence of analogue white holes around astrophysical black holes. Our calculation is general enough to accommodate accreting black holes with any mass

  10. Nonlinear (Anharmonic Casimir Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Razmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We want to study the dynamics of a simple linear harmonic micro spring which is under the influence of the quantum Casimir force/pressure and thus behaves as a (an nonlinear (anharmonic Casimir oscillator. Generally, the equation of motion of this nonlinear micromechanical Casimir oscillator has no exact solvable (analytical solution and the turning point(s of the system has (have no fixed position(s; however, for particular values of the stiffness of the micro spring and at appropriately well-chosen distance scales and conditions, there is (are approximately sinusoidal solution(s for the problem (the variable turning points are collected in a very small interval of positions. This, as a simple and elementary plan, may be useful in controlling the Casimir stiction problem in micromechanical devices.

  11. The Dirichlet Casimir problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, N.; Jaffe, R.L.; Khemani, V.; Quandt, M.; Schroeder, O.; Weigel, H.

    2004-01-01

    Casimir forces are conventionally computed by analyzing the effects of boundary conditions on a fluctuating quantum field. Although this analysis provides a clean and calculationally tractable idealization, it does not always accurately capture the characteristics of real materials, which cannot constrain the modes of the fluctuating field at all energies. We study the vacuum polarization energy of renormalizable, continuum quantum field theory in the presence of a background field, designed to impose a Dirichlet boundary condition in a particular limit. We show that in two and three space dimensions, as a background field becomes concentrated on the surface on which the Dirichlet boundary condition would eventually hold, the Casimir energy diverges. This result implies that the energy depends in detail on the properties of the material, which are not captured by the idealized boundary conditions. This divergence does not affect the force between rigid bodies, but it does invalidate calculations of Casimir stresses based on idealized boundary conditions

  12. On convergence generation in computing the electro-magnetic Casimir force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, F.

    2008-01-01

    We tackle the very fundamental problem of zero-point energy divergence in the context of the Casimir effect. We calculate the Casimir force due to field fluctuations by using standard cavity radiation modes. The validity of convergence generation by means of an exponential energy cut-off factor is discussed in detail. (orig.)

  13. Microscopic dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Impens, François; Neto, Paulo A. Maia

    2018-03-01

    We consider an atom in its ground state undergoing a nonrelativistic oscillation in free space. The interaction with the electromagnetic quantum vacuum leads to two effects to leading order in perturbation theory. When the mechanical frequency is larger than the atomic transition frequency, the dominant effect is the motion-induced transition to an excited state with the emission of a photon carrying the excess energy. We compute the angular distribution of emitted photons and the excitation rate. On the other hand, when the mechanical frequency is smaller than the transition frequency, the leading-order effect is the parametric emission of photon pairs, which constitutes the microscopic counterpart of the dynamical Casimir effect. We discuss the properties of the microscopic dynamical Casimir effect and build a connection with the photon production by an oscillating macroscopic metallic mirror.

  14. Nonperturbative Dynamical Casimir Effect in Optomechanical Systems: Vacuum Casimir-Rabi Splittings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Macrì

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamical Casimir effect using a fully quantum-mechanical description of both the cavity field and the oscillating mirror. We do not linearize the dynamics, nor do we adopt any parametric or perturbative approximation. By numerically diagonalizing the full optomechanical Hamiltonian, we show that the resonant generation of photons from the vacuum is determined by a ladder of mirror-field vacuum Rabi splittings. We find that vacuum emission can originate from the free evolution of an initial pure mechanical excited state, in analogy with the spontaneous emission from excited atoms. By considering a coherent drive of the mirror, using a master-equation approach to take losses into account, we are able to study the dynamical Casimir effect for optomechanical coupling strengths ranging from weak to ultrastrong. We find that a resonant production of photons out of the vacuum can be observed even for mechanical frequencies lower than the cavity-mode frequency. Since high mechanical frequencies, which are hard to achieve experimentally, were thought to be imperative for realizing the dynamical Casimir effect, this result removes one of the major obstacles for the observation of this long-sought effect. We also find that the dynamical Casimir effect can create entanglement between the oscillating mirror and the radiation produced by its motion in the vacuum field, and that vacuum Casimir-Rabi oscillations can occur. Finally, we also show that all these findings apply not only to optomechanical systems, but also to parametric amplifiers operating in the fully quantum regime.

  15. Graphene cantilever under Casimir force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derras-Chouk, Amel; Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Garanin, Dmitry A.; Jaafar, Reem

    2018-05-01

    The stability of graphene cantilever under Casimir attraction to an underlying conductor is investigated. The dependence of the instability threshold on temperature and flexural rigidity is obtained. Analytical work is supplemented by numerical computation of the critical temperature above which the graphene cantilever irreversibly bends down and attaches to the conductor. The geometry of the attachment and exfoliation of the graphene sheet is discussed. It is argued that graphene cantilever can be an excellent tool for precision measurements of the Casimir force.

  16. Tensile behaviour and properties of a bone analogue composite (HA, HDPE) crosslinked by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, G.; Smolko, Eduardo E.

    2005-01-01

    A natural composite material, hydroxyapatite (HA) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) crosslinked by ionizing radiations is been developed as a bioactive analogue material for bone replacement. Mechanical properties of the composites irradiated up to 300 kGy under tensile tests was studied. Gel content and micrographs of different composite fractures are shown. (author)

  17. Casimir effect for interacting fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses some recent work on the Casimir effect: that is the problem of renormalizing Tsub(μγ) on locally-flat space-times. That is on space-times which, while topologically non-trivial are locally Minkowskian - with vanishing local curvature. The author has developed a systematic method for calculating this Casimir effect for interacting fields to arbitrary order in perturbation theory - and for arbitrary components of Tsub(μγ) which he describes in general and then illustrates it by describing first order perturbation theory calculations for a lambdaphi 4 theory for the two models: the cylinder space-time and the parallel plates. (Auth.)

  18. Switching Colloidal Superstructures by Critical Casimir Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truc A; Newton, Arthur; Veen, Sandra J; Kraft, Daniela J; Bolhuis, Peter G; Schall, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Recent breakthroughs in colloidal synthesis promise the bottom-up assembly of superstructures on nano- and micrometer length scales, offering molecular analogues on the colloidal scale. However, a structural control similar to that in supramolecular chemistry remains very challenging. Here, colloidal superstructures are built and controlled using critical Casimir forces on patchy colloidal particles. These solvent-mediated forces offer direct analogues of molecular bonds, allowing patch-to-patch binding with exquisite temperature control of bond strength and stiffness. Particles with two patches are shown to form linear chains undergoing morphological changes with temperature, resembling a polymer collapse under poor-solvent conditions. This reversible temperature switching carries over to particles with higher valency, exhibiting a variety of patch-to-patch bonded structures. Using Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that the collapse results from the growing interaction range favoring close-packed configurations. These results offer new opportunities for the active control of complex structures at the nano and micrometer scale, paving the way to novel temperature-switchable materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Thermal Fluctuations in Casimir Pistons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, M.; Villarreal, C.

    2012-07-01

    We present analytical and simple expressions to determine the free energy, internal energy, entropy, as well as the pressure acting at the interface of a perfectly conducting rectangular Casimir piston. We show that infrared divergencies linear in temperature become cancelled within the piston configuration, and show a continuous behavior consistent with intuitive expectations.

  20. Archimedes force on Casimir apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The talk addresses a problem of Casimir apparatus in weak gravitational field, surrounded by a dense medium. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle, taking into account proper contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general ex pression for the corresponding force in terms of the effective action. By way of example we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  1. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum electromagnetic fluctuations, which break time-reversal symmetry. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Partly because of the lack of contact with observations, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here, we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  2. Casimir Effect on the Worldline

    CERN Document Server

    Gies, Holger; Moyaerts, L; Gies, Holger; Langfeld, Kurt; Moyaerts, Laurent

    2003-01-01

    We develop a method to compute the Casimir effect for arbitrary geometries. The method is based on the string-inspired worldline approach to quantum field theory and its numerical realization with Monte-Carlo techniques. Concentrating on Casimir forces between rigid bodies induced by a fluctuating scalar field, we test our method with the parallel-plate configuration. For the experimentally relevant sphere-plate configuration, we study curvature effects quantitatively and perform a comparison with the ``proximity force approximation'', which is the standard approximation technique. Sizable curvature effects are found for a distance-to-curvature-radius ratio of a/R >~ 0.02. Our method is embedded in renormalizable quantum field theory with a controlled treatment of the UV divergencies. As a technical by-product, we develop various efficient algorithms for generating closed-loop ensembles with Gaussian distribution.

  3. Investigating the Role of Ferromagnetic Materials on the Casimir Force & Investigation of the Van Der Waals/Casimir Force with Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohideen, Umar [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Duration of award was from 4/15/10-4/14/15. In this grant period our contributions to the field of VdW/Casimir forces are 24 refereed publications in journals such as Physical Review Letters (4) [1-4], Physical Review B (10) [5-14], Physical Review D (2) [15,16], Applied Physics Letters (1) [17], Review of Scientific Instruments (1) [18] and the International Journal of Modern Physics A (5) [19-23] and B(1) (invited review article [24]). We presented 2 plenary conference talks, 3 lectures at the Pan American School on Frontiers in Casimir Physics, 2 conferences, 1 colloquium and 11 APS talks. If publications are restricted to only those with direct connection to the aims proposed in the prior grant period, then it will be a total of 12: Physical Review Letters (3) [2-4], Physical Review B (6) [6-8,12,13,25], Review of Scientific Instruments (1) [18], International Journal of Modern Physics A (1) [19] and B(1) [169]. A brief aggregated description of the directly connected accomplishments is below. The following topics are detailed: dispersion force measurements with graphene, dispersion force from ferromagnetic metals, conclusion on role of electrostatic patches, UV radiation induced modification of the Casimir force, low temperature measurement of the Casimir force, and Casimir force from thin fluctuating membranes.

  4. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  5. Modification of radiation-induced division delay by caffeine analogues and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Snyder, M.H.; Rowley, R.; Schneiderman, M.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Hospital)

    1982-01-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the concentration-dependent modification of x-radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by methyl xanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The methyl xanthines (concentrations from 0.5 to 1000 ..mu..g/ml) all reduced radiation-induced division delay with the effect being linear between approximately 100 and 1000 ..mu..g/ml. After doses of 100-300 rad, delay was reduced by 75, 94 or 83 per cent at 1000 ..mu..g/ml for each drug, respectively. However, the addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP had an opposite effect: radiation-induced delay was increased by the concentration range of 0.3 to 300 ..mu..g/ml. These results indicate that in mammalian cells the control of cell cycle progression and the modification of radiation-induced division delay are not simply related to intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Rather, there appear to be at least two competing mechanisms which are differentially affected by caffeine analogues or by direct addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The direct effect of caffeine and the methyl xanthines on membrane calcium permeability is considered.

  6. Low-frequency analogue Hawking radiation: The Korteweg-de Vries model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutant, Antonin; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2018-01-01

    We derive analytic expressions for the low-frequency properties of the analogue Hawking radiation in a general weak-dispersive medium. A thermal low-frequency part of the spectrum is expected even when dispersive effects become significant. We consider the two most common class of weak-dispersive media and investigate all possible anomalous scattering processes due inhomogeneous background flows. We first argue that under minimal assumptions, the scattering processes in near-critical flows are well described by a linearized Korteweg-de Vries equation. Within our theoretical model grey-body factors are neglected, that is, the mode comoving with the flow decouples from the other ones. We also exhibit a flow example with an exact expression for the effective temperature. We see that this temperature coincides with the Hawking one only when the dispersive length scale is much smaller than the flow gradient scale. We apply the same method in inhomogeneous flows without an analogue horizon. In this case, the spectrum coefficients decrease with decreasing frequencies. Our findings are in agreement with previous numerical works, generalizing their findings to arbitrary flow profiles. Our analytical expressions provide estimates to guide ongoing experimental efforts.

  7. Radiation-Driven Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Oxychlorine-Containing Mars Surface Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Christos D; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios; Kalaitzopoulou, Electra; Quinn, Richard C

    2017-04-01

    The present study demonstrates that γ-radiolyzed perchlorate-containing Mars soil salt analogues (in a CO 2 atmosphere) generate upon H 2 O wetting the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide radical (O 2 •- ), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and hydroxyl radicals ( • OH). This study also validates that analogue radiolysis forms oxychlorine species that, in turn, can UV-photolyze to • OH upon UV photolysis. This investigation was made possible by the development of a new assay for inorganic-origin O 2 •- and H 2 O 2 determination and by the modification of a previous assay for soil • OH. Results show that radiolyzed Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 generates H 2 O 2 and • OH; and when included as part of a mixture analogous to the salt composition of samples analyzed at the Mars Phoenix site, the analogue generated O 2 •- , H 2 O 2 , and • OH, with • OH levels 150-fold higher than in the radiolyzed Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 samples. Radiolyzed Mars Phoenix site salt analogue that did not contain Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 generated only • OH also at 150-fold higher concentration than Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 alone. Additionally, UV photolysis of the perchlorate γ radiolysis product chlorite (ClO 2 - ) generated the oxychlorine products trihalide (Cl 3 - ), chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 • ), and hypochlorite (ClO - ), with the formation of • OH by UV photolysis of ClO - . While the generation of ROS may have contributed in part to 14 CO 2 production in the Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment and O 2 (g) release in the Viking Gas Exchange (GEx) experiment, our results indicate that they are not likely to be the major contributor to the LR and GEx results. However, due to their highly reactive nature, they are expected to play a significant role in the alteration of organics on Mars. Additionally, experiments with hypochlorite show that the thermal stability of NaClO is in the range of the thermal stability observed for thermally liable oxidant responsible for the Viking LR results. Key Words: Mars-Oxygen-Salts-Radiation

  8. Supersymmetry Breaking Casimir Warp Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obousy, Richard K.; Cleaver, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    This paper utilizes a recent model which relates the cosmological constant to the Casimir energy of the extra dimensions in brane-world theories. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that, given some sufficiently advanced civilization with the ability to manipulate the radius of the extra dimension, a local adjustment of the cosmological constant could be created. This adjustment would facilitate an expansion/contraction of the spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. This idea is analogous to the Alcubierre bubble, but differs entirely in the approach, utilizing the physics of higher dimensional quantum field theory, instead of general relativity.

  9. Theoretical ingredients of a Casimir analog computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; McCauley, Alexander P; Joannopoulos, John D; Johnson, Steven G

    2010-05-25

    We derive a correspondence between the contour integration of the Casimir stress tensor in the complex-frequency plane and the electromagnetic response of a physical dissipative medium in a finite real-frequency bandwidth. The consequences of this correspondence are at least threefold: First, the correspondence makes it easier to understand Casimir systems from the perspective of conventional classical electromagnetism, based on real-frequency responses, in contrast to the standard imaginary-frequency point of view based on Wick rotations. Second, it forms the starting point of finite-difference time-domain numerical techniques for calculation of Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries. Finally, this correspondence is also key to a technique for computing quantum Casimir forces at micrometer scales using antenna measurements at tabletop (e.g., centimeter) scales, forming a type of analog computer for the Casimir force. Superficially, relationships between the Casimir force and the classical electromagnetic Green's function are well known, so one might expect that any experimental measurement of the Green's function would suffice to calculate the Casimir force. However, we show that the standard forms of this relationship lead to infeasible experiments involving infinite bandwidth or exponentially growing fields, and a fundamentally different formulation is therefore required.

  10. Casimir Interaction from Magnetically Coupled Eddy Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Henkel, Carsten

    2009-09-01

    We study the quantum and thermal fluctuations of eddy (Foucault) currents in thick metallic plates. A Casimir interaction between two plates arises from the coupling via quasistatic magnetic fields. As a function of distance, the relevant eddy current modes cross over from a quantum to a thermal regime. These modes alone reproduce previously discussed thermal anomalies of the electromagnetic Casimir interaction between good conductors. In particular, they provide a physical picture for the Casimir entropy whose nonzero value at zero temperature arises from a correlated, glassy state.

  11. The Casimir effect: medium and geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marachevsky, Valery N

    2012-01-01

    Theory of the Casimir effect is presented in several examples. Casimir–Polder-type formulas, Lifshitz theory and theory of the Casimir effect for two gratings separated by a vacuum slit are derived. Equations for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a medium and dispersion are discussed. The Casimir effect for systems with a layer of 2 + 1 fermions is studied. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’. (paper)

  12. Shielding biomolecules from effects of radiation by Mars analogue minerals and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, G.; Ertem, M. C.; McKay, C. P.; Hazen, R. M.

    2017-07-01

    Organic compounds have been delivered over time to Mars via meteorites, comets and interplanetary dust particles. The fate of organic material on the surface of Mars must be affected by the Martian environment, in particular by ultraviolet (UV) and other ionizing radiation. Penetration depth of UV radiation into soils is in the sub-millimetre to millimetre range and depends on the properties of the soil. The aim of this research is to study the possible protective role of Martian analogue minerals and soils for survivability of biomolecules against UV radiation and to compare their decomposition rates within a 1 mm-thick portion of the surface. Results demonstrated that minerals offer significant protection to biomolecules purine, pyrimidine and uracil against UV photolysis. In the absence of these minerals, organic compounds are completely degraded when subjected directly to UV photolysis equivalent to only 5 Martian day's exposure. However, similar UV exposure of organics dried from solution onto powdered calcium carbonate (calcite; CaCO3), calcium sulphate (anhydrite; CaSO4), clay-bearing Atacama dessert soil and 7 Å clay mineral kaolinite [Al2Si2O5(OH)4] results in only 1-2% loss of organics. Mixtures of purine and uracil with calcium carbonate exposed to gamma radiation of 3 Gy (3 Gray), which corresponds to approximately 15 000 days on Mars, results in up to 10% loss of organics. By contrast, these organic compounds completely decomposed upon mixing with iron oxide (Fe2O3) before UV irradiation. As the search for extinct or extant life on Mars has been identified as a goal of top priority in NASA's Mars Exploration Program and continues with several missions planned to the red planet by both NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) in the next few decades, our findings may play a useful role in identifying optimal target sites on the Martian surface for future missions.

  13. Dynamics of flexural gravity waves: from sea ice to Hawking radiation and analogue gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Sahoo, T.; Meylan, M. H.

    2018-01-01

    The propagation of flexural gravity waves, routinely used to model wave interaction with sea ice, is studied, including the effect of compression and current. A number of significant and surprising properties are shown to exist. The occurrence of blocking above a critical value of compression is illustrated. This is analogous to propagation of surface gravity waves in the presence of opposing current and light wave propagation in the curved space-time near a black hole, therefore providing a novel system for studying analogue gravity. Between the blocking and buckling limit of the compressive force, the dispersion relation possesses three positive real roots, contrary to an earlier observation of having a single positive real root. Negative energy waves, in which the phase and group velocity point in opposite directions, are also shown to exist. In the presence of an opposing current and certain critical ranges of compressive force, the second blocking point shifts from the positive to the negative branch of the dispersion relation. Such a shift is known as the Hawking effect from the analogous behaviour in the theory of relativity which leads to Hawking radiation. The theory we develop is illustrated with simulations of linear waves in the time domain.

  14. Impact of an angiotensin analogue in treating thermal and combined radiation injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Sachin Suresh

    Background: In recent years there has been a growing concern regarding the use of nuclear weapons by terrorists. Such incidents in the past have shown that radiation exposure is often accompanied by other forms of trauma such as burns, wounds or infection; leading to increased mortality rates among the affected individuals. This increased risk with combined radiation injury has been attributed to the delayed wound healing observed in this injury. The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) has emerged as a critical regulator of wound healing. Angiotensin II (A-II) and Angiotensin (1-7) [A(1-7)] have been shown to accelerate the rate of wound healing in different animal models of cutaneous injury. Nor-Leu3-Angiotensin (1-7) [Nor-Leu3-A (1-7)], an analogue of A(1-7), is more efficient than both A-II and A(1-7) in its ability to improve wound healing and is currently in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Aims: The three main goals of this study were to; 1) Develop a combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI) model and a radiation-induced cutaneous injury model to study the pathophysiological effects of these injuries on dermal wound healing; 2) To treat thermal and CRBI injuries using Nor-Leu 3-A (1-7) and decipher the mechanism of action of this peptide and 3) Develop an in-vitro model of CRBI using dermal cells in order to study the effect of CRBI on individual cell types involved in wound healing. Results: CRBI results in delayed and exacerbated apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation in injured skin as compared to thermal injury by itself. Radiation-induced cutaneous injury shows a radiation-dose dependent increase in inflammation as well as a chronic inflammatory response in the higher radiation exposure groups. Nor-Leu3-A (1-7) can mitigate thermal and CRBI injuries by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage while increasing the rate of proliferation of dermal stem cells and re-epithelialization of injured skin. The in

  15. Casimir force in noncommutative Randall-Sundrum models revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2010-01-01

    We propose another method to compute the Casimir force in noncommutative Randall-Sundrum braneworld model considered by K. Nouicer and Y. Sabri, Phys. Rev. D 80, 086013 (2009). recently. Our method can be used to compute the Casimir force to any order in the noncommutative parameter. Contrary to the claim made by K. Nouicer and Y. Sabri that repulsive Casimir force can appear in the first order approximation, we show that the Casimir force is always attractive at any order of approximation.

  16. Factors effecting the efficiency of purine analogues as selective agents for mutants of mammalian cells induced by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thacker, J.; Stephens, M.A.; Stretch, A.

    1976-01-01

    In the Chines hamster cell line V79-4, the frequencies of cells selected for their resistance to purine analogues do not always reflect the true frequencies of resistant mutants. The frequency of cells resistant to 8-azaguanine varied widely, especially when different sources of serum were used in the selective medium. Even with the more efficient analogue, 6-thioguanine, small colonies arose in the selective medium at a frequency which was strongly dependent upon analogue concentration and viable cell seeding density. These colonies were shown to have a phenotype which was indistinguishable from wild type. Hence with irradiated cells, where the viability of the cell population is reduced to an extent varying with the dose and the interval allowed for mutant expression, the counting of all colonies arising in selective medium can lead to spuriously variable, and sometimes very high, 'mutation frequencies'. Although the frequency of wild type colonies selected in thioguanine was diminished by the use of high concentrations of the analogue, a loss of induced mutants also occurred at these concentrations. Further, the V79-4 line contained two distinct types of mutant with different levels of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity, and only one of these types (HGPRT-negative mutants) increased in frequency with radiation dose. These results can account for many of the anomalies encountered in previous studies with purine analogues as selective agents, and show that some care has to be taken to characterize the mutants selected by resistance to purine analogues before meaningful dose-response relationships can be established

  17. Detecting chameleons through Casimir force measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Bruck, Carsten van de; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas; Mota, David F.

    2007-01-01

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet to shield electrostatic forces; however, this sheet masks any detectable signal due to the presence of a strongly coupled chameleon field. As a result of this shielding, experiments that are designed to specifically test the behavior of gravity are often unable to place any constraint on chameleon fields with a strong coupling to matter. Casimir force measurements do not employ a physical electrostatic shield and as such are able to put tighter constraints on the properties of chameleons fields with a strong matter coupling than tests of gravity. Motivated by this, we perform a full investigation on the possibility of testing chameleon models with both present and future Casimir experiments. We find that present-day measurements are not able to detect the chameleon. However, future experiments have a strong possibility of detecting or rule out a whole class of chameleon models

  18. Casimir effect in spherical shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The analytic regularization method is applied to study the Casimir effect for spherical cavities. Although many works have been presented in the past few years, problems related to the elimination of the regulator parameter still remain. A way to calculate the zero point energy of a perfectly conducting spherical shell which is a miscellaneous of those presented early is here proposed, How a cancelation of divergent terms occurs and how a finite parte is obtained after the elimination of the regulator parameter is shown. As a by-product the zero point energy of the interior vibration modes is obtained and this has some relevance to the quarks bag model. This relev ance is also discussed. The calculation of the energy fom the density view is also discussed. Some works in this field are criticized. The logarithmic divergent terms in the zero point energy are studied when the interior and exterior of the sphere are considered as a medium not dispersive and characterized by a dielectric constants ε 1 and ε 2 and peermeability constants μ 1 and μ 2 respectivelly. The logarithmic divergent terms are not present in the case of ε i μ i =K, with K some constant and i=1,2. (author) [pt

  19. Gravitational Casimir-Polder effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiawei; Yu, Hongwei

    2017-04-01

    The interaction due to quantum gravitational vacuum fluctuations between a gravitationally polarizable object modelled as a two-level system and a gravitational boundary is investigated. This quantum gravitational interaction is found to be position-dependent, which induces a force in close analogy to the Casimir-Polder force in the electromagnetic case. For a Dirichlet boundary, the quantum gravitational potential for the polarizable object in its ground-state is shown to behave like z-5 in the near zone, and z-6 in the far zone, where z is the distance to the boundary. For a concrete example, where a Bose-Einstein condensate is taken as a gravitationally polarizable object, the relative correction to the radius of the BEC caused by fluctuating quantum gravitational waves in vacuum is found to be of order 10-21. Although the correction is far too small to observe in comparison with its electromagnetic counterpart, it is nevertheless of the order of the gravitational strain caused by a recently detected black hole merger on the arms of the LIGO.

  20. Johnson noise and the thermal Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    We study the thermal interaction between two nearby thin metallic wires, at finite temperature. It is shown that the Johnson currents in the wires give rise, via inductive coupling, to a repulsive force between them. This thermal interaction exhibits all the puzzling features found recently in the thermal Casimir effect for lossy metallic plates, suggesting that the physical origin of the difficulties encountered in the Casimir problem resides in the inductive coupling between the Johnson currents inside the plates. We show that in our simple model all puzzles are resolved if account is taken of capacitive effects associated with the end points of the wires. Our findings suggest that capacitive finite-size effects may play an important role in the resolution of the analogous problems met in the thermal Casimir effect

  1. Oscillating Casimir force between two slabs in a Fermi sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Wei, Chen; Guo-Zhen, Su; Jin-Can, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The Casimir effect for two parallel slabs immersed in an ideal Fermi sea is investigated at both zero and nonzero temperatures. It is found that the Casimir effect in a Fermi gas is distinctly different from that in an electromagnetic field or a massive Bose gas. In contrast to the familiar result...... that the Casimir force decreases monotonically with the increase of the separation L between two slabs in an electromagnetic field and a massive Bose gas, the Casimir force in a Fermi gas oscillates as a function of L. The Casimir force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending sensitively on the magnitude...... of L. In addition, it is found that the amplitude of the Casimir force in a Fermi gas decreases with the increase of the temperature, which also is contrary to the case in a Bose gas, since the bosonic Casimir force increases linearly with the increase of the temperature in the region T

  2. Casimir elements of epsilon Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheunert, M.

    1982-10-01

    The classical framework for investigating the Casimir elements of a Lie algebra is generalized to the case of an epsilon Lie algebra L. We construct the standard L-module isomorphism of the epsilon-symmetric algebra of L onto its enveloping algebra and we introduce the Harish-Chandra homomorphism. In case the generators of L can be written in a canonical two-index form, we construct the associated standard sequence of Casimir elements and derive a formula for their eigenvalues in an arbitrary highest weight module. (orig.)

  3. Reducing detrimental electrostatic effects in Casimir-force measurements and Casimir-force-based microdevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2018-03-01

    It is well known that residual electrostatic forces create significant difficulties in precise measurements of the Casimir force and the wide use of Casimir-operated microdevices. We experimentally demonstrate that, with the help of Ar-ion cleaning of the surfaces, it is possible to make electrostatic effects negligibly small compared to the Casimir interaction. Our experimental setup consists of a dynamic atomic force microscope supplemented with an Ar-ion gun and argon reservoir. The residual potential difference between the Au-coated surfaces of a sphere and those of a plate was measured both before and after in situ Ar-ion cleaning. It is shown that this cleaning decreases the magnitude of the residual potential by up to an order of magnitude and makes it almost independent of the separation. The gradient of the Casimir force was measured using ordinary samples subjected to Ar-ion cleaning. The obtained results are shown to be in good agreement both with previous precision measurements using specially selected samples and with theoretical predictions of the Lifshitz theory. The conclusion is made that the suggested method of in situ Ar-ion cleaning is effective in reducing the electrostatic effects and therefore is a great resource for experiments on measuring the Casimir interaction and for Casimir-operated microdevices.

  4. Lethal Effects of Radiation and Platinum Analogues on Multicellular Spheroids of HeLa Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Eon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Multicellul ar tumor spheroids of HeLa cells have been grown in a static culture system. Samples of spheroids were exposed for 2 h to graded concentration of sis-platinum and its analogue, carboplatin, and then response assayed by survival of clonogenic cells. The purpose of present experiment is to clarify the effectiveness of these platinum compounds and to evaluate intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells using spheroids of HeLa cells as an experimental in vitro model. Variations of the drug sensitivity of monolayers as well as spheroids were also evaluated in cell-survival curves. In cia-platinum concentration-survival cutie, there was a large shoulder extending as far as Cq=3.4 mM, after which there was exponential decrease in survival curve having a Co Value of 1,2 {mu}M in spheroids. While the Co for the spheroids was essentially no significant change, but Cq value was larger than that of monolayers. This suggest that the effect of cis-platinum is greater in the monolayer with actively proliferating cells than hypoxic one. In the carboplatin concentration-survival curves, the Co value of spheroids was 15.0 mM and the ratio with the Co from monolayer cell (32.5 mM) was 0.46, thus indicating that the spheroids had a greater sensitivity to carboplatin than monolayers. Therefore, the effect of carboplatin is mainly on the deeper layers of spheroids acting as hypoxic cell sensitizer. The enhanced effect was obtained for monolayer cells using combined X-ray and carboplatin treatment 2 hours before irradiation. The result shown in isobologram analysis for the level of surviving fraction at 0.01 indicated that the effect of two agents was truly supra-additive. From this experimental data, carboplatin has excited much receipt interest as one of the most promising, since it is almost without nephrotoxicity and causes less gastrointestinal toxicity than cia-platinum. Interaction between carboplatin and radiation might play an important role for more effective local tumor

  5. Repulsive electromagnetic stresses in the Casimir piston

    OpenAIRE

    García, L.; González, L. E.; Lomnitz, M.; Villarreal, C.

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript has been withdrawn, since the authors have detected numerical inaccuracies that invalidate their main results concerning the existence of repulsive Casimir forces within a rectangular piston. Formulas presented in the manuscript keep still valid. The authors deeply apologize for this mistake.

  6. Halving the Casimir force with Conductive Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Man, S.P.J.; Heeck, K.; Wijngaarden, R.J.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2009-01-01

    The possibility to modify the strength of the Casimir effect by tailoring the dielectric functions of the interacting surfaces is regarded as a unique opportunity in the development of micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. In air, however, one expects that, unless noble metals are used, the

  7. Dynamical Casimir effect with semi-transparent mirrors, and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2008-01-01

    After reviewing some essential features of the Casimir effect and, specifically, of its regularization by zeta function and Hadamard methods, we consider the dynamical Casimir effect (or Fulling-Davies theory), where related regularization problems appear, with a view to an experimental verification of this theory. We finish with a discussion of the possible contribution of vacuum fluctuations to dark energy, in a Casimir-like fashion, that might involve the dynamical version

  8. Low-frequency analogue Hawking radiation: The Bogoliubov-de Gennes model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutant, Antonin; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2018-01-01

    We analytically study the low-frequency properties of the analogue Hawking effect in Bose-Einstein condensates. We show that in one-dimensional flows displaying an analogue horizon, the Hawking effect is dominant in the low-frequency regime. This happens despite nonvanishing grey-body factors, that is, the coupling of the Hawking mode and its partner to the mode propagating with the flow. To show this, we obtained analytical expressions for the scattering coefficients, in general flows and taking into account the full Bogoliubov dispersion relation. We discuss the obtained expressions for the grey-body factors. In particular, we show that they can be significantly decreased if the flow obeys a conformal coupling condition. We argue that in the presence of a small but non-zero temperature, reducing grey-body factors greatly facilitates the observation of entanglement, that is, establishing that the state of the Hawking mode and its partner is non-separable.

  9. Casimir apparatuses in a weak gravitational field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe; Calloni, Enrico; Esposito, Giampiero

    2009-01-01

    We review and assess a part of the recent work on Casimir apparatuses in the weak gravitational field of the Earth. For a free, real massless scalar field subject to Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the parallel plates, the resulting regularized and renormalized energy-momentum tensor...... is covariantly conserved, while the trace anomaly vanishes if the massless field is conformally coupled to gravity. Conformal coupling also ensures a finite Casimir energy and finite values of the pressure upon parallel plates. These results have been extended to an electromagnetic field subject to perfect...... conductor (hence idealized) boundary conditions on parallel plates, by various authors. The regularized and renormalized energy-momentum tensor has beene valuated up to second order in the gravity acceleration. In both the scalar and the electromagnetic case, studied to first order in the gravity...

  10. Casimir energy for a piecewise uniform string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevik, I.; Nielsen, H.B.

    1989-07-01

    The Casimir energy for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string is calculated. The string consists of two parts I and II, endowed in general with different tensions and mass densities, although adjusted in such a way that the velocity of sound always equals the velocity of light. The dispersion equation is worked out under general conditions, and the frequency spectrum is determined in special cases. When the ratio L II /L I between the string lengths is an integer, it is in principle possible to determine the frequency spectrum through solving algebraic equations of increasingly high degree. The Casimir energy relative to the uniform string is in general found to be negative, although in the special case L I =L II the energy is equal to zero. Delicate points in the regularization procedure are discussed; they point toward an anomaly in the theory. (orig.)

  11. Casimir interactions between graphene sheets and metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosdoff, D.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2011-01-01

    The Casimir force between graphene sheets and metamaterials is studied. Theoretical results based on the Lifshitz theory for layered, planar, two-dimensional systems in media are presented. We consider graphene-graphene, graphene-metamaterial, and metal-graphene-metamaterial configurations. We find that quantum effects of the temperature-dependent force are not apparent until the submicron range. In contrast to results with bulk dielectric and bulk metallic materials, no Casimir repulsion is found when graphene is placed on top of a magnetically active metamaterial substrate, regardless of the strength of the low-frequency magnetic response. In the case of the metal-graphene-metamaterial setting, repulsion between the metamaterial and the metal-graphene system is possible only when the dielectric response from the metal contributes significantly.

  12. Casimir Energy, Extra Dimensions and Exotic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obousy, R.; Saharian, A.

    It is well known that the Casimir effect is an excellent candidate for the stabilization of the extra dimensions. It has also been suggested that the Casimir effect in higher dimensions may be the underlying phenomenon that is responsible for the dark energy which is currently driving the accelerated expansion of the universe. In this paper we suggest that, in principle, it may be possible to directly manipulate the size of an extra dimension locally using Standard Model fields in the next generation of particle accelerators. This adjustment of the size of the higher dimension could serve as a technological mechanism to locally adjust the dark energy density and change the local expansion of spacetime. This idea holds tantalizing possibilities in the context of exotic spacecraft propulsion.

  13. Casimir pistons with general boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Fucci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyze the Casimir energy and force for a scalar field endowed with general self-adjoint boundary conditions propagating in a higher dimensional piston configuration. The piston is constructed as a direct product I×N, with I=[0,L]⊂R and N a smooth, compact Riemannian manifold with or without boundary. The study of the Casimir energy and force for this configuration is performed by employing the spectral zeta function regularization technique. The obtained analytic results depend explicitly on the spectral zeta function associated with the manifold N and the parameters describing the general boundary conditions imposed. These results are then specialized to the case in which the manifold N is a d-dimensional sphere.

  14. Casimir forces from a loop integral formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babington, James

    2010-01-01

    We reformulate the Casimir force between bodies in non-trivial background media. The force may be written in terms of loop variables, the loop being a curve around the scattering sites. A natural path ordering of exponentials takes place when a particular representation of the scattering centres is given. The basic object to be evaluated is a reduced (or abbreviated) classical pseudo-action that can be operator valued, and can be obtained from a classical path integral description.

  15. On Casimir elements of simple Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Houari, M.

    1996-08-01

    In this letter, we recall briefly the generalized Casimir elements of a finite dimensional Lie algebra. We specify those of orders two and three: when the Lie algebra is simple (even semisimple), we begin by normalizing the former (the quadratic), and then we study some actions of the latter (the cubic). In particular, we introduce a graphical formalism, translating rigorously the tensorial calculus. This allows us to prove the main theorem in a graphic theoretic manner. (author). 11 refs, 1 tab

  16. Casimir-Polder interaction in second quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefele, Juergen

    2011-03-21

    The Casimir-Polder interaction between a single neutral atom and a nearby surface, arising from the (quantum and thermal) fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, is a cornerstone of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED), and theoretically well established. Recently, Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of ultracold atoms have been used to test the predictions of cQED. The purpose of the present thesis is to upgrade single-atom cQED with the many-body theory needed to describe trapped atomic BECs. Tools and methods are developed in a second-quantized picture that treats atom and photon fields on the same footing. We formulate a diagrammatic expansion using correlation functions for both the electromagnetic field and the atomic system. The formalism is applied to investigate, for BECs trapped near surfaces, dispersion interactions of the van der Waals-Casimir-Polder type, and the Bosonic stimulation in spontaneous decay of excited atomic states. We also discuss a phononic Casimir effect, which arises from the quantum fluctuations in an interacting BEC. (orig.)

  17. Casimir-Polder interaction in second quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiefele, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    The Casimir-Polder interaction between a single neutral atom and a nearby surface, arising from the (quantum and thermal) fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, is a cornerstone of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED), and theoretically well established. Recently, Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of ultracold atoms have been used to test the predictions of cQED. The purpose of the present thesis is to upgrade single-atom cQED with the many-body theory needed to describe trapped atomic BECs. Tools and methods are developed in a second-quantized picture that treats atom and photon fields on the same footing. We formulate a diagrammatic expansion using correlation functions for both the electromagnetic field and the atomic system. The formalism is applied to investigate, for BECs trapped near surfaces, dispersion interactions of the van der Waals-Casimir-Polder type, and the Bosonic stimulation in spontaneous decay of excited atomic states. We also discuss a phononic Casimir effect, which arises from the quantum fluctuations in an interacting BEC. (orig.)

  18. Temperature dependence of the Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevik, I [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Aarseth, J B [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2006-05-26

    In view of the increasing accuracy of Casimir experiments, there is a need for performing accurate theoretical calculations. Using accurate experimental data for the permittivities we present, via the Lifshitz formula applied to the standard Casimir setup with two parallel plates, accurate theoretical results in the case of the metals Au, Cu and Al. Both similar and dissimilar cases are considered. Concentrating in particular on the finite temperature effect, we show how the Casimir pressure varies with separation for three different temperatures, T = {l_brace}1, 300, 350{r_brace}K. The metal surfaces are taken to be perfectly plane. The experimental data for the permittivities generally yield results that are in a good agreement with those calculated from the Drude relation with finite relaxation frequency. We give the results in a tabular form, in order to facilitate the assessment of the temperature correction which is on the 1% level. We emphasize two points: (i) the most promising route for a definite experimental verification of the finite temperature correction appears to be to concentrate on the case of large separations (optimum around 2 {mu}m); and (ii) there is no conflict between the present kind of theory and the Nernst theorem in thermodynamics.

  19. Hopfield-Kerr model and analogue black hole radiation in dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgiorno, F.; Cacciatori, S. L.; Dalla Piazza, F.; Doronzo, M.

    2017-11-01

    In the context of the interaction between the electromagnetic field and a dielectric dispersive lossless medium, we present a nonlinear version of the relativistically covariant Hopfield model, which is suitable for the description of a dielectric Kerr perturbation propagating in a dielectric medium. The nonlinearity is introduced in the Lagrangian through a self-interacting term proportional to the fourth power of the polarization field. We find an exact solution for the nonlinear equations describing a propagating perturbation in the dielectric medium. Furthermore, the presence of an analogue Hawking effect, as well as the thermal properties of the model, are discussed, confirming and improving the results achieved in the scalar case.

  20. Purine and its analogues and radiation damage in Bacillus megaterium spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, E.L.

    1986-12-01

    As an extension of results obtained from radiation studies on caffeine both in other laboratories and more recently in this laboratory using the bacterial spore as the test system, six compounds with chemical structures closely resembling that of caffeine were tested as radiation modifiers. Of these compounds, purine, adenine and hypoxanthine resembled caffeine in sensitizing spores to radiation, while theobromine, xanthine and theophylline did not. These responses are discussed in relation to the electron sequestration hypothesis of cellular sensitization to high-energy radiation.

  1. Effect of stereoisomerism on the radiative and reactive relaxation channels of two thio-analogues of distyrylbenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchietti, G.; Galiazzo, G.; Pannacci, D.; Mazzucato, U.; Spalletti, A.

    2006-01-01

    The photophysical and photochemical properties of the ZE and ZZ stereoisomers of two thio-analogues of distyrylbenzene, where thiophene rings replaced the central or the side benzene rings, have been investigated. The kinetic competition between the radiative and reactive relaxation channels of the lowest excited singlet state has been compared with that previously found for the corresponding EE stereoisomers and the parent hydrocarbon. The photobehaviour markedly depends on the position of the heteroatom (central or side rings). Its main effect is an increase in the S 1 → T 1 intersystem crossing, which may open the way to isomerization in the triplet manifold. The triplet reactivity, sensitized by biacetyl, was also investigated. Adiabatic formation of the excited singlet and triplet EE* isomer by irradiation of the other isomers (in the case of ZZ, a 'one photon - two bonds' mechanism is operative) was evidenced by fluorescence and flash photolysis measurements

  2. Symmetries and casimir of an extended classical long wave system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss the construction of a sequence of negative ranking symmetries through the property of uniformity in rank. More interestingly, we obtain the conserved quantities directly from the casimir of Poisson pencil. Keywords. Dispersionless equations; symmetries; casimir; conserved quantities. PACS Nos 02.30.Ik; 02.30.

  3. Repulsive Casimir force at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2009-01-01

    We study the zero and finite temperature Casimir force acting on a perfectly conducting piston with arbitrary cross section moving inside a closed cylinder with infinitely permeable walls. We show that at any temperature, the Casimir force always tends to move the piston away from the walls and toward its equilibrium position. In the case of a rectangular piston, exact expressions for the Casimir force are derived. In the high-temperature regime, we show that the leading term of the Casimir force is linear in temperature and therefore the Casimir force has a classical limit. Due to duality, all these results also hold for an infinitely permeable piston moving inside a closed cylinder with perfectly conducting walls.

  4. Synthesis, biological distribution and radiation dosimetry of Te-123m analogues of hexadecenoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Ice, R.D.; Mills, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis and biological distribution of four Te-123m analogues of hexadecenoic acid in rats, rabbits and dogs were described for use as possible myocardial imaging agents. The heart-to-blood ratios ranged from 0.13 for 3-telluranonadecenoic acid in rats at 5 mins to 6.25 for 18-methyl-17-tellura-9-nonadecenoic acid in dogs at 24 hrs. The biological half-life of the Te-123m labelled fatty acids ranged from 26 to 583 hrs in the hearts of the test animals. These Te-123m fatty acids were retained in the heart longer than radioiodinated fatty acids and have acceptable absorbed doses to the various target organs. (U.K.)

  5. A microscopic approach to Casimir and Casimir-Polder forces between metallic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellona, Pablo; Passante, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    We consider the Casimir-Polder interaction energy between a metallic nanoparticle and a metallic plate, as well as the Casimir interaction energy between two macroscopic metal plates, in terms of the many-body dispersion interactions between their constituents. Expressions for two- and three-body dispersion interactions between the microscopic parts of a real metal are first obtained, both in the retarded and non-retarded limits. These expressions are then used to evaluate the overall two- and three-body contributions to the macroscopic Casimir-Polder and Casimir force, and to compare them with each other, for the two following geometries: metal nanoparticle/half-space and half-space/half-space, where all the materials are assumed perfect conductors. The above evaluation is obtained by summing up the contributions from the microscopic constituents of the bodies (metal nanoparticles). In the case of nanoparticle/half-space, our results fully agree with those that can be extracted from the corresponding macroscopic results, and explicitly show the non-applicability of the pairwise approximation for the geometry considered. In both cases, we find that, while the overall two-body contribution yields an attractive force, the overall three-body contribution is repulsive. Also, they turn out to be of the same order, consistently with the known non applicability of the pairwise approximation. The issue of the rapidity of convergence of the many-body expansion is also briefly discussed.

  6. Purine nucleoside analogues inhibit the repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage in mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsugawa, S.; Kumar, A.

    1982-01-01

    Three purine nucleoside analogues were found to be much more effective than pyrimidine nucleoside analogues in the screening of PLD repair inhibitors using X-irradiated Chinese hamster HA-1 cells. Among the three purine nucleoside analogues, 3'-dG was the most effective at a non-toxic concentration. (author)

  7. Sign and other aspects of semiclassical Casimir energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaden, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The Casimir energy of a massless scalar field is semiclassically given by contributions due to classical periodic rays. The required subtractions in the spectral density are determined explicitly. The semiclassical Casimir energies so defined coincide with those of zeta function regularization in the cases studied. Poles in the analytic continuation of zeta function regularization are related to nonuniversal subtractions in the spectral density. The sign of the Casimir energy of a scalar field on a smooth manifold is estimated by the sign of the contribution due to the shortest periodic rays only. Demanding continuity of the Casimir energy under small deformations of the manifold, the method is extended to integrable systems. The Casimir energy of a massless scalar field on a manifold with boundaries includes contributions due to periodic rays that lie entirely within the boundaries. These contributions in general depend on the boundary conditions. Although the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field may be sensitive to the physical dimensions of manifolds with boundary. In favorable cases its sign can, contrary to conventional wisdom, be inferred without calculation of the Casimir energy

  8. The Casimir effect for pistons with transmittal boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucci, Guglielmo

    2017-11-01

    This work focuses on the analysis of the Casimir effect for pistons subject to transmittal boundary conditions. In particular we consider, as piston configuration, a direct product manifold of the type I × N where I is a closed interval of the real line and N is a smooth compact Riemannian manifold. By utilizing the spectral zeta function regularization technique, we compute the Casimir energy of the system and the Casimir force acting on the piston. Explicit results for the force are provided when the manifold N is a d-dimensional sphere.

  9. Repulsive Casimir and Casimir–Polder forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, Kimball A; Abalo, E K; Parashar, Prachi; Pourtolami, Nima; Brevik, Iver; Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2012-01-01

    Casimir and Casimir–Polder repulsions have been known for more than 50 years. The general ‘Lifshitz’ configuration of parallel semi-infinite dielectric slabs permits repulsion if they are separated by a dielectric fluid that has a value of permittivity that is intermediate between those of the dielectric slabs. This was indirectly confirmed in the 1970s, and more directly by Capasso’s group recently. It has also been known for many years that electrically and magnetically polarizable bodies can experience a repulsive quantum vacuum force. More amenable to practical application are situations where repulsion could be achieved between ordinary conducting and dielectric bodies in vacuum. The status of the field of Casimir repulsion with emphasis on some recent developments will be surveyed. Here, stress will be placed on analytic developments, especially on Casimir–Polder (CP) interactions between anisotropically polarizable atoms, and CP interactions between anisotropic atoms and bodies that also exhibit anisotropy, either because of anisotropic constituents, or because of geometry. Repulsion occurs for wedge-shaped and cylindrical conductors, provided the geometry is sufficiently asymmetric, that is, either the wedge is sufficiently sharp or the atom is sufficiently far from the cylinder. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker’s 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’. (review)

  10. Casimir amplitudes in topological quantum phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, M A; Continentino, M A

    2018-01-01

    Topological phase transitions constitute a new class of quantum critical phenomena. They cannot be described within the usual framework of the Landau theory since, in general, the different phases cannot be distinguished by an order parameter, neither can they be related to different symmetries. In most cases, however, one can identify a diverging length at these topological transitions. This allows us to describe them using a scaling approach and to introduce a set of critical exponents that characterize their universality class. Here we consider some relevant models of quantum topological transitions associated with well-defined critical exponents that are related by a quantum hyperscaling relation. We extend to these models a finite-size scaling approach based on techniques for calculating the Casimir force in electromagnetism. This procedure allows us to obtain universal Casimir amplitudes at their quantum critical points. Our results verify the validity of finite-size scaling in these systems and confirm the values of the critical exponents obtained previously.

  11. Casimir amplitudes in topological quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, M. A.; Continentino, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    Topological phase transitions constitute a new class of quantum critical phenomena. They cannot be described within the usual framework of the Landau theory since, in general, the different phases cannot be distinguished by an order parameter, neither can they be related to different symmetries. In most cases, however, one can identify a diverging length at these topological transitions. This allows us to describe them using a scaling approach and to introduce a set of critical exponents that characterize their universality class. Here we consider some relevant models of quantum topological transitions associated with well-defined critical exponents that are related by a quantum hyperscaling relation. We extend to these models a finite-size scaling approach based on techniques for calculating the Casimir force in electromagnetism. This procedure allows us to obtain universal Casimir amplitudes at their quantum critical points. Our results verify the validity of finite-size scaling in these systems and confirm the values of the critical exponents obtained previously.

  12. Synchrotron-Radiation X-Ray Investigation of Li+/Na+ Intercalation into Prussian Blue Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Moritomo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prussian blue analogies (PBAs are promising cathode materials for lithium ion (LIB and sodium ion (SIB secondary batteries, reflecting their covalent and nanoporous host structure. With use of synchrotron-radiation (SR X-ray source, we investigated the structural and electronic responses of the host framework of PBAs against Li+ and Na+ intercalation by means of the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS. The structural investigation reveals a robust nature of the host framework against Li+ and Na+ intercalation, which is advantageous for the stability and lifetime of the batteries. The spectroscopic investigation identifies the redox processes in respective plateaus in the discharge curves. We further compare these characteristics with those of the conventional cathode materials, such as, LiCoO2, LiFePO4, and LiMn2O4.

  13. An ``Anatomic approach" to study the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Haakh, Harald; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    The Casimir effect, in its simplest definition, is a quantum mechanical force between two objects placed in vacuum. In recent years the Casimir force has been the object of an exponentially growing attention both from theorists and experimentalists. A new generation of experiments paved the way for new challenges and spotted some shadows in the comparison to theory. Here we are going to isolate different contributions to the Casimir interaction and perform a detailed study to shine new light on this phenomenon. As an example, the contributions of Foucault (eddy current) modes will be discussed in different configurations. This ``anatomic approach'' allows to clearly put into evidence special features and to explain unusual behaviors. This brings new physical understanding on the undergoing physical mechanisms and suggests new ways to engineer the Casimir effect.

  14. Casimir effect in presence of spontaneous Lorentz symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, C. A.

    2018-01-01

    The Casimir effect is one of the most remarkable consequences of the nonzero vacuum energy predicted by quantum field theory. In this contribution we study the Lorentz-violation effects of the minimal standard-model extension on the Casimir force between two parallel conducting plates in the vacuum. Using a perturbative method, we compute the relevant Green’s function which satisfies given boundary conditions. The standard point-splitting technique allow us to express the vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor in terms of this Green’s function. Finally, we study the Casimir energy and the Casimir force paying particular attention to the quantum effects as approaching the plates.

  15. Casimir stress in materials: Hard divergency at soft walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griniasty, Itay; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2017-11-01

    The Casimir force between macroscopic bodies is well understood, but not the Casimir stress inside bodies. Suppose empty space or a uniform medium meets a soft wall where the refractive index is continuous but its derivative jumps. For this situation we predict a characteristic power law for the stress inside the soft wall and close to its edges. Our result shows that such edges are not tolerated in the aggregation of liquids at surfaces, regardless whether the liquid is attracted or repelled.

  16. Casimir energy and the possibility of higher dimensional manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Obousy, R. K.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the Casimir effect is an excellent candidate for the stabilization of the extra dimensions. It has also been suggested that the Casimir effect in higher dimensions may be the underlying phenomenon that is responsible for the dark energy which is currently driving the accelerated expansion of the universe. In this paper we suggest that, in principle, it may be possible to directly manipulate the size of an extra dimension locally using Standard Model fields in the next ge...

  17. Towards a Casimir Force Measurement between Micromachined Parallel Plate Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco J. Wiegerink

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ever since its prediction, experimental investigation of the Casimir force has been of great scientific interest. Many research groups have successfully attempted quantifying the force with different device geometries; however, measurement of the Casimir force between parallel plates with sub-micron separation distance is still a challenging task, since it becomes extremely difficult to maintain sufficient parallelism between the plates. The Casimir force can significantly influence the operation of micro devices and to realize reliable and reproducible devices it is necessary to understand and experimentally verify the influence of the Casimir force at sub-micron scale. In this paper, we present the design principle, fabrication and characterization of micromachined parallel plate structures that could allow the measurement of the Casimir force with tunable separation distance in the range of 100 to 1000 nm. Initially, a gold coated parallel plate structure is explored to measure the Casimir force, but also other material combinations could be investigated. Using gold-silicon eutectic bonding, a reliable approach to bond chips with integrated suspended plates together with a well-defined separation distance in the order of 1–2 μm is developed.

  18. Particle creation by a black hole as a consequence of the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugayev, R. M.

    1987-12-01

    Particle creation by a black hole is investigated in terms of temperature corrections to the Casimir effect. The reduction of the Hawking effect to more familiar effects observed in the laboratory enables us to reveal the mechanism of particle creation. The blackbody nature of the Hawking radiation is due to the interaction of virtual particles with the surface of a “cavity” formed by the Schwarzschild gravitational field potential barrier. These particles are “squeezed out” by the contraction of the potential barrier and appear to an observer at J + as the real blackbody ones.

  19. Casimir scaling and Yang-Mills glueballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Deog Ki; Lee, Jong-Wan; Lucini, Biagio; Piai, Maurizio; Vadacchino, Davide

    2017-12-01

    We conjecture that in Yang-Mills theories the ratio between the ground-state glueball mass squared and the string tension is proportional to the ratio of the eigenvalues of quadratic Casimir operators in the adjoint and the fundamental representations. The proportionality constant depends on the dimension of the space-time only, and is henceforth universal. We argue that this universality, which is supported by available lattice results, is a direct consequence of area-law confinement. In order to explain this universal behavior, we provide three analytical arguments, based respectively on a Bethe-Salpeter analysis, on the saturation of the scale anomaly by the lightest scalar glueball and on QCD sum rules, commenting on the underlying assumptions that they entail and on their physical implications.

  20. Casimir Energies for Isorefractive or Diaphanous Balls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the Casimir self-energy of a homogeneous dielectric ball is divergent, although a finite self-energy can be extracted through second order in the deviation of the permittivity from the vacuum value. The exception occurs when the speed of light inside the spherical boundary is the same as that outside, so the self-energy of a perfectly conducting spherical shell is finite, as is the energy of a dielectric-diamagnetic sphere with ε μ = 1 , a so-called isorefractive or diaphanous ball. Here we re-examine that example and attempt to extend it to an electromagnetic δ -function sphere, where the electric and magnetic couplings are equal and opposite. Unfortunately, although the energy expression is superficially ultraviolet finite, additional divergences appear that render it difficult to extract a meaningful result in general, but some limited results are presented.

  1. Casimir scaling, glueballs, and hybrid gluelumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, V.; Semay, C.; Brau, F.

    2006-01-01

    Assuming that the Casimir scaling hypothesis is well verified in QCD, masses of glueballs and hybrid gluelumps (gluon attached to a point-like c anti c pair) are computed within the framework of the rotating string formalism. In our model, two gluons are attached by an adjoint string in a glueball, while the gluon and the colour octet c anti c pair are attached by two fundamental strings in a hybrid gluelump. Masses for such exotic hadrons are computed with very few free parameters. These predictions can serve as a guide for experimental searches. In particular, the ground-state glueballs lie on a Regge trajectory and the lightest 2 ++ state has a mass compatible with some experimental candidates. (orig.)

  2. A Toy Cosmology Using a Hubble-Scale Casimir Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. McCulloch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The visible mass of the observable universe agrees with that needed for a flat cosmos, and the reason for this is not known. It is shown that this can be explained by modelling the Hubble volume as a black hole that emits Hawking radiation inwards, disallowing wavelengths that do not fit exactly into the Hubble diameter, since partial waves would allow an inference of what lies outside the horizon. This model of “horizon wave censorship” is equivalent to a Hubble-scale Casimir effect. This incomplete toy model is presented to stimulate discussion. It predicts a minimum mass and acceleration for the observable universe which are in agreement with the observed mass and acceleration, and predicts that the observable universe gains mass as it expands and was hotter in the past. It also predicts a suppression of variation on the largest cosmic scales that agrees with the low-l cosmic microwave background anomaly seen by the Planck satellite.

  3. Analogue Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barceló Carlos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Analogue models of (and for gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity.

  4. Repulsive Casimir force from fractional Neumann boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S.C.; Teo, L.P.

    2009-01-01

    This Letter studies the finite temperature Casimir force acting on a rectangular piston associated with a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field at finite temperature. Dirichlet boundary conditions are imposed on the walls of a d-dimensional rectangular cavity, and a fractional Neumann condition is imposed on the piston that moves freely inside the cavity. The fractional Neumann condition gives an interpolation between the Dirichlet and Neumann conditions, where the Casimir force is known to be always attractive and always repulsive respectively. For the fractional Neumann boundary condition, the attractive or repulsive nature of the Casimir force is governed by the fractional order which takes values from zero (Dirichlet) to one (Neumann). When the fractional order is larger than 1/2, the Casimir force is always repulsive. For some fractional orders that are less than but close to 1/2, it is shown that the Casimir force can be either attractive or repulsive depending on the aspect ratio of the cavity and the temperature.

  5. Analogue Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Barceló

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Analogue gravity is a research programme which investigates analogues of general relativistic gravitational fields within other physical systems, typically but not exclusively condensed matter systems, with the aim of gaining new insights into their corresponding problems. Analogue models of (and for gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity.

  6. Some new results of the Casimir force for rectangular cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, X.-H.; Li, X.-Z.

    2001-01-01

    The Casimir effect giving rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the configuration boundaries that confine the massless scalar field is analytically approached for a p-dimensional rectangular cavity with the Dirichlet boundary conditions and different spacetime dimensions D. The Casimir force is attractive in the cases: i) p-odd hypercube when D is less than the critical dimension D c and p ≤ 29; ii) o =2 and the length ratio is less than a critical value; iii) p = 1. The Casimir force is repulsive in the cases: i) p = 2 and the length ratio is larger than a critical value; ii) the length of q edges is equal and others are much longer than q edges, in the direction of (p-q) edges; iii) (p-q) edges are much longer than q edges, in the direction of (p-q) edges

  7. The Casimir force for 2d sinusoidal gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marachevsky Valery N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Casimir free energy for 2d gratings separated by a vacuum slit is expressed in terms of Rayleigh coefficients, a novel general approach valid for arbitrary 2d surface profiles of gratings is outlined. The normal Casimir force in the system of two identical Si gratings with 2d sinusoidal surface profiles separated by a vacuum slit is computed for several amplitudes of surface profiles, distance dependence of the force is studied. A comparison with results for flat boundaries is performed.

  8. Radiation protection of the murine intestine by Misoprostol, a prostaglandin E/sub 1/ analogue, given alone or with WR-2721, is stereospecific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.R.; Houseman, K.A.; Nelson, A.K.; Collins, P.W.

    1988-06-01

    Misoprostol, a prostaglandin (PG) E/sub 1/ analogue, is one of the most effective radiation protectors of the PGs investigated to date. Misoprostol-induced protection is also additive to protection by the widely studied thio compound, WR-2721. The mechanism of PG-induced radiation protection and its interaction with WR-2721 is unknown. One important step in the investigation of the mechanism is to determine if PG-induced protection and its interaction with WR-2721 is mediated through PG receptor sites. A direct determination of receptor sites on murine intestinal clonogenic cells could not be made; however an indirect approach was possible. Misoprostol is composed of four stereoisomers of about equal proportions of which only one is gastric antisecretory and cytoprotective. Studies reported here compared radiation protection by this active isomer with that of one of the three inactive isomers. Furthermore, the additional protection of the two isomers when administered with WR-2721 was investigated. Results showed that only the active isomer was protective from radiation injury and this isomer was the only one which afforded additional protection with WR-2721. These data show that PG-induced radiation protection is receptor site dependent and stereospecific.

  9. Radiation protection of the murine intestine by Misoprostol, a prostaglandin E1 analogue, given alone or with WR-2721, is stereospecific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, W.R.; Houseman, K.A.; Nelson, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    Misoprostol, a prostaglandin (PG) E 1 analogue, is one of the most effective radiation protectors of the PGs investigated to date. Misoprostol-induced protection is also additive to protection by the widely studied thio compound, WR-2721. The mechanism of PG-induced radiation protection and its interaction with WR-2721 is unknown. One important step in the investigation of the mechanism is to determine if PG-induced protection and its interaction with WR-2721 is mediated through PG receptor sites. A direct determination of receptor sites on murine intestinal clonogenic cells could not be made; however an indirect approach was possible. Misoprostol is composed of four stereoisomers of about equal proportions of which only one is gastric antisecretory and cytoprotective. Studies reported here compared radiation protection by this active isomer with that of one of the three inactive isomers. Furthermore, the additional protection of the two isomers when administered with WR-2721 was investigated. Results showed that only the active isomer was protective from radiation injury and this isomer was the only one which afforded additional protection with WR-2721. These data show that PG-induced radiation protection is receptor site dependent and stereospecific. (author)

  10. Casimir densities for parallel plate in the domain wall background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setare, M R

    2003-01-01

    The Casimir forces on two parallel plates in the conformally flat domain wall background due to a conformally coupled massless scalar field satisfying mixed boundary conditions on the plates are investigated. In the general case of mixed boundary conditions, formulae are derived for the vacuum expectation values of the energy-momentum tensor and vacuum forces acting on the boundaries

  11. Casimir-Lifshitz force out of thermal equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antezza, M.; Pitaevskii, L.P.; Stringari, S.; Svetovoy, Vitaly

    We study the Casimir-Lifshitz interaction out of thermal equilibrium, when the interacting objects are at different temperatures. The analysis is focused on the surface-surface, surface-rarefied body, and surface-atom configurations. A systematic investigation of the contributions to the force

  12. Interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Alexej

    2010-06-23

    In this thesis, we investigate the interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the inclined-plates, sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. We use the worldline approach, which combines the string-inspired quantum field theoretical formalism with Monte Carlo techniques. The approach allows the precise computation of Casimir energies in arbitrary geometries. We analyze the dependence of the Casimir energy, force and torque on the separation parameter and temperature T, and find Casimir phenomena which are dominated by long-range fluctuations. We demonstrate that for open geometries, thermal energy densities are typically distributed on scales of thermal wavelengths. As an important consequence, approximation methods for thermal corrections based on local energy-density estimates, such as the proximity-force approximation, are found to become unreliable even at small surface-separations. Whereas the hightemperature behavior is always found to be linear in T, richer power-law behaviors at small temperatures emerge. In particular, thermal forces can develop a non-monotonic behavior. Many novel numerical as well as analytical results are presented. (orig.)

  13. What is the temperature dependence of the Casimir effect?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeye, J S [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Brevik, I [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Aarseth, J B [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Milton, K A [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2006-05-19

    There has been recent criticism of our approach to the Casimir force between real metallic surfaces at finite temperature, saying it is in conflict with the third law of thermodynamics and in contradiction with experiment. We show that these claims are unwarranted, and that our approach has strong theoretical support, while the experimental situation is still unclear.

  14. Switching Casimir forces with phase-change materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torricelli, G.; van Zwol, P. J.; Shpak, O.; Binns, C.; Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Wuttig, M.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate here a controllable variation in the Casimir force. Changes in the force of up to 20% at separations of similar to 100 nm between Au and Ag-In-Sb-Te (AIST) surfaces were achieved on crystallization of an amorphous sample of AIST. This material is well known for its structural

  15. Reaction analogues in the radiation-induced deamination and dephosphorylation of bio-organic molecules 2: Oxygenated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1988-02-01

    The OH-induced deamination and dephosphorylation of simple peptides and phosphate esters in oxygenated solutions involve the fomation and subsequent degradation of the perodyl radicals RCONHC(/dot O/)R 2 and /bigcirc P/ OC(/dot O/ 2 )R 2 respectively. Reaction analogues in the degradation of peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals in these two systems are evaluated with reference to the OH-induced main-chain cleavage of protein and DNA. 25 refs

  16. Casimir interaction between spheres in (D+1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, L.P. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500, Semenyih, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2014-05-06

    We consider the Casimir interaction between two spheres in (D+1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime due to the vacuum fluctuations of scalar fields. We consider combinations of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The TGTG formula of the Casimir interaction energy is derived. The computations of the T matrices of the two spheres are straightforward. To compute the two G matrices, known as translation matrices, which relate the hyper-spherical waves in two spherical coordinate frames differ by a translation, we generalize the operator approach employed in R.C. Wittman, Spherical Wave Operators and the Translation Formulas, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 36 (1988) 1078. . The result is expressed in terms of an integral over Gegenbauer polynomials. In contrast to the D=3 case, we do not re-express the integral in terms of 3j-symbols and hyper-spherical waves, which in principle, can be done but does not simplify the formula. Using our expression for the Casimir interaction energy, we derive the large separation and small separation asymptotic expansions of the Casimir interaction energy. In the large separation regime, we find that the Casimir interaction energy is of order L{sup −2D+3}, L{sup −2D+1} and L{sup −2D−1} respectively for Dirichlet-Dirichlet, Dirichlet-Neumann and Neumann-Neumann boundary conditions, where L is the center-to-center distance of the two spheres. In the small separation regime, we confirm that the leading term of the Casimir interaction agrees with the proximity force approximation, which is of order d{sup −((D+1)/2)}, where d is the distance between the two spheres. Another main result of this work is the analytic computations of the next-to-leading order term in the small separation asymptotic expansion. This term is computed using careful order analysis as well as perturbation method. In the case the radius of one of the sphere goes to infinity, we find that the results agree with the one we derive for sphere-plate configuration

  17. BALANOL ANALOGUES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to a solid phase methodology for the preparation of a combinatorial library of structural analogues of the natural product balanol (ophiocordin, azepinostatin), which is a protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. The method comprises solid...

  18. Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone), a polyamine analogue, sensitized γ-radiation-induced cell death in HL-60 leukemia cells Sensitizing effect of MGBG on γ-radiation-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sik; Lee, Jin; Chung, Hai Won; Choi, Han; Paik, Sang Gi; Kim, In Gyu

    2006-09-01

    Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), a polyamine analogue, has been known to inhibit the biosynthesis of polyamines, which are important in cell proliferation. We showed that MGBG treatment significantly affected γ-radiation-induced cell cycle transition (G(1)/G(0)→S→G(2)/M) and thus γ-radiation-induced cell death. As determined by micronuclei and comet assay, we showed that it sensitized the cytotoxic effect induced by γ-radiation. One of the reasons is that polyamine depletion by MGBG treatment did not effectively protect against the chemical (OH) or physical damage to DNA caused by γ-radiation. Through in vitro experiment, we confirmed that DNA strand breaks induced by γ-radiation was prevented more effectively in the presence of polyamines (spermine and spermidine) than in the absence of polyamines. MGBG also blocks the cell cycle transition caused by γ-radiation (G(2) arrest), which helps protect cells by allowing time for DNA repair before entry into mitosis or apoptosis, via the down regulation of cyclin D1, which mediates the transition from G(1) to S phase of cell cycle, and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, which is involved in the DNA sensing, repair and cell cycle check point. Therefore, the abrogation of G(2) arrest sensitizes cells to the effect of γ-radiation. As a result, γ-radiation-induced cell death increased by about 2.5-3.0-fold in cells treated with MGBG. However, exogenous spermidine supplement partially relieved this γ-radiation-induced cytotoxicity and cell death. These findings suggest a potentially therapeutic strategy for increasing the cytotoxic efficacy of γ-radiation.

  19. Casimir scaling and Yang–Mills glueballs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deog Ki Hong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We conjecture that in Yang–Mills theories the ratio between the ground-state glueball mass squared and the string tension is proportional to the ratio of the eigenvalues of quadratic Casimir operators in the adjoint and the fundamental representations. The proportionality constant depends on the dimension of the space-time only, and is henceforth universal. We argue that this universality, which is supported by available lattice results, is a direct consequence of area-law confinement. In order to explain this universal behavior, we provide three analytical arguments, based respectively on a Bethe–Salpeter analysis, on the saturation of the scale anomaly by the lightest scalar glueball and on QCD sum rules, commenting on the underlying assumptions that they entail and on their physical implications. Keywords: Glueballs, Yang–Mills theories, Confinement, Casimir scaling

  20. Cosmology in nonlinear multidimensional gravity and the Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolokhov, S V; Bronnikov, K A

    2017-01-01

    We study the possible cosmological models in Kaluza-Klein-type multidimensional gravity with a curvature-nonlinear Lagrangian and a spherical extra space, taking into account the Casimir energy. First, we find a minimum of the effective potential of extra dimensions, leading to a physically reasonable value of the effective cosmological constant in our 4D space-time. In this model, the huge Casimir energy density is compensated by a fine-tuned contribution of the curvature-nonlinear terms in the original action. Second, we present a viable model with slowly evolving extra dimensions and power-law inflation in our space-time. In both models, the results formulated in Einstein and Jordan frames are compared. (paper)

  1. Non-equilibrium Casimir force between vibrating plates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hanke

    Full Text Available We study the fluctuation-induced, time-dependent force between two plates confining a correlated fluid which is driven out of equilibrium mechanically by harmonic vibrations of one of the plates. For a purely relaxational dynamics of the fluid we calculate the fluctuation-induced force generated by the vibrating plate on the plate at rest. The time-dependence of this force is characterized by a positive lag time with respect to the driving. We obtain two distinctive contributions to the force, one generated by diffusion of stress in the fluid and another related to resonant dissipation in the cavity. The relation to the dynamic Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field and possible experiments to measure the time-dependent Casimir force are discussed.

  2. Attractive electromagnetic Casimir stress on a spherical dielectric shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, N.; Quandt, M.; Weigel, H.

    2013-01-01

    Based on calculations involving an idealized boundary condition, it has long been assumed that the stress on a spherical conducting shell is repulsive. We use the more realistic case of a Drude dielectric to show that the stress is attractive, matching the generic behavior of Casimir forces in electromagnetism. We trace the discrepancy between these two cases to interactions between the electromagnetic quantum fluctuations and the dielectric material

  3. Casimir force between two Aharonov-Bohm selenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duru, I.H.

    1989-06-01

    We show that a force of Casimir type case be associated with the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We consider two parallel, infinitely long and thin selenoids confining the quantized fluxes n 1 and n 2 within them. Using the Green function method, the vacuum expectation value of the system's energy which includes ''self interaction'' terms and a finite ''mutual interaction'' term is calculated. 8 refs

  4. On the static Casimir effect with parity-breaking mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, C.D. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Bariloche (Argentina); Remaggi, M.L. [Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Mendoza (Argentina)

    2017-03-15

    We study the Casimir interaction energy due to the vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic (EM) field in the presence of two mirrors, described by 2+1-dimensional, generally nonlocal actions, which may contain both parity-conserving and parity-breaking terms. We compare the results with the ones corresponding to Chern-Simons boundary conditions and evaluate the interaction energy for several particular situations. (orig.)

  5. Tuning the Mass of Chameleon Fields in Casimir Force Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Ph; Davis, A C; Shaw, D J; Iannuzzi, D

    2010-01-01

    We have calculated the chameleon pressure between two parallel plates in the presence of an intervening medium that affects the mass of the chameleon field. As intuitively expected, the gas in the gap weakens the chameleon interaction mechanism with a screening effect that increases with the plate separation and with the density of the intervening medium. This phenomenon might open up new directions in the search of chameleon particles with future long range Casimir force experiments.

  6. On the global Casimir effect in the Schwarzschild spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, C. R.; Tahim, M. O.; Cunha, M. S.; Vieira, H. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we study the vacuum quantum fluctuations of the stationary modes of an uncharged scalar field with mass m around a Schwarzschild black hole with mass M, at zero and non-zero temperatures. The procedure consists of calculating the energy eigenvalues starting from the exact solutions found for the dynamics of the scalar field, considering a frequency cutoff in which the particle is not absorbed by the black hole. From this result, we obtain the exterior contributions for the vacuum energy associated to the stationary states of the scalar field, by considering the half-summing of the levels of energy and taking into account the respective degeneracies, in order to better capture the nontrivial topology of the black hole spacetime. Then we use the Riemann's zeta function to regularize the vacuum energy thus found. Such a regularized quantity is the Casimir energy, whose analytic computation we show to yield a convergent series. The Casimir energy obtained does not take into account any boundaries artificially imposed on the system, just the nontrivial spacetime topology associated to the source and its singularity. We suggest that this latter manifests itself through the vacuum tension calculated on the event horizon. We also investigate the problem by considering the thermal corrections via Helmholtz free energy calculation, computing the Casimir internal energy, the corresponding tension on the event horizon, the Casimir entropy, and the thermal capacity of the regularized quantum vacuum, analyzing their behavior at low and high temperatures, pointing out the thermodynamic instability of the system in the considered regime, i.e. mMll 1.

  7. Dispersion forces in micromechanics: Casimir and Casimir-Polder forces affected by geometry and non-zero temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingsen, Simen Andreas Aadnoey

    2011-01-15

    The present thesis focuses on several topics within three separate but related branches of the overall field of dispersion forces. The three branches are: temperature corrections to the Casimir force between real materials (Part 1), explicit calculation of Casimir energy in wedge geometries (Part 2), and Casimir-Polder forces on particles out of thermal equilibrium (Part 3). Part 1 deals primarily with analysis of a previously purported thermodynamic inconsistency in the Casimir-Lifshitz free energy of the interaction of two plane mirrors - violation of the third law of thermodynamics - when the latter's dielectric response is described with dissipative models. It is shown analytically and numerically that the Casimir entropy of the interaction between two metallic mirrors described by the Drude model does tend to zero at zero temperature, provided electronic relaxation does not vanish. The leading order terms at low temperature are found. A similar calculation is carried out for the interaction of semiconductors with small but non-zero DC conductivity. In a generalisation, it is shown that a violation of the third law can only occur for permittivities whose low-frequency behaviour is temperature dependent near zero temperature. A calculation using path integral methods shows that the low temperature behaviour of the interaction of fluctuating Foucault currents in two mirrors of Drude metal is identical to that of the full Casimir-Lifshitz free energy, reasserting a previous finding by Intravaia and Henkel that such fluctuating bulk currents are the physical reason for the anomalous entropy behaviour. In a related effort, an analysis of the frequency dependence of the Casimir force by Ford is generalised to imperfectly reflecting mirrors. A paradox is pointed out, in that the effects of a perturbation of the reflecting properties of the mirrors in a finite frequency window can be calculated in two ways giving different results. It is concluded that optimistic

  8. Anthracyclines as radiosensitizers. A Cu(II) complex of a simpler analogue modifies DNA in Chinese Hamster V79 cells under low-dose γ radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saurabh Das; Mandal, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinones are structural analogues of anthracycline anticancer drugs showing similarity in physicochemical attributes, electrochemical behavior and biophysical interactions. 1,2-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (Q) and its complexes with Cu(II)/Ni(II) were studied for γ radiation induced modification of DNA in Chinese Hamster V79 cells. The amount of double stranded DNA remaining was ascertained by fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding using ethidium bromide. Modification of double stranded DNA increased in the presence of Q and Cu(II)-Q when cells were irradiated (0-4.2 Gray). Ni(II)-Q was not that effective. Changing incubation time before recovery of DNA from cells there was evidence for DNA repair that was least for Cu(II)-Q treated cells. Minimum repair in case of Cu(II)-Q treated cells suggest the compound either assists radiation induced damage of agents responsible for repair or interacts with species like H 2 O 2 that assist in repair. Since a hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone and its Cu(II) complex show radiosensitizing property, anthracyclines that contain a hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone as the core moiety could also be tried as radiosensitizers in treating cancer. (author)

  9. Eigenvalues of Casimir operators for the general linear, the special linear, and the orthosymplectic Lie superalgebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheunert, M.

    1982-10-01

    The generators of the algebras under consideration can be written in a canonical two-index form and hence the associated standard seuqence of Casimir elements can be constructed. Following the classical approach by Perelomov and Popov, we obtain the eigenvalues of these Casimir elements in an arbitrary highest weight module by calculating the corresponding generating functions. (orig.)

  10. A verification of quantum field theory – measurement of Casimir force

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Here we review our work on measurement of the Casimir force between a large alu- minum coated a sphere and flat plate using an atomic force microscope. The average statistical pre- cision is 1% of the force measured at the closest separation. We have also shown nontrival boundary dependence of the Casimir ...

  11. Towards measurement of the Casimir force between parallel plates separated at sub-mircon distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syed Nawazuddin, M.B.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2011-01-01

    Ever since its prediction, experimental investigation of the Casimir force has been of great scientific interest. Many research groups have successfully attempted quantifying the force with different device geometries; however measurement of the Casimir force between parallel plates with sub-micron

  12. Hide it to see it better: a robust setup to probe the thermal Casimir effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-06-20

    We describe a Casimir setup consisting of two aligned sinusoidally corrugated Ni surfaces, one of which is "hidden" by a thin opaque layer of gold with a flat exposed surface. The gold layer acts as a low-pass filter that allows for a clean observation of the controversial thermal Casimir force between the corrugations, with currently available Casimir apparatuses. The proposed scheme of measurement, based on the phase-dependent modulation of the Casimir force, requires no electrostatic calibrations of the apparatus, and is unaffected by uncertainties in the knowledge of the optical properties of the surfaces. This scheme should allow for an unambiguous discrimination between alternative theoretical prescriptions that have been proposed in the literature for the thermal Casimir effect.

  13. On the Casimir of the group ISL(n,R) and its algebraic decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecina-Cruz, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, an explicit expression for the Casimir operator (or the Casimir invariant) of the inhomogeneous group ISL(n,R) in its enveloping algebra is proposed, which using contractions of the tensorial indices of the generating operators P ρ and E μ ν may be presented in the following [slightly more comprehensible as Eq. (1)] form. The Casimir is obtained by symmetrizing this expression. This tensor form is useful in the classification of particles in affine gravitational gauge theories; such as that based on ISL(4,R). It is also proven that the Casimir of ISL(n,R) can be decomposed in terms of the Casimirs of its little groups, a key point in the posterior construction of its irreducible representations

  14. Radiation-Induced Defects in Kaolinite as Tracers of Past Occurrence of Radionuclides in a Natural Analogue of High Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, T.; Fourdrin, C.; Calas, G.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the processes controlling migrations of radioelements at the Earth's surface is an important issue for the long-term safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repositories (HLNWR). Evidence of past occurrence and transfer of radionuclides can be found using radiation-induced defects in minerals. Clay minerals are particularly relevant because of their widespread occurrence at the Earth's surface and their finely divided nature which provides high contact area with radioactive fluids. Owing to its sensitivity to radiations, kaolinite can be used as natural, in situ dosimeter. Kaolinite is known to contain radiation-induced defects which are detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. They are differentiated by their nature, their production kinetics and their thermal stability. One of these defects is stable at the scale of geological periods and provides a record of past radionuclide occurrence. Based on artificial irradiations, a methodology has been subsequently proposed to determine paleodose cumulated by kaolinite since its formation. The paleodose can be used to derive equivalent radioelement concentrations, provided that the age of kaolinite formation can be constrained. This allows quantitative reconstruction of past transfers of radioelements in natural systems. An example is given for the Nopal I U-deposit (Chihuahua, Mexico), hosted in hydrothermally altered volcanic tufs and considered as analogue of the Yucca Mountain site. The paleodoses experienced by kaolinites were determined from the concentration of defects and dosimetry parameters of experimental irradiations. Using few geochemical assumption, a equivalent U-content responsible for defects in kaolinite was calculated from the paleodose, a dose rate balance and model ages of kaolinites constrained by tectonic phases. In a former study, the ages were assumptions derived from regional tectonic events. In thepresent study, ages of mineralization events are measured from U

  15. Casimir energy of massless fermions in the Slab-bag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paola, R.D.M. de; Rodrigues, R.B.; Svaiter, N.F.

    1999-04-01

    The zero-point energy of a massless fermion field in the interior of two parallel plates in a D-dimensional space-time at zero temperature is calculated. In order to regularize the model, a mix between dimensional and zeta function regularization procedure is used and it is founded that the regularized zero-point energy density is finite for any number of space-time dimensions. We present a general expression for the Casimir energy for the fermionic field in such a situation. (author)

  16. Casimir entropy for a ball in front of a plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordag, M.; Pirozhenko, I. G.

    2010-12-01

    The violation of the third law of thermodynamics for metals described by the Drude model and for dielectrics with finite dc conductivity is one of the most interesting problems in the field of the Casimir effect. It manifests itself as a nonvanishing of the entropy for vanishing temperature. We review the relevant calculations for plane surfaces and calculate the corresponding contributions for a ball in front of a plane. In this geometry, these appear in much the same way as for parallel planes. We conclude that the violation of the 3rd law is not related to the infinite size of the planes.

  17. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Svaiter, N.F.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy

  18. A search for the analogue to Cherenkov radiation by high energy neutrinos at superluminal speeds in ICARUS

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.B.; Cocco, A.G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Ivashkin, A.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Mania, S.; Mannocchi, G.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Periale, L.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.R.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zaremba, K.; Cohen, A.

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA collaboration [1] has claimed evidence of superluminal propagation between CERN and the LNGS with . We find that the neutrino energy distribution of the ICARUS events in LAr agrees with the expectations from the Monte Carlo predictions from an unaffected energy distribution of beam from CERN. Our results therefore refute a superluminal interpretation of the OPERA result according to the Cohen and Glashow prediction [2] for a weak currents analog to Cherenkov radiation. In particular no events with a superluminal Cherenkov like e+e- pair or gamma emission have been directly observed inside the fiducial volume of the "bubble chamber like" ICARUS TPC-LAr detector, setting much stricter limits to the value of delta comparable with the one due to the observations from the SN1987A.

  19. Relativistic effects in the particle creation via dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rego, Andreson L.C.; Farina, Carlos; Alves, J.P.S.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The creation of real particles from vacuum induced by moving mirrors with non-uniform acceleration is a quantum vacuum effect usually called dynamical Casimir effect (DCE). The radiation reaction force acting on this moving plate is an alternative manner to explain this fascinating effect. The theoretical prediction of the DCE was made by Moore in 1970 (J Math. Phys. 11, 2679, (1970)), considering a cavity with a moving boundary, and a real massless scalar field in a two-dimensional space-time. DeWitt (Phys. Rep. 19, 295 (1975)), Fulling and Davies (Proc. R. Soc. London, A 348, 393 (1976)) also investigated the DCE with the same two-dimensional model, but with just a single moving mirror, the simplest way to produce the Casimir radiation. The experimental measure of the DCE can be treated as a direct confirmation of existence of vacuum fluctuations. In the single mirror problem, for realistic parameters, the amount of created particles is not appreciable. In order to remove this difficulty, several experimental proposals were presented to detect the radiation generated by the DCE. More than 40 years after its first theoretical prediction, the DCE was observed by Wilson and collaborators (Nature, 479, 376, (2011)) in the context of circuit Quantum Electrodynamics (circuit-QED). The experiment was based on a superconducting circuit consisting in a coplanar waveguide terminated by a SQUID (a sensitive magnetometer). The presence of time-dependent magnetic fluxes enable fast modulations in the electrical length of the transmission line. This setup simulates a moving mirror whose effective velocity can achieve 0:1 of velocity of light. In the present work, taking into account the fact of the effective velocity implemented on the first experimental observation of the DCE is a substantial fraction of velocity of light, we investigate relativistic effects in the particle creation via DCE in a superconducting circuit. Considering a massless scalar field in 1

  20. Intensifying the Casimir force between two silicon substrates within three different layers of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyedzahedi, A.; Moradian, A.; Setare, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Casimir force for a system composed of two thick slabs as substrates within three different homogeneous layers. We use the scattering approach along with the Matsubara formalism in order to calculate the Casimir force at finite temperature. First, we focus on constructing the reflection matrices and then we calculate the Casimir force for a water–lipid system. According to the conventional use of silicon as a substrate, we apply the formalism to calculate the Casimir force for layers of Au, VO 2 , mica, KCl and foam rubber on the thick slabs of silicon. Afterwards, introducing an increasing factor, we compare our results with Lifshitz force in the vacuum between two semispaces of silicon in order to illustrate the influence of the layers on intensifying the Casimir force. We also calculate the Casimir force between two slabs of the forementioned materials with finite thicknesses to indicate the substrate's role in increasing the obtained Casimir force. Our simple calculation is interesting since one can extend it along with the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis to systems containing inhomogeneous layers as good candidates for designing nanomechanical devices.

  1. Intensifying the Casimir force between two silicon substrates within three different layers of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyedzahedi, A. [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradian, A., E-mail: a.moradian@uok.ac.ir [Department of Science, Campus of Bijar, University of Kurdistan, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Setare, M.R., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the Casimir force for a system composed of two thick slabs as substrates within three different homogeneous layers. We use the scattering approach along with the Matsubara formalism in order to calculate the Casimir force at finite temperature. First, we focus on constructing the reflection matrices and then we calculate the Casimir force for a water–lipid system. According to the conventional use of silicon as a substrate, we apply the formalism to calculate the Casimir force for layers of Au, VO{sub 2}, mica, KCl and foam rubber on the thick slabs of silicon. Afterwards, introducing an increasing factor, we compare our results with Lifshitz force in the vacuum between two semispaces of silicon in order to illustrate the influence of the layers on intensifying the Casimir force. We also calculate the Casimir force between two slabs of the forementioned materials with finite thicknesses to indicate the substrate's role in increasing the obtained Casimir force. Our simple calculation is interesting since one can extend it along with the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis to systems containing inhomogeneous layers as good candidates for designing nanomechanical devices.

  2. A search for the analogue to Cherenkov radiation by high energy neutrinos at superluminal speeds in ICARUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonello, M.; Aprili, P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Baibussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica e INFN, Universita di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Canci, N. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Carbonara, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, INFN e Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Centro, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Cesana, A. [INFN, Sezione di Milano e Politecnico, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cieslik, K. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Krakow (Poland); Cline, D.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cocco, A.G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, INFN e Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Dabrowska, A. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Krakow (Poland); Dequal, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Dermenev, A. [INR RAS, prospekt 60-letiya Oktyabrya 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Dolfini, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica e INFN, Universita di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Farnese, C.; Fava, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Ferrari, A., E-mail: alfredo.ferrari@cern.ch [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); and others

    2012-05-15

    The OPERA Collaboration (2011) has reported evidence of superluminal {nu}{sub {mu}} propagation between CERN and the LNGS. Cohen and Glashow (2011) argued that such neutrinos should lose energy by producing photons and e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs, through Z{sup 0} mediated processes analogous to Cherenkov radiation. In terms of the parameter {delta}{identical_to}(v{sub {nu}}{sup 2}-v{sub c}{sup 2})/v{sub c}{sup 2}, the OPERA result corresponds to {delta}=5 Dot-Operator 10{sup -5}. For this value (note that (v{sub {nu}}-v{sub c})/v{sub c}={delta})/2 =2.5 Dot-Operator 10{sup -5}) of {delta}, a very significant deformation of the neutrino energy spectrum and an abundant production of photons and e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs should be observed at LNGS. We present an analysis based on the 2010 and part of the 2011 data sets from the ICARUS experiment, located at Gran Sasso National Laboratory and using the same neutrino beam from CERN. We find that the rates and deposited energy distributions of neutrino events in ICARUS agree with the expectations for an unperturbed spectrum of the CERN neutrino beam, as also reported by OPERA. Our results therefore refute a superluminal interpretation of the OPERA result according to the Cohen and Glashow (2011) prediction for a weak current analog to Cherenkov radiation. In a dedicated search, no superluminal Cherenkov-like e{sup +}e{sup -} pair or {gamma} emission event has been directly observed inside the fiducial volume of the 'bubble chamber-like' ICARUS TPC-LAr detector, setting the much stricter limit of {delta}<2.5 Dot-Operator 10{sup -8} at the 90% confidence level, comparable with the one due to the observations from the SN1987a (M.J. Longo, 1987 ). The observations of high energy neutrino events by Super-Kamiokande and IceCube are also pointing to a much stricter limit on {delta}.

  3. Modulation of the Casimir force by laser pulses: Influence of oxide films on the silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Bukina, M. N.; Churkin, Yu. V.; Yurova, V. A.

    2010-10-01

    The possibility of modulating the Casimir force that acts in an air medium between a gold sphere and a silicon plate irradiated by laser pulses has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the oxide film that is formed on the silicon surface in air hardly affects the possibility of modulating the Casimir force when the distances between interacting bodies are of the order of 100 nm. With an increase in the distance, the modulation depth decreases; however, this region is of less practical interest, because the Casimir forces become too weak.

  4. Selective decay by Casimir dissipation in inviscid fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D

    2013-01-01

    The problem of parameterizing the interactions of larger scales and smaller scales in fluid flows is addressed by considering a property of two-dimensional (2D) incompressible turbulence. The property we consider is selective decay, in which a Casimir of the ideal formulation (enstrophy in 2D flows, helicity in three-dimensional flows) decays in time, while the energy stays essentially constant. This paper introduces a mechanism that produces selective decay by enforcing Casimir dissipation in fluid dynamics. This mechanism turns out to be related in certain cases to the numerical method of anticipated vorticity discussed in Sadourny and Basdevant (1981 C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 292 1061–4, 1985 J. Atm. Sci. 42 1353–63). Several examples are given and a general theory of selective decay is developed that uses the Lie–Poisson structure of the ideal theory. A scale-selection operator allows the resulting modifications of the fluid motion equations to be interpreted in several examples as parametrizing the nonlinear, dynamical interactions between disparate scales. The type of modified fluid equation systems derived here may be useful in modelling turbulent geophysical flows where it is computationally prohibitive to rely on the slower, indirect effects of a realistic viscosity, such as in large-scale, coherent, oceanic flows interacting with much smaller eddies. (paper)

  5. Casimir force for a scalar field in warped brane worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, Roman; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Pedraza, Omar

    2008-01-01

    In looking for imprints of extra dimensions in braneworld models one usually builds these so that they are compatible with known low energy physics and thus focuses on high energy effects. Nevertheless, just as submillimeter Newton's law tests probe the mode structure of gravity other low energy tests might apply to matter. As a model example, in this work we determine the 4D Casimir force corresponding to a scalar field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on two parallel planes lying within the single brane of a Randall-Sundrum scenario extended by one compact extra dimension. Using the Green's function method such a force picks the contribution of each field mode as if it acted individually but with a weight given by the square of the mode wave functions on the brane. In the low energy regime one regains the standard 4D Casimir force that is associated to a zero mode in the massless case or to a quasilocalized or resonant mode in the massive one while the effect of the extra dimensions gets encoded as an additional term.

  6. Rectification of a Casimir Nanomachine with a Triangular Wave Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali moradian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the Casimir nano system composed of two quadrisected dielectric disks separated by a thin gap. Initially the two disks have the same surface dielectric distributions. We use scatting approach in the weak coupling limit and show that the top plate experiences a torque  if it rotates about its axes by an angle. Consequently, we will be able to calculate. Quite interesting, such a nanomachine may be used to examine the dielectric dependence of the Casimir torque. Our small system can be used to measure small torques. We assume that the top disk is mounted on an axle and part of the rotational friction in the system comes from the axial friction and an external load is mounted on it. For such a system with specified parameters, we can estimate inertia and axial friction. Therefor we can neglect the inertia term and use the over damped regime to describe the dynamics of our system. We show that our small system can rectify a periodic square-wave angular velocity and we obtain the average angular velocity of the top plate.

  7. Casimir force in the Goedel space-time and its possible induced cosmological inhomogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, Sh. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shojai, A. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Foundations of Physics Group, School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The Casimir force between two parallel plates in the Goedel universe is computed for a scalar field at finite temperature. It is observed that when the plates' separation is comparable with the scale given by the rotation of the space-time, the force becomes repulsive and then approaches zero. Since it has been shown previously that the universe may experience a Goedel phase for a small period of time, the induced inhomogeneities from the Casimir force are also studied. (orig.)

  8. Speeding up the antidynamical Casimir effect with nonstationary qutrits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonov, A. V.; Díaz-Guevara, J. J.; Napoli, A.; Militello, B.

    2017-09-01

    The antidynamical Casimir effect (ADCE) is a term coined to designate the coherent annihilation of excitations due to resonant external perturbation of system parameters, allowing for extraction of quantum work from nonvacuum states of some field. Originally proposed for a two-level atom (qubit) coupled to a single-cavity mode in the context of the nonstationary quantum Rabi model, it suffered from a very low transition rate and correspondingly narrow resonance linewidth. In this paper we show analytically and numerically that the ADCE rate can be increased by at least one order of magnitude by replacing the qubit by an artificial three-level atom (qutrit) in a properly chosen configuration. For the cavity thermal state we demonstrate that the dynamics of the average photon number and atomic excitation is completely different from the qubit's case, while the behavior of the total number of excitations is qualitatively similar yet significantly faster.

  9. Zeta-function approach to Casimir energy with singular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khusnutdinov, Nail R.

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of zeta-function approach the Casimir energy for three simple model system: single delta potential, step function potential and three delta potentials are analyzed. It is shown that the energy contains contributions which are peculiar to the potentials. It is suggested to renormalize the energy using the condition that the energy of infinitely separated potentials is zero which corresponds to subtraction all terms of asymptotic expansion of zeta-function. The energy obtained in this way obeys all physically reasonable conditions. It is finite in the Dirichlet limit, and it may be attractive or repulsive depending on the strength of potential. The effective action is calculated, and it is shown that the surface contribution appears. The renormalization of the effective action is discussed

  10. Casimir effect in multidimensional quantum supergravities and supersymmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odintsov, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    The one-loop effective action (the Casimir gravitational energy) of the aribitrary Einstein supergravity on the background M/sub 4/ X T/sub D-4/, where M/sub 4/ is the Minkowski space with non-zero temperature, T/sub d/ is the d-dimensional torus, is calculated. The problem of quantum breaking of supersymmetry is discussed. The Vilkovisky-De Witt effective action in the D-dimensional Einstein gravity with the Λ-term on the background M/sub 4/ X T/sub D-4/ is found. An idea is expressed that a temperature phase transition in Kaluza-Klein theories is possible. For d=5 gravity, the Vilkovisky-De Witt effective a< ction on the R/sub 4/ X S/sub 1/, where R/sub 4/ is fourdimensional curved space-time with non-zero temperature, is found

  11. Resolution of an apparent inconsistency in the electromagnetic Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnes, H; Olaussen, K; Ravndal, F; Wehus, I K

    2007-01-01

    The vacuum expectation value of the electromagnetic energy-momentum tensor between two parallel plates in spacetime dimensions D > 4 is calculated in the axial gauge. While the pressure between the plates agrees with the global Casimir force, the energy density is divergent at the plates and not compatible with the total energy which follows from the force. However, subtracting the divergent self-energies of the plates, the resulting energy is finite and consistent with the force. In analogy with the corresponding scalar case for spacetime dimensions D > 2, the divergent self-energy of a single plate can be related to the lack of conformal invariance of the electromagnetic Lagrangian for dimensions D > 4. (fast track communication)

  12. Analogue computing methods

    CERN Document Server

    Welbourne, D

    1965-01-01

    Analogue Computing Methods presents the field of analogue computation and simulation in a compact and convenient form, providing an outline of models and analogues that have been produced to solve physical problems for the engineer and how to use and program the electronic analogue computer. This book consists of six chapters. The first chapter provides an introduction to analogue computation and discusses certain mathematical techniques. The electronic equipment of an analogue computer is covered in Chapter 2, while its use to solve simple problems, including the method of scaling is elaborat

  13. Influence of van-der-Waals like interactions on the thermodynamic Casimir effect; Einfluss van-der-Waals-artiger Wechselwirkungen auf den thermodynamischen Casimir-Effekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grueneberg, Daniel

    2008-02-15

    To study how the behavior of the thermodynamic Casimir force changes qualitatively and quantitatively due to the presence of such interactions - compared to systems with purely short-range interactions - is the aim of this work. Considering d-dimensional models belonging to the universality class of the O(n)-symmetrical systems, the thermodynamic Casimir force and its leading corrections are derived for temperatures at and above the transition temperature (T{>=}T{sub c,{infinity}}). The underlying pair potential is assumed to be isotropic and long-ranged, decaying asymptotically proportional to x{sup -(d+{sigma}}{sup )} for large separations x, where the value of the parameter {sigma} is restricted to the interval 2<{sigma}<4. By solving an appropriate spherical model in 2Casimir force and its leading corrections are obtained. To study the case n<{infinity}, which in 2Casimir force and its leading corrections are evaluated to two-loop order. It is shown that both in the spherical model and in the O(n)-symmetrical case with n<{infinity} to two-loop order, the thermodynamic Casimir force in the presence of the long-range interaction decays algebraically {proportional_to}L{sup -(d+{sigma}}{sup )} at fixed temperature T>T{sub c,{infinity}} on sufficiently large length scales. (orig.)

  14. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen A.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  15. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen Å.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-09-01

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.130405 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  16. Casimir force experiments with quartz tuning forks and an atomic force microscope (AFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, T

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the measurement series is to study the Casimir force, specifically the effects of different materials and geometries. The art of measuring sub-nano Newton forces has been engineered to a great extent in the material sciences, especially for the atomic force microscope. In today's scanning microscope technologies there are several common methods used to measure sub-nano Newton forces. While the commercial atomic force microscopes (AFM) mostly work with soft silicon cantilevers, there are a large number of reports from university groups on the use of quartz tuning forks to get high resolution AFM pictures, to measure shear forces or to create new force sensors. The quartz tuning fork based force sensor has a number of advantages over the silicon cantilever, but also has some disadvantages. In this report the method based on quartz tuning forks is described with respect to their usability for Casimir force measurements and compared with other successful techniques. Furthermore, a design for Casimir force measurements that was set up in Berlin will be described and practical experimental aspects will be discussed. A status report on the Casimir experiments in Berlin will be given, including the experimental setup. In order to study the details of the Casimir effect the apparatus and active surfaces have to be improved further. The surfaces have to be flatter and cleaner. For better resolution, cantilevers and tuning forks with a low spring constant have to be employed

  17. Analogue MIMO Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNamara Darren

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we propose an analogue receiver that can perform turbo detection in MIMO systems. We present the case for a receiver that is built from nonlinear analogue devices, which perform detection in a "free-flow" network (no notion of iterations. This contribution can be viewed as an extension of analogue turbo decoder concepts to include MIMO detection. These first analogue implementations report reductions of few orders of magnitude in the number of required transistors and in consumed energy, and the same order of improvement in processing speed. It is anticipated that such analogue MIMO decoder could bring about the same advantages, when compared to traditional digital implementations.

  18. Measurement of Casimir force with magnetic materials Alexandr Banishev, Chia-Cheng Chang, Umar Mohideen Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Mohideen, Umar

    2012-02-01

    The Casimir effect is important in various fields from atomic physics to nanotechnology. According to the Lifshitz theory of the Casimir force, the interaction between two objects depends both on their dielectric permittivity and magenetic permeability. Thus the role of magnetic properties on the Casimir force is interesting particularly due to the possibility of a reduction the Casimir force. In this report we will present the results of a Casimir force measurement between a magnetic material such as nickel coated on SiO2 plate and a Au-coated sphere.

  19. Casimir effect in rugby-ball type flux compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizalde, Emilio; Minamitsuji, Masato; Naylor, Wade

    2007-01-01

    As a continuation of the work by Minamitsuji, Naylor, and Sasaki [J. High Energy Phys. 12 (2006) 079], we discuss the Casimir effect for a massless bulk scalar field in a 4D toy model of a 6D warped flux compactification model, to stabilize the volume modulus. The one-loop effective potential for the volume modulus has a form similar to the Coleman-Weinberg potential. The stability of the volume modulus against quantum corrections is related to an appropriate heat kernel coefficient. However, to make any physical predictions after volume stabilization, knowledge of the derivative of the zeta function, ζ ' (0) (in a conformally related spacetime) is also required. By adding up the exact mass spectrum using zeta-function regularization, we present a revised analysis of the effective potential. Finally, we discuss some physical implications, especially concerning the degree of the hierarchy between the fundamental energy scales on the branes. For a larger degree of warping our new results are very similar to the ones given by Minamitsuji, Naylor, and Sasaki [J. High Energy Phys. 12 (2006) 079] and imply a larger hierarchy. In the nonwarped (rugby ball) limit the ratio tends to converge to the same value, independently of the bulk dilaton coupling

  20. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    On a macroscopic scale, a nonreactive liquid partially covering a homogeneous solid surface will intersect the solid at an angle called the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, the contact angle is materially dependent upon both the solid and liquid and typical values fall in the range 80-170 deg, depending on the crucible material. On a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the liquid and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously. Consider the example of the so called detached Bridgman crystal growth process. In this technique, a small gap is formed between the growing crystal and the crucible. At the crystal/melt interface, a meniscus ring is formed. Its width can be in the range of a few micrometers, approaching a microscopic scale. It then becomes questionable to describe the shape of this meniscus by the contact angle. A more advanced treatment of the interface is needed and here we propose such a refined model. The interaction of the liquid surface with the solid can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir or van der Waals force.

  1. Effective field theory of thermal Casimir interactions between anisotropic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussman, Robert C; Deserno, Markus

    2014-06-01

    We employ an effective field theory (EFT) approach to study thermal Casimir interactions between objects bound to a fluctuating fluid surface or interface dominated by surface tension, with a focus on the effects of particle anisotropy. The EFT prescription disentangles the constraints imposed by the particles' boundaries from the calculation of the interaction free energy by constructing an equivalent point particle description. The finite-size information is captured in a derivative expansion that encodes the particles' response to external fields. The coefficients of the expansion terms correspond to generalized tensorial polarizabilities and are found by matching the results of a linear response boundary value problem computed in both the full and effective theories. We demonstrate the versatility of the EFT approach by constructing the general effective Hamiltonian for a collection of particles of arbitrary shapes. Taking advantage of the conformal symmetry of the Hamiltonian, we discuss a straightforward conformal mapping procedure to systematically determine the polarizabilities and derive a complete description for elliptical particles. We compute the pairwise interaction energies to several orders for nonidentical ellipses as well as their leading-order triplet interactions and discuss the resulting preferred pair and multibody configurations. Furthermore, we elaborate on the complications that arise with pinned particle boundary conditions and show that the powerlike corrections expected from dimensional analysis are exponentially suppressed by the leading-order interaction energies.

  2. The Casimir interaction of a massive vector field between concentric spherical bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, L.P.

    2011-01-01

    The Casimir interaction energy due to the vacuum fluctuations of a massive vector field between two perfectly conducting concentric spherical bodies is computed. The TE contribution to the Casimir interaction energy is a direct generalization of the massless case but the TM contribution is much more complicated. Each TM mode is a linear combination of a transverse mode which is the generalization of a TM mode in the massless case and a longitudinal mode that does not appear in the massless case. In contrast to the case of two parallel perfectly conducting plates, there are no TM discrete modes that vanish identically in the perfectly conducting spherical bodies. Numerical simulations show that the Casimir interaction force between the two bodies is always attractive.

  3. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joseph L; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N

    2015-06-03

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  4. Finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field with fractional Neumann conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eab, C. H.; Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the Casimir effect due to fractional massless Klein-Gordon field confined to parallel plates. A new kind of boundary condition called fractional Neumann condition which involves vanishing fractional derivatives of the field is introduced. The fractional Neumann condition allows the interpolation of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions imposed on the two plates. There exists a transition value in the difference between the orders of the fractional Neumann conditions for which the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive. Low and high temperature limits of Casimir energy and pressure are obtained. For sufficiently high temperature, these quantities are dominated by terms independent of the boundary conditions. Finally, validity of the temperature inversion symmetry for various boundary conditions is discussed

  5. Modelling critical Casimir force induced self-assembly experiments on patchy colloidal dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Arthur C; Nguyen, T Anh; Veen, Sandra J; Kraft, Daniela J; Schall, Peter; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2017-07-19

    Colloidal particles suspended in a binary liquid mixture can interact via solvent mediated interactions, known as critical Casimir forces. For anisotropic colloids this interaction becomes directional, which leads to rich phase behavior. While experimental imaging and particle tracking techniques allow determination of isotropic effective potentials via Boltzmann inversion, the modeling of effective interaction in anisotropic systems is non-trivial precisely because of this directionality. Here we extract effective interaction potentials for non-spherical dumbbell particles from observed radial and angular distributions, by employing reference interaction site model (RISM) theory and direct Monte Carlo simulations. For colloidal dumbbell particles dispersed in a binary liquid mixture and interacting via induced critical Casimir forces, we determine the effective site-site potentials for a range of experimental temperatures. Using these potentials to simulate the system for strong Casimir forces, we reproduce the experimentally observed collapse, and provide a qualitative explanation for this behavior.

  6. Casimir energy density for spherical universes in n-dimensional spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezcan, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    We consider the Casimir effect for the massless conformal scalar field in an n-dimensional, closed, static universe. We calculate the renormalized vacuum energy density using the covariant point-splitting method, the mode-sum regularization and the renormalized vacuum energy with the zeta-function regularization. We observe that all odd spacetime dimensions give us the zero renormalized vacuum energy density. For even spacetime dimensions the renormalized vacuum energy density oscillates in sign. The result agrees with three regularization techniques. The Casimir energy density for spherical universes in n-dimensional spacetime is regarded as interesting both to understand the correspondence between the sign of the effect and the dimension of manifold in topology and as a key to confirming the Casimir energy for half spherical universes (manifold with boundary) in n-dimensional spacetime

  7. Casimir free energy of dielectric films: classical limit, low-temperature behavior and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M

    2017-07-12

    The Casimir free energy of dielectric films, both free-standing in vacuum and deposited on metallic or dielectric plates, is investigated. It is shown that the values of the free energy depend considerably on whether the calculation approach used neglects or takes into account the dc conductivity of film material. We demonstrate that there are material-dependent and universal classical limits in the former and latter cases, respectively. The analytic behavior of the Casimir free energy and entropy for a free-standing dielectric film at low temperature is found. According to our results, the Casimir entropy goes to zero when the temperature vanishes if the calculation approach with neglected dc conductivity of a film is employed. If the dc conductivity is taken into account, the Casimir entropy takes the positive value at zero temperature, depending on the parameters of a film, i.e. the Nernst heat theorem is violated. By considering the Casimir free energy of SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 films deposited on a Au plate in the framework of two calculation approaches, we argue that physically correct values are obtained by disregarding the role of dc conductivity. A comparison with the well known results for the configuration of two parallel plates is made. Finally, we compute the Casimir free energy of SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and Ge films deposited on high-resistivity Si plates of different thicknesses and demonstrate that it can be positive, negative and equal to zero. The effect of illumination of a Si plate with laser light is considered. Possible applications of the obtained results to thin films used in microelectronics are discussed.

  8. On the Casimir scaling violation in the cusp anomalous dimension at small angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozin, Andrey; Henn, Johannes; Stahlhofen, Maximilian

    2017-10-01

    We compute the four-loop n f contribution proportional to the quartic Casimir of the QCD cusp anomalous dimension as an expansion for small cusp angle ϕ. This piece is gauge invariant, violates Casimir scaling, and first appears at four loops. It requires the evaluation of genuine non-planar four-loop Feynman integrals. We present results up to O({φ}^4) . One motivation for our calculation is to probe a recent conjecture on the all-order structure of the cusp anomalous dimension. As a byproduct we obtain the four-loop HQET wave function anomalous dimension for this color structure.

  9. Casimir force in the Gödel space-time and its possible induced cosmological inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabakhshi, Sh.; Shojai, A.

    2017-07-01

    The Casimir force between two parallel plates in the Gödel universe is computed for a scalar field at finite temperature. It is observed that when the plates' separation is comparable with the scale given by the rotation of the space-time, the force becomes repulsive and then approaches zero. Since it has been shown previously that the universe may experience a Gödel phase for a small period of time, the induced inhomogeneities from the Casimir force are also studied.

  10. The Casimir effect in rugby-ball type flux compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamitsuji, M.

    2008-04-01

    We discuss volume stabilization in a 6D braneworld model based on 6D supergravity theory. The internal space is compactified by magnetic flux and contains codimension two 3-branes (conical singularities) as its boundaries. In general the external 4D spacetime is warped and in the unwrapped limit the shape of the internal space looks like a 'rugby ball'. The size of the internal space is not fixed due to the scale invariance of the supergravity theory. We discuss the possibility of volume stabilization by the Casimir effect for a massless, minimally coupled bulk scalar field. The main obstacle in studying this case is that the brane (conical) part of the relevant heat kernel coefficient (a6) has not been formulated. Thus as a first step, we consider the 4D analog model with boundary codimension two 1-branes. The spacetime structure of the 4D model is very similar to that of the original 6D model, where now the relevant heat kernel coefficient is well known. We derive the one-loop effective potential induced by a scalar field in the bulk by employing zeta function regularization with heat kernel analysis. As a result, the volume is stabilized for most possible choices of the parameters. Especially, for a larger degree of warping, our results imply that a large hierarchy between the mass scales and a tiny amount of effective cosmological constant can be realized on the brane. In the non-warped limit the ratio tends to converge to the same value, independently of the bulk gauge coupling constant. Finally, we will analyze volume stabilization in the original model 6D by employing the same mode-sum technique.

  11. The Casimir effect in rugby-ball type flux compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamitsuji, M

    2008-01-01

    We discuss volume stabilization in a 6D braneworld model based on 6D supergravity theory. The internal space is compactified by magnetic flux and contains codimension two 3-branes (conical singularities) as its boundaries. In general the external 4D spacetime is warped and in the unwrapped limit the shape of the internal space looks like a 'rugby ball'. The size of the internal space is not fixed due to the scale invariance of the supergravity theory. We discuss the possibility of volume stabilization by the Casimir effect for a massless, minimally coupled bulk scalar field. The main obstacle in studying this case is that the brane (conical) part of the relevant heat kernel coefficient (a 6 ) has not been formulated. Thus as a first step, we consider the 4D analog model with boundary codimension two 1-branes. The spacetime structure of the 4D model is very similar to that of the original 6D model, where now the relevant heat kernel coefficient is well known. We derive the one-loop effective potential induced by a scalar field in the bulk by employing zeta function regularization with heat kernel analysis. As a result, the volume is stabilized for most possible choices of the parameters. Especially, for a larger degree of warping, our results imply that a large hierarchy between the mass scales and a tiny amount of effective cosmological constant can be realized on the brane. In the non-warped limit the ratio tends to converge to the same value, independently of the bulk gauge coupling constant. Finally, we will analyze volume stabilization in the original model 6D by employing the same mode-sum technique

  12. Recent breakthrough and outlook in constraining the non-Newtonian gravity and axion-like particles from Casimir physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimchitskaya, G.L. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Peter the Great Saint Petersburg Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology and Telecommunications, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    The strongest constraints on the Yukawa-type corrections to Newton's gravitational law and on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons, following from recently performed experiments of Casimir physics, are presented. Specifically, the constraints obtained from measurements of the lateral and normal Casimir forces between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces, and from the isoelectronic experiment are considered, and the ranges of their greatest strength are refined. Minor modifications in the experimental setups are proposed which allow for strengthening the resultant constraints up to an order of magnitude. The comparison with some weaker constraints derived in the Casimir regime is also made. (orig.)

  13. Uma introdução aos métodos de cálculo da energia de Casimir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passos Sobrinho J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available O efeito Casimir é um dos aspectos mais intrigantes da física moderna. A previsão da existência de uma força macroscópica de origem quântica entre condutores neutros e sua posterior comprovação experimental é sem dúvida um dos triunfos da teoria quântica dos campos. Complementando uma introdução conceitual publicada recentemente nesta revista, apresentamos alguns métodos de cálculo da energia de Casimir, que é a grandeza fundamental que origina o efeito Casimir.

  14. Kinetic Roughening and Material Optical Properties Influence on Van der Waals/Casimir Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwol, P. J.; Palasantzas, G.

    Atomic force microscopy measurements and force theory calculations using the Lifshitz theory show that van der Waals/Casimir dispersive forces have a strong dependence on surface roughness and material optical properties. It is found that at separations below 100 nm the roughness effect is

  15. Optical properties and kinetic roughening influence on dispersive casimir and van der Waals forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Svetovoy, Vitaly; van Zwol, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Casimir and van der Waals dispersive forces between real material surfaces can be strongly influenced by surface roughness and the frequency dependent dielectric functions of the interacting materials. The Lifshitz theory allows calculations of these forces between two flat plates if the frequency

  16. Optical Properties and Kinetic Roughening Influence on Dispersive Casimir and van der Waals Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Van Zwol, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Casimir and van der Waals dispersive forces between real material surfaces can be strongly influenced by surface roughness and the frequency dependent dielectric functions of the interacting materials. The Lifshitz theory allows calculations of these forces between two flat plates if the frequency

  17. Nanoparticle separation based on size-dependent aggregation of nanoparticles due to the critical Casimir effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongyu; Stan, Gheorghe; Liu, Yun

    2018-02-21

    Nanoparticles typically have an inherent wide size distribution that may affect the performance and reliability of many nanomaterials. Because the synthesis and purification of nanoparticles with desirable sizes are crucial to the applications of nanoparticles in various fields including medicine, biology, health care, and energy, there is a great need to search for more efficient and generic methods for size-selective nanoparticle purification/separation. Here we propose and conclusively demonstrate the effectiveness of a size-selective particle purification/separation method based on the critical Casimir force. The critical Casimir force is a generic interaction between colloidal particles near the solvent critical point and has been extensively studied in the past several decades due to its importance in reversibly controlling the aggregation and stability of colloidal particles. Combining multiple experimental techniques, we found that the critical Casimir force-induced aggregation depends on relative particle sizes in a system with larger ones aggregating first and the smaller ones remaining in solution. Based on this observation, a new size-dependent nanoparticle purification/separation method is proposed and demonstrated to be very efficient in purifying commercial silica nanoparticles in the lutidine/water binary solvent. Due to the ubiquity of the critical Casimir force for many colloidal particles in binary solvents, this method might be applicable to many types of colloidal particles.

  18. Casimir-lifshitz force out of thermal equilibrium and asymptotic nonadditivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antezza, Mauro; Pitaevskii, Lev P.; Stringari, Sandro; Svetovoy, Vitaly

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the force acting between two parallel plates held at different temperatures. The force reproduces, as limiting cases, the well-known Casimir-Lifshitz surface-surface force at thermal equilibrium and the surface-atom force out of thermal equilibrium recently derived by M. Antezza et

  19. Tailoring optical metamaterials to tune the atom-surface Casimir-Polder interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eng Aik; Aljunid, Syed Abdullah; Adamo, Giorgio; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ducloy, Martial; Wilkowski, David

    2018-02-01

    Metamaterials are fascinating tools that can structure not only surface plasmons and electromagnetic waves but also electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations. The possibility of shaping the quantum vacuum is a powerful concept that ultimately allows engineering the interaction between macroscopic surfaces and quantum emitters such as atoms, molecules, or quantum dots. The long-range atom-surface interaction, known as Casimir-Polder interaction, is of fundamental importance in quantum electrodynamics but also attracts a significant interest for platforms that interface atoms with nanophotonic devices. We perform a spectroscopic selective reflection measurement of the Casimir-Polder interaction between a Cs(6P 3/2 ) atom and a nanostructured metallic planar metamaterial. We show that by engineering the near-field plasmonic resonances of the metamaterial, we can successfully tune the Casimir-Polder interaction, demonstrating both a strong enhancement and reduction with respect to its nonresonant value. We also show an enhancement of the atomic spontaneous emission rate due to its coupling with the evanescent modes of the nanostructure. Probing excited-state atoms next to nontrivial tailored surfaces is a rigorous test of quantum electrodynamics. Engineering Casimir-Polder interactions represents a significant step toward atom trapping in the extreme near field, possibly without the use of external fields.

  20. Constraints on axionlike particles and non-Newtonian gravity from measuring the difference of Casimir forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    We derive constraints on the coupling constants of axionlike particles to nucleons and on the Yukawa-type corrections to Newton's gravitational law from the results of recent experiment on measuring the difference of Casimir forces between a Ni-coated sphere and Au and Ni sectors of a structured disc. Over the wide range of axion masses from 2.61 meV to 0.9 eV the obtained constraints on the axion-to-nucleon coupling are up to a factor of 14.6 stronger than all previously known constraints following from experiments on measuring the Casimir interaction. The constraints on non-Newtonian gravity found here are also stronger than all that following from the Casimir- and Cavendish-type experiments over the interaction range from 30 nm to 5.4 μ m . They are up to a factor of 177 stronger than the constraints derived recently from measuring the difference of lateral forces. Our constraints confirm previous somewhat stronger limits obtained from the isoelectronic experiment, where the contribution of the Casimir force was nullified.

  1. The energy–momentum tensor, the trace identity and the Casimir effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 345–360. The energy–momentum tensor, the trace identity and the Casimir effect. S G KAMATH. Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036,. India. E-mail: kamath@iitm.ac.in. MS received 11 July 2005; revised 10 October 2005; accepted 18 November 2005. Abstract.

  2. Generalized Riemann zeta-function regularization and Casimir energy for a piecewise uniform string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinzhou; Shi Xin; Zhang Jianzu.

    1990-12-01

    The generalized zeta-function techniques will be utilized to investigate the Casimir energy for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string. We find that zeta-function regularization method can lead straightforwardly to a correct result. (author). 6 refs

  3. The casimir free energy in high- and low-temperature limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svetovoy, Vitaly; Esquivel, R.

    2006-01-01

    The problem with the temperature dependence of the Casimir force is investigated. We analyse high-temperature limit analytically making calculations at real frequencies. The purpose is to answer the questionwhy there is no continuous transition between real and ideal metals and why the result does

  4. Chaotic behavior in Casimir oscillators: A case study for phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Fatemeh; Sedighi, Mehdi; Khorrami, Mohammad; Masoudi, Amir Ali; Palasantzas, George

    2017-10-01

    Casimir forces between material surfaces at close proximity of less than 200 nm can lead to increased chaotic behavior of actuating devices depending on the strength of the Casimir interaction. We investigate these phenomena for phase-change materials in torsional oscillators, where the amorphous to crystalline phase transitions lead to transitions between high and low Casimir force and torque states, respectively, without material compositions. For a conservative system bifurcation curve and Poincare maps analysis show the absence of chaotic behavior but with the crystalline phase (high force-torque state) favoring more unstable behavior and stiction. However, for a nonconservative system chaotic behavior can take place introducing significant risk for stiction, which is again more pronounced for the crystalline phase. The latter illustrates the more general scenario that stronger Casimir forces and torques increase the possibility for chaotic behavior. The latter is making it impossible to predict whether stiction or stable actuation will occur on a long-term basis, and it is setting limitations in the design of micronano devices operating at short-range nanoscale separations.

  5. Statistical field theory with constraints: Application to critical Casimir forces in the canonical ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Markus; Gambassi, Andrea; Dietrich, S

    2017-08-01

    The effect of imposing a constraint on a fluctuating scalar order parameter field in a system of finite volume is studied within statistical field theory. The canonical ensemble, corresponding to a fixed total integrated order parameter (e.g., the total number of particles), is obtained as a special case of the theory. A perturbative expansion is developed which allows one to systematically determine the constraint-induced finite-volume corrections to the free energy and to correlation functions. In particular, we focus on the Landau-Ginzburg model in a film geometry (i.e., in a rectangular parallelepiped with a small aspect ratio) with periodic, Dirichlet, or Neumann boundary conditions in the transverse direction and periodic boundary conditions in the remaining, lateral directions. Within the expansion in terms of ε=4-d, where d is the spatial dimension of the bulk, the finite-size contribution to the free energy of the confined system and the associated critical Casimir force are calculated to leading order in ε and are compared to the corresponding expressions for an unconstrained (grand canonical) system. The constraint restricts the fluctuations within the system and it accordingly modifies the residual finite-size free energy. The resulting critical Casimir force is shown to depend on whether it is defined by assuming a fixed transverse area or a fixed total volume. In the former case, the constraint is typically found to significantly enhance the attractive character of the force as compared to the grand canonical case. In contrast to the grand canonical Casimir force, which, for supercritical temperatures, vanishes in the limit of thick films, in the canonical case with fixed transverse area the critical Casimir force attains for thick films a negative value for all boundary conditions studied here. Typically, the dependence of the critical Casimir force both on the temperaturelike and on the fieldlike scaling variables is different in the two ensembles.

  6. Casimir effect due to a single boundary as a manifestation of the Weyl problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Straley, Joseph P.; Langsjoen, Luke S.; Zaidi, Hussain

    2010-09-01

    The Casimir self-energy of a boundary is ultraviolet-divergent. In many cases, the divergences can be eliminated by methods such as zeta-function regularization or through physical arguments (ultraviolet transparency of the boundary would provide a cutoff). Using the example of a massless scalar field theory with a single Dirichlet boundary, we explore the relationship between such approaches, with the goal of better understanding of the origin of the divergences. We are guided by the insight due to Dowker and Kennedy (1978 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 11 895) and Deutsch and Candelas (1979 Phys. Rev. D 20 3063) that the divergences represent measurable effects that can be interpreted with the aid of the theory of the asymptotic distribution of eigenvalues of the Laplacian discussed by Weyl. In many cases, the Casimir self-energy is the sum of cutoff-dependent (Weyl) terms having a geometrical origin, and an 'intrinsic' term that is independent of the cutoff. The Weyl terms make a measurable contribution to the physical situation even when regularization methods succeed in isolating the intrinsic part. Regularization methods fail when the Weyl terms and intrinsic parts of the Casimir effect cannot be clearly separated. Specifically, we demonstrate that the Casimir self-energy of a smooth boundary in two dimensions is a sum of two Weyl terms (exhibiting quadratic and logarithmic cutoff dependence), a geometrical term that is independent of cutoff and a non-geometrical intrinsic term. As by-products, we resolve the puzzle of the divergent Casimir force on a ring and correct the sign of the coefficient of linear tension of the Dirichlet line predicted in earlier treatments.

  7. Quantum theories on noncommutative spaces with nontrivial topology: Aharonov-Bohm and Casimir effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaichian, M.; Tureanu, A.; Demichev, A.; Presnajder, P.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M.M.

    2001-02-01

    After discussing the peculiarities of quantum systems on noncommutative (NC) spaces with nontrivial topology and the operator representation of the *-product on them, we consider the Aharonov-Bohm and Casimir effects for such spaces. For the case of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, we have obtained an explicit expression for the shift of the phase, which is gauge invariant in the NC sense. The Casimir energy of a field theory on a NC cylinder is divergent, while it becomes finite on a torus, when the dimensionless parameter of noncommutativity is a rational number. The latter corresponds to a well-defined physical picture. Certain distinctions from other treatments based on a different way of taking the noncommutativity into account are also discussed. (author)

  8. Thermal Casimir effect in Kerr spacetime with quintessence and massive gravitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, V.B. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Christiansen, H.R. [Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara (IFCE), Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Sobral, CE (Brazil); Cunha, M.S. [Universidade Estadual do Ceara, Grupo de Fisica Teorica (GFT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Muniz, C.R.; Tahim, M.O. [Universidade Estadual do Ceara, Faculdade de Educacao, Ciencias e Letras do Sertao Central, Quixada, CE (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Starting from an analytical expression for the Helmholtz free energy we calculate the thermal corrections to the Casimir energy density and entropy within nearby ideal parallel plates in the vacuum of a massless scalar field. Our framework is the Kerr spacetime in the presence of quintessence and massive gravitons. The high and low temperature regimes are especially analyzed in order to distinguish the main contributions. For instance, in the high temperature regime, we show that the force between the plates is repulsive and grows with both the quintessence and the massive gravitons. Regarding the Casimir entropy, our results are in agreement with the Nernst heat theorem and therefore confirm the third law of thermodynamics in the present scenario. (orig.)

  9. Edge corrections to electromagnetic Casimir energies from general-purpose Mathieu-function routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blose, Elizabeth Noelle; Ghimire, Biswash; Graham, Noah; Stratton-Smith, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Scattering theory methods make it possible to calculate the Casimir energy of a perfectly conducting elliptic cylinder opposite a perfectly conducting plane in terms of Mathieu functions. In the limit of zero radius, the elliptic cylinder becomes a finite-width strip, which allows for the study of edge effects. However, existing packages for computing Mathieu functions are insufficient for this calculation because none can compute Mathieu functions of both the first and second kind for complex arguments. To address this shortcoming, we have written a general-purpose Mathieu-function package, based on algorithms developed by Alhargan. We use these routines to find edge corrections to the proximity force approximation for the Casimir energy of a perfectly conducting strip opposite a perfectly conducting plane.

  10. Representations of the exceptional and other Lie algebras with integral eigenvalues of the Casimir operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macfarlane, A J; Pfeiffer, Hendryk

    2003-01-01

    The uniformity, for the family of exceptional Lie algebras g, of the decompositions of the powers of their adjoint representations is now well known for powers up to four. The paper describes an extension of this uniformity for the totally antisymmetrized nth powers up to n = 9, identifying families of representations with integer eigenvalues 5, ..., 9 for the quadratic Casimir operator, in each case providing a formula for the dimensions of the representations in the family as a function of D = dim g. This generalizes previous results for powers j and Casimir eigenvalues j, j ≤ 4. Many intriguing, perhaps puzzling, features of the dimension formulae are discussed and the possibility that they may be valid for a wider class of not necessarily simple Lie algebras is considered

  11. Stability Analysis of a Rigid Body with a Flexible Attachment Using the Energy-Casimir Method

    OpenAIRE

    Posbergh, T. A.; Krishnaprasad, Perinkulam S.; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    1987-01-01

    We consider a system consisting of a rigid body to which a linear extensible shear beam is attached. For such a system the Energy-Casimir method can be used to investigate the stability of the equilibria. In the case we consider, it can be shown that a test for (formal) stability reduces to checking the positive definiteness of two matrices which depend on the parameters of the system and the particular equilibrium about which the stability is to be ascertained.

  12. Energy loss mechanism for suspended micro- and nanoresonators due to the Casimir force

    OpenAIRE

    Gusso, André

    2011-01-01

    A so far not considered energy loss mechanism in suspended micro- and nanoresonators due to noncontact acoustical energy loss is investigated theoretically. The mechanism consists on the conversion of the mechanical energy from the vibratory motion of the resonator into acoustic waves on large nearby structures, such as the substrate, due to the coupling between the resonator and those structures resulting from the Casimir force acting over the separation gaps. Analytical expressions for the ...

  13. Derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2014-10-01

    We carefully reexamine the conditions of validity for the consistent derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors. We recover the usual expression for the lossy Drude model but not for the lossless plasma model. We give an interpretation of this new result in terms of the modes associated with the Foucault currents, which play a role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to common expectations.

  14. Out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the thermal Casimir effect in a model polarizable material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David S; Démery, Vincent; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-03-01

    Relaxation of the thermal Casimir or van der Waals force (the high temperature limit of the Casimir force) for a model dielectric medium is investigated. We start with a model of interacting polarization fields with a dynamics that leads to a frequency dependent dielectric constant of the Debye form. In the static limit, the usual zero frequency Matsubara mode component of the Casimir force is recovered. We then consider the out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the van der Waals force to its equilibrium value when two initially uncorrelated dielectric bodies are brought into sudden proximity. For the interaction between dielectric slabs, it is found that the spatial dependence of the out-of-equilibrium force is the same as the equilibrium one, but it has a time dependent amplitude, or Hamaker coefficient, which increases in time to its equilibrium value. The final relaxation of the force to its equilibrium value is exponential in systems with a single or finite number of polarization field relaxation times. However, in systems, such as those described by the Havriliak-Negami dielectric constant with a broad distribution of relaxation times, we observe a much slower power law decay to the equilibrium value.

  15. Casimir energy of a scalar field with a space-dependent mass distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, H.

    1984-01-01

    The Casimir energy is evaluated for a free scalar field that has a mass term m 2 (x 1 ), depending on one space coordinate x 1 . The formalism for evaluating the Casimir energy is developed for the case of m 2 (x 1 ) finite everywhere in d-dimensional space-time. The case with m 2 (x 1 )=m 0 2 theta((1/2)L-vertical strokex 1 vertical stroke)+msub(infinite) 2 theta(vertical strokex 1 vertical stroke(-1/2)L) is explicitly evaluated for any value of m 0 and msub(infinite) without any approximation. The result consists of volume energy terms, a surface term, and a non-leading term. Most of the UV divergences are in the volume energy terms and renormalize the coupling constants of the underlying theory. The surface energy term is finite for d =5 due to the boundaries being sharp. A closed finite expression is obtained for the non-leading term. Our results are shown to reproduce the known Casimir energies for the limiting cases, m 0 ->infinite and msub(infinite)->infinite. (orig.)

  16. Johnson-Nyquist noise and the Casimir force between real metals at nonzero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    It has been well known for a long time that all lossy conductors at finite temperature display an electronic noise, the Johnson-Nyquist noise, arising from the thermal agitation of electric charges inside the conductor. The existence of this noise implies that two nearby discharged conductors at finite temperature should repel each other, as a result of the electrodynamic interaction between the Johnson-Nyquist currents in either conductor and the eddy currents they induce in the other. It is suggested that this force is at the origin of the recently discovered large repulsive correction to the thermal Casimir force between two lossy metallic plates. Further support for this physical picture is obtained by studying a simple system of two linear noisy antennas. Using elementary concepts from circuit theory, we show that the repulsive force engendered by the Johnson-Nyquist noise results in the same kind of thermodynamic inconsistencies found in the Casimir problem. We show that all inconsistencies are however resolved if account is taken of capacitive effects associated with the end points of the antennas. Our findings therefore suggest that capacitive effects resulting from the finite size of the plates may be essential for a resolution of the analogous problems met in the thermal Casimir effect

  17. Vortex loops in the critical Casimir effect in superfluid and superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    Vortex-loop renormalization techniques are used to calculate the magnitude of the critical Casimir forces in superfluid and superconducting thin films. The force is found to become appreciable when the size of the thermally excited vortex loops is comparable to the film thickness, and the results for T c are found to match very well with perturbative renormalization-group theories that can only be carried out for T>T c . In helium films the Casimir force leads to a change in the film thickness close to T c that has been observed experimentally. A similar effect is predicted to occur near the transition temperature of high-T c superconducting films, which is also a vortex-loop phase transition. In this case the Casimir force takes the form of a voltage difference that will appear at the junction between a thin film and a bulk sample. Estimates show that this voltage can be appreciable (tens of microvolts), and it may be possible to observe the effect by measuring the voltage across two Josephson tunnel junctions to the film and to the bulk, using a SQUID voltmeter

  18. Johnson Nyquist noise and the Casimir force between real metals at nonzero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2008-04-01

    It has been well known for a long time that all lossy conductors at finite temperature display an electronic noise, the Johnson-Nyquist noise, arising from the thermal agitation of electric charges inside the conductor. The existence of this noise implies that two nearby discharged conductors at finite temperature should repel each other, as a result of the electrodynamic interaction between the Johnson-Nyquist currents in either conductor and the eddy currents they induce in the other. It is suggested that this force is at the origin of the recently discovered large repulsive correction to the thermal Casimir force between two lossy metallic plates. Further support for this physical picture is obtained by studying a simple system of two linear noisy antennas. Using elementary concepts from circuit theory, we show that the repulsive force engendered by the Johnson-Nyquist noise results in the same kind of thermodynamic inconsistencies found in the Casimir problem. We show that all inconsistencies are however resolved if account is taken of capacitive effects associated with the end points of the antennas. Our findings therefore suggest that capacitive effects resulting from the finite size of the plates may be essential for a resolution of the analogous problems met in the thermal Casimir effect.

  19. Feasibility of Multiple Examinations Using 68Ga-Labelled Collagelin Analogues: Organ Distribution in Rat for Extrapolation to Human Organ and Whole-Body Radiation Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Velikyan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fibrosis is involved in many chronic diseases. It affects the functionality of vital organs, such as liver, lung, heart and kidney. Two novel imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET imaging of fibrosis have previously pre-clinically demonstrated promising target binding and organ distribution characteristics. However, the relevant disease monitoring in the clinical setup would require multiple repetitive examinations per year. Thus, it is of paramount importance to investigate the absorbed doses and total effective doses and thus, the potential maximum number of examinations per year. Methods: Two cyclic peptide (c[CPGRVMHGLHLGDDEGPC] analogues coupled via an ethylene glycol linker (EG2 to either 2-(4,7-bis(2-(tert-butoxy-2-oxoethyl-1,4,7-triazonan-1-ylacetic acid (NO2A-Col or 4-(4,7-bis(2-(tert-butoxy-2-oxoethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononan-1-yl-5-(tert-butoxy-5-oxopentanoic acid (NODAGA-Col were labelled with 68Ga. The resulting agents, [68Ga]Ga-NO2A-Col and [68Ga]Ga-NODAGA-Col, were administered in the tail vein of male and female Sprague–Dawley rats (N = 24. An ex vivo organ distribution study was performed at the 5-, 10-, 20-, 40-, 60- and 120-min time points. The resulting data were extrapolated for the estimation of human organ and total body absorbed and total effective doses using Organ Level Internal Dose Assessment Code software (OLINDA/EXM 1.1 assuming a similar organ distribution pattern between the species. Time-integrated radioactivity in each organ was calculated by trapezoidal integration followed by a single-exponential fit to the data points extrapolated to infinity. The resulting values were used for the residence time calculation. Results: Ex vivo organ distribution data revealed fast blood clearance and washout from most of the organs. Although the highest organ absorbed dose was found for kidneys (0.1 mGy/MBq, this organ was not the dose-limiting one and would allow for the administration of over 1460

  20. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  1. Natural Analogue Synthesis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. M. Simmons

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present analogue studies and literature reviews designed to provide qualitative and quantitative information to test and provide added confidence in process models abstracted for performance assessment (PA) and model predictions pertinent to PA. This report provides updates to studies presented in the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [151945], Section 13) and new examples gleaned from the literature, along with results of quantitative studies conducted specifically for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The intent of the natural analogue studies was to collect corroborative evidence from analogues to demonstrate additional understanding of processes expected to occur during postclosure at a potential Yucca Mountain repository. The report focuses on key processes by providing observations and analyses of natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) systems to improve understanding and confidence in the operation of these processes under conditions similar to those that could occur in a nuclear waste repository. The process models include those that represent both engineered and natural barrier processes. A second purpose of this report is to document the various applications of natural analogues to geologic repository programs, focusing primarily on the way analogues have been used by the YMP. This report is limited to providing support for PA in a confirmatory manner and to providing corroborative inputs for process modeling activities. Section 1.7 discusses additional limitations of this report. Key topics for this report are analogues to emplacement drift degradation, waste form degradation, waste package degradation, degradation of other materials proposed for the engineered barrier, seepage into drifts, radionuclide flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ), analogues to coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes, saturated zone (SZ) transport

  2. NATURAL ANALOGUE SYNTHESIS REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present analogue studies and literature reviews designed to provide qualitative and quantitative information to test and provide added confidence in process models abstracted for performance assessment (PA) and model predictions pertinent to PA. This report provides updates to studies presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Description (CRWMS M and O 2000 [151945], Section 13) and new examples gleaned from the literature along with results of quantitative studies conducted specifically for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The intent of the natural analogue studies was to collect corroborative evidence from analogues to demonstrate additional understanding of processes expected to occur during postclosure at a potential Yucca Mountain repository. The report focuses on key processes by providing observations and analyses of natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) systems to improve understanding and confidence in the operation of these processes under conditions similar to those that could occur in a nuclear waste repository. The process models include those that represent both engineered and natural barrier processes. A second purpose of this report is to document the various applications of natural analogues to geologic repository programs, focusing primarily on the way analogues have been used by the YMP. This report is limited to providing support for PA in a confirmatory manner and to providing corroborative inputs for process modeling activities. Section 1.7 discusses additional limitations of this report. Key topics for this report are analogues to emplacement-drift degradation, waste-form degradation, waste-package degradation, degradation of other materials proposed for the engineered barrier, seepage into drifts, radionuclide flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ), analogues to coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes, saturated-zone (SZ) transport, impact of radionuclide release on the biosphere

  3. CEC natural analogue working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.; Chapman, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    The second meeting of the CEC Natural Analogue Working Group took place on June 17-19, 1986, hosted by the Swiss NAGRA in Interlaken (CH). A review of recent progress in natural analogue programmes was carried out, and complemented by detailed discussions about geomicrobiology, archaeological analogues, natural colloids, and use of analogues to increase confidence in safety assessments for radioactive waste disposal. A statement drafted by the Group, and the presentations made, are put together in this report

  4. CEC Natural Analogue Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.; Chapman, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    The central theme for the third meeting of the CEC analogue working group was ''How can analogue data be used for performance assessments, both in support of the results and for presentation to the public''. This report puts together the most recent achievements in this field, together with a review of on-going natural analogue programmes

  5. Natural analogue working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.; Chapman, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Natural Analogue Working Group was established by the Commission of the European Communities in 1985. The purpose of this group is to bring together modellers with earth scientists and others, so that maximum benefit can be obtained from natural analogue studies with a view to safe geological disposal of radioactive waste. The first meeting of this group was held in Brussels from November 5 to 7, 1985. The discussions mainly concerned the identification of the modellers' needs and of the earth scientists' capacity to provide for them. Following the debates, a written statement was produced by the Group; this document forms the core of the present Report. Notes and outlines of many of the presentations made are grouped in four appendixes. The valuable contribution of all those involved in the meeting is gratefully acknowledged

  6. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  7. Quantum analogue computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  8. The Palmottu analogue project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, L.; Blomqvist, R.; Suksi, J.

    1993-01-01

    The report gives a summary of the results of investigations carried out in 1992 at the Palmottu natural analogue study site, which is a small U-Th mineralization in Nummi-Pusula, southwestern Finland. Additionally, the report includes several separate articles dealing with various aspects of the Palmottu Analogue Project: (1) deep groundwater flow, (2) interpretation of hydraulic connections, (3) characterization of groundwater colloids, (4) uranium mineral-groundwater equilibrium, (5) water-rock interaction and (6) modelling of in situ matrix diffusion. The Palmottu Analogue Project aims at a more profound understanding of radionuclide transport processes in fractured crystalline bedrock. The essential factors controlling transport are groundwater flow and interaction between water and rock. Accordingly, the study includes (1) structural interpretations partly based on geophysical measurements, (2) hydrological studies including hydraulic drill-hole measurements, (3) flow modelling, (4) hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwater, uranium chemistry and colloid chemistry, (5) mineralogical studies, (6) geochemical interpretation and modelling, (7) studies of radionuclide mobilization and retardation including matrix diffusion, and (8) modelling of uranium series data. Palaeohydrogeological aspects, due to the anticipated future glaciation of the Fennoscandian Shield, are of special interest. Quaternary sediments are studied to gain information on post-glacial migration in the overburden. (orig.)

  9. Efficient evaluation of Casimir force in arbitrary three-dimensional geometries by integral equation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Jie L.; Tong, M.S.; Atkins, Phillip; Chew, W.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter, we generalized the surface integral equation method for the evaluation of Casimir force in arbitrary three-dimensional geometries. Similar to the two-dimensional case, the evaluation of the mean Maxwell stress tensor is cast into solving a series of three-dimensional scattering problems. The formulation and solution of the three-dimensional scattering problems are well-studied in classical computational electromagnetics. This Letter demonstrates that this quantum electrodynamic phenomenon can be studied using the knowledge and techniques of classical electrodynamics.

  10. Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the conditions of validity for the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic plane mirrors. As in the previously studied case of nonmagnetic materials [Guérout et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 042125 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.042125], we recover the usual expression for the lossy model of optical response, but not for the lossless plasma model. We also show that the modes associated with the Foucault currents play a crucial role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to expectations.

  11. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. Dowker's Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-07-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  12. Calculation of nonzero-temperature Casimir forces in the time domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Kai; Reid, M. T. Homer; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; White, Jacob K.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    We show how to compute Casimir forces at nonzero temperatures with time-domain electromagnetic simulations, for example, using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Compared to our previous zero-temperature time-domain method, only a small modification is required, but we explain that some care is required to properly capture the zero-frequency contribution. We validate the method against analytical and numerical frequency-domain calculations, and show a surprising high-temperature disappearance of a nonmonotonic behavior previously demonstrated in a pistonlike geometry.

  13. Thermal corrections to the Casimir energy in a general weak gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Borzoo

    2016-12-01

    We calculate finite temperature corrections to the energy of the Casimir effect of a two conducting parallel plates in a general weak gravitational field. After solving the Klein-Gordon equation inside the apparatus, mode frequencies inside the apparatus are obtained in terms of the parameters of the weak background. Using Matsubara’s approach to quantum statistical mechanics gravity-induced thermal corrections of the energy density are obtained. Well-known weak static and stationary gravitational fields are analyzed and it is found that in the low temperature limit the energy of the system increases compared to that in the zero temperature case.

  14. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  15. Casimir problem of spherical dielectrics: quantum statistical and field theoretical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, J S; Brevik, I; Aarseth, J B

    2001-05-01

    The Casimir free energy for a system of two dielectric concentric nonmagnetic spherical bodies is calculated with use of a quantum statistical mechanical method, at arbitrary temperature. By means of this rather novel method, which turns out to be quite powerful (we have shown this to be true in other situations also), we consider first an explicit evaluation of the free energy for the static case, corresponding to zero Matsubara frequency (n=0). Thereafter, the time-dependent case is examined. For comparison we consider the calculation of the free energy with use of the more commonly known field theoretical method, assuming for simplicity metallic boundary surfaces.

  16. Poincare-Birkhoff-Witt theorems and generalized Casimir invariants for some infinite-dimensional Lie groups: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ton-That, Tuong

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper we gave a generalization of the notion of Casimir invariant differential operators for the infinite-dimensional Lie groups GL ∞ (C) (or equivalently, for its Lie algebra gj ∞ (C)). In this paper we give a generalization of the Casimir invariant differential operators for a class of infinite-dimensional Lie groups (or equivalently, for their Lie algebras) which contains the infinite-dimensional complex classical groups. These infinite-dimensional Lie groups, and their Lie algebras, are inductive limits of finite-dimensional Lie groups, and their Lie algebras, with some additional properties. These groups or their Lie algebras act via the generalized adjoint representations on projective limits of certain chains of vector spaces of universal enveloping algebras. Then the generalized Casimir operators are the invariants of the generalized adjoint representations. In order to be able to explicitly compute the Casimir operators one needs a basis for the universal enveloping algebra of a Lie algebra. The Poincare-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) theorem gives an explicit construction of such a basis. Thus in the first part of this paper we give a generalization of the PBW theorem for inductive limits of Lie algebras. In the last part of this paper a generalization of the very important theorem in representation theory, namely the Chevalley-Racah theorem, is also discussed

  17. Pull-in voltage of microswitch rough plates in the presence of electromagnetic and acoustic Casimir forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, George

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the combined influence of electromagnetic and acoustic Casimir forces on the pull-in voltage of microswitches with self-affine rough plates. It is shown that for plate separations within the micron range the acoustic term arising from pressure fluctuations can influence

  18. Casimir energies in M4≥/sup N/ for even N. Green's-function and zeta-function techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantowski, R.; Milton, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Green's-function technique developed in the first paper in this series is generalized to apply to massive scalar, vector, second-order tensor, and Dirac spinor fields, as a preliminary to a full graviton calculation. The Casimir energies are of the form u/sub Casimir/ = (1/a 4 )[α/sub N/lna/b)+β/sub N/], where N (even) is the dimension of the internal sphere, a is its radius, and b/sup -1/ is an ultraviolet cutoff (presumably at the Planck scale). The coefficient of the divergent logarithm, α/sub N/, is unambiguously obtained for each field considered. The Green's-function technique gives rise to no difficulties in the evaluation of imaginary-mass-mode contributions to the Casimir energy. In addition, a new, simplified zeta-function technique is presented which is very easily implemented by symbolic programs, and which, of course, gives the same results. An error in a previous zeta-function calculation of the Casimir energy for even N is pointed out

  19. ACTINOMYCIN D ANALOGUES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    acids, $g(b)-amino acids and/or longer chain $g(v)-amino acids, and a difunctional group which preferably is a cyclic entity, in particular, an aromatic or heteroaromatic entity acting as an intercalator group. Specific compounds and a library of such compounds may be prepared using conventional solid......The present invention relates to new compounds being structurally and functionally similar to Actinomycin D and to combinatorial libraries of such compounds. The Actinomycin D analogues according to the present invention comprise two linear or cyclic peptide moieties constituted by $g(a)-amino...

  20. Plasma versus Drude Modeling of the Casimir Force: Beyond the Proximity Force Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Michael; Ingold, Gert-Ludwig; Neto, Paulo A. Maia

    2017-07-01

    We calculate the Casimir force and its gradient between a spherical and a planar gold surface. Significant numerical improvements allow us to extend the range of accessible parameters into the experimental regime. We compare our numerically exact results with those obtained within the proximity force approximation (PFA) employed in the analysis of all Casimir force experiments reported in the literature so far. Special attention is paid to the difference between the Drude model and the dissipationless plasma model at zero frequency. It is found that the correction to PFA is too small to explain the discrepancy between the experimental data and the PFA result based on the Drude model. However, it turns out that for the plasma model, the corrections to PFA lie well outside the experimental bound obtained by probing the variation of the force gradient with the sphere radius [D. E. Krause et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 050403 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.050403]. The corresponding corrections based on the Drude model are significantly smaller but still in violation of the experimental bound for small distances between plane and sphere.

  1. On electrostatic and Casimir force measurements between conducting surfaces in a sphere-plane configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W J; Brown-Hayes, M; Brownell, J H; Dalvit, D A R; Onofrio, R

    2009-01-01

    We report on measurements of forces acting between two conducting surfaces in a spherical-plane configuration in the 35 nm-1 μm separation range. The measurements are obtained by performing electrostatic calibrations followed by a residuals analysis after subtracting the electrostatic-dependent component. We find in all runs optimal fitting of the calibrations for exponents smaller than the one predicted by electrostatics for an ideal sphere-plane geometry. We also find that the external bias potential necessary to minimize the electrostatic contribution depends on the sphere-plane distance. In spite of these anomalies, by implementing a parametrization-dependent subtraction of the electrostatic contribution we have found evidence for short-distance attractive forces of magnitude comparable to the expected Casimir-Lifshitz force. We finally discuss the relevance of our findings in the more general context of Casimir-Lifshitz force measurements, with particular regard to the critical issues of the electrical and geometrical characterization of the involved surfaces.

  2. The generalized Abel-Plana formula. Applications to Bessel functions and Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharian, A.A.; Institute of Applied Problems in Physics NAS RA, Yerevan; Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste

    2000-02-01

    One of the most efficient methods to obtain the vacuum expectation values for the physical observables in the Casimir effect is based on using the Abel-Plana summation formula. This allows us to derive the regularized quantities in a manifestly cutoff independent way and present them in the form of strongly convergent integrals. However, the application of Abel-Plana formula, in its usual form, is restricted by simple geometries when the eigenmodes have a simple dependence on quantum numbers. The author generalized the Abel-Plana formula which essentially enlarges its application range. Based on this generalization, formulae have been obtained for various types of series over the zeros of some combinations of Bessel functions and for integrals involving these functions. It has been shown that these results generalize the special cases existing in literature. Further, the derived summation formulae have been used to summarize series arising in the mode summation approach to the Casimir effect for spherically and cylindrically symmetric boundaries. This allows us to extract the divergent parts from the vacuum expectation values for the local physical observables in a manifestly cutoff independent way. The present paper reviews these results. Some new considerations are also added. (author)

  3. Free vibration of geometrically nonlinear micro-switches under electrostatic and Casimir forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, X L; Kitipornchai, S; Lim, C W; Yang, J

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the free vibration characteristics of micro-switches under combined electrostatic, intermolecular forces and axial residual stress, with an emphasis on the effect of geometric nonlinear deformation due to mid-plane stretching and the influence of Casimir force. The micro-switch considered in this study is made of either homogeneous material or non-homogeneous functionally graded material with two material phases. The Euler–Bernoulli beam theory with von Karman type nonlinear kinematics is applied in the theoretical formulation. The principle of virtual work is used to derive the nonlinear governing differential equation. The eigenvalue problem which describes free vibration of the micro-beam at its statically deflected state is then solved using the differential quadrature method. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of micro-switches for four different boundary conditions (i.e. clamped–clamped, clamped–simply supported, simply supported and clamped–free) are obtained. The solutions are validated through direct comparisons with experimental and other existing results reported in previous studies. A parametric study is conducted to show the significant effects of geometric nonlinearity, Casimir force, axial residual stress and material composition for the natural frequencies

  4. Transaxial analogue tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duinker, S.; Geluk, R.J.; Mulder, H.

    1978-01-01

    After an introduction on computerized tomography (CT) scanners summarizing the various generations, the general outline of the concept of a transaxial tomography system is given, which is entirely based on analogue instead of digital techniques (AT system). In particular, the use of X-ray image-intensifier systems as a means of detecting the transmission profiles of the object in a so-called half-field detection method are discussed as well as various possibilities of detector scanning. It is further discussed how in a purely electronic way with the aid of a scan-converter, density profiles representative of parallel beams can be derived from the family of profiles as obtained from the fan-shaped beams in the actual experiment. A practical opto-electronic solution of the analogue spatial filtering problem is described as to how to process, on a real-time basis, parallel density profiles so that after back-projection tomographic images which are free from point-spreading effects will be obtained. Finally, after a brief indication of certain technical details for which corrective measures have to be worked out in the course of practical realization, the main relative advantages of AT scanners in comparison to CT scanners are enumerated. (Auth.)

  5. Alligator Rivers analogue project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.

    1990-01-01

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization has extensively evaluated uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Province in Australia as analogues of radioactive waste repositories. The work was extended for a three-year program as an international project based on the Koongarra uranium deposit and sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The technical program comprises six major sub-projects involving modelling and experimental work: modelling of radionuclide migration; hydrogeology of the Koongarra uranium deposit; uranium/thorium series disequilibria studies; groundwater and colloid studies; fission product studies; transuranic nuclide studies; an outline of the technical programs and a summary of progress in the technical sub-projects is given. This is followed by a series of technical reports which briefly describe current research tasks, and which have been separately indexed

  6. Reply to 'Comment on 'Temperature dependence of the Casimir force for lossy bulk media''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yampol' skii, V. A.; Maizelis, Z. A.; Apostolov, S. S. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); A. Ya. Usikov Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, NASU, 61085 Kharkov (Ukraine); Savel' ev, Sergey [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Here, we present an estimate of the characteristic wavelengths of the evanescent modes, which define the main contribution to the thermal part of the Casimir force. This estimate is more precise than the one in the preceding Comment by Bimonte et al.[Phys. Rev. A 84, 036501 (2011)]. The wavelengths we derive are indeed smaller than the sizes of the interacting bodies. We also discuss the results of several experiments on the thermal effects in the Casimir force.

  7. A Short Term Analogue Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Peter Jivan

    1992-01-01

    A short term analogue memory is described. It is based on a well-known sample-hold topology in which leakage currents have been minimized partly by circuit design and partly by layout techniques. Measurements on a test chip implemented in a standard 2.4 micron analogue CMOS process show a droop...

  8. Influence of the chemical potential on the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and gapped graphene or a graphene-coated substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    We present a formalism based on first principles of quantum electrodynamics at nonzero temperature which permits us to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a graphene sheet with arbitrary mass gap and chemical potential, including graphene-coated substrates. The free energy and force of the Casimir-Polder interaction are expressed via the polarization tensor of graphene in (2 +1 ) -dimensional space-time in the framework of the Dirac model. The obtained expressions are used to investigate the influence of the chemical potential of graphene on the Casimir-Polder interaction. Computations are performed for an atom of metastable helium interacting with either a freestanding graphene sheet or a graphene-coated substrate made of amorphous silica. It is shown that the impacts of the nonzero chemical potential and the mass gap on the Casimir-Polder interaction are in opposite directions, by increasing and decreasing the magnitudes of the free energy and force, respectively. It turns out, however, that the temperature-dependent part of the Casimir-Polder interaction is decreased by a nonzero chemical potential, whereas the mass gap increases it compared to the case of undoped, gapless graphene. The physical explanation for these effects is provided. Numerical computations of the Casimir-Polder interaction are performed at various temperatures and atom-graphene separations.

  9. Scattering matrices and expansion coefficients of martian analogue palagonite particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, E.C.; Volten, H.; Stam, D.M.; Muñoz, O.; Hovenier, J.W.; Roush, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of ratios of elements of the scattering matrix of martian analogue palagonite particles for scattering angles ranging from 3° to 174° and a wavelength of 632.8 nm. To facilitate the use of these measurements in radiative transfer calculations we have devised a method that

  10. Gauge dynamics in the PNJL model: Color neutrality and Casimir scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuki, Hiroaki; Fukushima, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a gauge-invariant prescription to take the mean-field approximation self-consistently in the PNJL model (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with the Polyakov loop). We first address the problem of non-vanishing color density in normal quark matter, which is an artifact arising from gauge-fixed treatment of the Polyakov loop mean-fields. We then confirm that the gauge average incorporated in our prescription resolves this problem and ensures color neutrality. We point out that the proposed method has an advantage in computing the expectation value of any function of the Polyakov loop matrix. We discuss the Casimir scaling as an immediate application of the method.

  11. Dynamics of the Vacuum and Casimir Analogs to the Hydrogen Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold; Vera, Jerry; Bailey, Paul; March, Paul; Lawrence, Tim; Sylvester, Andre; Brady, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss the current viewpoint of the vacuum state and explore the idea of a "natural" vacuum as opposed to immutable, non-degradable vacuum. This concept will be explored for all primary quantum numbers to show consistency with observation at the level of Bohr theory. A comparison with the Casimir force per unit area will be made, and an explicit function for the spatial variation of the vacuum density around the atomic nucleus will be derived. This explicit function will be numerically modeled using the industry multi-physics tool, COMSOL(trademark), and the eigenfrequencies for the n = 1 to n = 7 states will be found and compared to expectation.

  12. Irreversible dynamics, Onsager-Casimir symmetry, and an application to turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, Hans Christian

    2014-10-01

    Irreversible contributions to the dynamics of nonequilibrium systems can be formulated in terms of dissipative, or irreversible, brackets. We discuss the structure of such irreversible brackets in view of a degeneracy implied by energy conservation, where we consider different types of symmetries of the bracket corresponding to the Onsager and Casimir symmetries of linear irreversible thermodynamics. Slip and turbulence provide important examples of antisymmetric irreversible brackets and offer guidance for the more general modeling of irreversible dynamics without entropy production. Conversely, turbulence modeling could benefit from elucidating thermodynamic structure. The examples suggest constructing antisymmetric irreversible brackets in terms of completely antisymmetric functions of three indices. Irreversible brackets without well-defined symmetry properties can arise for rare events, causing big configurational changes.

  13. Lateral Casimir-Polder forces by breaking time-reversal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Weernink, Ricardo R. Q. P. T.; Barcellona, Pablo; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2018-03-01

    We examine the lateral Casimir-Polder force acting on a circular rotating emitter near a dielectric plane surface. As the circular motion breaks time-reversal symmetry, the spontaneous emission in a direction parallel to the surface is in general anisotropic. We show that a lateral force arises which can be interpreted as a recoil force because of this asymmetric emission. The force is an oscillating function of the distance between the emitter and the surface, and the lossy character of the dielectric strongly influences the results in the near-field regime. The force exhibits also a population-induced dynamics, decaying exponentially with respect to time on time scales of the inverse of the spontaneous decay rate. We propose that this effect could be detected measuring the velocity acquired by the emitter, following different cycles of excitation and spontaneous decay. Our results are expressed in terms of the Green's tensor and can therefore easily be applied to more complex geometries.

  14. Casimir theory of the relativistic composite string revisited, and a formally related problem in scalar QFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Iver

    2012-09-01

    The main part of this paper is to present an updated review of the Casimir energy at zero and finite temperature for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string. We make use of three different regularizations: the cutoff method, the complex contour integration method and the zeta-function method. The string model is relativistic, in the sense that the velocity of sound is for each string piece set equal to the velocity of light. In this sense the theory is analogous to the electromagnetic theory in a dielectric medium in which the product of permittivity and permeability is equal to unity (an isorefractive medium). We demonstrate how the formalism works for a two-piece string, and for a 2N-piece string, and show how in the latter case a compact recursion relation serves to facilitate the formalism considerably. The Casimir energy turns out to be negative, and the more so the larger the number of pieces in the string. The two-piece string is quantized in D-dimensional spacetime, in the limit when the ratio between the two tensions is very small. We calculate the free energy and other thermodynamic quantities, demonstrate scaling properties, and comment finally on the meaning of the Hagedorn critical temperature for the two-piece string. Thereafter, as a novel development we present a scalar field theory for a real field in three-dimensional space in a potential rising linearly with a longitudinal coordinate z in the interval 0 birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  15. Casimir effect for parallel plates in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.; Setare, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    We evaluate the Hadamard function, the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of the field squared and the energy-momentum tensor for a massive scalar field with a general curvature coupling parameter in the geometry of two parallel plates on a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background with a general scale factor. On the plates, the field operator obeys the Robin boundary conditions with the coefficients depending on the scale factor. In all the spatial regions, the VEVs are decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. Unlike the problem with the Minkowski bulk, in the region between the plates, the normal stress is not homogeneous and does not vanish in the geometry of a single plate. Near the plates, it has different signs for accelerated and decelerated expansions of the Universe. The VEV of the energy-momentum tensor, in addition to the diagonal components, has a nonzero off-diagonal component describing an energy flux along the direction normal to the boundaries. Expressions are derived for the Casimir forces acting on the plates. Depending on the Robin coefficients and on the vacuum state, these forces can be either attractive or repulsive. An important difference from the corresponding result in the Minkowski bulk is that the forces on the separate plates, in general, are different if the corresponding Robin coefficients differ. We give the applications of general results for the class of α vacua in the de Sitter bulk. It is shown that, compared with the Bunch-Davies vacuum state, the Casimir forces for a given α vacuum may change the sign.

  16. Cobalamin analogues in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Obeid, Rima; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Haptocorrin (HC) carries cobalamin analogues (CorA), but whether CorA are produced in the body is unknown. All cobalamins (Cbl) to the foetus are delivered by the Cbl-specific protein transcobalamin (TC), and therefore analysis of cord serum for CorA may help to clarify the origin...... of CorA. METHODS: HC-CorA were quantified in paired samples of cord serum from newborns and serum from mothers (n = 69). RESULTS: The CorA-concentration was higher in cord serum (median = 380, range: 41-780 pmol/L) than in serum from the mothers (median = 160, range: 64-330 pmol/L), (p...-analysis showed CorA-peaks with retention times of 13.5, 14,5 and 16.5 min in samples from both the mother and cord serum. The peak with retention time 16.5 min constituted 24% (mother) and 45% (cord serum) of the total amount CorA, and eluted as does dicyanocobinamide. CONCLUSION: Our results support that Cor...

  17. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included

  18. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  19. Chemoenzymatic preparation of germacrene analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascón, Oscar; Touchet, Sabrina; Miller, David J; Gonzalez, Veronica; Faraldos, Juan A; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2012-10-09

    A small library of novel germacrenes was generated using a combination of two plant enzymes, germacrene A synthase, and D synthase and modified farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) analogues. This chemoenzymatic approach allows the preparation of potentially valuable volatiles for biological studies.

  20. Chemoenzymatic preparation of germacrene analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Cascón, Oscar; Touchet, Sabrina; Miller, David James; Gonzalez, Veronica; Faraldos, Juan A.; Allemann, Rudolf Konrad

    2012-01-01

    A small library of novel germacrenes was generated using a combination of two plant enzymes, germacrene A synthase, and D synthase and modified farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) analogues. This chemoenzymatic approach allows the preparation of potentially valuable volatiles for biological studies.

  1. Finite temperature Casimir energy in closed rectangular cavities: a rigorous derivation based on a zeta function technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2007-01-01

    We derive rigorously explicit formulae of the Casimir free energy at finite temperature for massless scalar field and electromagnetic field confined in a closed rectangular cavity with different boundary conditions by a zeta regularization method. We study both the low and high temperature expansions of the free energy. In each case, we write the free energy as a sum of a polynomial in temperature plus exponentially decay terms. We show that the free energy is always a decreasing function of temperature. In the cases of massless scalar field with the Dirichlet boundary condition and electromagnetic field, the zero temperature Casimir free energy might be positive. In each of these cases, there is a unique transition temperature (as a function of the side lengths of the cavity) where the Casimir energy changes from positive to negative. When the space dimension is equal to two and three, we show graphically the dependence of this transition temperature on the side lengths of the cavity. Finally we also show that we can obtain the results for a non-closed rectangular cavity by letting the size of some directions of a closed cavity go to infinity, and we find that these results agree with the usual integration prescription adopted by other authors

  2. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  3. Kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolleman, Edgar J.; Melis, Marleen; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, V 220, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    This review focuses on the present status of kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. This treatment modality for somatostatin receptor-positive tumours is limited by renal reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides resulting in dose-limiting high kidney radiation doses. Radiation nephropathy has been described in several patients. Studies on the mechanism and localization demonstrate that renal uptake of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues largely depends on the megalin/cubulin system in the proximal tubule cells. Thus methods are needed that interfere with this reabsorption pathway to achieve kidney protection. Such methods include coadministration of basic amino acids, the bovine gelatin-containing solution Gelofusine or albumin fragments. Amino acids are already commonly used in the clinical setting during PRRT. Other compounds that interfere with renal reabsorption capacity (maleic acid and colchicine) are not suitable for clinical use because of potential toxicity. The safe limit for the renal radiation dose during PRRT is not exactly known. Dosimetry studies applying the principle of the biological equivalent dose (correcting for the effect of dose fractionation) suggest that a dose of about 37 Gy is the threshold for development of kidney toxicity. This threshold is lower when risk factors for development of renal damage exist: age over 60 years, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and previous chemotherapy. A still experimental pathway for kidney protection is mitigation of radiation effects, possibly achievable by cotreatment with amifostine (Ethylol), a radiation protector, or with blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Future perspectives on improving kidney protection during PRRT include combinations of agents to reduce renal retention of radiolabelled peptides, eventually together with mitigating medicines. Moreover, new somatostatin analogues with lower

  4. Introduction to electronic analogue computers

    CERN Document Server

    Wass, C A A

    1965-01-01

    Introduction to Electronic Analogue Computers, Second Revised Edition is based on the ideas and experience of a group of workers at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough, Hants. This edition is almost entirely the work of Mr. K. C. Garner, of the College of Aeronautics, Cranfield. As various advances have been made in the technology involving electronic analogue computers, this book presents discussions on the said progress, including some acquaintance with the capabilities of electronic circuits and equipment. This text also provides a mathematical background including simple differen

  5. De vette jaren: de Commissie-Casimir en het Nederlandse wetenschapsbeleid 1957-1970

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Baneke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Years of Abundance: the Casimir Committee and Dutch Science Policy 1957–1970 In October 1958, a committee of six prominent Dutch scientists and industrial managers presented a brief report in which they requested a major increase of the science budget. This report has been described as a turning point in the history of science in the Netherlands, signaling the beginning of a decade of rapid growth of funding for ‘pure’ research. Surprisingly little is known about the backgrounds of this report, however. In this paper, I analyze its origin, its relation to contemporary higher education policy, and its consequences. As it turns out, the report was less revolutionary than is usually assumed: it mostly reinforced developments that had already begun earlier. Furthermore, Sputnik and the Cold War were not as important as is often claimed. This paper also suggests a reinterpretation of the justification of the government spending on academic research after the Second World War. Producing skilled researchers for industry was at least as important as produc- ing new knowledge.

  6. Casimir meets Poisson: improved quark/gluon discrimination with counting observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Christopher; Larkoski, Andrew J.; Thaler, Jesse; Zhou, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    Charged track multiplicity is among the most powerful observables for discriminating quark- from gluon-initiated jets. Despite its utility, it is not infrared and collinear (IRC) safe, so perturbative calculations are limited to studying the energy evolution of multiplicity moments. While IRC-safe observables, like jet mass, are perturbatively calculable, their distributions often exhibit Casimir scaling, such that their quark/gluon discrimination power is limited by the ratio of quark to gluon color factors. In this paper, we introduce new IRC-safe counting observables whose discrimination performance exceeds that of jet mass and approaches that of track multiplicity. The key observation is that track multiplicity is approximately Poisson distributed, with more suppressed tails than the Sudakov peak structure from jet mass. By using an iterated version of the soft drop jet grooming algorithm, we can define a "soft drop multiplicity" which is Poisson distributed at leading-logarithmic accuracy. In addition, we calculate the next-to-leading-logarithmic corrections to this Poisson structure. If we allow the soft drop groomer to proceed to the end of the jet branching history, we can define a collinear-unsafe (but still infrared-safe) counting observable. Exploiting the universality of the collinear limit, we define generalized fragmentation functions to study the perturbative energy evolution of collinear-unsafe multiplicity.

  7. The prince as a Jesuit, the king as an abbot. The “monastic” theme in the iconography of John II Casimir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Skrodzka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The young Casimir Vasa was brought up at the court of his father, Sigismund III Vasa, in the atmosphere of great devotion, which made him enter the order of Jesuits. Even though he decided to leave the monastery and to take the Polish crown, he came back to the life of a monk after his abdication. The present paper presents the very few pieces of art commemorating the monastic life of John Casimir: an emblem, a medal, some prints and his tomb in Paris. All those objects demonstrate the deep piety of the king.

  8. Superconductive analogue of spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigel'man, M.; Ioffe, L.; Vinokur, V.; Larkin, A.

    1987-07-01

    The properties of granular superconductors in magnetic fields, namely the existence of a new superconductive state analogue of the low-temperature superconductive state in spin glasses are discussed in the frame of the infinite-range model and the finite-range models. Experiments for elucidation of spin-glass superconductive state in real systems are suggested. 30 refs

  9. PTH analogues and osteoporotic fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, H.J.; Lems, W.F.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field: At present there are two parathyroid hormone (PTH) analogues (PTH 1 34 and PTH 1 84) registered for the treatment of established osteoporosis in postmenopausal women (PTH 1 34 and PTH 1 84) and in men (PTH 1 34 only) who are at increased risk of having a fracture. Areas

  10. Chemopreventive properties of curcumin analogues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemopreventive properties of curcumin analogues, hexagamavunone-0 and gamavutone-0, in rat colorectal cancer model. ... Histopathological analysis was performed using H & E staining and immunohistochemistry with antibodies against adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Results: All ...

  11. A complete analogue of Hardy's theorem on SL2 (R) and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We also consider the `heat equation' of the Casimir operator, which plays the role of the Laplacian for the group. We show that despite the structural difference of the Casimir with the Laplacian on R n or the Laplace-Beltrami operator on the Riemannian symmetric spaces, it is possible to have a heat kernel. This heat kernel ...

  12. The Casimir Effect from the Point of View of Algebraic Quantum Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.dappiaggi@unipv.it; Nosari, Gabriele [Università degli Studi di Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Pinamonti, Nicola [Università di Genova, Dipartimento di Matematica (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We consider a region of Minkowski spacetime bounded either by one or by two parallel, infinitely extended plates orthogonal to a spatial direction and a real Klein-Gordon field satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions. We quantize these two systems within the algebraic approach to quantum field theory using the so-called functional formalism. As a first step we construct a suitable unital ∗-algebra of observables whose generating functionals are characterized by a labelling space which is at the same time optimal and separating and fulfils the F-locality property. Subsequently we give a definition for these systems of Hadamard states and we investigate explicit examples. In the case of a single plate, it turns out that one can build algebraic states via a pull-back of those on the whole Minkowski spacetime, moreover inheriting from them the Hadamard property. When we consider instead two plates, algebraic states can be put in correspondence with those on flat spacetime via the so-called method of images, which we translate to the algebraic setting. For a massless scalar field we show that this procedure works perfectly for a large class of quasi-free states including the Poincaré vacuum and KMS states. Eventually Wick polynomials are introduced. Contrary to the Minkowski case, the extended algebras, built in globally hyperbolic subregions can be collected in a global counterpart only after a suitable deformation which is expressed locally in terms of a *-isomorphism. As a last step, we construct explicitly the two-point function and the regularized energy density, showing, moreover, that the outcome is consistent with the standard results of the Casimir effect.

  13. From optical lattice clocks to the measurement of forces in the Casimir regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Peter; Lemonde, Pierre; Bize, Sebastien; Landragin, Arnaud; Clairon, Andre; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2007-01-01

    We describe an experiment based on atoms trapped close to a macroscopic surface, to study the interactions between the atoms and the surface at very small separations (0.6-10 μm). In this range the dominant potential is the QED interaction (Casimir-Polder and van der Waals) between the surface and the atom. Additionally, several theoretical models suggest the possibility of Yukawa-type potentials with sub-millimeter range, arising from new physics related to gravity. The proposed setup is very similar to neutral atom optical lattice clocks, but with the atoms trapped in lattice sites close to the reflecting mirror. A sequence of pulses of the probe laser at different frequencies is then used to create an interferometer with a coherent superposition between atomic states at different distances from the mirror (in different lattice sites). Assuming atom interferometry state-of-the-art measurement of the phase difference and a duration of the superposition of about 0.1 s, we expect to be able to measure the potential difference between separated states with an uncertainty of ≅10 -4 Hz. An analysis of systematic effects for different atoms and surfaces indicates no fundamentally limiting effect at the same level of uncertainty, but does influence the choice of atom and surface material. Based on those estimates, we expect that such an experiment would improve the best existing measurements of the atom-wall QED interaction by ≥ 2 orders of magnitude, while gaining up to four orders of magnitude on the best present limits on new interactions in the range between 100 nm and 100 μm

  14. Thermal Casimir-Polder forces on a V-type three-level atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen-Ran; Xu, Jing-Ping; Al-amri, M.; Zhu, Cheng-Jie; Xie, Shuang-Yuan; Yang, Ya-Ping

    2017-09-01

    We study the thermal Casimir-Polder (CP) forces on a V-type three-level atom. The competition between the thermal effect and the quantum interference of the two transition dipoles on the force is investigated. To shed light onto the role of the quantum interference, we analyze two kinds of initial states of the atom, i.e., the superradiant state and the subradiant state. Considering the atom being in the thermal reservoir, the resonant CP force arising from the real photon emission dominates in the evolution of the CP force. Under the zero-temperature condition, the quantum interference can effectively modify the amplitude and the evolution of the force, leading to a long-time force or even the cancellation of the force. Our results reveal that in the finite-temperature case, the thermal photons can enhance the amplitude of all force elements, but have no influence on the net resonant CP force in the steady state, which means that the second law of thermodynamics still works. For the ideal degenerate V-type atom with parallel dipoles under the initial subradiant state, the robust destructive quantum interference overrides the thermal fluctuations, leading to the trapping of the atom in the subradiant state and the disappearance of the CP force. However, in terms of a realistic Zeeman atom, the thermal photons play a significant role during the evolution of the CP force. The thermal fluctuations can enhance the amplitude of the initial CP force by increasing the temperature, and weaken the influence of the quantum interference on the evolution of the CP force from the initial superradiant (subradiant) state to the steady state.

  15. Thixotropic Phenomena in Water: Quantitative Indicators of Casimir-Magnetic Transformations from Vacuum Oscillations (Virtual Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Persinger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The ~1.5 × 10−20 J which is considered a universal quantity and is associated with the movement of protons in water also relates to the ratio of the magnetic moment of a proton divided by its unit charge, multiplied by viscosity and applied over the O-H distance. There is quantitative evidence that thixotropy, the “spontaneous” increased viscosity in water when undisturbed, originates from the transformation of virtual particles or vacuum oscillations to real states through conversion of Casimir-magnetic energies that involve the frequency of the neutral hydrogen line and the upper bound threshold value for intergalactic magnetic fields. The results indicate that ½ of a single electron orbit is real (particle and the other ½ is virtual (wave. The matter equivalent per s for virtual-to-real states for electrons in 1 mL of water with a neutral pH is consistent with the numbers of protons (H+ and the measured range of molecules in the coherent domains for both width and duration of growth and is similar to widths of intergalactic dust grains from which planets and stars may condense. The de Broglie momentum for the lower boundary of the width of coherent domains multiplied by the fine structure velocity of an electron is concurrent with the quantum when one proton is being removed from another and when the upper boundary of the rest mass of a photon is transformed by the product of velocities for putative “entanglement” and light. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that components of thixotropy, such as specific domains of intercalated water molecules, could display excess correlations over very large distances. Because the energies of the universal quantity and water converge it may be a special conduit for discrete transformations from virtual to real states.

  16. Novel acetylcholine and carbamoylcholine analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Christensen, Jeppe K.

    2008-01-01

    A series of carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine analogues were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Several of the compounds displayed low nanomolar binding affinities to the alpha 4beta 2 nAChR and pronounced selectivity...... for this subtype over alpha 3beta 4, alpha 4beta 4, and alpha 7 nAChRs. The high nAChR activity of carbamoylcholine analogue 5d was found to reside in its R-enantiomer, a characteristic most likely true for all other compounds in the series. Interestingly, the pronounced alpha 4beta 2 selectivities exhibited...... by some of the compounds in the binding assays translated into functional selectivity. Compound 5a was a fairly potent partial alpha 4beta 2 nAChR agonist with negligible activities at the alpha 3beta 4 and alpha 7 subtypes, thus being one of the few truly functionally selective alpha 4beta 2 nACh...

  17. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  18. The combinatorics computation for Casimir operators of the symplectic Lie algebra and the application for determining the center of the enveloping algebra of a semidirect product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Van Hop.

    1989-12-01

    The combinatorics computation is used to describe the Casimir operators of the symplectic Lie Algebra. This result is applied for determining the Center of the enveloping Algebra of the semidirect Product of the Heisenberg Lie Algebra and the symplectic Lie Algebra. (author). 10 refs

  19. Casimir amplitudes and capillary condensation of near-critical fluids between parallel plates: renormalized local functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2012-03-21

    We investigate the critical behavior of a near-critical fluid confined between two parallel plates in contact with a reservoir by calculating the order parameter profile and the Casimir amplitudes (for the force density and for the grand potential). Our results are applicable to one-component fluids and binary mixtures. We assume that the walls absorb one of the fluid components selectively for binary mixtures. We propose a renormalized local functional theory accounting for the fluctuation effects. Analysis is performed in the plane of the temperature T and the order parameter in the reservoir ψ(∞). Our theory is universal if the physical quantities are scaled appropriately. If the component favored by the walls is slightly poor in the reservoir, there appears a line of first-order phase transition of capillary condensation outside the bulk coexistence curve. The excess adsorption changes discontinuously between condensed and noncondensed states at the transition. With increasing T, the transition line ends at a capillary critical point T=T(c) (ca) slightly lower than the bulk critical temperature T(c) for the upper critical solution temperature. The Casimir amplitudes are larger than their critical point values by 10-100 times at off-critical compositions near the capillary condensation line. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  20. Optoelectronic analogue signal transfer for LHC detectors, 1991

    CERN Document Server

    Dowell, John D; Homer, R J; Jovanovic, P; Kenyon, I; Staley, R; Webster, K; Da Via, C; Feyt, J; Nappey, P; Stefanini, G; Dwir, B; Reinhart, F K; Davies, J; Green, N; Stewart, W; Young, T; Hall, G; Akesson, T; Jarlskog, G; Kröll, S; Nickerson, R; Jaroslawski, S; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1991-01-01

    We propose to study and develop opto-electronic analogue front-ends based on electro-optic intensity modulators. These devices translate the detector electrical analogue signals into optical signals which are then transferred via optical fibres to photodetector receivers at the remote readout. In comparison with conventional solutions based on copper cables, this technique offers the advantages of high speed, very low power dissipation and transmission losses, compactness and immunity to electromagnetic interference. The linearity and dynamic range that can be obtained are more than adequate for central tracking detectors, and the proposed devices have considerable radiation- hardness capabilities. The large bandwidth and short transit times offer possibilities for improved triggering schemes. The proposed R&D programme is aimed at producing multi-channel "demonstrator" units for evaluation both in laboratory and beam tests. This will allow the choice of the most effective technology. A detailed study wil...

  1. On the Casimir effect. Energy density of the free Klein-Gordon-field in front of static classical backgrounds; Zum Casimir-Effekt. Energiedichte des freien Klein-Gordon-Feldes vor statischen klassischen Hintergruenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.J.

    2008-01-15

    We study the Casimir energy density of the Klein-Gordon-field in the case of two static geometries. We model the effect by coupling the free quantum field to a static classical scalar field. We work out the dependence on the coupling {lambda}, including the limit {lambda}={infinity} (Dirichlet boundary condition). The chosen geometries are described by a {delta}-funktion ({sigma}(x)={delta}(x{sub 3})) and a step function of finite height ({sigma}(x)= (1)/(2{epsilon})1{sub [{epsilon},{epsilon}]}(x{sub 3})), respectively. In the area outside the support of the background the density energy converges; calculations for the distorted area lead to divergent surface terms. (orig.)

  2. The Valles natural analogue project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and 39 Ar/ 4O isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks

  3. Dependence of the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a cavity wall on atomic and material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostepanenko, V M; Babb, J F; Caride, A O; Klimchitskaya, G L; Zanette, S I

    2006-01-01

    The Casimir-Polder and van der Waals interactions between an atom and a flat cavity wall are investigated under the influence of real conditions including the dynamic polarizability of the atom, actual conductivity of the wall material and nonzero temperature of the wall. The cases of different atoms near metal and dielectric walls are considered. It is shown that to obtain accurate results for the atom-wall interaction at short separations, one should use the complete tabulated optical data for the complex refractive index of the wall material and the accurate dynamic polarizability of an atom. At relatively large separations in the case of a metal wall, one may use the plasma model dielectric function to describe the dielectric properties of the wall material. The obtained results are important for the theoretical interpretation of experiments on quantum reflection and Bose-Einstein condensation

  4. Uptake kinetics of the somatostatin receptor ligand [86Y]DOTA-dPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide ([86Y]SMT487) using positron emission tomography in non-human primates and calculation of radiation doses of the 90Y-labelled analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, F.; Brockmann, J.; Koehle, M.

    1999-01-01

    [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide ([ 90 Y]-SMT487) has been suggested as a promising radiotherapeutic agent for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. In order to quantify the in vivo parameters of this compound and the radiation doses delivered to healthy organs, the analogue [ 86 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide was synthesised and its uptake measured in baboons using positron emission tomography (PET). [ 86 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide was administered at two different peptide concentrations, namely 2 and 100 μg peptide per m 2 body surface. The latter concentration corresponded to a radiotherapeutic dose. In a third protocol [ 86 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide was injected in conjunction with a simultaneous infusion of an amino acid solution that was high in l-lysine in order to lower the renal uptake of radioyttrium. Quantitative whole-body PET scans were recorded to measure the uptake kinetics for kidneys, liver, lung and bone. The individual absolute uptake kinetics were used to calculate the radiation doses for [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide according to the MIRD recommendations extrapolated to a 70-kg human. The highest radiation dose was received by the kidneys, with 2.1-3.3 mGy per MBq [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide injected. For the 100 μg/m 2 SMT487 protocol with amino acid co-infusion this dose was about 20%-40% lower than for the other two treatment protocols. The liver and the red bone marrow received doses ranging from 0.32 to 0.53 mGy and 0.03 to 0.07 mGy per MBq [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide, respectively. The average effective dose equivalent amounted to 0.23-0.32 mSv/MBq. The comparatively low estimated radiation doses to normal organs support the initiation of clinical phase I trials with [ 90 Y]DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide in patients with somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. (orig.)

  5. Van der Waals interactions: Corrections from radiation in fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus H. Waage

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider induced van der Waals interactions with corrections due to radiation in fluids consisting of polarizable hard spheres. The fluctuating polarizations are quantized while the positions of particles are treated classically. First the well known result for the induced Casimir free energy for a pair of particles is used to establish the resulting free energy at low density. The Casimir interaction includes the full effect of the quantized radiating electromagnetic field. Then the situation with electrostatic dipole-dipole interactions is considered for general density. For this situation the induced interactions are the van der Waals interactions, and we evaluate numerically the free energy based upon analytic results obtained earlier. These analytic results were obtained by extending methods of classical statistical mechanics to the path integral of quantum mechanics. We have realized that these methods can be extended to time-dependent interactions too. Thus we here also make the extension to the radiating dipole-dipole interaction between pairs of particles to obtain explicit results for more arbitrary fluid densities, and radiation corrections to the induced free energy are found both analytically and numerically.

  6. Dynamic Pull-In Investigation of a Clamped-Clamped Nanoelectromechanical Beam under Ramp-Input Voltage and the Casimir Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir R. Askari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the Casimir excitation on dynamic pull-in instability of a nanoelectromechanical beam under ramp-input voltage is studied. The ramp-input actuation has applications in frequency sweeping of RF-N/MEMS. The presented model is nonlinear due to the inherent nonlinearity of electrostatics and the Casimir excitations as well as the geometric nonlinearity of midplane stretching. A Galerkin based reduced order modeling is utilized. It is found that the calculated dynamic pull-in ramp input voltage leads to dynamic pull-in step input voltage by increasing the slope of voltage-time diagram. This fact is utilized to verify the results of present study.

  7. Obtainment of internal labelling operators as broken Casimir operators by means of contractions related to reduction chains in semisimple Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R

    2008-01-01

    We show that the Inoenue-Wigner contraction naturally associated to a reduction chain s implies s' of semisimple Lie algebras induces a decomposition of the Casimir operators into homogeneous polynomials, the terms of which can be used to obtain additional mutually commuting missing label operators for this reduction. The adjunction of these scalars that are no more invariants of the contraction allow to solve the missing label problem for those reductions where the contraction provides an insufficient number of labelling operators.

  8. Investigating the effect of Casimir and van der Waals attractions on the electrostatic pull-in instability of nano-actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroush, R; Koochi, A; Haddadpour, H; Kazemi, A S; Noghrehabadi, A; Abadyan, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of dispersion (van der Waals and Casimir) forces on the pull-in instability of cantilever nano-actuators by considering their range of application. Adomian decomposition is introduced to obtain an analytical solution of the distributed parameter model. Dispersion forces decrease the pull-in deflection and voltage of a nano-actuator. However, the fringing field increases the pull-in deflection while decreasing the pull-in voltage of the actuator. The minimum initial gap and the detachment length of the actuator that does not stick to the substrate due to van der Waals and Casimir attractions were determined. Furthermore, the proposed approach is capable of determining the stress distribution of the actuator at the onset of instability. It is seen that Casimir and van der Waals attractions effectively reduce the maximum value of stress resultants at the onset of instability. The results indicate that Adomian decomposition is a reliable method for simulating nano-structures at submicrometer ranges.

  9. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Resveratrol Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Chalal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew. Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold. The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups and antimicrobial activity.

  11. Radio-modifying effects of amifostine analogues in whole body gamma irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, Ravi; Arora, Aastha; Singh, Saurabh; Bhuria, Vikas; Sharma, Anjali; Bhatt, A.N.; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Pathak, Uma; Mathur, Shweta; Sandhir, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    Damage to hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal systems contribute mainly to acute effects (mortality) following exposures to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. The aminothiol, amifostine (WR2721, a FDA approved pro-drug) has been well established protector of normal tissues against radiation damage and chemo-therapeutic drugs induced toxicity. A number of amifostine analogues (DRDE-07, DRDE-30 and DRDE-35) have been recently synthesized that afford protection against Sulfur Mustard (SM) when administered orally. Since, the mechanisms underlying toxicity by SM share a great deal with ionizing radiation and certain anti-cancer drugs, we investigated the potential of DRDE analogues in reducing the acute effects of radiation in whole body irradiated mice. Animal survival, body weight, changes in haematological parameters and CFU-S as well as morphology of GI was studied. DRDE analogues significantly enhanced the animal survival and reduced the radiation sickness (loss of weight) in a dose dependent manner when administered 30 min. before irradiation; optimal doses were 125 mg/kg body weight for DRDE-07; 220 mg/kg for DRDE-30 and 200 mg/kg for DRDE-35. All three analogues were orally effective unlike amifostine, albeit to different extents. The order of radio-protective efficacy in C57BL/6 mice when administered orally was DRDE-35 (60%) > DRDE-07 (50%) > DRDE-30 (40%), while it was DRDE-07 (58%) > DRDE-30 (44%) > DRDE-35 (40%) following intra-peritoneal administration. These analogues enhanced the recovery from radiation-induced hematopoietic damage (peripheral blood counts and improvement in endogenous spleen colony forming units) and gastrointestinal injury (improved structural integrity of GI, increase in villi height, regenerating crypts and mitotic figures) that correlated with the increase in survival. There were no survivors in the radiation group after 35 days of exposure and the values for the analyzed parameters were comparable to the control group. These

  12. An arsenical analogue of adenosine diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, D; Sparkes, M J; Dixon, H B

    1978-01-01

    An analogue of ADP was made in which the terminal phosphono-oxy group, -O-PO(OH)2, has been replaced by the arsonomethyl group, -CH2-AsO(OH)2. This compound cannot form a stable analogue of ATP because anhydrides of arsonic acids are rapidly hydrolysed, so that any enzyme that phosphorylates ADP and accepts this analogue as a substrate should release orthophosphate in its presence. The analogue proves to be a poor substrate for 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (V/Km is diminished by a factor of 10(2)-10(3)) and a very poor substrate for pyruvate kinase (V/Km is diminished by a factor of 10(5)-10(6)). No substrate action was detected with adenyl kinase and creatine kinase. PMID:204292

  13. International video project on natural analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentensperger, Marcel

    1993-01-01

    A natural analogue can be defined as a natural process which has occurred in the past and is studied in order to test predictions about the future evolution of similar processes. In recent years, natural analogues have been used increasingly to test the mathematical models required for repository performance assessment. Analogues are, however, also of considerable use in public relations as they allow many of the principles involved in demonstrating repository safety to be illustrated in a clear manner using natural systems with which man is familiar. The international Natural Analogue Working Group (NAWG), organised under the auspices of the CEC, has recognised that such PR applications are of considerable importance and should be supported from a technical level. At the NAWG meeting in Pitlochry, Scotland (June 1990), it was recommended that the possibilities for making a video film on this topic be investigated and Nagra was requested to take the lead role in setting up such a project

  14. Natural analogues and radionuclide transport model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, some possible roles for natural analogues are discussed from the point of view of those involved with the development of mathematical models for radionuclide transport and with the use of these models in repository safety assessments. The characteristic features of a safety assessment are outlined in order to address the questions of where natural analogues can be used to improve our understanding of the processes involved and where they can assist in validating the models that are used. Natural analogues have the potential to provide useful information about some critical processes, especially long-term chemical processes and migration rates. There is likely to be considerable uncertainty and ambiguity associated with the interpretation of natural analogues, and thus it is their general features which should be emphasized, and models with appropriate levels of sophistication should be used. Experience gained in modelling the Koongarra uranium deposit in northern Australia is drawn upon. (author)

  15. Rigorous analysis of Casimir and van der Waals forces on a silicon nano-optomechanical device actuated by optical forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Janderson R; Gusso, Andre; Rosa, Felipe S S; Almeida, Vilson R

    2018-02-22

    Nano-optomechanical devices have enabled a lot of interesting scientific and technological applications. However, due to their nanoscale dimensions, they are vulnerable to the action of Casimir and van der Waals (dispersion) forces. This work presents a rigorous analysis of the dispersion forces on a nano-optomechanical device based on a silicon waveguide and a silicon dioxide substrate, surrounded by air and driven by optical forces. The dispersion forces are calculated using a modified Lifshitz theory with experimental optical data and validated by means of a rigorous 3D FDTD simulation. The mechanical nonlinearity of the nanowaveguide is taken into account and validated using a 3D FEM simulation. The results show that it is possible to attain a no pull-in critical point due to only the optical forces; however, the dispersion forces usually impose a pull-in critical point to the device and establish a minimal initial gap between the waveguide and the substrate. Furthermore, it is shown that the geometric nonlinearity effect may be exploited in order to avoid or minimize the pull-in and, therefore, the device collapse.

  16. Between Analogue and Digital Diagrams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Bun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay is about the interstitial. About how the diagram, as a method of design, has lead fromthe analogue deconstruction of the eighties to the digital processes of the turn of the millennium.Specifically, the main topic of the text is the interpretation and the critique of folding (as a diagramin the beginning of the nineties. It is necessary then to unfold its relationship with immediatelypreceding and following architectural trends, that is to say we have to look both backwards andforwards by about a decade. The question is the context of folding, the exchange of the analogueworld for the digital. To understand the process it is easier to investigate from the fields of artand culture, rather than from the intentionally perplicated1 thoughts of Gilles Deleuze. Both fieldsare relevant here because they can similarly be used as the yardstick against which the era itselfit measured. The cultural scene of the eighties and nineties, including performing arts, movies,literature and philosophy, is a wide milieu of architecture. Architecture responds parallel to itsera; it reacts to it, and changes with it and within it. Architecture is a medium, it has always beena medium, yet the relations are transformed. That’s not to say that technical progress, for exampleusing CAD-software and CNC-s, has led to the digital thinking of certain movements ofarchitecture, (it is at most an indirect tool. But the ‘up-to-dateness’ of the discipline, however,a kind of non-servile reading of an ‘applied culture’ or ‘used philosophy’2 could be the key.(We might recall here, parenthetically, the fortunes of the artistic in contemporary mass society.The proliferation of museums, the magnification of the figure of the artist, the existence of amassive consumption of printed and televised artistic images, the widespread appetite for informationabout the arts, all reflect, of course, an increasingly leisured society, but also relateprecisely to the fact

  17. Synthesis and anticancer evaluation of spermatinamine analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Moosa, Basem

    2016-02-04

    Spermatinamine was isolated from an Australian marine sponge, Pseudoceratina sp. as an inhibitor of isoprenylcystiene carboxyl methyltransferase (Icmt), an attractive and novel anticancer target. Herein, we report the synthesis of spermatinamine analogues and their cytotoxic evaluation against three human cancer cell lines i.e. cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), and prostate carcinoma (DU145). Analogues 12, 14 and 15 were found to be the most potent against one or more cell lines with the IC50 values in the range of 5 - 10 μM. The obtained results suggested that longer polyamine linker along with aromatic oxime substitution provided the most potent analogue compounds against cancer cell lines.

  18. Quantum electrodynamics based on self-energy, without second quantization: The Lamb shift and long-range Casimir-Polder van der Waals forces near boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Dowling, J.P.

    1986-12-01

    Using a previously formulated theory of quantum electrodynamics based on self-energy, we give a general method for computing the Lamb shift and related Casimir-Polder energies for a quantum system in the vicinity of perfectly conducting boundaries. Our results are exact and easily extendable to a full covariant relativistic form. As a particular example we apply the method to an atom near an infinite conducting plane, and we recover the standard QED results (which are known only in the dipole approximation) in a simple and straightforward manner. This is accomplished in the context of the new theory which is not second quantized and contains no vacuum fluctuations. (author)

  19. Quasi-particle creation by analogue black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Carlos; Liberati, Stefano; Sonego, Sebastiano; Visser, Matt

    2006-09-01

    We discuss the issue of quasi-particle production by 'analogue black holes' with particular attention to the possibility of reproducing Hawking radiation in a laboratory. By constructing simple geometric acoustic models, we obtain a somewhat unexpected result: we show that in order to obtain a stationary and Planckian emission of quasi-particles, it is not necessary to create an ergoregion in the acoustic spacetime (corresponding to a supersonic regime in the flow). It is sufficient to set up a suitable dynamically changing flow. For instance, either a flow that eventually generates an arbitrarily small sonic region v = c, but without any ergoregion, or even a flow that just asymptotically, in laboratory time, approaches a sonic regime with sufficient rapidity.

  20. Quasi-particle creation by analogue black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcelo, Carlos [Instituto de AstrofIsica de AndalucIa, CSIC, Camino Bajo de Huetor 50, 18008 Granada (Spain); Liberati, Stefano [International School for Advanced Studies, Via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Sonego, Sebastiano [Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, 33100 Udine (Italy); Visser, Matt [School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2006-09-07

    We discuss the issue of quasi-particle production by 'analogue black holes' with particular attention to the possibility of reproducing Hawking radiation in a laboratory. By constructing simple geometric acoustic models, we obtain a somewhat unexpected result: we show that in order to obtain a stationary and Planckian emission of quasi-particles, it is not necessary to create an ergoregion in the acoustic spacetime (corresponding to a supersonic regime in the flow). It is sufficient to set up a suitable dynamically changing flow. For instance, either a flow that eventually generates an arbitrarily small sonic region v = c, but without any ergoregion, or even a flow that just asymptotically, in laboratory time, approaches a sonic regime with sufficient rapidity.

  1. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed [pt

  2. Slicing the vacuum: New accelerating mirror solutions of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Michael R. R.; Linder, Eric V.

    2017-12-01

    Radiation from accelerating mirrors in a Minkowski spacetime provides insights into the nature of horizons, black holes, and entanglement entropy. We introduce new, simple, symmetric and analytic moving mirror solutions and study their particle, energy, and entropy production. This includes an asymptotically static case with finite emission that is the black hole analog of complete evaporation. The total energy, total entropy, total particles, and spectrum are the same on both sides of the mirror. We also study its asymptotically inertial, drifting analog (which gives a black hole remnant) to explore differences in finite and infinite production.

  3. Natural analogues of bitumen and bituminized radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmuth, K.-H.

    1989-07-01

    Occurrences of natural bitumen provide possibilities to identify and assess materials, processes, phenomena and conditions in nature which can serve as model cases valid also with respect to a final repository. Natural bitumens meet the basic requirements for use as natural analogues. In natural sites, processes of bitumen formation and degradation often work simultaneously. The major processes are thermal alteration, evaporation, reaction with water, biodegradation, oxidation, weathering and radiation degradation. Progress in analytical organic geochemistry made during recent years has enabled a deeper understanding of the structural and compositional effects of these processes on bitumen. This is necessary in natural analogue applications. The time scales involved in degradation processes, as observed in natural occurrences, exceed the time scales dictated by the half-lives of most important fission products in low and medium level waste by orders of magnitude. Only exposure to the weather at the surface leads to a more rapid destruction of bitumen. Trace metals in bitumen arenot released until the matrix is completely destroyed. Products of radiation degradation and weathering of bitumen are able, to a certain degree, to delay migration of the metal ions released. Impregnation with bitumen may effectively reduce the microbial decomposition of easily destructable organic waste components, as can be deduced on the basis of the excellent preservation of fossils observed in bitumen. The complexity of all the natural sites described requires extensive understanding of the origin and kind of organic material in bitumen, its maturation, migration, alteration and degradation and of the geological and tectonic evolution of the site. The latter is used for establishing the time scale

  4. Fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane and classical Casimir-Polder force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Partha

    2016-05-01

    We start with the well-known expression for the vacuum polarization and suitably modify it for 2+1-dimensional spin-orbit coupled (SOC) fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane described by the low-energy Liu-Yao-Feng-Ezawa (LYFE) model Hamiltonian involving the Dirac matrices in the chiral representation obeying the Clifford algebra. The silicene and germanene fit this description suitably. They have the Dirac cones similar to those of graphene and SOC is much stronger. The system could be normal or ferromagnetic in nature. The silicene turns into the latter type if there is exchange field arising due to the proximity coupling to a ferromagnet (FM) such as depositing Fe atoms to the silicene surface. For the silicene, we find that the many-body effects considerably change the bare Coulomb potential by way of the dependence of the Coulomb propagator on the real-spin, iso-spin and the potential due to an electric field applied perpendicular to the silicene plane. The computation aspect of the Casimir-Polder force (CPF) needs to be investigated in this paper. An important quantity in this process is the dielectric response function (DRF) of the material. The plasmon branch was obtained by finding the zeros of DRF in the long-wavelength limit. This leads to the plasmon frequencies. We find that the collective charge excitations at zero doping, i.e., intrinsic plasmons, in this system, are absent in the Dirac limit. The valley-spin-split intrinsic plasmons, however, come into being in the case of the massive Dirac particles with characteristic frequency close to 10 THz. Our scheme to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction (CPI) of a micro-particle with a sheet involves replacing the dielectric constant of the sample in the CPI expression obtained on the basis of the Lifshitz theory by the static DRF obtained using the expressions for the polarization function we started with. Though the approach replaces a macroscopic constant by a microscopic

  5. Analogue alternative the electronic analogue computer in Britain and the USA, 1930-1975

    CERN Document Server

    Small, James S

    2013-01-01

    We are in the midst of a digital revolution - until recently, the majority of appliances used in everyday life have been developed with analogue technology. Now, either at home or out and about, we are surrounded by digital technology such as digital 'film', audio systems, computers and telephones. From the late 1940s until the 1970s, analogue technology was a genuine alternative to digital, and the two competing technologies ran parallel with each other. During this period, a community of engineers, scientists, academics and businessmen continued to develop and promote the analogue computer.

  6. Stress tensor for a scalar field in a spatially varying background potential: Divergences, "renormalization", anomalies, and Casimir forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Fulling, Stephen A.; Parashar, Prachi; Kalauni, Pushpa; Murphy, Taylor

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand quantum fluctuation energy densities and stress within a spatially varying dielectric medium, we examine the vacuum expectation value for the stress tensor of a scalar field with arbitrary conformal parameter, in the background of a given potential that depends on only one spatial coordinate. We regulate the expressions by incorporating a temporal-spatial cutoff in the (imaginary) time and transverse-spatial directions. The divergences are captured by the zeroth- and second-order WKB approximations. Then the stress tensor is "renormalized" by omitting the terms that depend on the cutoff. The ambiguities that inevitably arise in this procedure are both duly noted and restricted by imposing certain physical conditions; one result is that the renormalized stress tensor exhibits the expected trace anomaly. The renormalized stress tensor exhibits no pressure anomaly, in that the principle of virtual work is satisfied for motions in a transverse direction. We then consider a potential that defines a wall, a one-dimensional potential that vanishes for z 0 , for z >0 . Previously, the stress tensor had been computed outside of the wall, whereas now we compute all components of the stress tensor in the interior of the wall. The full finite stress tensor is computed numerically for the two cases where explicit solutions to the differential equation are available, α =1 and 2. The energy density exhibits an inverse linear divergence as the boundary is approached from the inside for a linear potential, and a logarithmic divergence for a quadratic potential. Finally, the interaction between two such walls is computed, and it is shown that the attractive Casimir pressure between the two walls also satisfies the principle of virtual work (i.e., the pressure equals the negative derivative of the energy with respect to the distance between the walls).

  7. Total synthesis of sannanine and analogues thereof

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BADHER NAVEEN

    2018-03-02

    Mar 2, 2018 ... concise manner. The key strategies involve Friedländer quinoline synthesis, demethylation, in situ oxidation and amination process. ..... (b) Hargreaves R, David C L, Whitesell L and Skibo E. B 2003 Design of Quinolinedione-Based Geldanamycin. Analogues Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 13 3075; (c) Arg-.

  8. Ultrasound exfoliation of inorganic analogues of graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Slušná, Michaela; Ecorchard, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, APR (2014), s. 1-14 ISSN 1556-276X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05146S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Ultrasound * Exfoliation * Graphene inorganic analogues Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.779, year: 2014

  9. The World Is either Digital or Analogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berto, F.; Tagliabue, J.

    2014-01-01

    We address an argument by Floridi (Synthese 168(1):151-178, 2009; 2011a), to the effect that digital and analogue are not features of reality, only of modes of presentation of reality. One can therefore have an informational ontology, like Floridi’s Informational Structural Realism, without

  10. Somatostatin analogue scintigraphy and tuberculosis: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biancheri, I.; Rudenko, B.; Vautrin, P.; Raddoul, J.; Lamfichek, N.; Kantelip, B.; Mantion, G.

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphy using a radiolabelled somatostatin analogue (111 In-pentetreotide) is useful in the detection of neuroendocrine tumors. But this radiopharmaceutical accumulates also in solid tumours or in inflammatory diseases such as granulomatosis. We present a case of 111 In-pentetreotide uptake in a tuberculous adenopathy. (author)

  11. Prussian Blue Analogues of Reduced Dimensionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gengler, Regis Y. N.; Toma, Luminita M.; Pardo, Emilio; Lloret, Francesc; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-valence polycyanides (Prussian Blue analogues) possess a rich palette of properties spanning from room-temperature ferromagnetism to zero thermal expansion, which can be tuned by chemical modifications or the application of external stimuli (temperature, pressure, light irradiation). While

  12. The Palmottu analogue project: overview for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskeeniemi, T.; Blomqvist, R.; Suksi, J.; Niini, H.

    1994-01-01

    This article gives a summary of the activities carried out within the Palmottu analogue project in 1993. It consists of (1) an introductory part, followed by (2) a geological description of the site, and (3)an up-to-date summary of the results of the project. (orig.) (33 refs., 6 figs.)

  13. Natural product analogues: towards a blueprint for analogue-focused synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, Magnus W P

    2017-08-14

    For the first time a general overview of approaches to the synthesis of natural product analogues is presented. This reflects a process of evolution of natural product synthesis which has accelerated in the years since the implementation of diversity-oriented synthesis, which has emerged in parallel with collective synthesis, diverted total synthesis and the preparation of truncated natural products optimised for biological activity. A method involving computational assessment for the validation of core-modified natural product analogues is discussed.

  14. Tryptophan analogues. 1. Synthesis and antihypertensive activity of positional isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdy, M E; Kurchacova, E; Schut, R N; Vidrio, H; Hong, E

    1982-06-01

    A series of tryptophan analogues having the carboxyl function at the beta-position was synthesized and tested for antihypertensive activity. The 5-methoxy analogue 46 exhibited antihypertensive activity in the rat via the oral route and was much more potent than the normal tryptophan analogue. The methyl ester was found to be a critical structural feature for activity.

  15. Fluctuation of a Piston in Vacuum Induced by Thermal Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Norio

    2017-10-01

    We consider the displacement of a piston dividing a vacuum cavity at a finite temperature T induced by fluctuations in the thermal radiation pressure. The correlation function of the thermal radiation pressure is calculated using the theoretical framework developed by Barton, which was first applied to the fluctuation of the Casimir force at absolute zero. We show that the variance of the radiation pressure at a fixed point is proportional to T8 and evaluate the mean square displacement for a piston with a small cross section in a characteristic correlation timescale ħ/(kBT). At room temperature, the contribution of the thermal radiation to the fluctuation is larger than that of the vacuum fluctuation.

  16. Somatostatin analogues for acute bleeding oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Hrobjartsson, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatostatin and its derivatives are sometimes used for emergency treatment of bleeding oesophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. OBJECTIVES: To study whether somatostatin or its analogues improve survival or reduce the need for blood transfusions in patients...... with bleeding oesophageal varices. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library were searched (November 2007). Reference lists of publications, contacts with authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised trials comparing somatostatin or analogues with placebo or no treatment in patients suspected of acute...... or recent bleeding from oesophageal varices. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The outcome measures extracted were: mortality, blood transfusions, use of balloon tamponade, initial haemostasis and rebleeding. Intention-to-treat analyses including all randomised patients were conducted if possible; a random...

  17. Studies of natural analogues and geological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandberg, F.; Grundfelt, B.; Hoeglund, L.; Skagius K.; Karlsson, F.; Smellie, J.

    1993-04-01

    This review has involved studies of natural analogues and natural geological systems leading to the identification and quantification of processes and features of importance to the performance and safety of repositories for radioactive waste. The features and processes selected for the study comprise general geochemical issues related to the performance of the near- and far-field, the performance and durability of construction materials and the effects of glaciation. For each of these areas a number of potentially important processes for repository performance have been described, and evidence for their existence, as well as quantification of parameters of models describing the processes have been sought from major natural analogue studies and site investigations. The review has aimed at covering a relatively broad range of issues at the expense of in-depth analysis. The quantitative data presented are in most cases compilations of data from the literature; in a few cases results of evaluations made within the current project are included

  18. Boron hydride analogues of the fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quong, A.A.; Pederson, M.R.; Broughton, J.Q.

    1994-01-01

    The BH moiety is isoelectronic with C. We have studied the stability of the (BH) 60 analogue of the C 60 fullerene as well as the dual-structure (BH) 32 icosahedron, both of them being putative structures, by performing local-density-functional electronic calculations. To aid in our analysis, we have also studied other homologues of these systems. We find that the latter, i.e., the dual structure, is the more stable although the former is as stable as one of the latter's lower homologues. Boron hydrides, it seems, naturally form the dual structures used in algorithmic optimization of complex fullerene systems. Fully relaxed geometries are reported as well as electron affinities and effective Hubbard U parameters. These systems form very stable anions and we conclude that a search for BH analogues of the C 60 alkali-metal supeconductors might prove very fruitful

  19. The synthesis and pharmacology of ephedrine analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Mullen, Aidan J

    1991-01-01

    In this report we set out to extend recent studies on substituted PAC analogues produced by the fermentation of aromatic aldehydes with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The medium selected contained glucose as a carbon source for the biotransformation, and sodium pyruvate as an inhibitor for alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the conversion of the carbinol to a benzyl alcohol derivatives. An investigation of sodium cyanoborohydride for a selective reductive ami...

  20. Electromagnetic wave analogue of electronic diode

    OpenAIRE

    Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Powell, David A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Fedotov, Vassili A.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2010-01-01

    An electronic diode is a nonlinear semiconductor circuit component that allows conduction of electrical current in one direction only. A component with similar functionality for electromagnetic waves, an electromagnetic isolator, is based on the Faraday effect of the polarization state rotation and is also a key component of optical and microwave systems. Here we demonstrate a chiral electromagnetic diode, which is a direct analogue of an electronic diode: its functionality is underpinned by ...

  1. Geometric Analogue of Holographic Reduced Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Aerts, Diederik; Czachor, Marek; De Moor, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Holographic reduced representations (HRR) are based on superpositions of convolution-bound $n$-tuples, but the $n$-tuples cannot be regarded as vectors since the formalism is basis dependent. This is why HRR cannot be associated with geometric structures. Replacing convolutions by geometric products one arrives at reduced representations analogous to HRR but interpretable in terms of geometry. Variable bindings occurring in both HRR and its geometric analogue mathematically correspond to two ...

  2. Analogue forecasting of New Zealand climate anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, A. Brett; Thompson, Craig S.

    2006-03-01

    An analogue forecast scheme is described for multifield prediction of monthly and seasonal New Zealand climate anomalies on the basis of the methodology of Livezey and Barnston ([1988]) for US seasonal temperatures. The method is applied to predicting terciles of temperature and precipitation for six regions of New Zealand. Empirical orthogonal function analysis is used to reduce sea surface temperature and sea-level pressure predictors down to a set of five independent indices, which incorporate variations due to El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Indian Ocean sea temperatures and a wave 3 pattern in the Southern Hemisphere westerlies. A full bootstrap cross-validation procedure is carried out, along with Monte Carlo tests, to assess the skill of the method on independent data and to determine the significance of the results. Significant skill is found for seasonal temperature forecasts for the summer and winter seasons; there is less success in predicting monthly temperatures or rainfall at either timescale. Considerable care is required to constrain the climate state vector, from which analogues are defined, and to constrain the search procedure itself, in order to produce results that are stable with respect to small parameter changes in the model. For the New Zealand region, 5 to 7 is found to be the optimum number of closest analogues, and the inclusion of anti-analogues improves the predictions, at least in the seasonal case. Skill in predicting regional temperature and rainfall is shown to be related to a combination of skill in predicting sea-level pressure patterns and to how strongly these patterns project onto temperature and rainfall anomalies.

  3. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary

  4. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  5. Synthesis of D-nor steroid analogues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavíková, Barbora; Kudová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 108, S2 (2014), s142 ISSN 0009-2770. [Conference on Isoprenoids /22./. 07.09.2014-10.09.2014, Praha] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1464 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : D-nor steroid analogues * patch clamp technique Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  6. New alloferon analogues: synthesis and antiviral properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczer, Mariola; Majewska, Anna; Zahorska, Renata

    2013-02-01

    We have extended our study on structure/activity relationship studies of insect peptide alloferon (H-His-Gly-Val-Ser-Gly-His-Gly-Gln-His-Gly-Val-His-Gly-OH) by evaluating the antiviral effects of new alloferon analogues. We synthesized 18 alloferon analogues: 12 peptides with sequences shortened from N- or C-terminus and 6 N-terminally modified analogues H-X(1)-Gly-Val-Ser-Gly-His-Gly-Gln-His-Gly-Val-His-Gly-OH, where X(1) = Phe (13), Tyr (14), Trp (15), Phg (16), Phe(p-Cl) (17), and Phe(p-OMe) (18). We found that most of the evaluated peptides inhibit the replication of Human Herpesviruses or Coxsackievirus B2 in Vero, HEp-2 and LLC-MK(2) cells. Our results indicate that the compound [3-13]-alloferon (1) exhibits the strongest antiviral activity (IC(50) = 38 μM) among the analyzed compound. Moreover, no cytotoxic activity against the investigated cell lines was observed for all studied peptides at concentration 165 μM or higher. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Analogue to Digital and Digital to Analogue Converters (ADCs and DACs): A Review Update

    CERN Document Server

    Pickering, J.

    2015-06-15

    This is a review paper updated from that presented for CAS 2004. Essentially, since then, commercial components have continued to extend their performance boundaries but the basic building blocks and the techniques for choosing the best device and implementing it in a design have not changed. Analogue to digital and digital to analogue converters are crucial components in the continued drive to replace analogue circuitry with more controllable and less costly digital processing. This paper discusses the technologies available to perform in the likely measurement and control applications that arise within accelerators. It covers much of the terminology and 'specmanship' together with an application-oriented analysis of the realisable performance of the various types. Finally, some hints and warnings on system integration problems are given.

  8. The Greenland analogue project. Yearly report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.; Brinkerhoff, D.; Johnson, J.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Engstroem, J.; Kukkonen, I.

    2012-04-01

    A four-year field and modelling study of the Greenland ice sheet and subsurface conditions, Greenland Analogue Project (GAP), has been initiated collaboratively by SKB, Posiva and NWMO to advance the understanding of processes associated with glaciation and their impact on the long-term performance of a deep geological repository. The study site encompasses a land terminus portion of the Greenland ice sheet, east of Kangerlussuaq, and is in many ways considered to be an appropriate analogue of the conditions that are expected to prevail in much of Canada and Fennoscandia during future glacial cycles. The project begins in 2009 and is scheduled for completion in 2012. Our current understanding of the hydrological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical processes associated with cold climate conditions and glacial cycles, and their impact on the long-term performance of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel, will be significantly improved by studying a modern analogue. The GAP will conduct the first in situ investigations of some of the parameters and processes needed to achieve a better understanding of how an ice sheet may impact a deep repository, and will provide measurements, observations and data that may significantly improve our safety assessments and risk analyses of glaciation scenarios. This report was produced by the GAP team members and presents an overview of the activities within the GAP during the interval January 1 to December 31, 2010, as well as research results obtained during this time frame. Research for the GAP is ongoing, and additional results related to the data presented here may become available in the future and will be presented in subsequent annual reports. (orig.)

  9. The Greenland analogue project. Yearly report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, J.; Brinkerhoff, D.; Johnson, J. [University of Montana, Missoula (United States); Ruskeeniemi, T.; Engstroem, J.; Kukkonen, I. [Geological Survey of Finland (Finland)] [and others

    2012-04-15

    A four-year field and modelling study of the Greenland ice sheet and subsurface conditions, Greenland Analogue Project (GAP), has been initiated collaboratively by SKB, Posiva and NWMO to advance the understanding of processes associated with glaciation and their impact on the long-term performance of a deep geological repository. The study site encompasses a land terminus portion of the Greenland ice sheet, east of Kangerlussuaq, and is in many ways considered to be an appropriate analogue of the conditions that are expected to prevail in much of Canada and Fennoscandia during future glacial cycles. The project begins in 2009 and is scheduled for completion in 2012. Our current understanding of the hydrological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical processes associated with cold climate conditions and glacial cycles, and their impact on the long-term performance of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel, will be significantly improved by studying a modern analogue. The GAP will conduct the first in situ investigations of some of the parameters and processes needed to achieve a better understanding of how an ice sheet may impact a deep repository, and will provide measurements, observations and data that may significantly improve our safety assessments and risk analyses of glaciation scenarios. This report was produced by the GAP team members and presents an overview of the activities within the GAP during the interval January 1 to December 31, 2010, as well as research results obtained during this time frame. Research for the GAP is ongoing, and additional results related to the data presented here may become available in the future and will be presented in subsequent annual reports. (orig.)

  10. Natural Analogues of CO2 Geological Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez del Villar, L.; Pelayo, M.; Recreo, F.

    2007-01-01

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide is nowadays, internationally considered as the most effective method for greenhouse gas emission mitigation, in order to minimize the global climate change universally accepted. Nevertheless, the possible risks derived of this long-term storage have a direct influence on its public acceptance. Among the favourable geological formations to store CO2, depleted oil and gas fields, deep saline reservoirs, and unamiable coal seams are highlighted. One of the most important objectives of the R and D projects related to the CO2 geological storage is the evaluation of the CO2 leakage rate through the above mentioned geological formations. Therefore, it is absolutely necessary to increase our knowledge on the interaction among CO2, storage and sealing formations, as well as on the flow paths and the physical resistance of the sealing formation. The quantification of the CO2 leakage rate is essential to evaluate the effects on the human and animal health, as well as for the ecosystem and water quality. To achieve these objectives, the study of the natural analogues is very useful in order to know the natural leakage rate to the atmosphere, its flow paths, the physical, chemical and mineralogical modifications due to the long term interaction processes among the CO2 and the storage and sealing formations, as well as the effects on the groundwaters and ecosystems. In this report, we have tried to summarise the main characteristics of the natural reservoirs and surficial sources of CO2, which are both natural analogues of the geological storage and CO2 leakage, studied in EEUU, Europe and Australia. The main objective of this summary is to find the possible applications for long-term risk prediction and for the performance assessment by means of conceptual and numerical modelling, which will allow to validate the predictive models of the CO2 storage behaviour, to design and develop suitable monitoring techniques to control the CO2 behaviour

  11. Nuclear waste geochemistry: natural and anthropic analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The geochemical evolution of nuclear waste storage is difficult to describe, due to the long time scales involved, the radioactivity confinement complexity and the un-natural radionuclides which evolution is not known. In order to carry out a long term prediction, a special approach is used, based on a combination of experiments conducted in laboratories and in situ, modelizations and comparisons with process and material analogues (natural or man-made, such as basaltic and rhyolitic volcanic glasses, plutonium, historical and archaeological artefacts)

  12. Somatostatin analogue scintigraphy in granulomatous diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhagen, P.M. (Dept. of Internal Medicine 3, Dijkzigt Univ. Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands) Dept. of Immunology, Dijkzigt Univ. Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Krenning, E.P. (Dept. of Internal Medicine 3, Dijkzigt Univ. Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands) Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dijkzigt Univ. Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Reubi, J.C. (Inst. of Pathology, Bern Univ. (Switzerland)); Kwekkeboom, D.J. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dijkzigt Univ. Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Bakker, W.H. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dijkzigt Univ. Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Mulder, A.H. (Dept. of Pathology, Dijkzigt Univ. Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Laissue, I. (Inst. of Pathology, Bern Univ. (Switzerland)); Hoogstede, H.C. (Dept. of Chest Medicine, Dijkzigt Univ. Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Lamberts, S.W.J. (Dept. of Internal Medicine 3, Dijkzigt Univ. Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1994-06-01

    In the present study 20 consecutive patients were investigated, 12 with sarcoidosis, one with both sarcoidosis and aspergillosis, four with tuberculosis and three with Wegener's granulomatosis. For in vivo SS-R imaging, total-body scintigraphy was performed 24 and 48 h after the administration of [sup 111]In-octreotide. Granuloma localizations could be visualized in all patients studied; additional sites were found in nine patients with sarcoidosis and in two patients with tuberculosis. In vitro autoradiography of fresh tissue biopsies, using the SS analogue [[sup 125]I-Tyr[sup 3

  13. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process

  14. Ways to Optimize Analogue Switched Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hospodka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how analogue switched circuits (switched-capacitor and switched-current circuits can be optimized by means of a personal computer. The optimization of this kind of circuits is not so common and their analysis is more difficult in comparison with continuously working circuits. Firstly, the nonidealities occurring in these circuits whose effect on their characteristics should be optimized are discussed. Then a few ways to analyze analogue switched circuits are shown. From all optimization algorithms applicable for this kind of optimization, two ones that seem to be the most promising are proposed. The differential evolution (one of evolutionary algorithms combined with the simplex method was found to be most appropriate from these two ones. Two types of programs are required for the optimization of these circuits: a program for implementing calculations of the used optimization algorithm and a program for the analysis of the optimized circuit. Several suitable computer programs from both of the groups together with their proper settings according to authors’ experience are proposed. At the end of the paper, an example of a switched-current circuit optimization documenting the previous description is presented.

  15. Andrographolide and analogues in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Tripathi, Swati; Shukla, Archana; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a medicinal plant traditionally used for treatment of cough and cold, fever, laryngitis, and several infectious diseases. Extracts of A. paniculata have shown versatile potency against various diseases including cancer. The active biomolecules of A. paniculata mainly are lactone and diterpene. Andrographolide and analogues have been widely used for prevention of different diseases. Andrographolides have shown potent antiinflammatory and anticancer activities. It showed potentials as chemopreventive agents by suppressing growth of cancer cells by inhibiting NF-kappaB, PI3K/AKT and other kinase pathways and by inducing apoptosis. Andrographolide induced both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathway in different cancer cells via expression of different anti-apoptotic protein like Bax, p53, and activated caspases. Andrographolide was successfully used as an antineoplastic drug in cancer chemotherapy. Andrographolide inhibited the growth of human breast, prostate, and hepatoma tumors. Andrographolide and analogues need to be subjected to further clinical and biomedical studies in cancer chemoprevention. Andrographolide could be potent anticancer agent when used in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that

  17. Jupiter analogues and planets of active stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Combined results are now available from a 15 year long search for Jupiter analogues around solar-type stars using the ESO CAT + CES, ESO 3.6 m + CES, and ESO 3.6 m + HARPS instruments. They comprise planet (co-discoveries (ι Hor and HR 506 and confirmations (three planets in HR 3259 as well as non-confirmations of planets (HR 4523 and ɛ Eri announced elsewhere. A long-term trend in ɛ Ind found by our survey is probably attributable to a Jovian planet with a period >30 yr, but we cannot fully exclude stellar activity effects as the cause. A 3.8 year periodic variation in HR 8323 can be attributed to stellar activity.

  18. The gravitational analogue of the Witten effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.

    1984-06-01

    In the presence of massive fermions, and assuming a non-vanishing theta-parameter as the only source of CP-violation, the Witten effect [a shift in the electric charge of a magnetic monopole due to CP-non-conservation] is shown to follow from an anomalous chiral commutator. Next, given the gravitational contribution to the chiral anomaly, the corresponding anomalous commutator for Dirac fermion currents in a gravitational background is derived. From that, we infer the equivalence of a theta R-tilde R term in the Lagrangian to a shift in the mass parameter of the NUT metric, in proportion to theta. This is interpreted as the gravitational analogue of the Witten effect. Its relevance to certain Kaluza-Klein monopoles is briefly discussed. (author)

  19. Gravitational analogue of the Witten effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O. (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy))

    1985-07-22

    In the presence of massive fermions, and assuming a non-vanishing theta-parameter as the only source of CP violation, the Witten effect (a shift in the electric charge of a magnetic monopole due to CP non-conservation) is shown to follow from an anomalous chiral commutator. Next, given the gravitational contribution to the chiral anomaly, the corresponding anomalous commutator for Dirac fermion currents in a gravitational background is derived. From that, we infer the equivalence of a thetaR tildeR term in the lagrangian to a shift in the mass parameter of the NUT metric, in proportion to theta. This is interpreted as the gravitational analogue of the Witten effect. Its relevance to certain Kaluza-Klein monopoles is briefly discussed.

  20. The gravitational analogue of the Witten effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.

    1985-01-01

    In the presence of massive fermions, and assuming a non-vanishing theta-parameter as the only source of CP violation, the Witten effect (a shift in the electric charge of a magnetic monopole due to CP non-conservation) is shown to follow from an anomalous chiral commutator. Next, given the gravitational contribution to the chiral anomaly, the corresponding anomalous commutator for Dirac fermion currents in a gravitational background is derived. From that, we infer the equivalence of a thetaR tildeR term in the lagrangian to a shift in the mass parameter of the NUT metric, in proportion to theta. This is interpreted as the gravitational analogue of the Witten effect. Its relevance to certain Kaluza-Klein monopoles is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  1. Reflective analogue optical link operating issues

    CERN Document Server

    Batten, Jeremy

    1996-01-01

    The proposed readout of analogue data from CMS tracker will use an optical fibre link. The choice of transmitter/receiver technology, however, has been the subject of intense research and development by the RD23 collaboration. One solution uses passive devices, multi-quantum well modulators, at the detector front end, and continuous wave driving lasers at the readout back end. This system has been tested at Imperial College. We report on the following: problems of noise associated with multimoded behaviour of a degraded laser; measurements of laser wavelength dependence on both drive current and temperature; and modulator reflectance dependence on laser wavelength. We extrapolate the findings to system issues, highlighting the degree of temperature control required of the driving laser.

  2. The glaciogenic reservoir analogue studies project (GRASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moscariello, A.; Moreau, Julien; Vegt, P. van der

    increasing the risk associated with developing effectively these reservoirs. Therefore a analogue-based predictive stratigraphical and sedimentological model can help to steer drilling strategy and reduce uncertainties and associated risks. For this purpose the GRASP joint industry programme was established......Tunnel galleys are common features in Palaeozoic glacigenic succession in North Afrcica and Middle East and they are amongst the most challenging target for hydrocarbon exploration and developing drilling in these regions. Similarly, these buried valleys form important groundwater reservoirs...... in Quaternary glaciated areas and their nature and sediment composition is critical to drive a sustainable production strategy and assess their vulnerability. Seismic resolution however, often limits the understanding of channel valleys morphology, 3D geometry and internal reservoir distribution, thus...

  3. Synthesis of an Orthogonal Topological Analogue of Helicene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wixe, Torbjörn; Wallentin, Carl‐Johan; Johnson, Magnus T.

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of an orthogonal topological pentamer analogue of helicene is presented. This analogue forms a tubular structure with its aromatic systems directed parallel to the axis of propagation, which creates a cavity with the potential to function as a host molecule. The synthetic strategy...

  4. Caged ceramide 1-phosphate analogues: synthesis and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankalapalli, Ravi S; Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Bittman, Robert

    2009-11-20

    Sphingolipid phosphate analogues bearing 7-(diethylamino)coumarin (DECM) and 4-bromo-5-hydroxy-2-nitrobenzhydryl (BHNB) groups in a photolabile ester bond were synthesized. The ability of the "caged" ceramide 1-phosphate analogues to release the bioactive parent molecule upon irradiation at 400-500 nm was demonstrated by stimulation of macrophage cell proliferation.

  5. Automated Layout Generation of Analogue and Mixed-Signal ASIC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Rene

    The research and development carried out in this Ph.D. study focusses on two key areas of the design flow for analogue and mixed-signal integrated circuit design, the mixed-signal floorplanning and the analogue layout generation.A novel approach to floorplanning is presented which provides true i...

  6. Uncertainties and credibility building of safety analyses. Natural analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laciok, A.

    2001-07-01

    The substance of natural analogues and their studies is defined as a complementary method to laboratory and in-situ experiments and modelling. The role of natural analogues in the processes of development of repositories is defined, mainly in performance assessment of repository system and communication with public. The criteria for identification of natural analogues which should be evaluated in the phase of initiation of new studies are specified. Review part of this report is divided to study of natural analogues and study of anthropogenic and industrial analogues. The main natural analogue studies performed in various countries, in different geological setting, with various aims are characterized. New results acquired in recently finished studies are included: Palmottu (2nd phase of project financed by European Commission), Oklo (results of research financed also by European Commission), Maqarin (3rd phase) and other information obtained from last meetings and workshops of NAWG. In view of the fact that programmes of development of deep repositories in Czech and Slovak Republics are interconnected, the natural analogues studies carried out in the Czech republic are incorporated in separate chapter - study of uranium accumulation in Tertiary clays at Ruprechtov site and study of degradation of natural glasses. In final part the areas of natural analogue studies as an integral part of development of deep geological repository are proposed along with characterization of broader context and aspects of realization of these studies (international cooperation, preparation and evaluation of procedures, communication with public). (author)

  7. Insulin analogues and severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P L; Hansen, L S; Jespersen, M J

    2012-01-01

    The effect of insulin analogues on glycaemic control is well-documented, whereas the effect on avoidance of severe hypoglycaemia remains tentative. We studied the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in unselected patients with type 1 diabetes treated with insulin analogues, human insulin, or mixed...

  8. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W.R.; Mazurek, M.; Waber, H.N. [Univ. of Berne (Switzerland). Institutes of Geology, Mineralogy and Petrology, Rock-Water Interaction Group (GGWW); Arlinger, J.; Erlandson, A.C.; Hallbeck, L.; Pedersen, K. [Goeteborg University (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Boehlmann, W.; Fritz, P.; Geyer, S.; Geyer, W.; Hanschman, G.; Kopinke, F.D.; Poerschmann, J. [Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany); Chambers, A.V.; Haworth, A.; Ilett, D.; Linklater, C.M.; Tweed, C.J. [AEA Technology plc, Harwell (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N.; Kemp, S.J.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Reeder, S.; Rochelle, C.A.; Smith, B.; Wetton, P.D.; Wragg, J. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Clark, I.D. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Hodginson, E.; Hughes, C.R. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Hyslop, E.K. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Karlsson, F. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Khoury, H.N.; Salameh, E. [Univ. of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Lagerblad, B. [Cement Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Longworth, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology; Pitty, A.F. [Private consultant, Norwich (United Kingdom); Savage, D. [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Smellie, J.A.T. [ed.] [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH){sub 2} type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the `alkali disturbed zone` of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  9. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses

  10. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  11. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W.R.; Mazurek, M.; Waber, H.N. [Univ. of Berne (Switzerland). Institutes of Geology, Mineralogy and Petrology, Rock-Water Interaction Group (GGWW); Arlinger, J.; Erlandson, A.C.; Hallbeck, L.; Pedersen, K. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Boehlmann, W.; Fritz, P.; Geyer, S.; Geyer, W.; Hanschman, G.; Kopinke, F.D.; Poerschmann, J. [Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany); Chambers, A.V.; Haworth, A.; Ilett, D.; Linklater, C.M.; Tweed, C.J. [AEA Technology plc, Harwell (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N.; Kemp, S.J.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Reeder, S.; Rochelle, C.A.; Smith, B.; Wetton, P.D.; Wragg, J. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Clark, I.D. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Hodginson, E.; Hughes, C.R. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Hyslop, E.K. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Karlsson, F. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Khoury, H.N.; Salameh, E. [Univ. of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Lagerblad, B. [Cement Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Longworth, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology; Pitty, A.F. [Private consultant, Norwich (United Kingdom); Savage, D. [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Smellie, J.A.T. [ed.] [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH){sub 2} type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the `alkali disturbed zone` of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  12. Magnetic properties of Proxima Centauri b analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Bustamante, Sebastian

    2018-03-01

    The discovery of a planet around the closest star to our Sun, Proxima Centauri, represents a quantum leap in the testability of exoplanetary models. Unlike any other discovered exoplanet, models of Proxima b could be contrasted against near future telescopic observations and far future in-situ measurements. In this paper we aim at predicting the planetary radius and the magnetic properties (dynamo lifetime and magnetic dipole moment) of Proxima b analogues (solid planets with masses of ∼ 1 - 3M⊕ , rotation periods of several days and habitable conditions). For this purpose we build a grid of planetary models with a wide range of compositions and masses. For each point in the grid we run the planetary evolution model developed in Zuluaga et al. (2013). Our model assumes small orbital eccentricity, negligible tidal heating and earth-like radiogenic mantle elements abundances. We devise a statistical methodology to estimate the posterior distribution of the desired planetary properties assuming simple lprior distributions for the orbital inclination and bulk composition. Our model predicts that Proxima b would have a mass 1.3 ≤Mp ≤ 2.3M⊕ and a radius Rp =1.4-0.2+0.3R⊕ . In our simulations, most Proxima b analogues develop intrinsic dynamos that last for ≥4 Gyr (the estimated age of the host star). If alive, the dynamo of Proxima b have a dipole moment ℳdip >0.32÷2.9×2.3ℳdip , ⊕ . These results are not restricted to Proxima b but they also apply to earth-like planets having similar observed properties.

  13. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; Mazurek, M.; Waber, H.N.; Arlinger, J.; Erlandson, A.C.; Hallbeck, L.; Pedersen, K.; Chambers, A.V.; Haworth, A.; Ilett, D.; Linklater, C.M.; Tweed, C.J.; Chenery, S.R.N.; Kemp, S.J.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Reeder, S.; Rochelle, C.A.; Smith, B.; Wetton, P.D.; Wragg, J.; Clark, I.D.; Karlsson, F.; Khoury, H.N.; Salameh, E.; Lagerblad, B.; Longworth, G.; Savage, D.; Smellie, J.A.T.

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH) 2 type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the 'alkali disturbed zone' of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  14. Analogue to Digital and Digital to Analogue (AD/DA) Conversion Techniques: An Overview

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The basic ideas behind modern Analogue to Digital and Digital to Analogue (AD/DA) conversion methods will be introduced: a general view of the importance of these devices will be given, along with the digital representation of time-varying, real-world analogue signals. Some CERN applications will be outlined. The variety of conversion methods, their limitations, error sources and measurement methods will form the major part of this presentation. A review of the technological progress in this field over the last 30 years will be presented, concluding with the present 'state of the art' and a quick look at what is just around the corner. This Technical Training Seminar is in the framework of the FEED-2002 Lecture Series, and it is a prerequisite to attending to any of the FEED-2002 Terms. FEED-2002 is a two-term course that will review the techniques dealing with closed loop systems, focussing on time-invariant linear systems. (free attendance, no registration required) More information on the FEED-2002 ...

  15. Analogues of uracil nucleosides with intrinsic fluorescence (NIF-analogues): synthesis and photophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Meirav; Fischer, Bilha

    2012-02-28

    Uridine cannot be utilized as fluorescent probe due to its extremely low quantum yield. For improving the uracil fluorescence characteristics we extended the natural chromophore at the C5 position by coupling substituted aromatic rings directly or via an alkenyl or alkynyl linker to create fluorophores. Extension of the uracil base was achieved by treating 5-I-uridine with the appropriate boronic acid under the Suzuki coupling conditions. Analogues containing an alkynyl linker were obtained from 5-I-uridine and the suitable boronic acid in a Sonogashira coupling reaction. The uracil fluorescent analogues proposed here were designed to satisfy the following requirements: a minimal chemical modification at a position not involved in base-pairing, resulting in relatively long absorption and emission wavelengths and high quantum yield. 5-((4-Methoxy-phenyl)-trans-vinyl)-2'-deoxy-uridine, 6b, was found to be a promising fluorescent probe. Probe 6b exhibits a quantum yield that is 3000-fold larger than that of the natural chromophore (Φ 0.12), maximum emission (478 nm) which is 170 nm red shifted as compared to uridine, and a Stokes shift of 143 nm. In addition, since probe 6b adopts the anti conformation and S sugar puckering favored by B-DNA, it makes a promising nucleoside analogue to be incorporated in an oligonucleotide probe for detection of genetic material.

  16. The Greenland Analogue Project. Yearly Report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    A deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel needs to be designed to keep used nuclear fuel isolated from mankind and the environment for a million years. Within this time frame glacial conditions are expected in regions that have been glaciated in the past two to ten million years. Climate induced changes such as the growth of ice sheets and permafrost will influence and alter the ground surface and subsurface environment, including its hydrology, which may impact repository safety. Glaciation impact assessments have to-date used over-simplified models and conservative assumptions, for example in the representation of ice sheet hydrology, that do not reflect the complexity of natural systems and processes. This is largely due to lack of direct observations of such processes from existing ice sheets, which if more readily available could help reduce uncertainties and provide a strong scientific basis for the treatment of glacial impacts in safety assessments. Our current understanding of the hydrological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical processes associated with glacial cycles and their impact on the long-term performance of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel will be significantly improved by studying a modern analogue. To advance the understanding of processes associated with glaciation and their impact on the long-term performance of a deep geological repository, the Greenland Analogue Project (GAP), a four-year field and modelling study of the Greenland ice sheet and sub-surface conditions, has been initiated collaboratively by SKB, Posiva and NWMO. The study site encompasses a land terminus portion of the Greenland ice sheet east of Kangerlussuaq and is in many ways considered to be an appropriate analogue of the conditions that are expected to prevail in much of Canada and Fennoscandia during future glacial cycles. The project is planned to run from 2009 until 2012. The GAP will conduct the first in situ investigations of some of

  17. The Greenland Analogue Project. Yearly Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    A deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel needs to be designed to keep used nuclear fuel isolated from mankind and the environment for a million years. Within this time frame glacial conditions are expected in regions that have been glaciated in the past two to ten million years. Climate induced changes such as the growth of ice sheets and permafrost will influence and alter the ground surface and subsurface environment, including its hydrology, which may impact repository safety. Glaciation impact assessments have to-date used over-simplified models and conservative assumptions, for example in the representation of ice sheet hydrology, that do not reflect the complexity of natural systems and processes. This is largely due to lack of direct observations of such processes from existing ice sheets, which if more readily available could help reduce uncertainties and provide a strong scientific basis for the treatment of glacial impacts in safety assessments. Our current understanding of the hydrological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical processes associated with glacial cycles and their impact on the long-term performance of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel will be significantly improved by studying a modern analogue. To advance the understanding of processes associated with glaciation and their impact on the long-term performance of a deep geological repository, the Greenland Analogue Project (GAP), a four-year field and modelling study of the Greenland ice sheet and sub-surface conditions, has been initiated collaboratively by SKB, Posiva and NWMO. The study site encompasses a land terminus portion of the Greenland ice sheet east of Kangerlussuaq and is in many ways considered to be an appropriate analogue of the conditions that are expected to prevail in much of Canada and Fennoscandia during future glacial cycles. The project is planned to run from 2009 until 2012. The GAP will conduct the first in situ investigations of some of

  18. High Accuracy DOA Estimation of Electromagnetic Pulses using Analogue Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, Takao; Oka, Fujio; Kashizaki, Tsutomu

    Partial discharges (PDs), which occur at coupling points of tension insulators or binding spots of insulated wire of distribution lines, might cause television interference or ground fault. A technique for location of the sources of PDs using time differences in arrival of electromagnetic pulses radiated from PDs has been investigated recently, because it is difficult to find the sources by visual inspection from the ground. However, the technique requires a large and expensive apparatus such as digital storage oscilloscope able to record waveforms of the electromagnetic pulses very fast. We investigate a new technique to estimate the direction of arrival (DOA) of the electromagnetic pulses using analogue signal processing. The experimental analogue circuits for measurement of the time (phase) differences are composed of general purpose modules, i.e., amplifiers, filters, local oscillator, dividers, mixers, etc, and the DOA of the electromagnetic pulse is indicated using a circular symbol superimposed onto the photo image taken with a CCD camera. From the results of the experiments on the DOA estimation, it was proved that the new technique is available for high accuracy DOA estimation of the electromagnetic pulses radiated from PDs in air.

  19. UK Natural Analogue Coordinating Group: fourth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, D.; Hooker, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    HMIP has a research programme investigating some naturally radioactive sites as geochemical analogues of radionuclide migration. All of the analogue sites under investigation, both in the U.K. and overseas, are located where elevated uranium concentrations occur naturally. Coordination of the programme is achieved through the UK Natural Analogue Co-ordinating Group (NACG) which has met three times in this reporting period. The NACG is steered by the British Geological Survey. Its purpose is to ensure that the different research projects have an integrated function aimed at increasing our understanding of natural geochemical processes. Effort is also being expended in testing research models which may be used in such assessments. (author)

  20. A chemoselective and continuous synthesis of m-sulfamoylbenzamide analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Verlee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available For the synthesis of m-sulfamoylbenzamide analogues, small molecules which are known for their bioactivity, a chemoselective procedure has been developed starting from m-(chlorosulfonylbenzoyl chloride. Although a chemoselective process in batch was already reported, a continuous-flow process reveals an increased selectivity at higher temperatures and without catalysts. In total, 15 analogues were synthesized, using similar conditions, with yields ranging between 65 and 99%. This is the first automated and chemoselective synthesis of m-sulfamoylbenzamide analogues.

  1. A Low-cost Multi-channel Analogue Signal Generator

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Shen, W; Stamen, R

    2009-01-01

    A scalable multi-channel analogue signal generator is presented. It uses a commercial low-cost graphics card with multiple outputs in a standard PC as signal source. Each color signal serves as independent channel to generate an analogue signal. A custom-built external PCB was developed to adjust the graphics card output voltage levels for a specific task, which needed differential signals. The system furthermore comprises a software package to program the signal shape. The signal generator was successfully used as independent test bed for the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger Pre-Processor, providing up to 16 analogue signals.

  2. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10 3 -10 5 years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., open-quotes natural analoguesclose quotes) provide perhaps the only means of partial open-quotes validation,close quotes as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10 3 -10 8 years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the open-quotes validationclose quotes of performance assessments

  3. Direct measurements of surface scattering in Si nanosheets using a microscale phonon spectrometer: implications for Casimir-limit predicted by Ziman theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Jared B; Aksit, Mahmut; Otelaja, Obafemi O; Stewart, Derek A; Robinson, Richard D

    2014-02-12

    Thermal transport in nanostructures is strongly affected by phonon-surface interactions, which are expected to depend on the phonon's wavelength and the surface roughness. Here we fabricate silicon nanosheets, measure their surface roughness (∼ 1 nm) using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and assess the phonon scattering rate in the sheets with a novel technique: a microscale phonon spectrometer. The spectrometer employs superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) to produce and detect controllable nonthermal distributions of phonons from ∼ 90 to ∼ 870 GHz. This technique offers spectral resolution nearly 10 times better than a thermal conductance measurement. We compare measured phonon transmission rates to rates predicted by a Monte Carlo model of phonon trajectories, assuming that these trajectories are dominated by phonon-surface interactions and using the Ziman theory to predict phonon-surface scattering rates based on surface topology. Whereas theory predicts a diffuse surface scattering probability of less than 40%, our measurements are consistent with a 100% probability. Our nanosheets therefore exhibit the so-called "Casimir limit" at a much lower frequency than expected if the phonon scattering rates follow the Ziman theory for a 1 nm surface roughness. Such a result holds implications for thermal management in nanoscale electronics and the design of nanostructured thermoelectrics.

  4. Solistatinol, a novel phenolic compactin analogue from Penicillium solitum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Lange, Lene; Schnorr, Kirk

    2007-01-01

    Solistatinol, a novel phenolic compactin analogue, has been isolated from Penicillium solitum using a UV-guided strategy. The structure and relative stereochemistry were determined by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The absolute stereochemistry was determined by chemical degradation...

  5. Heterocyclic Analogues of Modafinil as Novel, Atypical Dopamine Transporter Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaba, Predrag; Aher, Nilima Y; Ilić, Marija; Dragačević, Vladimir; Wieder, Marcus; Miklosi, Andras G; Zehl, Martin; Wackerlig, Judith; Roller, Alexander; Beryozkina, Tetyana; Radoman, Bojana; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Lindner, Wolfgang; Gonzalez, Eduardo Perez; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Leban, Johann Jakob; Sitte, Harald H; Urban, Ernst; Langer, Thierry; Lubec, Gert

    2017-11-22

    Modafinil is a wake promoting compound with high potential for cognitive enhancement. It is targeting the dopamine transporter (DAT) with moderate selectivity, thereby leading to reuptake inhibition and increased dopamine levels in the synaptic cleft. A series of modafinil analogues have been reported so far, but more target-specific analogues remain to be discovered. It was the aim of this study to synthesize and characterize such analogues and, indeed, a series of compounds were showing higher activities on the DAT and a higher selectivity toward DAT versus serotonin and norepinephrine transporters than modafinil. This was achieved by substituting the amide moiety by five- and six-membered aromatic heterocycles. In vitro studies indicated binding to the cocaine pocket on DAT, although molecular dynamics revealed binding different from that of cocaine. Moreover, no release of dopamine was observed, ruling out amphetamine-like effects. The absence of neurotoxicity of a representative analogue may encourage further preclinical studies of the above-mentioned compounds.

  6. Trustworthiness and Influence: A Reexamination in an Extended Counseling Analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmeier, Rosemarie C.; Dixon, David N.

    1980-01-01

    The study demonstrated that: (1) interviewer trustworthiness can be manipulated in an analogue interview setting; and (2) interviewer trustworthiness is related to interpersonal influence in the interview setting. Findings follow a pattern of outcomes predicted by cognitive dissonance theory. (Author)

  7. Synthesis and antifungal activity of two novel spermidine analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackintosh, C A; Slater, L A; McClintock, C A; Walters, D R; Havis, N D; Robins, D J

    1997-03-01

    Two spermidine analogues were synthesised and examined for antifungal activity. Both compounds used as 1 mM post-inoculation sprays reduced infection of barley seedlings by the powdery mildew fungus, Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei, infection of broad bean seedlings by the rust fungus, Uromyces viciae-fabae, and infection of apple seedlings by the powdery mildew fungus, Podosphaera leucotricha. Since these fungal pathogens cannot be cultured axenically, the effects of the two spermidine analogues on mycelial growth in vitro, as well as preliminary investigations on polyamine biosynthesis, were undertaken using the oat stripe pathogen, Pyrenophora avenae. Although neither compound affected radial growth of the fungus on plates, both analogues reduced fungal biomass in liquid culture substantially. The two spermidine analogues, used at a concentration of 1 mM, had no significant effect on the conversion of labelled ornithine into polyamines in P. avenae.

  8. Current prodrug strategies for improving oral absorption of nucleoside analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youxi Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside analogues are first line chemotherapy in various severe diseases: AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome, cytomegalovirus infections, cancer, etc. However, many nucleoside analogues exhibit poor oral bioavailability because of their high polarity and low intestinal permeability. In order to get around this drawback, prodrugs have been utilized to improve lipophilicity by chemical modification of the parent drug. Alternatively, prodrugs targeting transporters present in the intestine have been applied to promote the transport of the nucleoside analogues. Valacyclovir and valganciclovir are two classic valine ester prodrugs transported by oligopeptide transporter 1. The ideal prodrug achieves delivery of a parent drug by attaching a non-toxic moiety that is stable during transport, but is readily degraded to the parent drug once at the target. This article presents advances of prodrug approaches for enhancing oral absorption of nucleoside analogues.

  9. Insulin analogues in pregnancy and specific congenital anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Josta; Garne, Ester; Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    women with pregestational diabetes using insulin analogues in the first trimester and information on congenital anomalies. The studies were analysed to compare the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses of mothers using insulin analogues with foetuses of mothers using human insulin. Of 29 studies, we...... included 1286 foetuses of mothers using short-acting insulin analogues with 1089 references of mothers using human insulin and 768 foetuses of mothers using long-acting insulin analogues with 685 references of mothers using long-acting human insulin (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn). The congenital anomaly rate...... was 4.84% and 4.29% among the foetuses of mothers using lispro and aspart. For glargine and detemir, the congenital anomaly rate was 2.86% and 3.47%, respectively. No studies on the use of insulin glulisine and degludec in pregnancy were found. There was no statistically significant difference...

  10. Analogue Signal Processing: Collected Papers 1996-97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    This document is a collection of the papers presented at international conferences and in international journals by the analogue signal processing group of the Department of Information Technology, Technical University of Denmark, in 1996 and 1997....

  11. 3-alkyl fentanyl analogues: Structure-activity-relationship study

    OpenAIRE

    Vučković, Sonja; Savić-Vujović, Katarina; Srebro, Dragana; Ivanović, Milovan; Došen-Mićović, Ljiljana; Stojanović, Radan; Prostran, Milica

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Fentanyl belongs to 4-anilidopiperidine class of synthetic opioid analgesics. It is characterized by high potency, rapid onset and short duration of action. A large number of fentanyl analogues have been synthesized so far, both to establish the structure-activity-relationship (SAR) and to find novel, clinically useful analgesic drugs. Objective. In this study, newly synthesized 3-alkyl fentanyl analogues were examined for analgesic activity and compared with fentanyl. Methods. ...

  12. Analogue Signal Processing: Collected Papers 1994-95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    This document is a collection of the papers presented at international conferences and in international journals by the analogue signal processing group of Electronics Institute, Technical University of Denmark, in 1994 and 1995.......This document is a collection of the papers presented at international conferences and in international journals by the analogue signal processing group of Electronics Institute, Technical University of Denmark, in 1994 and 1995....

  13. The Greenland Analogue Project, Yearly Report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    To advance the understanding of processes associated with glaciation and their impact on the long-term performance of a deep geological repository, the Greenland Analogue Project (GAP), a four-year field and modelling study of the Greenland ice sheet and sub-surface conditions, has been initiated collaboratively by SKB, Posiva and NWMO. The study site encompasses a land terminus portion of the Greenland ice sheet east of Kangerlussuaq and is in many ways considered to be an appropriate analogue of the conditions that are expected to prevail in much of Canada and Fennoscandia during future glacial cycles. The project is planned to run from 2009 until 2012. The GAP will conduct the first in situ investigations of some of the parameters and processes needed to achieve a realistic understanding of how an ice sheet may impact a deep repository, and will provide measurements, observations and data that may significantly improve our safety assessments and risk analyses of glaciation scenarios. The project includes three sub-projects (A-C) with specific individual objectives, which collectively aim at contributing knowledge and input to the overall project aim. Three field campaigns were carried out in SPA during 2009. These campaigns focused on: (1) deployment and maintenance of AWS and GPS stations and to test the deep-look radar equipment; (2) investigating the hydrological processes and feedbacks and testing of passive seismic equipment; (3) downloading of weather station data and GPS data and winterizing the equipment. An extensive archive of real-time satellite remote sensing datasets has been obtained to be able to better constraint the surface elevation and dynamics of basal hydrological mechanisms. From this archive it has been possible to obtain Russell Glacier Cachment (RGC)-wide constraints on annual, seasonal and specific temporal snapshots of surface speed, initial lake and moulin distribution, drainage and network connections along with the temporal

  14. Habitability & Astrobiology Research in Mars Terrestrial Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    We performed a series of field research campaigns (ILEWG EuroMoonMars) in the extreme Utah desert relevant to Mars environments, and in order to help in the interpretation of Mars missions measurements from orbit (MEX, MRO) or from the surface (MER, MSL), or Moon geochemistry (SMART-1, LRO). We shall give an update on the sample analysis in the context of habitability and astrobiology. Methods & Results: In the frame of ILEWG EuroMoonMars campaigns (2009 to 2013) we deployed at Mars Desert Research station, near Hanksville Utah, a suite of instruments and techniques [A, 1, 2, 9-11] including sample collection, context imaging from remote to local and microscale, drilling, spectrometers and life sensors. We analyzed how geological and geochemical evolution affected local parameters (mineralogy, organics content, environment variations) and the habitability and signature of organics and biota. Among the important findings are the diversity in the composition of soil samples even when collected in close proximity, the low abundances of detectable PAHs and amino acids and the presence of biota of all three domains of life with significant heterogeneity. An extraordinary variety of putative extremophiles was observed [3,4,9]. A dominant factor seems to be soil porosity and lower clay-sized particle content [6-8]. A protocol was developed for sterile sampling, contamination issues, and the diagnostics of biodiversity via PCR and DGGE analysis in soils and rocks samples [10, 11]. We compare the 2009 campaign results [1-9] to new measurements from 2010-2013 campaigns [10-12] relevant to: comparison between remote sensing and in-situ measurements; the study of minerals; the detection of organics and signs of life. Keywords: field analogue research, astrobiology, habitability, life detection, Earth-Moon-Mars, organics References [A] Foing, Stoker & Ehrenfreund (Editors, 2011) "Astrobiology field Research in Moon/Mars Analogue Environments", Special Issue of International

  15. Application of natural analogues in the Yucca Mountain project - overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.

    2003-01-01

    The Natural Analogue Synthesis Report (NASR) [1] provides a compilation of information from analogues that test, corroborate, and add confidence to process models and model predictions pertinent to total system performance assessment (TSPA). The report updated previous work [2] with new literature examples and results of quantitative studies conducted by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The intent of the natural analogue studies was to collect corroborative evidence from analogues to demonstrate greater understanding of processes expected to occur during postclosure of a proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Natural analogues, as used here, refer to either natural or anthropogenic systems in which processes similar to those expected to occur in a nuclear waste repository are thought to have occurred over long time periods (decades to millenia) and large spatial scales (up to tens of kilometers). In the past, the YMP has used analogues for testing and building confidence in conceptual and numerical process models in a number of ways. Yucca Mountain mineral alteration phases provided a self-analogue for postclosure alteration [3]. Thermodynamic parameters for silica minerals of the Wairakai, New Zealand geothermal field were added to databases used in geochemical modeling [4]. Scoping calculations of radionuclide transport using the Yucca Mountain TSPA numerical model were conducted for the Peqa Blanca site [5]. Eruption parameters from the Cerro Negro volcano, Nicaragua, were used to verify codes that model ash plume dispersion [6]. Analogues have also been used in supplemental science and performance analyses to provide multiple lines of evidence in support of both analyses and model reports (AMRs) [7]; in screening arguments for inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEP)s in TSPAs; in the quantification of uncertainties [7]; in expert elicitations of volcanic and seismic hazards [8, 9] and in peer reviews [10]. Natural analogues may be applied

  16. Characterisation of insulin analogues therapeutically available to patients

    KAUST Repository

    Adams, Gary G.

    2018-03-29

    The structure and function of clinical dosage insulin and its analogues were assessed. This included \\'native insulins\\' (human recombinant, bovine, porcine), \\'fast-acting analogues\\' (aspart, glulisine, lispro) and \\'slow-acting analogues\\' (glargine, detemir, degludec). Analytical ultracentrifugation, both sedimentation velocity and equilibrium experiments, were employed to yield distributions of both molar mass and sedimentation coefficient of all nine insulins. Size exclusion chromatography, coupled to multi-angle light scattering, was also used to explore the function of these analogues. On ultracentrifugation analysis, the insulins under investigation were found to be in numerous conformational states, however the majority of insulins were present in a primarily hexameric conformation. This was true for all native insulins and two fast-acting analogues. However, glargine was present as a dimer, detemir was a multi-hexameric system, degludec was a dodecamer (di-hexamer) and glulisine was present as a dimer-hexamer-dihexamer system. However, size-exclusion chromatography showed that the two hexameric fast-acting analogues (aspart and lispro) dissociated into monomers and dimers due to the lack of zinc in the mobile phase. This comprehensive study is the first time all nine insulins have been characterised in this way, the first time that insulin detemir have been studied using analytical ultracentrifugation and the first time that insulins aspart and glulisine have been studied using sedimentation equilibrium. The structure and function of these clinically administered insulins is of critical importance and this research adds novel data to an otherwise complex functional physiological protein.

  17. Incorporation of tryptophan analogues into the lantibiotic nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liang; Shao, Jinfeng; Li, Qian; van Heel, Auke J; de Vries, Marcel P; Broos, Jaap; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-05-01

    Lantibiotics are posttranslationally modified peptides with efficient inhibitory activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the original modifications, incorporation of non-canonical amino acids can render new properties and functions to lantibiotics. Nisin is the most studied lantibiotic and contains no tryptophan residues. In this study, a system was constructed to incorporate tryptophan analogues into nisin, which included the modification machinery (NisBTC) and the overexpression of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS). Tryptophan and three different tryptophan analogues (5-fluoroTrp (5FW), 5-hydroxyTrp (5HW) and 5-methylTrp (5MeW)) were successfully incorporated at four different positions of nisin (I1W, I4W, M17W and V32W). The incorporation efficiency of tryptophan analogues into mutants I1W, M17W and V32W was over 97 %, while the mutant I4W showed relatively low incorporation efficiency (69-93 %). The variants with 5FW showed relatively higher production yield, while 5MeW-containing variants showed the lowest yield. The dehydration efficiency of serines or threonines was affected by the tryptophan mutants of I4W and V32W. The affinity of the peptides for the cation-ion exchange and reverse phase chromatography columns was significantly reduced when 5HW was incorporated. The antimicrobial activity of IIW and its 5FW analogue both decreased two times compared to that of nisin, while that of its 5HW analogue decreased four times. The 5FW analogue of I4W also showed two times decreased activity than nisin. However, the mutant M17W and its 5HW analogue both showed 32 times reduced activity relative to that of nisin.

  18. Insulin analogues and cancer: a note of caution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A.M.J.L. eJanssen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In view of the lifelong exposure and large patient populations involved, insulin analogues with an increased mitogenic effect in comparison to human insulin may potentially constitute a major health problem, since these analogues may possibly induce the growth of pre-existing neoplasms. At present, the available data suggest that insulin analogues are safe. In line with these findings, we observed that serum of diabetic patients treated with insulin analogues, compared to that of diabetic patients treated with human insulin, did not induce an increased phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR. However, the classical model of the IGF-IR signaling may be insufficient to explain (all mitogenic effects of insulin analogues since also non-canonical signaling pathways of the IGF-IR may play a major role in this respect. Although phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of the IGF-IR is generally considered to be the initial activation step within the intracellular IGF-IR signaling pathway, it has been found that cells undergo a signaling switch under hyperglycemic conditions. After this switch, a completely different mechanism is utilized to activate the mitogenic (mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways of the IGF-IR that is independent from tyrosine phosphorylation of the IGF-IR. At present it is unknown whether activation of this alternative intracellular pathway of the IGF-IR occurs during hyperglycemia in vivo and whether it is stronger in patients treated with (some insulin analogues than in patients treated with human insulin. In addition, it is unknown whether the insulin receptors (IRs also undergo a signaling switch during hyperglycemia. This should be investigated in future studies. Finally, relative overexpression of IR isoform A (IR-A in (pre cancer tissues may play a key role in the development and progression of human cancers during treatment with insulin (analogues. Further

  19. MARKOV GRAPHS OF ONE–DIMENSIONAL DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS AND THEIR DISCRETE ANALOGUES AND THEIR DISCRETE ANALOGUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIY KOZERENKO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One feature of the famous Sharkovsky’s theorem is that it can be proved using digraphs of a special type (the so–called Markov graphs. The most general definition assigns a Markov graph to every continuous map from the topological graph to itself. We show that this definition is too broad, i.e. every finite digraph can be viewed as a Markov graph of some one–dimensional dynamical system on a tree. We therefore consider discrete analogues of Markov graphs for vertex maps on combinatorial trees and characterize all maps on trees whose discrete Markov graphs are of the following types: complete, complete bipartite, the disjoint union of cycles, with every arc being a loop.

  20. Climatic Forecasting of Net Infiltration at Yucca Mountain Using Analogue Meteorological Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B. Faybishenko

    2006-01-01

    At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, future changes in climatic conditions will most likely alter net infiltration, or the drainage below the bottom of the evapotranspiration zone within the soil profile or flow across the interface between soil and the densely welded part of the Tiva Canyon Tuff. The objectives of this paper are to: (a) develop a semi-empirical model and forecast average net infiltration rates, using the limited meteorological data from analogue meteorological stations, for interglacial (present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacial climates over the Yucca Mountain region, and (b) corroborate the computed net-infiltration rates by comparing them with the empirically and numerically determined groundwater recharge and percolation rates through the unsaturated zone from published data. In this paper, the author presents an approach for calculations of net infiltration, aridity, and precipitation-effectiveness indices, using a modified Budyko's water-balance model, with reference-surface potential evapotranspiration determined from the radiation-based Penman (1948) formula. Results of calculations show that net infiltration rates are expected to generally increase from the present-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate, and then to the glacial climate. The forecasting results indicate the overlap between the ranges of net infiltration for different climates. For example, the mean glacial net-infiltration rate corresponds to the upper-bound glacial transition net infiltration, and the lower-bound glacial net infiltration corresponds to the glacial transition mean net infiltration. Forecasting of net infiltration for different climate states is subject to numerous uncertainties-associated with selecting climate analogue sites, using relatively short analogue meteorological records, neglecting the effects of vegetation and surface runoff and runon on a local scale, as well as possible anthropogenic climate changes

  1. Climatic Forecasting of Net Infiltration at Yucca Montain Using Analogue Meteororological Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Faybishenko

    2006-09-11

    At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, future changes in climatic conditions will most likely alter net infiltration, or the drainage below the bottom of the evapotranspiration zone within the soil profile or flow across the interface between soil and the densely welded part of the Tiva Canyon Tuff. The objectives of this paper are to: (a) develop a semi-empirical model and forecast average net infiltration rates, using the limited meteorological data from analogue meteorological stations, for interglacial (present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacial climates over the Yucca Mountain region, and (b) corroborate the computed net-infiltration rates by comparing them with the empirically and numerically determined groundwater recharge and percolation rates through the unsaturated zone from published data. In this paper, the author presents an approach for calculations of net infiltration, aridity, and precipitation-effectiveness indices, using a modified Budyko's water-balance model, with reference-surface potential evapotranspiration determined from the radiation-based Penman (1948) formula. Results of calculations show that net infiltration rates are expected to generally increase from the present-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate, and then to the glacial climate. The forecasting results indicate the overlap between the ranges of net infiltration for different climates. For example, the mean glacial net-infiltration rate corresponds to the upper-bound glacial transition net infiltration, and the lower-bound glacial net infiltration corresponds to the glacial transition mean net infiltration. Forecasting of net infiltration for different climate states is subject to numerous uncertainties-associated with selecting climate analogue sites, using relatively short analogue meteorological records, neglecting the effects of vegetation and surface runoff and runon on a local scale, as well as possible anthropogenic climate changes.

  2. Photochemistry of nucleic acid bases and their thio- and aza-analogues in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollum, Marvin; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E

    2015-01-01

    The steady-state and time-resolved photochemistry of the natural nucleic acid bases and their sulfur- and nitrogen-substituted analogues in solution is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the experimental studies performed over the last 3-5 years that showcase topical areas of scientific inquiry and those that require further scrutiny. Significant progress has been made toward mapping the radiative and nonradiative decay pathways of nucleic acid bases. There is a consensus that ultrafast internal conversion to the ground state is the primary relaxation pathway in the nucleic acid bases, whereas the mechanism of this relaxation and the level of participation of the (1)πσ*, (1) nπ*, and (3)ππ* states are still matters of debate. Although impressive research has been performed in recent years, the microscopic mechanism(s) by which the nucleic acid bases dissipate excess vibrational energy to their environment, and the role of the N-glycosidic group in this and in other nonradiative decay pathways, are still poorly understood. The simple replacement of a single atom in a nucleobase with a sulfur or nitrogen atom severely restricts access to the conical intersections responsible for the intrinsic internal conversion pathways to the ground state in the nucleic acid bases. It also enhances access to ultrafast and efficient inter-system crossing pathways that populate the triplet manifold in yields close to unity. Determining the coupled nuclear and electronic pathways responsible for the significantly different photochemistry in these nucleic acid base analogues serves as a convenient platform to examine the current state of knowledge regarding the photodynamic properties of the DNA and RNA bases from both experimental and computational perspectives. Further investigations should also aid in forecasting the prospective use of sulfur- and nitrogen-substituted base analogues in photochemotherapeutic applications.

  3. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  4. Radiation forces and the Abraham-Minkowski problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Iver

    2018-04-01

    Recent years have witnessed a number of beautiful experiments in radiation optics. Our purpose with this paper is to highlight some developments of radiation pressure physics in general, and thereafter to focus on the importance of the mentioned experiments in regard to the classic Abraham-Minkowski problem. That means, what is the “correct” expression for electromagnetic momentum density in continuous matter. In our opinion, one often sees that authors over-interpret the importance of their experimental findings with respect to the momentum problem. Most of these experiments are actually unable to discriminate between these energy-momentum tensors at all, since they can be easily described in terms of force expressions that are common for Abraham and Minkowski. Moreover, we emphasize the inherent ambiguity in applying the formal conservation principles to the radiation field in a dielectric, the reason being that the electromagnetic field in matter is only a subsystem which has to be supplemented by the mechanical subsystem to be closed. Finally, we make some suggestions regarding the connection between macroscopic electrodynamics and the Casimir effect, suggesting that there is a limit for the magnitudes of the cutoff parameters in QFT related to surface tension in ordinary hydromechanics.

  5. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  6. A preliminary feasibility study on natural analogue in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chun Soo; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Kyung Su; Koh, Yong Kwon; Park, Byung Yun

    2000-03-01

    Preliminary study on the assessment of natural analogue study in Korea for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste was carried out. The project on natural analogue study in other countries are introduced. The uranium-bearing deposit in Okcheon belt are summarized, which reported to be uranium-bearing minerals in order to assess to feasibility for natural analogue study in Korea. Among the uranium-bearing deposits, the Deokpyeong area, reported to be the highest reservoir and grade, are selected as the study site, and the elementary investigation, including survey of radioactivity and geochemistry are carried out. According to the investigation of surface environment, the radioactivity and uranium content in the surface water and shallow groundwater does not show any anormal values. However, the radioactivity is expected to be increased in depth and the groundwater reacted with uranium-bearing graphite formation shows high unanium content, indicating the potential possibility for natural analogue study in Korea. In future, if more detail study are performed, the assessment of natural analogue study in Korea are expected.

  7. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  8. Radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeister, K.

    1977-01-01

    This chapter is included in a textbook which is primarily intended for medical students. The following topics are dealt with: radiation effects on molecules; chemical and biochemical radiation effects; modification of radiation effects and radiosensitivity; radiation-induced pathomorphological and pathophysiological effects in organs and organ systems; radiation syndrome; radiation effects in embryos and fetuses; genetic radiation effects; carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis after irradiation; and radiation effects after intake of radionuclides

  9. Concise synthesis of new bridged-nicotine analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crestey, François; Hooyberghs, Geert; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a very efficient strategy for the synthesis of two new bridged-nicotine analogues. Starting from either 4- or 3-chloropyridine the desired tricyclic ring systems are accessed in just three steps in 23% and 40% overall yield, respectively.......This study describes a very efficient strategy for the synthesis of two new bridged-nicotine analogues. Starting from either 4- or 3-chloropyridine the desired tricyclic ring systems are accessed in just three steps in 23% and 40% overall yield, respectively....

  10. Desert spring mounds: a potential analogue to Martian arid environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, F.; Frisia, S.

    2017-09-01

    Spring carbonates have been often considered as putative analogues of Martian arid environments. On Earth these are believed to form by the interaction of highly saline water and microbial communities, which favor the formation of authigenic micrite. Here we present new data from spring mounds in the western Makgadikgadi Pan (Botswana) and the Great Artesian Basin (South Australia). In both areas, upwelling of ground water give rise to mounds and layered deposits which are close morphological analogues of landforms documented on Mars. The authigenic carbonates and evaporites associated with the spring mounds retain evidence of microbial microfabric founded elsewhere, pointing to the potential existence of similar microbial in the extreme Martian conditions.

  11. Medical applications of analogue and digital telephone data links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D W; Mable, S E; Payne, J P

    1976-07-20

    The increasing use of digital computer techniques for the analysis of signals such as the EEG, ECG, plethysmograms and cardiac output curves has led to the use of multichannel analogue frequency modulation telephone data links in the forward direction from the patient to the computer and digital links in the return direction. Single-channel analogue links are also being used for the surveillance of cardiac pacemaker patients and the television Viewphone offers the possibility of a visual contact between two centers. Examples will be given of the use of these various forms of telephone link.

  12. A Low-cost Multi-channel Analogue Signal Generator

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Shen, W; Stamen, R

    2009-01-01

    A scalable multi-channel analogue signal generator is presented. It uses a commercial low-cost graphics card with multiple outputs in a standard PC as signal source. Each color signal serves as independent channel to generate an analogue signal. A custom-built external PCB was developed to adjust the graphics card output voltage levels for a specific task, which needed differential signals. The system furthermore comprises a software package to program the signal shape. The implementation of the signal generator is presented as well as an application where it was successfully utilized.

  13. Neurochemical binding profiles of novel indole and benzofuran MDMA analogues.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimshoni, JA; Winkler, I; Golan, E; Nutt, D

    2016-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in numerous clinical trials. In the present study, we have characterized the neurochemical binding profiles of three MDMA-benzofuran analogues (1-(benzofuran-5-yl)-propan-2-amine, 5-APB; 1-(benzofuran-6-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine, 6-MAPB; 1-(benzofuran-5-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine, 5-MAPB) and one MDMA-indole analogue (1-(1H-indol-5-yl)-2-methylamino-propan-1-...

  14. Natural analogues, paradigm for manmade repositories for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelescu, M.; Pavelescu, A.

    2004-01-01

    Natural analogues are given by nature. They show the results of natural processes which have lasted thousands or millions of years. They provide an excellent example of what could happen in an underground site, offering in the same time the opportunity to test by observation and measurement, many of the geochemical processes that are expected to influence in a realistic and appropriate way, the predicted reliability of the radioactive waste repository over long periods of geological time. The natural analogue studies attempt to understand the multiprocessing complexity of the natural system, which contrasts with the limitations of the laboratory experiments and bring arguments to overcome the difficult time scale issue. By this the natural analogues are a useful paradigm for manmade repository for radioactive wastes. The paper discusses the implicit link in the public mind between natural analogues and manmade waste repository with an accent of the positive impact on public acceptance. It is also discussed the decisive qualities of the natural analogues concerning providing valid long term data and increasing the confidence of the public for manmade repositories. The debate is conducting in terms of sustainable development, having at base high-level principles in order to protect humans and their environment, both now and in the future, from potential hazards arising from such wastes. Safe radwaste management involves the application of technology and resources in a regulated manner so that the public, workers and the environment are protected in accordance with the accepted national and international standards. There are at least seven high-level principles which are mentioned in the paper. It is presented the general concept of the deep geological repository, very important for an acceptable solution for the management of nuclear waste, what is a prerequisite for a renewal of nuclear power. Further are introduced natural and archaeological (manufactured) analogue

  15. Performance of a 128 channel analogue front-end chip for read-out of Si strip detector modules for LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Chesi, Enrico Guido; Cindro, V; Dabrowski, W; Ferrère, D; Kramberger, G; Kaplon, J; Lacasta, C; Lozano-Bahilo, J; Mikuz, M; Morone, C; Roe, S; Szczygiel, R; Tadel, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Zsenei, A

    2000-01-01

    We present a 128-channel analogue front-end chip, SCT128A-HC, for readout of silicon strip detectors employed in the inner tracking detectors of the LHC experiment. The chip is produced in the radiation hard DMILL technology. The architecture of the chip and critical design issues are discussed. The performance of the chip has been evaluated in details in the test bench and is presented in the paper. The chip is used to read out prototype analogue modules compatible in size, functionality and performance with the ATLAS SCT base line modules. Several full size detector modules equipped with SCT128A-HC chips has been built and tested successfully in the lab with beta particles as well as in the test beam. The results concerning the signal-to-noise ratio, noise occupancy, efficiency and spatial resolution are presented. The radiation hardness issues are discussed. (5 refs).

  16. Transition radiation and transition scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    Transition radiation is a process of a rather general character. It occurs when some source, which does not have a proper frequency (for example, a charge) moves at a constant velocity in an inhomogeneous and (or) nonstationary medium or near such a medium. The simplest type of transition radiation takes place when a charge crosses a boundary between two media (the role of one of the media may be played by vacuum). In the case of periodic variation of the medium, transition radiation possesses some specific features (resonance transition radiation or transition scattering). Transition scattering occurs, in particular, when a permittivity wave falls onto an nonmoving (fixed) charge. Transition scattering is closely connected with transition bremsstrahlung radiation. All these transition processes are essential for plasma physics. Transition radiation and transition scattering have analogues outside the framework of electrodynamics (like in the case of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation). In the present report the corresponding range of phenomena is elucidated, as far as possible, in a generally physical aspect. (Auth.)

  17. Synthesis, DNA interaction and antimicrobial activities of three rimantadine analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Wang, Xin, E-mail: wangxinlnu@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Zhang, Li-Ping; Liu, Yang [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Niu, Hua-Ying [Jinan Dachpharm Development Co., Ltd., Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Bin, E-mail: liubinzehao@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-03-15

    The interactions of three rimantadine analogues (RAs) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) in buffer solution (pH 7.4) were investigated using berberine (BR) as a probe by various methods. Fluorescence studies revealed that the RAs interacted with DNA in vitro and the quenchings were all static. Furthermore, the binding modes of these compounds to DNA were disclosed as groove binding supported by absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement and denatured DNA experiment. The antimicrobial activities of the RAs were also evaluated in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and they all exhibited good bacteriostasic effects. The results might provide an important reference for investigation of the molecular mechanism associated with the DNA binding of the RAs. - Highlights: • Three rimantadine analogues were synthesized. • The RAs effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of DNA via a static combination. • These analogues can bind to DNA via groove binding mode. • The antimicrobial activities of three analogues were also evaluated by the disk diffusion method.

  18. Are structural analogues to bisphenol A a safe alternative?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Dybdahl, Marianne; Pedersen, Gitte Alsing

    2013-01-01

    of which are found in foods and have been measured in humans. Due to the structural analogy there is an inherent risk that these compounds may lead to similar effects as BPA. The aim of this study was to characterize the toxicological profile of BPA and the five analogues using in vitro assays assessing...

  19. A new analogue of fatty alcohol from Tamarix hampeana L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykac, Ahmet; Akgül, Yurdanur

    2010-01-01

    New analogues of a long-chain secondary alcohol (1) and laserine (2) were isolated from the flowers of Tamarix hampeana L. The isolated compounds were identified using 1D and 2D NMR, LCMS/APCI, and chemical methods. Laserine was isolated for the first time from T. hampeana L.

  20. Cytotoxicity of natural ginseng glycosides and semisynthetic analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atopkina, LN; Malinovskaya, GV; Elyakov, GB; Uvarova, NI; Woerdenbag, HJ; Koulman, A; Potier, P

    The cytotoxicity of natural glycosides from Ginseng, semisynthetic analogues and related triterpenes of the dammarane series, isolated from the leaves of the Far-East species of the genus Betula was studied in order to elucidate structure-activity relationships. Some of the compounds studied were

  1. Influence of Bakuchiol, a JH analogue from Bemchi ( Psoralea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of a juvenile hormone analogue (JHA), bakuchiol on the silk yield of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. was studied involving two popular commercial hybrids, KA x NB4D2 (bivoltine x bivoltine) and PM x NB4D2 (multivoltine x bivoltine). The compound was administered topically to 5th instars at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h as ...

  2. Difference in brain activations during appreciating paintings and photographic analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori eMizokami

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have investigated neural correlates of aesthetic appreciation for paintings but to date the findings have been heterogeneous. This heterogeneity may be attributed to previous studies’ measurement of aesthetic appreciation of not only the beauty of paintings but also the beauty of motifs of the paintings. In order to better elucidate the beauty of paintings, it seems necessary to compare aesthetic appreciation of paintings and photographic analogues which included corresponding real images. We prepared for famous painters’ pictures and their photographic analogues which were set up to resemble each painting in order to investigate the hypothesis that there exist specific neural correlates associated with the aesthetic appreciation for paintings. Forty-four subjects participated in functional magnetic resonance study which required comparisons of aesthetic appreciation of paintings of still life and landscape versus photographic analogues including corresponding real images of still life and landscape. Bilateral cuneus and the left lingual gyrus were activated in the comparison of aesthetic appreciation of paintings versus photographic analogues. In conclusion, the present findings suggest a possibility of the existence of specific neural correlates associated with the aesthetic appreciation for paintings and that bilateral cuneus and the left lingual gyrus may be involved.

  3. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Walmagh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-glucopyranoside is a non-reducing sugar with unique stabilizing properties due to its symmetrical, low energy structure consisting of two 1,1-anomerically bound glucose moieties. Many applications of this beneficial sugar have been reported in the novel food (nutricals, medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Trehalose analogues, like lactotrehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside or galactotrehalose (α-d-galactopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside, offer similar benefits as trehalose, but show additional features such as prebiotic or low-calorie sweetener due to their resistance against hydrolysis during digestion. Unfortunately, large-scale chemical production processes for trehalose analogues are not readily available at the moment due to the lack of efficient synthesis methods. Most of the procedures reported in literature suffer from low yields, elevated costs and are far from environmentally friendly. “Greener” alternatives found in the biocatalysis field, including galactosidases, trehalose phosphorylases and TreT-type trehalose synthases are suggested as primary candidates for trehalose analogue production instead. Significant progress has been made in the last decade to turn these into highly efficient biocatalysts and to broaden the variety of useful donor and acceptor sugars. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the latest insights and future perspectives in trehalose analogue chemistry, applications and production pathways with emphasis on biocatalysis.

  4. An Analysis of an Autoclitic Analogue in Pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Toshikazu; Lattal, Kennon A.; García-Penagos, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Using a conditional discrimination procedure, pigeons were exposed to a nonverbal analogue of qualifying autoclitics such as "definitely" and "maybe." It has been suggested that these autoclitics are similar to tacts except that they are under the control of private discriminative stimuli. Instead of the conventional assumption…

  5. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmagh, Maarten; Zhao, Renfei; Desmet, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-glucopyranoside) is a non-reducing sugar with unique stabilizing properties due to its symmetrical, low energy structure consisting of two 1,1-anomerically bound glucose moieties. Many applications of this beneficial sugar have been reported in the novel food (nutricals), medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Trehalose analogues, like lactotrehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside) or galactotrehalose (α-d-galactopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside), offer similar benefits as trehalose, but show additional features such as prebiotic or low-calorie sweetener due to their resistance against hydrolysis during digestion. Unfortunately, large-scale chemical production processes for trehalose analogues are not readily available at the moment due to the lack of efficient synthesis methods. Most of the procedures reported in literature suffer from low yields, elevated costs and are far from environmentally friendly. “Greener” alternatives found in the biocatalysis field, including galactosidases, trehalose phosphorylases and TreT-type trehalose synthases are suggested as primary candidates for trehalose analogue production instead. Significant progress has been made in the last decade to turn these into highly efficient biocatalysts and to broaden the variety of useful donor and acceptor sugars. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the latest insights and future perspectives in trehalose analogue chemistry, applications and production pathways with emphasis on biocatalysis. PMID:26084050

  6. An azumamide C analogue without the zinc-binding functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Jesper; Kitir, Betül; Wich, Kathrine

    2014-01-01

    + - coordinating moiety. Herein, we describe the synthesis of an azumamide analogue lacking its native Zn 2+ -binding group and evaluation of its inhibitory activity against recombinant human HDAC1 – 11. Furthermore, kinetic investigation of the inhibitory mechanism of both parent natural product and synthetic...

  7. Evaluation of the antibacterial spectrum of drosocin analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, F.J.; Kaman-van Zanten, W.E.; Vries-van de Ruit, A.M.B.C. de; Voskamp-Visser, I.; Hooft, P.A.V. van; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Visser, P.C. de; Noort, D.

    2006-01-01

    Drosocin is a 19-mer, cationic antimicrobial peptide from Drosophila melanogaster. The aim of the study was to examine the antibacterial spectrum of unglycosylated drosocin analogues. Furthermore, the amino acid sequence of DnaK, drosocin's intracellular target, from susceptible species was aligned

  8. Research on uranium deposits as analogues of radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The disposal of highly radioactive waste deep underground in suitable geological formations is proposed by many countries to protect public health and safety. The study of natural analogues of nuclear waste repositories is one method of validating mathematical models and assuring that a proposed repository site and design will be safe. (author)

  9. Reasoning by analogy: rational foundation of natural analogue studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.-C.

    1992-01-01

    Long-term extrapolations concerning the safety of a nuclear waste repository cannot be satisfactorily made on the sole basis of short-term laboratory investigations. Most nuclear countries have hence developed an approach relying on the following research directions: 1. laboratory experiments; 2. in situ testing; 3. modeling; and 4. natural analogues, which are the only means by which very slow mechanisms can be identified and by which long-term predictions of models can be tested for pertinence (if not truly validated). Although the field of natural analogues has grown very rapidly in recent years, receiving support from varied specialists and institutions involved in radioactive waste disposal, there is not yet a full consensus on their actual usefulness. More problematic is the criticism sometimes made that analogical reasoning is not ''true science'' and that information retrieved from the study of natural analogues will always remain questionable. The present paper gives some clues about the exact status of reasoning by analogy, compared to more ''scientific'' ways of deriving information from investigated systems. It is not a thorough discussion of this very complex, and by far too philosophical issue but we hope, at least, to present to readers of papers devoted to natural analogue studies arguments showing that this approach has some sound foundation. (author)

  10. Using natural analogue studies in the secondary science curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, E.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses an atomic theory unit of a high school chemistry course taught in Nevada. The unit is based on the application of natural analogues to nuclear waste issues. The paper focuses on the students' reactions to the subject material

  11. A Short Review on Cardiotonic Steroids and Their Aminoguanidine Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo San Feliciano

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A short review on cardiotonic steroids and their analogues is presented. The natural, semisynthetic and synthetic derivatives, as well as their mechanism of action and structure-activity relationships are shown, with a special reference to aminoguanidine derivatives.

  12. Design and synthesis of epicocconone analogues with improved fluorescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Philippe A; Boulangé, Agathe; Ball, Malcolm; Naudin, Bertrand; Alle, Thibault; Cosette, Pascal; Karuso, Peter; Franck, Xavier

    2014-10-29

    Epicocconone is a natural latent fluorophore that is widely used in biotechnology because of its large Stokes shift and lack of fluorescence in its unconjugated state. However, the low photostability and quantum yields of epicocconone have limited its wider use, and in the absence of a total synthesis, this limitation has been a long-standing problem. Here we report a general strategy for the synthesis of epicocconone analogues that relies on a 2-iodoxybenzoic acid-mediated dearomatization and on the replacement of the triene tail of the natural product by an aromatic ring. This design element is general and the synthesis is straightforward, providing ready access to libraries of polyfunctional fluorophores with long Stokes shifts based on the epicocconone core. Our structural modifications resulted in analogues with increased photostability and quantum yields compared with the natural product. Staining proteomic gels with these new analogues showed significant lowering of the detection limit and a 30% increase in the number of low-abundance proteins detected. These epiccoconone analogues will substantially improve the discovery rate of biomarker needles in the proteomic haystack.

  13. Evaluative comparison of palm wine analogue and oil palm wine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0.05 and P=0.01) in colour, odour, effervescence and general acceptability between palm wine analogue and oil palm wine. While there also was no significant difference in the tastes and balance of sweetness at P=0.01, a slight difference ...

  14. Vitamin E analogues and immune response in cancer treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomasetti, M.; Neužil, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 76, - (2007), s. 463-491 ISSN 0083-6729 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : vitamin E analogues * inducers of apoptosis * immune surveillance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.889, year: 2007

  15. Analogue Building Blocks Based on Digital CMOS Gates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mucha, Igor

    1996-01-01

    Low-performance analogue circuits built of digital MOS gates are presented. Depending on the threshold voltages of the technology used the final circuits can be operated using low supply voltages. The main advantage using the proposed circuits is the simplicity and ultimate compatibility...... with the design of digital circuits....

  16. Brassinosteroids: Synthesis and activity of some fluoro analogues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavíková, Barbora; Kohout, Ladislav; Buděšínský, Miloš; Swaczynová, Jana; Kasal, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 13 (2008), s. 3979-3984 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550609 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : brassinosteroids * fluor o analogues Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.898, year: 2008

  17. Comparison of overlay metrology with analogue and digital cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigden, Timothy C.; Soroka, Andrew J.; Binns, Lewis A.

    2005-05-01

    Overlay metrology is a very demanding image processing application; current applications are achieving dynamic precision of one hundredth of a pixel or better. As such it requires an accurate image acquisition system, with minimal distortions. Distortions can be physical (e.g. pixel size / shape) or electronic (e.g. clock skew) in nature. They can also affect the image shape, or the gray level intensity of individual pixels, the former causing severe problems to pattern recognition and measurement algorithms, the latter having an adverse effect primarily on the measurement itself. This paper considers the artifacts that are present in a particular analogue camera, with a discussion on how these artifacts translate into a reduction of overlay metrology performance, in particular their effect on precision and tool induced shift (TIS). The observed effects include, but are not limited to, banding and interlacing. This camera is then compared to two digital cameras. The first of these operates at the same frame rate as the analogue camera, and is found to have fewer distortions than the analogue camera. The second camera operates with a frame rate twice that of the other two. It is observed that this camera does not exhibit the distortions of the analogue camera, but instead has some very specific problems, particularly with regards to noise. The quantitative data on the effect on precision and TIS under a wide variety of conditions, is presented. These show that while it is possible to achieve metrology-capable images using an analogue camera, it is preferable to use a digital camera, both from the perspective of overall system performance, and overall system complexity.

  18. Neurochemical binding profiles of novel indole and benzofuran MDMA analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimshoni, Jakob A; Winkler, Ilan; Golan, Ezekiel; Nutt, David

    2017-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in numerous clinical trials. In the present study, we have characterized the neurochemical binding profiles of three MDMA-benzofuran analogues (1-(benzofuran-5-yl)-propan-2-amine, 5-APB; 1-(benzofuran-6-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine, 6-MAPB; 1-(benzofuran-5-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine, 5-MAPB) and one MDMA-indole analogue (1-(1H-indol-5-yl)-2-methylamino-propan-1-ol, 5-IT). These compounds were screened as potential second-generation anti-PTSD drugs, against a battery of human and non-human receptors, transporters, and enzymes, and their potencies as 5-HT 2 receptor agonist and monoamine uptake inhibitors determined. All MDMA analogues displayed high binding affinities for 5-HT 2a,b,c and NE α2 receptors, as well as significant 5-HT, DA, and NE uptake inhibition. 5-APB revealed significant agonist activity at the 5-HT 2a,b,c receptors, while 6-MAPB, 5-MAPB, and 5-IT exhibited significant agonist activity at the 5-HT 2c receptor. There was a lack of correlation between the results of functional uptake and the monoamine transporter binding assay. MDMA analogues emerged as potent and selective monoamine oxidase A inhibitors. Based on 6-MAPB favorable pharmacological profile, it was further subjected to IC 50 determination for monoamine transporters. Overall, all MDMA analogues displayed higher monoamine receptor/transporter binding affinities and agonist activity at the 5-HT 2a,c receptors as compared to MDMA.

  19. Analogue model studies of induction effects at auroral latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Viljanen

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to field observations and numerical models, geomagnetic induction effects can be studied by scaled analogue model experiments. We present here results of analogue model studies of the auroral electrojet with an Earth model simulating the Arctic Ocean and inland conductivity structures in northern Fennoscandia. The main elements of the analogue model used were salt water simulating the host rock, an aluminium plate corresponding to the ocean and graphite pieces producing the inland highly conducting anomalies. The electrojet was a time-harmonic line current flowing at a (simulated height of 100 km above northern Fennoscandia. The period simulated was 9 min. The analogue model results confirmed the well-known rapid increase of the vertical field when the coast is approached from the continent. The increase of the horizontal field due to induced ocean currents was demonstrated above the ocean, as well as the essentially negligible effect of these currents on the horizontal field on the continent. The behaviour of the magnetic field is explained with a simple two-dimensional thin-sheet model. The range, or the adjustment distance, of the ocean effect inland was found to be some hundreds of kilometers, which also agrees with earlier results of the Siebert-Kertz separation of IMAGE magnetometer data. The modelled inland anomalies evidently had too large conductivities, but on the other hand, their influence decayed on scales of only some tens of kilometers. Analogue model results, thin-sheet calculations, and field observations show that the induction effect on the horizontal magnetic field Bx near the electrojet is negligible. On the other hand, the vertical component Bz is clearly affected by induced currents in the ocean. Evidence of this is the shift of the zero point of Bz 0-1° southwards from the maximum of Bx. The importance of these results are discussed, emphasizing the determination of ionospheric currents.

  20. Insecticidal action of synthetic girgensohnine analogues and essential oils on Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cuadros

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Synthetic girgensohnine analogues, and C. flexuosus and C. sinensis essential oils showed insecticidal activity in R. prolixus. Analogue 3 showed the greatest insecticidal activity among all molecules and oils evaluated under our laboratory conditions.

  1. The impact of watching educational video clips on analogue patients' physiological arousal and information recall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, I.R. van; Ende, I.T. van den; Visser, L.N.; Dulmen, S. van

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigating the influence of watching three educational patient-provider interactions on analogue patients' emotional arousal and information recall. METHODS: In 75 analogue patients the emotional arousal was measured with physiological responses (electrodermal activity and heart rate)

  2. The impact of watching educational video clips on analogue patients' physiological arousal and information recall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bruinessen, I. R.; van den Ende, I. T. A.; Visser, L. N. C.; van Dulmen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the influence of watching three educational patient-provider interactions on analogue patients' emotional arousal and information recall. In 75 analogue patients the emotional arousal was measured with physiological responses (electrodermal activity and heart rate) and self-reported

  3. Altering the communication networks of multispecies microbial systems using a diverse toolbox of AI-2 analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamby, Sonja; Roy, Varnika; Guo, Min; Smith, Jacqueline A I; Wang, Jingxin; Stewart, Jessica E; Wang, Xiao; Bentley, William E; Sintim, Herman O

    2012-06-15

    There have been intensive efforts to find small molecule antagonists for bacterial quorum sensing (QS) mediated by the "universal" QS autoinducer, AI-2. Previous work has shown that linear and branched acyl analogues of AI-2 can selectively modulate AI-2 signaling in bacteria. Additionally, LsrK-dependent phosphorylated analogues have been implicated as the active inhibitory form against AI-2 signaling. We used these observations to synthesize an expanded and diverse array of AI-2 analogues, which included aromatic as well as cyclic C-1-alkyl analogues. Species-specific analogues that disrupted AI-2 signaling in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium were identified. Similarly, analogues that disrupted QS behaviors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa were found. Moreover, we observed a strong correlation between LsrK-dependent phosphorylation of these acyl analogues and their ability to suppress QS. Significantly, we demonstrate that these analogues can selectively antagonize QS in single bacterial strains in a physiologically relevant polymicrobial culture.

  4. Analogue Electrical Circuit for Simulation of the Duffing-Holmes Equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamaseviciute, E.; Tamasevicius, A.; Mykolaitis, G.

    2008-01-01

    An extremely simple second order analogue electrical circuit for simulating the two-well Duffing-Holmes mathematical oscillator is described. Numerical results and analogue electrical simulations are illustrated with the snapshots of chaotic waveforms, phase portraits (Lissajous figures...

  5. The impact of watching educational video clips on analogue patients' physiological arousal and information recall.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, I.R. van; Ende, I.T.A. van den; Visser, I.N.C.; Dulmen, S. van

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Investigating the influence of watching three educational patient–provider interactions on analogue patients’ emotional arousal and information recall. Methods: In 75 analogue patients the emotional arousal was measured with physiological responses (electrodermal activity and heart rate)

  6. Deficiencies in fat-soluble vitamins in long-term users of somatostatin analogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiebrich, H. -B.; van den Berg, G.; Kema, I. P.; Links, T. P.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; van Beek, A. P.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.; Sluiter, W. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2010-01-01

    P>Background Somatostatin analogues are administered to control hormone hypersecretion in acromegaly and carcinoid patients. Somatostatin analogues can increase fat in the stools, which can lead to loss of fat-soluble vitamins. The effect of long-term somatostatin analogue use on vitamin levels

  7. On Using Current Steering Logic in Mixed Analogue-digital Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten

    1998-01-01

    The authors investigate power supply noise in mixed analogue-digital circuits, arising from communication between the analogue and digital parts of the circuit. Current steering techniques and proper buffering are used to show which noise currents can be reduced and which cannot. In addition......, a high-swing current steering buffer for driving analogue switches or external digital signals is proposed....

  8. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Application of scenario development method in evaluation of the Koongarra Analogue. Final Report - Volume 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagius, K.; Wingefors, S.

    1992-01-01

    The study of natural analogues has been established as one of the most important methods for validation of concepts and models applied for the assessment of long-term performance of repositories for nuclear waste. The objectives of such studies range from detailed investigations of processes and features on a small scale to attempts of explaining the evolution of whole sites. For studies of specific processes it may well be as important to consider the larger scale settings as boundary conditions. This appreciation of context and an integrated view may be as important for evaluation of most natural analogues as for performance assessments. This is more evident the more the evaluation depends on a knowledge about the evolution of the natural analogue. The attempted formulation of scenarios of the Koongarra Analogue has been based on the external conditions and external features. A rapid weathering of the host rock, i.e. the chlorite schist, is assumed to have started around the onset of the Pleistocene Ice Age (ca 1.6 Ma BP). The eventual oxidation and mobilization of the uranium ore could then have occurred under unsaturated or saturated conditions. This leads to the following major scenarios: (1) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions, with a periodical evolution of the dispersion fan in conjunction with alternating dry (glacial) and wet (interglacial) periods during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (2) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions as a single event, taking place either early or late during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (3)Uranyl Phosphates formed under saturated conditions, in conjunction with periods of higher and lower flow due to the climatic cycling. Although the original objectives may not have been fully achieved, this work is believed to contribute to a better understanding of the Koongarra Analogue as well as to give a basis for further scenario work

  9. Radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, C.T.; Green, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    A system for indicating radiation from a radioactive fluid such as a gas wherein simultaneous indications of the activity concentration of radioactivity of the gas, the radiation dose rate and average energy of the radiation are provided

  10. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ures Pantazi, M.

    1994-01-01

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  11. Evaluating effusive volcanic hazard from thermal remote-sensing: insight from analogue experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, Fanny; Kaminski, Edouard; Tait, Steve; Limare, Angela

    2014-05-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flow advance. The spreading of a lava flow depends mainly on its rheology and on the effusion rate, and can be modeled as a gravity current. A thermal proxy, based on the power radiated by lava flows and measured by remote-sensing, has been quite widely used in the literature to evaluate the effusion rate in near real-time. But firm physical bases are still lacking for such modeling to be used to assess robustly the time variation of the effusion rate. To gain a better understanding of the physical processes underlying lava flow advance and to better assess the validity of thermal proxies, we have performed and analysed analogue experiments using a solidifying wax material. Two aspects of volcanic hazard mitigation are studied: (i) how supply rate relates to surface thermal signal, and (ii) how flow advance relates to supply rate. We find that, for material injected at a constant rate, flow advance is discontinuous and occurs through a succession of stagnation phases and overflows. Stagnation phases are longer for lower supply rates, whereas flows with higher supply rates are less affected by solidification. The total radiated power also grows by stages, but the signal radiated by the hottest and liquid part of the flow reaches a quasi-steady state after some time. This plateau value is shown to scale with the theoretical thermal response of an isoviscous gravity current. The experimental scaling yields satisfying estimates of the effusion rate from the total radiated power measured on a range of basaltic lava flows. However, even though lava lava flow effusion rate can be estimated, our experiments show that prediction of lava advance remains difficult due to chaotic emplacement of solidifying flows.

  12. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation results in biological damage that differs from other hazardous substances and is highly dangerous to man. Ionizing radiation cannot be perceived by man's sense organs and the biological damage cannot be detected immediately afterwards (except in very high doses). Every human being is exposed to low doses of radiation. The structure of the atom; sources of ionizing radiation; radiation units; biological effects; norms for radiation protection; and the national control in South Africa are discussed. 1 fig., 5 refs

  13. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  14. Phosphorylation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate analogues by 3-kinase and dephosphorylation of inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate analogues by 5-phosphatase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, Peter van; Lammers, Aleida A.; Ozaki, Shoichiro; Potter, Barry V.L.; Erneux, Christophe; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1994-01-01

    A series of P-32-labeled D-myo-inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate [Ins(1,3,4,5)P-4] analogues was enzymically prepared from the corresponding D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P-3] analogues using recombinant rat brain Ins(1,4,5)P-3 3-kinase and [gamma-P-32]ATP. Ins(1,4,5)P-3 analogues

  15. The analogue method for precipitation prediction: finding better analogue situations at a sub-daily time step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Pascal; Obled, Charles; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2017-07-01

    Analogue methods (AMs) predict local weather variables (predictands) such as precipitation by means of a statistical relationship with predictors at a synoptic scale. The analogy is generally assessed on gradients of geopotential heights first to sample days with a similar atmospheric circulation. Other predictors such as moisture variables can also be added in a successive level of analogy. The search for candidate situations similar to a given target day is usually undertaken by comparing the state of the atmosphere at fixed hours of the day for both the target day and the candidate analogues. This is a consequence of using standard daily precipitation time series, which are available over longer periods than sub-daily data. However, it is unlikely for the best analogy to occur at the exact same hour for the target and candidate situations. A better analogue situation may be found with a time shift of several hours since a better fit can occur at different times of the day. In order to assess the potential for finding better analogues at a different hour, a moving time window (MTW) has been introduced. The MTW resulted in a better analogy in terms of the atmospheric circulation and showed improved values of the analogy criterion on the entire distribution of the extracted analogue dates. The improvement was found to increase with the analogue rank due to an accumulation of better analogues in the selection. A seasonal effect has also been identified, with larger improvements shown in winter than in summer. This may be attributed to stronger diurnal cycles in summer that favour predictors taken at the same hour for the target and analogue days. The impact of the MTW on the precipitation prediction skill has been assessed by means of a sub-daily precipitation series transformed into moving 24 h totals at 12, 6, and 3 h time steps. The prediction skill was improved by the MTW, as was the reliability of the prediction. Moreover, the improvements were greater for days

  16. Ribosome-catalyzed formation of an abnormal peptide analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesser, J.R.; Chorghade, M.S.; Hecht, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    The peptidyl-tRNA analogue N-(chloracetyl) phenylalanyl-tRNA/sup Phe/ was prepared by chemical aminoacylation and prebound to the P site of Escherichia coli ribosomes in response to poly(uridylic acid). Admixture of phenylalanyl-tRNA/sup Phe/ to the A site resulted in the formation of two dipeptides, one of which was found by displacement of chloride ion from the peptidyl-tRNA. This constitutes the first example of ribosome-mediated formation of a peptide of altered connectivity and suggests a need for revision of the current model of peptide bond formation. Also suggested by the present finding is the feasibility of utilizing tRNAs to prepare polypeptides of altered connectivity in an in vitro protein biosynthesizing system. [ 32 P]-oligo(rA), [ 3 H]- and [ 14 C] phenylalanines were used in the assay of the peptidye-tRNA analogue

  17. Concentration and second-gas effects in the water analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapleson, W W; Korman, B

    1998-12-01

    The water analogue provides a visual model of the process of anaesthetic exchange. In the standard version, a single pipe connects the mouth container to the lung container and the conductance of this mouth-lung pipe is proportional to alveolar ventilation. This implies that inspired and expired ventilations are equal. In fact, with high inspired concentrations of nitrous oxide, early rapid uptake of gas by solution leads to a substantial difference between inspired and expired ventilation which in turn leads to concentration and second-gas effects. It is shown that by representing inspired and expired ventilations separately, and keeping one of them constant while varying the other to compensate for rapid uptake, concentration and second-gas effects are reproduced in the water analogue. Other means of reproducing the effects are reported but we believe that the first method is the most realistic and the most appropriate for teaching.

  18. A rationally designed CD4 analogue inhibits experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Bradford A.; McDonnell, James M.; Marini, Joseph C.; Korngold, Robert

    1994-04-01

    EXPERIMENTAL allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an acute inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that can be elicited in rodents and is the major animal model for the study of multiple sclerosis (MS)1,2. The pathogenesis of both EAE and MS directly involves the CD4+ helper T-cell subset3-5. Anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies inhibit the development of EAE in rodents6-9, and are currently being used in human clinical trials for MS. We report here that similar therapeutic effects can be achieved in mice using a small (rationally designed) synthetic analogue of the CD4 protein surface. It greatly inhibits both clinical incidence and severity of EAE with a single injection, but does so without depletion of the CD4+ subset and without the inherent immunogenicity of an antibody. Furthermore, this analogue is capable of exerting its effects on disease even after the onset of symptoms.

  19. From the Canadian High Arctic to Mars by Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soare, R. J.; Pollard, W. H.

    2002-12-01

    Planetary scientists are limited in their understanding of physical bodies in the solar system by the lack of primary data or knowledge. Analogue science is science practised in absentia, precisely in those instances when a non-terrestrial physical environment lies beyond one's direct, empirical grasp. Recognising that some environments on Earth may mirror present or past conditions on Mars, planetary scientists have invoked terrestrial analogues with increasing regularity over the last thirty years as fonts of putative understanding. Notwithstanding its ubiquity in planetary science, analogical reasoning has stood, by and large, unconstrained by rules or guidelines of usage. In order to redress this imbalance we propose to take two steps: 1. introduce primary data on newly discovered pingos at Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic, and 2. coalesce these and related data on Martian glacial, peri-glacial and fluvio-glacial landforms as a model with which to evaluate the meaningfulness of analogical reasoning in planetary science.

  20. Optical analogue of relativistic Dirac solitons in binary waveguide arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Truong X., E-mail: truong.tran@mpl.mpg.de [Department of Physics, Le Quy Don University, 236 Hoang Quoc Viet str., 10000 Hanoi (Viet Nam); Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Longhi, Stefano [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano and Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Biancalana, Fabio [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    We study analytically and numerically an optical analogue of Dirac solitons in binary waveguide arrays in the presence of Kerr nonlinearity. Pseudo-relativistic soliton solutions of the coupled-mode equations describing dynamics in the array are analytically derived. We demonstrate that with the found soliton solutions, the coupled mode equations can be converted into the nonlinear relativistic 1D Dirac equation. This paves the way for using binary waveguide arrays as a classical simulator of quantum nonlinear effects arising from the Dirac equation, something that is thought to be impossible to achieve in conventional (i.e. linear) quantum field theory. -- Highlights: •An optical analogue of Dirac solitons in nonlinear binary waveguide arrays is suggested. •Analytical solutions to pseudo-relativistic solitons are presented. •A correspondence of optical coupled-mode equations with the nonlinear relativistic Dirac equation is established.

  1. Somatostatin analogues labelled with 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenaus, Esteban R.; Crudo, Jose L.; Edreira, Martin M.; Castiglia, Silvia G.

    1999-01-01

    Biological and radiochemical studies have been carried out on two labelled somatostatin analogues, the peptide RC-150 and the Tyr 3 -Octreotide. Both analogues have been labelled with 99m Tc using the direct and the indirect method and MAG-3 and HYNIC as chelating agents. By the direct method RC-150 was labelled using sodium ascorbate and dithionite as reducing agents. The radiochemical purity was 70%. By the indirect method, in the case of RC-160 with MAG-3 a radiochemical purity higher than 70% was attained while a purity of 100% was reached in the case of Tyr 3 -Octreotide with HYNIC. The biological distribution of HYNIC-Tyr 3 -Octreotide has been studied in rats. (author)

  2. Anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives and analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-09-01

    Natural products have played a vital role in drug discovery and development process for cancer. Diospyrin, a plant based bisnaphthoquinonoid, has been used as a lead molecule in an effort to develop anti-cancer drugs. Several derivatives/analogues have been synthesized and screened for their pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities so far. Our review is focused on the pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives/analogues and the different mechanisms potentially involved in the bioactivity of these compounds. Particular focus has been placed on the different mechanisms (both chemical and molecular) thought to underlie the bioactivity of these compounds. A brief bioinformatics analysis at the end of the article provides novel insights into the new potential mechanisms and pathways by which these compounds might exert their effects and lead to a better realization of the full therapeutic potential of these compounds as anti-cancer drugs. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Solid-phase synthesis of polyamine toxin analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Hasse; Krikstolaityte, Sonata; Andersen, Anne J

    2002-01-01

    The wasp toxin philanthotoxin-433 (PhTX-433) is a nonselective and noncompetitive antagonist of ionotropic receptors, such as ionotropic glutamate receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Polyamine toxins are extensively used for the characterization of subtypes of ionotropic glutamate...... receptors, in particular Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA and kainate receptors. We have previously shown that an analogue of PhTX-433 with one of the amino groups replaced by a methylene group, philanthotoxin-83 (PhTX-83) is a selective and potent antagonist of AMPA receptors. We now describe the solid...... of analogues, the acyl moiety of PhTX-83 was replaced by acids of different size and lipophilicity. Using electrophysiological techniques, PhTX-56 was shown to be a highly potent (K(i) = 3.3 +/- 0.78 nM) and voltage-dependent antagonist of homomeric GluR1 receptors and was more than 1000-fold less potent when...

  4. New Immunosuppressive Sphingoid Base and Ceramide Analogues in Wild Cordyceps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jia-Ning; Han, Yuwei; Xu, Yingqiong; Kou, Junping; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive identification of sphingoid bases and ceramides in wild Cordyceps was performed by integrating a sequential chromatographic enrichment procedure and an UHPLC-ultrahigh definition-Q-TOF-MS based sphingolipidomic approach. A total of 43 sphingoid bases and 303 ceramides were identified from wild Cordyceps, including 12 new sphingoid base analogues and 159 new ceramide analogues based on high-resolution MS and MS/MS data, isotope distribution, matching with the comprehensive personal sphingolipid database, confirmation by sphingolipid standards and chromatographic retention time rule. The immunosuppressive bioassay results demonstrated that Cordyceps sphingoid base fraction exhibits more potent immunosuppressive activity than ceramide fraction, elucidating the immunosuppressive ingredients of wild Cordyceps. This study represented the most comprehensive identification of sphingoid bases and ceramides from a natural source. The findings of this study provided an insight into therapeutic application of wild Cordyceps. PMID:27966660

  5. Haplopappus gracilis cell strains resistant to pyrimidine analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G E; Hann, J

    1979-03-01

    Strains of Haplopappus gracilis (Nutt.) Gray cells resistant to 6-azauracil have been isolated from cultures of diploid cells. These strains are also resistant to 8-azaguanine, as is their parent. The variants are 100- to 125-fold more resistant to 6-azauracil than their parent, and they exhibit different spectra of cross resistance to other pyrimidine analogues. The phenotype of each variant is stable in the absence of selection. The majority of cells in cultures of the variants are diploid; all others examined were tetraploid. Initial rates of uptake of uracil are not reduced in the variants. Fluorouracil, to which two variants are resistant, is taken up by one of them as well as by the parent. Responses of the other two to fluorouracil are not correlated with decreased ability to accumulate this analogue.

  6. Higher-dimensional analogues of Donaldson-Witten theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, B.S.; Spence, B.

    1997-01-01

    We present a Donaldson-Witten-type field theory in eight dimensions on manifolds with Spin(7) holonomy. We prove that the stress tensor is BRST exact for metric variations preserving the holonomy and we give the invariants for this class of variations. In six and seven dimensions we propose similar theories on Calabi-Yau threefolds and manifolds of G 2 holonomy, respectively. We point out that these theories arise by considering supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory defined on such manifolds. The theories are invariant under metric variations preserving the holonomy structure without the need for twisting. This statement is a higher-dimensional analogue of the fact that Donaldson-Witten field theory on hyper-Kaehler 4-manifolds is topological without twisting. Higher-dimensional analogues of Floer cohomology are briefly outlined. All of these theories arise naturally within the context of string theory. (orig.)

  7. Localisation and mechanism of renal retention of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Marleen; Krenning, Eric P.; Bernard, Bert F.; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Barone, Raffaella [UCL, Centre of Nuclear Medicine and Laboratory of PET, Brussels (Belgium); Visser, Theo J. [Erasmus MC, Department of Internal Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-10-01

    Radiolabelled somatostatin analogues, such as octreotide and octreotate, are used for tumour scintigraphy and radionuclide therapy. The kidney is the most important critical organ during such therapy owing to the reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides. The aim of this study was to investigate in a rat model both the localisation and the mechanism of renal uptake after intravenous injection of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. The multi-ligand megalin/cubilin receptor complex, responsible for reabsorption of many peptides and proteins in the kidney, is an interesting candidate for renal endocytosis of these peptide analogues. For localisation studies, ex vivo autoradiography and micro-autoradiography of rat kidneys were performed 1-24 h after injection of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues and compared with the renal anti-megalin immunohistochemical staining pattern. To confirm a role of megalin in the mechanism of renal retention of [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide, the effects of three inhibitory substances were explored in rats. Renal ex vivo autoradiography showed high cortical radioactivity and lower radioactivity in the outer medulla. The distribution of cortical radioactivity was inhomogeneous. Micro-autoradiography indicated that radioactivity was only retained in the proximal tubules. The anti-megalin immunohistochemical staining pattern showed a strong similarity with the renal [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide ex vivo autoradiograms. Biodistribution studies showed that co-injection of positively charged d-lysine reduced renal uptake to 60% of control. Sodium maleate reduced renal [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide uptake to 15% of control. Finally, cisplatin pre-treatment of rats reduced kidney uptake to 70% of control. Renal retention of [{sup 111}In-DTPA]octreotide is confined to proximal tubules in the rat kidney, in which megalin-mediated endocytosis may play an important part. (orig.)

  8. Rubrene analogues with the aggregation-induced emission enhancement behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Sørensen, Jakob Kryger; Fu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    In the light of the principle of aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE), the rubrene analogue with orange light-emitting properties is designed and synthesized by substituting the phenyl side groups of rubrene with thienyl groups. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on...... on the synthesis of rubrene with AIEE behaviour, thus paving the way for the development of light-emitting rubrene derivatives. This journal is...

  9. Synthetic analogues of natural semiochemicals as promising insect control agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujvary, Istvan; Toth, Miklos; Guerin, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    After decades of research and development, insect pheromones and other semiochemicals became indispensable tools of ecologically based agricultural pest and disease vector management programmes with main uses as: 1) detection and population monitoring of emerging and migrating insects, 2) mass trapping of insects, 3) combined formulation of semiochemicals and insecticides ('lure-and-kill'), and 4) mating disruption with specially formulated pheromone components. In spite of their demonstrated safety and biodegradability, the direct application of these semiochemicals for pest control has not fulfilled initial expectations. Nonetheless considerable field experience has been accumulated (Carde and Minks 1995). Evidently, two important factors limit the practical potential of these substances: 1) inherent in their particular mode of action, semiochemicals, especially pheromones, are effectively cleared by specific enzymes in the insect antennae, and 2) some of these compounds contain labile functional moieties that are prone to degradation (oxidation, isomerisation and polymerisation) under field conditions. Appropriate chemical modifications of these natural compounds, however, can circumvent these problems by providing synthetic analogues (sometimes also called parapheromones or antipheromones; for early studies, see Roelofs and Comeau 1971, Payne et al. 1973) which in ideal cases are not only more potent and environmentally acceptable but more economical as well. It should also be mentioned that many effective attractants have been discovered through the empirical screening of synthetic chemicals, some of which have actually turned out to be structural relatives of natural semiochemicals of the particular insect. In this paper, selected case studies of analogues of sex pheromones and kairomones will be presented. The examples from our work include nitrile bioisosteres of labile aldehyde pheromone components of the cranberry girdler moth, Chrysoteuchia topiaria

  10. Evaluation of Anti-HIV-1 Mutagenic Nucleoside Analogues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P.; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of “lethal mutagenesis” that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. PMID:25398876

  11. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 mutagenic nucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-02

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of "lethal mutagenesis" that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. The Two-Dimensional Analogue of General Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Lemos, José P. S.; Sá, Paulo M.

    1993-01-01

    General Relativity in three or more dimensions can be obtained by taking the limit $\\omega\\rightarrow\\infty$ in the Brans-Dicke theory. In two dimensions General Relativity is an unacceptable theory. We show that the two-dimensional closest analogue of General Relativity is a theory that also arises in the limit $\\omega\\rightarrow\\infty$ of the two-dimensional Brans-Dicke theory.

  13. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories

  14. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasilainen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories. 98 refs. The thesis includes also eight previous publications by author.

  15. (18)F-labelled metomidate analogues as adrenocortical imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Maria; Karimi, Farhad; Lindhe, Orjan; Långström, Bengt

    2009-05-01

    Two- and one-step syntheses of (18)F-labelled analogues of metomidate, such as 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl 1-[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (1), 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl 1-[(1R)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (2), 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl 1-[(1R)-1-(4-bromophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (3), 3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl 1-[(1R)-1-(4-bromophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (4) and 3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl 1-[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (5) are presented. Analogues 1-5 were prepared by a two-step reaction sequence that started with the synthesis of either 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate or 3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate. These were used as (18)F-alkylating agents in the second step, in which they reacted with the ammonium salt of a 1-[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylic acid. One-step-labelling syntheses of 1, 2 and 5 were also explored. Analogues 1-4 were biologically validated by frozen-section autoradiography and organ distribution. Metabolite analysis was performed for 2 and 3. The radiochemical yield of the two-step synthesis was in the range of 10-29% and that of the one-step synthesis was 25-37%. Using microwave irradiation in the one-step synthesis of 1 and 2 increased the radiochemical yield to 46+/-3% and 79+/-30%, respectively. Both the frozen-section autoradiography and organ distribution results indicated that analogue 2 has a potential as an adrenocortical imaging agent, having the highest degree of specific adrenal binding and best ratio of adrenal to organ uptake among the compounds studied.

  16. Combinatorial Solid-Phase Synthesis of Balanol Analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Lyngsø, Lars Ole

    1996-01-01

    The natural product balanol has served as a template for the design and synthesis of a combinatorial library using solid-phase chemistry. Using a retrosynthetic analysis, the structural analogues have been assembled from three relatively accessible building blocks. The solid-phase chemistry...... including MSNT-mediated esterification of both support-bound alcohols and carboxylic acids has been implemented successfully. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  17. Alkaloids of family Amaryllidaceae and their analogues as potential drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kavková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Charles University in Prague Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of Pharmaceutical Botany and Ecology Candidate: Zuzana Kavková Supervisor: doc. Ing. Lucie Cahlíková, Ph.D. Title of diploma thesis: Alkaloids of family Amaryllidaceae and their analogues as potential drugs The object of this diploma thesis was to prepare derivatives of alkaloids of Amaryllidaceae family and to deal with their biological activity. These alkaloids are famous for their antibacterial, antiinfectives, a...

  18. Antineoplastic Efficacy of Novel Polyamine Analogues in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    product analogs. J Am Chem Soc 1978; 100: 2551–2553. 39 Burri C, Brun R. Eflornithine for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis . Parasitol Res...ototoxicity) at high therapeutic doses [29]. Currently, DFMO is the front-line agent in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis and is undergoing...Polyamine Analogues in Human Breast Cancer. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yi Huang, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns

  19. Bisphenol A and Its Analogues Activate Human Pregnane X Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Sui, Yipeng; Ai, Ni; Park, Se-Hyung; Rios-Pilier, Jennifer; Perkins, Jordan T.; Welsh, William J.; Zhou, Changcheng

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a base chemical used extensively in many consumer products. BPA and its analogues are present in environmental and human samples. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including BPA, have been shown to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that functions as a master regulator of xenobiotic metabolism. However, the detailed mechanism by which these chemicals activate PXR remains unknown. Objective: We investigated the mechanism by which BPA ...

  20. Manipulating lightcone fluctuations in an analogue cosmic string

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawei Hu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the flight time fluctuations in an anisotropic medium inspired by a cosmic string with an effective fluctuating refractive index caused by fluctuating vacuum electric fields, which are analogous to the lightcone fluctuations due to fluctuating spacetime metric when gravity is quantized. The medium can be realized as a metamaterial that mimics a cosmic string in the sense of transformation optics. For a probe light close to the analogue string, the flight time variance is ν times that in a normal homogeneous and isotropic medium, where ν is a parameter characterizing the deficit angle of the spacetime of a cosmic string. The parameter ν, which is always greater than unity for a real cosmic string, is determined by the dielectric properties of the metamaterial for an analogue string. Therefore, the flight time fluctuations of a probe light can be manipulated by changing the electric permittivity and magnetic permeability of the analogue medium. We argue that it seems possible to fabricate a metamaterial that mimics a cosmic string with a large ν in laboratory so that a currently observable flight time variance might be achieved.

  1. Amphetamine-Like Analogues in Diabetes: Speeding towards Ketogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Branis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is common in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Amphetamine-like analogues comprise the most popular class of weight loss medications. We present a case of a 34-year-old African American female with a history of type 1 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity who developed diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA after starting Diethylpropion for the purpose of weight loss. Shortly after starting Diethylpropion, she developed nausea, vomiting, and periumbilical pain. Blood work revealed glucose of 718 mg/dL, pH 7.32 (7.35–7.45, bicarbonate 16 mmol/L (22–29 mmol/L, and anion gap 19 mmol/L (8–16 mmol/L. Urine analysis demonstrated large amount of ketones. She was hospitalized and successfully treated for DKA. Diethylpropion was discontinued. Amphetamine-like analogues administration leads to norepinephrine release from the lateral hypothalamus which results in the appetite suppression. Peripheral norepinephrine concentration rises as well. Norepinephrine stimulates adipocyte lipolysis and thereby increases nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA availability. It promotes β-oxidation of NEFA to ketone bodies while decreasing metabolic clearance rate of ketones. In the setting of acute insulin deficiency these effects are augmented. Females are more sensitive to norepinephrine effects compared to males. In conclusion, amphetamine-like analogues lead to a release of norepinephrine which can result in a clinically significant ketosis, especially in the setting of insulin deficiency.

  2. Degludec: the new ultra-long insulin analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambascia, Marcos Antonio; Eliaschewitz, Freddy Goldberg

    2015-01-01

    The development of extended-action insulin analogues was motivated by the unfavorable pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of the conventional long-acting insulin formulations, generally associated with marked inter and intra patient variability and site- and dose-dependent effect variation. The new ultra-long insulin analogue degludec (IDeg) has the same amino acid sequence as human insulin except for the removal of threonine in the position 30 of the B chain (Des-B30, "De") and the attachment, via a glutamic acid linker ("glu"), of a 16-carbon fatty diacid (hexadecanoic diacid, "dec") to lysine in the position 29 of the B chain. These modifications allow that, after changing from the pharmaceutical formulation to the subcutaneous environment, IDeg precipitates in the subcutaneous tissue, forming a depot that undergoes a highly predictable gradual dissociation. Thus, once-daily dosing of IDeg results in a low peak: trough ratio, with consequent low intra-individual variability and plasmatic concentrations less critically dependent upon the time of injections. The clinical development program of IDeg (BEGIN) was comprised of 9 therapeutic confirmatory trials of longer duration (26-52 weeks) and showed that the efficacy of IDeg is comparable to insulin glargine in type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes patients across different age, body mass index and ethnic groups. This new ultra-long insulin analogue presents as advantages flexibility in dose timing and lower risk of hypoglycemia.

  3. Natural analogue studies as supplements to biomineralization research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    Chemical reactions can alter the chemistry and crystal structure of solid objects over archeological or geological times, while preserving external physical shapes. The reactions resulting in these structures offer natural analogues to laboratory experiments in biomineralization and to biologically influenced alteration of nuclear waste packages, and thus, they offer the only available way of validating models that purport waste package behavior over archaeological or geological times. Potential uses of such analogues in the construction and validation of hypothetical mechanisms of microbiological corrosion and biomineralization are reviewed. Evidence from such analogues suggests that biofilms can control materials alteration in ways usually overlooked. The newly hypothesized mechanisms involve control by biofilms of the cation flow near the solid surface and offer plausible mechanisms for the formation of mixed-cation minerals under conditions that would lead to dealloying in abiotic experiments; they also account for the formation of unusual minerals [such as posnjakite, Cu 4 SO 4 (OH) 6· H 2 O] and mineral morphologies unusual in corrosion [malachite, Cu 2 CO 3 (OH) 2 , rarely forms botryoidally under corrosion conditions and its occasional presence on archaeological objects that appear to have undergone microbiological corrosion may be related to biofilm phenomena

  4. Do film soundtracks contain nonlinear analogues to influence emotion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumstein, Daniel T.; Davitian, Richard; Kaye, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of vertebrates produce nonlinear vocalizations when they are under duress. By their very nature, vocalizations containing nonlinearities may sound harsh and are somewhat unpredictable; observations that are consistent with them being particularly evocative to those hearing them. We tested the hypothesis that humans capitalize on this seemingly widespread vertebrate response by creating nonlinear analogues in film soundtracks to evoke particular emotions. We used lists of highly regarded films to generate a set of highly ranked action/adventure, dramatic, horror and war films. We then scored the presence of a variety of nonlinear analogues in these film soundtracks. Dramatic films suppressed noise of all types, contained more abrupt frequency transitions and musical sidebands, and fewer noisy screams than expected. Horror films suppressed abrupt frequency transitions and musical sidebands, but had more non-musical sidebands, and noisy screams than expected. Adventure films had more male screams than expected. Together, our results suggest that film-makers manipulate sounds to create nonlinear analogues in order to manipulate our emotional responses. PMID:20504815

  5. Design and synthesis of biotin analogues reversibly binding with streptavidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Aoki, Kiyoshi; Sugiyama, Akira; Doi, Hirofumi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-04-01

    Two new biotin analogues, biotin carbonate 5 and biotin carbamate 6, have been synthesized. These molecules were designed to reversibly bind with streptavidin by replacing the hydrogen-bond donor NH group(s) of biotin's cyclic urea moiety with oxygen. Biotin carbonate 5 was synthesized from L-arabinose (7), which furnishes the desired stereochemistry at the 3,4-cis-dihydroxy groups, in 11% overall yield (over 10 steps). Synthesis of biotin carbamate 6 was accomplished from L-cysteine-derived chiral aldehyde 33 in 11% overall yield (over 7 steps). Surface plasmon resonance analysis of water-soluble biotin carbonate analogue 46 and biotin carbamate analogue 47 revealed that KD values of these compounds for binding to streptavidin were 6.7×10(-6)  M and 1.7×10(-10)  M, respectively. These values were remarkably greater than that of biotin (KD =10(-15)  M), and thus indicate the importance of the nitrogen atoms for the strong binding between biotin and streptavidin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Saulnier and W. Statham

    2006-04-16

    The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following analogous characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site: (1) Analogous source--UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geology--(i.e. fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs); (3) Analogous climate--Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous setting--Volcanic tuffs overlie carbonate rocks; and (5) Analogous geochemistry--Oxidizing conditions Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table.

  7. Manipulating lightcone fluctuations in an analogue cosmic string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiawei; Yu, Hongwei

    2018-02-01

    We study the flight time fluctuations in an anisotropic medium inspired by a cosmic string with an effective fluctuating refractive index caused by fluctuating vacuum electric fields, which are analogous to the lightcone fluctuations due to fluctuating spacetime metric when gravity is quantized. The medium can be realized as a metamaterial that mimics a cosmic string in the sense of transformation optics. For a probe light close to the analogue string, the flight time variance is ν times that in a normal homogeneous and isotropic medium, where ν is a parameter characterizing the deficit angle of the spacetime of a cosmic string. The parameter ν, which is always greater than unity for a real cosmic string, is determined by the dielectric properties of the metamaterial for an analogue string. Therefore, the flight time fluctuations of a probe light can be manipulated by changing the electric permittivity and magnetic permeability of the analogue medium. We argue that it seems possible to fabricate a metamaterial that mimics a cosmic string with a large ν in laboratory so that a currently observable flight time variance might be achieved.

  8. Amphetamine-Like Analogues in Diabetes: Speeding towards Ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branis, Natalia M; Wittlin, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is common in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Amphetamine-like analogues comprise the most popular class of weight loss medications. We present a case of a 34-year-old African American female with a history of type 1 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity who developed diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) after starting Diethylpropion for the purpose of weight loss. Shortly after starting Diethylpropion, she developed nausea, vomiting, and periumbilical pain. Blood work revealed glucose of 718 mg/dL, pH 7.32 (7.35-7.45), bicarbonate 16 mmol/L (22-29 mmol/L), and anion gap 19 mmol/L (8-16 mmol/L). Urine analysis demonstrated large amount of ketones. She was hospitalized and successfully treated for DKA. Diethylpropion was discontinued. Amphetamine-like analogues administration leads to norepinephrine release from the lateral hypothalamus which results in the appetite suppression. Peripheral norepinephrine concentration rises as well. Norepinephrine stimulates adipocyte lipolysis and thereby increases nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) availability. It promotes β-oxidation of NEFA to ketone bodies while decreasing metabolic clearance rate of ketones. In the setting of acute insulin deficiency these effects are augmented. Females are more sensitive to norepinephrine effects compared to males. In conclusion, amphetamine-like analogues lead to a release of norepinephrine which can result in a clinically significant ketosis, especially in the setting of insulin deficiency.

  9. On the Use of the Analogue Transformation Acoustics in Aeroacoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Iemma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is the assessment of the Analogue Transformation Acoustics (ATA in the design of acoustic metamaterial for aeronautical applications. The work focuses on the consistency of the background flow resulting from the application of the ATA with the equations governing the potential aerodynamics. Indeed, in case of acoustic perturbations propagating within moving media, the convective terms in the governing equations are responsible for the failure of formal invariance under the action of conformal mappings. The ATA approach overcomes this limitation, introducing the possibility of handling the convective form of the wave equation in a straightforward and elegant way. It is based on the concept of analogue space-time and fully relies on the analytical tools of Lorentzian differential geometry. The present paper analyses the relationship between the analogue velocity field with a realistic potential flow. The method is validated through numerical simulations using two widely assessed acoustic cloaking problems. The preliminary results obtained show that the use of numerical, quasi-conformal mappings can lead to transformed streamlines negligibly deviating from those of the potential velocity field satisfying the fluid-dynamic conservation laws, but with incompatible intensity of the local velocity.

  10. Charge isomers of myelin basic protein: structure and interactions with membranes, nucleotide analogues, and calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaozhan Wang

    Full Text Available As an essential structural protein required for tight compaction of the central nervous system myelin sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP is one of the candidate autoantigens of the human inflammatory demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis, which is characterized by the active degradation of the myelin sheath. In this work, recombinant murine analogues of the natural C1 and C8 charge components (rmC1 and rmC8, two isoforms of the classic 18.5-kDa MBP, were used as model proteins to get insights into the structure and function of the charge isomers. Various biochemical and biophysical methods such as size exclusion chromatography, calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy, and conventional as well as synchrotron radiation circular dichroism were used to investigate differences between these two isoforms, both from the structural point of view, and regarding interactions with ligands, including calmodulin (CaM, various detergents, nucleotide analogues, and lipids. Overall, our results provide further proof that rmC8 is deficient both in structure and especially in function, when compared to rmC1. While the CaM binding properties of the two forms are very similar, their interactions with membrane mimics are different. CaM can be used to remove MBP from immobilized lipid monolayers made of synthetic lipids--a phenomenon, which may be of relevance for MBP function and its regulation. Furthermore, using fluorescently labelled nucleotides, we observed binding of ATP and GTP, but not AMP, by MBP; the binding of nucleoside triphosphates was inhibited by the presence of CaM. Together, our results provide important further data on the interactions between MBP and its ligands, and on the differences in the structure and function between MBP charge isomers.

  11. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    This will be a simple explanation of the reasons why CERN has to be careful about radiation protections issues, a practical guide on how to recognize radiation dangers, the monitoring systems that make sure radiation levels are well tolerable norms, and a quick summary of what radiation levels mean in terms of personal risk.

  12. THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

    2006-01-01

    The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO 2 uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 ± 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory analysis

  13. THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

    2006-03-10

    The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory

  14. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R.S.; Pal, Debojyoti; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K.

    2016-01-01

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • DIMC enhances radiosensitivity of cancer cells by inducing cell death. • DIMC with radiation disrupted the cellular redox and targeted cancer stem cells. • DNA repair is hampered when cells are treated with DIMC. • DIMC inhibited thioredoxin reductase in cancer cells.

  15. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R.S.; Pal, Debojyoti [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, Deepak [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2016-09-09

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • DIMC enhances radiosensitivity of cancer cells by inducing cell death. • DIMC with radiation disrupted the cellular redox and targeted cancer stem cells. • DNA repair is hampered when cells are treated with DIMC. • DIMC inhibited thioredoxin reductase in cancer cells.

  16. Quantum Analogues: From Phase Transitions to Black Holes and Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberati, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    'And I cherish more than anything else the analogies, my most trustworthy masters. They know all the secrets of nature, and they ought to be least neglected in geometry.' These words of the great astronomer Johannes Kepler embody the philosophy behind the research recounted in this interesting book-a book composed of nine selected lectures (and a nice introduction by Bill Unruh) from the international workshop on 'Quantum Simulations via Analogues', which was held in the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden during the summer of 2005. Analogue models of (and for) gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. However the last decade has seen a remarkable and steady development of analogue gravity models based on condensed matter systems, leading to some hundreds of published articles, numerous workshops, and several books. While the main driver for this booming field has definitely been the puzzling physics associated with quantum effects in black holes, more recently much attention has also been devoted to other interesting issues-such as cosmological particle production or the cosmological constant problem. Moreover, together with these new themes there has been a persistent interest in the possibility of simulating cosmic topological defects in the laboratory (although it should be said that momentum for this line of research has been somewhat weakened by the progressive decrease of interest in cosmological topological defects as an alternative to inflationary scenarios). All these aspects are faithfully accounted for in this book, which does a good job at presenting a vivid snapshot of many (if not quite all) of the most interesting lines of research in the field. All the articles have a self-consistent structure-which allows one to read them in arbitrary order and appreciate the full richness of each topic. However, when considered together I would say that they also provide a

  17. Quantitative comparisons of analogue models of brittle wedge dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Analogue model experiments are widely used to gain insights into the evolution of geological structures. In this study, we present a direct comparison of experimental results of 14 analogue modelling laboratories using prescribed set-ups. A quantitative analysis of the results will document the variability among models and will allow an appraisal of reproducibility and limits of interpretation. This has direct implications for comparisons between structures in analogue models and natural field examples. All laboratories used the same frictional analogue materials (quartz and corundum sand) and prescribed model-building techniques (sieving and levelling). Although each laboratory used its own experimental apparatus, the same type of self-adhesive foil was used to cover the base and all the walls of the experimental apparatus in order to guarantee identical boundary conditions (i.e. identical shear stresses at the base and walls). Three experimental set-ups using only brittle frictional materials were examined. In each of the three set-ups the model was shortened by a vertical wall, which moved with respect to the fixed base and the three remaining sidewalls. The minimum width of the model (dimension parallel to mobile wall) was also prescribed. In the first experimental set-up, a quartz sand wedge with a surface slope of ˜20° was pushed by a mobile wall. All models conformed to the critical taper theory, maintained a stable surface slope and did not show internal deformation. In the next two experimental set-ups, a horizontal sand pack consisting of alternating quartz sand and corundum sand layers was shortened from one side by the mobile wall. In one of the set-ups a thin rigid sheet covered part of the model base and was attached to the mobile wall (i.e. a basal velocity discontinuity distant from the mobile wall). In the other set-up a basal rigid sheet was absent and the basal velocity discontinuity was located at the mobile wall. In both types of experiments

  18. Migrastatin analogues inhibit canine mammary cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Majchrzak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6 on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. RESULTS: OUR RESULTS SHOWED THAT TWO OF SIX FULLY SYNTHETIC ANALOGUES OF MIGRASTATIN: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6 disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. CONCLUSION: Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs

  19. Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Final Report - Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.; Lever, D.A.; Sverjensky, D.A.; Townley, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    This summary report, which highlights the work and findings of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) is one of a series of 16 volumes, listed below. Detailed descriptions and results are provided in Volumes 2 to 16. Full acknowledgment to individual contributions is provided in the individual reports, and in Appendix I of this report. The findings from the technical studies are discussed in the context of assessments of the long-term performance of geological repositories for radioactive wastes, which are being undertaken in many countries. They are also considered in an integrated 'Scenario Development' approach, aimed to understand the formation of the ore deposit. Despite their inherent uncertainties, the findings provide a basis for assessing the way in which radionuclides will migrate in environments with a variety of geologic settings and over a range of different geologic timescales. Thus, section 2 of this report discusses the concept of using uranium deposits as natural analogues and refers to a number of such studies, including those at the Koongarra deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Section 3 reviews early scientific work in the Alligator Rivers Region and summarises the results of the analogue studies undertaken between 1981 and 1987 that were funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the UK Department of the Environment (UKDoE). Section 4 describes the objectives of ARAP and the manner in which the study was conducted and provides a general outline of the project and a summary of the findings. A general description of the Koongarra ore deposit, the focus of ARAP, is provided in Section 5, with Sections 6-13 providing summaries of the work carried out to characterise the site in detail and provide data for modelling. Sections 14-18 discuss how this data was used in modelling and how the results may be applied for performance assessment studies. Finally, Section 19 considers the

  20. Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Project: Summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, S.; Goldstein, S.; Dobson, P.F.; Goodell, P.; Ku, T.-L.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Saulnier, G.; Fayek, M.; de la Garza, R.

    2011-02-01

    The inactive Nopal I uranium mine in silicic tuff north of Chihuahua City, Chihuahua, Mexico, was studied as a natural analogue for an underground nuclear-waste repository in the unsaturated zone. Site stratigraphy was confirmed from new drill cores. Data from site studies include chemical and isotopic compositions of saturated- and unsaturated-zone waters. A partial geochronology of uranium enrichment and mineralization was established. Evidence pertinent to uranium-series transport in the soil zone and changing redox conditions was collected. The investigations contributed to preliminary, scoping-level performance assessment modeling.

  1. Application of FPGA's in Flexible Analogue Electronic Image Generator Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kulla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on usage of the FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays Xilinx as a part of our more complex workdedicated to design of flexible analogue electronic images generator for application in TV measurement technique or/and TV servicetechnique or/and education process. The FPGAs performs here the role of component colour R, G, B, synchronization and blanking signals source. These signals are next processed and amplified in other parts of the generator as NTSC/PAL source encoder and RF modulator. The main aim of this paper is to show the possibilities how with suitable development software use a FPGAs in analog TV technology.

  2. Captopril analogues as metallo-β-lactamase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Yusralina; Tan, Daniel T C; Arjomandi, Omid Khalili; Schenk, Gerhard; McGeary, Ross P

    2016-03-15

    A number of captopril analogues were synthesised and tested as inhibitors of the metallo-β-lactamase IMP-1. Structure-activity studies showed that the methyl group was unimportant for activity, and that the potencies of these inhibitors could be best improved by shortening the length of the mercaptoalkanoyl side-chain. Replacing the thiol group with a carboxylic acid led to complete loss of activity, and extending the length of the carboxylate group led to decreased potency. Good activity could be maintained by substituting the proline ring with pipecolic acid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis, Preliminary Bioevaluation and Computational Analysis of Caffeic Acid Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqian Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of caffeic acid amides were designed, synthesized and evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity. Most of them exhibited promising anti-inflammatory activity against nitric oxide (NO generation in murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. A 3D pharmacophore model was created based on the biological results for further structural optimization. Moreover, predication of the potential targets was also carried out by the PharmMapper server. These amide analogues represent a promising class of anti-inflammatory scaffold for further exploration and target identification.

  4. Optical analogues of nanostructures with Rashba–Dresselhaus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragoman, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that light propagation through uniaxial crystals with suitably oriented optical axes is quantitatively analogous to electron propagation in a two-dimensional electron gas in the presence of Rashba and/or Dresselhaus effects. It is shown that, through an appropriate shaping of light beams and a rigorous control of their incidence angle on properly oriented uniaxial crystals, it is possible to investigate independently the effects of angular divergence and energy broadening on electron wavefunction evolution. Such optical analogues could be useful in designing spintronic devices, in particular those relying on the equality of Rashba and Dresselhaus coefficients. (paper)

  5. A high speed digital-to-analogue converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallgren, B.I.

    1974-02-01

    An 8-bit Digital-to-Analogue converter of the current-weighting type has been constructed using 8 monolithic integrated circuit transistor arrays -one for each bit. The D/A-converter has a voltage output within the range 0 to -2V. The settling time to within half of the least significant bit is about 50 nsec. The temperature dependence and transient response of the converter has been analysed using computer aided design techniques. A comparison is made between the experimental and simulated transient performance. (Auth.)

  6. Pena blanca natural analogue project: summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Schon S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldstein, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdel - Fattah, Amr I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-08

    The inactive Nopal I uranium mine in silicic tuff north of Chihuahua City, Chihuahua, Mexico, was studied as a natural analogue for an underground nuclear-waste repository in the unsaturated zone. Site stratigraphy was confirmed from new drill core. Datafrom site studies include chemical and isotopic compositions of saturated- and unsaturated-zone waters. A partial geochronology of uranium enrichment and mineralization was established. Evidence pertinent to uranium-series transport in the soil zone and changing redox conditions was collected. The investigations contributed to preliminary, scoping-level performance assessment modeling.

  7. Isosteric phosphonate pyrrolidine-based dinucleoside monophosphate analogues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, Václav; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kavenová, Ivana; Rinnová, Markéta; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, 5/8 (2003), s. 1065-1067 ISSN 1525-7770. [International Roundtable Nucleosides, Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids /15./. Leuven, 10.09.2002-14.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/1166; GA AV ČR IAA4055101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : pyrrolidine-based phosphonate nucleotides * ApA analogues * triplex Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.813, year: 2003

  8. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma: A rare salivary gland tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Jackson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC is a rare and recently described tumour of the salivary glands. MASC has similar histomorphological and immunohistochemical features of secretory carcinoma of the breast. MASC can be mistaken for other salivary gland tumours, especially acinic cell carcinoma. A 28-year-old man was diagnosed with a rare salivary gland tumour in Pretoria, South Africa (SA. To our knowledge, a report of MASC in SA has not previously been published. The surgeons dealing with salivary gland tumours should be aware of the clinical presentation. Current treatment is similar to that of other salivary gland malignancies.

  9. Are Structural Analogues to Bisphenol A Safe Alternatives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Dybdahl, Marianne; Pedersen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical with widespread human exposure suspected of causing low-dose effects. Thus, a need for developing alternatives to BPA exists. Structural analogues of BPA have already been detected in foods and humans. Due to the structural analogy of the alternatives......, there is a risk of effects similar to BPA.Objectives: The aim was to elucidate and compare the hazards of bisphenol B (BPB), bisphenol E (BPE), bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol S (BPS) and 4-cumylphenol (HPP) to BPA.Methods: In vitro studies on steroidogenesis, receptor activity, and biomarkers of effect, as well...

  10. Synthesis of Analogues of Thyroid Hormones: Nuclear Receptor Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Vieira de Castro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones are essential for the development and differentiation of all cells of the human body. This work reports the synthesis of some synthetic structural analogues of thyroid hormones, which may be modulators of the thyroid hormone receptor. The known compounds GC-1 (Sobetirome and CG-24 were successfully prepared and two novel analogous molecules were also synthesized by a new and efficient synthetic methodology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i3.739  

  11. Tidal regimes and salt marshes - the River Hamble analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, A.J.; Moy, I.L.; Warman, E.A.; Dawson, F.H.; Henville, P.

    1993-01-01

    Construction of estuarine tidal-energy barrages has a potentially major effect on the tidal regime of the estuary, particularly upstream of a barrage. Because tidal regime largely controls the distribution and species composition of intertidal plant and animal communities, it is important to understand how barrages may affect such communities. The main objectives of the research described in this report were to relate recent changes in tidal regime within an embanked area of salt marsh and mudflat to changes in the distribution of plant species. This was to test predictions about tidal control of species' range and to assess the site's suitability as an analogue of post-barrage conditions. (author)

  12. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  13. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Sections include: dose units, dose limits, dose rate, potential hazards of ionizing radiations, control of internal and external radiation exposure, personal dosemeters, monitoring programs and transport of radioactive material (packaging and shielding)

  14. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kill any cancer cells that remain. Lifetime Dose Limits There is a limit to the amount of radiation an area of ... total dose of radiation more quickly or to limit damage to healthy cells. Different ways of delivering ...

  15. Radiation Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amounts of radiation and could be caused by Dirty bombs - a mix of explosives with radioactive powder Fallout from a nuclear bomb Accidental release from a nuclear reactor or a nuclear weapons plant A lot of radiation over a short ...

  16. The arsonomethyl analogue of adenosine 5'-phosphate. An uncoupler of adenylate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, S R; Sparkes, M J; Dixon, H B

    1984-01-01

    Adenosine was converted into the arsonomethyl analogue of AMP. The reactions used provide a general route for converting an alcohol, R-CH2-OH, into the arsonomethyl analogue, R-CH2-CH2-AsO3H2, of its phosphate, R-CH2-O-PO3H2. The analogue of AMP proves to be a substrate for rabbit adenylate kinase, which shows a limiting velocity with it of 1/17 that with AMP, a Michaelis constant raised 70-fold to about 10 mM, and hence a specificity constant lowered about 1200-fold. The product of transfer of a phospho group from ATP to the analogue is, like all anhydrides of arsonic acids, unstable to hydrolysis, and so breaks down to yield orthophosphate and regenerate the analogue. Hence adenylate kinase is converted into an ATPase by the presence of the analogue. PMID:6089748

  17. Medical radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This leaflet in the At-a-Glance Series describes the medical use of X-rays, how X-rays help in diagnosis, radiation protection of the patient, staff protection, how radioactive materials in nuclear medicine examinations help in diagnosis and the use of radiation in radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging, a diagnostic technique involving no ionizing radiation, is also briefly examined. The role of the NRPB in the medical use of radiation is outlined. (UK).

  18. Radiation watchdog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, R.

    1984-01-01

    Designated by WHO as a Collaborating Centre, the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee provides assistance to all countries of the Americas in radiation accidents including human contamination or overexposure. It also conducts courses in radiation emergency response for health professionals from throughout the world

  19. Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation is energy that travels in the form of waves or high-speed particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a long ...

  20. Synthesis of phosphono analogues of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, P; Blonski, C; Périé, J

    1999-07-01

    The present paper describes the synthetic routes of six phosphono analogues of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and five phosphono analogues of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate through alpha-, beta- and gamma-hydroxyphosphonate esters precursors containing a protected carbonyl group. In some situations, depending on the sequence used for the deprotection of the phosphonate and carbonyl groups, the aldol/ketol rearrangement allowed the synthesis of either dihydroxyacetone phosphate or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate analogues from the same precursors. All these analogues are of interest both as active-site probes and as potential substrates for glycolytic enzymes such as fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolases (EC 4.1.2.13).

  1. Applications of natural analogue studies to Yucca Mountain as a potential high level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The 5-member group convened in Las Vegas, Nov. 11-13, 1991, to clarify the extent to which studies of natural analogues can assist the Yucca Mountain site characterization (SC) project. This document is to provide guidance and recommendations to DOE for the implementation of natural analogue studies in the SC program. Performance assessment, integrity of engineered barriers, and communication to the public and the scientific community are stressed. The reference design being developed by Babcock ampersand Wilcox Fuel Company are reviewed. Guidelines for selecting natural analogues are given. Quality assurance is discussed. Recommendations are given for developing an effective natural analogue program within the SC program

  2. Isolation and structural identification of a novel minoxidil analogue in an illegal dietary supplement: triaminodil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Park, Han Na; Park, Hyoung Joon; Kim, Nam Sook; Park, Sung-Kwan; Lee, Jongkook; Baek, Sun Young

    2018-01-01

    A new minoxidil analogue was detected in an illegal dietary supplement advertised as a hair-growth treatment. The analogue was identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HR-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The compound was structurally elucidated as a minoxidil analogue in which the piperidinyl group of minoxidil was replaced with a pyrrolidinyl group corresponding to a molecular formula of C 8 H 13 N 5 O. The new analogue has been named triaminodil. As this is the first report of the compound, there are no chemical, toxicology or pharmacological data available.

  3. Martian analogue test site - pilbara craton, western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A.; Allwood, A.; Walter, M. R.; van Kranendonk, M.

    All exploration for life elsewhere depends on extrapolation from our knowledge of Earth. If the target is former microbial life, for example on Mars, there is no better analogue on Earth than the 3.5 billion year old rocks of the Pilbara region, Western Australia. This area is home to signs of the earliest life on Earth in the form of microbe, many famous stromatolitic horizons and carbon isotope biosignatures. These occur in a volcanic terrain, with weathering and hydrothermal alteration, which also has some similarity to Mars. The geology of this region is known in detail after decades of mapping and other studies. Current work includes studies to resolve disputes about the biogenicity of the microfossils and stromatolites. On balance, biological origins are most likely. In any event, problems of demonstrating biogenicity on other planets will be far more severe, and the work on the Pilbara materials will illuminate those problems. Also underway is mineral mapping of the volcanic, hydrothermal and fossiliferous units using both airborne and hand-held short-wave infrared spectrometers, We are able to map the fossiliferous units using this technique and contend that it would be a powerful exploration technique on Mars and elsewhere. Using the Pilbara as an analogue for other bodies in the Solar System can extend to using it as a place to test instrument packages under realistic conditions. The region has good air and road access, and good supporting infrastructure.

  4. Integrating TEMPO and Its Analogues with Visible-Light Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Xianjun; Zhao, Jincai

    2018-01-16

    Visible light has risen to become a very important facilitator for selective radical reactions enabled by well-cognized photocatalysts. The renaissance of visible-light photocatalysis on this matter partly relies on integrating it with other fields of catalysis. In parallel, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin N-oxide (TEMPO), a quintessential persistent radical, has a wide range of uses owing to its exceptional redox behavior, which gives rise to its latest prominence in catalysis. Therefore, integrating the catalysis of TEMPO with photocatalysis to perform visible-light-induced selective reactions becomes a very convenient marriage of merits. In this context, the integration of different types of photocatalysts, including metal complexes, metal-free organic dyes, and semiconductors, with TEMPO for outstanding organic transformations will be summarized. To expand further the catalytic repertoire, the integration of TEMPOH analogues such as NHPI (N-hydroxyphthalimide) and NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) with photocatalysis will also be discussed. Hopefully, these advances will pave the way for more breakthroughs by integrating TEMPO and its analogues with photocatalysis to lead to a valuable blueprint for visible-light-induced selective organic transformations. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A Bosonic Analogue of a Topological Dirac Semi-Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Matthew; Cho, Gil Young; Hughes, Taylor

    We construct a bosonic analogue of a two-dimensional topological Dirac Semi-Metal (DSM). The low-energy description of the most basic 2D DSM model consists of two Dirac cones at positions +/-k0 in momentum space. The local stability of the Dirac cones is guaranteed by a composite symmetry Z2, where  is time-reversal and  is inversion. This model also exhibits interesting time-reversal and inversion symmetry breaking electromagnetic responses. In this work we construct a bosonic analogue of a DSM by replacing each Dirac cone with a copy of the O (4) Nonlinear Sigma Model (NLSM) with topological theta term and theta angle θ = +/- π . One copy of this NLSM also describes the gapless surface termination of the 3D Bosonic Topological Insulator (BTI). We compute the time-reversal and inversion symmetry breaking electromagnetic responses for our model and show that they are twice the value one gets in the DSM case. We also investigate the local stability of the individual O (4) NLSM's in the BSM model. Along the way we clarify many aspects of the surface theory of the BTI including the electromagnetic response, the charges of vortex excitations, and the stability to symmetry-allowed perturbations. Nsf CAREER DMR-1351895.

  6. Classical analogue of an interstellar travel through a hydrodynamic wormhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euvé, L.-P.; Rousseaux, G.

    2017-09-01

    The classical theory of space-time, namely general relativity, suggests but does not demonstrate the existence of so-called wormholes allowing for interstellar journeys. Alternative proposals such as quantum gravity theories are developed nowadays to allow for wormhole travels by assuming hypothetical trans-Planckian effects at tiny scales. Here we show experimentally that analogue traversable and bidirectional wormholes exist in hydrodynamics following a suggestion by Wheeler. Using a water channel, we sent free surface waves on a countercurrent in an analogue gravity setup aiming at showing that hydrodynamic wormhole travels are controlled by a cascade of dispersive scales including surface tension effects: the capillary wavelength plays the role of a Planckian scale below which long gravity waves are transformed into short capillary waves that are able to move at speeds higher than the "flow" of space-time. Whereas our results do not apply to putative astrophysical wormholes per se, we anticipate that they will trigger new ideas to explore quantum gravity physics.

  7. Limonene hydroperoxide analogues show specific patch test reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensson, Johanna Bråred; Hellsén, Staffan; Börje, Anna; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2014-05-01

    The fragrance terpene R-limonene is a very weak sensitizer, but forms allergenic oxidation products upon contact with air. The primary oxidation products of oxidized limonene, the hydroperoxides, have an important impact on the sensitizing potency of the oxidation mixture. One analogue, limonene-1-hydroperoxide, was experimentally shown to be a significantly more potent sensitizer than limonene-2-hydroperoxide in the local lymph node assay with non-pooled lymph nodes. To investigate the pattern of reactivity among consecutive dermatitis patients to two structurally closely related limonene hydroperoxides, limonene-1-hydroperoxide and limonene-2-hydroperoxide. Limonene-1-hydroperoxide, limonene-2-hydroperoxide, at 0.5% in petrolatum, and oxidized limonene 3.0% pet. were tested in 763 consecutive dermatitis patients. Of the tested materials, limonene-1-hydroperoxide gave most reactions, with 2.4% of the patients showing positive patch test reactions. Limonene-2-hydroperoxide and oxidized R-limonene gave 1.7% and 1.2% positive patch test reactions, respectively. Concomitant positive patch test reactions to other fragrance markers in the baseline series were frequently noted. The results are in accordance with the experimental studies, as limonene-1-hydroperoxide gave more positive patch test reactions in the tested patients than limonene-2-hydroperoxide. Furthermore, the results support the specificity of the allergenic activity of the limonene hydroperoxide analogues and the importance of oxidized limonene as a cause of contact allergy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Metabolites of saxitoxin analogues in bivalves contaminated by Gymnodinium catenatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    Bivalve metabolites of saxitoxin analogues, not present in microalgae, were recently described as an important toxin fraction in mussels contaminated by Alexandrium tamarense. These possess very low fluorescence, and require mass spectrometry detection. HILIC-MS was implemented to look for these metabolites in bivalves contaminated during Gymnodinium catenatum blooms at the Portuguese coast. The presence of M1 was tentatively identified in several bivalves, ranging from estuarine (Mytilus galloprovinciallis, Cerastoderma edule and Ruditapes decussatus) to oceanic habitat (Donax trunculus and Ensis spp.). It was hypothesized that M1 could contribute to an important fraction of the profile of STX analogues. M1 was more abundant in estuarine bivalves that retain longer PSP toxins, in the following order: mussels>cockles>clams. These data highlight that the study by fluorimetry alone of the carbamoyl, N-sulfocarbamoyl, and decarbamoyl families is manifestly insufficient to fully understand toxin dynamics in bivalves feeding on G. catenatum without a proper study of hydroxybenzoate and hydroxylated M-toxins.

  9. Parabolic flights as Earth analogue for surface processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2017-04-01

    The interpretation of landforms and environmental archives on Mars with regards to habitability and preservation of traces of life requires a quantitative understanding of the processes that shaped them. Commonly, qualitative similarities in sedimentary rocks between Earth and Mars are used as an analogue to reconstruct the environments in which they formed on Mars. However, flow hydraulics and sedimentation differ between Earth and Mars, requiring a recalibration of models describing runoff, erosion, transport and deposition. Simulation of these processes on Earth is limited because gravity cannot be changed and the trade-off between adjusting e.g. fluid or particle density generates other mismatches, such as fluid viscosity. Computational Fluid Dynamics offer an alternative, but would also require a certain degree of calibration or testing. Parabolic flights offer a possibility to amend the shortcomings of these approaches. Parabolas with reduced gravity last up to 30 seconds, which allows the simulation of sedimentation processes and the measurement of flow hydraulics. This study summarizes the experience gathered during four campaigns of parabolic flights, aimed at identifying potential and limitations of their use as an Earth analogue for surface processes on Mars.

  10. The role of natural analogues in safety assessment and acceptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, Toenis

    1987-01-01

    The safety assessment must evaluate the level of safety for a repository, the confidence that can be placed on the assessment and how well the repository can meet the acceptance criteria of the society. Many of the processes and phenomena that govern the long term performance of a deep geologic repository for radioactive waste also take place in nature. To investigate these natural analogues and try to validate the models on which the safety assessment are based is a main task in the effort to build of confidence in the safety assessments. The assessment of the safety of a repository can, however, not only be based on good models. The possible role of natural analogues or natural evidence in other parts of the safety assessment is discussed. Specially with regard to - the need to demonstrate that all relevant processes have been taken into account, and that the important ones have been validated to an acceptable level for relevant parameters spans, -the definition and analysis of external scenarios for the safety assessment and for the claim that all reasonable scenarios have been addressed, - the public confidence in the long-term relevance of the acceptance criteria. (author)

  11. Historical space psychology: Early terrestrial explorations as Mars analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedfeld, Peter

    2010-03-01

    The simulation and analogue environments used by psychologists to circumvent the difficulties of conducting research in space lack many of the unique characteristics of future explorations, especially the mission to Mars. This paper suggests that appropriate additional analogues would be the multi-year maritime and terrestrial explorations that mapped the surface of the Earth in previous centuries. These, like Mars, often involved a hazardous trek through unknown territory, flanked by extended, dangerous voyages to and from the exploration sites. Characteristic issues included interpersonal relationships under prolonged stress, stretches of boredom interspersed with intense work demands, the impossibility of rescue, resupply, or other help from home, chronic danger, physical discomfort and lack of privacy, and the crucial role of the leader. Illustrative examples of one important factor, leadership style, are discussed. The examination of such expeditions can help to identify the psychological stressors that are likely to be experienced by Mars explorers, and can also indicate countermeasures to reduce the damaging impact of those stressors.

  12. A low-dimensional analogue of holographic baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Baryons in holographic QCD correspond to topological solitons in the bulk. The most prominent example is the Sakai-Sugimoto model, where the bulk soliton in the five-dimensional spacetime of AdS-type can be approximated by the flat space self-dual Yang-Mills instanton with a small size. Recently, the validity of this approximation has been verified by comparison with the numerical field theory solution. However, multi-solitons and solitons with finite density are currently beyond numerical field theory computations. Various approximations have been applied to investigate these important issues and have led to proposals for finite density configurations that include dyonic salt and baryonic popcorn. Here we introduce and investigate a low-dimensional analogue of the Sakai-Sugimoto model, in which the bulk soliton can be approximated by a flat space sigma model instanton. The bulk theory is a baby Skyrme model in a three-dimensional spacetime with negative curvature. The advantage of the lower-dimensional theory is that numerical simulations of multi-solitons and finite density solutions can be performed and compared with flat space instanton approximations. In particular, analogues of dyonic salt and baryonic popcorn configurations are found and analysed.

  13. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    According to f =d(mv)/dt=m(dv/dt)+ v(dm/dt), a same gravitational formula had been de-duced from the variance in physical mass of QFT and from the variance in mass of inductive energy-transfer of GR respectively: f QF T = f GR = -G (mM/r2 )((r/r)+(v/c)) when their interaction-constants are all taken the experimental values (H05-0029-08, E15-0039-08). f QF T is the quasi-Casimir pressure. f GR is equivalent to Einstein's equation, then more easy to solve it. The hypothesis of the equivalent principle is not used in f QF T , but required by f GR . The predictions of f QF T and f GR are identical except that f QF T has quantum effects but f GR has not and f GR has Lense-Thirring effect but f QF T has not. The quantum effects of gravitation had been verified by Nesvizhevsky et al with the ultracold neutrons falling in the earth's gravitational field in 2002. Yet Lense-Thirring effect had not been measured by GP-B. It shows that f QF T is essential but f GR is phenomenological. The macro-f QF T is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos ν 0 flux (after self-offset in opposite directions) and in direct proportion to the mass. But micro-f QF T is in direct proportion to the scattering section. The electric mass (in inverse proportion to de Broglie wavelength λ) far less than nucleonic mass and the electric scattering section (in direct proportion to λ2 ) far large than that of nucleon, then the net ν 0 flux pressure exerted to electron far large than that to nucleon and the electric displacement far large than that of nucleon, it causes the gravitational polarization of positive-negative charge center separation. Because the gravity far less than the electromagnetic binding force, in atoms the gravitational polarization only produces a little separation. But the net ν 0 flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the earth's surface, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons from further

  14. The costal landslide from analogue experiments: perspectives and limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ventisette, C.; Nolesini, T.; Moretti, S.; Fanti, R.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the triggering mechanism of coastal landslides (triggered and/or developed at air-water interface) and their evolution is fundamental to evaluate their hazard and, predicting the energy, the associated tsunami risk. The aim of this work is to verify the suitability of analogue modelling to understand the triggering mechanism and the evolution of landslide along the costal line. As a starting case study the Sciara del Fuoco (SdF), northwest flank of the volcanic island of Stromboli (Italy), was chosen. The analogue modelling technique has been proven to represent an useful tool to understand many geological processes, as it allows studying the progressive deformation, providing also useful indications about the role of distinct factors controlling the final deformation pattern. The models simulated at a first approximation the geological geometries observed at Stromboli, a composite volcano forming the northernmost island of the Aeolian Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea). The activity of Stromboli volcano is characterized by a persistent mild explosive activity at the summit craters sporadically interrupted by episodes of lava effusion and violent paroxysmal explosions as in 2002-2003 and in 2007. During the 2002 effusion a large landslide occurred on the SdF. The landslide caused a tsunami, which produced severe damages along the island shores. A series of analogue models was performed to investigate the influence of two different types of triggering mechanism and the behaviour of landslides both in air and air-water interface: 1) surface bulging due to the intrusion of a dike; 2) accumulation of material due to an uppermost landslide or due to opening of a new vent. The models, constructed in a Plexiglas tank, were scaled to the natural prototype following the geometrical, rheological, kinematical and dynamical similarities (e.g. Hubbert, 1937; Ramberg, 1981). The modelling material (Fontainbleau sand and rice) was sieved on a slope, inclination of which

  15. Radiation imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmayne, I.

    1986-05-21

    A detector for the detection of radiation such as X-ray radiation comprises an array of scintillation elements embedded in a sheet of radiation absorbing material. The scintillation elements are monitored individually, for example by a corresponding array of photodiodes, to build up a picture of the incident radiation. The front face of the sheet and the inner walls of the bores may be coated with a reflective material. The detector finds particular application in weld radiography. The detector may be stepped relative to the radiation source, the signals produced by the rows of the detector as they pass a predetermined point being summed.

  16. Radiation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmayne, Ian.

    1986-01-01

    A detector for the detection of radiation such as X-ray radiation comprises an array of scintillation elements embedded in a sheet of radiation absorbing material. The scintillation elements are monitored individually, for example by a corresponding array of photodiodes, to build up a picture of the incident radiation. The front face of the sheet and the inner walls of the bores may be coated with a reflective material. The detector finds particular application in weld radiography. The detector may be stepped relative to the radiation source, the signals produced by the rows of the detector as they pass a predetermined point being summed. (author)

  17. Racemic amino acids from the ultraviolet photolysis of interstellar ice analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Cooper, George W.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2002-01-01

    The delivery of extraterrestrial organic molecules to Earth by meteorites may have been important for the origin and early evolution of life. Indigenous amino acids have been found in meteorites-over 70 in the Murchison meteorite alone. Although it has been generally accepted that the meteoritic amino acids formed in liquid water on a parent body, the water in the Murchison meteorite is depleted in deuterium relative to the indigenous organic acids. Moreover, the meteoritical evidence for an excess of laevo-rotatory amino acids is hard to understand in the context of liquid-water reactions on meteorite parent bodies. Here we report a laboratory demonstration that glycine, alanine and serine naturally form from ultraviolet photolysis of the analogues of icy interstellar grains. Such amino acids would naturally have a deuterium excess similar to that seen in interstellar molecular clouds, and the formation process could also result in enantiomeric excesses if the incident radiation is circularly polarized. These results suggest that at least some meteoritic amino acids are the result of interstellar photochemistry, rather than formation in liquid water on an early Solar System body.

  18. On the characterisation of the corrosion layout of ferrous archaeological analogues in binders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitty, Walter-John; Dillmann, Philippe; L'Hostis, Valerie; Beranger, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with an analytical study on ferrous reinforcements embedded in hydraulic binders found in ancient buildings from the Middle Age period to the beginning of the 20. c. AD. The study of these kind of archaeological analogues is necessary to improve the knowledge on the long-term corrosion of low carbon steels that could be used in concrete to build the substructure of nuclear wastes reversible storage facilities. The corrosion system can be described as a multi-layer pattern made of the metal, a dense corrosion product layer, a transformed medium and a binder. All the morphological and physicochemical properties as composition, structure and porosities of these different parts were studied with different analytical methods as optical and electron microscopy, EDS coupled to SEM, EPMA, mercury porosimetry, micro Raman spectroscopy and micro Diffraction under Synchrotron Radiation. Moreover, average corrosion rates were evaluated by two different methods. These rates are relatively low compared to the same parameters measured on low alloyed steels immersed in aqueous environments and are comparable with results obtained for passivated systems. (authors)

  19. The geochemical behavior of protactinium 231 and its chosen geochemical analogue thorium in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillberg-Wickman, M.

    1983-03-01

    To be able to judge whether protactinium 231 might represent a major contribution to the human radiation risk from high level radioactive waste a literature study of the geochemical behavior of protactinium has been made. The interest in protactinium determinations has, as far, been in the field of marine geochemistry and geochronology. These investigations show that thorium may be used as a chemical analogue. The content of protactinium 231 is determined by the 235 U content and consequently the occurrence of protactinium in nature is directly associated to the geochemistry of uranium. The pronounced hydrolytic tendency of protactinium and its great sorption and coprecipitation capacity ought to prevent or at least appreciably delay its transport from a back-filled nuclear waste vault to the uppermost surface of the earth. It also has a tendency to form colloids or particulates which may be strongly fixed on a rock surface. In adsorption and desorption processes kinetics must play an important role. Our knowledge in this field is quite limited. Under the physico-chemical conditions in the sea, protactinium is rapidly scavenged from the water column by particulates. It accumulates in the sediments. (author)

  20. Sign change in the net force in sphere-plate and sphere-sphere systems immersed in nonpolar critical fluid due to the interplay between the critical Casimir and dispersion van der Waals forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We study systems in which both long-ranged van der Waals and critical Casimir interactions are present. The latter arise as an effective force between bodies when immersed in a near-critical medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. They are due to the fact that the presence of the bodies modifies the order parameter profile of the medium between them as well as the spectrum of its allowed fluctuations. We study the interplay between these forces, as well as the total force (TF) between a spherical colloid particle and a thick planar slab and between two spherical colloid particles. We do that using general scaling arguments and mean-field-type calculations utilizing the Derjaguin and the surface integration approaches. They both are based on data of the forces between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining the fluctuating fluid medium characterized by its temperature T and chemical potential μ. The surfaces of the colloid particles and the slab are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials, ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. On the other hand, the core region of the slab and the particles influence the fluid by long-ranged competing dispersion potentials. We demonstrate that for a suitable set of colloids-fluid, slab-fluid, and fluid-fluid coupling parameters, the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the core regions of the objects involved result, when one changes T, μ, or L, in sign change of the Casimir force (CF) and the TF acting between the colloid and the slab, as well as between the colloids. This can be used for governing the behavior of objects, say colloidal particles, at small distances, say in colloid suspensions for preventing flocculation. It can also provide a strategy for solving problems with handling, feeding

  1. Sign change in the net force in sphere-plate and sphere-sphere systems immersed in nonpolar critical fluid due to the interplay between the critical Casimir and dispersion van der Waals forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We study systems in which both long-ranged van der Waals and critical Casimir interactions are present. The latter arise as an effective force between bodies when immersed in a near-critical medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. They are due to the fact that the presence of the bodies modifies the order parameter profile of the medium between them as well as the spectrum of its allowed fluctuations. We study the interplay between these forces, as well as the total force (TF) between a spherical colloid particle and a thick planar slab and between two spherical colloid particles. We do that using general scaling arguments and mean-field-type calculations utilizing the Derjaguin and the surface integration approaches. They both are based on data of the forces between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining the fluctuating fluid medium characterized by its temperature T and chemical potential μ . The surfaces of the colloid particles and the slab are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials, ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. On the other hand, the core region of the slab and the particles influence the fluid by long-ranged competing dispersion potentials. We demonstrate that for a suitable set of colloids-fluid, slab-fluid, and fluid-fluid coupling parameters, the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the core regions of the objects involved result, when one changes T , μ , or L , in sign change of the Casimir force (CF) and the TF acting between the colloid and the slab, as well as between the colloids. This can be used for governing the behavior of objects, say colloidal particles, at small distances, say in colloid suspensions for preventing flocculation. It can also provide a strategy for solving problems with handling, feeding

  2. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with the design and measurement of physical parameters used in theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and uses the theoretical developments for experimental design, and provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  3. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with design and measurement of those physical parameters used in the theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and makes use of the theoretical developments for experimental design. Also, this program provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  4. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  5. Climate Analogues for agricultural impact projection and adaptation – a reliability test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swen P.M. Bos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The climate analogue approach is often considered a valuable tool for climate change impact projection and adaptation planning, especially for complex systems that cannot be modelled reliably. Important examples are smallholder farming systems using agroforestry or other mixed-cropping approaches. For the projected climate at a particular site of interest, the analogue approach identifies locations where the current climate is similar to these projected conditions. By comparing baseline-analogue site pairs, information on climate impacts and opportunities for adaptation can be obtained. However, the climate analogue approach is only meaningful, if climate is a dominant driver of differences between baseline and analogue site pairs. For a smallholder farming setting on Mt. Elgon in Kenya, we tested this requirement by comparing yield potentials of maize and coffee (obtained from the IIASA Global Agro-ecological Zones dataset among 50 close analogue sites for different future climate scenarios and models, and by comparing local ecological knowledge and farm characteristics for one baseline-analogue pair.Yield potentials among the 50 closest analogue locations varied strongly within all climate scenarios, hinting at factors other than climate as major drivers of what the analogue approach might interpret as climate effects. However, on average future climatic conditions seemed more favourable to maize and coffee cultivation than current conditions. The detailed site comparison revealed substantial differences between farms in important characteristics, such as farm size and presence of cash crops, casting doubt on the usefulness of the comparison for climate change analysis. Climatic constraints were similar between sites, so that no apparent lessons for adaptation could be derived. Pests and diseases were also similar, indicating that climate change may not lead to strong changes in biotic constraints at the baseline site in the near future. From

  6. In vitro structure-activity relationship of Re-cyclized octreotide analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannoon, Shorouk F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Bigott-Hennkens, Heather M. [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Ma Lixin [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Service, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Gallazzi, Fabio [Structural Biology Core, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Lewis, Michael R., E-mail: lewismic@missouri.ed [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Service, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Jurisson, Silvia S., E-mail: jurissons@missouri.ed [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: Development of radiolabeled octreotide analogues is of interest for targeting somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-positive tumors for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We are investigating a direct labeling approach for incorporation of a Re ion into octreotide analogues, where the peptide sequences are cyclized via coordination to Re rather than through a disulfide bridge. Methods: Various octreotide analogue sequences and coordination systems (e.g., S{sub 2}N{sub 2} and S{sub 3}N) were synthesized and cyclized with nonradioactive Re. In vitro competitive binding assays with {sup 111}In-DOTA-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide in AR42J rat pancreatic tumor cells yielded IC{sub 50} values as a measure of SSTR affinity of the Re-cyclized analogues. Three-dimensional structures of Re-cyclized Tyr{sup 3}-octreotate and its disulfide-bridged analogue were calculated from two-dimensional NMR experiments to visualize the effect of metal cyclization on the analogue's pharmacophore. Results: Only two of the 11 Re-cyclized analogues investigated showed moderate in vitro binding affinity toward somatostatin subtype 2 receptors. Three-dimensional molecular structures of Re- and disulfide-cyclized Tyr{sup 3}-octreotate were calculated, and both of their pharmacophore turns appear to be very similar with minor differences due to metal coordination to the amide nitrogen of one of the pharmacophore amino acids. Conclusions: Various Re-cyclized analogues were developed and analogue 4 had moderate affinity toward somatostatin subtype 2 receptors. In vitro stable studies that are in progress showed stable radiometal cyclization of octreotide analogues via NS{sub 3} and N{sub 2}S{sub 2} coordination forming five- and six-membered chelate rings. In vivo biodistribution studies are underway of {sup 99m}Tc-cyclized analogue 4.

  7. Cyprus natural analogue project (CNAP). Phase II Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; Milodowski, A.E.

    2011-02-01

    Due to the extremely slow kinetics of bentonite reaction in low alkali cement leachates, natural analogues would appear to be the only viable method of studying bentonite reaction. As a result of a review of the available literature, several sites in Cyprus were selected as particularly promising for this purpose. This report presents the results of two short field campaigns in Cyprus in November/December, 2008 and February, 2009. The main aim of these campaigns was to establish if appropriate sites existed for a natural analogue study of bentonite-low alkali cement leachate reaction. Focus is on mineralogical changes and not changes in physical properties (such as porosity and permeability) of bentonite as the industrially-processed bentonite used in a repository will be completely different in terms of its engineering and hydrogeological properties to the unprocessed natural bentonite or analogue smectite-rich materials. The first campaign was in the form of a reconnaissance study to identify sites of likely interest and the second, follow-up, campaign focussed on obtaining preliminary groundwater and solid phase (bentonites/clay-rich sediments/altered igneous rocks/soils) samples which would allow a more detailed assessment of several of the potential sites. A large amount of information was collected during these short field campaigns and subsequent laboratory analysis of the collected samples so, to keep the main report down to a digestible size, much of the supporting information has been collated in seven appendices. These include full details of all 30 sites visited during both campaigns along with sample details, information on the analytical techniques, the analytical raw data and numerous photographs of the sites. The intention is that this report will provide full supporting information for a potential Phase III and a detailed database for our colleagues at the Geological Survey Department (GSD) in Cyprus. Consequently, all the information acquired

  8. Holography of radiation and jet quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sin, S.-J.; Zahed, I.

    2004-07-01

    We study the on-linear propagation of radiation in N=4 SYM at zero and finite temperature using the refined radius/scale duality in AdS/CFT. We find that at finite temperature, the radiation stalls at a distance of 1/πT with a natural geometric and holographic interpretation. Indeed, the stalling is the holographic analogue of the gravitational in-fall of light towards the black hole in the bulk. We show that in the strongly interacting finite temperature medium, radiation can reach much farther than the static force. We suggest that these results are relevant for jet quenching by a strongly coupled quark-gluon liquid as currently probed in heavy ion colliders at RHIC. In particular, colored jets cannot make it beyond 1/3 fin at RHIC whatever their energy. (author)

  9. Bacterial Motility As a Biosignature: Tests at Icy Moon Analogue Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, J. L.; Lindensmith, C.; Deming, J. W.; Stocker, R.; Graff, E.; Serabyn, E.; Wallace, J. K.; Liewer, K.; Kuhn, J.

    2014-12-01

    Extraterrestrial life in our Solar System, if present, is almost certain to be microbial. Methods and technologies for unambiguous detection of living or extinct microorganisms are needed for life-detection missions to the Jovian and Saturnian moons, where liquid water is known to exist. Our research focuses specifically on microbial meaningful motion as a biosignature—"waving crowds" at the micron scale. Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) is an excellent tool for unambiguous identification of bacterial and protozoal swimming, even in the presence of turbidity, drift, and currents. The design of a holographic instrument with bacteria scale resolution was described in the previous talk. In this presentation, we will illustrate the design challenges for construction of a field instrument for extreme environments and space, and present plans for scientific investigations at analogue sites for the coming season. The challenges of creating a field instrument involve performance trade-offs, the ability to operate at extreme temperatures, and handling large volumes of data. A fully autonomous instrument without external cables or power is also desirable, and this is something that previous holographic instruments have not achieved. The primary issues for space exploration are identification of a laser and drive electronics that are qualified for the expected radiation environments of the moons around gas giant planets. Tests in Earth analogue environments will establish performance parameters as well as answer scientific questions that traditional microscopic techniques cannot. Specifically, we will visit a Greenland field site to determine whether or not microorganisms are motile within the brine-filled interior network of sea ice, and if they can be autonomously tracked using the instrument. Motility within the liquid phase of a frozen matrix has been hypothesized to explain how bacteria contribute to the biogeochemical signatures detected in ice, but observational

  10. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic tumors with radiation therapy is so outweighed by the benefit of cure that estimates of risk have not been considered necessary. However, with the introduction of chemotherapy, combined therapy, and particle radiation therapy, the comparative risks should be examined. In the case of radiation, total dose, fractionation, dose rate, dose distribution, and radiation quality should be considered in the estimation of risk. The biological factors that must be considered include incidence of tumors, latent period, degree of malignancy, and multiplicity of tumors. The risk of radiation induction of tumors is influenced by the genotype, sex, and age of the patient, the tissues that will be exposed, and previous therapy. With chemotherapy the number of cells at risk is usually markedly higher than with radiation therapy. Clearly the problem of the estimation of comparative risks is complex. This paper presents the current views on the comparative risks and the importance of the various factors that influence the estimation of risk

  11. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  12. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of cholic acid hydrazone analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasras, Anas J M; Al-Tel, Taleb H; Al-Aboudi, Amal F; Al-Qawasmeh, Raed A

    2010-06-01

    Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of cholic acid analogues 4a-t are reported. The synthesis of 4a-t was accomplished from ethylcholate 2. The hydrazone moiety was introduced via coupling of the cholic acid hydrazide (3) with appropriately functionalized aldehyde utilizing acetic acid as a catalyst. Quiet of interest in relation to the synthesized hydrazones is the formation of two rotamers s-cis.E and s-trans.E. Most compounds showed stronger antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria than Cefaclor and Cefixime. Compounds 4d, 4i and 4j indicated 15-fold stronger antimicrobial activities against Enterobacter faecalis compared to Cefaclor and Cefixime. Some of the synthesized compounds (e.g. 4a, 4c, 4d, 4i, and 4l) reflected two-folds less activity against Escherichia coli relative to Cefixime. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The Mojave vadose zone: a subsurface biosphere analogue for Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, William; Salas, Everett; Bhartia, Rohit; Beegle, Luther W

    2013-07-01

    If life ever evolved on the surface of Mars, it is unlikely that it would still survive there today, but as Mars evolved from a wet planet to an arid one, the subsurface environment may have presented a refuge from increasingly hostile surface conditions. Since the last glacial maximum, the Mojave Desert has experienced a similar shift from a wet to a dry environment, giving us the opportunity to study here on Earth how subsurface ecosystems in an arid environment adapt to increasingly barren surface conditions. In this paper, we advocate studying the vadose zone ecosystem of the Mojave Desert as an analogue for possible subsurface biospheres on Mars. We also describe several examples of Mars-like terrain found in the Mojave region and discuss ecological insights that might be gained by a thorough examination of the vadose zone in these specific terrains. Examples described include distributary fans (deltas, alluvial fans, etc.), paleosols overlain by basaltic lava flows, and evaporite deposits.

  14. An IMS-IMS Analogue of MS-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeniger, Stormy L.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Valentine, Stephen J.; Jarrold, Martin F.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.; Clemmer, David E.

    2006-06-15

    The development of a new ion mobility/mass spectrometry instrument that incorporates a multifield drift tube/ion funnel design is described. In this instrument, individual components from a mixture of ions can be resolved and selected on the basis of mobility differences prior to collisional activation inside the drift tube. The fragment ions that are produced can be dispersed again in a second ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) region prior to additional collisional activation and MS analysis. The result is an IMS-IMS analogue of MS-MS. Here, we describe the preliminary instrumental design and experimental approach. We illustrate the approach by examining the highly characterized bradykinin and ubiquitin systems. Mobility-resolved fragment ions of bradykinin show that b-type ions are readily discernible fragments, because they exist as two easily resolvable structural types. Current limitations and future directions are briefly discussed.

  15. Thermal environment and sleep in winter shelter-analogue settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Yosuke; Maeda, Kazuki; Nabeshima, Yuki; Tsuzuki, Kazuyo

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to examine sleep in shelter-analogue settings in winter to determine the sleep and environmental conditions in evacuation shelters. Twelve young healthy students took part in the sleep study of two nights for seven hours from 0 AM to 7 AM in a gymnasium. One night the subject used a pair of futons and on the other the subject used emergency supplies consisting of four blankets and a set of portable partitions. Air temperature, humidity were measured around the sleeping subjects through the night. Sleep parameters, skin temperature, microclimate temperature, rectal temperature, and heart rate of the subjects were continuously measured and recorded during the sleeping period. The subjects completed questionnaires relating to thermal comfort and subjective sleep before and after sleep. The sleep efficiency indices were lower when the subjects slept using the blankets. As the microclimate temperature between the human body and blanket was lower, mean skin temperature was significantly lower in the case of blankets.

  16. Pheophytin analogues from the medicinal lichen Usnea diffracta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Bo; Yang, Tong-Hua; Xie, Pei; Liu, Shi-Jun; Liang, Yan-Ni; Zhang, Yu; Song, Zhong-Xing; Tang, Zhi-Shu

    2018-05-01

    A new pheophytin, (13 2 S, 17S, 18S)-13 2 -hydroxy-20-chloro-ethylpheophorbide a (3), along with two known analogues (1-2) were isolated from the lichen Usnea diffracta Vainio (Parmeliaceae). Among them, compound 3 was a rare C-20-chloro type pheophytin obtained from lichens. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis, and all the compounds were obtained for the first time from U. diffracta. Compounds (1-3) were evaluated for their xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activities in vitro, and the results showed that 1-3 possessed significant enzyme inhibitory actions with IC 50 values of 46.9 ± 3.8, 75.9 ± 7.4 and 42.1 ± 1.7 μg/mL, respectively.

  17. Synthesis and antifungal evaluation of PCA amide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chuan; Yu, Di-Ya; Zhou, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Min; Wu, Qing-Lai; Li, Jun-Kai

    2018-04-18

    To improve the physical and chemical properties of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) and find higher antifungal compounds, a series of PCA amide analogues were designed and synthesized and their structures were confirmed by 1 H NMR, HRMS, and X-ray. Most compounds showed some antifungal activities in vitro. Particularly, compound 3d exhibited inhibition effect against Pyriculariaoryzac Cavgra with EC 50 value of 28.7 μM and compound 3q exhibited effect against Rhizoctonia solani with EC 50 value of 24.5 μM, more potently active than that of the positive control PCA with its EC 50 values of 37.3 μM (Pyriculariaoryzac Cavgra) and 33.2 μM (Rhizoctonia solani), respectively.

  18. Determination of micro amounts of praseodymium by analogue derivative spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Hajime; Satoh, Katsuhiko.

    1986-01-01

    Derivative spectrophotometry using the analogue differentiation circuit was applied to the determination of praseodymium at the ppm level. By the proposed method, in which the second or fourth derivative spectrum of the characteristic absorption band of praseodymium(III) at 444 nm is measured, as little as 3 ppm of praseodymium can be determined directly and easily even in the presence of large amounts of other rare earths without any prior separation. Interferences from neodymium, samarium, dysprosium, holmium and erbium ions which have characteristic absorption bands around 444 nm can easily be removed by utilizing the isosbestic point in the derivative spectra of praseodymium(III) and the interfering rare earth(III). (author)

  19. A green multicomponent synthesis of tocopherol analogues with antiproliferative activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingold, Mariana; Dapueto, Rosina; Victoria, Sabina; Galliusi, Germán; Batthyàny, Carlos; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Tejedor, David; García-Tellado, Fernando; Padrón, José M; Porcal, Williams; López, Gloria V

    2018-01-01

    A one-pot efficient, practical and eco-friendly synthesis of tocopherol analogues has been developed using water or solvent free conditions via Passerini and Ugi multicomponent reactions. These reactions can be optimized using microwave irradiation or ultrasound as the energy source. Accordingly, a small library of 30 compounds was prepared for biological tests. The evaluation of the antiproliferative activity in the human solid tumor cell lines A549 (lung), HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (lung), T-47D (breast), and WiDr (colon) provided lead compounds with GI 50 values between 1 and 5 μM. A structure-activity relationship is also discussed. One of the studied compounds comes up as a future candidate for the development of potent tocopherol-mimetic therapeutic agents for cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil: a natural analogue study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Pocos de Caldas natural analogue project is an internationally funded project hosted by Brazil; the contributary organizations are SKB (Sweden), NAGRA (Switzerland), DOE (United Kingdom) and the DOE (United States). The Project is a multidisciplinary study of two mineralized areas within an alkaline igneous caldera complex located near the town of Pocos de Caldas in the state of Minas Gerais. One area, the Osamu Utsumi mine, is characterized by redox deposits of secondary remobilized pitchblende, and the other area, Morro do Ferro, comprises a highly weathered deposit of thorium and REE with subordinate uranium. The project, scheduled for three years (1986-1989), is now entering its third and final year. The pilot and feasibility studies, which characterized the first year, helped to establish the major drilling programme and the sampling protocols for both rock and groundwater studies which constituted the major part of the second year. The latest status of the investigations are briefly reported