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Sample records for analgesics

  1. Analgesic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kerec Kos, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    In the management of pain analgesic drugs are chosen regarding the intensity and type of pain. The selection of analgesic drug depends on pharmacokinetic properties of the drug and available pharmaceutical dosage forms. Beside non-opioid analgesics (non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, acetaminophen), opioid analgesic drugs have an important role in the treatment of pain. Pri zdravljenju bolečine izberemo analgetik glede na jakost in vrsto bolečine. Na izbiro ustreznega analgetika vplivaj...

  2. [Chronic use of analgesics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, E; Klimpel, A; Pommer, W; Molzahn, M

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative aspects of longterm analgesic intake are presented, based on a case-control-study on the relation between regular analgesic intake and endstage renal failure in the area of West Berlin (1984-86). Lifetime analgesic consumption of more than 1000 persons were investigated. A total of 285 longterm analgesic users (185 cases = 35.8%; 100 controls = 19.3%) were detected. An odd ratio of 2.44 (95% CI: 1.77-3.39) was computed. Regular analgesic intake was defined as an intake of at least 15 analgesic doses per month continuously over a period of at least 12 months. 90% of the regular users preferred mixed analgesics compounds, in most cases with the psychotropic additive caffeine. PMID:2238838

  3. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J;

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine, produced mainly by the pineal gland. Melatonin has been proven to have chronobiotic, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anxiolytic and sedative properties. There are also experimental and clinical data supporting an analgesic role of melatonin. In experimental...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid µ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...... may reduce anxiety, which leads to lower levels of pain. In this paper, we review the current evidence regarding the analgesic properties of melatonin in animals and humans with chronic pain....

  4. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J;

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine, produced mainly by the pineal gland. Melatonin has been proven to have chronobiotic, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anxiolytic and sedative properties. There are also experimental and clinical data supporting an analgesic role of melatonin. In experimental...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid μ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...... may reduce anxiety, which leads to lower levels of pain. In this paper, we review the current evidence regarding the analgesic properties of melatonin in animals and humans with chronic pain....

  5. Tapentadol hydrochloride: A novel analgesic

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    Dewan Roshan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tapentadol is a novel, centrally acting analgesic with dual mechanism of action, combining mu-opioid receptor agonism with noradrenaline reuptake inhibition in the same molecule. It has an improved side effect profile when compared to opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The dual mechanism of action makes Tapentadol a useful analgesic to treat acute, chronic, and neuropathic pain.

  6. Tapentadol hydrochloride: A novel analgesic

    OpenAIRE

    Dewan Roshan Singh; Kusha Nag; Shetti, Akshaya N.; Krishnaveni, N.

    2013-01-01

    Tapentadol is a novel, centrally acting analgesic with dual mechanism of action, combining mu-opioid receptor agonism with noradrenaline reuptake inhibition in the same molecule. It has an improved side effect profile when compared to opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The dual mechanism of action makes Tapentadol a useful analgesic to treat acute, chronic, and neuropathic pain.

  7. The future of topical analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnstein, Paul M

    2013-07-01

    Topically applied analgesic therapies have been used throughout history to treat a variety of patient conditions that present with pain. Before modem pharmaceuticals became readily available, mud-based emollients, salves, cold therapies, and other natural remedies were often used. Now we have effective therapies and are developing advanced topical analgesics as we learn more about the physiology and pathophysiology of pain. The use of topical analgesics may be associated with fewer patient systemic side effects than are seen with oral, parenteral, or transdermally administered agents, making the topical route of administration attractive to prescribers and patients. With further refinement of existing drugs and the development of novel agents, topical analgesics may offer relief for treating patient pain conditions that are currently challenging to treat, such as pain resulting from burns, wound debridement, and pressure ulcers. Recognizing the value of a multimodal approach, topical analgesics may offer a therapeutic option that can become part of a comprehensive treatment plan for the patient. With continued advancements in targeted drug-delivery systems, topical analgesics may be able to provide a method to prevent or reverse the phenomena of peripheral and central sensitization, or the neuroplastic changes believed to be responsible for the transition from acute to chronic pain states in patients. For those patients at risk for developing chronic pain states, such as complex regional pain syndrome, the combination of cutaneous stimulation (achieved through rubbing during application) and analgesic effects produced by the drug itself may prevent the disabling pain that often emerges during the subacute phase of disease. In summary, better utilization of currently available topical analgesics and continued research promise to ensure that topical analgesics are, and will continue to be, important tools in the treatment of patients with resistant pain. PMID

  8. LABORATORY MODELS FOR SCREENING ANALGESICS

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    Parle Milind

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a complex unpleasant phenomenon composed of sensory experiences that include time, space, intensity, emotion, cognition and motivation. Analgesics are the agents, which selectively relieve pain by acting in the CNS or by peripheral pain mechanisms without significantly altering consciousness. Analgesics may be narcotic or non-narcotic. The study of pain in animals raises ethical, philosophical and technical problems. Philosophically, there is a problem that pain cannot be monitored directly in animals but can only be measured by examining their responses to nociceptive stimuli. The observed reactions are almost always motor responses ranging from spinal reflexes to complex behavior. The animal models employed for screening of analgesic agents, include Pain-state models based on the use of thermal stimuli, mechanical stimuli, electrical stimuli and chemical stimuli. The neuronal basis of most of the above laboratory models is poorly understood, however their application is profitable in predicting analgesic activity of newly discovered substances.

  9. Pure analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

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    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pure analgesics are only rarely used by Italian clinicians and this holds true also for rheumatologists. This work is concerned with an evaluation of the use of analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic during the period 1989-1999. Methods: The records of 1705 patients consecutively seen at the clinic were downloaded on a specifically built website. Results: 4469 visits were considered. In 260 of them (5.8%, analgesics were prescribed to 234 (13.7% patients. The number of patients with a prescription of analgesics steadily increased during the years 1989-1999. The diagnoses in patients assuming analgesics were: osteoarthritis (47.1%, inflammatory arthritis (24.2%, soft tissue rheumatisms (13.7%, nonspecific arthralgia/myalgia (7.5%, and connective tissue diseases (2.6%. Peripheral analgesics were used in 188 (82.5% patients and central analgesics were used in the remaining 40 patients (17.5%. Analgesic drugs were used mainly in degenerative joint conditions. The indications for analgesics in the 55 patients with inflammatory arthrits were: (a partial or total remission of arthritis; for this reason non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were no longer required in 18 patients; (b to increase the analgesic effect of NSAIDs in 23 patients; (c contraindications to NSAIDs in 14 patients (renal failure in 2 patients, gastritis in 10, allergy and bleeding in the remaining two. Conclusions: About 14% of our outpatients were treated with analgesics with an increasing trend in the examined period. The main indications for analgesics are degenerative conditions but they can be used also in selected patients with arthritis.

  10. Analgesic Activity of Sphaeranthus indicus Linn

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    P. Malairajan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol extracts of the whole plant Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. (ALSI (Compositae was tested for analgesic activity by tail immersion method in rat models. The test extracts were tested at 250 mg and 500 mg/kg body weight. The analgesic activity was assessed by keeping pentazocine 10 mg/kg as standard drug. The parameters studied were tail withdrawal reflex and percentage protection. In tail immersion method ALSI pretreatment caused significant increase in analgesic activity and percentage protection found was 66.6 and 67.4 respectively. The result suggested that ALSI possess significant and dose dependent analgesic activity.

  11. Analgesic principle from Abutilon indicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M; Amin, S; Islam, M; Takahashi, M; Okuyama, E; Hossain, C F

    2000-04-01

    Bioactivity guided isolation of Abutilon indicum yielded eugenol [4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol], which was found to possess significant analgesic activity. At doses of 10, 30, and 50 mg/kg body weight, eugenol exhibited 21.30 (p < 0.05), 42.25 (p < 0.01) and 92.96% (p < 0.001) inhibition of acetic acid induced writhing in mice. At a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight, eugenol showed 33.40% (p < 0.05) prolongation of tail flicking time determined by the radiant heat method. PMID:10798248

  12. Analgesic Potential of Essential Oils

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    José Ferreira Sarmento-Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pain is an unpleasant sensation associated with a wide range of injuries and diseases, and affects approximately 20% of adults in the world. The discovery of new and more effective drugs that can relieve pain is an important research goal in both the pharmaceutical industry and academia. This review describes studies involving antinociceptive activity of essential oils from 31 plant species. Botanical aspects of aromatic plants, mechanisms of action in pain models and chemical composition profiles of the essential oils are discussed. The data obtained in these studies demonstrate the analgesic potential of this group of natural products for therapeutic purposes.

  13. Acute Metabolic Changes Associated With Analgesic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine Maria; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Simonsen, Carsten Wiberg;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is used to measure brain metabolites. Limited data exist on the analgesic-induced spectroscopy response. This was an explorative study with the aims to investigate the central effects of two analgesic drugs, an opioid and a selective...

  14. [Mechanism of action of the analgesic flupirtine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, B; Herz, A; Jakovlev, V; Tibes, U

    1985-01-01

    To answer the questions of mode and site of action partly supplementary, partly new investigations with flupirtine (Katadolon) were carried out which are described below. The investigation for opiate receptor affinity of flupirtine in rat brain homogenate did not show any reduction in 3He-etorphine binding up to the highest concentration of flupirtine of 10(-5) mol/1. This result suggests that flupirtine either has a very low opiate receptor affinity or lacks it fully. Therefore the analgesic activity of flupirtine is not based on opiate mechanism. The intracerebroventricular and intrathecal administration of flupirtine and the other analgesics tested showed dose dependent analgesic activity in doses which, when applied systemically, did not cause any analgesia in rats. Thus these substances show cerebral or spinal analgesic activity. In relation to the effective doses (ED50 in micrograms/rat) flupirtine was of the same efficacy in both kinds of administration. Pethidine tested comparatively was found to be less potent by intrathecal than by intracerebroventricular application. On the other hand, morphine was weaker by intracerebroventricular than by intrathecal application. As in the experiments by oral administration, naloxone did not show any effect on the analgesic activity of flupirtine, neither by intracerebroventricular nor by intrathecal application. On the other hand, the analgesic effects of pethidine and morphine were completely suppressed by naloxone. These results demonstrate that the analgesic activity of flupirtine is not caused by the opiate mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3002399

  15. Dose-related analgesic effects of flupirtine.

    OpenAIRE

    Hummel, T; Friedmann, T; Pauli, E.; Niebch, G.; Borbe, H. O.; Kobal, G

    1991-01-01

    1. Flupirtine is a novel and, in all probability, centrally acting, analgesic. The present investigation was conducted in order to investigate dose-related effects of perorally administered flupirtine in man, with special regard to specifically analgesic actions, employing a model based on pain-related chemosomatosensory evoked potentials and subjective intensity estimates of painful stimuli. 2. Plasma concentrations of flupirtine measured 2 h after dosing linearly increased as a function of ...

  16. Alcohol, tobacco and analgesics--Busselton, 1972.

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    Woodings, T

    1975-08-01

    Mass health examinations carried out in Busselton in November and December, 1972, revealed that drinking and smoking were more prevalent amongst men, whereas more women took analgesic drugs. Compared with older age groups more young people consumed alcohol, tobacco and analgesics. Younger people are also taking up smoking and drinking at earlier ages than the older age groups. These findings stress the need for better health education to alter the attitudes of younger people. The people of Busselton would support legislation to allow spot breathalyser tests for drivers, women (70%) providing stronger support than men (57%). This suggests that public opinion could support continuing legislation to combat road accidents. Comparisons between the North Shore, Sydney, and Busselton populations indicated somewhat higher proportions of the urban people were consuming alcohol, tobacco and analgesics, particularly urban women. However, both Australian samples revealed disturbingly high proportions of subjects taking excessive monthly quantities of analgesics (3% to 5%) compared with the United Kingdom (2-8%). Previous reports of the high proportion of Traralgon people taking drugs or medication is supported by the Busselton data, which suggest the Australia requires stricter statutory control of analgesics, compulsory warnings on labels and restriction of sales to pharmacists. PMID:1160770

  17. Use of analgesic drugs and risk of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammundsen, Henriette B; Faber, Mette T; Jensen, Allan;

    2012-01-01

    The role of analgesic drug use in development of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. We examined the association between analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer. In addition, we examined whether the association differed according to histological types.......The role of analgesic drug use in development of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. We examined the association between analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer. In addition, we examined whether the association differed according to histological types....

  18. Analgesic effects of dexamethasone in burn injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Kehlet, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Glucocorticoids are well-known adjuvant analgesics in certain chronic pain states. There is, however, a paucity of data on their analgesic efficacy in acute pain. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the analgesic effects of dexamethasone in a validated burn m...... administration of dexamethasone 2 hours before a burn injury does not reduce the inflammatory-mediated changes in quantitative sensory thresholds, pain perception, or skin erythema in humans....... differences between treatments in regard to skin erythema (P >.8), thermal or mechanical thresholds (P >.2), thermal or mechanical pain response (P >.2), or mechanical secondary hyperalgesia (P >.2). Dexamethasone had no analgesic effects in normal skin. CONCLUSIONS: The study indicates that systemic...... model of acute inflammatory pain in humans. METHODS: Twenty-two volunteers were investigated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Intravenous dexamethasone 8 mg or placebo was administered on 2 separate study days. Two hours after drug administration, a first-degree burn...

  19. Antimicrobial and analgesic activities of Wendlandia thyrsoidea leaf extracts

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    Basavaraja Basavanakote

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The leaves of Wendlandia thyrsoidea were extracted with different solvents and screened for their antimicrobial and analgesic activities. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated using the minimum inhibitory concentration method and the analgesic activity was carried out by the acetic acid-induced writhing method. The ethyl acetate extract exhibited potent antimicrobial activity, whereas, the methanol extract showed a significant analgesic activity.

  20. Analgesic therapy of skeletal metastases with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionculide therapy of bone metastases is an unspecific palliative treatment of metastatic skeletal pain especially useful in patients suffering in multiple sites. In these cases the long-term administration of increasing doses of analgesics such as opiate which have important side effects can be reduced. The aim of this therapy is pain relief and improvement of quality of life in patients with advanced cancer. This report is focusing on options, indications and contraindications of the radionuclide therapy of metastases and on used radionuclides such as Strontium-89, Yttrium-90, Rhenium-186 (188) and Samarium-153. In oncology, the analgesic therapy using boneseeking radiopharmaceuticals in combination to drug administration should gain more importance because this therapy can be administered on an outpatient basis. (orig.)

  1. Three Newly Approved Analgesics: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Saraghi, Mana; Hersh, Elliot V.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, three new analgesic entities, tapentadol immediate release (Nucynta) diclofenac potassium soft gelatin capsules (Zipsor), and bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension (EXPAREL) were granted US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to treat acute pain. Tapentadol immediate-release is a both a mu-opioid agonist and a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, and is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Diclofenac potassium soft gelatin capsules are a novel formula...

  2. Analgesic Treatment in Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenberg, Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    This review aimed to present an overview of the randomized controlled trials investigating analgesic regimens used in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery. Literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases in August 2013 in accordance to PRISMA guidelines. The...... literature search identified nine studies eligible for inclusion. The administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local anesthetics (intraperitoneally or subfascially/subcutaneously), transversus abdominis plane block, dexmedetomidine, and ketamine may improve analgesia compared to placebo...

  3. The analgesic activity of morphine-6-glucuronide.

    OpenAIRE

    Osborne, R; Van P. Thompson; Joel, S; Trew, D; Patel, N; Slevin, M.

    1992-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics, cardio-respiratory effects and analgesic effects of intravenous morphine-6-glucuronide were studied in 20 cancer patients with pain. Four different dose levels (0.5, 1, 2, and 4 mg 70 kg-1) were studied. Plasma concentrations of morphine-6-glucuronide were measured for 12 h after dosing. Pulse rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure were monitored, and pain relief was measured using two rating scales and a visual analogue scale. 2. The mean elimination half-life (+/...

  4. Analgesics and sedatives in vascular interventionist radiologic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventionist radiology routinely requires the use of different drugs (analgesics and sedatives) in the course of a procedure. Aside from their therapeutic action, these drugs can produce secondary or undesirable effects, making necessary an in-depth knowledge of them to assure their safe and efficient management. The aim of this work is to provide the vascular interventionist radiologist with additional information on the management of those drugs that contribute to minimizing patient discomfort and pain in interventionist procedures. Author

  5. Recent pharmacological advances in paediatric analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B J; Palmer, G M

    2006-08-01

    Growth and development are two linked processes that distinguish children from adults. The use of size as the primary covariate during pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses allows exploration of the effects of age. Allometric scaling models have assisted understanding of the developmental clearance changes in common analgesic drugs such as paracetamol, morphine, tramadol and local anaesthetics agents. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (pharmacogenomics [PG]) and their impact on hepatic drug metabolism for opioids, tramadol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and drug receptor responses are increasingly reported. Altered chemical structure or formulations of common analgesics alter pharmacodynamic (PD) effects enhancing safety and efficacy for NSAIDs by stereoselectivity and the addition of nitric oxide, for intravenous paracetamol by formulation and structural difference from propacetamol and for local anaesthetics through stereoselectivity. This article focuses upon recent data for analgesics used in paediatric pain management including paracetamol, NSAIDs, morphine, tramadol, amide local anaesthetics and ketamine. It centres on PK and clinical studies in neonates, infants and children. PG studies are acknowledged as potentially allowing individual drug therapy tailoring through a decrease in between-patient population variability, although the impact of PG in the very young is less certain. There are few data describing age-related PD changes in children despite recognition that the number, affinity and type of receptors or the availability of natural ligands changes with age. PMID:16854558

  6. Pattern of use of analgesics in a surgical unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Abdullah Al Masud; Syed Ashrafuzzaman; Md. Jalaluddin Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the prescribing pattern of analgesics in post-operative patients in a surgical unit. Total number of 180 prescriptions containing analgesics was collected randomly. The only drug in the operation day that was used was pethidine (90.6%). Patients (9.4%) did not receive any analgesics in the operation day. Associated analgesics in the operation day were either tramadol (42.2 %) or ketorolac (54.4%). Only 3.3% did not receive any such drugs. In first po...

  7. Paracetamol and analgesic nephropathy: Are you kidneying me?

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    Waddington F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Freya Waddington, Mark Naunton, Jackson Thomas Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia Introduction: Analgesic nephropathy is a disease resulting from the frequent use of combinations of analgesic medications over many years, leading to significant impairment of renal function. The observation of a large number of cases of renal failure in patients abusing analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin led to the initial recognition of the nephrotoxicity from the use of analgesics. Phenacetin was subsequently exclusively blamed for this disease. However, the role of a single analgesic as a sole cause of analgesic nephropathy was challenged, and a number of researchers have since attempted to determine the extent of involvement of other analgesics including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, aspirin, and paracetamol. Case presentation: We present the case of an 83-year-old woman with a history of NSAID-induced nephropathy with poor pain control and reluctance to use paracetamol. We attempt to briefly review the evidence of paracetamol being implicated in the development of analgesic-induced nephropathy. Conclusion: There is a lack of concrete data regarding causative analgesics, including paracetamol. Patients should therefore not be withheld paracetamol, an effective and commonly recommended agent, for fear of worsening renal function. Keywords: kidney, paracetamol, nephropathy, phenacetin

  8. Analgesic effect of Persian Gulf Conus textile venom

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    Nasim Tabaraki

    2014-10-01

    Results: SDS-PAGE indicated 12 bands ranged between 6 and 180 KDa. Finally, ten ng of Conus crude venom showed the best analgesic activity in formalin test. No death observed up to 100 mg/kg. Analgesic activity of crude venom was more significant (P

  9. Safety of nimesulide, meloxicam and rofecoxib as alternative analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, G; Kalyoncu, A F

    2000-01-01

    Paracetamole and codeine are safe alternative analgesics for analgesic intolerant patients. Recently marketed selective and specific COX2 inhibitors are also considered to be safe for this group of patients. In this survey we wanted to disclose the safety of nimesulide and meloxicam and rofecoxib where they have been marketed recently in Turkey. PMID:11269899

  10. Venom-based biotoxins as potential analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazerani, Parisa; Cairns, Brian Edwin

    2014-11-01

    Chronic pain is a common debilitating condition with negative social and economic consequences. Management of chronic pain is challenging and the currently available medications do not yet yield satisfactory outcomes for many patients. Venom-derived biotoxins from various venomous species consist of several substances with different structures and compositions that include peptides. A unique characteristic of some venom-based biotoxins is the ability to block essential components of the pain signaling system, notably ion channels. This property is leading to the evaluation of the potential of biotoxins as analgesics to manage chronic pain. In addition to their therapeutic potential, biotoxins have also been essential tools to probe mechanisms underlying pain signaling, channelopathies and receptor expression. This review discusses venom-derived peptidergic biotoxins that are in preclinical stages or already in clinical trials. Some promising results from preliminary in vitro studies, ongoing challenges and unmet needs will also be discussed. PMID:25234848

  11. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION FOR ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF MAMSYADI KWATHA

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    Shreevathsa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Siddha Yoga Sangraha of Yadavji Trikamji Acharya, states about Mamsyadi kwatha, an Ayurvedic formulation which is said to be effective in minor mental disorders. The ingredients of Mamsyadi kwatha are Jatamamsi (Nardistachys jatamansi DC, Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera Linn and Parasika yavani (Hyoscymus niger Linn, in 8:4:1 ratio respectively. The test formulation was subjected to assess its analgesic effect. The model selected for the assessment of analgesic effect was tail flick test, in albino mice. The test formulation possesses analgesic effect, which is mainly due to its component Parasika yavani.

  12. Phytochemical Screening and Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Oroxylum indicum

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    Das, B. K.; Al-Amin, M. M.; Russel, S. M.; Kabir, S.; Bhattacherjee, R.; Hannan, J. M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study phytochemical screening and analgesic activity of ethanol extract of Oroxylum indicum. The dried powder of the barks of the plant was extracted with 95% ethanol and was subjected to various phytochemical tests to ascertain the principle constituents contained in the extract. The result revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, glycosides in the ethanol extract of Oroxylum indicum. The extract was screened for analgesic activity by using hot plate, acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin test. The ethanol extract of the plant at two different doses (250 and 500 mg/kg) showed significant (Pflavonoids and tannins might be responsible for the analgesic activity. We suggest that ethanol extract of Oroxylum indicum might have potential chemical constituents that could be used in the future for the development of novel analgesic agent. PMID:25593396

  13. Radioreceptor assay of narcotic analgesics in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevel, J; Thomas, J; Richards, M L; Sadée, W

    1984-09-01

    A sensitive radioreceptor assay (RRA) to determine the serum concentrations of fentanyl, pentazocine and morphine was developed on the basis of the drug's competition with a labeled tracer ((3)H-naloxone) for the membrane bound opioid receptor in rat brain homogenates. The binding data were computer-fitted to a standard curve by means of nonlinear least square regression. Sensitivity of the assay applied directly to serum samples without extraction was limited to approximately 3, 5 and 25 ng/ml for fentanyl, morphine and pentazocine, respectively, because of endogenous plasma constituents that interfere with the opioid receptor binding. With the use of petrol-ether extraction the sensitivity was improved to 0.3 ng/ml fentanyl and 3 ng/ml pentazocine (0.3 ml serum samples). No RRA-active metabolites were detectable after HPLC separation of serum from a patient treated with fentanyl. The plasma concentration time course of fentanyl in a patient, measured by RRA, was similar to that obtained by a radioimmunoassay (RIA). The RRA represents a general procedure for the detection of clinically used opioid analgesics and their active metabolites. PMID:24277330

  14. Caffeine Accelerates Absorption and Enhances the Analgesic Effect of Acetaminophen

    OpenAIRE

    Renner, Bertold; Clarke, Geoff; Grattan, Tim; Beisel, Angelika; Mueller, Christian; Werner, Ulrike; Kobal, Gerd; Brune, Kay

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the analgesic effect of acetaminophen compared to a combination of both caffeine and acetaminophen or caffeine alone using tonic and phasic pain stimulation. Twenty-four subjects were treated orally with 1000 mg acetaminophen, 130 mg caffeine, and a combination of both in a 4-way crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects were assessed by means of an experimental pain model based on pain-related cortical pot...

  15. Analgesic use - prevalence, biomonitoring and endocrine and reproductive effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David Møbjerg; Mazaud-Guittot, Sverine; Gaudriault, Pierre;

    2016-01-01

    policies, habits, accessibility, disease patterns and the age distribution of each population. Biomonitoring indicates ubiquitous and high human exposure to paracetamol and to salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of acetylsalicylic acid. Furthermore, evidence suggests that analgesics can have......Paracetamol and NSAIDs, in particular acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and ibuprofen, are among the most used and environmentally released pharmaceutical drugs. The differences in international trends in the sale and consumption of mild analgesics reflect differences in marketing, governmental...

  16. [Dextromethorphan enhances analgesic activity of propacetamol--experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrogowski, Jan; Wordliczek, Jerzy; Przewłocka, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    While many pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that the addition of N-methyl-d--aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, such as dextromethorphan, to opioid analgesics, such as morphine may enhance the analgesic effects. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of non-competitive NMDA antagonists and paracetamol (propacetamol) on pain threshold and analgesic potency of this drugs and their combinations in formalin model for pain in rats. Intraperitoneal administration of paracetamol only in doses of 100 g/kg or higher resulted in increase of pain threshold in tail flick and paw pressure tests. The results of our study suggest that there was no significant difference in pain threshold between separate administration of dextromethorphan and in combination with paracetamol. In a formalin model for pain we have shown that paracetamol in non-analgesic doses (10 mg/kg) administered in combination with dextrometorphan, ketamine and mamantine was more effective than those drugs given separately but the best analgesic effect was obtained when combination of paracetamol and dextromethorphan was applied. The addition of higher doses of these combined drugs, that is paracetamol and all three NMDA antagonists did not result in enhancement of dose-dependant analgesia. In conclusion it should be stated that NMDA antagonists improve analgesic effect of paracetamol in the formalin model for pain. although only to a limited extend. PMID:17037292

  17. Tramadol: a new centrally acting analgesic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K S; Han, N H

    1997-03-15

    The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, adverse effects, and dosage and administration of tramadol are reviewed. Tramadol is a synthetic analogue of codeine that binds to mu opiate receptors and inhibits norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake. It is rapidly and extensively absorbed after oral doses and is metabolized in the liver. Analgesia begins within one hour and starts to peak in two hours. In patients with moderate postoperative pain, i.v. or i.m. tramadol is roughly equal in efficacy to meperidine or morphine; for severe acute pain, tramadol is less effective than morphine. Oral tramadol can also be effective after certain types of surgery. Tramadol and meperidine are equally effective in postoperative patient-controlled analgesia. In epidural administration for pain after abdominal surgery, tramadol is more effective than bupivacaine but less effective than morphine. In patients with ureteral calculi, both dipyrone and butylscopolamine are more effective than tramadol. For labor pain, i.m. tramadol works as well as meperidine and is less likely to cause neonatal respiratory depression. Oral tramadol is as effective as codeine for acute dental pain. In several types of severe or refractory cancer pain, tramadol is effective, but less so than morphine; for other types of chronic pain, such as low-back pain, oral tramadol works as well as acetaminophen-codeine. Common adverse effects of tramadol include dizziness, nausea, dry mouth, and sedation. The abuse potential seems low. The recommended oral dosage is 50-100 mg every four to six hours. Tramadol is an effective, if expensive, alternative to other analgesics in some clinical situations. PMID:9075493

  18. Role of serotonin in pathogenesis of analgesic induced headache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikiatkhachorn, A.

    1999-12-16

    Analgesic abuse has recently been recognized as a cause of deterioration in primary headache patients. Although the pathogenesis of this headache transformation is still obscure, and alteration of central pain control system is one possible mechanism. A number of recent studies indicated that simple analgesics exert their effect by modulating the endogenous pain control system rather than the effect at the peripheral tissue, as previously suggested. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine ; 5-HT) has long been known to play a pivotal role in the pain modulatory system in the brainstem. In the present study, we investigated the changes in 5-HT system in platelets and brain tissue. A significant decrease in platelet 5-HT concentration (221.8{+-}30.7, 445.3{+-}37.4 and 467.2{+-}38.5 ng/10{sup 9} platelets, for patients with analgesic-induced headache and migraine patients, respectively, p<0.02) were evident in patients with analgesic induced headache. Chronic paracetamol administration induced a decrease in 5-HT{sub 2} serotonin receptor in cortical and brain stem tissue in experimental animals (B{sub max}=0.93{+-}0.04 and 1.79{+-}0.61 pmol/mg protein for paracetamol treated rat and controls, respectively, p<0.05). Our preliminary results suggested that chronic administration of analgesics interferes with central and peripheral 5-HT system and therefore possibly alters the 5-HT dependent antinociceptive system. (author)

  19. Use of analgesic drugs for pain management in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, I; Chambers, J P

    2012-03-01

    Awareness of pain and its effects is increasing within the veterinary profession, but pain management in food animals has been neglected. Sheep seldom receive analgesics despite various conditions, husbandry practice and experimental procedures being known to be painful, e.g. footrot, mastitis, vaginal prolapse, castration, vasectomy, penis deviation, and laparoscopy. The evidence supporting use of analgesic drugs in this species is reviewed here. Opioid agonists are of dubious efficacy and are short acting. α₂-agonists such as xylazine are good, short-lived analgesics, but induce hypoxaemia. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) such as ketoprofen provide long-lasting analgesia, but not as marked as that from α₂-agonists; they should be more widely used for inflammatory pain. Local anaesthetics reliably block pain signals, but may also induce motor blockade. Balanced analgesia using more than one class of drug, such as an α₂ agonist (e.g. medetomidine) and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist (e.g. ketamine), with the combination selected for the circumstances, probably provides the best analgesia for severe pain. It should be noted that there are no approved analgesic drugs for use in sheep and therefore the use of such drugs in this species has to be off-label. This information may be useful to veterinary practitioners, biomedical researchers, and regulators in animal welfare to develop rational analgesic regimens which ultimately may improve the health and welfare of sheep in both farming and experimental conditions. PMID:22352925

  20. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Melanthera scandens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jude E Okokon; Anwanga E Udoh; Samuel G Frank; Louis U Amazu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of leaf extract of Melanthera scandens (M. scandens). Methods: The crude leaf extract (39-111 mg/kg) of M. scandens was investigated for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using various experimental models. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carragenin, egg-albumin induced oedema models, while acetic acid, formalin-induced paw licking and thermal-induced pain models were used to evaluate the antinociceptive property. Results: The extract caused a significant (P<0.05 - 0.001) dose-dependent reduction of inflammation and pains induced by different agents used. Conclusions: The leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects which may be mediated through the phytochemical constituents of the plant.

  1. Analgesic activity of various extracts of Punica granatum (Linn flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborthy Guno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracts of flowers of Punica granatum (Linn. (N.O. Family Punicaceae were investigated for analgesic activity in mice using hot plate method. The flowers of Punica granatum (Linn were collected from the local market of Mumbai, Maharashtra and were in a dried condition. The dried powdered flowers (500 gm were extracted in a soxhlet apparatus by using different solvents. Mice weighing 15-25 gm were taken for the experiment. The reaction time of animals in all the groups was noted at 30, 60 and 120 min after drug administration. All data were analyzed with Student-t test. The various extract of the flowers of Punica granatum (Linn showed significant analgesic activity at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight. A maximum analgesic activity was found at 60 min, after drug administration, which was equivalent to the standard drug used as morphine sulphate.

  2. Drug Repurposing for the Development of Novel Analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisignano, Marco; Parnham, Michael J; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2016-03-01

    Drug development consumes huge amounts of time and money and the search for novel analgesics, which are urgently required, is particularly difficult, having resulted in many setbacks in the past. Drug repurposing - the identification of new uses for existing drugs - is an alternative approach, which bypasses most of the time- and cost-consuming components of drug development. Recent, unexpected findings suggest a role for several existing drugs, such as minocycline, ceftriaxone, sivelestat, and pioglitazone, as novel analgesics in chronic and neuropathic pain states. Here, we discuss these findings as well as their proposed antihyperalgesic mechanisms and outline the merits of pathway-based repurposing screens, in combination with bioinformatics and novel cellular reprogramming techniques, for the identification of novel analgesics. PMID:26706620

  3. Cytotoxic and analgesic potentials of papaver pavoninum fisch and mey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanolic extract of whole plant of Papaver pavoninum was used to investigate its cytotoxic and analgesic potentials. Brine Shrimp Cytotoxic bioassay showed that 100 and 1000 micro g/ml doses produced highly significant cytotoxicities causing 83.3 ± 1.924 percentage and 96.7 ± 1.924 percentage lethalities respectively, with LD50 value of 2.54 micro g/ml. The analgesic bioassay, using acetic acid induced writhing behavior in mice showed that all the three doses of the extract (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) were highly effective and even more effective than the standard analgesic drug (Diclofenic Sodium), which reduced the number of writhes by 13.54 percentage, while the three doses of the plant extract reduced the writhing by 36.91 percentage, 57.01 percentage and 68.39 percentage respectively. (author)

  4. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy - V. Analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological treatment of pain has very ancient origins, when plant-derived products were used, including mandrake extracts and opium, a dried latex obtained from Papaver somniferum. In the XVI and XVII centuries opium came into the preparation of two compounds widely used for pain relief: laudanum and Dover’s powder. The analgesic properties of extracts of willow bark were then recognized and later, in the second half of the XIX century, experimental studies on chemically synthesized analgesics were planned, thus promoting the marketing of some derivatives of para-amino-phenol and pyrazole, the predecessors of paracetamol and metamizol. In the XX century, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were synthesized, such as phenylbutazone, which was initially considered primarily a pain medication. The introduction on the market of centrally acting analgesics, such as tramadol, sometimes used in the treatment of rheumatic pain. is quite recent.

  5. Analgesic effect of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of clove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Kamkar Asl

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The beneficial effects of clove on toothache have been well documented. We have also previously shown the analgesic effects of clove essential oil. The present work was done to investigate the analgesic effects of the aqueous extract of clove using hot plate test. The possible role of opioid receptors in the analgesic effects of clove was also investigated using naloxone. Materials and Methods: Ninety male mice were divided into nine groups: (1 Saline, (2-4 Aaqueous (Aq 50, Aq 100, and Aq 200 groups which were treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg of aqueous extract of clove, respectively, (5-7 Ethanolic (Eth 50, Eth 100, and Eth 200 groups which were treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg of ethanolic extract of clove, respectively, and (8-9 Aq 100- Naloxone and Aq 200- Naloxone which were pretreated with 4 mg/kg of naloxone before injection of 100 or 200 mg/kg of the aqueous extract. The hot plate test was performed as a base record 10 min before injection of drugs and consequently repeated every 10 minutes after the injection. Results: The maximal percent effect (MPE in the animal groups treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg of aqueous extract was significantly higher than the control group. Pretreatment with naloxone reduced the analgesic effects of both 100 and 200 mg/kg of the aqueous extract. Administration of all three doses of the ethanloic extract also non-significantly increased the MPE. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that aqueous extract of clove has analgesic effect in mice demonstrated by hot plate test which is reversible by naloxone. The role of opioid system in the analgesic effect of clove might be suggested. However, more investigations are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism(s.

  6. Serial Analgesic Consumptions and Predictors of Intravenous Patient-controlled Analgesia with Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the dynamics of analgesic consumption regarding intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) during postoperative period is rather complex partly due to between-patient variation and partly due to within-patient variation. A statistical method was proposed to classify serial analgesic consumption into different classifications that were further taken as the multiple outcomes on which to explore the associated predictors. Methods: We retrospectively included 3284 patients administrated by IVPCA for 3 days after surgery. A repeated measurement design corresponding to serial analgesic consumption variables defined as six-hour total analgesic consumptions was adopted. After determining the numbers of clusters, serial analgesic consumptions were classified into several homogeneous subgroups. Factors associated with new classifications were identified and quantified with a multinominal logistic regression model. Results: Three distinct analgesic classifications were aggregated, including “high”, ”middle” and “low” level of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. The mean analgesic consumptions on 12 successive analgesic consumptions at 6-hour interval of each classification consistently revealed a decreasing trend. As the trends were almost parallel with time, this suggests the time-invariant proportionality of analgesic consumption between the levels of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. Patient’s characteristics, like age, gender, weight, height, and cancer status, were significant factors associated with analgesic classifications. Surgical sites had great impacts on analgesic classifications. Discussion: The serial analgesic consumptions were simplified into 3 analgesic consumptions classifications. The identified predictors are useful to recognize patient’s analgesic classifications before using IVPCA. This study explored a new approach to analysing dynamic changes of postoperative analgesic consumptions. PMID:26710218

  7. Analgesic effect of clove essential oil in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Hosseini; Mina Kamkar Asl; Hassan Rakhshandeh

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Results obtained from literature reviews and human studies have shown the analgesic effects of clove plant in toothache. The present work was undertaken in order to investigate the possible analgesic effect of clove oil in mice. Materials and Methods: Fifty mice were divided into 5 groups: 1) Saline; 2) Essential oil (Ess) 2%, 3) Ess 5%, 4) Ess10% and 5) Ess 20%. The hot plate test (55±0.2 °C; Cut-off 60 sec) was performed as a base record 15 min before injection of drugs (Salin...

  8. [Analgesic effects of cannabinoids on central pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igon'kina, S I; Churiukanov, M V; Churiukanov, V V; Kukushkin, M L

    2011-01-01

    It was shown that cannabinoids anandamide, HU210 and WIN 55,212-2 inhibit both spontaneous episodes of pain and mechanical allodynia in rats with central pain syndrome caused by disturbance of inhibitory processes in the dorsal horns of lumbar spinal cord. The analgesic effect is most pronounced in the intrathecal route of administration. The intensity of analgesic actions of cannabinoids on the central pain syndrome in rats, depending on the drug is as follows: HU210 > WIN 55,212-2 > anandamide. PMID:22359935

  9. Analgesic profile of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from Marrubium vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, M M; de Jesus, R A; Cechinel-Filho, V; Schlemper, V

    1998-04-01

    Marrubium vulgare L. is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to cure a variety of diseases. Recently we have demonstrated that a hydroalcoholic extract of this plant showed significant, nonspecific antispasmodic effects on isolated smooth muscle. In this report, we have investigated the possible analgesic effects of the same hydroalcoholic extract in different models of pain in mice. The results suggest that this extract exhibits significant analgesic activity, antagonizing chemically-induced acute pain. Such effects may be related to the presence of steroids and terpenes, which were detected by TLC analysis. PMID:23195761

  10. The analgesic efficacy of flurbiprofen compared to acetaminophen with codeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S A; Kupperman, A

    1991-01-01

    In a single-dose, parallel group, randomized block treatment allocation study, the relative analgesic efficacy of flurbiprofen, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, was compared to acetaminophen 650 mg with codeine 60 mg, zomepirac sodium 100 mg, and placebo. A total of 226 post-surgical dental patients (146 females and 80 males) participated in the study. Flurbiprofen in 50 mg and 100 mg dosages demonstrated effective analgesic activity with the 100 mg dosage being at least as effective as the acetaminophen/codeine combination. The results of this study support previous work on flurbiprofen. PMID:1930699

  11. Ethical Considerations for Analgesic Use in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matava, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of commonly used analgesics in athletes and the ethical implications of their use in athletic settings. Given the highly competitive nature of modern-day sports and the economic impact of athletic performance at elite levels, athletes feel more compelled than ever to play with injury, which has led to the widespread use of a variety of analgesic agents. An ethical dilemma often ensues for team physicians who must balance the medical implications of these drugs with pressure from players, coaches, and management. The most commonly used agents and their ethical and rational use are discussed. PMID:26832973

  12. Evaluation of analgesic activity of Aegle marmelos steam bark in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarang Gajanan Ghodki

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: AMSBAE has analgesic activity. The analgesic activity of AMSBAE was comparable to that of tramadol and Aspirin. Hence, AMSBAE could be a possible alternative to NSAIDs. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 1081-1086

  13. Stress and use of over-the-counter analgesics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke Jenny; Ekholm, Ola; Holstein, Bjørn E; Andersen, Anette; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2011-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of over-the-counter analgesic (OTCA) use and perceived stress among 25 to 44-year-old men and women from 1994 to 2005; to examine the association between stress and OTCA use over time, and to explore whether the association attenuates when controlled by stress...

  14. Antiinflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of Mimusops elengi Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnima A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, 70% ethanol extract of Mimusops elengi Linn. bark was assessed for antiinflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in animals. The antiinflammatory activity of ethanol extract of Mimusops elengi (200 mg/kg, p.o was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma models. Analgesic effect was evaluated using acetic acid-induced writhing and Eddy′s hot plate models and antipyretic activity was assessed by Brewer′s yeast-induced pyrexia in rats. The ethanol extract of Mimusops elengi (200 mg/kg, p.o significantly inhibited the carrageenan-induced paw oedema at 3rd and 4th h and in cotton pellet model it reduced the transudative weight and little extent of granuloma weight. In analgesic models the ethanol extract of Mimusops elengi decreases the acetic acid-induced writhing and it also reduces the rectal temperature in Brewer′s yeast induced pyrexia. However, Mimusops elengi did not increase the latency time in the hot plate test. These results show that ethanol extract of Mimusops elengi has an antiinflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activity.

  15. Evaluation of analgesic activity of Emblica officinalis in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhomik Goel

    2014-04-01

    Results: Emblica officinalis extract did not produced statistically significant (p>0.05 analgesia when compared with the control group in hot plate latency, but produced a statistically significant reduction in 6% NaCl induced abdominal writhing (pEmblica officinalis exhibit analgesic activity involving peripheral mechanisms. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 365-368

  16. [Analgesic abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in headache patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radat, F; Irachabal, S; Swendsen, J; Henry, P

    2002-01-01

    Headache patients frequently overuse analgesic medications: 20% of the patients from headache centers is concerned by this problem, which has been estimated to occur in four percent of the community migrainers. Frequent use of various types of headache medication may paradoxically cause an increase in headache attack frequency as well as their chronicisation due to potentially complex mechanisms of sensitization. Patients will enter into a self- perpetuating cycle of daily headaches and use of symptomatic medications which can lead to addiction and to social and occupational impairement. Indeed, many patients will experience pharmacological tolerance and dependence but also by some kind of craving. International Headache Society qualify these patients as abusers referring mostly to the amount of substance ingested. Hence patients are labelled analgesic abusers . However, as many of these analgesic medications contained psychotropic substances (i.e. caffeine, codeine.), these patients may fulfill DSM IV criteria of dependance. Nevertheless, the dependance criteria should be adapted to chronic pain patients. Indeed, if pharmacological dependence and tolerance criteria are easy to apply in such patients, it is not the case for the criteria a great deal of time spent to obtain substances, to use substances or to recover from substances effects . As analgesic medications are legally obtained from medical practitioners, drug seeking behaviours are mostly: obtaining medications from multiple providers, repeating episodes of prescription loss and multiplying requests for early refills. Moreover the detrimental effects of analgesic abuse on psychosocial functioning is likely to be related to pain rather than to medication overuse. Finally the best indicator of addictive behaviors in such patients, is the loss of control over the use of analgesic medication despite the adverse consequences over pain. Comorbidity with addiction to other substances has never been specifically

  17. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0-10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0-10), and perceived analgesic needs (0-10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = -0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R (2) = 0.443, p Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements. PMID:27143966

  18. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD. Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI, Fear of Pain (FPQ, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0–10, anticipated analgesic threshold (0–10, and perceived analgesic needs (0–10. Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r=0.349, anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r=-0.349, and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r=0.313. Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R2=0.443, p<0.0001; expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R2=0.421, p<0.0001. Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements.

  19. Analgesic and antiinflammatory activity of kaur-16-en-19-oic acid from Annona reticulata L. bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Machindra J; Kolhe, Dinesh R; Wakte, Pravin S; Shinde, Devanand B

    2012-02-01

    Kaur-16-en-19-oic acid was isolated from the bark of Annona reticulata and studied for its analgesic and antiinflammatory activity. Analgesic activity was assessed using the hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhing, and the antiinflammatory activity using the carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method. Kaur-16-en-19-oic acid, at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg, exhibited significant (p < 0.05) analgesic and antiinflammatory activity. These activities were comparable to the standard drugs used, and furthermore the analgesic effect of kaur-16-en-19-oic acid was blocked by naloxone (2 mg/kg) in both analgesic models. PMID:21674631

  20. Impairment of aspirin antiplatelet effects by non-opioid analgesic medication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amin; Polzin; Thomas; Hohlfeld; Malte; Kelm; Tobias; Zeus

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay in prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects are associated with enhanced incidence of cardiovascular events. Comedication with non-opioid analgesic drugs has been described to interfere with aspirin,resulting in impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects. Additionally,nonopioid analgesic medication has been shown to enhance the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Pain is very frequent and many patients rely on analgesic drugs to control pain. Therefore effective analgesic options without increased risk of cardiovascular events are desirable. This review focuses on commonly used nonopioid analgesics,interactions with aspirin medication and impact on cardiovascular risk.

  1. Analgesic use - prevalence, biomonitoring and endocrine and reproductive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, David M; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Gaudriault, Pierre; Lesné, Laurianne; Serrano, Tania; Main, Katharina M; Jégou, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Paracetamol and NSAIDs, in particular acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and ibuprofen, are among the most used and environmentally released pharmaceutical drugs. The differences in international trends in the sale and consumption of mild analgesics reflect differences in marketing, governmental policies, habits, accessibility, disease patterns and the age distribution of each population. Biomonitoring indicates ubiquitous and high human exposure to paracetamol and to salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of acetylsalicylic acid. Furthermore, evidence suggests that analgesics can have endocrine disruptive properties capable of altering animal and human reproductive function from fetal life to adulthood in both sexes. Medical and public awareness about these health concerns should be increased, particularly among pregnant women. PMID:27150289

  2. A Novel Behavioral Fish Model of Nociception for Testing Analgesics

    OpenAIRE

    E. Don Stevens; Cunha, Sérgio R.; Martin Scholze; Correia, Ana D.

    2011-01-01

    Pain is a major symptom in many medical conditions, and often interferes significantly with a person's quality of life. Although a priority topic in medical research for many years, there are still few analgesic drugs approved for clinical use. One reason is the lack of appropriate animal models that faithfully represent relevant hallmarks associated with human pain. Here we propose zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a novel short-term behavioral model of nociception, and analyse its sensitivity and ...

  3. Open Source Patient-Controlled Analgesic Pump Requirements Documentation

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Brian R.; Hatcliff, John; Chalin, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the medical domain is driving a need for continuous innovation and improvement in techniques for developing and assuring medical devices. Unfortunately, research in academia and communication between academics, industrial engineers, and regulatory authorities is hampered by the lack of realistic non-proprietary development artifacts for medical devices. In this paper, we give an overview of a detailed requirements document for a Patient-Controlled Analgesic (PCA) pump de...

  4. Analgesic Effects of Intrathecal Curcumin in the Rat Formalin Test

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yong Ku; Lee, Seong Heon; Jeong, Hye Jin; Kim, Min Sun; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Woong Mo

    2012-01-01

    Background Curcumin has been reported to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, antifungal, antitumor, and antinociceptive activity when administered systemically. We investigated the analgesic efficacy of intrathecal curcumin in a rat model of inflammatory pain. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were prepared for intrathecal catheterization. Pain was evoked by injection of formalin solution (5%, 50 µl) into the hind paw. Curcumin doses of 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 µg were delivered thr...

  5. Sound can enhance the analgesic effect of virtual reality

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Sarah,; Coxon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology may serve as an effective non-pharmacological analgesic to aid pain management. During VR distraction, the individual is immersed in a game presented through a head-mounted display (HMD). The technological level of the HMD can vary, as can the use of different input devices and the inclusion of sound. While more technologically advanced designs may lead to more effective pain management the specific roles of individual components within such systems are not yet...

  6. Analgesic stairway in the treatment of oncological pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah María Regueira Betancourt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pain represents the main symptom in an important group of patients who are in active treatment for cancer and in sick people in a very advanced stage. The objective of this article is to review the basic pharmacology of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, weak opioids, bigger opioids, as well as the different special pharmacological and non- pharmacological techniques that constitute the analgesic stairway in the management of patients who are suffering from oncological pain.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic potency of [Delta]9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

    OpenAIRE

    Näf, Myrtha

    2004-01-01

    It is known from the folk medicine that Cannabis may reduce pain. The aim of the pain study was to compare analgesic effects of oral delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, dronabinol, Marinol‚, main psychoactive component of the Cannabis plant) and a THC-morphine combination to morphine and placebo. This pain study was performed with 12 healthy volunteers in four different experimental models of acute pain. Additionally, side effects and vital functions were monitored and blood sam...

  8. ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF ROOT EXTRACT OF SOLANUM MELONGENA LINN ROOT

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava Ashish; Sanjay Yadav

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed at Pharmacognostic study and biological evaluation of analgesic activity of plants roots. The roots of plants were studies for Pharmacognostic characteristics namely, morphology, microscopy, physicochemical parameters, which can be of utilized in identification/authentication of the plant and/or its roots in crude drug form. The preliminary phytochemical screening of the dry residue was carried out by the chemical test and thin layer chromatographic method. The p...

  9. Post Tonsillectomy Pain: Can Honey Reduce the Analgesic Requirements?

    OpenAIRE

    Boroumand, Peyman; Zamani, Mohammad Mahdi; Saeedi, Masoumeh; Rouhbakhshfar, Omid; Hosseini Motlagh, Seyed Reza; Aarabi Moghaddam, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures performed worldwide, especially for children. Oral honey administration following tonsillectomy in pediatric cases may reduce the need for analgesics via relieving postoperative pain. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of honey on the incidence and severity of postoperative pain in patients undergoing tonsillectomy. Patients and Methods A randomized, double blind, pla...

  10. Overuse of non-prescription analgesics by dental clinic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zallen Richard D; Bogdan Gregory M; Dart Richard C; Ries Nicole L; Heard Kennon J; Daly Frank

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Many patients present to dental clinics for treatment of painful conditions. Prior to seeking treatment, many of these patients will self-medicate with non-prescription analgesics (NPA), and some will unintentionally overdose on these products. The objective of this study is to describe the use of NPA among dental patients. Methods All adult patients presenting to an urban dental clinic during a two-week period in January and February of 2001 were approached to participate...

  11. Analgesic and anti-arthritic effect of Corallocarpus epigaeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subashini Uthrapathy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease associated with the development of oxidative stress and inflammation. The safety and efficacy profile of 85% methanolic extract of Corallocarpus epigaeus (CE was evaluated in the present study. In safety profile LD50 value was determined by carrying out an acute toxicity study. In efficacy profile, the analgesic activity was evaluated by both hot plate and tail immersion tests. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by carrageenan-induced paw edema and anti-arthritic effect by complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis. Phytochemical screening of different CE extracts and quantitative analysis of both raw herb and 85% methanolic extract have been also carried out. The methanolic extract displayed analgesic activity by increasing the response time in both hot plate and tail immersion method. Extract exhibited 23,19% of anti-inflammatory activity and 33,59% of anti-arthritic effect in complete Freund's adjuvant induced paw edema. The CE extract increased the antioxidant level, along with a decrease of the oxidative stress developed by complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis. In conclusion, CE is a rich source of phytochemicals with analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities.

  12. Clinical pharmacology of non opioid analgesics in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegaert, K; de Hoon, J; Van Overmeire, B; Devlieger, H

    2005-01-01

    An integrated approach of neonatal analgesia starts with the systematic evaluation of pain and should be followed by effective interventions, mainly based on the appropriate (i.e. safe and effective) administration of analgesics. In contrast to the more potent opioids, data on the pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of non-opioid analgesics in this specific population are still rare or even lacking. We therefore evaluated various aspects of developmental pharmacology of non-opioid analgesics (paracetamol, ibuprofen, acetylsalicyl acid) in neonates. We first performed a single dose propacetamol study in preterm and term neonates. Based on these preliminary findings, a repeated dose administration scheme was developed and tested and maturational aspects from preterm till teenage were documented. Although non-selective COX-inhibitors might be effective in the treatment of postoperative or inflammatory pain syndromes in neonates, potential efficacy should be balanced against the drugs' safety profile. Neonatal renal clearance strongly depends on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and GFR itself strongly depends on the vaso-dilatative of prostaglandins on the afferent arterioli. We therefore evaluated the impact of the administration of ibuprofen or acetylsalicylic acid on renal clearance in preterm infants and hereby used amikacin clearance as a surrogate marker. We hereby documented the negative effect of ibuprofen on glomerular filtration rate in preterm infants up to 34 weeks and we were able to show that ibuprofen and acetylsalicylic acid had an equal impact on the glomerular filtration rate. PMID:16408826

  13. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Ginger Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Yong-liang; XIE Qiang-min; ZHAO Jun-ming; ZHANG Lin-hui; SUN Bao-shan; BAO Meng-jing; LI Fen-fen; SHEN Jian; SHEN Hui-jun; ZHAO Yu-qing

    2011-01-01

    Objective Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is widely used as a spice in cooking and as a medicinal herb in traditional herbal medicine. The present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ginger oil in experimental animal models. Methods The analgesic effect of the oils was evaluated by the "acetic acid" and "hot-plate" test models of pain in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of the oil was investigated in rats, using rat paw edema induced by carrageenan, adjuvant arthritis, and vascular permeability induced by bradykinin, arachidonic acid, and histamine. Indomethacin (1 mg/kg), Aspirin (0.5 g/kg) and Dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg) were used respectively as reference drugs for comparison. Results The ginger oil (0.25-1.0 g/kg) produced significant analgesic effect against chemically- and thermally-induced nociceptive pain stimuli in mice (P < 0.05, 0.01). And the ginger oil (0.25-1.0 g/kg) also significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema, adjuvant arthritis, and inflammatory mediators-induced vascular permeability in rats (P < 0.05, 0.001). Conclusion These findings confirm that the ginger oil can be used to treat pain and chronic inflammation such as rheumatic arthritis.

  14. [Oral exposure testing in non-aspirin-induced analgesic intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedow, O; Brasch, J; Christophers, E

    1996-12-01

    Although intolerance reaction to analgesics are not uncommon, there is still a lack of standardized procedures to diagnose the problem. We retrospectively analyzed results of scratch tests as well as oral challenges with analgesics in order to evaluate risk and diagnostic relevance of these procedures. In 1987-1992 a total of 650 patients with supposed intolerance to drugs were tested by oral challenge. Among them were 98 patients with a positive history of intolerance to non-aspirin analgesics. In 56 patients the intolerance could be verified by oral challenge. In order of decreasing frequency, the most likely agents were propyphenazone, diclofenac, metamizole, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, indomethacin, phenazone (antipyrine), and paracetamol (acteaminophen). Oral provocation showed clear dose-response relationships. For propyphenazone, the half-effective provocation dose was the same for all symptoms (cutaneous, nasal, bronchial, anaphylactoid). Scratch testing was not of diagnostic significance. Standardized test protocols starting with low dose oral challenges are suitable and helpful in minimizing the risk of severe side effects. PMID:9081936

  15. ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF ROOT EXTRACT OF SOLANUM MELONGENA LINN ROOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Ashish

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at Pharmacognostic study and biological evaluation of analgesic activity of plants roots. The roots of plants were studies for Pharmacognostic characteristics namely, morphology, microscopy, physicochemical parameters, which can be of utilized in identification/authentication of the plant and/or its roots in crude drug form. The preliminary phytochemical screening of the dry residue was carried out by the chemical test and thin layer chromatographic method. The preliminary phytochemical screening of dry residue showed the presence of Saponins, Alkaloids, Glycoside, and Flavonoids in various extracts. However most of the medicinally potential phytoconstituents were present in methanolic and aqueous extracts. The Hydroalcoholic extract was selected for Biological screening due to high alcoholic-soluble extractive value, high yield of successive alcoholic extract and TLC results. The analgesic screening was done using Hot plate method, Tail immersion methods and acetic acid induced in rats and mice. Hydroalcoholic extract was administered orally at the acute doses of 200mg/kg and 400mg/kg b.w. Several activities on these doses have already been reported. Both the doses showed significant (p<0.05 analgesic activity.

  16. Analgesic effect of clove essential oil in mice

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    Mahmoud Hosseini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Results obtained from literature reviews and human studies have shown the analgesic effects of clove plant in toothache. The present work was undertaken in order to investigate the possible analgesic effect of clove oil in mice.Materials and Methods: Fifty mice were divided into 5 groups: 1 Saline; 2 Essential oil (Ess 2%, 3 Ess 5%, 4 Ess10% and 5 Ess 20%. The hot plate test (55±0.2 °C; Cut-off 60 sec was performed as a base record 15 min before injection of drugs (Saline or 2, 5, 10 and 20% concentrations of Essential oil and consequently repeated every 15 minutes after injection. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA test showed that maximal percent effect (MPE in animal groups treated by 5, 10 and 20% essential oil was significantly higher than saline group. Comparison between 4 treated groups showed that MPE in 10% essential group was higher than 2 and 5% groups however; there was no significant difference between 10% and 20% groups.Conclusion: The result of present study showed that clove essential oil has analgesic effect inmice using hot plate test. More investigations are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism (s.

  17. Evaluation of analgesic activity of perindopril in albino mice

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    R N Suresha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to evaluate the analgesic activity of perindopril in chemical, thermal and mechanical pain on Swiss albino mice. A total of 54 albino mice (Swiss strain weighing 25-30 g were allocated to each experimental model and in each model there were three groups. The control group received normal saline (25 ml/kg per orally, standard group received pentazocine (10 mg/kg intra-peritoneal and test groups received perindopril (1 mg/kg per orally. Perindopril and normal saline was administered 2 h before, whereas the pentazocine was administered 15 min prior to Eddy′s hot plate, writhing and tail clip methods. The decrease in number of writhes, the delay in reaction time in tail clip and Eddy′s hot plate method denoted the analgesic activity. Perindopril decreased the number of writhes, delayed the reaction time in tail clip and Eddy′s hot plate method considerably when compared with control (normal saline, but less when compared with standard (pentazocine. Perindopril exhibits analgesic activity in thermal, chemical, and mechanical pain models in albino mice.

  18. A benefit-risk assessment of caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W Y

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine has been an additive in analgesics for many years. However, the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine have not been seriously investigated since a pooled analysis conducted in 1984 showed that caffeine reduces the amount of paracetamol (acetaminophen) necessary for the same effect by approximately 40%. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological research has provided some evidence that caffeine can have anti-nociceptive actions through blockade of adenosine receptors, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme synthesis, or by changes in emotion state. Nevertheless, these actions are only considered in some cases. It is suggested that the actual doses of analgesics and caffeine used can influence the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine, and doses that are either too low or too high lead to no analgesic enhancement. Clinical trials suggest that caffeine in doses of more than 65 mg may be useful for enhancement of analgesia. However, except for in headache pain, the benefits are equivocal. While adding caffeine to analgesics increases the number of patients who become free from headache [rate ratio = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17 to 1.58], it also leads to more patients with nervousness and dizziness (relative risk = 1.60, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.03). It is suggested that long-term use or overuse of analgesic medications is associated with rebound headache. However, there is no robust evidence that headache after use or withdrawal of caffeine-containing analgesics is more frequent than after other analgesics. Case-control studies have shown that caffeine-containing analgesics are associated with analgesic nephropathy (odds ratio = 4.9, 95% CI 2.3 to 10.3). However, no specific contribution of caffeine to analgesic nephropathy can be identified from these studies. Whether caffeine produces nephrotoxicity on its own, or increases nephrotoxicity due to analgesics, is yet to be established. PMID:11772146

  19. Pattern self-medication use of analgesics in Pune, Maharashtra, India

    OpenAIRE

    Shruti Jaiswal; Yogendra N. Keche; Radha Yegnanarayan; Giriraj Gajendra; Kshitija Chandanwale; Vinaya Lanke; Surabhi Jain; Aditi Dakua; Gourav Das; Aishwarya Bhat; Sailee Belvi; Anandita Desai

    2014-01-01

    Background: Objective of current study was to find out self-medication pattern and to study awareness of ADRs to analgesics self-medication. Methods: II MBBS students collected the information of names of analgesics self-medication, dose, frequency of administration, health related problem for use of self-medication, source of information for the use of self-medication and information about ADRs. Students also educated the population about ADRs to analgesics with the help of ADR checklist....

  20. Repeated Time-to-event Analysis of Consecutive Analgesic Events in Postoperative Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Kreilgaard, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    the probability. RESULTS: A Gompertz distribution RTTE model described the data well. The probability of having one or more analgesic events within 24 h was 80% for the first event, 55% for the second event, 31% for the third event, and 18% for fourth or more events for a typical woman of age 80 yr...... analgesic events. Thus, RTTE modeling of analgesic events is proposed as a valuable tool when investigating new approaches to pain management such as opioid-sparing analgesia....

  1. Postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians.

    OpenAIRE

    Dohoo, S E; Dohoo, I.R.

    1996-01-01

    Four hundred and seventeen Canadian veterinarians were surveyed to determine their postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following 6 surgical procedures, and to determine their opinions toward pain perception and perceived complications associated with the postoperative use of potent opioid analgesics. Three hundred and seventeen (76%) returned the questionnaire. The percentage of animals receiving analgesics postoperatively ranged from 84% of dogs and 70% of cats following orthope...

  2. Intraoperative esmolol infusion reduces postoperative analgesic consumption and anaesthetic use during septorhinoplasty: a randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Nalan Celebi; Elif A. Cizmeci; Ozgur Canbay

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives: Esmolol is known to have no analgesic activity and no anaesthetic properties; however, it could potentiate the reduction in anaesthetic requirements and reduce postoperative analgesic use. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of intravenous esmolol infusion on intraoperative and postoperative analgesic consumptions as well as its effect on depth of anaesthesia. Methods: This randomized-controlled double blind study was conducted in a tertiary care ...

  3. Potential analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of hydroalcoholic extract of Areca catechu L. nut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandare, Amol M; Kshirsagar, Ajay D; Vyawahare, Neeraj S; Hadambar, Avinash A; Thorve, Vrushali S

    2010-12-01

    The hydroalcoholic extract of Areca catechu L. (ANE) nut was screened for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and in vitro antioxidant potential. Three doses of ANE (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg orally) were tested for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Evaluation of analgesic activity of ANE was performed using hot plate and formalin test in mice. ANE showed maximum increase in hot plate reaction time (56.27%, pAreca catechu could be considered as a potential analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agent. PMID:20849907

  4. 76 FR 22404 - Analgesic Clinical Trials Innovation, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... Networks (ACTION) Initiative AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food... Analgesic Clinical Trials Innovation, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) Initiative. The goal of...

  5. Etodolac: analgesic effects in musculoskeletal and postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, M

    1990-01-01

    Numerous clinical trials have shown etodolac to be an effective analgesic. The purpose of the present report is to review results of 14 studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of etodolac in a variety of painful conditions. Presented are the results of four postsurgical pain studies, one study of acute gouty arthritis and nine studies of acute musculoskeletal disorders: acute low back pain, acute painful shoulder, tendinitis and bursitis, and acute sports injuries. A single oral dose of etodolac (25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg) was compared with aspirin (650 mg) or a combination of acetaminophen (600 mg) plus codeine (60 mg) for the relief of pain up to 12 h following oral, urogenital or orthopedic surgery. In multiple dose studies of acute gouty arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions, etodolac 200 or 300 mg twice a day (b.i.d.) or 200 mg three times a day (t.i.d.) was compared with naproxen 500 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., diclofenac 50 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., and piroxicam 20 or 40 mg once a day (o.d.) administered over 5 to 14 days. The efficacy of etodolac was at least equal and in some ways superior to aspirin and acetaminophen plus codeine in the relief of postsurgical pain. In studies of acute gouty arthritis, significant improvement from baseline were seen for all efficacy parameters evaluated for both the etodolac- and naproxen-treated patients. All the present studies of musculoskeletal conditions have shown etodolac to be effective and comparable in analgesic efficacy to naproxen, diclofenac or piroxicam. In summary, etodolac therapy for pain following surgery, in acute gouty arthritis and in acute musculoskeletal conditions resulted in analgesia comparable to that provided by several well-established analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:2150571

  6. Analgesic oral efficacy of tramadol hydrochloride in postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, A; Olson, N Z; Zighelboim, I; DeCastro, A; Minn, F L

    1992-06-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride is a synthetic opiate agonist with a plasma elimination half-life of 5 to 6 hours and peak plasma levels at about 1 1/2 hours. It derives its activity from attachment to the mu-receptor and blockage of norepinephrine reuptake. The purpose of this single-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine the analgesic effectiveness of an oral administration of two dose levels of tramadol hydrochloride (75 or 150 mg) compared with the combination of 650 mg acetaminophen plus 100 mg propoxyphene napsylate in 161 patients with severe postoperative pain after cesarean section. Analgesia was assessed over a 6-hour period. Treatments were compared on the basis of standard scales for pain intensity and relief and a number of derived variables based on these data. A global rating of the study medication was also used to compare treatments. The three active treatments were effective analgesics, statistically superior to placebo for many hourly and summary measures. A dose response was seen between the two tramadol doses, with the 150 mg dose providing significantly greater analgesia over the lower dose. The 75 mg dose of tramadol was generally more effective than the acetaminophen-propoxyphene combination after hour 2, and significantly so for some hourly time points, as well as for the global rating of the medication. The 150 mg dose of tramadol was significantly more effective than the acetaminophen-propoxyphene combination from hour 2 through hour 6 for the sum of pain intensity differences and total pain relief scores, as well as for the global rating of the medication. Tramadol hydrochloride at both dose levels is an effective analgesic agent and at 150 mg is statistically superior to the acetaminophen-propoxyphene combination. No serious adverse effects were observed; however, dizziness was more frequently reported with 150 mg tramadol. PMID:1351804

  7. Analgesic action of laser therapy (LLLT) in an animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Pozza; Patricia Fregapani; João Weber; Marília Gerhardt de Oliveira; Marcos André de Oliveira; Nelson Ribeiro Neto; João Macedo Sobrinho

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the analgesic effect of laser therapy on healthy tissue of mice.STUDY DESIGN: Forty-five animals were divided in three groups of 15: A--infrared laser irradiation (830 nm, Kondortech, São Carlos, SP, Brazil); B--red laser irradiation (660 nm, Kondortech, São Carlos, SP, Brazil); C-- ham irradiation with laser unit off. After laser application, the mice remained immobilized for the injection of 30 microl of 2% formalin in the plantar pad of the irradiated hind paw. The ...

  8. Coffee drinking enhances the analgesic effect of cigarette smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastase, Anca; Ioan, Silvia; Braga, Radu I;

    2007-01-01

    Nicotine (from cigarette smoke) and caffeine (from coffee) have analgesic effects in humans and experimental animals. We investigated the combined effects of coffee drinking and cigarette smoking on pain experience in a group of moderate nicotine-dependent, coffee drinking, young smokers. Pain...... threshold and pain tolerance were measured during cold pressor test following the habitual nocturnal deprivation of smoking and coffee drinking. Smoking increased pain threshold and pain tolerance in both men and women. Coffee drinking, at a dose that had no independent effect, doubled the increase in pain...

  9. Evaluation of analgesic activity of perindopril in albino mice

    OpenAIRE

    Suresha, R. N.; Siddamma Amoghimath; Vaibhavi, P. S.; Shruthi, S L; M.K. Jayanthi; H L Kalabharathi

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the analgesic activity of perindopril in chemical, thermal and mechanical pain on Swiss albino mice. A total of 54 albino mice (Swiss strain) weighing 25-30 g were allocated to each experimental model and in each model there were three groups. The control group received normal saline (25 ml/kg) per orally, standard group received pentazocine (10 mg/kg) intra-peritoneal and test groups received perindopril (1 mg/kg) per orally. Perindopril and normal saline was administ...

  10. Analgesics use in competitive triathletes: its relationship to doping and on predicting its usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Pavel; Dalaker, Robert; Letzel, Stephan; Ulrich, Rolf; Simon, Perikles

    2016-10-01

    The two major objectives of this study were (i) to assess variables that predict the use of analgesics in competitive athletes and (ii) to test whether the use of analgesics is associated with the use of doping. A questionnaire primarily addressing the use of analgesics and doping was distributed among 2,997 triathletes. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to predict the use of analgesics. Moreover, the randomised response technique (RRT) was used to estimate the prevalence of doping in order to assess whether users of analgesics have a higher potential risk for doping than non-users. Statistical power analyses were performed to determine sample size. The bootstrap method was used to assess the statistical significance of the prevalence difference for doping between users and non-users of analgesics. Four variables from a pool of 16 variables were identified that predict the use of analgesics. These were: "version of questionnaire (English)", "gender (female)", "behaviour in case of pain (continue training)", and "hours of training per week (>12 h/week)". The 12-month prevalence estimate for the use of doping substances (overall estimate 13.0%) was significantly higher in athletes that used analgesics (20.4%) than in those athletes who did not use analgesics (12.4%). The results of this study revealed that athletes who use analgesics prior to competition may be especially prone to using doping substances. The predictors of analgesic use found in the study may be of importance to prepare education material and prevention models against the misuse of drugs in athletes. PMID:26911564

  11. ANTIOXIDANT, ANALGESIC AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITIES OF MIMUSOPS ELENGI LINN. LEAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal Kumar Karmakar et al.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mimusops elengi Linn. (Family: Sapotaceae is a tree which is traditionally used against a number of diseases including ulcers, headache, dental diseases, wound and fever. In the present study crude methanolic extract of Mimusops elengi Linn. leaf was investigated for possible antioxidant, analgesic and cytotoxic activity. The extract exhibited statistically significant antioxidant activity in DPPH free radical scavenging and Nitric oxide scavenging test. The analgesic activity of the sample was studied using acetic acid induced writhing of white albino mice and hot plate test. The extract produced 45.61% and 63.85% (P<0.001 writhing inhibition at the doses of 250mg/kg and 500 mg/kg body weight respectively which is comparable to the standard drug diclofenac sodium was found to be 76.69% at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight. In hot plate test the extract exerted significant (P<0.001 prolongation in the response of latency time to the heat stimulus. The cytotoxic activity of the extract was assessed by brine shrimp lethality bioassay as an indicator of toxicity in which LC50= 80μg/ml and LC90 = 320μg/ml for sample. All the results tend to justify the traditional uses of the plant and require further investigation to identify the chemicals.

  12. Analgesic efficacy with rapidly absorbed ibuprofen sodium dihydrate in postsurgical dental pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholt, Sven Erik; Hallmer, F; Hartlev, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the onset of analgesic effect for a new formulation of ibuprofen sodium dihydrate versus conventional ibuprofen (ibuprofen acid).......To evaluate the onset of analgesic effect for a new formulation of ibuprofen sodium dihydrate versus conventional ibuprofen (ibuprofen acid)....

  13. Clinical Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Guduchi (Tinospora Cordifolia) Using Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Bhomik; Pathak, Nishant; Nim, Dwividendra Kumar; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Dixit, Rakesh Kumar; Chaurasia, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pain is a very well-known signal of ill health and analgesics are the drugs that are used to relieve pain. The main problem with these drugs remains that of side effects. Safer alternatives are natural herbs. Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia) is one such plant with analgesic potential but few studies are there.

  14. Regular analgesic intake and the risk of end-stage renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, W; Bronder, E; Greiser, E; Helmert, U; Jesdinsky, H J; Klimpel, A; Borner, K; Molzahn, M

    1989-01-01

    The strength of the association between regular analgesic intake (RAI) and end-stage renal failure (EF) has been insufficiently established until now. A case-control study was conducted to estimate the relative risks (RR) of EF after RAI (defined as consumption of 15 or more analgesic doses per month for a continuous period of at least 1 year) for cumulative drug intake, single-ingredient analgesics, combinations, and specific compounds. The case group included all patients with EF undergoing renal replacement therapy in the area of West Berlin (1984-1986, n = 921). Control subjects, matched to cases by sex, age, and nationality, were selected from a group of patients in outpatient clinics. Matching was possible for 517 cases. The RR of EF after RAI of any analgesic was 2.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.77-3.39) and after RAI of combination drugs 2.65 (95% confidence interval 1.91-3.67). No significant increase was found, however, after RAI of single-ingredient analgesics. The RR after RAI of combination drugs and for the most preferred analgesic ingredients (phenacetin, paracetamol, acetylsalicylic acid, phenazones, caffeine) increased with dose. Furthermore, a dose-time-related RR after RAI of the longest used preparation was found. Thus, the results clearly show an increased RR of EF after RAI related to both dose and exposure time of mixed analgesic compounds, but not for the use of only single-ingredient analgesics. PMID:2801788

  15. Study of analgesic activity of ethanol extract of Phlogacanthus thyrsiflorus on experimental animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurba Mukherjee, Meghali Chaliha and Swarnamoni Das

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the central and peripheral analgesic action of Phlogacanthus thyrsiflorus in experimental animal models. The extract was prepared by percolation method and acute oral toxicity testing was performed as per OECD guidelines. Analgesic activity was assessed by tail flick method (for central action and glacial acetic acid-induced writhing test (for peripheral action. Leaves extract (500 mg/kg, p.o. and aspirin (100 mg/kg showed significant peripheral analgesic activity (p<0.05. Leaves extract (500 mg/kg, p.o. and pethidine (50 mg/kg, i.p. also showed significant central analgesic activity (p<0.05. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, s.c. was used to find the mechanism of central analgesic action. Some partial agonistic activity for the opioid receptors seems to be probable mechanism of action.

  16. Evaluation of Analgesic effects of Clove Extracton Male Offspring of Surrey Female Miceduring Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Hatami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: The analgesic effects of Clove plant is due to the presence of phenolic substances. Since no study has yet evaluated the analgesic effect of this plant extract during lactation, hencethe present study aimed to evaluate the analgesic effect of clove oil orally on offspringmalemiceduringlactation. Methods: Inthe present experimental study, two groupsoffemalemice, receiving cloveoil and control groupwere used. After delivery, animalsweretreatedorallywith cloveextract at the dose of 4% on the first day of delivery. In order toassess pain,formalin was used inmaleoffspringafterthirty daysofbirth. Data were analyzed using GraphPad prismstatistical software. Results: The results of this study showed that treating lactating female mice during lactation by clove oil induced analgesic effects of male offspring and this analgesia in the chronic phase of itself was shown significantly (P<0.01. Conclusions: Analgesic effectinduced byfeedingratswithcloveextractinmalemice possibly will be favorable inclinical usein the near future.

  17. Peripheral analgesic effects of ketamine in acute inflammatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Galle, T S; Kehlet, H

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. This study examined the analgesic effect of local ketamine infiltration, compared with placebo and systemic ketamine, in a human model of inflammatory pain. METHODS: Inflammatory pain was induced by a burn (at 47 degrees C for 7 min; wound size, 2.5 x 5 cm) on the calf in 15 volunteers...... on 3 separate days with 7-day intervals. They received either (1) subcutaneous infiltration with ketamine in the burn area (local treatment) and contralateral placebo injections, or (2) subcutaneous ketamine contralateral to the burn (systemic treatment) and placebo in the burn area, or (3) placebo...... significant hyperalgesia. Local ketamine infiltration reduced pain during the burn injury compared with systemic treatment and placebo (P < 0.01). Heat pain thresholds were increased by local ketamine treatment compared with placebo immediately after injection (P < 0.03), and so were the mechanical pain...

  18. Vasorelaxant effect of the analgesic clonixin on rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M A; Silva, A; Brito, G; Bustamante, S; Ponce, H; Paeile, C

    1995-03-01

    1. A novel vasorelaxant effect of clonixinate of L-lysine (Clx), analgesic and anti-inflammatory, was studied in rat aortic rings. 2. Clx completely relaxed aortic rings contracted by KCl 70 mM and together with its analog flunixin exhibited lesser potency but equal efficacy than verapamil. In comparison, indomethacin, which is a more potent cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor relaxed only about 40% of the maximal contraction of aortic rings. 3. Furthermore, Clx antagonized Ca2+ dependent aortic contraction and BAY K-8644 induced aortic contraction suggesting its calcium antagonist character. 4. From these results it can be concluded that the hypotensive effect seen in rats in vivo after Clx i.v. injection arises because of vasodilatory effect of Clx and gives further support to the proposal that the pharmacological mechanism of action of Clx should be calcium antagonism. PMID:7590098

  19. Analgesic regimens for third molar surgery: pharmacologic and behavioral considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P A; Werther, J R; Seldin, E B; Stevens, C M

    1986-11-01

    The level of pain following the extraction of impacted third molars was evaluated in 75 patients. Participants were administered acetaminophen 1,000 mg or a placebo before surgery. After surgery, acetaminophen 650 mg was administered either at fixed intervals or as needed to relieve pain. When acetaminophen was administered before surgery, the onset of peak pain was delayed and patient discomfort was decreased 3, 4, and 5 hours after surgery. Patients following the fixed interval regimen after surgery experienced more pain overall and requested the backup narcotic analgesic more frequently. Of the regimens tested, patients preferred the regimen of acetaminophen 1,000 mg administered before surgery with acetaminophen administered as needed for pain after surgery. PMID:3465787

  20. Analgesic and antipyretic activities of Momordica charantia linn. fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Patel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant Momordica charantia Linn. belongs to family Cucurbitaceae. It is known as bitter gourd in English and karela in Hindi. Earlier claims show that the plant is used in stomachic ailments as a carminative tonic; as an antipyretic and antidiabetic agent; and in rheumatoid arthritis and gout. The fruit has been claimed to contain charantin, steroidal saponin, momordium, carbohydrates, mineral matters, ascorbic acid, alkaloids, glucosides, etc. The ethanolic extract of the fruit showed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, glycosides, steroids, proteins, and carbohydrates. The present study was carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing and tail-immersion tests in mice, while yeast-induced pyrexia in rats. The ethanolic extracts (250 and 500 mg/kg, po. showed an analgesic and antipyretic effect, which was significantly higher than that in the control rats. The observed pharmacological activities provide the scientific basis to support traditional claims as well as explore some new and promising leads.

  1. Intrauterine exposure to mild analgesics is a risk factor for development of male reproductive disorders in human and rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David Møbjerg; Hass, Ulla; Lesné, Laurianne;

    2011-01-01

    reproductive problems, and many of the anti-androgenic compounds are like the mild analgesics potent inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis. Therefore, it appears imperative to further investigate the potential endocrine disrupting properties of mild analgesics. ; METHODS: In a prospective birth cohort study...... results suggest that intrauterine exposure to mild analgesics is a risk factor for development of male reproductive disorders....

  2. Predictors of post-caesarean section pain and analgesic consumption

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    Luana Buhagiar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ideally, the intensity of postoperative pain should be predicted so as to customize analgesia. The objective of this study was to investigate whether preoperative electrical and pressure pain assessment can predict post-caesarean section pain and analgesic requirement. Materials and Methods: A total of 65 subjects scheduled for elective caesarean section, who gave written informed consent, were studied. Preoperatively, PainMatcher® was used to evaluate electrical pain threshold, while manual PainTest™ FPN 100 Algometer and digital PainTest™ FPX 25 Algometer determined pressure pain threshold and tolerance. Postoperatively, numerical rating scales were used to assess pain at regular time intervals. Patients received intramuscular pethidine (100mg, 6 hourly, rectal diclofenac (100mg, 12 hourly, and oral paracetamol (1g, p.r.n. for pain relief. Statistical analysis was conducted using PASW Statistics 18 software. Results: Preoperative electrical pain threshold correlated significantly with post-caesarean pain scores at 6 and 24 hours (r = -0.26, P < 0.02; r = -0.23, P < 0.04, respectively, and with the quantity of paracetamol consumed by the patient within 48 hours of surgery (r = -0.33, P < 0.005. Preoperative pressure pain tolerance measured by PainTest™ FPX 25 Algometer was significantly correlated with pain scores 6 hours postsurgery (r = -0.21, P < 0.05. Pain scores 6 hours post-caesarean section correlated significantly with anesthesia--general or spinal (F = 4.22, v 1 = 1, v 2 = 63, P < 0.05. Conclusions: The predictive methods proposed may aid in identifying patients at greater risk for postoperative pain. Electrical pain threshold could be useful in personalizing the postoperative analgesic protocol.

  3. Regular use of analgesic drugs and ovarian cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysich, K B; Mettlin, C; Piver, M S; Natarajan, N; Menezes, R J; Swede, H

    2001-08-01

    Analgesics have been shown to reduce risk for colorectal cancer. Results from three recent reports (D. W. Cramer et al., Lancet, 351: 104-107, 1998; C. Rodriguez et. al., Lancet, 352: 1354-1355, 1998; L. Rosenberg et al., Cancer Epidemiol. Biomark. Prev., 9: 933-937, 2000) suggest that these drugs might be associated with decreased risk for ovarian cancer. In this hospital-based case-control study, we compared 547 patients with ovarian cancer to 1094 age-matched patients with nonneoplastic conditions. All of the participants received treatment at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute between 1982 and 1998 and completed a comprehensive epidemiological questionnaire that included information on demographics, life-style factors, and reproductive characteristics as well as frequency and duration of aspirin and acetaminophen use. Women who reported that they had used one or more of these agents at least once a week for at least 6 months were classified as analgesic users. Logistic regression was used to compute crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Aspirin users were not at reduced risk of ovarian cancer compared with nonusers (adjusted OR, 1.00; CI, 0.73-1.39). There was also no evidence of a decrease in risk as a function of greater frequency of use or prolonged duration of use. Regular acetaminophen use was associated with a reduced risk (adjusted OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86), and risk reductions were observed for women with the greatest frequency of use (adjusted OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.09-1.08) and longest duration of use (adjusted OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27-0.97). These data suggest that regular use of acetaminophen, but not aspirin, may be associated with lower risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:11489759

  4. Ondansetron Does Not Attenuate the Analgesic Efficacy of Nefopam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kai-zhi; Shen, Hong; Chen, Yan; Li, Min-guang; Tian, Guo-pin; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if there is any interaction between ondansetron and nefopam when they are continuously co-administrated during patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA). Methods: The study was a prospective, randomized, controlled, non-inferiority clinical trial comparing nefopam-plus-ondansetron to nefopam alone. A total of 230 postoperative patients using nefopam for PCIA, were randomly assigned either to a group receiving continuous infusion of ondansetron (Group O) or to the other group receiving the same volume of normal saline continuously (Group N). Postoperative pain intensity scores, the sum of pain intensity difference over 24 hours postoperatively (SPID24hr), the incidence of adverse events, and the total consumption of nefopam were evaluated respectively. Results: Postoperative pain was treated successfully in both groups. The mean SPID24hr scores were 95.6 mm in Group N and 109.3mm in Group O [95% confidence interval (CI) -14.28, 24.32]. The lower margin of the 95% CI was above the pre-determined non-inferiority margin (-30mm) for SPID24hr, which indicated that nefopam-plus-ondansetron was not worse than the nefopam alone in term of analgesic efficacy. In addition, there was no statistical difference between the two groups in term of cumulative consumption of nefopam. Compared with Group N, postoperative vomiting was significantly reduced in Group O during the postoperative 24 hours (P < 0.05). Less rescue antiemetics were given to patients in Group O than those receiving nefopam alone (P < 0.05). There were no differences in postoperative nausea between the two groups. Conclusion: Nefopam-plus-ondansetron is not inferior to nefopam alone in relieving the pain in PCIA after minimally invasive surgery. In addition, adverse events are reduced without compromising analgesic efficacy. PMID:24273453

  5. The analgesic activity of Bestatin as a potent APN inhibitor

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    Mei-RongJia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bestatin, a small molecular weight dipeptide, is a potent inhibitor of various aminopeptidases as well as LTA4 hydrolase. Various physiological functions of Bestatin have been identified, viz.: (1 an immunomodifier for enhancing the proliferation of normal human bone marrow granulocyte–macrophage progenitor cells to form CFU-GM colonies; Bestatin exerts a direct stimulating effect on lymphocytes via its fixation on the cell surface and an indirect effect on monocytes via aminopeptidase B inhibition of tuftsin catabolism; (2 an immunorestorator and curative or preventive agent for spontaneous tumor; Bestatin alone or its combination with chemicals can prolongate the disease-free interval and survival period in adult acute or chronic leukemia, therefore, it was primarily marketed in 1987 in Japan as an anticancer drug and servers as the only marketed inhibitor of Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13 to cure leukemia to date; (3 a pan-hematopoietic stimulator and restorator; Bestatin promotes granulocytopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis in vitro and restores them in myelo-hypoplastic men; (4 an inhibitor of several natural opioid peptides. Based on the knowledge that APN can cleave several bioactive neuropeptides such as Met-enkaphalins, Leu-enkaphalins, β-Endorphin, and so on, the antiaminopeptidase action of Bestatin also allows it to protect endopeptides against their catabolism, exhibiting analgesic activity. Although many scientific studies and great accomplishments have been achieved in this field, a large amount of problems are unsolved. This article reviews the promising results obtained for future development of the analgesic activity of Bestatin that can be of vital interest in a number of severe and chronic pain syndromes.

  6. Overuse of non-prescription analgesics by dental clinic patients

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    Zallen Richard D

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients present to dental clinics for treatment of painful conditions. Prior to seeking treatment, many of these patients will self-medicate with non-prescription analgesics (NPA, and some will unintentionally overdose on these products. The objective of this study is to describe the use of NPA among dental patients. Methods All adult patients presenting to an urban dental clinic during a two-week period in January and February of 2001 were approached to participate in this research project. Trained research assistants using a standardized questionnaire interviewed patients. Patient demographics and the NPA usage over the 3 days preceding the office visit were recorded. We defined a supra-therapeutic dose as any dose greater than the total recommended daily dose stated on package labeling. Results We approached 194 patients and 127 participated. The mean age of participants was 35.5 years, 52% were male. Analgesic use preceding the visit was reported by 99 of 127 patients, and most (81/99 used a NPA exclusively. Fifty-four percent of NPA users were taking more than one NPA. NPA users reported using ibuprofen (37%, acetaminophen (27%, acetaminophen/aspirin combination product (8%, naproxen (8%, and aspirin (4%. Sixteen patients reported supra-therapeutic use of one or more NPA (some ingested multiple products: ibuprofen (14, acetaminophen (3, and naproxen (5. Conclusion NPA use was common in patients presenting to a dental clinic. A significant minority of patients reported excessive dosing of NPA. Ibuprofen was the most frequently misused product, followed by naproxen and acetaminophen. Though mostly aware of the potential toxicity of NPA, many patients used supra-therapeutic dosages.

  7. Pattern self-medication use of analgesics in Pune, Maharashtra, India

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    Shruti Jaiswal

    2014-06-01

    Methods: II MBBS students collected the information of names of analgesics self-medication, dose, frequency of administration, health related problem for use of self-medication, source of information for the use of self-medication and information about ADRs. Students also educated the population about ADRs to analgesics with the help of ADR checklist. Results: Paracetamol was most commonly taken as self-medication and 39% persons reported ADRs with paracetamol. Ibuprofen, diclofenac, paracetamol and aspirin were taken less than WHO DDD for joint pain. 79% study population was ignorant about ADRs to analgesics. Headache (37% was common health related problem for self-medication of analgesics. Conclusion: Information about problems with repeated use of analgesics like liver damage, analgesic nephropathy, gastric ulceration/bleeding should be provided by pharmacists either orally or with the help of leaflets or display board. Headache is common health related problem for the use of analgesics as self-medication. Pharmacists should take help of assistance tool to diagnosis headache like screener for migraine and guidelines for chronic headache for timely visit of self-medicating person to physician. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 1092-1096

  8. National consumption of opioid and nonopioid analgesics in Croatia: 2007–2013

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    Krnic D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Darko Krnic,1 Andrea Anic-Matic,2 Svjetlana Dosenovic,2 Pero Draganic,1 Sasa Zezelic,1 Livia Puljak2 1Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices, Zagreb, 2Laboratory for Pain Research, School of Medicine, University of Split, Split, Croatia Background: The increased consumption of analgesics has been documented worldwide during the last 2 decades. The aim of the study was to examine the trends in opioid and nonopioid analgesic consumption in Croatia between 2007 and 2013. Methods: Data on opioid consumption were extracted from the database of the national authority. All opioid and nonopioid analgesics were included in the analysis. Data were presented as defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants per day. Adequacy of opioid consumption was calculated using adequacy of consumption measure. Results: During the examined 7-year period, the total consumption and total cost of all analgesics in Croatia showed continuous increase. In the M01A group (anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic products, nonsteroids, ibuprofen had an exponential increasing trend, and in 2011, it overtook diclofenac consumption. Ibuprofen and diclofenac had the highest consumption also in the M02A group of topical products for joint and muscular pain. Tramadol was by far the most consumed type of opioids (N02A group and paracetamol in the group of other analgesics and antipyretics (N02B. The adequacy of consumption measure value was 0.19, indicating that Croatia is a country with a low opioid consumption. Conclusion: Between 2007 and 2013, both consumption of analgesics and their cost in Croatia had an increasing trend. Comparisons with data from other countries, based on the published literature, indicate that analgesic consumption in Croatia is still relatively low. Calculation of the adequacy of opioid consumption indicated that Croatia is a country with low opioid consumption. Further studies are necessary for establishing whether current analgesic consumption in

  9. Preoperative education and use of analgesic before onset of pain routinely for post-thoracotomy pain control can reduce pain effect and total amount of analgesics administered postoperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol, Emine; Alpar, Sule Ecevit; Erdoğan, Abdullah

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency of preoperative pain management education and the role of analgesics administration before the onset of pain postoperatively. The study was a prospective, randomized, and single-blind clinical trial, which was conducted January 1, 2008 through October 1, 2008 in the Thoracic Surgery Unit of Akdeniz University Hospital. A total of 70 patients who underwent thoracotomy (35 in the control group and 35 in the study group) were included in the study. Of the patients, 70% (n = 49) were male and 30% (n = 21) were female. Mean age was 51 ± 10 years (range = 25-65). The same analgesia method was used for all patients; the same surgical team performed each operation. Methods, including preemptive analgesia and placement of pleural or thoracic catheter for using analgesics, that were likely to affect pain level, were not used. The same analgesia medication was used for both patient groups. But the study group, additionally, was educated on how to deal with pain preoperatively and on the pharmacological methods to be used after surgery. An intramuscular diclofenac Na 75 mg was administered to the study group regardless of whether or not they reported pain in the first two postoperative hours. The control group did not receive preoperative education, and analgesics were not administered to them unless they reported pain in the postoperative period. The routine analgesics protocol was as follows: diclofenac Na 75 mg (once a day) intramuscular administered upon the complaint of pain following extubation in the postoperative period and 20 mg mepederin intravenously (maximum dose, 100 mg/day), in addition, when the patient expressed pain. Pain severity was assessed during the second, fourth, eighth, 16th, 24th, and 48th hours, and marked using the Verbal Category Scale and the Behavioral Pain Assessment Scale. Additionally, the total dose of daily analgesics was calculated. The demographic characteristics showed a

  10. Adamantyl analogues of paracetamol as potent analgesic drugs via inhibition of TRPA1.

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    Nieves Fresno

    Full Text Available Paracetamol also known as acetaminophen, is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of adamantyl analogues of paracetamol with important analgesic properties. The mechanism of nociception of compound 6a/b, an analog of paracetamol, is not exerted through direct interaction with cannabinoid receptors, nor by inhibiting COX. It behaves as an interesting selective TRPA1 channel antagonist, which may be responsible for its analgesic properties, whereas it has no effect on the TRPM8 nor TRPV1 channels. The possibility of replacing a phenyl ring by an adamantyl ring opens new avenues in other fields of medicinal chemistry.

  11. 信息动态%Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of granule to pelvic inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of granucle to pelvic inflammation. Methods The anti-inflammatory effects were studied by dimethylbenzene-induced swelling oar in mouse, carrageenin induced paw edema and tampon-induced proliferation in rats. The analgesic effects were studied by acetic acid-induced writhing and optothermal-induced pain in mice. Results Granule to pelvic inflammation significantly reduced swelling oar in mouse, paw edema and proliferation in rats;prolonged latency of writhing test, reduced the writhing number and improved optothermal-induced analgesia percentage. Conclusion Granule to pelvic inflammation has anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects.

  12. Use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchner, H; May, A; Coates, E

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. The directors of 38 pediatric units and 31 neonatal units reported that analgesics were infrequently used for intravenous cannulation (10%), suprapubic bladder aspiration (8%), urethral catheterization (2%), or venipuncture (2%). Analgesics were used significantly more regularly in pediatric than in neonatal intensive care units for arterial line placement, bone marrow aspiration, central line placement, chest tube insertion, paracentesis, and lumbar puncture. PMID:1403404

  13. The evidence of neuraxial administration of analgesics for cancer-related pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; Benthien, K S; Nordly, M;

    2015-01-01

    retrieved was 2147, and 84 articles were selected for full reading. The final selection comprised nine articles regarding randomised controlled trials (RCTs) divided in four groups: neuraxial combinations of opioid and adjuvant analgesic compared with neuraxial administration of opioid alone (n = 4); single...... neuraxial drug in bolus compared with continuous administration (n = 2); single neuraxial drug compared with neuraxial placebo (n = 1); and neuraxial opioid combined with or without adjuvant analgesic compared with other comprehensive medical management than neuraxial analgesics (n = 2). The RCTs presented...

  14. The use of analgesic drugs by South African veterinarians : continuing education

    OpenAIRE

    K.E. Joubert

    2001-01-01

    According to a survey, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents were the most popular analgesic used in South Africa for management of peri-operative pain, acute post-operative pain and chronic pain. The most popular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents are flunixin meglumine and phenylbutazone. The most popular opioid type drug is buprenorphine, followed by morphine. In the peri-operative setting, analgesic agents were not actively administered to 86.3 % of cats and 80.7 % of dogs. Analgesic...

  15. EVALUATION OF ANALGESIC AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF STEM BARK EXTRACT OF JATROPHA CURCAS

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    Sachdeva Kamal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The analgesic in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanol: acetone: water (70:20:10 extract of the stem bark of Jatropha curcas L. were evaluated. Analgesic activity of JCE were determined by help of three different models name Acetic acid induced writhing, tail clip, tail flick. JCE showed significant activity in these models by inhibition of writhing and increase latency compare to control and Standard (Aspirin. Antimicrobial activity was performed on bacteria: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis; Fungi: Alternaria alternata and fusarium solani. JCE Extract showed the presence of antimicrobial activity. This indicates the JCE extract have analgesic and Antimicrobial activity.

  16. The analgesic and sedative properties of dexmedetomidine infusion after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty

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    W.Abd El Megid ¹* and Ahmed M. Nassar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dexmedetomidine is an alpha2 - adrenergic agonist with sedative and analgesic properties. This study aimed to investigate if the use of continuous dexmedetomidine infusion with i.v. morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA could improve postoperative analgesia while reducing opioid consumption and opioid-related side effects. Materials & methods: In this prospective randomized, double-blinded, controlled study, 24 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome undergoing uvulopalatopharyngoplasty were assigned to two groups. Group D received a loading dose of dexmedetomidine 1µg kg¯¹ i.v., 30 min before the anticipated end of surgery, followed by a continuous infusion at a rate of 0.6 µg kg¯¹ hr¯¹ for 24 hr. Group P received a volume-matched bolus and infusion of placebo. In both groups, postoperative pain was initially controlled by i.v. morphine titration and then PCA with morphine. Cumulative PCA morphine consumption, pain intensities, sedation scores, cardiovascular and respiratory variables and narcotic-related adverse effects were recorded for 48 h after operation. Results: Extubation time was significantly prolonged in dexmedetomidine group (16±7 vs. 11±6 min p=0.074 in the placebo group. Visual analogue scale scores were significantly greater during the first 2h after tracheal extubation in the placebo group than in the dexmedetomidine group. The time to first analgesic request was significantly longer in the dexmedetomidine group than in the placebo group (21±11 vs. 9±4min; p=0.002. Compared with group P, patients in group D required 52.7% less morphine by PCA during the first 24h postoperative period, whereas levels of sedation were similar between the 2 groups at each observational time point. Fewer patients in group D experienced nausea and vomiting than those in group P (P< 0.05. There was no bradycardia, hypotension, or respiratory depression. Continuous dexmedetomidine infusion may be a useful anesthetic

  17. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities ofPassiflora foetida L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sasikala V; Saravanan S; Parimelazhagan T

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol extract of Passiflora foetida (P. foetida) leaves.Methods:Ethanol extract ofP. foetida leaf was evaluated for analgesic action by acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate method in albino mice. The anti-inflammatory property of ethanolic leaf extract was tested by carrageenan induced acute paw edema and histamine induced acute paw edema in rats.Results:The dose200 mg/kg ofP. foetida leaf extract exhibited highest significant analgesic activity [(13.50±0.43) min] at a reaction time of20 min in hot plate method in mice. The ethanol extract of leaf dose 100 mg/kg produced a highly significant anti inflammatory effect [(1.302±0.079)mL] in rats.Conclusions: It is very clear thatP. foetidaalso has analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities for the pharmaceuticals.

  18. Intravenous paracetamol infusion versus intramuscular tramadol as an intrapartum labor analgesic

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    Hema Mohan

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Intravenous paracetamol is more effective labor analgesic with fewer maternal adverse effects and shortens labor as compared to intramuscular tramadol. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(6.000: 1726-1729

  19. The effect of whole body irradiation on the action of strong analgesics of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of whole body irradiation of male mice with single doses of 3 and 7 Gy (60Co source) on analgesic action of three morphine-like drugs was studied. Over the first 6 days after irradiation, the analgesic effect of alfentanil and fentanyl was significantly less pronounced in irradiated animals than in control ones. During the subsequent period of 24 days till the end of experiment, the analgesic effect in irradiated animals gradually increased reaching and exceeding the control values. On the contrary, the analgesic effect of butorphanole was less pronounced in irradiated animals than in control ones, although the difference was not significantly. The difference between butorphanole and other two drugs are probably due to chemical structure and the metabolic fate in the body. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  20. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of Grewia asiatica Linn. in rodents

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    Udaybhan Singh Paviaya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study indicates that root bark of G. asiatica exhibits peripheral and central analgesic effect and anti-inflammatory activity, which may be attributed to the various phytochemicals present in root bark of G. asiatica.

  1. Analgesic potential of marrubiin derivatives, a bioactive diterpene present in Marrubium vulgare (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyre-Silva, C; Yunes, R A; Schlemper, V; Campos-Buzzi, F; Cechinel-Filho, V

    2005-04-01

    Marrubiin, a furane labdane diterpene, is the main analgesic compound present in Marrubium vulgare, a medicinal plant used in Brazil and other countries to treat several ailments. Considering its important pharmacological action, as well as its high yield, some structural modifications were performed in order to obtain more active compounds. Success was obtained in reducing the lactonic function, in the formation of marrubiinic acid and two esterified derivatives, which exhibited significant analgesic effect against the writhing test in mice. Marrubiinic acid showed better activity and excellent yield, and its analgesic effect was confirmed in other experimental models of pain in mice, suggesting its possible use as a model to obtain new and potent analgesic agents. PMID:15848207

  2. The use of analgesic drugs by South African veterinarians : continuing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available According to a survey, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents were the most popular analgesic used in South Africa for management of peri-operative pain, acute post-operative pain and chronic pain. The most popular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents are flunixin meglumine and phenylbutazone. The most popular opioid type drug is buprenorphine, followed by morphine. In the peri-operative setting, analgesic agents were not actively administered to 86.3 % of cats and 80.7 % of dogs. Analgesic premedications were frequently administered, e.g. xylazine or ketamine, but no specific drug was administered for post-operative pain. Veterinarians need to critically review their anaesthetic and analgesic practices in order to achieve balanced anaesthesia.

  3. ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF THE PLANT TRIANTHEMA PORTULACASTRUM IN EXPERIMENTAL MODELS

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    Umesh G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trianthema portulacastrum has got many medicinal values and is being used in Ayurveda since a long time for these properties. So the current study was undertaken to evaluate the analgesic effects of this plant . MATERIALS AND METHODS: W istar albino rats we re treated with whole plant ethanolic extract of trianthema portulacastrum 100 mg/kg orally with 2% gum acacia, as suspending agent and indomethacin 20mg/kg as standard. And the effects were observed in experimental models of analgesic activity viz, acetic acid induced writhing and formalin induced paw licking test. RESULTS: O ur study demonstrated trianthema portulacastrum reduced the number writhings in acetic acid induced writhing test and duration of paw licking in formalin induced paw licking test signi ficantly. CONCLUSION: T rianthema portulacastrum has got significant analgesic activity . It may as well act as an adjuvant to the currently available analgesic drugs.

  4. Analgesic and antioxidant activities of the methanolic extract of Operculina turpethum leaves in mice

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    Maxwell I. Ezeja

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The study showed that O. turpethum possesses analgesic and antioxidant properties and confirmed the folkloric use of O. turpethum leaves in the traditional pain management. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 453-457

  5. Sound can enhance the analgesic effect of virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah; Coxon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology may serve as an effective non-pharmacological analgesic to aid pain management. During VR distraction, the individual is immersed in a game presented through a head-mounted display (HMD). The technological level of the HMD can vary, as can the use of different input devices and the inclusion of sound. While more technologically advanced designs may lead to more effective pain management the specific roles of individual components within such systems are not yet fully understood. Here, the role of supplementary auditory information was explored owing to its particular ecological relevance. Healthy adult participants took part in a series of cold-pressor trials submerging their hand in cold water for as long as possible. Individual pain tolerances were measured according to the time (in seconds) before the participant withdrew their hand. The concurrent use of a VR game and the inclusion of sound was varied systematically within participants. In keeping with previous literature, the use of a VR game increased pain tolerance across conditions. Highest pain tolerance was recorded when participants were simultaneously exposed to both the VR game and supplementary sound. The simultaneous inclusion of sound may therefore play an important role when designing VR to manage pain. PMID:27069646

  6. Bromism caused by mix-formulated analgesic injectables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, P F; Tsan, Y T; Hung, D Z; Hsu, C L; Lee, Y C; Chang, M H

    2007-12-01

    Bromism, chronic bromide intoxication, can be caused by a variety of medicines, but bromism due to pain-relieving injectable medications has not been reported. In this study, the methods used were internet searching on bromide-containing injectables available in Taiwan and the first case report of bromism due to mixed-formulated injectable medication. Many analgesic/antipyretic and antihistamine injections containing bromides are still being used in Taiwan. They contain sodium bromide up to 1000 mg/ampoule or calcium bromide up to 800 mg/amp. A 25-year-old female suffered from forgetfulness and unstable gait after long-term frequent injections of a preparation to relieve head and neck pain. Blood tests showed hyperchloremia (171 mEq/L) and a negative anion gap (-48.7 mEq/L). Serum bromide measured 2150 mg/L. She recovered completely in 3 days with saline treatment. Many bromide-containing injections are still being used in Taiwan. Clinicians should keep alert on this issue to avoid iatrogenic bromism or making misdiagnoses. PMID:18375642

  7. Managing chronic pain with nonopioid analgesics: a multidisciplinary consult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauw, Daniel; McCarberg, Bill H

    2012-05-01

    As detailed in this online CME activity (www.cmeaccess.com/AJM/ChronicPain04), determining pain mechanism is an important aspect guiding treatment selection for chronic musculoskeletal pain states. Although broad classifications provide a framework, any combination of mechanisms may be present in a chronic pain patient, and there is growing evidence that pain states generally considered nociceptive may also involve elements of augmented central nervous system pain processing. Nonopioid analgesics, including serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic antidepressants, and alpha-2-delta ligand anticonvulsants, are the treatments of choice for fibromyalgia and other central neuropathic pain states. Additionally, studies have now shown that certain SNRIs can be effective in treating "classic" nociceptive pain states, such as osteoarthritis, and also are effective for low back pain. In addition to considering biological mechanisms, chronic pain management also involves recognizing and evaluating the contribution of psychological and sociocultural factors that can influence pain chronicity and patient prognosis. A multimodal/multidisciplinary approach incorporating pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapy into a program that includes more than 1 discipline is important to improve outcomes in patients with chronic pain. PMID:22482859

  8. The role of urine toxicology in chronic opioid analgesic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Peggy

    2007-12-01

    The current trend of treating chronic nonmalignant pain with opioid therapy means that pain management nurses are increasingly involved in the care of patients who are prescribed and using potent opioid analgesics on a daily basis. Although demonstrated to be quite effective in certain patients, sanctioned access to these medications brings with it risks for abuse, addiction, and diversion. Urine toxicology analysis is a valuable, yet underutilized, tool to monitor patterns of medication use and potential use of illicit drugs to evaluate the effect of these on health outcomes. This review provides a guide for the use of urine toxicology in the nursing management of chronic pain patients on opioid therapy, detailing the information provided by urine toxicology analysis, the benefits and limitations of urine drug testing, principles of sample collection, and correct interpretation of findings. It is emphasized that the results of urine toxicology analysis should never be used in isolation to identify abuse, addiction, or diversion, and that patterns of medication and other drug use should always be evaluated with respect to evidence of improved functionality. Nurses involved in the care of patients with chronic pain are encouraged to consider urine toxicology analysis as an integral component in care plan for those on chronic opioid therapy, and to knowledgeably implement and interpret this powerful tool in the practice of pain care. PMID:18036504

  9. Can anaesthetic and analgesic techniques affect cancer recurrence or metastasis?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heaney, A

    2012-12-01

    Summary Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the ratio of incidence is increasing. Mortality usually results from recurrence or metastases. Surgical removal of the primary tumour is the mainstay of treatment, but this is associated with inadvertent dispersal of neoplastic cells into the blood and lymphatic systems. The fate of the dispersed cells depends on the balance of perioperative factors promoting tumour survival and growth (including surgery per se, many anaesthetics per se, acute postoperative pain, and opioid analgesics) together with the perioperative immune status of the patient. Available evidence from experimental cell culture and live animal data on these factors are summarized, together with clinical evidence from retrospective studies. Taken together, current data are sufficient only to generate a hypothesis that an anaesthetic technique during primary cancer surgery could affect recurrence or metastases, but a causal link can only be proved by prospective, randomized, clinical trials. Many are ongoing, but definitive results might not emerge for a further 5 yr or longer. Meanwhile, there is no hard evidence to support altering anaesthetic technique in cancer patients, pending the outcome of the ongoing clinical trials.

  10. Use of Nonopioid Analgesics and the Impact on Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzone, Anthony G

    2016-05-01

    Although opioids are widely used for the management of pain in patients with hip fracture, these medications are known to have a wide range of adverse effects that can result in suboptimal outcomes or serious life-threatening complications. Common opioid-related adverse events include gastrointestinal effects, central nervous system effects, and respiratory depression. Hip fractures occur most frequently among the elderly-the very population that is most susceptible to the adverse effects of opioids and the risks of serious physiological complications. There has been much interest during recent years in identifying alternative analgesic approaches that are less opioid-dependent. There is good evidence to show that nerve blocks can be effective in managing the acute pain associated with hip fracture. However, sciatic and femoral nerve blocks seem to increase the risk of several clinically significant adverse events. A retrospective cohort study that examined the effectiveness of scheduled intravenous acetaminophen as part of the pain management protocol for hip fracture patients revealed significant improvement in pain scores, narcotic use, length of stay, and missed physical therapy sessions. Limited data exist in patients with hip fracture on the effects of infiltration of the surgical site with the local anesthetic agent, bupivacaine. However, extensive use of bupivacaine in hip arthroplasty surgery suggests that it may be highly beneficial in the patient with hip fracture. PMID:27101320

  11. Screening of Ficus religiosa leaves fractions for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gulecha; Sivakumar, T.; Aman Upaganlawar; Manoj Mahajan; Chandrashekhar Upasani

    2011-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate the different fractions of dried leaves of Ficus religiosa Linn for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity using different models of pain and inflammation Materials and Methods : The analgesic activity of F. religiosa carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and tail flick test in rats. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet-granuloma formation in rats. Five different fractions (FRI, FR...

  12. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of bupropion in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Hajhashemi, V.; Khanjani, P.

    2014-01-01

    Antidepressants are widely used for the treatment of various neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated that bupropion is effective for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Also antidepressants like bupropion showed anti-inflammatory properties. So in the present study, the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of bupropion in mice and rat were investigated. The acetic acid, formalin and hot plate tests were used in male mice to assess analgesic activity. For eval...

  13. Analgesic prescription pattern in the management of dental pain among dentists in İstanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Şermet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the pattern of analgesic prescriptions and the information given to their patients about use of these drugs by the dentists working in Istanbul.METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to 250 dentists working in Istanbul. The questionnaires consisted of open-ended questions about analgesic use in dentistry and were handed out directly to dentists. They were analyzed and responses to each question expressed as absolute frequencies. The cases and the analgesics prescribed by dentists for each case were determined by the descriptive statistics method; “frequency”.RESULTS: Responses to questionnaires were received from 130 (52% dentists. The most commonly prescribed analgesic was naproxen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID. It is also estimated that dentists did not prescribe selective COX-2 inhibitors or opioid analgesics. Some dentists reported prescribing more than one NSAIDs for the same patient (n = 11 cases. Although more than 75% of the dentists reported that they gave information to their patients about the use of analgesics, the content of the information was limited.DISCUSSION: The results of the questionnaires applied to the dentists showed that dentists most commonly prescribe naproxen for the management of dental pain and they rarely prescribe incompatible analgesic combinations. The results also showed that dentists informed their patients inadequately about analgesic use. Incomplete information given by dentists about drug interactions, storage conditions and price of the prescribed drugs is an important point of the study that may also affect the success ratio of the therapy and the compliance of the patients.

  14. ANTIHYPERGLYCEMIC AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITIES OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF CASSIA FISTULA (L.) STEM BARK

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ashraf Ali et al.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate antihyperglycemic and analgesic effects of ethanolic extract of Cassia fistula (CF) stem barks in rats and mice, respectively. The analgesic effect of extract was evaluated by acetic acid induced writhing test method while antihyperglycemic effect was investigated by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. Diclofenac (10 mg/kg, i. p.) and metformin (150 mg/kg, p. o.) were used as reference drugs for comparison....

  15. The efficacy of nonopioid analgesics for postoperative dental pain: a meta-analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, N; Grad, H. A.; Haas, D.A; Aronson, K.J.; Jokovic, A; Locker, D.

    1997-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of nonopioid analgesics in the dental pain model was examined by conducting a meta-analysis. Studies were obtained by searching the literature from August 1996 back to 1975 using the terms pain, analgesics, and dentistry. This led to the review of 294 articles, of which 33 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pain scale results were transformed into a common percent scale and converted to N-weighted means with differences in efficacy considered significant using a...

  16. Evaluation of analgesic activity of aqueous extract of leaves of hibiscus sabdariffa in albino rats

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya Basavaraj Patil; Sanappa Rambhimaiah; Prabhakar Patil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Analgesia and inflammation continues to be an area of great interest for research, probably due to the non-availability of a safer and more effective analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent. This has led to increase in demand for natural products with analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity having fewer side effects. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as indomethacin are used in the treatment of inflammation, fever and pain. However, NSAIDs cause gastric damage as ...

  17. Experimental evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of simvastatin and atorvastatin

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal, Swapnil R.; Smita D Sontakke

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of atorvastatin and simvastatin in different experimental models in mice and rats. Materials and Methods: Analgesic activity of simvastatin and atorvastatin was assessed in tail flick model in rats (n = 6), where it was compared with aspirin and tramadol and in acetic acid induced writhing in mice (n = 6), where it was compared with aspirin. Anti-inflammatory activity of statins was evaluated using ca...

  18. Pattern of self-medication with analgesics among Iranian University students in central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Sarahroodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-medication is defined as the use of drugs for the treatment of self-diagnosed disorders. It is influenced by factors such as education, family, society, law, availability of drugs and exposure to advertisements. This study was performed to evaluate self-medication with analgesics and its pattern among different groups of Iranian University Students. Materials and Methods: A randomized, cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted from December 2009 to February 2010. The target population of this study was 564 students out of 10,000 students attending four medical and non-medical science universities in Qom state. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16, and analysis was conducted with descriptive analysis procedures. Results: 76.6% of the students had used analgesics in self-medication in the previous 3 months. The frequency of analgesic use in the study period was once in 19.2% of the participants, twice in 22.2%, three times in 16.3% and more than three times in 35.5% of the participants, although 6.8% of them were not sure when they were used. Of all the respondents, 49.8% reported headache as the problem. This was the most common problem, after which came Dysmenorrhea,headache and stomach ache. Bone and joint pains were other problems that led to the use of analgesics. The most commonly used source of information for self-medication with analgesics was advice from friends and family (54.7%, previously prescribed medications (30.1%, their medical knowledge (13.3% and recommendation of a pharmacist (1.9%. Conclusion: Self-medication with analgesics is very high among Iranian students in Qom city. This could be an index for other parts of the Iranian community. Because the source of information about analgesics is inappropriate, we would recommend education courses about analgesics and self-medication on the radio and television for the entire population.

  19. Comparison of the Analgesic Effects of Dronabinol and Smoked Marijuana in Daily Marijuana Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Ziva D; Comer, Sandra D.; Haney, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids to treat pain, yet none have compared the analgesic effectiveness of smoked marijuana to orally administered Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; dronabinol). This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-dummy, double-blind study compared the magnitude and duration of analgesic effects of smoked marijuana and dronabinol under well-controlled conditions using a validated experimental model of pain. Healthy male (N=15) and femal...

  20. Association of Maternal Self-Medication and Over-the-Counter Analgesics for Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne Fangel; Gottschau, Mathilde; Siersma, Volkert Dirk;

    2014-01-01

    Self-medication with over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics, such as paracetamol (PCM), among children and adolescents is increasing and constitutes an important public health issue internationally. Reasons for this development are unclear; parental influence is suggested. Our objective was to examine...... whether self-medication with OTC analgesics among school-aged children is influenced by maternal self-reported health and medicine use, taking the child's frequency of pain into account....

  1. Anticancer, Anti-Inflammatory, and Analgesic Activities of Synthesized 2-(Substituted phenoxy) Acetamide Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Rani; Dilipkumar Pal; Rahul Rama Hegde; Syed Riaz Hashim

    2014-01-01

    The aphorism was to develop new chemical entities as potential anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic agents. The Leuckart synthetic pathway was utilized in development of novel series of 2-(substituted phenoxy)-N-(1-phenylethyl)acetamide derivatives. The compounds containing 1-phenylethylamine as basic moiety attached to substituted phenols were assessed for their anticancer activity against MCF-7 (breast cancer), SK-N-SH (neuroblastoma), anti-inflammatory activity, and analgesic activ...

  2. Analgesic effects of various extracts of the root of Abutilon indicum linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Goyal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Abutilon indicum (Linn. sweet (Malvaceae commonly called ′Country Mallow′ is a perennial plant up to 3 m in height. It is abundantly found as a weed in the sub-Himalayan tract and in the hotter parts of India. The plant is traditionally used for treatment of several diseases like bronchitis, body ache, toothache, jaundice, diabetes, fever, piles, leprosy, ulcers, cystitis, gonorrhea, diarrhea, and so on. Abutilon indicum Linn. is reported to have hepatoprotective, hypoglycemic, antimicrobial, male contraceptive, and antidiarrheal activities. The present study was done to evaluate the analgesic potential of various extracts of the root of Abutilon indicum Linn. Materials and Methods : The powdered root (900 g was subjected to successive solvent extraction, with solvents in increasing order of polarity, namely, petroleum ether (60 - 80΀C, methanol, and ethanol, using the soxhlet apparatus for 72 hours. The marc was extracted by cold maceration for 72 hours, to obtain a water-soluble extract. The peripheral analgesic activity was studied using acetic acid-induced writhing method in Swiss albino mice (20 - 30 g, while the central analgesic activity was evaluated by the tail flick method and the tail immersion method. Results : Results indicated that all the tested extracts, except the methanol extract, exhibited significant analgesic activity in both animals′ models. Petroleum ether extract showed higher analgesic activity. The activity may be related to the central mechanism or may be due to the peripheral analgesic mechanisms. Conclusion : The present study authenticates the traditional use.

  3. ANALGESIC AND ANTIINFLAMMATORY EFFECTS OF TOTAL EXTRACT, FLAVONOID FRACTION AND VOLATILE OIL OF SALVIA HYDRANGEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A HAJ HASHEMI

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gol-e-arvaneh with the scientific name of salvia hydrangea (Labiatea belongs to Salvia genus. In traditional medicine it has been used as analgesic, relieving headache, cold remedy, antipyretic and diuretic. Since until now this plant has not been investigated pharacologically. This study was aimed to find any anti-inflammatory or analgesic activity of the plant. Methods. At first, total extract, flavonoid fraction and volatile oil was prepared. Analgesic effect was assessed using light tail flick and acetic acid writhing test. Male wistar rats (180-220g and mice (25±2g were used in these tests. Carrageen in test was used for assessing anti-inflammatory activity. Results. Total extract and flavonoid fraction could not produce analgesic effect in light tail flick test, while morphine as a standard drug 15 and 30 min. after administration produced 35% and 90% of MPE respectively. In writhing test, total extract and flavonoid fraction had considerable analgesic effect which was comparable to that of indomethacin. Results of Carageenin test showed that both total extract and flavonoid fraction had marked anti-inflammatory activity and volatile oil had only a slight effect. Discussion. Since potent drugs (such as opioids show positive response to light tail flick test, it seems that the plant lacks such compounds. Considerable analgesic activity of total extract and flavonoid fraction in writhing test and also their anti-inflammatory activity indicate that this plant is probably useful for relieving pains, particularly with inflammatory origin.

  4. Analgesic therapy in postherpetic neuralgia: a quantitative systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN is a complication of acute herpes zoster, which is emerging as a preferred clinical trial model for chronic neuropathic pain. Although there are published meta-analyses of analgesic therapy in PHN, and neuropathic pain in general, the evidence base has been substantially enhanced by the recent publication of several major trials. Therefore, we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for both efficacy and adverse events of analgesic therapy for PHN. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We systematically searched databases (MEDLINE 1966-2004, EMBASE 1988-2004, CINAHL 1982-2002, and PubMed [29 October 2004] for trials of PHN. We also searched references of retrieved studies and review articles for further trials. We included trials that examined adult patients with PHN of greater duration than 3 mo, that were blinded, randomised, and had at least one measure of pain outcome. Dichotomous pain outcome data were extracted for 50% decrease in baseline pain using a hierarchy of pain/pain-relief measurement tools. Where available, dichotomous data were also collected for adverse events. Calculated estimates of efficacy included relative benefit and number needed to treat. Of 62 studies identified, 35 were randomised controlled trials. Of these, 31 were placebo controlled and suitable for meta-analysis, from which it was possible to extract dichotomous efficacy outcome data from 25. This meta-analysis revealed that there is evidence to support the use of the following orally administered therapies: tricyclic antidepressants, "strong" opioids, gabapentin, tramadol, and pregabalin. Topical therapies associated with efficacy were lidocaine 5% patch and capsaicin. Finally, a single study of spinal intrathecal administration of lidocaine and methyl prednisolone demonstrated efficacy, although this has yet to be replicated. Data suggest that the following therapies are not associated with efficacy in PHN: certain NMDA

  5. The animal pharmacology of buprenorphine, an oripavine analgesic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, A; Doxey, J C; Harry, E J

    1977-08-01

    1. The general pharmacology of buprenorphine, a potent analgesic agent derived from oripavine, is described. 2. After cute administration of buprenorphine, the spontaneous locomotor activity of mice was increased; rats displayed stereotyped licking and biting movements; behavioural depression was marked in guinea-pigs but mild in rhesus monkeys. The behaviour of cats was unchanged. 3. In general, buprenorphine reduced heart rate but had no significant effect on arterial blood pressure in conscious rats and dogs. 4. In anaesthetized, open-chest cats buprenorphine (0.10 and 1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) caused no major haemodynamic changes. 5. Buprenorphine (0.01-10 mg/kg i.a.) and morphine (0.30-30 mg/kg, i.a.) increased arterial PCO2 values and reduced PO2 values in conscious rats. With doses of buprenorphine greater than 0.10 mg/kg (a) the duration of respiratory depression became less, (b) ceiling effects occurred such that the maximum effects produced were less than those obtained with morphine. 6. Buprenorphine was a potent and long-lasting antagonist of citric acid-induced coughing in guinea-pigs. 7. At a dose level 20 times greater than the ED50 for antinociception (tail pressure), morphine suppressed urine output to a greater extent than the corresponding dose of buprenorphine in rats. 8. Over the range 0.01-1.0 mg/kg (s.c.), buprenorphine slowed the passage of a charcoal meal along the gastrointestinal tract in rats. After doses in excess of 1 mg/kg, the meal travelled increasingly further such that the distances measured at 10 and 30 mg/kg did not differ significantly from control values. In contrast, the morphine dose-response relationship was linear. PMID:409449

  6. Effect of intravenous esmolol on analgesic requirements in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritima Dhir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Perioperative beta blockers are also being advocated for modulation of acute pain and reduction of intraoperative anesthetic requirements. This study evaluated the effect of perioperative use of esmolol, an ultra short acting beta blocker, on anesthesia and modulation of post operative pain in patients of laproscopic cholecystectomy. Material and Methods: Sixty adult ASA I & II grade patients of either sex, scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia, were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly allocated to one of the two groups E or C according to computer generated numbers. Group E- Patients who received loading dose of injection esmolol 0.5 mg/kg in 30 ml isotonic saline, before induction of anesthesia, followed by an IV infusion of esmolol 0.05 μg/kg/min till the completion of surgery and Group C- Patients who received 30 ml of isotonic saline as loading dose and continuous infusion of isotonic saline at the same rate as the esmolol group till the completion of surgery. Results: The baseline MAP at 0 minute was almost similar in both the groups. At 8th minute (time of intubation, MAP increased significantly in group C as compared to group E and remained higher than group E till the end of procedure. Intraoperatively, 16.67% of patients in group C showed somatic signs as compared to none in group E. The difference was statistically significant. 73.33% of patients in group C required additional doses of Inj.Fentanyl as compared to 6.67% in group E. Conclusions: We conclude that intravenous esmolol influences the analgesic requirements both intraoperatively as well as postoperatively by modulation of the sympathetic component of the pain i.e. heart rate and blood pressure.

  7. Pharmacokinetic profiles of the analgesic drug flupirtine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, V; Lebkowska-Wieruszewska, B; Owen, H; Kowalski, C J; Giorgi, M

    2014-11-01

    Flupirtine (FLU) is a non-opioid analgesic drug with no antipyretic or antiphlogistic effects, used in the treatment of a wide range of pain states in human beings. There is a substantial body of evidence on the efficacy of FLU in humans but this is inadequate to recommend its off-label use in veterinary clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles of FLU after IV and PO administration in healthy cats. Six mixed breed adult cats were randomly assigned to two treatment groups using an open, single-dose, two-treatment, two-phase, paired, cross-over design (2 × 2 Latin-square). Group 1 (n  =  3) received a single dose of 5 mg/kg of FLU injected IV into the jugular vein. Group 2 (n  =  3) received the same dose via PO route. The wash out period was 1 week. Blood samples (1 mL) were collected at assigned times and plasma was then analysed by a validated HPLC method. No adverse effects at the point of injection and no behavioural changes or alterations in health parameters were observed in the animals during or after the study (up to 7 days after the full study). After IV administration, FLU was detectable in plasma up to 36 h. After PO administration, FLU plasma concentrations were lower than those following IV administration, but they were detectable over the same time range. The terminal part of both mean pharmacokinetic curves showed a similar trend of elimination. The oral bioavailability was approximately 40%. This is the first study of FLU in an animal species of veterinary interest and it could pave the way for the use of this active ingredient in the veterinary field. PMID:25011711

  8. Analgesic treatment of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Katharina; Deuis, Jennifer R; Inserra, Marco C; Collins, Lindon S; Namer, Barbara; Cabot, Peter J; Reeh, Peter W; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-10-01

    Ciguatera, the most common form of nonbacterial ichthyosarcotoxism, is caused by consumption of fish that have bioaccumulated the polyether sodium channel activator ciguatoxin. The neurological symptoms of ciguatera include distressing, often persistent sensory disturbances such as paraesthesias and the pathognomonic symptom of cold allodynia. We show that intracutaneous administration of ciguatoxin in humans elicits a pronounced axon-reflex flare and replicates cold allodynia. To identify compounds able to inhibit ciguatoxin-induced Nav responses, we developed a novel in vitro ciguatoxin assay using the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Pharmacological characterisation of this assay demonstrated a major contribution of Nav1.2 and Nav1.3, but not Nav1.7, to ciguatoxin-induced Ca2+ responses. Clinically available Nav inhibitors, as well as the Kv7 agonist flupirtine, inhibited tetrodotoxin-sensitive ciguatoxin-evoked responses. To establish their in vivo efficacy, we used a novel animal model of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia. However, differences in the efficacy of these compounds to reverse ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia did not correlate with their potency to inhibit ciguatoxin-induced responses in SH-SY5Y cells or at heterologously expressed Nav1.3, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, or Nav1.8, indicating cold allodynia might be more complex than simple activation of Nav channels. These findings highlight the need for suitable animal models to guide the empiric choice of analgesics, and suggest that lamotrigine and flupirtine could be potentially useful for the treatment of ciguatera. PMID:23778293

  9. Investigation of the in vitro metabolism of the analgesic flupirtine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methling, Karen; Reszka, Przyemslaw; Lalk, Michael; Vrana, Oldrich; Scheuch, Eberhard; Siegmund, Werner; Terhaag, Bernd; Bednarski, Patrick J

    2009-03-01

    The in vitro metabolism of flupirtine, ethyl-N-[2-amino-6-(4-fluorophenylmethyl-amino)pyridine-3-yl]carbamate, a centrally acting analgesic with muscle tone-reducing activity, was studied. Two flupirtine metabolites were already known: the N-acetylated analog D13223 and 4-fluorohippuric acid. The structure of flupirtine suggested that redox chemistry may play a role in metabolism, and cyclic voltammetry studies showed that the drug undergoes facile and irreversible redox reactions. Thus, oxidative metabolism was investigated first. With CYP3A1-induced rat liver microsomes an 18% turnover of flupirtine and a 20 to 25% turnover of D13223 took place over 30 min, but less than 5% turnover of flupirtine was observed with all human liver microsomal preparations tested, evidence that cytochrome P450 does not contribute appreciably to the metabolism in humans. Likewise, no involvement of human monoamine oxidase (isoforms A and B) was found for either flupirtine or D13223. In contrast, flupirtine was an excellent substrate for both human myeloperoxidase and horse radish peroxidase (HRP). These enzymes produced detectable amounts of oxidation products. Incubations of flupirtine with HRP produced an oxidation product that could be trapped with glutathione, the resulting glutathione conjugate was characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR. Metabolism of D13223 by both peroxidases was also observed but to a much lesser extent. Porcine liver esterases cleave the carbamate group of flupirtine, and both human N-acetyltransferases 1 and 2 acetylated the hydrolysis product, presumably descarboethoxyflupirtine, with nearly equal efficiencies to yield D13223. Incubations of human liver microsomes with flupirtine or the metabolite D13223 together with UDP-glucuronic acid gave two isomeric N-glucuronides in both cases. PMID:19074524

  10. The molecular mechanisms of the analgesic action of melatonin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu-hui; LI Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective To analyse the potential involvement of the opioid receptor gene expression in the mechanisms of the analgesic action of melatonin. Methods A trauma-pain model was established in Wistar rats by combining right-hind limb amputation with 50 ℃ tail-flick test. Antinoeiception was determined by tail-flick latency to hot waster at 50 ℃. RT-PCR was used to observe the the expression of the M1OR and KOR gene. Results Melatonin produced the antinociceptive effect in dose-dependent manner after i. p or i. c. v. administration. Injected i. c. v. to rats, naloxone (10 μg) obviously antagonized the antinoeiceptive effect induced by i. p. melatonin. The expression of the M1OR gene in the rat hypothalamus and the KOR gene in the hippocampus was both significantly reduced at day 3 after injury, which was parallel to the reduction of the rat pain thresholds. However, the expression of the M1OR gene in the hippocampus and the KOR gene in the hypothalamus was not changed. Treatment of trauma-pain rats with melatonin (30-120 mg·kg-1) i. p. administrated induced the up-regulation of M1OR mRNA in the hypothalamus and the KOR mRNA in the hippocampus in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions The present observations suggest that Melatonin-induced antinociceptive effect may partially contribute to the up-regulation of M1OR mRNA level in the hypothalamus and the KOR mRNA level in the hippocampus.

  11. A review of analgesic and emotive breathing: a multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordoni B

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Bordoni,1–3 Fabiola Marelli,2,3 Giovannni Bordoni,2,31Department of Cardiology, Santa Maria Nascente IRCCS, Milan, Don Carlo Gnocchi Foundation, Milan, Italy; 2Department of Osteopathy, Centre de recherche d’emploi du Sud-Ouest (CRESO, Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Falconara Marittima, Ancona, Italy; 3Department of Osteopathy, Centre de recherche d’emploi du Sud-Ouest (CRESO, Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Castellanza, Varese, Italy Abstract: The diaphragm is the primary muscle involved in breathing and other non-primarily respiratory functions such as the maintenance of correct posture and lumbar and sacroiliac movement. It intervenes to facilitate cleaning of the upper airways through coughing, facilitates the evacuation of the intestines, and promotes the redistribution of the body’s blood. The diaphragm also has the ability to affect the perception of pain and the emotional state of the patient, functions that are the subject of this article. The aim of this article is to gather for the first time, within a single text, information on the nonrespiratory functions of the diaphragm muscle and its analgesic and emotional response functions. It also aims to highlight and reflect on the fact that when the diaphragm is treated manually, a daily occurrence for manual operators, it is not just an area of musculature that is treated but the entire body, including the psyche. This reflection allows for a multidisciplinary approach to the diaphragm and the collaboration of various medical and nonmedical practitioners, with the ultimate goal of regaining or improving the patient’s physical and mental well-being. Keywords: diaphragm, fascia, osteopathic, pain, motions, manual therapy

  12. Analgesic nephropathy as a cause of end-stage renal disease in a 55 year-old Nigerian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, U H; Unuigbe, E I; Onwuchekwa, A C; Emem-Chioma, P

    2012-01-01

    Analgesic nephropathy is a subtle but significant cause of chronic renal failure. There is paucity of data on analgesic nephropathy in Nigeria. This case presentation is to highlight the need to have high index of suspicion in patients at risk of developing analgesic nephropathy. In March 2009 a 55-year-old businessman was referred to the renal unit on account of azotemia by the hematologist who had hitherto managed the patient as a case of refractory anemia. The patient had osteoarthritis for over 10 years and was managed with several analgesic drugs over the same period. He was found to have features suggestive of analgesic nephropathy and had end-stage renal disease. He was commenced on appropriate therapy, and he had a live related kidney transplant six months later. Analgesic nephropathy is preventable and morbidity/mortality can be remarkably reduced with appropriate and prompt intervention. PMID:22718180

  13. Analgesic Effects of 1st Generation Anti-histamines in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mebae; Shima, Kazuhiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sugawara, Shunji; Fujita, Takuo; Tadano, Takeshi; Watanabe, Makoto; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Endo, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Pain is sensed, transmitted, and modified by a variety of mediators and receptors. Histamine is a well-known mediator of pain. In addition to their anti-histaminic effects, the classical, or 1st generation, anti-histamines (1st AHs) possess, to various degrees, anti-muscarinic, anti-serotonergic, anti-adrenergic, and other pharmacologic effects. Although there have been attempts to use 1st AHs as analgesics and/or analgesic adjuvants, the advent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) discouraged such trials. We previously reported that in patients with temporomandibular disorders, osteoporosis, and/or osteoarthritis, the analgesic effects of certain 1st AHs (chlorpheniramine and diphenhydramine) are superior to those of the NSAIDs flurbiprofen and indomethacin. Here, we compared analgesic effects among 1st AHs and NSAIDs against responses shown by mice to intraperitoneally injected 0.7% acetic acid. Since 1st AHs are water soluble, we selected water-soluble NSAIDs. For direct comparison, drugs were intravenously injected 30 min before the above tests. Histamine-H1-receptor-deficient (H1R-KO) mice were used for evaluating H1-receptor-independent effects. The tested 1st AHs (especially cyproheptadine) displayed or tended to display analgesic effects comparable to those of NSAIDs in normal and H1R-KO mice. Our data suggest that the anti-serotonergic and/or anti-adrenergic effects of 1st AHs make important contributions to their analgesic effects. Moreover, combination of a 1st AH with an NSAID (cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor) produced remarkably potent analgesic effects. We propose that a 1st AH, by itself or in combination with a cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor, should undergo testing to evaluate its usefulness in analgesia. PMID:27040636

  14. ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF CURCUMA AMADA (MANGO - GINGER IN MALE ALBINO WISTAR RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Bai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mango ginger ( Curcuma amada Roxb. has morphological resemblance with ginger, but imparts mango flavour. According to Ayurveda and Unani medicinal systems , the biological activities include antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, anti - inflammatory, antiallergic, CNS depressant and analgesic activity. Hence curcuma amada aqueous extract for analgesic activity was evaluated in pain animal models. Pain is a most common complaint of many medical conditions, and pain control is one of t he most important therapeutic priorities. Curcuma Amada suppresses the inflammatory mediators associated with pain. However there is no scientific data suggestive of its analgesic activity. Hence this study was carried out to evaluate its role in central a nd peripheral models of pain. OBJECTIVE: To Evaluate rhizomes of Curcuma Amada for analgesic activity in male albino wistar rats . MATERIALS AND METHODS: Albino rats, the proven models for analgesic studies. They were obtained from the animal house of DR.B. R. Ambedkar Medical College. Animals were maintained as per CPCSEA guidelines . The aqueous extract of curcuma amada was used.4x2 groups of 6 Rats were used to ensure that results obtained were statistically significant using ANOVA test. Analgesic activity was assessed with the help of following screening methods . Acetic Acid Writhing Method using Acetic Acid . Tail Flick Method using the Analgesiometer . Tail Immersion Method using Hot Water (55 0 C . Hot Plate method using Hot Plate . RESULT S: Aqueous extract of curcuma amada significantly suppressed the 1% acetic acid induced writhing response in rats when compared to control group (Gum acacia. In Tail flick test and Hot plate test Curcuma Amada increases the latency period of pain (reaction time. In Tail im mersion test the test drug significantly (P < 0.001 reduces pain at 30 min when compared to control group at 60 min of oral administration. CONCLUSION : The present findings indicate that

  15. INTRARTICULAR ANALGESICS FOLLOWING SHOULDER ARTHROSCOPY: COMPARISON OF ROPIVACAINE/DEXAMETHASONE WITH ROPIVACAINE

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    Ranajit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Shoulder arthroscopy is a common orthopedics procedure performed on day - case basis. Adequate pain relief reduces surgical stress response, patient’s morbidity and improves postoperative recovery and rehabilitation. Various drugs have been tried intra - articularly t o provide postoperative analgesia. PURPOSE: We studied analgesic effect of dexamethasone 16mg (4ml with ropivacaine and compared it with ropivacaine intra - articularly in shoulder arthroscopic procedures in search of the ideal analgesic combination. METHODS: A Prospective Multicenter Double Blind study on 60 patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery from July’13 - April’14. Patients were assigned into 3 groups randomly - Group I (20 ml normal saline,Group II (20 ml 0.2% ropivacaine and Group III (16 ml 0.2% of ropivacaine & dexamethasone - 4 ml containing 16 mg. VARIABLES ASSESSED: Analgesic effect (VAS Score, time to first postoperative analgesic request, Analgesic used during first 24 hours. RESULTS: Group III had significant low pain scores for 1 st 20 hours as compared to Group II and Group I. Time to first analgesic requirement was longest in Group III (1356.2±193.10mins (p<0.01. Intensity of pain &Total analgesic requirement was significantly less in Group III (38.2±27.83 mg(p<0.01 in comparison to Group II and I. No significant side - effects were noted. CONCLUSION: A16 mg (4ml dosage of Dexamethasone is safe, cost effective and free from relative side effects, has a better patient compliance in terms of post - operative pain, need for analgesia and should be used routinely in arthroscopic shoulder surgeries. Helps in the recovery of patients to the pre - operative level.

  16. A comparative study of analgesic property of whole plant and fruit extracts of Fragaria vesca in experimental animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Lalit Kanodia; Swarnamoni Das

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the analgesic activities of ethanolic extract of fruits and whole plant of Fragaria vesca in experimental animal models. The extracts were prepared by percolation method and oral toxicity testing was performed as per OECD guidelines. Analgesic activity was assessed by tail flickmethod (for central action) and acetic acid-induced writhing test (for peripheral action). Fruit extract, whole plant extract and aspirin showed significant analgesic activity, both ...

  17. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of flupirtine maleate and ibuprofen in gynaecological ambulatory surgeries: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vanita Ahuja; Sukanya Mitra; Sunita Kazal; Anju Huria

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Flupirtine maleate is a centrally acting, non-opioid analgesic with unique muscle relaxant properties as compared to common analgesics. The aim of this study was to compare post-operative analgesic efficacy of flupirtine maleate and ibuprofen in patients undergoing gynaecological ambulatory surgeries. Methods: This prospective, randomised controlled study was conducted in 60 women of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I/II, 18–70 years of age and schedu...

  18. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of the Methanol Extract from the Galls of Quercus infectoria (Olivier) in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sook-Ha; Ali, Noraisah Akbar; Basri, Dayang Fredalina

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the analgesic activity of the methanol extract of the galls of Quercus infectoria in rats using hot plate and tail-flick methods. The extract was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 20 mg/kg while morphine sulfate and sodium salicylate (10 mg/kg) served as standards. The methanol extract exhibited significant analgesic activity in the tail-flick model (P Quercus infectoria displayed analgesic activity. PMID:25254062

  19. Analgesics: a comparison of therapeutic knowledge and inter-professional liaison between general practitioners and community pharmacists.

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, A; Scott, E.; Steele, K

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain general practitioners' (GPs') and pharmacists' knowledge of analgesics, to establish professional opinion on their use, and to assess the extent of pharmacist input into the prescribing of analgesics. Pharmacists displayed a better knowledge of analgesics than their colleagues in general practice, but had little input into the prescribing decisions made by GPs. Pharmacists' knowledge is not being put to best use in contributing to the preparation of prac...

  20. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of acetophenone semicarbazone and benzophenone semicarbazone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaikh M Mohsin Ali; Mele Jesmin; M Abul Kalam Azad; M Khairul Islam; Ronok Zahan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in swiss albino mice, two schiff bases namely acetophenone semicarbazone (ASC) and benzophenone semicarbazone (BSC) were synthesized and characterized. Methods: Two doses of the test compounds 25 and 50 mg/kg (p.o) for each were selected throughout the research work. The anti-inflammatory activity of the test compounds was determined by ‘carragenan induced mice paw edema inhibition’ method. The analgesic activity was determined by both, ‘acetic acid induced writhing’ and ‘tail immersion' methods. All such data were compared with standard drugs at the dose of 10 mg/kg (p.o.). Results:Both ASC and BSC have showed positive effects as anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the test compounds at 50 mg/kg (p.o.) were quite comparable to those of standard drugs at 10 mg/kg (p.o.). Conclusion: Both ASC and BSC can be considered as potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents.

  1. Effects of analgesics and antidepressants on TREK-2 and TRESK currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Han, Jaehee; Han, Jongwoo; Kang, Dawon

    2016-07-01

    TWIK-related K(+) channel-2 (TREK-2) and TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) channel are members of two-pore domain K(+) channel family. They are well expressed and help to set the resting membrane potential in sensory neurons. Modulation of TREK-2 and TRESK channels are involved in the pathogenesis of pain, and specifi c activators of TREK-2 and TRESK may be benefi cial for the treatment of pain symptoms. However, the effect of commonly used analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels are not known. Here, we investigated the effect of analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels. The effects of analgesics were examined in HEK cells transfected with TREK-2 or TRESK. Amitriptyline, citalopram, escitalopram, and fluoxetine significantly inhibited TREK-2 and TRESK currents in HEK cells (p<0.05, n=10). Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, nabumetone, and bupropion inhibited TRESK, but had no effect on TREK-2. These results show that all analgesics tested in this study inhibit TRESK activity. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms by which the analgesics modulate TREK-2 and TRESK differently. PMID:27382354

  2. The analgesic effect of electrostimulation (WoundEL®) in the treatment of leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloup, Pauline; Toussaint, Pascal; Lembelembe, Jean-Paul; Célérier, Philippe; Maillard, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of electrostimulation (ES), a recognised treatment for leg ulcers. Patients treated by ES for leg ulcers between 2011 and 2013 were included in the study. The pain score obtained with the numerical rating scale (NRS) was reported before the start of the ES (D0), after 3 days (D3) and 1 week following treatment initialisation. The analgesic treatments (AT) were reported at each assessment. Seventy-three patients were included (mean age 75·19 years): 31 venous leg ulcers, 21 mixed venous leg ulcers, 2 arterial ulcers, 17 hypertensive ischaemic ulcers, 1 Hydrea(®)-induced ulcer and an amputation stump ulcer. The NRS at D0 was on average 5·3 (median = 6) while it was 2·2 at D7 (median = 2), that is P < 0·001. The results were also significant between D0 and D3 (P < 0·001). A decrease in the number of AT used was observed between D0 (2·0 AT per patient on average) and D7 (1·7 AT on average) (P < 0·001). We also observed a decrease in the consumption of grade 3 analgesics on D0 and D7 (P = 0·03). This study demonstrates the rapid analgesic efficacy of ES in leg ulcers, with a clear impact on the NRS score and especially on the decrease in analgesic consumption. PMID:24618089

  3. Translational pain research: Evaluating analgesic effect in experimental visceral pain models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne Estrup Olesen; Trine Andresen; Lona Louring Christrup; Richard N Upton

    2009-01-01

    Deep visceral pain is frequent and presents major challenges in pain management, since its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. One way to optimize treatment of visceral pain is to improve knowledge of the mechanisms behind the pain and the mode of action of analgesic substances. This can be achieved through standardized experimental human pain models. Experimental pain models in healthy volunteers are advantageous forevaluation of analgesic action, as this is often difficult to assess in the clinic because of confounding factors such as sedation, nausea and general malaise. These pain models facilitate minimizing the gap between knowledge gained in animal and human clinical studies. Combining experimental pain studies and pharmacokinetic studies can improve understanding of the pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic relationship of analgesics and, thus, provide valuable insight into optimal clinical treatment of visceral pain. To improve treatment of visceral pain, it is important to study the underlying mechanisms of pain and the action of analgesics used for its treatment. An experimental pain model activates different modalities and can be used to investigate the mechanism of action of different analgesics in detail. In combination with pharmacokinetic studies and objective assessment such as electroencephalography, new information re- garding a given drug substance and its effects can be obtained. Results from experimental human visceral pain research can bridge the gap in knowledge between animal studies and clinical condition in patients suffering from visceral pain, and thus constitute the missing link in translational pain research.

  4. Effect of drugs modulating serotonergic system on the analgesic action of paracetamol in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandikar, Yogita S.; Belsare, Peeyush; Panditrao, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The underlying mechanisms for the analgesic action of paracetamol (PCT) are still under considerable debate. It has been recently proposed that PCT may act by modulating the Serotonin system. This study was conducted to verify the influence of Serotonin modulating drugs (buspirone, ondansetron, and fluoxetine) on the analgesic effect of PCT. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult albino mice were assigned to five groups: Normal saline, PCT, fluoxetine selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) + PCT, buspirone (5-HT1A Agonist) + PCT, and ondansetron (5HT3 antagonist) + PCT. Hot-plate and formalin test were used to determine pain threshold, tests being conducted 60 min after the last treatment. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance followed by Dunnet's test. Results: Coadministration of buspirone with PCT attenuated the antinociceptive activity of PCT (P < 0.001), whereas fluoxetine + PCT increased pain threshold in the hot-plate and formalin test (P = 0.0046). Analgesic effect of PCT was not affected by ondansetron in formalin models. It attenuated analgesic action of PCT in hot-plate test (P = 0.0137). Conclusion: The results suggest that 5-HT1 receptors could also be responsible for the analgesic effect of PCT. Also, higher analgesia is produced by co-administration of SSRI (fluoxetine) + PCT. PMID:27298498

  5. Study of Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Lappaconitine Gelata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying-zi; XIAO YONG-qing; ZHANG Chao; SUN Xiu-mei

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To explore the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of lappaconitine gelata (LA). Methods:The writhing response induced by acetic acid, the pain response induced by formaldehyde and hot plate method in the mouse, and the paw edema induced by egg albumen in the rat and the ear edema induced by xylene in the mouse were used for investigation on the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of LA.Results: The writhing response induced by acetic acid, the pain response induced by formaldehyde and hot plate methods was significantly inhibited by LA. In addition, the paw edema induced by egg albumen in the rat and the ear edema induced by xylene in the mouse were all significantly suppressed by LA. Conclusion:LA has the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects.

  6. Comparison of Conorphone, A Mixed Agonist-Antagonist Analgesic, to Codeine for Postoperative Dental Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Raymond A.; Wirdezk, Peggy R.; Butler, Donald P.; Fox, Philip C.

    1984-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy of two doses of conorphone (20 and 40 mg), a mixed agonist-antagonist analgesic, were compared to two doses of codeine for postoperative pain in the oral surgery model. Each subject received 2 of the 4 possible treatment at two separate sessions in an incomplete block, single crossover design. Both doses of conorphone and the 60 mg dose of codeine were superior to 30 mg of codeine for the various indices of analgesic activity. The 40 mg dose of conorphone resulted in a high incidence of side effects (25/30 subjects) such as drowsiness, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. The low dose of conorphone resulted in side effects similar to 60 mg of codeine with the exception of a greater incidence of drowsiness. These data suggest that while 40 mg of conorphone may not be well tolerated clinically, 20 mg of conorphone may be an alternative to 60 mg of codeine for postoperative pain. PMID:6597688

  7. Analgesic efficacy of local infiltration analgesia in hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Østergaard; Kehlet, H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in local infiltration analgesia (LIA) as a technique to control postoperative pain. We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials investigating LIA for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) to evaluate...... the analgesic efficacy of LIA for early postoperative pain treatment. In addition, the analgesic efficacy of wound catheters and implications for length of hospital stay (LOS) were evaluated. Twenty-seven randomized controlled trials in 756 patients operated on with THA and 888 patients operated on...... reported to have similar or improved analgesic efficacy. In TKA, most trials reported reduced pain and reduced opioid requirements with LIA compared with a control group treated with placebo/no injection. Compared with femoral nerve block, epidural or intrathecal morphine LIA provided similar or improved...

  8. [Does iv paracetamol have preemptive analgesic effect on lumber disc surgeries?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toygar, Pinar; Akkaya, Taylan; Ozkan, Derya; Ozel, Ozgür; Uslu, Ebru; Gümüş, Haluk

    2008-04-01

    In this study, postoperative analgesic effects of intravenous paracetamol administration in lumbar discectomy patients were evaluated. After the approval of ethic committee, 90 patients undergoing lumbar disc hernia operation randomly divided into 3 groups. After standart general anesthesia, patients in group I received 1 gr i.v. paracetamol infusion 15 minutes before the induction, patients in group II received i.v. Paracetamol infusion started 15 minutes before the end of surgery. i.v morphine via PCA is used for postoperative analgesia maintenance and patients pain scores were assessed with VAS at 0., 1., 2., 3., 6., 12. and 24. hours. First analgesic requirement time, total morphine consumption and side effects were recorded. In group I and II, VAS scores, 24 h morphine consumption and first morphine requirement times were significantly different comparing to group III. As a result, we think that in lumbar discectomy cases preoperative administration of 1 gr paracetamol has no preemptive analgesic effect. PMID:19021006

  9. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities of virgin coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intahphuak, S; Khonsung, P; Panthong, A

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated some pharmacological properties of virgin coconut oil (VCO), the natural pure oil from coconut [Cocos nucifera Linn (Palmae)] milk, which was prepared without using chemical or high-heat treatment. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of VCO were assessed. In acute inflammatory models, VCO showed moderate anti-inflammatory effects on ethyl phenylpropiolate-induced ear edema in rats, and carrageenin- and arachidonic acid-induced paw edema. VCO exhibited an inhibitory effect on chronic inflammation by reducing the transudative weight, granuloma formation, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity. VCO also showed a moderate analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response as well as an antipyretic effect in yeast-induced hyperthermia. The results obtained suggest anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties of VCO. PMID:20645831

  10. Analgesic effects of lappaconitine in leukemia bone pain in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Cui Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone pain is a common and severe symptom in cancer patients. The present study employed a mouse model of leukemia bone pain by injection K562 cells into tibia of mouse to evaluate the analgesic effects of lappacontine. Our results showed that the lappaconitine treatment at day 15, 17 and 19 could effectively reduce the spontaneous pain scoring values, restore reduced degree in the inclined-plate test induced by injection of K562 cells, as well as restore paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency induced by injection of K562 cells to the normal levels. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms of lappaconitine’s analgesic effects may be related to affect the expression levels of endogenous opioid system genes (POMC, PENK and MOR, as well as apoptosis-related genes (Xiap, Smac, Bim, NF-κB and p53. Our present results indicated that lappaconitine may become a new analgesic agent for leukemia bone pain management.

  11. Phytochemical Screening And Analgesic Studies Of The Root Bark Of Hymenocardia Acida, Tul (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olotu N. Paul

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The research work covers the phytochemical screening and Analgesic studies of the root bark of Hymenocardia acida, Tul, (Euphorbiaceae which is claimed by the Hausa in the Northern Nigeria to be used traditionally for the treatment of headache, chest-pain, rheumatic pain, toothache, ear pain, migraine and sickle cell crisis. The various phytochemical tests revealed the presence of carbohydrates, tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins and cardiac glycosides. The result of analgesic activity of the extracts showed a significant and dose dependent analgesic activity when compared to the untreated control group at P<0.05. This justifies the use of the plant in ethnomedicine for the treatment of headache, chest pain, rheumatic pain, toothache, ear pain, migraine and sickle cell crisis.

  12. Translational pain research: evaluating analgesic effect in experimental visceral pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Christrup, Lona Louring; Upton, Richard N.

    2009-01-01

    analgesics in detail. In combination with pharmacokinetic studies and objective assessment such as electroencephalography, new information regarding a given drug substance and its effects can be obtained. Results from experimental human visceral pain research can bridge the gap in knowledge between animal...... achieved through standardized experimental human pain models. Experimental pain models in healthy volunteers are advantageous for evaluation of analgesic action, as this is often difficult to assess in the clinic because of confounding factors such as sedation, nausea and general malaise. These pain models...... facilitate minimizing the gap between knowledge gained in animal and human clinical studies. Combining experimental pain studies and pharmacokinetic studies can improve understanding of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of analgesics and, thus, provide valuable insight into optimal clinical...

  13. Anticancer, Anti-Inflammatory, and Analgesic Activities of Synthesized 2-(Substituted phenoxy Acetamide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Rani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aphorism was to develop new chemical entities as potential anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic agents. The Leuckart synthetic pathway was utilized in development of novel series of 2-(substituted phenoxy-N-(1-phenylethylacetamide derivatives. The compounds containing 1-phenylethylamine as basic moiety attached to substituted phenols were assessed for their anticancer activity against MCF-7 (breast cancer, SK-N-SH (neuroblastoma, anti-inflammatory activity, and analgesic activity. These investigations revealed that synthesized products 3a–j with halogens on the aromatic ring favors as the anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. Among all, compound 3c N-(1-(4-chlorophenylethyl-2-(4-nitrophenoxyacetamide exhibited anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities. In conclusion, 3c may have potential to be developed into a therapeutic agent.

  14. Anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities of synthesized 2-(substituted phenoxy) acetamide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Priyanka; Pal, Dilipkumar; Hegde, Rahul Rama; Hashim, Syed Riaz

    2014-01-01

    The aphorism was to develop new chemical entities as potential anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic agents. The Leuckart synthetic pathway was utilized in development of novel series of 2-(substituted phenoxy)-N-(1-phenylethyl)acetamide derivatives. The compounds containing 1-phenylethylamine as basic moiety attached to substituted phenols were assessed for their anticancer activity against MCF-7 (breast cancer), SK-N-SH (neuroblastoma), anti-inflammatory activity, and analgesic activity. These investigations revealed that synthesized products 3a-j with halogens on the aromatic ring favors as the anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. Among all, compound 3c N-(1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl)-2-(4-nitrophenoxy)acetamide exhibited anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities. In conclusion, 3c may have potential to be developed into a therapeutic agent. PMID:25197642

  15. Analgesic Effects of Various Extracts of Root of Abutilon indicum linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitra Singh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Abutilon indicum (Linn. sweet (Malvaceae commonly called “Country Mallow” is a perennial plant up to 3m in
    height. It is abundantly found as weed in sub-Himalayan tract and in hotter parts of India. The plant is traditionally
    used for treatment of several diseases like bronchitis, body ache, toothache, jaundice, diabetes, fever, piles,
    leprosy, ulcers, cystitis, gonorrhea, diarrhoea etc. Abutilon indicum Linn. is reported to have hepatoprotective,
    hypoglycemic, antimicrobial, male contraceptive and antidiarrhoeal activities. The present study was done to
    evaluate the analgesic potential of various extracts of root of Abutilon indicum Linn. The powdered root (900 g
    was subjected to successive solvent extraction with solvents in increasing order of polarity viz. petroleum ether
    (60-80 C°, methanol and ethanol by soxhlet apparatus for 72 hrs. The marc was extracted by cold maceration for
    72 hrs. to obtain water soluble extract. Peripheral analgesic activity was studied using acetic acid induced writhing
    method in Swiss albino mice (20-30 g while central analgesic activity was evaluated by tail flick method and
    tail immersion method. Results indicated that all the tested extracts except methanol extract exhibited significant
    analgesic activity in both animals’ models. Petroleum ether extract showed higher analgesic activity. The activity
    may be related with central mechanism or due to peripheral analgesic mechanisms. Thus the present study authenticates
    the traditional use.

  16. Use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A D; Nicholson, A; Church, D B; Pearson, M R

    1996-09-01

    Responses (486) were collared from a survey of 5054 Australian veterinarians on their use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs in dogs and cats. Almost all respondents used glucocorticoids (usually prednisolone) to treat allergic, pruritic dermatoses in dogs, while two-thirds also gave fatty acid supplements and one-half used antihistamines. Almost 60% of respondents initially injected a glucocorticoid (frequently a long-acting preparation) when treating inflammatory skin diseases in dogs. More than 90% of respondents used glucocorticoids to treat immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia or thrombocytopenia, and about one-third also gave cytotoxic drugs. Administration of prednisolone on alternate days was generally favoured for long-term enteral steroid therapy. Phenylbutazone was the most preferred treatment for painful or inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders of dogs, but aspirin and pentosan polysulphate were also used widely. Regarding the use of analgesics drugs generally, both narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were used more widely in dogs than in cats, but alpha-2 agonists were used similarly in both species. The most commonly used narcotic analgesics were pethidine and buprenorphine in both species, while the NSAIDs used most often were flunixin and dipyrone in dogs and ketoprofen in cats. More than 80% of respondents generally used analgesic drugs with potentially painful surgical procedures, with doses given usually before anaesthetic recovery. Analgesic use rates varied with the condition, ranging from 94% for patients with acute severe trauma, through 60% for cruciate ligament repair and 29% for perineal herniorrahphy, to about 5% for ovariohysterectomy and dog castration. The three clinical signs most frequently nominated as indicators of pain in dogs and cats were (in descending order) vocalisation, response to handling or palpating the affected area, and mental depression. Other items mentioned frequently were

  17. ANTIHYPERGLYCEMIC AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITIES OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF CASSIA FISTULA (L. STEM BARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ashraf Ali et al.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate antihyperglycemic and analgesic effects of ethanolic extract of Cassia fistula (CF stem barks in rats and mice, respectively. The analgesic effect of extract was evaluated by acetic acid induced writhing test method while antihyperglycemic effect was investigated by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. Diclofenac (10 mg/kg, i. p. and metformin (150 mg/kg, p. o. were used as reference drugs for comparison. The extract significantly (P<0.05 reduced blood sugar level in alloxan induced diabetic (hyperglycaemic and glucose induced hyperglycemic (normo-hyperglycaemic rats orally at 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg body weight respectively. The glucose tolerance results showed significant (p<0.05 improved at the dose 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg body weight (b. wt. of ethanolic extract respectively. On the Other hand, the analgesic activity of extract at 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg dose level were produced 45% and 62% writhing inhibitory response but diclofenac was observed 82% of that when compared to control group. The plant's extract produced dose-dependent, significant (P<0.05 analgesic effects against chemically induced nociceptive pain in mice. Preliminary phytochemical screening of the plant extract showed the presence of alkaloids, triterpenoids, flavonoids, saponins and tannins etc. were present in the plant which has antihyperglycemic and analgesic properties. However a glucose tolerance hypoglycemic test is comparable to diabetic control group and effect is a dose dependent. The findings of this experimental animal study indicate that Cassia fistula stem-bark ethanolic extract possesses analgesic and antihyperglycemic properties; and thus lend pharmacological credence to the folkloric, ethnomedical uses of the plant in the treatment and/or management of painful, inflammatory conditions, as well as in the management and/or control of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Synthesis and Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of New Pyridazinones

    OpenAIRE

    DOĞRUER, Deniz S.; ŞAHİN, M. Fethi

    2003-01-01

    A new series of 2-(6-oxo-3,5-diphenyl-6H-pyridazin-1-yl)- acetamides and 3-[6-oxo-3,5-diphenyl-6H-pyridazin-1-yl)-propanamides were synthesized and evaluated in terms of their analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. All compounds except for 7g were more potent than aspirin in a p-benzoquinone--induced writhing test at 100 mg/kg dose. Compounds 7b, 7c and 7e had the highest anti-inflammatory activity; compound 7e was the most potent in terms of analgesic and anti-inflammatory acti...

  19. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of amifostine, DRDE-07, and their analogs, in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bhutia Yangchen; Vijayaraghavan Rajagopalan; Pathak Uma

    2010-01-01

    Objectives : To find out the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity, if any, of Amifostine [S-2(3 amino propyl amino) ethyl phosphorothioate], DRDE-07 [S-2(3 amino ethyl amino) ethyl phenyl sulphide] and their analogs DRDE-30 and DRDE-35, the probable prophylactic agent for sulphur mustard (SM). Materials and Methods : In order to find out the analgesic activities of the compounds two methods were employed, namely, acetic acid-induced writhing test and formalin-induced paw licking. The pe...

  20. The analgesic efficacy of xylazine and dipyrone in hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in chicks

    OpenAIRE

    Y. J. Mousa; Mohammad, F. K.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of oxidative stress–induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the analgesic effect of xylazine and dipyrone in 7-14 days old chicks was studied, compared with the control group that given plane tap water. H2O2, 0.5 % in water, induced oxidative stress in chicks by significantly lowering glutathione, rising malondialdehyde in plasma, whole brain during the day 7th, 10th, 14th of chicks old in comparison with the control group. The analgesic median effective doses (ED50) of xylazine and...

  1. Treatment of renal colic by prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors and avafortan (analgesic antispasmodic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sherif, A E; Foda, R; Norlen, L J; Yahia, H

    1990-12-01

    In a study of the pain-relieving effect of 3 drugs commonly used to treat acute renal colic in this hospital, intravenous indomethacin and intramuscular diclofenac (prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors) were compared with intravenous Avafortan (analgesic antispasmodic). As first-line analgesics, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, if given intravenously, offer an effective alternative to Avafortan. Of 145 patients studied, 32 required a second injection for complete relief of pain. Administering a second dose of prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors resulted in equally significant pain relief rate even though the route was intramuscular. PMID:2265331

  2. Naloxone acts as a potent analgesic in transgenic mouse models of sickle cell anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Lunzer, Mary M.; Yekkirala, Ajay; Hebbel, Robert P.; Portoghese, Philip S.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a common genetic disorder in African Americans. Opioid analgesics are traditionally the treatment for the severe pain associated with this disease. Here we reveal that the opioid antagonist naloxone possesses potent analgesic activity in two transgenic mouse models of sickle cell anemia (NY1DD and hBERK1) and not in their respective controls (ICR-CD1 and C57BL/6J) when administered by three parenteral routes [intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.), intrathecal, and subcutaneou...

  3. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the sesquiterpene fraction from Annona reticulata L. bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Machindra J; Wakte, Pravin S; Shinde, Devanand B

    2012-01-01

    The sesquiterpene fraction of Annona reticulata bark was studied by GC/MS. Three major components were identified: copaene (35.40%), patchoulane (13.49%) and 1H-cycloprop(e)azulene (22.77%). The fraction was also screened for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The sesquiterpene fraction at doses 12.5 and 25 mg kg⁻¹ and the unsaponified petroleum ether extract at a dose of 50 mg kg⁻¹ exhibited significant central as well as peripheral analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. These activities were comparable with the standard drugs used in the respective experiments. PMID:22007723

  4. Regular use of traditional analgesics predicts major coronary events: A cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Haara

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mikko Haara1, Markku Heliövaara2, Jari PA Arokoski3, Paul Knekt2, Pirjo Manninen4, Arpo Aromaa2, Antti Reunanen2, Olli Impivaara2, Heikki Kröger51Bone and Cartilage Research Unit (BCRU, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland; 2National Public Health Institute, Helsinki and Turku, Finland; 3Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland; 4Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Kuopio, Finland; 5Department of Surgery/Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, FinlandAims: Serious concern has arisen about the cardiovascular safety of selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors. However, recent studies have shown that the cardiovascular risks of regular use of traditional analgesics also deserve attention. We investigated the use of traditional analgesics for their prediction of major coronary events during 16 years of follow-up.Methods: A population sample of 8000 Finns aged 30 years and over was invited to a comprehensive health examination in 1978–1980; 7217 (90% complied, and 4824 of these had no diagnosed cardiovascular disease. The participants filled in a questionnaire eliciting information on the use of analgesics. Record linkage to the National Hospital Discharge Register and the mortality register of the Central Statistical Office of Finland identified 266 major coronary events (myocardial infarctions or coronary deaths by the end of 1994.Results: The risk of a major coronary event was significantly elevated among those reporting regular use of analgesics at baseline. Compared with nonusers and adjusted for known risk factors for coronary heart disease, the relative risk of an event during the whole follow-up period was 1.51 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–2.10 among regular users of analgesics. The risk was as high as 5.27 (95% CI 2.13–13.11 during the first two years of the follow-up. Thereafter it leveled off.Conclusion: Based on sales statistics almost all

  5. Analgesic Activity of Some 1,2,4-Triazole Heterocycles Clubbed with Pyrazole, Tetrazole, Isoxazole and Pyrimidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdas Bhanudas Pandhare

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the present study in vivo analgesic activity of some previously synthesized 1,2,4-triazole derivatives containing pyrazole, tetrazole, isoxazole and pyrimidine ring have been evaluated. Methods: Acetic acid induced writhing method and Hot plate method has been described to study analgesic activity of some 1,2,4-triazole derivatives containing pyrazole, tetrazole, isoxazole and pyrimidine as a pharmacological active lead. Results: Thirty six different derivatives containing 1,2,4-triazole ring were subjected to study their in vivo analgesic activity. Chloro, nitro and methoxy, hydroxy and bromo substituted derivatives showed excellent analgesic activity and dimethylamino, furan and phenyl substituted derivatives showed moderate analgesic activity in both of the methods. Compounds IIIa, IIId, IIIf, IIIi, IIIj, IVa, IVb, IVd, IVf, IVh, IVj IV3a and IIj were found to be superior analgesic agents after screening by Acetic acid induced writhing method. Compounds IIIb, IIId, IIIf, IIIh, IIIj, IVa, IVb, IVd, IVf, IVh, IVi, IV3c, IV3e and IIj were showed analgesic potential after screening of Hot plate method. Conclusion: All tested compounds containing 1,2,4-triazole were found to be promising analgesic agents, for this activity pyrazole, tetrazole, isoxazole and pyrimidine leads might be supported.

  6. Ibuprofen as a pre-emptive analgesic is as effective as rofecoxib for mandibular third molar surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morse, Zac; Tump, Anna; Kevelham, Ester

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the pre-emptive analgesic effect of rofecoxib, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, with a more traditional and commonly used analgesic, ibuprofen, for mandibular third molar surgery, utilizing a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clin

  7. Evaluation of peripheral and central analgesic activity of ethanolic extract of Clerodendrum infortunatum Linn. in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Kale

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The study showed significant central and peripheral analgesic activity of EECI which may be attributed to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, phospholipase A2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. C. infortunatum Linn. as a commercial source of analgesic drug should be subjected to further research. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(5.000: 912-918

  8. Analgesics use and ESRD in younger age: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moehner Sabine

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ad hoc peer-review committee was jointly appointed by Drug Authorities and Industry in Germany, Austria and Switzerland in 1999/2000 to review the evidence for a causal relation between phenacetin-free analgesics and nephropathy. The committee found the evidence as inconclusive and requested a new case-control study of adequate design. Methods We performed a population-based case-control study with incident cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD under the age of 50 years and four age and sex-matched neighborhood controls in 170 dialysis centers (153 in Germany, and 17 in Austria from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2004. Data on lifetime medical history, risk factors, treatment, job exposure and intake of analgesics were obtained in a standardized face-to-face interview using memory aids to enhance accuracy. Study design, study performance, analysis plan, and study report were approved by an independent international advisory committee and by the Drug Authorities involved. Unconditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The analysis included 907 cases and 3,622 controls who had never used phenacetin-containing analgesics in their lifetime. The use of high cumulative lifetime dose (3rd tertile of analgesics in the period up to five years before dialysis was not associated with later ESRD. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 0.8 (0.7 – 1.0 and 1.0 (0.8 – 1.3 for ever- compared with no or low use and high use compared with low use, respectively. The same results were found for all analgesics and for mono-, and combination preparations with and without caffeine. No increased risk was shown in analyses stratifying for dose and duration. Dose-response analyses showed that analgesic use was not associated with an increased risk for ESRD up to 3.5 kg cumulative lifetime dose (98 % of the cases with ESRD. While the large subgroup of users with a lifetime dose up to 0.5 kg (278 cases and

  9. Evaluation of the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of fixed dose combination: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Lahoti

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Combining paracetamol with ibuprofen enhances analgesic/anti-inflammatory activity over their individual component but potentiation of analgesic activity of diclofenac was not seen when paracetamol was added to it.

  10. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of a Novel Biflavonoid from Shells of Camellia oleifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Shells are by-products of oil production from Camellia oleifera which have not been harnessed effectively. The purpose of this research is to isolate flavonoid from shells of Camellia oleifera and evaluate its anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. The flavonoid was identified as bimolecular kaempferol structure by UV, MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra, which is a new biflavonoid and first found in Camellia oleifera. It showed dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenin-induced paw oedema in rats and croton oil induced ear inflammation in mice, and analgesic activity by hot plate test and acetic acid induced writhing. The mechanism of anti-inflammation of biflavonoid is related to both bradykinin and prostaglandins synthesis inhibition. The biflavonoid showed both central and peripheral analgesic effects different from aspirin, inhibition of the synthesis or action of prostaglandins may contribute to analgesic effect of biflavonoid. The biflavonoid significantly decreased malonaldehyde (MDA and increased superoxidase dismutase (SOD and Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px activity in serum (p < 0.01, revealed strong free radical scavenging activity in vivo. It indicates the biflavonoid can control inflammation and pain by eliminating free radical so as to inhibit the mediators and decrease the prostaglandins. The biflavonoid can be used as a prospective medicine for inflammation and pain.

  11. Prescription pattern of analgesic drugs for patients receiving Palliative Care in a Teaching Hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishma Hydie Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The study shows that prescription pattern in palliative care unit of this hospital was in accordance with WHO pain management guidelines. The study showed the current trend in prescription of analgesic drugs in the teaching hospital where the study was conducted.

  12. Microwave-assisted one-pot synthesis of benzothiazole and benzoxazole libraries as analgesic agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Praveen; A Nandakumar; P Dheenkumar; D Muralidharan; P T Perumal

    2012-05-01

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of benzothiazole and benzoxazole libraries via PIFA promoted cyclocondensation of 2-aminothiophenols/2-aminophenols with aldehydes under one-pot condition in good to excellent yields was achieved. Twenty compounds have been investigated for their analgesic activity and showed moderate to good activity.

  13. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of leaf extract of Kydia calycina Roxb.

    OpenAIRE

    Baburao Bhukya, Rama Narsimha Reddy Anreddy, Carey M. William and Krishna Mohan Gottumukkala

    2009-01-01

    The methanol extract of leaves of Kydia calycina Roxb. was screened for the analgesic (using hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice) and anti-inflammatory (using rat paw edema test) activity at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight. A significant (p

  14. The Influence of Genotype Polymorphism on Morphine Analgesic Effect for Postoperative Pain in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Geum; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Keun Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Background Although opioids are the most commonly used medications to control postoperative pain in children, the analgesic effects could have a large inter-individual variability according to genotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the analgesic effect of morphine for postoperative pain in children. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 88 healthy children undergoing tonsillectomy, who received morphine during the operation. The postoperative pain score, frequency of rescue analgesics, and side effects of morphine were assessed in the post-anesthesia care unit. The children were genotyped for OPRM1 A118G, ABCB1 C3435T, and COMT Val158Met. Results Children with at least one G allele for OPRM1 (AG/GG) had higher postoperative pain scores compared with those with the AA genotype at the time of discharge from the post-anesthesia care unit (P = 0.025). Other recovery profiles were not significantly different between the two groups. There was no significant relationship between genotypes and postoperative pain scores in analysis of ABCB1 and COMT polymorphisms. Conclusions Genetic polymorphism at OPRM1 A118G, but not at ABCB1 C3435T and COMT Val158Met, influences the analgesic effect of morphine for immediate acute postoperative pain in children. PMID:26839669

  15. Evaluation of analgesic activity of the leaves of Passiflora incarnata Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvarna Ingale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Passiflora incarnata also known as ′Passion flower′ is used as an anxiolytic and sedative throughout the world from ancient time. The plant is used as an analgesic, antispasmodic, sedative- hypnotic and narcotic. It is also used in neuralgia, epilepsy, insomnia, ulcers, haemorrhoids and neurosis in many parts of the world. There was no report on analgesic activity of P. incarnata. Hence, the present study is designed to assess analgesic activity of leaves of P. incarnata using sodium chloride-induced eye wiping test and formalin test. In formalin test, n-butanol extract of leaves of P. incarnata (BEPI in the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg as well as BEPI-F1 showed significant reduction in duration of paw licking in neurogenic and inflammatory phase(P<0.001. Pretreatment with naloxone reversed the analgesia induced by BEPI, while atropine did not reverse the analgesia induced by BEPI significantly (P≤0.001. In eye wiping test, BEPI in the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg, i.p. exerted significant reduction ( P≤0.001 in number of eye wipes compared to control group. Thus, the result concludes that BEPI and the fraction separated, BEPI-F1 has significant analgesic activity, which may be mediated through central mechanism by modulation of opioid receptors and nicotinic receptors.

  16. Analgesic effect of interferon-alpha via mu opioid receptor in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C L; Son, L X; Lu, C L; You, Z D; Wang, Y X; Sun, L Y; Cui, R Y; Liu, X Y

    2000-03-01

    Using the tail-flick induced by electro-stimulation as a pain marker, it was found that pain threshold (PT) was significantly increased after injecting interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) into the lateral ventricle of rats. This effect was dosage-dependent and abolished by monoclonal antibody (McAb) to IFN alpha. Naloxone could inhibit the analgesic effect of IFN alpha, suggesting that the analgesic effect of IFN alpha be related to the opioid receptors. Beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), the mu specific receptor antagonist could completely block the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. The selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist, ICI174,864 and the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-BNI both failed to prevent the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. IFN alpha could significantly inhibit the production of the cAMP stimulated by forskolin in SK-N-SH cells expressing the mu-opioid receptor, not in NG108-15 cells expressing the delta-opioid receptor uniformly. The results obtained provide further evidence for opioid activity of IFN alpha and suggest that this effect is mediated by central opioid receptors of the mu subtype. The evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that multiple actions of cytokines, such as immunoregulatory and neuroregulatory effects, might be mediated by distinct domains of cytokines interacting with different receptors. PMID:10676852

  17. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties of Acacia suma stem bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumanta Mondal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acacia suma (Fabaceae is a medium sized erect tree found in the greater part of India. Present study was carried out for evaluation of ethanolic extract of stem bark of Acacia suma (EEAS at 200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o. for analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activity. EEAS was screened for analgesic activity by writhing, tail flick, tail immersion and hot plate method in mice.  The anti-inflammatory activity by acute carrageenan induced paw oedema and chronic Freund’s adjuvant arthritis models in rats. The antipyretic activity was evaluated using Brewer’s yeast induced pyrexia in rabbits. Acute toxicity in mice was found to be higher than 2000 mg/kg., p.o.  Analgesic activity revealed that test dose of 400 mg/kg, p.o., had significant activity in various tested models. Anti-inflammatory studies at 200 and 400 mg/kg., p.o., of extract showed significant activity (P<0.01.  The extract showed significant (P<0.01 effect on yeast-induced fever in rabbits in dose dependant manner. Preliminary phytochemical tests revealed presence of carbohydrates, tannins, alkaloids, saponins and phenolic compounds in the ethanol extract of A. suma bark. The present study therefore provides scientific base for its use in the folklore remedies as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties of natural origin.

  18. Analysis of Currently Available Analgesic Tablets by Modern Liquid Chromatography: An Undergraduate Laboratory Introduction to HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagel, R. A.; Farwell, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and results, are provided for an undergraduate experiment in which analgesic tablets are analyzed using liquid chromatography. The experiment, an improved, modified version of the Waters Associates Inc. experiment, is simple to prepare, requiring little glassware and minimal sample manipulation by students. (JN)

  19. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous propacetamol vs rectal paracetamol in children after major craniofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Sandra A.; Van Dijk, Monique; Van Leeuwen, Pim; Searle, Susan; Anderson, Brian J.; Tibboel, Dick; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous and rectal paracetamol were compared in nonventilated infants after craniofacial surgery in a double-blind placebo controlled study. Methods: During surgery all infants (6 months-2 years) received a rectal loading dose of 40 mg.kg

  20. Multiple Interventions Improve Analgesic Treatment of Supracondylar Fractures in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N Porter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Provision of appropriate and timely treatment for pain in the pediatric population has been challenging. Children with painful conditions commonly present to emergency departments (EDs, a setting in which it may be particularly difficult to consistently provide timely analgesic interventions.

  1. Leaves extract of Murraya Koenigii linn for anti--inflammatory and analgesic activity in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailly Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work has been done for the investigation of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of methanol extract of dried leaves of Murraya koenigii Linn by oral administration at dose of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight, to healthy animals. Extract was studied for its anti-inflammatory activity by using carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in albino rats and the mean increase in paw volume and % inhibition in paw volume were measured plethysmometrically at different time intervals after carrageenan (1% w/v injection. Extract was also evaluated for analgesic activity using Eddy′s hot plate method and formalin induced paw licking method in albino rats. The methanol extract showed significant (P < 0.001 reduction in the carrageenan-induced paw edema and analgesic activity evidenced by increase in the reaction time by eddy′s hot plate method and percentage increase in pain in formalin test. The methanol extract showed anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect in dose dependent manner when compared with the control and standard drug, diclofenac sodium (10mg/kg, p.o. These inhibitions were statistically significant (P < 0.05. Thus our investigation suggests a potential benefit of Murraya koenigii in treating conditions associated with inflammatory pain.

  2. Postoperative pain relief with pentazocine and acetaminophen: comparison with other analgesic combinations and placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, A

    1985-01-01

    A single-blind, parallel-group study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an analgesic combining 650 mg of acetaminophen and 25 mg of pentazocine in 129 patients with moderate postoperative pain. Comparisons were made with a combination containing acetaminophen (300 mg) and codeine (30 mg), a combination containing acetaminophen (650 mg) and propoxyphene napsylate (100 mg), and a placebo. A nurse observer queried patients at regular intervals over a six-hour period concerning the intensity of pain and the degree of pain relief. The scores obtained were used in the calculation of standard measures of analgesic efficacy. Acetaminophen/pentazocine proved to be significantly superior to placebo and equivalent to the other active analgesic combinations. No side effects were reported with acetaminophen/pentazocine, acetaminophen/propoxyphene napsylate, or placebo. One mild side effect was questionably associated with acetaminophen/codeine. This study demonstrates that the combination of acetaminophen and pentazocine is as safe and effective in controlling postoperative pain of moderate severity as other commonly used analgesics. PMID:2870808

  3. Evaluation of analgesic activity of aqueous extract of leaves of hibiscus sabdariffa in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Basavaraj Patil

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: H. sabdariffa possesses significant analgesic activity probably due to presence of flavonoids and organic acids like ascorbic acid and citric acid as well as polysaccharides reported to be present in this plant. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 910-913

  4. The analgesic efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block after abdominal surgery: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, John G

    2007-01-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a novel approach for blocking the abdominal wall neural afferents via the bilateral lumbar triangles of Petit. We evaluated its analgesic efficacy in patients during the first 24 postoperative hours after abdominal surgery, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  5. The analgesic efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block after cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, John G

    2008-01-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is an effective method of providing postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing midline abdominal wall incisions. We evaluated its analgesic efficacy over the first 48 postoperative hours after cesarean delivery performed through a Pfannensteil incision, in a randomized controlled, double-blind, clinical trial.

  6. Use of over-the-counter analgesics and perceived stress among 25-44-year olds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke; Holstein, Bjørn E; Andersen, Anette;

    2010-01-01

    -to-face interviews. The outcome measure was use of over-the-counter analgesics (OTCA). The independent variable was perceived stress. Demographic variables and pain and discomfort symptoms were included as covariates. RESULTS: Analyses stratified by socio-demographic factors (gender, education, cohabiting status and...

  7. Evaluation of analgesic, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities of Sansevieria roxburghiana Schult. and Schult. f.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jimuty Roy; Mohammad Kuddus; Bilkis Begum; Choudhury Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the crude methanolic extract of whole plant part of Sansevieria roxburghiana Schult. and Schult. f. (Agavaceae) and the possibility of analgesic, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities. Methods: The analgesic activity was assessed by acetic acid induced writhing test in mice. The cytotoxic activity was evaluated by brine shrimp lethality bioassay while antioxidant effect was measured by 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl-hydrate (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. Results: The ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the crude extract was found to have significant (P<0.001) analgesic activity at the oral dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. In brine shrimp lethality bioassay, the aqueous soluble fraction exhibited maximum toxicity towards the shrimp with LC50 value of 0.735 μg/mL compared to 0.544 μg/mL exhibited by standard vincristine. The crude methanolic extract along with its all partitionates revealed mild to moderate free radical scavenging activity. Conclusions: These primary findings suggest that the extract might possess some chemical constituents that are responsible for analgesic, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities.

  8. Antioxidant, antimicrobial, cytotoxic and analgesic activities of ethanolic extract of Mentha arvensis L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nripendra Nath Biswas; Subarna Saha; Mohammed Khadem Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate potential antioxidant, antimicrobial, cytotoxic and analgesic activities of ethanolic extract of Mentha arvensis L. in different in vivo and in vitro experimental models. Methods: In vitro DPPH radical scavenging assay was used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of the plant extract. In vivo analgesic activity was carried out by acetic acid-induced writhing test in Swiss albino mice. All studies in mice were undertaken at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Antibacterial activity was studied by disk diffusion assay against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Brine shrimp lethality assay was used to investigate cytotoxicity effects of the plant extract. Results:The extract showed free radical scavenging activity in the DPPH assay (IC50~41 µg/mL) compared to the standard antioxidant ascorbic acid (IC50~19 µg/mL). The extract also produced prominent antimicrobial activity against Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi, Shigella boydii,Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus aureus compared to standard drug kanamycin at the dose of 30 µg/disc. The extract exhibited lethality against the brine shrimp nauplii with the LC50 values of 40 µg/mL, and also 90% mortality (LC90) value was found to be 160 µg/mL. In analgesic test, the extract demonstrated statistically significant (P Conclusions:These results suggest that the ethanolic extract of Mentha arvensis L. has potential antioxidant, antibacterial, cytotoxic and analgesic activities that support the ethnopharmacological uses of this plant.

  9. Evaluation of Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Tamarindus indica Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama A Suralkar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of methanolic extract of Tamarindus indica (TI seeds on anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in vivo using rat as an animal model at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg body weight. The anti-inflammatory activities were investigated by utilizing carrageenan induced paw edema in rat. The analgesic activity was examined against tail immersion method in rats. The results showed that TI significantly (p<0.01 reduced carrageenan induced paw edema in rats. In tail immersion method, methanolic extract of Tamarindus indica has shown significant (p<0.01 increase in reaction time of tail in water maintained at 55°C indicating analgesic activity. Preliminary phytochemical screening of the extract revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, saponins, glycosides and flavonoids. These results demonstrated that the methanolic extract of Tamarindus indica (TI seed exhibited significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities.

  10. Is carprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic, safe for use in Pekin ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carprofen (Rymadyl) is a common systemic analgesic used to relieve chronic pain states in dogs, such as osteoarthritis. There is no comparable drug recommended to treat pain, such as that originating from bill trimming procedures, in ducks. The aim of this study was to evaluate if carprofen could be...

  11. Study on consumers' preferences and habits for over-the-counter analgesics use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefterova, A; Getov, I

    2004-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate consumers' knowledge, preference habits and use of the over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Our survey indicates the preferences of respondents in consultation with medical specialists (medical doctors and pharmacists) and their sources of information about drugs. A questionnaire survey was conducted during the periods March/April and July/August 2002 in 11 community pharmacies situated in Sofia (capital) and two towns in different regions in Eastern Bulgaria. From 250 questionnaires 222 were filled in correctly and analyzed (response rate 89%). Metamizole (dipyrone) is the most popular OTC analgesic--35% of the questioned patients prefer it to relieve the pain. In the second place is paracetamole (acetaminophen), but patients prefer to use it mainly for symptomatic treatment of cold/flu and influenza-like symptoms. More than 50% of patients have indicated that medical doctor recommended them the chosen OTC analgesic and in case of health problems during the therapy they prefer to consult him. They had more confidence in medical doctors' than pharmacists' recommendations and consultation. The main conclusion is that the pharmacists do not have the main say in the choice of OTC analgesics and their rational and correct use. PMID:15068209

  12. Evaluation of Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory activity of Abutilon indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Satish Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Most of the synthetic drugs used at present as analgesic and antiinflammatory agents cause many side effects and toxic effects. Many medicines of plant origin with analgesic and antiinflammatory activity have been used since long time without adverse effects. The plant Abutilon indicum (AI is reported to be used as a febrifuge, anthelmintic and anti-inflammatory agent. It is also used to treat ulcers, toothache and hepatic disorders. Thus the present study was undertaken to investigate the analgesic and antiinflammatory potential of the plant Abutilon indicum. The formalin induced paw licking and tail flick method were used to study the analgesic activity of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of the plant. Carrageenan induced hind paw edema model was used to study anti-inflammatory activity. 200 mg/kg dose was selected to study both activities. Wistar strain albino rats were used for all studies. Diclofenac sodium (5 mg/kg was used as the standard drug. In tail flick test the increase in the reaction time was highly significant (P < 0.001 with ethanolic and aqueous extracts of the plant Abutilon indicum as compared to the control group. Acute edema in the left hind paw of the animals was induced by sub plantar injection of 0.1 ml (1% carrageenan suspension in normal saline. The ethanolic extract of the plant significantly (P <0.01 reduced the paw edema in carrageenan treated rats. The effect was maximum at 3hr after the carrageenan injection. The significant suppression of inflammation during the whole experimental period indicates the long duration of action of the ethanolic extract of the plant. Preliminary phytochemical investigation revealed the presence of glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and phenolic compounds in the ethanolic extract of the plant under study. The phytochemical constituents present in these extracts may be responsible for the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the plant Abutilon indicum and the actions may be

  13. The analgesic efficacy of xylazine and dipyrone in hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in chicks

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    Y.J. Mousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of oxidative stress–induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the analgesic effect of xylazine and dipyrone in 7-14 days old chicks was studied, compared with the control group that given plane tap water. H2O2, 0.5 % in water, induced oxidative stress in chicks by significantly lowering glutathione, rising malondialdehyde in plasma, whole brain during the day 7th, 10th, 14th of chicks old in comparison with the control group. The analgesic median effective doses (ED50 of xylazine and dipyrone in the control group were determined to be 0.79 and 65.3 mg/kg, intramuscularly (i.m., respectively whereas H2O2 treated groups decreased these values to be 0.31 and 37.2 mg/kg, i.m. by 61 and 43%, respectively. Intramuscular injection of xylazine and dipyrone at 0.5, 70 mg/kg respectively causes analgesia from electro-stimulation induced pain in 50, 66.67% respectively in control groups whereas H2O2 treated chicks increases the analgesic efficacy to be 83.33 and 83.33% respectively. Xylazine and dipyrone injection at 1 and 100 mg/kg, i.m. 15 minutes before formaldehyde injection in right planter foot of stressed chicks causes analgesia from pain induced by formaldehyde through significant increases in onset of lifting of formaldehyde injected foot, significantly decreases its lifting numbers, decreases the time elapsed of lifting of formaldehyde injected foot in comparison with the stressed control group that injected with saline in right planter foot. The data of this study indicate that H2O2-induced oxidative stress potentiate the analgesic efficacy of the central and peripheral analgesics of xylazine and dipyrone in chicks.

  14. Antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Viola betonicifolia whole plant

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    Muhammad Naveed

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrexia, algesia and inflammation are associated with several pathological conditions. Synthetic drugs available for the treatment of these conditions cause multiple unwanted effects. Several studies are ongoing worldwide to find natural healing agents with better safety profile. The current study was thus aimed at evaluating antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of whole plant of V. betonicifolia (VBME. Methods VBME was employed to assess antipyretic activity in yeast induced hyperthermia. Analgesic profile was ascertained in acetic acid induced writhing, hot plat and tail immersion test. Nevertheless, the anti-inflammatory activity was tested in carrageenan induced paw edema and histamine induced inflammatory tests. BALB/c mice were used at test doses of 100, 200 and 300mg/kg body weight intra peritoneally (i.p. Results In yeast induced pyrexia, VBME demonstrated dose dependently (78.23% protection at 300mg/kg, similar to standard drug, paracetamol (90% at 150mg/kg i.p. VBME showed a dose dependent analgesia in various pain models i.e. acetic acid, hot plat and tail immersion having 78.90%, 69.96% and 68.58% protection respectively at 300mg/kg. However, the analgesic action of VBME was completely antagonized by the injection of naloxone like opiate antagonists. Similarly carrageenan and histamine induces inflammation was significantly antagonized by VBME, 66.30% and 60.80% respectively at 300mg/kg. Conclusions It is concluded that VBME has marked antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in various animal models and this strongly supports the ethnopharmacological uses of Viola betonicifolia as antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory plant.

  15. Intraoperative esmolol infusion reduces postoperative analgesic consumption and anaesthetic use during septorhinoplasty: a randomized trial

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    Nalan Celebi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Esmolol is known to have no analgesic activity and no anaesthetic properties; however, it could potentiate the reduction in anaesthetic requirements and reduce postoperative analgesic use. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of intravenous esmolol infusion on intraoperative and postoperative analgesic consumptions as well as its effect on depth of anaesthesia. Methods: This randomized-controlled double blind study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital between March and June 2010. Sixty patients undergoing septorhinoplasty were randomized into two groups. History of allergy to drugs used in the study, ischaemic heart disease, heart block, bronchial asthma, hepatic or renal dysfunction, obesity and a history of chronic use of analgesic or β-blockers were considered cause for exclusion from the study. Thirty patients received esmolol and remifentanil (esmolol group and 30 patients received normal saline and remifentanil (control group as an intravenous infusion during the procedure. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and bispectral index values were recorded every 10min. Total remifentanil consumption, visual analogue scale scores, time to first analgesia and total postoperative morphine consumption were recorded. Results: The total remifentanil consumption, visual analogue scale scores at 0, 20 and 60 min, total morphine consumption, time to first analgesia and the number of patients who needed an intravenous morphine were lower in the esmolol group. Conclusions: Intravenous infusion of esmolol reduced the intraoperative and postoperative analgesic consumption, reduced visual analogue scale scores in the early postoperative period and prolonged the time to first analgesia; however it did not influence the depth of anaesthesia.

  16. Analgesic use among nursing homes residents, with and without dementia, in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann-Podczaska, Agnieszka; Nowak, Tomasz; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Łojko, Dorota; Krzymińska-Siemaszko, Roma; Kozak-Szkopek, Elżbieta; Wieczorowska-Tobis, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Many age-associated diseases are accompanied by pain. There is no doubt that pain is underrecognized among elderly nursing home residents and the diagnosing of pain is a real challenge in subjects with dementia. The aim of the study was to characterize analgesic use among nursing home residents and to delineate the putative associations between pain management and cognitive functions of elderly persons. The study involved 392 subjects (males:females - 81:311) with a mean age of 83.6±5.9 years. The residents' medical files in relation to diagnoses and drug consumption were analyzed, and the screening of cognitive functions was performed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). One hundred and thirteen residents (28.8%) received some analgesics. Among them 84 (21.4%) used them routinely, 25 (6.4%) - pro re nata (PRN) and four (1.0%) - both routinely and PRN. Non-opioid analgesics were taken routinely by 53 residents, weak opioids by nine subjects, and one person was receiving strong opioids. Additionally, three individuals were taking a combination preparation of tramadol and acetaminophen. The rate of subjects who were not receiving any pain treatment was higher in residents with MMSE between 0 and 9 points than in those with MMSE between 24 and 30 points (P=0.0151). Furthermore, ten residents (9.1%) with severe dementia were treated with analgesics PRN. The results of our study point to a remarkably low use of analgesics in nursing home residents in Poland and indicate a need to introduce pain evaluation and monitoring of drug treatment appropriateness as a standard procedure in the geriatric assessment in nursing homes. PMID:27051281

  17. Antioxidant,antimicrobial,cytotoxic and analgesic activities of ethanolic extract of Mentha arvensis L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nripendra; Nath; Biswas; Subarna; Saha; Mohammed; khadem; Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate potential antioxidant,antimicrobial,cytotoxic and analgesic activities of ethanolic extract of Mentha arrensis l.,in different in vivo and in vitro experimental models.Methods:In vitro DPPH radical scavenging assay was used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of the plant extract.In vivo analgesic activity was carried out by acetic acid—induced writhing test in Swiss albino mice.All studies in mice were undertaken at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight.Antibacterial activilv was studied by disk diffusion assay against some Gram—positive and Gram—negative bacterial strains.Brine shrimp lethality assay was used to investigate cyloloxicity effects of the plant extract.Results:The extract showed free radical scavenging activity in the DPPH assay(IC5041 μg/mL)compared to the standard antioxidant ascorbic acid(IC5019 μg/mL).The extract also produced prominent antimicrobial activity against Salmonella typhi.Salmonella paratyphi.Shigella boydii,Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus aureus compared to standard drug kanamycin at the dose of 30 μg/disc.The extract exhibited lethality against the brine shrimp nauplii with the LC50,values of 40 μg/mL.and also 90%mortality(LC90) value was found to be 160 μg/mL.In analgesic test.the extract demonstrated statistically significant(P<0.01) analgesic effect in acetic acid induced writhing in white albino mice al both dose levels.Conclusions:These results suggest that the ethanolic extract of Mentha arvenns L.has potential antioxidant,antibacterial,cytotoxic and analgesic activities that support the ethnopharmacological uses of this plant.

  18. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliti, Naim R; Haliti, Fehim R; Koçani, Ferit K; Gashi, Ali A; Mrasori, Shefqet I; Hyseni, Valon I; Bytyqi, Samir I; Krasniqi, Lumnije L; Murtezani, Ardiana F; Krasniqi, Shaip L

    2015-01-01

    Background Because Kosovo has no reliable information on antimicrobial and analgesic use in dental practice, the survey reported here evaluated the antibiotic and analgesic prescriptions in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo (UDCCK). Methods The data of 2,442 registered patients for a 1-year period were screened and analyzed concerning antibiotic and analgesic use as per standards of rational prescription. Results Dentistry doctors prescribed antibiotics significantly more often than analgesics. Antibiotics were prescribed in 8.11% of all cases, while only 1.35% of total prescriptions were for analgesics. The total consumption of antibiotic drugs in the UDCCK was 4.53 Defined Daily Doses [DDD]/1,000 inhabitants/day, compared with only 0.216 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day for analgesics. From a total number of 117 patients, 32 patients received combinations of two antibiotics. Conclusion Pharmacotherapy analysis showed that the prescription rates of antibiotics and analgesics in the UDCCK are not rational in terms of the qualitative aspects of treatment. For the qualitative improvement of prescription of these drug groups, we recommend the implementation of treatment guidelines following rational standards. PMID:26491336

  19. PATTERN OF USE OF GASTROPROTECTIVE AGENTS ALONG WITH THE ANTI – INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESICS DRUGS

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    Sanalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs are one of the highly prescribed drugs in the world. In addition to their beneficial effect, they are having adverse reactions, of which, gastrointestinal toxicity is the most common. The reduction in NSAID-induced GI toxicity is primarily accomplished by prescribing gastro-protective agents that when co-administered with NSAIDs would protect against mucosal ulceration and the ideal candidates for co-prescription of gastro-protective agents are those considered to have a high-risk for NSAID induced ulcers. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the pattern of use of gastro-protective agents along with the anti-inflammatory and analgesics agents and to study the adverse effects in those patients receiving the anti-inflammatory agents and analgesics. METHODOLOGY A cross-sectional study done in orthopaedic outpatient departments of tertiary and secondary health centers of Thiruvananthapuram, which include totally 769 patients. The study was conducted from June 1st to September 30th 2006, after ethical clearance from the ethical committee, Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram. RESULTS Seven hundred and sixty nine patients were studied from three health facilities in Thiruvananthapuram District. Of the 752 cases receiving NSAIDs/analgesics in this sampling frame, Taluk hospital is receiving the highest percentage of co-prescription with gastro-protective agents (96.8%. In General hospital, 247 cases received NSAIDs/analgesics out of which 95 cases only received gastro-protective agents (38%, the lowest % among the three centers. Out of 262 cases in the MCH, 249 cases received NSAIDs/analgesics in which 193 cases received gastro protective agents (77.5 %. In the total sample, 126 patients reported with any one of the adverse effect (16.7%; 50 cases were from the general hospital (20%, 20 cases from MCH (8% and the remaining 56 cases from Taluk hospital (21.8%. CONCLUSION Co-Prescription of Gastro

  20. Analgesic use among nursing homes residents, with and without dementia, in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann-Podczaska A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Agnieszka Neumann-Podczaska,1 Tomasz Nowak,2 Aleksandra Suwalska,3 Dorota Łojko,4 Roma Krzymińska-Siemaszko,2 Elżbieta Kozak-Szkopek,5 Katarzyna Wieczorowska-Tobis2 1Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, 2Department of Palliative Medicine, Laboratory of Geriatrics, 3Department of Psychiatry, Laboratory of Neuropsychobiology, 4Department of Adult Psychiatry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, 5Department of Geriatrics, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: Many age-associated diseases are accompanied by pain. There is no doubt that pain is underrecognized among elderly nursing home residents and the diagnosing of pain is a real challenge in subjects with dementia. The aim of the study was to characterize analgesic use among nursing home residents and to delineate the putative associations between pain management and cognitive functions of elderly persons. The study involved 392 subjects (males:females – 81:311 with a mean age of 83.6±5.9 years. The residents’ medical files in relation to diagnoses and drug consumption were analyzed, and the screening of cognitive functions was performed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. One hundred and thirteen residents (28.8% received some analgesics. Among them 84 (21.4% used them routinely, 25 (6.4% – pro re nata (PRN and four (1.0% – both routinely and PRN. Non-opioid analgesics were taken routinely by 53 residents, weak opioids by nine subjects, and one person was receiving strong opioids. Additionally, three individuals were taking a combination preparation of tramadol and acetaminophen. The rate of subjects who were not receiving any pain treatment was higher in residents with MMSE between 0 and 9 points than in those with MMSE between 24 and 30 points (P=0.0151. Furthermore, ten residents (9.1% with severe dementia were treated with analgesics PRN. The results of our study point to a remarkably low use of analgesics in nursing home residents in

  1. Hair analysis to monitor abuse of analgesic combinations containing butalbital and propyphenazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Anna; Tiraferri, Ilaria; Palazzoli, Federica; Verri, Patrizia; Vandelli, Daniele; Marchesi, Filippo; Ciccarese, Michela; Licata, Manuela

    2015-11-10

    Butalbital, a barbiturate, is present in analgesic combinations used by headache sufferers. Overuse/abuse of these combinations may cause dependence, chronic migraine, and medication-overuse headache (MOH). MOH is difficult to manage: it improves interrupting analgesic overuse, but requires monitoring, because relapses are frequent. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for hair analysis has been developed and validated to document abuse of an analgesic combination containing butalbital and propyphenazone by a patient with MOH. For over ten years the patient managed her headache using eight suppositories/day of an analgesic combination containing butalbital 150mg, caffeine 75mg, and propyphenazone 375mg per suppository. An outpatient detoxification treatment was carried out. After three weeks, the patient reduced the consumption to one suppository/day. At the first control visit, after three months from the beginning of detoxification, the patient increased the use of the combination to four suppositories/day and at the second control visit, after seven months from the beginning of detoxification, she was back to eight suppositories/day. At the two control visits, a hair sample was taken for determination of butalbital and propyphenazone. Moreover blood and urine samples for determination of butalbital were drawn at the beginning of detoxification treatment and at the two control visits. With the segmental analysis of two hair samples the medication history of ten months could be estimated. In the first hair sample, collected at the first control visit, in the distal segment, butalbital and propyphenazone concentrations were, respectively, 17.5ng/mg and 56.0ng/mg, confirming the prolonged abuse; in the proximal segment, concurrently with the detoxification treatment, butalbital and propyphenazone concentrations had reduced respectively to 5.45ng/mg and 11.1ng/mg. The second hair sample, collected at the second control visit, proved the fair course

  2. µ-Conotoxins as Leads in the Development of New Analgesics

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    Raymond S. Norton

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs contain a specific binding site for a family of cone shell toxins known as µ-conotoxins. As some VGSCs are involved in pain perception and µ-conotoxins are able to block these channels, µ-conotoxins show considerable potential as analgesics. Recent studies have advanced our understanding of the three-dimensional structures and structure-function relationships of the µ-conotoxins, including their interaction with VGSCs. Truncated peptide analogues of the native toxins have been created in which secondary structure elements are stabilized by non-native linkers such as lactam bridges. Ultimately, it would be desirable to capture the favourable analgesic properties of the native toxins, in particular their potency and channel sub-type selectivity, in non-peptide mimetics. Such mimetics would constitute lead compounds in the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of pain.

  3. The unsolved case of "bone-impairing analgesics": the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Raffa, Robert B; Mattia, Consalvo

    2015-01-01

    The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users. There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids: 1) the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness; 2) reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and 3) chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism. The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine). Opioid-associated androgen deficiency is correlated with an increased risk of osteoporosis; thus, despite that standards have not been established for monitoring and treating opioid-induced hypogonadism or hypoadrenalism, all patients chronically taking opioids (particularly at doses ≥100 mg morphine daily) should be monitored for the early detection of hormonal impairment and low bone mass density. PMID:25848298

  4. Screening of Caesalpinia pulcherrima Linn Flowers for Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Patel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The flowers of Caesalpinia pulcherrima were extracted with methanol to determine their analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Intraperitoneal administration of methanolic extract (75, 150 and 225 mg/kg produced significant analgesic activity in acetic acid-induced writhing, tail immersion test and hot plate tests and anti-inflammatory effect against carrageenan-induced paw edema in experimental animals. Industrial relevance: The herbal medicines are getting more importance in the treatment of inflammation because of the side effect of the current therapy used to treat those inflammation using synthetic drugs. Herbal medicines have less side effects and less costly when compared to the synthetic drugs. The present study will help the industry to produce herbal drug with less side effect, less costly affordable and more effective in the treatment of pain and inflammation. Finally the phytochemical screening or elucidation of the bioactive compounds from the plant would be effective drug against pain and inflammation.

  5. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira; da Costa, José Madson Vidal; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Pinheiro, Ênio de Oliveira; Fernandes, Maria Angela Ferreira; de Araujo, Ivonete Batista

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47). The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious. PMID:26625989

  6. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of New Chemical Entities from Ibuprofen as Novel Analgesic Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, A; Naderi, N; Daniali, M; Kazemi, S; Aazami, S; Alizadeh, N; Nahri-Niknafs, B

    2015-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the first choice of drugs that are normally used for the treatment of pain and inflammation. Ibuprofen (I) and its analogues as the most widely used NSAIDs have been synthesized in recent years. In an effort to establish new candidates with improved analgesic properties, derivatives (II-VII) with substituted aromatic as well as aliphatic moieties were synthesized in this experiment and evaluated in formalin test with rats. The results were compared to ibuprofen and control groups. Findings indicated that derivatives with new alkylphenyl rings (VI and VII) had some similar or more analgesic activities relative to the control and ibuprofen groups, respectively; which could be justified as to more alkyl and phenyl groups instead of p-isobutylphenyl moiety in I. PMID:24871929

  7. Analgesic and antipyretic activity of Curcuma longa rhizome extracts in wister rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Neha

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to ascertain analgesic and antipyretic activities of rhizome extracts of Curcuma longa in Wister rats. Both aqueous and alcoholic extracts at 100 and 200 mg/kg by oral, single dose treatment for seven days revealed significant difference (P<0.05, 0.01 in reaction time in terms of analgesic activity before and after treatments which was comparable to analgin (10 mg/kg b wt. and were ineffective in reversal of brewers yeast induced pyrexia. Solvent yield of these extracts was 20 percent and color dark brown and reddish brown with solid and semisolid consistency respectively. [Vet World 2009; 2(8.000: 304-306

  8. Post-operative analgesic effects of paracetamol, NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids and their combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen Berg; Nielsen, Rasmus; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2014-01-01

    well-documented 'gold standards' exist. The aim of the present topical, narrative review is to provide an update of the evidence for post-operative analgesic efficacy with the most commonly used, systemic non-opioid drugs, paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)/COX-2 antagonists......, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids, and combinations of these. The review is based on data from previous systematic reviews with meta-analyses, investigating effects of non-opioid analgesics on pain, opioid-requirements, and opioid-related adverse effects. Paracetamol, NSAIDs, COX-2 antagonists, and gabapentin....... Trials of pregabalin > 300 mg/day indicated a morphine-sparing effect of 13.4 (4, 22.8) mg morphine/24 h. Notably, though, the available evidence for additive or synergistic effects of most combination regimens was sparse or lacking. Paracetamol, NSAIDs, selective COX-2 antagonists, and gabapentin all...

  9. Analgesic properties of the aqueous and ethanol extracts of the leaves of Kalanchoe crenata (Crassulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguelefack, T B; Fotio, A L; Watcho, P; Wansi, S L; Dimo, T; Kamanyi, A

    2004-05-01

    The aqueous and ethanol extracts of the dry leaves of Kalanchoe crenata (300 and 600 mg/kg) were evaluated for their analgesic properties on the pain induced by acetic acid, formalin and heat in mice and by pressure on rats. The ethanol extract of K. crenata at a dose of 600 mg/kg produced an inhibition of 61.13% on pain induced by acetic acid and 50.13% for that induced by formalin. An inhibition of 67.18% was observed on pain induced by heat 45 min after the administration of the extract. The aqueous extract administered at a dose of 600 mg/kg produced a maximum effect of 25% on pain induced by pressure. These activities were similar to those produced by a paracetamol-codeine association, while indomethacin exhibited a protective effect only against the writhing test. Our results suggest that the leaves of K. crenata could be a source of analgesic compounds. PMID:15173998

  10. Gram Scale Syntheses of (-)-Incarvillateine and Its Analogs. Discovery of Potent Analgesics for Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Zhang, Fengying; Yu, Gang; Song, Yan; Wang, Xintong; Wang, Meiliang; Gong, Zehui; Su, Ruibin; Jia, Yanxing

    2016-04-28

    (-)-Incarvillateine (INCA) is the major antinociceptive component of Incarvillea sinensis, which has been used to treat rheumatism and relieve pain in traditional Chinese medicine. We have developed a concise and general synthetic approach for INCA, which enabled gram-scale asymmetric syntheses of (-)-INCA, (-)-incarvilline, (-)-isoincarvilline, and six other INCA analogues. The synthesis of isoincarvilline was reported for the first time. Three structurally simplified analogues of INCA were also synthesized. In vivo screening found that INCA and two structurally optimized analogues were efficacious in preventing the acetic acid-induced writhing response. Moreover, their analgesic efficacy was demonstrated in formalin induced pain model. More importantly, administration of 20 or 40 mg/kg INCA and two structurally optimized analogues showed strong analgesic effects in spared nerve injury (SNI) model, and their effective doses were lower than the current gold standard, gabapentin (100 mg/kg in this model). PMID:27022999

  11. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrul Alam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities ofthe methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves (MPBL. Materials and Methods: MPBL was evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model. Analgesic activity of MPBL was evaluated by hot plate, writhing, and formalin tests. Total phenolic and flavonoids content, total antioxidant activity, scavenging of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical, peroxynitrate (ONOO- as well as  inhibition of total ROS generation, and assessment of reducing power were used to evaluate antioxidant potential of MPBL. Results: The extract of MPBL, at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg, produced a significant (p

  12. Experimental evaluation of antipyretic and analgesic activities of Amalakyadi Gana: An Ayurvedic formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Timbadiya, Manoj J.; Nishteswar, K.; Acharya, Rabinarayan; Nariya, Mukesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In Ayurvedic classics, the symptom fever is considered as a separate disease called Jwara. Acharya Sushruta has mentioned Amalakyadi Gana for treatment of all types of Jwara, which contains four drugs namely Amalaki (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.), Haritaki (Terminalia chebula Retz.), Pippali (Piper longum L.), and Chitraka (Plumbago zeylenica L.). Aims: To evaluate the antipyretic and analgesic activity of Amalakyadi Gana in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: Decoction ...

  13. Intravenous paracetamol infusion versus intramuscular tramadol as an intrapartum labor analgesic

    OpenAIRE

    Hema Mohan; Rekha Ramappa; Sandesh M.; Akash B. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was to compare intravenous paracetamol and intramuscular tramadol as labor analgesics. Methods: This prospective-randomized study conducted in 200 primigravidae in active labor, distributed into two groups of 100 women each with one receiving intravenous 1,000 mg Paracetamol and other 100 mg intramuscular tramadol. Pain intensity is recorded by McGills scale before, one and 3 h after drug administration. Perinatal outcome is recorded. Results: No d...

  14. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    OpenAIRE

    Prachi Anand; Alison O’Neil; Emily Lin; Trevor Douglas; Mandë Holford

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocon...

  15. Evaluation of antidepressant and analgesic activity of tapentadol with mirtazapine: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Pankaj K. Chaudhary; Atul Jain; Asha Pathak; Neha Sharma; Atul K. Mishra; Arvind K. Maurya; Vikas Gaur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data comparing tapentadol with an antidepressant is limited. A comparison of tapentadol with mirtazapine at different dose has not been performed, the other antidepressant in the same therapeutic class with a significant market share, has been undertaken. In the absence of relevant data to assess the place that tapentadol should occupy in the therapeutic arsenal, indirect comparisons are the most rigorous way to go. We conducted a study evaluate antidepressant and analgesic activi...

  16. Push-Me Pull-You: Comparative Advertising in the OTC Analgesics Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Simon; Ciliberto, Federico; Liaukonyte, Jura; Renault, Regis

    2015-01-01

    We derive equilibrium incentives to use comparative advertising that pushes up own brand perception and pulls down the brand image of targeted rivals. Data on content and spending for all TV advertisements in OTC analgesics 2001-2005 enable us to construct matrices of dollar rival targeting and estimate the structural model. Using brands' optimal choices, these attack matrices identify diversion ratios, from which we derive comparative advertising damage measures. We find that outgoing compar...

  17. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils of Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jeane; Abebe, Worku; Sousa, S M; Duarte, V G; Machado, M I L; Matos, F J A

    2003-12-01

    Many species of the genus Eucalyptus from the Myrtaceae family are used in Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of various medical conditions such as cold, flue, fever, and bronchial infections. In the current investigation, we evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oil extracts from three species of Eucalyptus employing various standard experimental test models. Using acetic acid-induced writhes in mice and hot plate thermal stimulation in rats, it was shown that the essential oils of Eucalyptus citriodora (EC), Eucalyptus tereticornis (ET), and Eucalyptus globulus (EG) induced analgesic effects in both models, suggesting peripheral and central actions. In addition, essential oil extracts from the three Eucalyptus species produced anti-inflammatory effects, as demonstrated by inhibition of rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, neutrophil migration into rat peritoneal cavities induced by carrageenan, and vascular permeability induced by carrageenan and histamine. However, no consistent results were observed for some of the parameters evaluated, both in terms of activities and dose-response relationships, reflecting the complex nature of the oil extracts and/or the assay systems used. Taken together, the data suggest that essential oil extracts of EC, ET, and EG possess central and peripheral analgesic effects as well as neutrophil-dependent and independent anti-inflammatory activities. These initial observations provide support for the reported use of the eucalyptus plant in Brazilian folk medicine. Further investigation is warranted for possible development of new classes of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs from components of the essential oils of the Eucalyptus species. PMID:14611892

  18. Analgesic effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy versus ultrasound therapy in chronic tennis elbow

    OpenAIRE

    Paweł LIZIS

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the analgesic effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy with those of ultrasound therapy in patients with chronic tennis elbow. [Subjects] Fifty patients with tennis elbow were randomized to receive extracorporeal shock wave therapy or ultrasound therapy. [Methods] The extracorporeal shock wave therapy group received 5 treatments once per week. Meanwhile, the ultrasound group received 10 treatments 3 times per week. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue ...

  19. Analgesic activity of extracts of the whole plant of Amaranthus spinosus Linn.

    OpenAIRE

    Jamaluddin Abu Taiab Md; Qais Nazmul; Howlader Md. Amran; Shams- Ud-Doha K. M; Sarker Apu Apurba; Ali Mirza Asif

    2011-01-01

    Successive petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of the whole plant of Amaranthus spinosus Linn. were investigated for the analgesic activity. Experiments were carried out with these extracts for their peripheral and central antinociceptive potentials on acetic acid induced writhing and radiant heat tail-flick models in mice, respectively. In both the models, methanolic extract showed significant writhing inhibition as well as the elongation of tail-flick time at a dose of 500 ...

  20. The Role of Spinal Dopaminergic Transmission in the Analgesic Effect of Nefopam on Rat Inflammatory Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Yun; Chae, Joo Wung; Lim, Chang Hun; Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Keun Suk; Lee, Hyung Gon; Choi, Jeong Il; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background Nefopam has been known as an inhibitor of the reuptake of monoamines, and the noradrenergic and/or serotonergic system has been focused on as a mechanism of its analgesic action. Here we investigated the role of the spinal dopaminergic neurotransmission in the antinociceptive effect of nefopam administered intravenously or intrathecally. Methods The effects of intravenously and intrathecally administered nefopam were examined using the rat formalin test. Then we performed a microdi...

  1. Analgesic effect of Minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bruckert, Mitchell; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the analgesic effect of minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, in a rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Inflammation was induced in male rats by intracolonic administration of tri-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Visceral hyperalgesia was assessed by comparing the viscero-motor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) prior and post 7 days after TNBS treatment. Electrophysiology recordings from CRD-sensitive pelvic nerv...

  2. Analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjskjaer, Jesper O; Gade, Erik; Kiel, Louise B;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with ropivacaine compared with placebo as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial following the CONSORT criteria. SETTING: Hvidovre...... ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block in women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. As part of a multimodal regimen the transversus abdominis plane block showed some effect on pain scores at rest only in the early postoperative period....

  3. Intra- and post-operative analgesic effects of carprofen in medetomidine premedicated dogs undergoing ovariectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Seliškar Alenka; Rostaher Ana; Ostrouška Maja; Butinar J.

    2005-01-01

    Intra- and post-operative analgesic effects of pre-operative administration of carprofen were investigated in 16 medetomidine-premedicated dogs undergoing elective ovariectomy. Dogs were randomly allocated into carprofen (n=8; 4 mg/kg, intramuscularly) or placebo group (n = 8). After medetomidine (1000 [xg/m2, intramuscularly) premedication, they were induced with propofol (1 mg/kg, intravenously) and maintained with isoflurane (FE'ISO 1.0 %) in 100% oxygen. During anaesthesia, t...

  4. The Postoperative Analgesic Effect of Morphine and Paracetamol in the Patients Undergoing Laparotomy, Using PCA Method

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghoubi, Siamak; Pourfallah, Reza; Barikani, Ameneh; Kayalha, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: postoperative pain increases the activity of the sympathetic system, causes hypermetabolic conditions, retains salt and water, increases glucose, fatty acid lactate and oxygen consumption, weakens the immunity system which delays wound healing. Our object was comparison of the analgesic effect of morphine and paracetamol in the patients undergoing laparotomy, using PCA method. Method: Seventy patients who had undergone laparotomy were studied using double blind randomized clinical ...

  5. Antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Viola betonicifolia whole plant

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Naveed; Saeed Muhammad; Khan Haroon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Pyrexia, algesia and inflammation are associated with several pathological conditions. Synthetic drugs available for the treatment of these conditions cause multiple unwanted effects. Several studies are ongoing worldwide to find natural healing agents with better safety profile. The current study was thus aimed at evaluating antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of whole plant of V. betonicifolia (VBME). Methods VBME was employe...

  6. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of Grewia asiatica Linn. in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Udaybhan Singh Paviaya; Parveen Kumar; Wanjari, Manish M.; Thenmozhi, S.; B R Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Grewia asiatica Linn. (Family: Tiliaceae), called Phalsa in Hindi is an Indian medicinal plant used for a variety of therapeutic and nutritional uses. The root bark of the plant is traditionally used in rheumatism (painful chronic inflammatory condition). Aims: The present study demonstrates the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of G. asiatica in rodents. Settings and Design: The methanolic extract of Grewia asiatica (MEGA) and aqueous extract of Grewia...

  7. The marine plant thalassia testudinum possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Llanio, M.; Fernández, M.D.; Cabrera, B.; Bermejo, P.; Abad, M.J.; Payá, M; Alcaraz, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    The natural marine compounds represent a source of new chemical structures and of pharmacological substances with anti-inflammatory activity that will allow to deep in the knowledge of the inflammatory process and in novel mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents. In this work we carry out the study of a extract of a marine plant present in the Cuban coast, Thalassia testudinum (Tt) with the objective of detecting anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects by carrageena...

  8. Pattern of self-medication with analgesics among Iranian University students in central Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Shadi Sarahroodi; Ali Maleki-Jamshid; Sawalha, Ansam F.; Peyman Mikaili; Leila Safaeian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Self-medication is defined as the use of drugs for the treatment of self-diagnosed disorders. It is influenced by factors such as education, family, society, law, availability of drugs and exposure to advertisements. This study was performed to evaluate self-medication with analgesics and its pattern among different groups of Iranian University Students. Materials and Methods: A randomized, cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted from December 2009 to February 2010. The t...

  9. δ Subunit‐containing GABAA receptors are preferred targets for the centrally acting analgesic flupirtine

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Felicia; Bajric, Mirnes; Salzer, Isabella; Dorostkar, Mario M.; Khan, Deeba; Pollak, Daniela D.; Kubista, Helmut; Boehm, Stefan; Koenig, Xaver

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The Kv7 channel activator flupirtine is a clinical analgesic characterized as ‘selective neuronal potassium channel opener’. Flupirtine was found to exert comparable actions at GABAA receptors and Kv7 channels in neurons of pain pathways, but not in hippocampus. Experimental Approach Expression patterns of GABAA receptors were explored in immunoblots of rat dorsal root ganglia, dorsal horns and hippocampi using antibodies for 10 different subunits. Effects of flupirtine...

  10. Correlation versus Causation? Pharmacovigilance of the Analgesic Flupirtine Exemplifies the Need for Refined Spontaneous ADR Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Nora; Borlak, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Annually, adverse drug reactions result in more than 2,000,000 hospitalizations and rank among the top 10 causes of death in the United States. Consequently, there is a need to continuously monitor and to improve the safety assessment of marketed drugs. Nonetheless, pharmacovigilance practice frequently lacks causality assessment. Here, we report the case of flupirtine, a centrally acting non-opioid analgesic. We re-evaluated the plausibility and causality of 226 unselected, spontaneously rep...

  11. Role of flupirtine as a preemptive analgesic in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Ghanshyam; Behera, Shailaja Shankar; Das, Saurabh Kumar; Jain, Gaurav; Choupoo, Sujali; Raj, Janak

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Postsurgical pain is the leading complaint after laparoscopic cholecystectomy that may delay the postoperative recovery and hence we undertook a prospective randomized trial to analyze the role of flupirtine as a preemptive analgesic for postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing above surgery. Material and Methods: A total of 66 cases were randomly assigned to two groups to receive capsule flupirtine (200 mg) or capsule vitamin B complex administered orally, 2 h be...

  12. The analgesic effect of the ultrasound-guided transverse abdominis plane block after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ra, Yoon Suk; Kim, Chi Hyo; Lee, Guie Yong; Han, Jong In

    2010-01-01

    Background Several methods are performed to control the pain after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Recently, the transverse abdominis plane block has been proposed to compensate for the problems developed by preexisting methods. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of the ultrasound-guided transverse abdominis plane block (US-TAP block) and compare efficacy according to the concentration of local analgesics in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods Fifty-four pati...

  13. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of saponified fraction from Annona reticulata L. Bark

    OpenAIRE

    Chavan, Machindra J.; Pravin S. Wakte; Shinde, Devanand B.

    2010-01-01

    The saponified petroleum ether extract (SPE) of the Annona reticulata L. bark were studied for fatty acid composition by GC-MS analysis. Six fatty acids amounting 86.68% of the total contents were identified. The composition of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid was 22.10 % and 64.58 %, respectively. SPE at the doses of 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight showed significant central as well as peripheral analgesic, along with anti-inflammatory activity.

  14. The analgesic effect of different antidepressants combined with aspirin on thermally induced pain in Albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla S. Elhwuegi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Combination analgesics provide more effective pain relief for a broader spectrum of pain. This research examines the possible potentiation of the analgesic effect of different classes of antidepressants when combined with aspirin in thermal model of pain using Albino mice.Methods:Different groups of six animals each were injected intraperitoneally by different doses of aspirin (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, imipramine (2.5, 7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg, fluoxetine (1.25, 2.5, 5 or 7.5 mg/kg, mirtazapine (1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg and a combination of a fixed dose of aspirin (100 mg/kg with the different doses of the three antidepressants. One hour later the analgesic effect of these treatments were evaluated against thermally induced pain. All data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired Student's t-test.Results:Aspirin had no analgesic effect in thermally induced pain. The three selected antidepressants produced dose dependent analgesia. The addition of a fixed dose of aspirin to imipramine significantly increased the reaction time (RT of the lowest dose (by 23% and the highest dose (by 20%. The addition of the fixed dose of aspirin to fluoxetine significantly increased RT by 13% of the dose 2.5 mg/Kg. Finally, the addition of the fixed dose of aspirin significantly potentiated the antinociceptive effect of the different doses of mirtazapine (RT was increased by 24, 54 and 38% respectively.Conclusion:Combination of aspirin with an antidepressant might produce better analgesia, increasing the efficacy of pain management and reduces side effects by using smaller doses of each drug.

  15. Analgesic effect of preoperative versus intraoperative dexamethasone after laparoscopic cholecystectomy with multimodal analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Se Hun; Jang, Eun Ho; KIM, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwangrae; Lee, Jeong Han; Lee, Kun Moo; Cheong, Soon Ho; Kim, Young-Jae; Shin, Chee-Mahn

    2011-01-01

    Background Pain after laparoscopy is multifactorial and different treatments have been proposed to provide pain relief. Multimodal analgesia is now recommended to prevent and treat post-laparoscopy pain. Dexamethasone is effective in reducing postoperative pain. The timing of steroid administration seems to be important. We evaluated the analgesic efficacy of preoperative intravenous dexamethasone 1 hour before versus during laparoscopic cholecystectomy with multimodal analgesia. Methods One ...

  16. Comparing the Duration of the Analgesic Effects of Intravenous and Rectal Acetaminophen Following Tonsillectomy in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Haddadi, Soudabeh; Marzban, Shideh; Karami, Mohammad Seddigh; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Parvizi, Arman; Naderi Nabi, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain control (especially, after adenotonsillectomy) has a very important effect on recovery time, hospitalization duration, hemodynamic disorders, bleeding, nausea, vomiting and medical costs. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the effects of intravenous and rectal acetaminophen on controlling post-adenotonsillectomy pain in children, and duration of their analgesic effects. Patients and Methods: In this randomized double-blinded clinica...

  17. Analgesic effect of highly reversible ω-conotoxin FVIA on N type Ca2+ channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyun Jeong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-type Ca2+ channels (Cav2.2 play an important role in the transmission of pain signals to the central nervous system. ω-Conotoxin (CTx-MVIIA, also called ziconotide (Prialt®, effectively alleviates pain, without causing addiction, by blocking the pores of these channels. Unfortunately, CTx-MVIIA has a narrow therapeutic window and produces serious side effects due to the poor reversibility of its binding to the channel. It would thus be desirable to identify new analgesic blockers with binding characteristics that lead to fewer adverse side effects. Results Here we identify a new CTx, FVIA, from the Korean Conus Fulmen and describe its effects on pain responses and blood pressure. The inhibitory effect of CTx-FVIA on N-type Ca2+ channel currents was dose-dependent and similar to that of CTx-MVIIA. However, the two conopeptides exhibited markedly different degrees of reversibility after block. CTx-FVIA effectively and dose-dependently reduced nociceptive behavior in the formalin test and in neuropathic pain models, and reduced mechanical and thermal allodynia in the tail nerve injury rat model. CTx-FVIA (10 ng also showed significant analgesic effects on writhing in mouse neurotransmitter- and cytokine-induced pain models, though it had no effect on acute thermal pain and interferon-γ induced pain. Interestingly, although both CTx-FVIA and CTx-MVIIA depressed arterial blood pressure immediately after administration, pressure recovered faster and to a greater degree after CTx-FVIA administration. Conclusions The analgesic potency of CTx-FVIA and its greater reversibility could represent advantages over CTx-MVIIA for the treatment of refractory pain and contribute to the design of an analgesic with high potency and low side effects.

  18. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of the Methanol Extract from Pogostemon cablin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Chun Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pogostemon cablin (PC is a herbal medicine traditionally applied to treat not only common cold, nausea and diarrhea but also headache and fever. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of standardized PC methanol extract (PCMeOH in vivo. Investigations were performed in mice with two analgesic models. One was acetic acid-induced writhing response and the other formalin-induced paw licking. The anti-inflammatory effect was tested by λ-carrageenan (Carr-induced mice paw edema. These analgesic experimental results indicated that PCMeOH (1.0 g/kg decreased the acetic acid-induced writhing responses and PCMeOH (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg decreased the licking time in the second phase of the formalin test. Moreover, Carr-induced paw edema inflammation was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner when PCMeOH (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg was administered 3 and 4 h after the Carr injection. Mechanistic studies showed that PCMeOH decreased the levels of malondialdehyde in the edema paw by increasing the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, in the liver and decreasing the cyclooxygenase 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α activities in the edema paw. This study has demonstrated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of PCMeOH, thus verifying its popular use in traditional medicine.

  19. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Leucas cephalotes (Roxb.ex Roth) Spreng

    OpenAIRE

    Bhukya Baburao; Anreddy Rama Narsimha Reddy; Gangarapu Kiran; Yellu Narsimha Reddy; Gottumukkala Krishna Mohan

    2010-01-01

    The whole plant of the methanolic extract from Leucas cephalotes was screened for invitro antioxidant (using the DPPH method), invivo analgesic (using hot plate test in mice) and anti-inflammatory (using rat paw edema test) activities. The methanolic extract of Leucas cephalotes (MELC) scavenged the DPPH radicals in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50 value to scavenge DPPH radicals was found to be 421.3µg/ml. A significant (p

  20. Phytochemical screening and studies of analgesic potential of Moringa oleifera Lam. stem bark extract on experimental animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Shumaia Parvin; Md. Abu Shuaib Rafshanjani; Md. Abdul Kader; Most. Afia Akhtar; Tahmida Sharmin

    2014-01-01

    The work has been done for the phytochemical investigation and study of analgesic activity of Moringa oleifera Lam. ethanolic stem bark extract using Acetic Acid Induced Writhing method. The effect of extract was tested for qualitative chemical analysis which reveals the presence of alkaloid, glycosides, flavonoids, tannins, saponin, carbohydrate etc. For peripheral analgesic effect acetic acid induced writhing test was used and for this stem bark extract was administered intraperitoneally at...

  1. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory-analgesic activity of 2',4'-difluoro-3-(carbamoyl)biphenyl-4-yl benzoates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Eighteen 2',4'-difluoro-3-(carbamoyl)biphenyl-4-yl benzoates were synthesized from diflunisal in three steps with total yields from 72% to 86%. All compounds were identified by IR, 1H NMR, MS and elemental analysis. The anti-inflammatory activity and analgesic activity for 18 compounds were evaluated. The preliminary assay results showed that compounds 4a and 4p exhibited potent anti-inflammatory-analgesic activity.

  2. Synthesis of antipyrine/pyridazinone hybrids and investigation of their in vivo analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

    OpenAIRE

    BAYTAŞ, Sultan; İNCELER, Nazan; MAVANEH, Khatereh Fattahpour

    2012-01-01

    Eleven antipyrine/pyridazinone hybrids were synthesized and evaluated for their in vivo analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities by p-benzoquinone-induced writhing test and carrageenan-induced paw edema model, respectively. The test results indicated that compounds 6a, 6c, and 6d were equally or more potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents than aspirin and indomethacin, respectively. Side effects of the compounds were examined on gastric mucosa. Most of the compounds were fou...

  3. A comparison Comparison between analgesic effects of aqueous ethanolic extract of mentha longifolia and morphine in male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ezatollah Paknia; Mohammad Ebrahim Rezvani; Mohammad Hossain Dashti-Rahmatabadi; Majid Bagheri

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Long-term consumption of many drugs followed by reduction of their effectiveness has necessitated performing research on new analgesics .Thus, the present study was conducted to evaluate the analgesic effects of mentha longifolia and morphine in mice using writhing and hot plate tests. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 70 male rats were divided into 7 equal groups. The groups included the control, three experimental groups receiving 400, 800, or 1600 m...

  4. Impulsivity but not sensation seeking is associated with opioid analgesic misuse risk in patients with chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Elise N.; Rosen, Kristen D.; Gutierrez, Antonio; Eckmann, Maxim; Ramamurthy, Somayaji; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity and sensation seeking have been associated with substance use disorders, including opioid use disorders. This pilot study sought to examine whether impulsivity and sensation seeking, as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS), were associated with opioid analgesic misuse risk in chronic, low-back pain patients prescribed opioid analgesics. Participants were 42 chronic, low-back pain patients enrolled in a larger study examining problemat...

  5. Analgesic Activity of Some 1,2,4-Triazole Heterocycles Clubbed with Pyrazole, Tetrazole, Isoxazole and Pyrimidine

    OpenAIRE

    Ramdas Bhanudas Pandhare; Popat Baban Mohite; Appala Raju; Shantaram Gajanan Khanage

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study in vivo analgesic activity of some previously synthesized 1,2,4-triazole derivatives containing pyrazole, tetrazole, isoxazole and pyrimidine ring have been evaluated. Methods: Acetic acid induced writhing method and Hot plate method has been described to study analgesic activity of some 1,2,4-triazole derivatives containing pyrazole, tetrazole, isoxazole and pyrimidine as a pharmacological active lead. Results: Thirty six different derivatives con...

  6. A new analgesic method, two-minute sciatic nerve press, for immediate pain relief: a randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Fenglin; Jiang Xianrong; Wu Bin; He Jiman; Zhao Tao; Zhang Wenlon

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Current analgesics have drawbacks such as delays in acquisition, lag-times for effect, and side effects. We recently presented a preliminary report of a new analgesic method involving a two-minute sciatic nerve press, which resulted in immediate short-term relief of pain associated with dental and renal diseases. The present study investigated whether this technique was effective for pain associated with other disease types, and whether the relief was effective for up to o...

  7. Self-medication with analgesics among medical students and interns in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; Alamoudi, Banan Mohammad; Baamer, Wejdan Omar; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and predictors of self-medication with analgesics among senior medical students and interns in King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 504 participants in 2013. A multistage stratified random sampling was used. A confidential, anonymous & self-administered questionnaire was used to collect personal & socio-demographic data. Data about self-medication and self-medication with analgesics ...

  8. Evaluation on Anti-Inflammatory, Analgesic, Antitumor, and Antioxidant Potential of Total Saponins from Nigella glandulifera Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Zhao; Fang Xu; Hua Huang; Zhengyi Gu; Linlin Wang; Wei Tan; Jinhua He; Yan Chen; Chenyang Li

    2013-01-01

    Nigella glandulifera seeds are used as a spice or remedy for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. This study aimed to investigate analgesic (writhing test), anti-inflammatory (ear-induced edema, vascular permeability test), antioxidant, and antitumor activities of total saponins from this plant (TSN). TSN (6, 12, and 24 mg/kg) were exhibited analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). In D-galactose-induced ageing model, TSN significantly incre...

  9. Primary care providers' judgments of opioid analgesic misuse in a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavan, M.; Penko, J; D. Guzman; Miaskowski, C; Kushel, MB

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care providers (PCPs) must balance treatment of chronic non-cancer pain with opioid analgesics with concerns about opioid misuse. OBJECTIVE: We co-enrolled community-based indigent adults and their PCPs to determine PCPs' accuracy of estimating opioid analgesic misuse and illicit substance use. DESIGN: Patient-provider dyad study. PARTICIPANTS: HIV-infected, community-based indigent adults ('patients') and their PCPs. MAIN MEASURES: Using structured interviews, we queried ...

  10. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extracted leaves of selected medicinal plants in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad M. Hassan; Shahneaz A. Khan; Amir H. Shaikat; Md. Emran Hossain; Md. Ahasanul Hoque; Md Hasmat Ullah; Saiful Islam

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The research was carried out to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extract of Desmodium pauciflorum, Mangifera indica and Andrographis paniculata leaves. Materials and Methods: In order to assess the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects acetic acid induced writhing response model and carrageenan induced paw edema model were used in Swiss albino mice and Wistar albino rats, respectively. In both cases, leaves extract were administered (2gm/kg body weight...

  11. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haliti NR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Naim R Haliti,1 Fehim R Haliti,2 Ferit K Koçani,3 Ali A Gashi,4 Shefqet I Mrasori,3 Valon I Hyseni,5 Samir I Bytyqi,5 Lumnije L Krasniqi,2 Ardiana F Murtezani,5 Shaip L Krasniqi5 1Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, 2Department of Children Dentistry, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 3Department of Oral Disease, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 4Department of Oral Surgery, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 5Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, Prishtina, Kosovo Background: Because Kosovo has no reliable information on antimicrobial and analgesic use in dental practice, the survey reported here evaluated the antibiotic and analgesic prescriptions in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo (UDCCK.Methods: The data of 2,442 registered patients for a 1-year period were screened and analyzed concerning antibiotic and analgesic use as per standards of rational prescription.Results: Dentistry doctors prescribed antibiotics significantly more often than analgesics. Antibiotics were prescribed in 8.11% of all cases, while only 1.35% of total prescriptions were for analgesics. The total consumption of antibiotic drugs in the UDCCK was 4.53 Defined Daily Doses [DDD]/1,000 inhabitants/day, compared with only 0.216 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day for analgesics. From a total number of 117 patients, 32 patients received combinations of two antibiotics.Conclusion: Pharmacotherapy analysis showed that the prescription rates of antibiotics and analgesics in the UDCCK are not rational in terms of the qualitative aspects of treatment. For the qualitative improvement of prescription of these drug groups, we recommend the implementation of treatment guidelines following rational standards. Keywords: antibiotic, analgesics

  12. Effects of lidocaine and esmolol infusions on hemodynamic changes, analgesic requirement, and recovery in laparoscopic cholecystectomy operations

    OpenAIRE

    Serpil Dagdelen Dogan; Faik Emre Ustun; Elif Bengi Sener; Ersin Koksal; Yasemin Burcu Ustun; Cengiz Kaya; Fatih Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: We compared the effects of lidocaine and esmolol infusions on intraoperative hemodynamic changes, intraoperative and postoperative analgesic requirements, and recovery in laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. METHODS: The first group (n = 30) received IV lidocaine infusions at a rate of 1.5 mg/kg/min and the second group (n = 30) received IV esmolol infusions at a rate of 1 mg/kg/min. Hemodynamic changes, intraoperative and postoperative analgesic requirements, and rec...

  13. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of Cassia uniflora Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    She S Chaudhari; Sanjay R Chaudhari; Machindra J Chavan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of leaves of Cassia uniflora (C. uniflora) Mill. Methods: Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanolic extract of C. uniflora (100 and 200 mg/kg, body weight) was screened for analgesic (Eddy's hot plate and acetic acid induced writhing), anti-inflammatory (Carrageenan induced paw edema) and anti-arthritic (Complete Freund's Adjuvant induced arthritis). In Complete Freund's Adjuvant arthritis model degree of inflammation was evaluated by hind paw swelling, body weight, and biochemical parameters and supported by radiological analysis. Results: Treatment with extracts of C. uniflora showed significant (P<0.05) and dose dependant increase in paw licking time in Eddy's hot plate method. In writhing test, extracts were significantly reduced the number of writhes. A dose dependant and significant inhibition of edema was observed in carrageenan induced paw edema. Petroleum ether extract at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight showed most potent and significant activity which is supported by the results of body weight, biochemical parameters and radiological analysis in complete Freund's Adjuvant arthritis model. Conclusion:The extract possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity which may be mediated through the phytochemical constituents of the plant.

  14. Screening of Ficus religiosa leaves fractions for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

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    Vishal Gulecha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To evaluate the different fractions of dried leaves of Ficus religiosa Linn for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity using different models of pain and inflammation Materials and Methods : The analgesic activity of F. religiosa carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and tail flick test in rats. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet-granuloma formation in rats. Five different fractions (FRI, FRII, FRIII, FRIV and FRV of F. religiosa at the dose level of 20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o were tested. Results : The fraction FRI (40 mg/kg, p.o. and FRIII (40 mg/kg, p.o were found to be more effective (P<0.01 in preventing carrageenan induced rat paw edema, cotton pellet granuloma formation, and acetic acid induced writhing compared to the other fractions. FRI (20 mg/kg, p.o. and FRIII (20 mg/kg, p.o. were also found to be more effective in increasing latency period in tail flick method. Conclusion : Out of five different fractions of F. religiosa leaves tested, FRI and FRIII possess potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities against different models of inflammation and pain.

  15. Effect of some analgesics on paraoxonase-1 purified from human serum.

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    Ekinci, Deniz; Beydemir, Sükrü

    2009-08-01

    The in vitro effects of the analgesic drugs, lornoxicam, indomethacin, tenoxicam, diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen and lincomycine, on the activity of purified human serum paraoxonase (hPON1) (EC 3.1.8.1.) were evaluated. hPON1 was purified from human serum with a final specific activity of 3840 U mg(-1) and a purity of 25.3 % using simple chromatographic methods, including DEAE-Sephadex anion exchange and Sepharose 4B-L-tyrozine-1-napthylamine hydrophobic interaction chromatography. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated a single protein band corresponding to hPON1. The six analgesics dose-dependently decreased in vitro hPON1 activity, with IC(50) values for lornoxicam, indomethacin, tenoxicam, diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen and lincomycine of 0.136, 0.195, 0.340, 1.639, 6.23 and 9.638 mM, respectively. K(i) constants were 0.009, 0.097, 0.306, 0.805, 13.010 and 11.116 mM, respectively. Analgesics showed different inhibition mechanisms: lornoxicam, diclofenac sodium and lincomycine were uncompetitive, indomethacin and tenoxicam were competitive, ketoprofen was noncompetitive. According to the results, inhibition potency was lornoxicam>indomethacin>tenoxicam> diclofenac sodium>ketoprofen> lincomycine. PMID:19548782

  16. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the aqueous extract of Cussonia paniculata stem Bark

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    Adeolu A. Adedapo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous extract of the stem bark of Cussonia paniculata was investigated for its anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in animal models. The extract at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight reduced significantly, the formation of oedema induced by carrageenan and histamine. In the acetic acid-induced writhing model, the extract showed a good analgesic effect characterized by reduction in the number of writhes when compared to the control. The extract caused dose-dependent decrease of licking time and licking frequency in rats injected with 2.5% formalin, signifying its analgesic effect. These results were also comparable to those of indomethacin and cyproheptadine, the reference drugs used in this study. Acute toxicity test showed that the plant caused 80% mortality in rats hence it is a toxic plant. Though the study has provided some justification for the folkloric use of the plant in several communities for conditions such as stomach-ache, pain and inflammations but caution should be exercised in its use for medicinal purpose.

  17. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and immunostimulatory effects of Luehea divaricata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae bark

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    Roseane Leandra da Rosa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Luehea divaricata (Malvaceae is a plant widely used for treatment of various inflammatory and infectious conditions; however few reports discuss its biological properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects as well as the macrophage activity in mice treated with the hydroalcoholic crude extract of L. divaricata(CLD. Thin layer chromatography revealed presence of epicathequin, stigmasterol, lupeol and α,β-amyrin in the extract. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities, animals were subjected to paw edema induced by carrageenan test, writhing, formalin and capsaicin tests. Immunomodulatory activity was evaluated by adhesion and phagocytic capacity, lysosomal volume, and reactive oxygen species (ROS production by peritoneal macrophages, after daily treatment with CLD for 15 days. CLD promoted reduction in paw edema (36.8% and 50.2%; p<0.05 at doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg, respectively, inhibited writhing behavior at the higher dose (64.4%, p<0.05, reduced formalin reactivity (81.2% and 91.6% at doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg, respectively, p<0.05, and reduced capsaicin reactivity by 63.9% (300 mg/kg. CLD (200 mg• kg-1• day-1 increased phagocytosis capacity of macrophages (~3 fold, p<0.05, neutral red uptake (~50%, p<0.001, and ROS production (~90%, p<0.001. These data suggest that CLD possesses anti-inflammatory, analgesic and immunostimulatory properties.

  18. EVALUTION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF PUNICA GRANATUM LINN

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    Priyanka Bagri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous-ethanolic (50% extracts of fruit rind (PGR, flower (PGF, and leaves (PGL of Punica granatum were examined for its oral anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities at the doses of 150, 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Oral pretreatment with the dried extracts of P. granatum produced statistically significant and dose dependent inhibition of edema induced by carrageenan at all doses when compared to the control groups. The highest activity was shown in the PGR that at 500 mg/kg p.o. inhibited inflammation by 82.14%. (79 % for indomethacin at 10 mg/kg. On the contrary, the aqueous-ethanolic (50 % extracts of PGF and PGL exhibited 71.42% and 67.85% inhibition, respectively, at 500 mg/kg dose. The extracts at tested doses were found to possess analgesic activity in mice against tail-flick method. These results indicated that extracts of P. granatum possessed significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities suggesting its potential as an anti-inflammatory agent for use in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases in traditional medicine.

  19. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Evaluation of Ethanolic Extract of Seenthil churanam

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    V. Rajalakshimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The polyherbal formulation of Seenthil churanam is composition of whole plant extracts of Eclipta prostata, Tinospora cordifolia and the dried powder form of Earthworm used in folk medicine. The study was conducted to evaluate the scientific figures for the treatment of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of ethanolic extract of Seenthil churanam by acetic acid induced writhing test and eddy’s hot plate method, and carrageenan induced paw edema method. There was significant response in analgesic and inflammatory activity at high dose (400 mg/kg compared to low dose 200 mg/kg against the standards Analgin (500 mg/kg, Aspirin (100 mg/kg and Diclofenac sodium (100 mg/kg body weight of mice and rats. The results of this study show that the chronic oral administration of an ethanolic extract of Seenthil churanam at a 400 mg/kg body weight dosage be a good alternative natural medicine for analgesics and anti-inflammatory drug without side effects.

  20. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of amifostine, DRDE-07, and their analogs, in mice

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    Bhutia Yangchen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To find out the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity, if any, of Amifostine [S-2(3 amino propyl amino ethyl phosphorothioate], DRDE-07 [S-2(3 amino ethyl amino ethyl phenyl sulphide] and their analogs DRDE-30 and DRDE-35, the probable prophylactic agent for sulphur mustard (SM. Materials and Methods : In order to find out the analgesic activities of the compounds two methods were employed, namely, acetic acid-induced writhing test and formalin-induced paw licking. The persistent pain model of formalin-induced hind paw licking was carried out to test the effect of the compounds on neurogenic pain or early phase (0 to 5 minutes and on the peripheral pain or the late phase (15 to 30 minutes. To test the effect of the compound in acute inflammation, carrageenan-induced hind paw edema was carried out. This model of inflammation involves a variety of mediators of inflammation. Results : DRDE-07 (81.7% and DRDE-30 (79.4% showed significant reduction in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. DRDE-07 (93.1%, DRDE-30 (82%, and DRDE-35 (61.3% showed significant reduction in the second or late phase of formalin-induced paw licking. All the analogs (more than 60% including amifostine (43.9% showed significant reduction of paw edema in the carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. Conclusion : The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of the antidotes were comparable with aspirin.

  1. Synthesis and analgesic properties of N-substituted trans-4a-aryldecahydroisoquinolines.

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    Zimmerman, D M; Cantrell, B E; Swartzendruber, J K; Jones, N D; Mendelsohn, L G; Leander, J D; Nickander, R C

    1988-03-01

    A representative series of N-substituted derivatives of the morphine-based trans-4a-aryldecahydroisoquinoline were synthesized and evaluated for opioid analgesic activities. Compounds with potent analgesic activity and high affinities for the mu and kappa opioid receptors were discovered. The effect of varying the N-substituent in the trans-4a-aryldecahydroisoquinoline paralleled, to a certain extent, previous findings with other morphine part structures. Replacement of the N-methyl with a phenethyl group significantly increased analgesic potency. The N-cyclopropylmethyl analogue was found in rodents to have mixed agonist-antagonist properties; however, its antagonist activity was far weaker than those reported for the N-(cyclopropylmethyl)morphinan and -benzomorphan derivatives. Resolution of the stereoisomers and determination of their absolute configuration by X-ray crystallography showed that the opioid receptor effects were predominantly found with the 4aR,8aR isomer, the same relative absolute configuration of morphine. Unexpectedly, the 4aR,8aR N-cyclopropylmethyl analogue (compound 30), which in rodents had mixed agonist-antagonist properties similar to those of pentazocine, was found in rhesus monkeys to behave as a full morphine-like agonist. PMID:2831363

  2. Analgesic activity of Ugni molinae (murtilla) in mice models of acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delporte, C; Backhouse, N; Inostroza, V; Aguirre, M C; Peredo, N; Silva, X; Negrete, R; Miranda, H F

    2007-05-30

    Leaf extracts of Ugni molinae Turcz. (Myrtaceae) are used in Chilean folk medicine as analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The antinociceptive effect of dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA) and methanol (ME) leaf extracts was assessed by intraperitoneal, oral and topical administration in writhing, tail flick, and tail formalin tests in mice. The extracts showed a dose-dependent antinociceptive activity in all the assays under different administration routes. The ED(50) values for the different tests for the DCM, EA, ME extract and reference drug (ibuprofen) were as follows. Writhing test in acetic acid (i.p. administration): 0.21, 0.37, 1.37 and 0.85mg/kg, respectively; tail flick test (oral administration): 199, 189, 120 and 45.9mg/kg. The EC(50) values for tail flick test were (topical administration): 2.0, 0.35, 1.4 and 8.2% (w/v), respectively; and the topical analgesic effects were (formalin assay) 75.5, 77.5, 31.6 and 76.5%, respectively. Ugni molinae extracts produce antinociception in chemical and thermal pain models through a mechanism partially linked to either lipooxygenase and/or cyclooxygenase via the arachidonic acid cascade and/or opioid receptors. Flavonoid glycosides and triterpenoids have been isolated from the plant and can be associated with the observed effect. Our results corroborate the analgesic effects of Ugni molinae, and justify its traditional use for treating pain. PMID:17403589

  3. Study of the use of analgesics by patients with headache at a specialized outpatient clinic (ACEF

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    Olga Francis Pita Chagas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To evaluate the use of analgesics in headache diagnosed in Outpatients Headache Clinic (ACEF, as well as his involvement in the activities of the patients. Method : 145 patients with headache seen at ACEF during the period August/July 2009/2010 underwent a questionnaire and interview with neurologist responsible for the final diagnosis according to ICHD-II. Results : Relationship Women:Men 7:1. 1 Prevalence: Migraine without aura (52.4%, migraine with aura (12.4%, chronic migraine (15.2% and medication overuse headache (MOH (20%. 2 Analgesic drugs used: Compounds with Dipyrone (37%, Dipyrone (23%, Paracetamol (16% compound with Paracetamol (6%, triptans (6% and non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (12%. There was a significant decrease in the duration of pain and less interference in the activities of the headache patients after the use of analgesics. Conclusion : Prevalence of MOH has been increasing in population level and specialized services. New studies emphasizing the MOH are needed to assist in the improvement of their diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  4. Analgesics in ophthalmic practice: a review of the oral non-narcotic agent tramadol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynes, B I; Barkin, R L

    1999-07-01

    This report reviews the causes of ocular pain and discusses the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, adverse effects, and dosage of tramadol, a novel non-narcotic oral analgesic. Tramadol is a synthetic analog of codeine with a dual mechanism of action that involves agonist activity at the mu opioid receptor, as well as inhibition of monoaminergic (norepinephrine and serotonin) re-uptake. Unlike opiate analgesics, tramadol has very low propensity toward physical dependence. Common dose-related adverse effects of tramadol include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, and/or drowsiness. Clinically, tramadol has been shown to be equivalent to acetaminophen (325 mg)-codeine (30 mg) combinations for the treatment of moderate or severe nonocular pain. Tramadol appears to be an effective analgesic agent for pain control due to postoperative surgical trauma, as well as in various chronic malignant and nonmalignant disease states. Tramadol has shown variable effectiveness in the control of pain related to dental procedures. The usefulness of tramadol in pain states from ophthalmic origin has yet to be clinically established. PMID:10445636

  5. The effect of acupressure at SP6 point on analgesic taking in women during labor

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    Parisa Samad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the potential side effects of analgesics and anaesthetic drugs to control the labour pains, it is possible to replace non-medical method for palliative treatment. The purpose of this research is to assess the effect of acupressure in spleen point 6 (SP6 on the amount of analgesic drug taking during labour. Materials and Method: We conducted one sided blind randomized clinical trial in 2008. 131 term pregnant women randomly selected and divided into three groups; including one experimental group (pressure on SP6:41 persons and two control groups (SP6 touch: 41 cases and common care: 49 persons. The data has been analyzed by using the descriptive and inferential statistics by SPSS-16 software.Results: Comparing the average amounts of the consumed drug between three groups showed a significant decrease in the experimental group more than the other two control groups (p=0.006. The average amount of consumed pethidine in the experimental group showed a significant decrease (p=0.02.Conclusion: The findings of our study showed that the pressure on SP6 is an effective method to decrease the amount of analgesic consumption in labor specially pethidine

  6. Pain and analgesic response after third molar extraction and other postsurgical pain.

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    Barden, Jodie; Edwards, Jayne E; McQuay, Henry J; Andrew Moore, R

    2004-01-01

    There is uncertainty over whether the patient group in which acute pain studies are conducted (pain model) has any influence on the estimate of analgesic efficacy. Data from four recently updated systematic reviews of aspirin 600/650 mg, paracetamol 600/650 mg, paracetamol 1000 mg and ibuprofen 400 mg were used to investigate the influence of pain model. Area under the pain relief versus time curve equivalent to at least 50% maximum pain relief over 6 h was used as the outcome measure. Event rates with treatment and placebo, and relative benefit (RB) and number needed to treat (NNT) were used as outputs from the meta-analyses. The event rate with placebo was systematically statistically lower for dental than postsurgical pain for all four treatments. Event rates with analgesics, RB and NNT were infrequently different between the pain models. Systematic difference in the estimate of analgesic efficacy between dental and postsurgical pain models remains unproven, and, on balance, no major difference is likely. PMID:14715393

  7. Analgesic effects of intra-articular fentanyl, pethidine and dexamethasone after knee arthroscopic surgery

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    H Saryazd

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many different methods have been used in an effort to provide adequate analgesia after knee arthroscopic surgery. In this study analgesic effect of intra-articular fentanyl, pethidine and dexamethasone was compared. METHODS: In a double blind randomized study 48 male patients undergoing knee arthroscopic meniscectomy were allocated to groups receiving intra-articular fentanyl 50 µg or pethidine 20 mg or dexamethasone 8 mg at the end of arthroscopy during general aesthesia. Postoperative pain scores using visual analogue scale were measured and also analgesic requirements and the time of ability to walk were recorded. RESULTS: Pain scores at one, two, six and 24 h after intra-articular injection were not significantly different for fentanyl and pethidine but were higher significantly for dexamethasone at all four mentioned times. The mean average time of ability to walk was significantly longer for dexamethasone. The analgesic requirements during the first 24 h after intraarticular injection were significantly greater only for dexamethasone too. CONCLUSION: Better postoperative analgesia, less pain score and shorter time to walk were achieved by fentanyl and pethidine in comparison to dexamethasone but the results were not significantly different between fentanyl group and pethidine. KEYWORDS: Arthroscopy, opioid, pain.

  8. Avicenna's Canon of Medicine: a review of analgesics and anti-inflammatory substances

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    Shahla Mahdizadeh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring substances mentioned in medieval medical literatures currently have, and will continue to have, a crucial place in drug discovery. Avicenna was a Persian physician who is known as the most influential medical writers in the Middle ages. Avicenna`s Canon of Medicine, the most famous books in the history of medicine, presents a clear and organized summary of all the medical knowledge of the time, including a long list of drugs. Several hundred substances and receipts from different sources are mentioned for treatment of different illnesses in this book. The aim of the present study was to provide a descriptive review of all anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs presented in this comprehensive encyclopedia of medicine. Data for this review were provided by searches of different sections of this book. Long lists of anti-inflammatory and analgesic substances used in the treatment of various diseases are provided. The efficacy of some of these drugs, such as opium, willow oil, curcuma, and garlic, was investigated by modern medicine; pointed to their potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. This review will help further research into the clinical benefits of new drugs for treatment of inflammatory diseases and pain.

  9. Phytochemical, analgesic, antibacterial, and cytotoxic effects of Alpinia nigra (Gaertn.) Burtt leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Ahmed, A M; Sharmen, Farjana; Mannan, Adnan; Rahman, Md Atiar

    2015-10-01

    This research evaluated the phytochemical contents as well as the analgesic, cytotoxic, and antimicrobial effects of the methanolic extract of Alpinia nigra leaf. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using established methods. The analgesic effects of the extract were measured with the formalin test and tail immersion test. The antibacterial activity of the extract was evaluated using the disc diffusion technique. Cytotoxicity was assessed with the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance using statistical software (SPSS, Version 19.0). The qualitative phytochemical screening of A. nigra leaf extract showed the presence of medicinally active secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, glycosides, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, steroids, tannins, anthraquinone glycosides, and saponins. The extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg revealed a prevailed central nociception increasing the reaction time in response to thermal stimulation. The extract also showed a response to chemical nociceptors, causing pain inhibition in the late phase. The leaf extract (2 mg/disc) showed mild antibacterial activity compared to tetracycline (50 μg/disc). In the brine shrimp lethality bioassay, the LC50 (lethal concentration 50) value of the extract was found to be 57.12 μg/mL, implying a promising cytotoxic effect. The results evidenced the moderate analgesic and antibacterial effects with pronounced cytotoxic capability. PMID:26587396

  10. Weighing the balance: how analgesics used in chronic pain influence sleep?

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    Bohra, Miqdad H; Kaushik, Chhavi; Temple, Daniel; Chung, Sharon A; Shapiro, Colin M

    2014-08-01

    Pain and sleep share a bidirectional relationship, with each influencing the other. Several excellent reviews have explored this relationship. In this article, we revisit the evidence and explore existing research on this complex inter-relationship. The primary focus of the article is on the pharmacological treatment of chronic non-malignant pain and the main purpose is to review the effect of various pharmacological agents used in the management of chronic pain on sleep. This has not been comprehensively done before. We explore the clinical use of these agents, their impact on sleep architecture and sleep physiology, the mechanism of action on sleep parameters and sleep disorders associated with these agents. Pharmacological classes reviewed include antidepressants, opioid analgesics, anti-epileptics, cannabinoids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, drugs most commonly used to manage chronic pain. The objective is to help health professionals gain better insight into the complex effect that commonly used analgesics have on an individual's sleep and how this could impact on the effectiveness of the drug as an analgesic. We conclude that antidepressants have both positive and negative effects on sleep, so do opioids, but in the latter case the evidence shifts towards the counterproductive side. Some anticonvulsants are sleep sparing and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are sleep neutral. Cannabinoids remain an underexplored and researched group. PMID:26516542

  11. The Analgesic and Antineuroinflammatory Effect of Baicalein in Cancer-Induced Bone Pain.

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    Hu, Shan; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Fu; Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Mi, Wen-Li; Jiang, Jian-Wei; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is a severe type of chronic pain. It is imperative to explore safe and effective analgesic drugs for CIBP treatment. Baicalein (BE), isolated from the traditional Chinese herbal medicine Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (or Huang Qin), has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we examined the effect of BE on CIBP and the mechanism of this effect. Intrathecal and oral administration of BE at different doses could alleviate the mechanical allodynia in CIBP rats. Intrathecal 100 μg BE could inhibit the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in the spinal cord of CIBP rats. Moreover, intrathecal 100 μg BE could effectively inhibit the activation of p-p38 and p-JNK MAPK signals in CIBP rats. The analgesic effect of BE may be associated with the inhibition of the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and through the activation of p-p38 and p-JNK MAPK signals in the spinal cord. These findings suggest that BE is a promising novel analgesic agent for CIBP. PMID:26649065

  12. Tolerance to non-opioid analgesics is opioid-sensitive in nucleus raphe magnus

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    MerabGTsagareli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of its effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM in the following four days result in progressively less antinociception, i.e. produce the development of tolerance to these drugs in mail rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with μ-opioid antagonist naloxone in NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs at the first day in behavioral tail flick reflex (TF and hot plate (HP latencies. At the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion on endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  13. Local analgesic effect of tramadol is not mediated by opioid receptors in early postoperative pain in rats

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    Angela Maria Sousa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tramadol is known as a central acting analgesic drug, used for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Local analgesic effect has been demonstrated, in part due to local anesthetic-like effect, but other mechanisms remain unclear. The role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect is not known. In this study, we examined role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect of tramadol in the plantar incision model. METHODS: Young male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups: control, intraplantar tramadol, intravenous tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol, and intravenous naloxone. After receiving the assigned drugs (tramadol 5 mg, naloxone 200 µg or 0.9% NaCl, rats were submitted to plantar incision, and withdrawal thresholds after mechanical stimuli with von Frey filaments were assessed at baseline, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after incision. RESULTS: Plantar incision led to marked mechanical hyperalgesia during the whole period of observation in the control group, no mechanical hyperalgesia were observed in intraplantar tramadol group, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol group and intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol. In the intravenous tramadol group a late increase in withdrawal thresholds (after 45 min was observed, the intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol group and intravenous naloxone remained hyperalgesic during the whole period. CONCLUSIONS: Tramadol presented an early local analgesic effect decreasing mechanical hyperalgesia induced by plantar incision. This analgesic effect was not mediated by peripheral opioid receptors.

  14. Synthesis of the Amide Derivatives of 3-[1-(3-Pyridazinyl)-5-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3-yl]propanoic Acids as Potential Analgesic Compounds

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    BANOĞLU, Erden; Şüküroğlu, Murat; ERGÜN, Burcu ÇALIŞKAN

    2007-01-01

    A series of structurally diverse amide derivatives of 3-[1-(3-pyridazinyl)-5-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3-yl]propanoic acids were prepared and tested for their in vivo analgesic activity using an acetic acid induced writhing test. All the test compounds displayed approximately equipotent analgesic activity to aspirin. The results showed that the analgesic activity of 5a, 5f, 5n, and 5o is significantly higher than that of 5d.

  15. Opioid analgesic misuse is associated with incomplete antiretroviral adherence in a cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults in San Francisco

    OpenAIRE

    Jeevanjee, S; Penko, J; D. Guzman; Miaskowski, C; Bangsberg, DR; Kushel, MB

    2014-01-01

    There is little or no data examining the association between either pain or the use or misuse of opioid analgesic with adherence to antiretroviral medications (ARVs) among HIV-infected adults. We interviewed a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults prescribed antiretroviral medications (ARVs) quarterly to examine the association between (1) pain, (2) receipt of opioid analgesics, and (3) opioid analgesic misuse with self-reported ARV adherence. Of 281 participants, most (82.5 ...

  16. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activity of methanolic Tecomaria capensis leaves extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neeraj Kumar Saini; Manmohan Singhal

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activity of methanolic Tecomaria capensis (T. capensis) leaves extract using different models in rats. Methods:Methanolic T. capensis leaves extract (100, 300, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg body weight) was given to rats orally to observe acute toxicity, and observed for 14 days. Analgesic activity was evaluated using tail immersion and formalin induced paw licking models in rats. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan induced paw edema model in rats. Antipyretic activity was evaluated using brewer’s yeast induced pyrexia model in rats. Methanolic T. capensis leaves extract were given at dose of 100, 200 and 500 mg/kg p.o. Results: Results demonstrated that the no mortality was reported even after 14 days. This indicated that the methanol extract was safe up to a single dose of 2000 mg/kg body weight. Methanolic T. capensis leaves extract (100, 200 and 500 mg/kg p.o.) significantly increased the latency period in the tail immersion test, reduced the licking time in both the neurogenic and inflammatory phases in the formalin test. Methanolic T. capensis leaves extract (100, 200 and 500 mg/kg p.o.) significantly prevented increase in volume of paw edema. Methanolic T. capensis leaves extract at the doses of (100, 200 and 500 mg/kg p.o.) significantly decreased the rectal temperature of the rats. Conclusions: This study exhibites that methanolic T.capensis leaves extract possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activity which may be mediated by the central and peripheral mechanisms.

  17. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of β-sitosterol isolated from leaves of Oxalis corniculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Bhausaheb Dighe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxalis corniculata Linn. (Oxalidaceae is one of the important medicinal plants used traditionally for the treatment of fever, pain and inflammation.  To validate folk use of Oxalis corniculata as analgesic and anti-inflammatory remedy. The leaves of Oxalis corniculata was used for successive extraction with increasing polarity solvents. Petroleum ether extract was selected for activity guided fractionation to isolate β-sitosterol due to its better efficacy than other extracts. Analgesic activity was done by hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhings, while anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan-induced paw edema method. All the extracts were screened at the dose of 100 mg/kg, i.p. and isolated β-sitosterol was screened at the doses of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, s.c. was used to understand the mechanism of nociception. In hot plate test, Petroleum ether extract was found most active with reaction time of 8.4 ± 0.4 sec after 60 min while isolated β-sitosterol at dose of 20 mg/kg showed 11.1 ± 0.3 sec after 90 min. The number of writings in 30 min was compared with paracetamol. Petroleum ether extract and β-sitosterol (20 mg/kg showed 43.14 ± 1.9 and 34.21 ± 1.4 writhings respectively. Isolated β-sitosterol (20 mg/kg inhibited rat paw edema to 0.32± 0.06 ml after 120 min.  Naloxone reversed antinociceptive effects of extracts and isolated β-sitosterol.  It can be concluded that isolated β-sitosterol is responsible for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Oxalis corniculata leaves and it works through central mechanism.

  18. Spider peptide Phα1β induces analgesic effect in a model of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Flavia Karine; Trevisan, Gabriela; Rosa, Fernanda; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Cueto, Ana Paula; de Castro Junior, Célio José; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurelio; Cordeiro, Marta do N; Richardson, Michael; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V

    2013-09-01

    The marine snail peptide ziconotide (ω-conotoxin MVIIA) is used as an analgesic in cancer patients refractory to opioids, but may induce severe adverse effects. Animal venoms represent a rich source of novel drugs, so we investigated the analgesic effects and the side-effects of spider peptide Phα1β in a model of cancer pain in mice with or without tolerance to morphine analgesia. Cancer pain was induced by the inoculation of melanoma B16-F10 cells into the hind paw of C57BL/6 mice. After 14 days, painful hypersensitivity was detected and Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA (10-100 pmol/site) was intrathecally injected to evaluate the development of antinociception and side-effects in control and morphine-tolerant mice. The treatment with Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA fully reversed cancer-related painful hypersensitivity, with long-lasting results, at effective doses 50% of 48 (32-72) or 33 (21-53) pmol/site, respectively. Phα1β produced only mild adverse effects, whereas ω-conotoxin MVIIA induced dose-related side-effects in mice at analgesic doses (estimated toxic dose 50% of 30 pmol/site). In addition, we observed that Phα1β was capable of controlling cancer-related pain even in mice tolerant to morphine antinociception (100% of inhibition) and was able to partially restore morphine analgesia in such animals (56 ± 5% of inhibition). In this study, Phα1β was as efficacious as ω-conotoxin MVIIA in inducing analgesia in a model of cancer pain without producing severe adverse effects or losing efficacy in opioid-tolerant mice, indicating that Phα1β has a good profile for the treatment of cancer pain in patients. PMID:23718272

  19. A central analgesic mechanism of acupuncture for migraine An ongoing functional MRI study**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Lan; Yujie Gao; Fang Zeng; Wei Qin; Mingkai Dong; Mailan Liu; Taipin Guo; Fanrong Liang

    2013-01-01

    Shaoyang acupoints are the most frequently used in migraine treatment. However, the central anal-gesic mechanism remains poorly understood. Studies have demonstrated that single stimulus of the verum acupuncture in healthy subjects can induce significant connectivity or activity changes in pain-related central networks compared with sham acupuncture. However, these findings are not indicative of the central analgesic mechanism of acupuncture at Shaoyang acupoints. Thus, we recruited 100 migraine sufferers and randomly assigned them into five groups: Shaoyang uncommon acupoint, Shaoyang common acupoint, Yangming uncommon acupoint, non-acupoint control, and blank control groups. Subjects were subjected to evaluation of curative effects and functional MRI prior to and after 10 and 20 acupuncture treatments. Al subjects were diagnosed by physicians and enrol ed fol owing clinical physical examination. Subjects were observed during 1-4 weeks after inclusion. At the fifth week, the first clinical evaluation and resting functional MRI were conducted. The Shaoyang uncom-mon acupoint, Shaoyang common acupoint, Yangming uncommon acupoint, and non-acupoint control grousp then were treated with acupuncture, five times per week, 20 times in total over 4 weeks. The second and third clinical evaluations and resting functional MRI screenings were conducted fol owing 10 and 20 acupuncture treatments. The blank control group was observed during the 5 to 8 week pe-riod, fol owed by clinical evaluation and resting functional MRI. The aim of this study was to examine changes in brain functional activity and central networks in subjects with migraine undergoing acu-puncture at Shaoyang uncommon acupoints. This study provides a further explanation of the central analgesic mechanism by which acupuncture at Shaoyang acupoints treats migraine.

  20. Analgesic properties of a dexmedetomidine infusion after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed M Abdelmageed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dexmedetomidine is an alpha 2 -adrenergic agonist with sedative and analgesic properties. This study aimed to investigate if the use of a continuous dexmedetomidine infusion with i.v. morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA could improve postoperative analgesia while reducing opioid consumption and opioid-related side effects. Methods: In this prospective randomized, double-blinded, controlled study, 39 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome undergoing uvulopalatopharyngoplasty were assigned to two groups. Group D (dexmedetomidine group received a loading dose of dexmedetomidine 1 μg.kg-1 i.v., 30 minutes before the anticipated end of surgery, followed by infusion at 0.6 μg.kg-1 h-1 for 24 hours. Group P (placebo group received a bolus and infusion of placebo. In both groups, postoperative pain was initially controlled by i.v. morphine titration and then PCA with morphine. Cumulative PCA morphine consumption, pain intensities, sedation scores, cardiovascular and respiratory variables and opioid-related adverse effects were recorded for 48 hours after operation. Results: Compared with placebo group, patients in the dexmedetomidine group required 52.7% less PCA morphine during the first 24 hours postoperatively, with significantly better visual analogue scale scores, less incidence of respiratory obstruction (5 vs. 12 patients, respectively; P = .037 and longer time to first analgesic request (21 (11 vs. 9 (4 minutes; P = .002. Fewer patients in group D experienced nausea and vomiting than those in group P (7 vs. 24 patients, respectively; P < .05. Conclusion: Continuous dexmedetomidine infusion may be a useful analgesic adjuvant for patients susceptible to opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  1. Shock titration in the rhesus monkey: effects of opiate and nonopiate analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, J L; Hammond, D L

    1985-11-01

    This study evaluated the antinociceptive effects of several opiate and nonopiate analgesics in the rhesus monkey using a discrete trial shock titration paradigm. Morphine sulfate (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg i.m.) and codeine sulfate (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg i.m.) produced a significant and dose-dependent increase in mean shock threshold that was not accompanied by a significant increase in mean response latency. The mean number of shocks terminated was significantly decreased at the highest dose of each opiate. Aspirin (100 and 300 mg/kg p.o.) or ibuprofen (200 mg/kg p.o.) did not significantly increase mean shock threshold or mean response latency or decrease mean number of shocks terminated. However, 6 mg/kg i.m. of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol produced a significant increase in mean shock threshold and mean response latency with no significant effect on mean number of shocks terminated. The absence of any effects of a 2-mg/kg dose of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol and the severe side effects produced by 10 mg/kg prevented determination of its dose-response relationship. Diazepam (0.5, 2 and 8 mg/kg i.m.) produced a significant, dose-dependent increase in mean shock threshold and a significant increase in mean response latency with no consistent or significant effect on mean number of shocks terminated. Doses of 2 and 8 mg/kg of diazepam also produced signs of ataxia. These results suggest that the discrete trial shock titration paradigm is suitable for demonstration of the antinociceptive effects of opiate and certain nonopiate analgesics, but not nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics in the rhesus monkey. PMID:4057079

  2. Auricular point acupressure as an adjunct analgesic treatment for cancer patients: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chao Hsing; Chien, Lung-Chang; Chiang, Yi Chien; Ren, Dianxu; Suen, Lorna Kwai-Ping

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed (1) to examine the feasibility of an auricular point acupressure (APA) research protocol in terms of recruitment and for the assessment and management of pain and (2) to examine the potential APA analgesic effects for cancer patients. This study was a repeated-measures one-group design. Participants were recruited from the cancer center follow-up clinic affiliated with a large university hospital in the northeastern United States. Participants included 50 patients aged 55-87 years with a diagnosis of cancer. Participants received 7 days of APA treatment for their pain. After appropriate acupoints were identified, vaccaria seeds were carefully taped onto each selected auricular point on each ear. The study recruitment and retention rates were 92% and 91%, respectively. Importantly, the study found preliminary evidence for the analgesic effects of APA for cancer pain management. For example, by the end of the 7-day study, APA reduced pain intensity more than 55% for "worst pain" and about 57% for "average pain" and "pain intensity." Moreover, the use of pain medication was reduced during the APA treatment (e.g., 78% of patients [n = 39] took less pain medication than before the treatment). APA appears to be highly acceptable to patients with cancer-related pain. However, without a placebo control, we cannot draw conclusive evidence for the analgesic effect of APA for cancer patients. A sham group must be added to future studies to differentiate the true effects of APA from the possible psychological effects of the APA treatment. PMID:25439120

  3. Comparison of the analgesic effects of robenacoxib, buprenorphine and their combination in cats after ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffieri, F; Centonze, P; Gigante, G; De Pietro, L; Crovace, A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the postoperative analgesic effects of robenacoxib and buprenorphine alone or in combination, in cats after ovariohysterectomy. Thirty healthy cats were randomly assigned to receive buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg, n=10; GB), robenacoxib (2mg/kg, n=10; GR) or their combination at the same dosages (n=10; GBR) SC. After 30 min cats were sedated with an IM administration of medetomidine (0.02 mg/kg) and ketamine (5mg/kg). General anaesthesia was induced with propofol and after intubation was maintained with isoflurane. Before premedication and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24h after extubation, pain and sedation were assessed using a simple descriptive pain scale, ranging from 0 (no pain/no sedation) to 4 (intense pain/ deep sedation). If the pain score was ≥ 3, rescue analgesia was provided using buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) administered IM. Pain score was higher in GB at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8h compared to baseline and compared to GBR at the same study times. Moreover, the pain score was also higher in GB compared to GR at 2, 3, 4 and 6h. Pain score was similar at all study times between GR and GBR. Sedation at 1 and 2h was higher than baseline values in all groups. Cats in GB received rescue analgesia more often than cats assigned to GR or GBR. Robenacoxib was an effective analgesic drug in cats up to 24h after ovariohysterectomy. The addition of buprenorphine did not provide any additional analgesic effects compared to robenacoxib alone. PMID:23434263

  4. Paracetamol as a prophylactic analgesic for hysterosalpingography: A double blind randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of paracetamol as a prophylactic analgesic for hysterosalpingography (HSG). DESIGN: A prospective double blind randomized controlled trial comparing one 1 g of paracetamol (SmithKline Beecham, Brentford, U.K.) to placebo taken 30 min before HSG. One hundred consecutive out-patients were studied prospectively. The analgesic effectiveness during the procedure and at 24 h and 1 week post procedure was analysed by a postal pain score questionnaire. Additional data on the ethnicity of the patient, sex and level of experience of the radiologist performing the hysterosalpingogram, the parity of the patient, the ease of the procedure, and whether pathology was identified were also recorded. RESULTS: Eighty-eight patients (88%) replied, 39 (44%) received paracetamol and 49 placebo (56%). During the procedure 3/39 (7%) of women in the paracetamol group were pain-free compared to 9/49 (18%) in the placebo group, which was not significant (P = 0.11). At 24 h, 15/39 (38%) of women in the paracetamol group were pain-free compared to 20/49 (41%) in the placebo group, which was not significant (P = 0.82). At 1 week, 27/39 (69%) of women in the paracetamol group were pain-free compared to 29/49 (59%) in the placebo group, which was not significant (P = 0.33). No significant difference in mean pain scores was determined during the procedure (P 0.91), or at 24 h post procedure (P = 0.94). Similarly, no difference in mean pain scores was identified with regard to the ethnicity of the patient, the sex of the radiologist performing the procedure, the level of experience of the radiologist performing the procedure, or whether pathology was present or not. Difficult cannulations were associated with higher mean pain scores, however, there was no difference in mean pain scores between the paracetamol or placebo groups for both easy and difficult cannulations. CONCLUSION: Paracetamol is not effective as a prophylactic analgesic for HSG. If a prophylactic

  5. EVALUTION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF PUNICA GRANATUM LINN

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Bagri; Mohd. Ali; Vidhu Aeri; Shahnaz Sultana; Malay Bhowmik

    2010-01-01

    The aqueous-ethanolic (50%) extracts of fruit rind (PGR), flower (PGF), and leaves (PGL) of Punica granatum were examined for its oral anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities at the doses of 150, 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Oral pretreatment with the dried extracts of P. granatum produced statistically significant and dose dependent inhibition of edema induced by carrageenan at all doses when compared to the control groups. The highest activity was shown in the PGR that at 500 mg/kg p.o...

  6. Analgesic activity of various extracts of Punica granatum (Linn) flowers

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborthy Guno

    2008-01-01

    The extracts of flowers of Punica granatum (Linn). (N.O. Family Punicaceae) were investigated for analgesic activity in mice using hot plate method. The flowers of Punica granatum (Linn) were collected from the local market of Mumbai, Maharashtra and were in a dried condition. The dried powdered flowers (500 gm) were extracted in a soxhlet apparatus by using different solvents. Mice weighing 15-25 gm were taken for the experiment. The reaction time of animals in all the groups was noted at 30...

  7. EVALUATION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF PUNICA GRANATUM LINN LEAVES

    OpenAIRE

    Nain Parminder; Saini Mamta; Malik Manisha

    2011-01-01

    The methanolic extract of dried leaves of Punica granatum linn was studied for the anti-inflammatory activity in rat using carrageenan induced paw edema with plethysmometer and analgesic activity on mice by Eddy’s hot plate & tail immersion method. A preliminary phytochemical screening of leaves extract revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids, and steroids. Among all the doses (200mg/kg, 400mg/kg, 600mg/kg, 800mg/kg) of methanolic extract 600mg/kg orally showed maximum signifi...

  8. The Analgesic Efficacy of Fentanyl: Relationship to Tolerance and μ-Opioid Receptor Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V.; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C.

    2008-01-01

    This study determined if fentanyl analgesic efficacy predicts the magnitude of tolerance and μ-opioid receptor regulation. To estimate efficacy, mice were injected i.p. with saline or clocinnamox (CCAM), an irreversible μ-opioid receptor antagonist, (0.32 – 25.6 mg/kg) and 24 hr later fentanyl cumulative dose response studies were conducted. CCAM dose dependently shifted the fentanyl dose-response function to the right. The apparent efficacy (τ) of fentanyl, based on the operational model of ...

  9. Analgesic Activity of a Glucan Polysaccharide Isolated from Agaricus blazei Murill

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Leônia C. Gonzaga; Menezes, Thiago M. F.; de Souza, José R. R.; Nágila M. P. S. Ricardo; Ana L. P. Freitas; Sandra de A. Soares

    2013-01-01

    A water soluble polysaccharide and its selective precipitated fractions (F1, F2, and F3) were isolated from hot water extract of fruiting bodies of Agaricus blazei Murril known as Agaricus brasiliensis to evaluate the analgesic activity of the materials in Swiss mice. The isolated material and its fractions were characterized by two-dimensional COSY and HMQC spectra as β-(1→6)-α-(1→4)-glucan-bound-protein polysaccharide constituted mainly by β-(1→6) glucan. The glucan-protein polysaccharide a...

  10. The Central Analgesic Mechanism of YM-58483 in Attenuating Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zeyou; Wang, Yaping; Zhou, Haocheng; Liang, Na; Yang, Lin; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain. Their analgesic effects rely on inhibiting long-term potentiation, and neurotransmitters release in the spinal cord. Store-operated Ca(2+)channels (SOCCs) are highly Ca(2+)-selective cation channels broadly expressed in non-excitable cells and some excitable cells. Recent studies have shown that the potent inhibitor of SOCCs, YM-58483, has analgesic effects on neuropathic pain, but its mechanism is unclear. This experiment performed on spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain model in rats tries to explore the mechanism, whereby YM-58483 attenuates neuropathic pain. The left L5 was ligated to produce the SNL neuropathic pain model in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The withdrawal threshold of rats was measured by the up-down method and Hargreaves' method before and after intrathecal administration of YM-58483 and vehicle. The SOCCs in the spinal dorsal horn were located by immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated ERK and phosphorylated CREB, CD11b, and GFAP proteins in spinal level was tested by Western blot, while the release of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, PGE2) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Intrathecal YM-58483 at the concentration of 300 μM (1.5 nmol) and 1000 μM (10 nmol) produced a significant central analgesic effect on the SNL rats, compared with control + vehicle (n = 7, P  0.05). YM-58483 also inhibited the release of spinal cord IL-1β, TNF-α, and PGE2, compared with control + vehicle (n = 5, #P < 0.001). The analgesic mechanism of YM-58483 may be via inhibiting central ERK/CREB signaling in the neurons and decreasing central IL-1β, TNF-α, and PGE2 release to reduce neuronal excitability in the spinal dorsal horn of the SNL rats. PMID:26514127

  11. Analgesic activity of extracts of the whole plant of Amaranthus spinosus Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamaluddin Abu Taiab Md

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Successive petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of the whole plant of Amaranthus spinosus Linn. were investigated for the analgesic activity. Experiments were carried out with these extracts for their peripheral and central antinociceptive potentials on acetic acid induced writhing and radiant heat tail-flick models in mice, respectively. In both the models, methanolic extract showed significant writhing inhibition as well as the elongation of tail-flick time at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight. A linear dose response relationship was also observed.

  12. Paracetamol as a prophylactic analgesic for hysterosalpingography: A double blind randomized controlled trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elson, E.M.; Ridley, N.T.F

    2000-09-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of paracetamol as a prophylactic analgesic for hysterosalpingography (HSG). DESIGN: A prospective double blind randomized controlled trial comparing one 1 g of paracetamol (SmithKline Beecham, Brentford, U.K.) to placebo taken 30 min before HSG. One hundred consecutive out-patients were studied prospectively. The analgesic effectiveness during the procedure and at 24 h and 1 week post procedure was analysed by a postal pain score questionnaire. Additional data on the ethnicity of the patient, sex and level of experience of the radiologist performing the hysterosalpingogram, the parity of the patient, the ease of the procedure, and whether pathology was identified were also recorded. RESULTS: Eighty-eight patients (88%) replied, 39 (44%) received paracetamol and 49 placebo (56%). During the procedure 3/39 (7%) of women in the paracetamol group were pain-free compared to 9/49 (18%) in the placebo group, which was not significant (P = 0.11). At 24 h, 15/39 (38%) of women in the paracetamol group were pain-free compared to 20/49 (41%) in the placebo group, which was not significant (P = 0.82). At 1 week, 27/39 (69%) of women in the paracetamol group were pain-free compared to 29/49 (59%) in the placebo group, which was not significant (P = 0.33). No significant difference in mean pain scores was determined during the procedure (P 0.91), or at 24 h post procedure (P = 0.94). Similarly, no difference in mean pain scores was identified with regard to the ethnicity of the patient, the sex of the radiologist performing the procedure, the level of experience of the radiologist performing the procedure, or whether pathology was present or not. Difficult cannulations were associated with higher mean pain scores, however, there was no difference in mean pain scores between the paracetamol or placebo groups for both easy and difficult cannulations. CONCLUSION: Paracetamol is not effective as a prophylactic analgesic for HSG. If a prophylactic

  13. Analgesic and Antipyretic Activities of Methanol Extract and Its Fraction from the Root of Schoenoplectus grossus

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmal Kumar Subedi; S. M. Abdur Rahman; Mohammad Ahsanul Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to evaluate analgesic and antipyretic activities of the methanol extract and its different fractions from root of Schoenoplectus grossus using acetic acid induced writhing and radiant heat tail flick method of pain models in mice and yeast induced pyrexia in rats at the doses of 400 and 200 mg/kg. In acetic acid writhing test, the methanol extract, petroleum ether, and carbon tetrachloride fractions produced significant (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05) inhibition of writhing responses ...

  14. Scandinavian bovine practitioners' attitudes to the use of analgesics in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Peter; Gidekull, M; Herskin, Mette S; Huxley, J N; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Ranheim, B; Whay, H R

    2010-01-01

    management procedures such as castration (Boesch and others 2008) and dehorning (Stewart and others 2009). As well as these changes in scientific focus, the emphasis on the treatment of pain in veterinary medicine has changed dramatically during the past 10 to 15 years (Flecknell 2008). In order to allow...... implementation of new knowledge regarding pain in dairy cattle, it is important to understand the attitudes of bovine practitioners and their perceived limiting factors. This short communication presents the results of a questionnaire survey focusing on the use of analgesics in cows and calves among bovine...

  15. Paroxetine engenders analgesic effects through inhibition of p38 phosphorylation in a rat migraine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanming Wang; Wei Bi; Yanran Liang; Xiuna Jing; Songhua Xiao; Yannan Fang; Qiaoyun Shi; Enxiang Tao

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a model of migraine was established by electrical stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus in rats. These rats were then treated orally with paroxetine at doses of 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg per day for 14 days. Following treatment, mechanical withdrawal thresholds were significantly higher, extracellular concentrations of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the periaqueductal grey matter and nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis were higher, and the expression of phosphorylated p38 in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis was lower. Our experimental findings suggest that paroxetine has analgesic effects in a rat migraine model, which are mediated by inhibition of p38 phosphorylation.

  16. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi, Malviya; Patro, M Nagaraju; Kusumvalli, Somisetty; Kusumdevi, Vemula

    2016-01-01

    Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of diclofenac (Dic) diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion–evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box–Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP) prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF) and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN “S8” were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP loaded with Lig base and Dic diethylamine-SLNs exhibited immediate and complete permeation with tissue accumulation of Lig followed by controlled prolonged release and tissue accumulation of Dic at the site of application. Thus, it could be anticipated from the in vivo studies that the

  17. SYNTHESIS AND STUDY OF ANALGESIC, ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITIES OF BIS (INDOLYL METHANES (BIMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Pratim Kaishap*, Chandrajit Dohutia and Dipak Chetia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-intestinal (GI toxicity is the common adverse effect which has been associated with most of NSAIDs available in the market. So the search for new therapeutic agents with high margin of safety and freedom from normally associated GI toxic effects has been a priority of pharmacologists and pharmaceutical industries. There are virtually limitless series of structurally novel heterocyclic compounds with a wide range of physical, chemical and biological properties. Literature survey reveals that coupling of two or more biodynamic molecules resulted in the enhanced biological activity. The present work embodied here involves synthesis and evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of some bis (indolyl methane derivatives.

  18. Hepatotoxicity of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs:ultrastructural aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irena MANOV; Helen MOTANIS; Idan FRUMIN; Theodore C IANCU

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing incidence of drug-induced liver disease,attempts are being made to better understand the mechanisms behind these frequently life-endangering reactions.Analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs are a major group exhibiting hepatotoxicity.We review research relating to these reactions,focusing on ultrastructural findings,which may contribute to the comprehension and possible avoidance of drug-induced liver disease.We also present some original observations on clinical material and cultured cells exposed to acetaminophen alone or in combination with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or the P-glycoprotein inhibitor verapamil.

  19. Superior analgesic effect of an active distraction versus pleasant unfamiliar sounds and music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garza Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Brattico, Elvira; Vase, Lene;

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a superior analgesic effect of favorite music over other passive or active distractive tasks. However, it is unclear what mediates this effect. In this study we investigated to which extent distraction, emotional valence and cognitive styles may explain part of the...... of valence they relieved pain to a similar degree. The emotional ratings of the conditions were correlated with the amount of pain relief and cognitive styles seemed to influence the analgesia effect. These findings suggest that the pain relieving effect previously seen in relation to music may be at...... least partly mediated by distraction, emotional factors and cognitive styles rather than by the music itself....

  20. Studies on the Analgesic Potential of leaf Extracts of Allium humile on Swiss albino mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kamini Singh; Raveesh Kumar Gangwar; Garima Singh; Vikash S. Jadon; Shashi Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Allium humile is a medicinal plant found at the Alpine Himalayas of Uttarakhand at altitute of 2500-3000 meters height of sea level. In India, Allium humile, is used by local people as a spice and in ethano-medicine. In the present study, Allium humile leaves were explored for their analgesic potential on experimental model and compared to standard drugs. Allium humile at the doses of 100 mg/kg and aspirin 25 mg/kg exhibited significant (p>0.05) inhibition of the control writhes at the rate o...

  1. The impact of listening to music on analgesic use and length of hospital stay while recovering from laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaajoki, Anne; Kankkunen, Päivi; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Kokki, Hannu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pain management is based on the use of analgesics; however, music may alleviate pain either by direct analgesic effects or by relaxing and distracting the mind from pain and unpleasant feelings. Conflicting results have been presented about how listening to music affects analgesic use and length of hospital stay after surgery. We assessed the effect of music listening on analgesic use, length of hospital stay, and adverse effects in adult patients having laparotomy, using a prospective design with two parallel groups. Patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery (n = 168) were assigned to either a music group (n = 83) operated on odd weeks or a control group (n = 85) operated on even weeks. The music group listened to music 7 times for 30 minutes at a time during the first 3 postoperative days. The control group did not listen to the music. The hypotheses that patients in the music group will need less analgesic, have a shorter length of hospital stay, and experience less adverse effects than those in the control group were not supported by the data, although patients recovering from surgery enjoyed listening to music. Music listening may enhance quality of hospital stay and recovery in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery and could be a useful tool to relieve the patient's pain experience. PMID:22847288

  2. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of the Methanol Extract from the Galls of Quercus infectoria (Olivier in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Ha Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the analgesic activity of the methanol extract of the galls of Quercus infectoria in rats using hot plate and tail-flick methods. The extract was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 20 mg/kg while morphine sulfate and sodium salicylate (10 mg/kg served as standards. The methanol extract exhibited significant analgesic activity in the tail-flick model (P<0.05 by increasing the reaction time of the rats to 8.0 sec at 30 min after treatment in comparison to control (4.4 sec. Morphine sulfate produced a reaction time of 11.9 sec in the same test. At the peak of activity (30 min, the extract produced maximum possible analgesia (MPA of 34.2%, whilst morphine sulfate achieved a peak MPA of 70.9%. No analgesic effects have been observed using sodium salicylate in the tail-flick model. In the same model, the extract and sodium salicylate demonstrated comparable reaction times. Tail-flick is a better method to evaluate analgesic activity as no significant results were observed for all treatments using hot plate with the exception of morphine sulfate, which showed significant results only at 45 and 60 min after treatment. In conclusion, the methanol extract of the galls of Quercus infectoria displayed analgesic activity.

  3. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extracted leaves of selected medicinal plants in animal model

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    Mohammad M. Hassan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The research was carried out to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extract of Desmodium pauciflorum, Mangifera indica and Andrographis paniculata leaves. Materials and Methods: In order to assess the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects acetic acid induced writhing response model and carrageenan induced paw edema model were used in Swiss albino mice and Wistar albino rats, respectively. In both cases, leaves extract were administered (2gm/kg body weight and the obtained effects were compared with commercially available analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug Dclofenac sodium (40mg/kg body weight. Distilled water (2ml/kg body weight was used as a control for the study. Results: In analgesic bioassay, oral administration of the ethanol extract of leaves were significantly (p<0.01 reduced the writhing response. The efficacy of leaves extract were almost 35% in Desmodium pauciflorum, 56% in Mangifera indica and 34% in Andrographis paniculata which is found comparable to the effect of standard analgesic drug diclofenac sodium (76%. Leaves extract reduced paw edema in variable percentages but they did not show any significant difference among the leaves. Conclusion: We recommend further research on these plant leaves for possible isolation and characterization of the various active chemical substances which has the toxic and medicinal values. [Vet World 2013; 6(2.000: 68-71

  4. Treatment with analgesics after mouse sciatic nerve injury does not alter expression of wound healing-associated genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matt C Danzi; Dario Motti; Donna L Avison; John L Bixby; Vance P Lemmon

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of sciatic nerve injury are commonly used to study neuropathic pain as well as axon regen-eration. Administration of post-surgical analgesics is an important consideration for animal welfare, but the actions of the analgesic must not interfere with the scientiifc goals of the experiment. In this study, we show that treatment with either buprenorphine or acetaminophen following a bilateral sciatic nerve crush surgery does not alter the expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons of a panel of genes associated with wound healing. These ifndings indicate that the post-operative use of buprenorphine or acetaminophen at doses commonly suggested by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees does not change the intrinsic gene expression response of DRG neurons to a sciatic nerve crush injury, for many wound healing-associated genes. Therefore, administration of post-operative analgesics may not confound the results of transcriptomic studies employing this injury model.

  5. Enhanced analgesic effect of morphine-nimodipine combination after intraspinal administration as compared to systemic administration in mice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dilip Verma; Subrata Basu Ray; Ishan Patro; Shashi Wadhwa

    2005-09-01

    Calcium plays an important role in the pathophysiology of pain. A number of studies have investigated the effect of L-type calcium channel blockers on the analgesic response of morphine. However, the results are conflicting. In the present study, the antinociceptive effect of morphine (2.5 g) and nimodipine (1 g) co-administered intraspinally in mice was observed using the tail flick test. It was compared to the analgesic effect of these drugs (morphine – 250 g subcutaneously; nimodipine – 100 g intraperitoneally) after systemic administration. Nimodipine is highly lipophilic and readily crosses the blood brain barrier. Addition of nimodipine to morphine potentiated the analgesic response of the latter when administered through the intraspinal route but not when administered through systemic route. It may be due to direct inhibitory effect of morphine and nimodipine on neurons of superficial laminae of the spinal cord after binding to -opioid receptors and L-type calcium channels respectively.

  6. EVALUATION OF HYDROALCOHOLIC EXTRACT OF AERIAL PARTS OF ABUTILON INDICUM FOR ITS ANALGESIC AND SEDATIVE PROPERTY

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    Deepraj Paul

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydro alcoholic extract of aerial parts of Abutilon Indicum was tried for its efficacy as analgesic and sedative property. Several pain models namely Eddy’s hot plate, acetic acid induced writhing test, tail clip test and hot water immersion test were tried and for sedative property actophotometer test was performed. As the extract has shown very significant (P˂0.01 result in Eddy’s hot plate, acetic acid induced writhing test and hot water immersion test hence it is believed that the extract has certain central and peripheral analgesic property which may be mediated either by closing Na+ or/and Ca2+ channels or by facilitating chloride Cl- influx by acting on GABAA receptor. As the extract has significantly reduced loco motor activity hence the mechanism of action of the extract is believed to be mediated by opening of Cl- channel, indicating that the extract may have GABA mimetic or facilitating effect. As following the administration of the extract no straub reaction was observed hence may be in future it will gain more popularity to be used as a substitute for narcotics to treat pain and also as a good sedative.

  7. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of leaf extract of Wattakaka volubilis (Dreagea volubilis

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    Nandi Debkumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wattakaka volubilis (Family: Asclepiadaceae has been reported to possess medicinal effects. In the present study, the dried leaf extract [methanol-water (1:1] of W. volubilis designated as ′the extract′ was evaluated for pharmacological activity in rats and mice. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using acute, sub-chronic and chronic models of inflammation in rodents. The antipyretic and analgesic activities were evaluated in mice models. In the acute toxicity study, it was found that the extract was non-toxic up to 1 g/kg, i.p. The extract (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p. was found to possess, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in a dose-dependent manner and the effect was comparable with that produced by the standard drug, ibuprofen. The extract significantly inhibited the arachidonic acid-induced paw oedema in rats, indicating that the extract inhibited both the cyclo-oxygenase and lipo-oxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism. The extract also significantly enhanced the macrophage count in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It is possible that the saponins present in the extract may be responsible for these activities.

  8. Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Buchu Plant Extracts and Their Analgesic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiguvare, Herbert; Oyedeji, Opeoluwa O; Matewu, Reuben; Aremu, Olukayode; Oyemitan, Idris A; Oyedeji, Adebola O; Nkeh-Chungag, Benedicta N; Songca, Sandile P; Mohan, Sneha; Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi S

    2016-01-01

    We herein report for the first time the synthesis and analgesic properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using buchu plant extract. The as-synthesised Ag-NPs at different temperatures were characterised by UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission transform microscopy (TEM) to confirm the formation of silver nanoparticles. Phytochemical screening of the ethanolic extract revealed the presence of glycosides, proteins, tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids and saponins. The absorption spectra showed that the synthesis is temperature and time dependent. The TEM analysis showed that the as-synthesised Ag-NPs are polydispersed and spherical in shape with average particle diameter of 19.95 ± 7.76 nm while the FTIR results confirmed the reduction and capping of the as-synthesised Ag-NPs by the phytochemicals present in the ethanolic extract. The analgesic study indicated that the combined effect of the plant extract and Ag-NPs is more effective in pain management than both the aspirin drug and the extract alone. PMID:27314316

  9. Effect of gender on pain perception and analgesic consumption in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: An observational study

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    Aziza M Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence regarding gender affecting the response to pain and its treatment is inconsistent in literature. The objective of this prospective, observational study was to determine the effect of gender on pain perception and postoperative analgesic consumption in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: We recruited 60 male and 60 female patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were observed for additional intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. Numerical rating scale was documented at 10 min interval for 1 h in post-anesthesia recovery room and at 4, 8, and 12 h postoperatively. Boluses of tramadol given as rescue analgesia were also noted. There were no dropouts. Results: The mean pain scores were significantly higher in female patients at 20 and 30 min following surgery. Mean dose of tramadol consumption was significantly higher in female patients for the first postoperative hour (P = 0.002, but not in the later period. Conclusion: Female patients exhibited greater intensity of pain and required higher doses of analgesics compared to males in in the immediate postoperative period in order to achieve a similar degree of analgesia.

  10. The analgesic effect of clonixine is not mediated by 5-HT3 subtype receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paeile, C; Bustamante, S E; Sierralta, F; Bustamante, D; Miranda, H F

    1995-10-01

    1. The analgesic effect of clonixinate of L-lysine (Clx) in the nociceptive C-fiber reflex in rat and in the writhing test in mice is reported. 2. Clx was administered by three routes, i.v., i.t. and i.c.v., inducing a dose-dependent antinociception. 3. The antinociceptive effect of Clx was 40-45% with respect to the control integration values in the nociceptive C-fiber reflex method. 4. The writhing test yielded ED50 values (mg/kg) of 12.0 +/- 1.3 (i.p.), 1.8 +/- 0.2 (i.t.) and 0.9 +/- 0.1 (i.c.v.) for Clx administration. 5. Ondansetron was not able to antagonize the antinociception response of Clx in the algesiometric tests used. 6. Chlorophenilbiguanide did not produce any significative change in the analgesic effect of Clx in the nociceptive C-fiber reflex method. 7. It is suggested that the mechanism of action of the central analgesia of Clx is not mediated by 5-HT3 subtype receptors. PMID:7590133

  11. Analgesic effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on central post-stroke pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sea-Hyun; Kim, Gi-Do; Kim, Kyung-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Pain that occurs after a stroke lowers the quality of life. Such post-stroke pain is caused in part by the brain lesion itself, called central post-stroke pain. We investigated the analgesic effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients through quantitative sensory testing. Fourteen participants with central post-stroke pain (7 female and 7 male subjects) were recruited and were allocated to either tDCS (n = 7) or sham-tDCS (n = 7) group. Their ages ranged from 45 to 55 years. tDCS was administered for 20 min at a 2-mA current intensity, with anodal stimulations were performed at primary motor cortex. The sham-tDCS group was stimulated 30-second current carrying time. Both group interventions were given for 3 days per week, for a period of 3 weeks. Subjective pain was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) of 0 to 10. Sensations of cold and warmth, and pain from cold and heat were quantified to examine analgesic effects. The sham-tDCS group showed no statistically significant differences in time. In contrast, tDCS group showed decreased VAS scores and skin temperature (p temperatures for the sense of cold and pain from cold increased (p heat decreased (p stroke patients with central post-stroke pain. PMID:25341455

  12. Studies on the Analgesic Potential of leaf Extracts of Allium humile on Swiss albino mice

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    Kamini Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Allium humile is a medicinal plant found at the Alpine Himalayas of Uttarakhand at altitute of 2500-3000 meters height of sea level. In India, Allium humile, is used by local people as a spice and in ethano-medicine. In the present study, Allium humile leaves were explored for their analgesic potential on experimental model and compared to standard drugs. Allium humile at the doses of 100 mg/kg and aspirin 25 mg/kg exhibited significant (p>0.05 inhibition of the control writhes at the rate of 64.25%, 44.54%, 44.54% and 59.89% respectively when compared to that of control. Thus, methanolic extract of the plant can be fully explored for its analgesic potential which has not been reported so far. The plant extract showed a relative low toxicity hence justifies the folkloric use of plant by the local people in Western Himalayan region for curing inflammation and painful conditions.

  13. Mechanisms Underlying the Analgesic Effect of Moxibustion on Visceral Pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renjia Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional bowel disorder that causes recurrent abdominal (visceral pain. Epidemiological data show that the incidence rate of IBS is as high as 25%. Most of the medications may lead to tolerance, addiction and toxic side effects. Moxibustion is an important component of traditional Chinese medicine and has been used to treat IBS-like abdominal pain for several thousand years in China. As a mild treatment, moxibustion has been widely applied in clinical treatment of visceral pain in IBS. In recent years, it has played an irreplaceable role in alternative medicine. Extensive clinical studies have demonstrated that moxibustion for treatment of visceral pain is simple, convenient, and inexpensive, and it is being accepted by an increasing number of patients. There have not been many studies investigating the analgesic mechanisms of moxibustion. Studies exploring the analgesic mechanisms have mainly focused on visceral hypersensitivity, brain-gut axis neuroendocrine system, and immune system. This paper reviews the latest developments in moxibustion use for treatment of visceral pain in IBS from these perspectives. It also evaluates potential problems in relevant studies on the mechanisms of moxibustion therapy to promote the application of moxibustion in the treatment of IBS.

  14. Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Buchu Plant Extracts and Their Analgesic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Chiguvare

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We herein report for the first time the synthesis and analgesic properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs using buchu plant extract. The as-synthesised Ag-NPs at different temperatures were characterised by UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR and transmission transform microscopy (TEM to confirm the formation of silver nanoparticles. Phytochemical screening of the ethanolic extract revealed the presence of glycosides, proteins, tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids and saponins. The absorption spectra showed that the synthesis is temperature and time dependent. The TEM analysis showed that the as-synthesised Ag-NPs are polydispersed and spherical in shape with average particle diameter of 19.95 ± 7.76 nm while the FTIR results confirmed the reduction and capping of the as-synthesised Ag-NPs by the phytochemicals present in the ethanolic extract. The analgesic study indicated that the combined effect of the plant extract and Ag-NPs is more effective in pain management than both the aspirin drug and the extract alone.

  15. Analgesic efficacy of ketoprofen in postpartum, general surgery, and chronic cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, A; Olson, N Z

    1988-12-01

    This article summarizes the results of five single-dose clinical studies of three pain models: postpartum, postoperative, and chronic cancer pain. The efficacy of ketoprofen (in varying doses from 25 to 225 mg) was compared with one of the following standards: aspirin (650 mg), codeine (90 mg), acetaminophen (650 mg) plus codeine (60 mg), and parenteral morphine (5 mg and 10 mg). The results indicate that ketoprofen in doses as low as 25 mg has analgesic properties significantly superior to those of placebo. For the treatment of postpartum pain, ketoprofen was significantly more effective than aspirin 650 mg but not significantly different from codeine 90 mg. Ketoprofen doses of 50 mg and 150 mg also provided analgesia superior to that with acetaminophen 650 mg plus codeine 60 mg for the management of moderate to severe postoperative pain. Moreover, oral doses of ketoprofen (75 and 225 mg) provided analgesia similar to that obtained with 5 and 10 mg parenteral doses of morphine. Adverse effects related to ketoprofen were relatively minor and infrequent. Ketoprofen was recently approved for use as an analgesic for treatment of mild to moderate pain in total daily doses up to 300 mg; the recommended initial dose is 25 to 50 mg every 6 to 8 hours as necessary. PMID:3072358

  16. Analgesic and Antipyretic Activities of Methanol Extract and Its Fraction from the Root of Schoenoplectus grossus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Nirmal Kumar; Rahman, S M Abdur; Akbar, Mohammad Ahsanul

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to evaluate analgesic and antipyretic activities of the methanol extract and its different fractions from root of Schoenoplectus grossus using acetic acid induced writhing and radiant heat tail flick method of pain models in mice and yeast induced pyrexia in rats at the doses of 400 and 200 mg/kg. In acetic acid writhing test, the methanol extract, petroleum ether, and carbon tetrachloride fractions produced significant (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05) inhibition of writhing responses in dose dependent manner. The methanol extract at 400 and 200 mg/kg being more protective with 54% and 45.45% of inhibition compared to diclofenac sodium of 56% followed by petroleum ether fractions of 49.69% and 39.39% at the same doses. The extracts did not produce any significant antinociceptive activity in tail flick test except standard morphine. When studied on yeast induced pyrexia, methanol and petroleum ether fractions significantly lowered the rectal temperature time dependently in a manner similar to standard drug paracetamol and distinctly more significant (P < 0.001) after second hour. These findings suggest that the root extracts of S. grossus possess significant peripherally acting analgesic potential and antipyretic property. The phytochemical screening showed the presence of flavonoids, alkaloids, and tannins. PMID:26977173

  17. Analgesic and Antipyretic Activities of Methanol Extract and Its Fraction from the Root of Schoenoplectus grossus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar Subedi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to evaluate analgesic and antipyretic activities of the methanol extract and its different fractions from root of Schoenoplectus grossus using acetic acid induced writhing and radiant heat tail flick method of pain models in mice and yeast induced pyrexia in rats at the doses of 400 and 200 mg/kg. In acetic acid writhing test, the methanol extract, petroleum ether, and carbon tetrachloride fractions produced significant (P<0.001 and P<0.05 inhibition of writhing responses in dose dependent manner. The methanol extract at 400 and 200 mg/kg being more protective with 54% and 45.45% of inhibition compared to diclofenac sodium of 56% followed by petroleum ether fractions of 49.69% and 39.39% at the same doses. The extracts did not produce any significant antinociceptive activity in tail flick test except standard morphine. When studied on yeast induced pyrexia, methanol and petroleum ether fractions significantly lowered the rectal temperature time dependently in a manner similar to standard drug paracetamol and distinctly more significant (P<0.001 after second hour. These findings suggest that the root extracts of S. grossus possess significant peripherally acting analgesic potential and antipyretic property. The phytochemical screening showed the presence of flavonoids, alkaloids, and tannins.

  18. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Methanol Extract of Ficus pumila L. in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ren Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated possible analgesic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the methanol extract of Ficus pumila (FPMeOH. Analgesic effects were evaluated in two models including acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin-induced paw licking. The results showed FPMeOH decreased writhing response in the acetic acid assay and licking time in the formalin test. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by λ-carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema and histopathological analyses. FPMeOH significantly decreased the volume of paw edema induced by λ-carrageenan. Histopathologically, FPMeOH abated the level of tissue destruction and swelling of the edema paws. This study indicated anti-inflammatory mechanism of FPMeOH may be due to declined levels of NO and MDA in the edema paw through increasing the activities of SOD, GPx, and GRd in the liver. Additionally, FPMeOH also decreased the level of inflammatory mediators such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2. HPLC fingerprint was established and the contents of three active ingredients, rutin, luteolin, and apigenin, were quantitatively determined. This study provided evidence for the classical treatment of Ficus pumila in inflammatory diseases.

  19. The efficacy of nonopioid analgesics for postoperative dental pain: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, N; Grad, H A; Haas, D A; Aronson, K J; Jokovic, A; Locker, D

    1997-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of nonopioid analgesics in the dental pain model was examined by conducting a meta-analysis. Studies were obtained by searching the literature from August 1996 back to 1975 using the terms pain, analgesics, and dentistry. This led to the review of 294 articles, of which 33 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pain scale results were transformed into a common percent scale and converted to N-weighted means with differences in efficacy considered significant using a 95% confidence interval. Collectively, therapeutic doses of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) commonly used in dentistry were significantly more efficacious than the combination of acetaminophen (600 or 650 mg) with codeine (60 mg). Similarly, specific doses of each of diflunisal, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, and ketorolac were significantly more efficacious than the commonly used acetaminophen-codeine combination. These quantitative results show that particular NSAIDs may be more efficacious than the acetaminophen-codeine combination for relief of postoperative dental pain. PMID:9481955

  20. Fatty acid composition, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn. seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaia Awad Elkariem Ali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hibiscus (H. sabdariffa (commonly known as “Karkadeh” in Arabic is widely used in various pharmacological applications in Sudan. The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of H. sabdariffa seed extracts using rat models. In acute anti-inflammatory models, oral administration of petroleum ether extract of H. sabdariffa seeds inhibited the hind paw edema (p<0.01 which was induced by carrageenan. The petroleum ether extract exhibited significant (p<0.01 inhibition of vascular permeability in rats induced by intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (0.6%. In cotton pellet granuloma method, the petroleum ether extract of H. sabdariffa seed showed significant inhibition of granuloma. The extract reduced (p<0.001 abdominal constrictions which was induced by injection of acetic acid (0.7%. Analysis of seed oil of H. sabdariffa using Gas Chromatography revealed the presence of three fatty acids; these were linolelaidic acid, arachidic acid, and palmitic acid. In conclusion, H. sabdariffa seeds possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in rat model.

  1. Analgesic efficacy of intra-articular morphine after arthroscopic knee surgery in sport injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Yari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL tearing is a common injury among football players. The present study aims to determine the best single-dose of intra-articular morphine for pain relief after arthroscopic knee surgery that, in addition to adequate and long-term analgesia, leads to fewer systemic side effects. METHODS: This clinical trial was conducted on 40 ASA-I athletes. After surgery, all participants received an injection of 20cc of 0.5% intra-articular bupivacaine. In addition, the first control group received a saline injection and 5, 10 and 15 mg of morphine were respectively injected into the joints of the second, third and fourth groups by use of Arthroscopic equipment before the Arthroscopic removal. The amount of pain based on VAS at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours after surgery, duration of analgesia and the consumption of narcotic drugs were recorded. RESULTS: The VAS scores in the fourth, sixth and twenty-fourth hours after surgery showed a significant difference between the study groups. The average time to the first analgesic request from the bupivacaine plus 15 mg morphine group was significantly longer than other groups and total analgesic requests were significantly lower than other groups. No drowsiness complications were observed in any of the groups in the first 24 hours after injection. CONCLUSION: Application of 15 mg intra-articular morphine after Arthroscopic knee surgery increases the analgesia level as well as its duration (IRCT138902172946N3 .

  2. Stress-induced changes in the analgesic and thermic effects of opioid peptides in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, B D; Holtzman, S G

    1986-07-01

    Stress (e.g. restraint) potentiates analgesia and alters changes in body temperature induced by morphine administered either systemically or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) in rats. In order to extend the generality of this phenomenon to opioid peptides, we determined whether the analgesic and thermic effects of i.c.v. D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (DADLE) or D-Ala2-N-MePhe4-Gly5(ol)-enkephalin (DAGO), agonists selective for delta- and mu-opioid receptors, respectively, were affected by restraint stress. Analgesia was measured in the tail-flick test and core body temperature by rectal probe. The unstressed rats exhibited a dose-dependent increase in tail-flick latencies after administration of either DAGO or DADLE. Restrained rats treated with DAGO or DADLE had a greater analgesic response to each dose of peptide than did unstressed rats; both the magnitude and duration of the drug effect were increased. The unstressed group of rats responded to all doses of DAGO and DADLE with an increase of core temperature. In contrast, restrained rats showed a decrease of core temperature following injection with either DAGO or DADLE. Thus, restraint stress can significantly modify the effects of DAGO and DADLE on analgesia and body temperature in a manner that is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that observed previously for morphine administered by the i.c.v. route. PMID:3015351

  3. Stress-induced changes in the analgesic and thermic effects of morphine administered centrally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, B D; Holtzman, S G

    1985-12-01

    Stress (e.g. restraint) potentiates analgesia and changes in body temperature induced by morphine administered systemically to rats. In order to determine if stress-induced potentiation of these effects of morphine are mediated within the central nervous system, restrained and unstressed groups of rats were injected in the lateral ventricle (i.c.v.) with graded doses of morphine, and their analgesic and body temperature responses were measured. Compared to unstressed animals, restrained rats had a greater analgesic response at each dose of morphine, characterized by an increase in both the magnitude and duration of the drug effect. The unstressed group of rats responded consistently to 1.0-100 micrograms of morphine with a 1.5-2.0 degrees C increase in core temperature. Restrained rats had either a smaller increase in body temperature or a hypothermia at these doses of morphine. Thus, restraint stress can modify the effects of morphine administered i.c.v. on analgesia and body temperature in a manner similar to that seen after systemic administration of morphine, indicating that this phenomenon is mediated centrally. PMID:4075121

  4. Analgesic and thermic responses to intravenously administered morphine in 8- and 24-week-old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, H N; Villar, V M

    1991-01-01

    The analgesic and thermic responses to morphine (5 and 10 mg/kg) injected intravenously to 8- and 24-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were determined. Greater analgesic and lower hyperthermic responses to morphine in 24-week-old rats in comparison to 8-week-old rats were observed. The pharmacokinetic parameters of morphine administered intravenously were also determined. Cmax for 5 and 10 mg/kg doses of morphine were smaller in 24-week-old rats in comparison to 8-week-old rats; however, AUC0----infinity was smaller only for 5 mg/kg dose. For 10 mg/kg dose, mean residence time (MRT) and the apparent steady state volume of distribution (Vss) for the older rats were higher than for the younger ones, but for 5 mg/kg dose the values did not differ. The enhanced responses to morphine in older age group of rats for 5 mg/kg dose cannot be explained solely on the basis of pharmacokinetics. However, for 10 mg/kg dose of morphine, the greater responses in 24-week-old rats could probably be related to increases in MRT and Vss. Factors other than serum kinetics, like kinetics of morphine in the brain as well as the brain opiate receptors, may also be involved in the differential effects of morphine in rats of different ages. PMID:1784625

  5. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of ketoprofen in palm oil esters nanoemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakeena, M H F; Yam, M F; Elrashid, S M; Munavvar, A S; Azmin, M N

    2010-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a potent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug has been used in the treatment of various kinds of pains, inflammation and arthritis. However, oral administration of ketoprofen produces serious gastrointestinal adverse effects. One of the promising methods to overcome these adverse effects is to administer the drug through the skin. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects from topically applied ketoprofen entrapped palm oil esters (POEs) based nanoemulsion and to compare with market ketoprofen product, Fastum(®) gel. The novelty of this study is, use of POEs for the oil phase of nanoemulsion. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic studies were performed on rats by carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema test and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia pain threshold test to compare the ketoprofen entrapped POEs based nanoemulsion formulation and market formulation. Results indicated that there are no significant different between ketoprofen entrapped POEs nanoemulsion and market formulation in carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema study and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia pain threshold study. However, it shows a significant different between POEs nanoemulsion formulation and control group in these studies at p<0.05. From these results it was concluded that the developed nanoemulsion have great potential for topical application of ketoprofen. PMID:21099145

  6. STUDIES ON THE ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC EFFICACY OF SCINDAPSUS OFFICINALIS (ROXB. SCHOTT IN LABORATORY ANIMALS

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    N. Ferdous* and S.U. Hridi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This research was focused on the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of ethanolic extract of Scindapsus officinalis (EESO fruit in laboratory animals and whether these effects were of any statistical significance. Carrageenan-induced Hind Paw Edema test in long evans rat was the experiment for anti-inflammatory activity of the ethanolic extract of Scindapsus officinalis fruit while hot plate test was carried out to assess its analgesic activity in swiss albino mice. At two different doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight, the analgesic test was evaluated on mice and the anti-inflammatory test was evaluated on rats by the ethanolic extract of the fruit. Phytochemical analysis of ethanolic extract of Scindapsus officinalis has indicated the presence of steroid, carbohydrate, flavonoid, alkaloid, tanin, saponin and terpenoid-compounds. Since these compounds are of pharmacological interest, coupled with the use of this plant in traditional medicine, prompted us for its possible analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The experimental activities for the ethanolic extract of Scindapsus officinalis fruit exhibited statistically significant (p<0.05 anti-inflammatory activity in Carrageenan-induced Hind Paw Edema in long evans rat and statistically significant (P<0.05 analgesic activity in swiss albino mice in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, these observations provide evidence and possible mechanisms of action for the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of fruit of Scindapsus officinalis claimed in Ayurveda medicine. Further studies should be undertaken to correlate the pharmacological activities with the chemical constituents of the fruit of Scindapsus officinalis.

  7. Low-dose spinal neostigmine further enhances the analgesic effect of spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, following orthopedic surgery

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    Gabriela Rocha Lauretti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opioids are considered mainstream for combined spinal-epidural anesthesia, but frequently limited by adverse effects. The aim of this study was to examine whether low-dose spinal neostigmine, epidural dexamethasone or their combination enhances analgesia from spinal bupivacaine without adverse effects. Materials and Methods : A total of 60 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery were randomized to one of four groups and evaluated for 24-h after surgery for analgesia (time to first rescue analgesic and rescue analgesic consumption. Patients received 15 mg bupivacaine plus the test drug intrathecally (saline or 1 microgram (μg neostigmine. The epidural test drug was either saline or 10 mg dexamethasone. The Control group (CG received spinal and epidural saline. The Neostigmine group (NG, spinal neostigmine and epidural saline; the Dexamethasone group (DG, spinal saline and epidural dexamethasone; and the Neostigmine-dexamethasone group (NDG, spinal neostigmine and epidural dexamethasone. Results: The CG (282 ± 163 min and NG (524 ± 142 min were similar in their times to first rescue analgesic and analgesic consumption. The time to first rescue analgesic was longer for the DG (966 ± 397 min compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0002, and the DG had less ketoprofen consumption and lower overall visual analogue scale-pain sores compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0005. Addition of 1 mg-neostigmine (NDG resulted in longer time to rescue analgesic (1205 ± 303 min; P < 0.02 and lower ketoprofen consumption (P < 0.05 compared to DG. Sporadic cases of vesical catheterization and emesis were observed, however adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusion: Spinal 1 microgram (μg neostigmine further enhanced analgesia from spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, without increasing the incidence of adverse effects.

  8. The analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for retroperitoneoscopic donor nephrectomy: A randomized controlled study

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    Beena K Parikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP block is suitable for lower abdominal surgeries. Blind TAP block has many complications and uncertainty of its effects. Use of ultrasonography increases the safety and efficacy. This study was conducted to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound (USG-guided TAP block for retroperitoneoscopic donor nephrectomy (RDN. Methods: In a prospective randomized double-blind study, 60 patients undergoing laparoscopic donor nephrectomy were randomly divided into two groups by closed envelope method. At the end of surgery, USG-guided TAP block was given to the patients of both the groups. Study group (group S received inj. Bupivacaine (0.375%, whereas control group (group C received normal saline. Inj. Tramadol (1 mg/kg was given as rescue analgesic at visual analog scale (VAS more than 3 in any group at rest or on movement. The analgesic efficacy was judged by VAS both at rest and on movement, time to first dose of rescue analgesic, cumulative dose of tramadol, sedation score, and nausea score, which were also noted at 30 min, 2, 4, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h postoperatively. Total tramadol consumption at 24 h was also assessed. Results: Patients in group S had significantly lower VAS score, longer time to first dose of rescue analgesic (547.13±266.96 min vs. 49.17±24.95 min and lower tramadol consumption (103.8±32.18 mg vs. 235.8±47.5 mg in 24 h. Conclusion: The USG-guided TAP block is easy to perform and effective as a postoperative analgesic regimen in RDN, with opioids-sparing effect and without any complications.

  9. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis)

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman Atiba; Alaa Ghazy; Naglaa Gomaa; Tarek Kamal; Mustafa Shukry

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick...

  10. A CLINICAL COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANALGESIC EFFECT OF TRAMADOL AND PENTAZOCINE IN POST - OPERATIVE PATIENTS FOLLOWING UPPER ABDOMINAL SURGERY

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    Jamuna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The post - operative pain can be treated by various approaches. Aim of this randomised prospective study was to compare two drugs (Tramadol and Pentazocine . 100 adult patients of both sexes of ASA status 1 & 2 posted for elective upper abdominal surgery were randomly assigned into two groups of 50 each, where Group 1 received Tramadol intravenously and Group 2 received Pentazocine intravenously as post - opera tive pain management. The efficacy of the analgesic effect of intravenous Tramadol & Pentazocine was compared during post - operative pain management. It was observed that Tramadol has got more potent analgesic action compared to equianalgesic dose of Pentaz ocine.

  11. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of the Methanol Extract from the Galls of Quercus infectoria (Olivier) in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sook-Ha Fan; Noraisah Akbar Ali; Dayang Fredalina Basri

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the analgesic activity of the methanol extract of the galls of Quercus infectoria in rats using hot plate and tail-flick methods. The extract was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 20 mg/kg while morphine sulfate and sodium salicylate (10 mg/kg) served as standards. The methanol extract exhibited significant analgesic activity in the tail-flick model (P < 0.05) by increasing the reaction time of the rats to 8.0 sec at 30 min after treatment in co...

  12. Preoperative cognitive-behavioural intervention improves in-hospital mobilisation and analgesic use for lumbar spinal fusion patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Christensen, Finn Bjarke;

    2016-01-01

    preoperative intervention focussed on pain coping using a CBT approach. Primary outcome was back pain during the first week (0-10 scale). Secondary outcomes were mobility, analgesic consumption, and length of hospitalisation. Data were retrieved using self-report questionnaires, assessments made by physical...... therapists and from medical records. RESULTS: No difference between the groups' self-reported back pain (p = 0.76) was detected. Independent mobility was reached by a significantly larger number of patients in the CBT group than the control group during the first three postoperative days. Analgesic...

  13. EXPERIMENTAL ESTIMATION OF THE ANALGESIC EFFECT AT COMBINED INFLUENCE OF THE ELECTROSTIMULATION AND THE PERCUSSIVE-FRICTIONAL MASSAGE AND IMPULSE CURRENTS REGISTRATION

    OpenAIRE

    M. G. Kiselev; E. I. Labun

    2015-01-01

    The experimental complex of percussive-frictional massager with electrostimulation function and softand hardware of original design gives a possibility to use various mechanical and electrical parameters of massage and electrostimulation and it can be used like the alternative instead of the accepted medicine analgesics. Analgesic effect decreases pain sensation of the patient up to 50 %.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL ESTIMATION OF THE ANALGESIC EFFECT AT COMBINED INFLUENCE OF THE ELECTROSTIMULATION AND THE PERCUSSIVE-FRICTIONAL MASSAGE AND IMPULSE CURRENTS REGISTRATION

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    M. G. Kiselev

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The experimental complex of percussive-frictional massager with electrostimulation function and softand hardware of original design gives a possibility to use various mechanical and electrical parameters of massage and electrostimulation and it can be used like the alternative instead of the accepted medicine analgesics. Analgesic effect decreases pain sensation of the patient up to 50 %.

  15. [Analgesics and laxatives as risk factors for cancer in the efferent urinary tract--results of the Berlin Urothelial Carcinoma Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, E; Klimpel, A; Helmert, U; Greiser, E; Molzahn, M; Pommer, W

    1999-01-01

    A retrospective case-control study (1990-1995), the Berlin Urothelial Cancer Study (BUS), examined analgesics and laxatives as risks for the induction of urothelial cancer in renal pelvis, ureter and bladder. Especially for renal pelvis cancer could observe substance and dose specific risk of compound analgesics. The analgesic substances Phenacetin, Paracetamol, Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and Pyrazolones were assessed. Besides a risk of contact laxatives (chemical or anthranoide ingredients) for urothelial cancer was found, not yet described. The highest risk shows the anthranoide plant Senna. Thus this study confirms the risk of specific analgesic ingredients and found an evidence for a new risk of contact laxatives. As both, analgesics and contact laxatives, are typical OTC--("Over the counter") products, a severe controlling is demanded and for laxatives further studies are needed. PMID:10436491

  16. Analgesic effects of adding lidocaine to morphine pumps after orthopedic surgeries

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    Mahmoud Reza Alebouyeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opiate is used in patient-controlled intravenous analgesia pumps (PCIA for controlling pain in post-surgical patients. Other drugs are remarkably added to opioid pumps to enhance quality, lengthen analgesia, and reduce side effects. Lidocaine, a local anesthetic which inhibits sodium channels, has anesthetic and analgesic effects when injected locally or intravenously. The objective of this study is to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding lidocaine 1% to different doses of morphine via IV pump to patient-controlled analgesia (PCA after orthopedic surgeries. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients who had undergone orthopedic surgery of lower extremities were divided into three equal groups to control postoperative pain. Intravenous pump with 5 ml/h flow rate was used as the analgesic method. The solution consisted of lidocaine 1% plus 20 mg morphine for the first group, lidocaine 1% plus 10 mg morphine for the second group, and only 20 mg morphine for the third group (control group. Patients were checked every 12 h, and Visual Analog Scale (VAS, extra opioid doses, nausea/vomiting, and sedation scale were examined. Results: Pain score was lower in the first group compared to the other two groups. Mean VAS was 2.15 ± 0.2, 2.75 ± 0.2, and 2 ± 0.25 on the first day and 1.88 ± 0.1, 2.74 ± 0.3, and 2.40 ± 0.3 on the second day, respectively, in the three groups and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01 and <0.05, respectively. Also, 10% of patients in the first group needed extra opioid doses, while this figure was 30% in the second group and 25% in the third group (P < 0.01. Nausea/vomiting and sedation scores were not statistically different among the three groups. Conclusion: Compared to lidocaine 1% plus 10 mg morphine or 20 mg morphine alone in PCIA, adding lidocaine 1% to 20 mg morphine decreases the pain score and opioid dose after orthopedic surgeries without having side

  17. Assessment of analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of crude extracts of ray fish, Narcine brunnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravitchandirane V; Yogamoorthi A; Thangaraj M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of the crude petroleum ether and ether extracts of Narcine brunnea. Methods: The homogenized flesh was extracted exhaustively in a soxhlet apparatus separately with petroleum ether and ether. The Chemical analysis of petroleum ether and ether extracts was carried out by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, FT-IR and GC-MS. The analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of the crude extract was assessed by hot plate, Haffner’s tail clip and carrageenan induced rat paw oedema methods in animal models. Results: The GC-MS and EIMS revealed five compounds viz. 3, 5- dihydroxy phenyl acetic acid, phtha1ic acid, N-methyl 2, 3-dihydro 3-but-2-enyl indole 5-sulphonic acid, 2-methoxy serotonin sulphate and 3-but-2 enyl-indole-5- sulphonic acid. The results (mean±SE) of hot plate showed that the crude petroleum ether and ether extracts exhibited increase in basal reaction time from 2.150±0.043 and 2.300±0.058 at 0 min to 6.102±0.037 and 8.783±0.070 at 120 min respectively. The tail clip method revealed a well marked increase in basal reaction time of 6.817±0.031 in petroleum ether and 8.852±0.043 in ether extract at 120 min. The crude petroleum ether inhibited the oedema volume of 51% with a mean oedema volume of 3.465±0.022 at 4h, where as the crude ether extract produced to the extent of 56% inhibition of oedema volume with a mean 3.363±0.023 at 4 h. Conclusions: This study confirmed the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Narcine brunnea observed during the ethno-pharmacological survey. In order to go towards a valuation of this traditional knowledge, further studies like purification, isolation and NMR must be carried out to determine which of these compounds are actually responsible for such properties.

  18. Patterns of analgesic use, pain and self-efficacy: a cross-sectional study of patients attending a hospital rheumatology clinic

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    Greenfield Sheila

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many people attending rheumatology clinics use analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories for persistent musculoskeletal pain. Guidelines for pain management recommend regular and pre-emptive use of analgesics to reduce the impact of pain. Clinical experience indicates that analgesics are often not used in this way. Studies exploring use of analgesics in arthritis have historically measured adherence to such medication. Here we examine patterns of analgesic use and their relationships to pain, self-efficacy and demographic factors. Methods Consecutive patients were approached in a hospital rheumatology out-patient clinic. Pattern of analgesic use was assessed by response to statements such as 'I always take my tablets every day.' Pain and self-efficacy (SE were measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC and Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES. Influence of factors on pain level and regularity of analgesic use were investigated using linear regression. Differences in pain between those agreeing and disagreeing with statements regarding analgesic use were assessed using t-tests. Results 218 patients (85% of attendees completed the study. Six (2.8% patients reported no current pain, 26 (12.3% slight, 100 (47.4% moderate, 62 (29.4% severe and 17 (8.1% extreme pain. In multiple linear regression self efficacy and regularity of analgesic use were significant (p Low SE was associated with greater pain: 40 (41.7% people with low SE reported severe pain versus 22 (18.3% people with high SE, p Conclusion Our study confirms that there is a strong inverse relationship between self-efficacy and pain severity. Analgesics are often used irregularly by people with arthritis, including some reporting severe pain.

  19. A comparison Comparison between analgesic effects of aqueous ethanolic extract of mentha longifolia and morphine in male rats

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    Ezatollah Paknia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Long-term consumption of many drugs followed by reduction of their effectiveness has necessitated performing research on new analgesics .Thus, the present study was conducted to evaluate the analgesic effects of mentha longifolia and morphine in mice using writhing and hot plate tests. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 70 male rats were divided into 7 equal groups. The groups included the control, three experimental groups receiving 400, 800, or 1600 mg/kg of mentha extract and three experimental groups which received 2, 4, or 8 mg/kg of morphine .In order to measure pain, the two acceptable tests, writhing and hot plate tests, were applied. Pain scores were measured at 0, 15, 30, 45 or 60 min after administration of algogenic stimulus. Results: It was found that in hot plate test, only the dose of 1600mg/kg of Mentha extract after 60 minutes was significantly able to exert an analgesic effect (P<0.05. In wrighting test, mentha extract at different doses significantly reduced the number and time of wrightes in the rats, comparable to morphine (P<0.05. Conclusion: It seems that all doses of mentha extract in wrighting test have analgesic effects which indicate chronic pain inhibition of mentha hydroalcholic extract.

  20. Identification and Quantitative Analysis of Acetaminophen, Acetylsalicylic Acid, and Caffeine in Commercial Analgesic Tablets by LC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenk, Christopher J.; Hickman, Nicole M.; Fincke, Melissa A.; Motry, Douglas H.; Lavine, Barry

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate LC-MS experiment is described for the identification and quantitative determination of acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, and caffeine in commercial analgesic tablets. This inquiry-based experimental procedure requires minimal sample preparation and provides good analytical results. Students are provided sufficient background…

  1. Analgesic efficacy of lysine clonixinate plus tramadol versus tramadol in multiple doses following impacted third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Urizar, J; Martínez-Rider, R; Torres-Roque, I; Garrocho-Rangel, A; Pozos-Guillen, A

    2014-03-01

    This study compared the analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy, trismus control, and tolerability of the combination of lysine clonixinate and tramadol (LCT) versus tramadol (T) alone after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. This study was a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, including two study groups of 20 patients each, who exhibited acute pain subsequent to surgical extraction of two mandibular third molars. Pain intensity was quantified over a 96-h period using a visual analogue scale and a 5-point verbal rating scale. Secondary indicators of analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy, trismus control, and tolerability were determined. Patients administered LCT exhibited better therapeutic effects that those administered T. Fifty percent of patients in the LCT group rated this therapy as 'excellent analgesia' compared with only 10% in the T group. The onset of the analgesic effect of LCT was significantly faster, without any therapeutic failures. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to anti-inflammatory effect or trismus. The results of this study suggest that the postsurgical analgesic efficacy of LCT in combination (LC 125 mg + T 25 mg) is superior to that obtained with T alone, administered at the standard dose of 50 mg, for up to 96 h after the extraction of both impacted mandibular third molars. PMID:24042066

  2. Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS have a clinically relevant analgesic effect on different pain conditions? A literature review

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    Asami Naka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS is a standard therapy used in different painful conditions such as low back pain, diabetic polyneuropathy or arthrosis. However, literature reviews focusing on the effects and the clinical implication of this method in various painful conditions are yet scarce. The purpose of this literature research was to determine, whether TENS provides an analgesic effect on common painful conditions in clinical practice. Literature research was performed using three data bases (Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Database, focusing on papers published in the space of time from 2007 to 2012. Papers were evaluated from two reviewers independently concerning the clinical outcome, taking account for the level of external evidence according to the German Cochrane levels of evidence (Ia – IV. 133 papers of varying methodological quality dealing with different painful conditions were selected in total. A clinically relevant analgesic effect was described in 90 painful conditions (67%. In 30 painful states (22%, the outcome was inconclusive due to the study design. No significant analgesic effect of TENS was observed in 15 painful conditions (11%. The vast majority of the papers were classified as Cochrane evidence level Ib (n = 64; 48%, followed by level Ia (n = 23; 17%, level III (n = 18; 14%, level IV (n = 15; 11%, level IIb (n = 10; 8% and level IIa (n = 3; 2%. Most of the studies revealed an analgesic effect in various painful conditions, confirming the usefulness of TENS in clinical practice.

  3. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced analgesic effect of oxycodone compared to morphine in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

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    Karine Thibault

    Full Text Available Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone.

  4. Effect of intraoperative lidocaine on anesthetic consumption, and bowel function, pain intensity, analgesic consumption and hospital stay after breast surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Soo Joo; Kim, Myung Hee; Jeong, Hui Yeon; Lee, Jeong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Background Perioperative lidocaine infusion improves postoperative outcomes, mostly after abdominal and urologic surgeries. Knowledge of the effect of lidocaine on peripheral surgeries is limited. Presently, we investigated whether intraoperative lidocaine infusion reduced anesthetic consumption, duration of ileus, pain intensity, analgesic consumption and hospital stay after breast plastic surgeries. Methods Sixty female patients, aged 20-60 years, enrolled in this prospective study were ran...

  5. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the hydrolyzed sasanquasaponins from the defatted seeds of Camellia oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong; Xing, Haiting; Chen, Xuelan

    2013-08-01

    The defatted seeds of Camellia oleifera (Abel.) are used for stopping itching and pain in old days, the effective compounds need to be investigated. Sasanquasaponin as a rich fraction was extracted with 70% ethanol, purified by AB-8 macro-reticular resin, crystallized in 80% ethanol, and further hydrolyzed by 4% hydroxyl potassium or 2 M hydrochloride. Anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts were measured by carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and croton oil induced ear inflammation in mice; the analgesic activities were analyzed by hot plate test, acetic acid induced writhing in mice; the levels of pain mediators of IL-1β, TNF-α and PGE₂ were determined; the antioxidative activities in vivo were evaluated by MDA, SOD and GSH-Px in serum of rats. The extracts showed significant (p < 0.01) anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities, remarkably (p < 0.01) inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and PGE2, decreased MDA and increased SOD and GSH-Px in serum. Inhibition of IL-1β, TNF-α and PGE2 may contribute to their anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects; elimination of free radicals is also involved. The sapogenin and acid hydrolyzed product have better anti-inflammatory, analgesic effects, and stronger antioxidative activity than sasanquasaponin and alkaline hydrolyzed product, and they are better candidate medicines for inflammation and pain. PMID:23625174

  6. Analgesic and Antiinflammatory Activities of the Aqueous Extract from Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Yung-Jia Chiu; Tai-Hung Huang; Chuan-Sung Chiu; Tsung-Chun Lu; Ya-Wen Chen; Wen-Huang Peng; Chiu-Yuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. is a native Labiatae plant of Taiwan. The plants are commonly used in Chinese folk medicine for the treatment of cough, fever, sore throats, mumps, and mosquito bite. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the aqueous extract from Plec...

  7. Noninterventional study of transdermal fentanyl (fentavera) matrix patches in chronic pain patients: analgesic and quality of life effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Fentanyl is considered to be an effective, transdermal treatment of chronic, cancer, and noncancer pain. This noninterventional, clinical practice-based study, on 426 patients attending 42 practices, assessed a proprietary, Aloe vera-containing, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch (Fentavera), for its analgesic effects, patients' quality of life (QoL) effects, tolerability, and adhesiveness. Study outcomes were mean changes from baseline of patient (11-point scales) and physician (5-point scales) ratings. After 1 and 2 months treatment, there were significant (P walking, general activity, sleep quality, and QoL. For each parameter, the patient response rate was >30% at 2 months (response = 2-point decrease on 11-point rating scale). In a large majority of patients, the physicians rated the matrix patch as good or very good for analgesic effect, systemic and local tolerance, and adhesiveness. There were 30 adverse events in 4.2% of patients and analgesic comedications were reduced during treatment compared to before treatment. It is concluded, from this population-based data, that the proprietary, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch is effective and safe for chronic pain management in clinical practice, with significant positive analgesic and QoL effects, while being well tolerated and exhibiting good or very good adhesiveness. PMID:25861472

  8. Phytopharmacological Assessment from Two Medicinal Plants Used for Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Purposes in Burkina Faso

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    M. Ouédraogo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of aqueous acetone extracts from Cienfuegosia digitata Cav; and Sida Alba L. in Swiss mice, with an aim to provide a scientific basis for the traditional use of these plants in the treatment of inflammation disorders. In anti-inflammatory activity, the carrageenan-induced paw edema and oil croton-induced ear edema in Swiss mice. As for analgesic effects, acetic acid writhing and formalin test methods were used in mice. About anti-inflammatory potential, the extracts at doses of 100; 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight produced significant comparatively to the control groups (p<0.05; p<0.01 and p<0.001 and we noticed a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity. The dose-dependent inhibition of edema was observed at 1; 2 and 3 h. However, extracts showed dose-dependent inhibition of croton oil induced ear oedema, at doses of 200; 300 and 500 µg/ear. As for analgesic activity, extracts produced significant analgesic effects in acetic acid writhing and formalin test method (p<0.05; p<0.01 and p<0.001 compared to the control groups and a dose-dependent inhibition was observed. The present study concludes that Cienfuegosia digitata Cav. and Sida Alba L. have anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties.

  9. Narcotic receptor blockade and its effect on the analgesic response to placebo and ibuprofen after oral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, E V; Ochs, H; Quinn, P; MacAfee, K; Cooper, S A; Barasch, A

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of endogenous opiates to the analgesic response after treatment with placebo, codeine, and ibuprofen after oral surgery. Eighty-one patients undergoing complicated dental extractions were pretreated with either a placebo or the narcotic antagonist naltrexone 50 mg, 30 minutes before surgery. After surgery, patients self administered one of three possible postsurgical medications, which included placebo, codeine 60 mg, and ibuprofen 400 mg, when their pain reached a moderate or severe intensity. The study was double-blind with the three postsurgical treatments being randomly allocated within each presurgical treatment block. Pain intensity, pain relief, pain half gone, and overall evaluations were assessed for up to 6 hours. Ibuprofen was significantly more efficacious (p < .05) than codeine or placebo for most analgesic measures. The administration of naltrexone before surgery reduced the analgesic response to both placebo and codeine. Pretreatment with naltrexone did not diminish the peak analgesic response to ibuprofen, but surprisingly prolonged (p < .05) the duration of its action. The results suggest that a blockade of endogenous opiates by naltrexone diminished the placebo response, but that naltrexone may prolong ibuprofen analgesia by some unknown mechanism. PMID:8387662

  10. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modelling of the Analgesic and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Morphine after Intravenous Infusion in Human Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Foster, David J. R.; Kreilgaard, Mads;

    2014-01-01

    Using a modelling approach, this study aimed to (i) examine whether the pharmacodynamics of the analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects of morphine differ; (ii) investigate the influence of demographic, pain sensitivity and genetic (OPRM1) variables on between-subject variability of morphine pharm...

  11. Step 7: Educates Staff in Nondrug Methods of Pain Relief and Does Not Promote Use of Analgesic, Anesthetic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Mayri Sagady; Romano, Amy; Woolley, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Step 7 of the Ten Steps of Mother-Friendly Care insures that staff are knowledgeable about nondrug methods of pain relief and that analgesic or anesthetic drugs are not promoted unless required to correct a complication. The rationales for compliance and systematic reviews are presented on massage, hypnosis, hydrotherapy, and the use of opioids, regional analgesia, and anesthesia. PMID:18523667

  12. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Prachi; O'Neil, Alison; Lin, Emily; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-08-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocontainer based on the Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage P22 capsid, genetically incorporating ziconotide in the interior cavity, and chemically attaching cell penetrating HIV-Tat peptide on the exterior of the capsid. Virus like particles (VLPs) of P22 containing ziconotide were successfully transported in several BBB models of rat and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a recyclable noncytotoxic endocytic pathway. This work demonstrates proof in principle for developing a possible alternative to intrathecal injection of ziconotide using a tunable VLP drug delivery nanocontainer to cross the BBB.

  13. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoradiographic studies localize [3H]bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. [3H]Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of [3H]bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models

  14. Postoperative catecholamine response to onychectomy in isoflurane-anesthetized cats. Effects of analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, G J; Wheaton, L G; Thurmon, J C; Tranquilli, W J; Olson, W A; Davis, C A

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-four healthy adult cats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. Six cats (group 1) served as controls; onychectomy of the forefeet was performed in the other three groups. Saline was administered intravenously to group 1, and morphine, xylazine, and salicylate were administered to groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Mixed venous blood samples were drawn for catecholamine analysis before induction of anesthesia, after recovery from anesthesia, and 30 minutes and 60 minutes after administration of the analgesic agent. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Isoflurane anesthesia alone induced a transient increase in epinephrine concentration. Norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations increased significantly after onychectomy. Morphine and xylazine significantly decreased postoperative norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations; salicylate did not. PMID:1853554

  15. The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with local anaesthetics after breast surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byager, N; Hansen, Mads; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, J B

    2014-01-01

    -operative pain after breast surgery. METHODS: A systematic review was performed by searching PubMed, Google Scholar, the Cochrane database and Embase for randomised, blinded, controlled trials of wound infiltration with local anaesthetics for post-operative pain relief in female adults undergoing breast surgery......BACKGROUND: Wound infiltration with local anaesthetics is commonly used during breast surgery in an attempt to reduce post-operative pain and opioid consumption. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effect of wound infiltration with local anaesthetics compared with a control group on post...... statistically significant reduction in post-operative, supplemental opioid consumption that was, however, of limited clinical relevance. CONCLUSION: Wound infiltration with local anaesthetics may have a modest analgesic effect in the first few hours after surgery. Pain after breast surgery is, however...

  16. Analgesic effect of perioperative escitalopram in high pain catastrophizing patients after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, Troels H; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Hansen, Torben Bæk;

    2015-01-01

    has not previously been investigated. The authors hypothesized that perioperative escitalopram would reduce pain after TKA in high pain catastrophizing patients. METHODS: A total of 120 pain catastrophizing patients (selected using the pain catastrophizing scale as preoperative screening tool......) scheduled for TKA were randomized in a double-blind manner to either 10 mg escitalopram or placebo daily from preanesthesia to postoperative day 6 in addition to a standardized analgesic regime. The primary outcome was pain upon ambulation 24 h after surgery. Secondary outcomes were overall pain during well......-defined mobilizations and at rest from 2 to 48 h and from days 2 to 6, morphine equivalents, anxiety, depression, and side effects. RESULTS: Pain upon ambulation (mean [95% CI]) 24 h after surgery in the escitalopram versus placebo group was 58 (53 to 64) versus 64 (58 to 69), the mean difference being -5 (-13 to 3), P...

  17. Synthesis and analysis of the opioid analgesic [14C]-fentanyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of [14C]-fentanyl, the radiolabelled congener of the potent opioid analgesic chosen for utilization in drug disposition studies, is described. [14C]-Labelling was achieved in the first of two steps, a room temperature reduction of the in situ generated Schiff base from 1-phenylethyl-4-piperidone and [UL-14C]-aniline hydrochloride with sodium triacetoxyborohydride. A nearly instantaneous production of fentanyl was accomplished at room temperature with the addition of propionyl chloride. The overall radiochemical yield was 18%. The method described is efficiently adaptable for submicromolar scale while yielding a product of sufficient specific activity for in vivo studies. Our solvent system for thin layer chromatography was superior to the USP system reported for chromatographic analysis of fentanyl. This is the first reported preparation of [14C]-fentanyl with the radiolabel in the aniline benzene ring. (author)

  18. Synthesis and analysis of the opioid analgesic [[sup 14]C]-fentanyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagley, J.R.; Wilhelm, J.A. (Anaquest Inc., Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    1992-11-01

    The synthesis of [[sup 14]C]-fentanyl, the radiolabelled congener of the potent opioid analgesic chosen for utilization in drug disposition studies, is described. [[sup 14]C]-Labelling was achieved in the first of two steps, a room temperature reduction of the in situ generated Schiff base from 1-phenylethyl-4-piperidone and [UL-[sup 14]C]-aniline hydrochloride with sodium triacetoxyborohydride. A nearly instantaneous production of fentanyl was accomplished at room temperature with the addition of propionyl chloride. The overall radiochemical yield was 18%. The method described is efficiently adaptable for submicromolar scale while yielding a product of sufficient specific activity for in vivo studies. Our solvent system for thin layer chromatography was superior to the USP system reported for chromatographic analysis of fentanyl. This is the first reported preparation of [[sup 14]C]-fentanyl with the radiolabel in the aniline benzene ring. (author).

  19. Analgesic effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy versus ultrasound therapy in chronic tennis elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizis, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the analgesic effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy with those of ultrasound therapy in patients with chronic tennis elbow. [Subjects] Fifty patients with tennis elbow were randomized to receive extracorporeal shock wave therapy or ultrasound therapy. [Methods] The extracorporeal shock wave therapy group received 5 treatments once per week. Meanwhile, the ultrasound group received 10 treatments 3 times per week. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale during grip strength evaluation, palpation of the lateral epicondyle, Thomsen test, and chair test. Resting pain was also recorded. The scores were recorded and compared within and between groups pre-treatment, immediately post-treatment, and 3 months post-treatment. [Results] Intra- and intergroup comparisons immediately and 3 months post-treatment showed extracorporeal shock wave therapy decreased pain to a significantly greater extent than ultrasound therapy. [Conclusion] Extracorporeal shock wave therapy can significantly reduce pain in patients with chronic tennis elbow. PMID:26357440

  20. Radioimmunoassay of the new opiate analgesics alfentanil and sufentanil. Preliminary pharmacokinetic profile in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michiels, M.; Hendriks, R.; Heykants, J. (Janssen Pharmaceutical, Beerse (Belgium))

    1983-02-01

    The development of two analogous radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedures based on dextran-charcoal separation is described for the quantification of alfentanil and sufentanil. Immunization of rabbits with conjugates of bovine serum albumin and carboxy-derivatives of the respective drugs resulted in the production of antisera capable of detecting less than 0.05 ng ml/sup -1/ of the parent analgesics with high specificity and almost no cross-reactivity with major metabolites. Excellent agreement was obtained between RIA - without prior extraction - and gas chromatography for alfentanil concentrations in human plasma. Because of sufentanil's low therapeutic levels no comparison could be made between its RIA and an alternative assay, however, there was strong evidence for the specificity of the assay when applied directly to plasma.

  1. Analgesic effect of acetaminophen, phenyltoloxamine and their combination in postoperative oral surgery pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, J A; Barkaszi, B A; Ragland, R N; Hankle, J J

    1984-01-01

    In this factorial study, 148 outpatients with pain after oral surgery were randomly assigned, on a double-blind basis, a single oral dose of acetaminophen 650 mg, phenyltoloxamine 60 mg, a combination of acetaminophen 650 mg with phenyltoloxamine 60 mg, or placebo. Using a self-rating record, subjects rated their pain and its relief hourly for 6 hours after medication. Measures of total and peak analgesia were derived from these subjective reports. The acetaminophen effect was significant for every measure of total and peak analgesia. The phenyltoloxamine effect was not significant for any measure of analgesia. Although efficacy was lower for the acetaminophen-phenyltoloxamine combination than for acetaminophen alone, for every variable, the contrast for interaction was not statistically significant. The results of this study differ from those of previous studies in patients with headache and musculoskeletal pain. All adverse effects were transitory and consistent with the known pharmacologic profiles of the study medications or the backup analgesic. PMID:6483639

  2. PHARMACOLOGICAL SCREENING OF ISOLATED COMPOUND FROM MADHUKA LONGIFOLIA SEEDS GIVES SIGNIFICANT ANALGESIC EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirantan S. Chakma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to assess the analgesic effect of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of isolated compound from M.longifolia seeds in rats and mice model. All three animal groups were administered the aq. and alc.ext of M.longifolia at a dose of 4 mg to 64 mg/kg body weight. The standard drug diclofenac 5 mg/kg b.w is used in three screening method. The paw licking time, tail withdrawal time and chemical writhings in mice both aq. and alc. extracts of M.longifolia prevents significant dose dependent anti-nociceptive effect. Diclofenac 5 mg/kg failed to alter significantly the antinociceptive effect of 16 to 32 mg of both extracts or the effect on chemical assay.

  3. Physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Sjøgren, Per; Møldrup, Claus;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of studies on physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in PUBMED, using a combined text word and MeSH heading search strategy. Those articles whose full...... texts were not available in PUBMED were retrieved from the electronic databases of specific journals. RESULTS: Sixty-five relevant articles, published in the period from 1986 to 2006, were identified. Physicians' barriers to cancer pain management were studied in questionnaire surveys and in the reviews...... review revealed mostly general and common physician-related barriers to cancer pain management: concerns about side effects to opioids, prescription of not efficient doses of opioids, and very poor prescription for the treatment of side effects from opioids. In the future, the evaluation of the influence...

  4. Absence of analgesic effect of intravenous melatonin administration during daytime after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Kücükakin, Bülent; Werner, Mads U;

    2014-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether melatonin administered intraoperatively reduced pain following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. DESIGN: Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study. SETTING: Two surgical departments in Copenhagen. PATIENTS: 44 women between 18 and 70 years of age, who...... mg of intravenous (IV) melatonin or placebo were administered at the time of surgical incision. MEASUREMENTS: Pain was assessed by a set of questionnaires documenting "pain at rest" using a visual analog scale (VAS). The use of rescue medication was recorded. Sleep quality and general well-being were...... between the two groups in the postoperative period. The use of postoperative rescue medication did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: The use of 10mg of IV melatonin administered during laparoscopic cholecystectomy did not affect postoperative pain or use of analgesic medication....

  5. Analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects of melatonin in a human inflammatory pain model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Gögenur, Ismail; Fenger, Andreas Q;

    2015-01-01

    Antinociceptive effects of melatonin have been documented in a wide range of experimental animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic, antihyperalgesic, and anti-inflammatory properties of melatonin using a validated burn injury (BI) model in healthy male volunteers. The...... design was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-arm crossover study. Each volunteer participated in 3 identical study sessions with intravenous administration of placebo, melatonin 10 mg, or melatonin 100 mg. Sixty minutes after bolus injection of study medication, a BI was induced by a...... primary outcomes. Twenty-nine volunteers were randomized and completed the study. While the BI induced large secondary hyperalgesia areas and significantly increased the markers of inflammation, no significant effects of melatonin were observed with respect to primary or secondary outcomes, compared with...

  6. Urinary tract analgesics for the treatment of patients with acute cystitis: where is the clinical evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergialiotis, Vassilis; Arnos, Pantelis; Mavros, Michael N; Pitsouni, Eleni; Athanasiou, Stavros; Falagas, Matthew E

    2012-08-01

    Acute cystitis is one of the most common health-related problems in the female population. Over the last few decades, a number of drugs labeled as 'urinary tract analgesics' were released; these are available over the counter and are gaining widespread resonance among the North American population. The main representatives of this class of drugs are phenazopyridine and methenamine hippurate. Methenamine's efficacy and side effects have been well studied in a recent systematic review. On the other hand, in contrast to its widespread use, the published clinical evidence regarding phenazopyridine's effectiveness and safety is scarce. In addition, consumers (potentially patients) appear to ignore the limitations of this kind of treatment. In this article, concerns regarding the use of over-the-counter uroanalgesics, with a focus on the relevant clinical evidence, are discussed. PMID:23030327

  7. Green Chemical Synthesis and Analgesic Activity of Fluorinated Thiazolidinone, Pyrazolidinone, and Dioxanedione Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshita Sachdeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Facile lemon juice catalyzed green and efficient synthesis of a series of new classes of 5-(fluorinatedbenzylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones (3a–e, 5-methyl-4-(fluorinatedbenzylidene-2-phenylpyrazolidin-3-ones (5a–e, and 2,2-dimethyl-5-(fluorinatedbenzylidene-1,3-dioxane-4,6-diones (7a–e by the reaction of fluorinated aromatic aldehydes with active methylene compounds is reported. Lemon juice is natural acid catalyst which is readily available, cheap, nontoxic, and ecofriendly. This method is experimentally simple, clean, high yielding, green, and with reduced reaction times. The product is purified by simple filtration followed by washing with water and drying process. Some of the synthesized compounds have been evaluated “in vivo” for their analgesic activity and all the synthesized compounds are characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 19F NMR, and mass spectral studies.

  8. 3-Aminothiophene-2-Acylhydrazones: Non-Toxic, Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Lead-Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Karla Cupertino da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Different chemotypes are described as anti-inflammatory. Among them the N-acylhydrazones (NAH are highlighted by their privileged structure nature, being present in several anti-inflammatory drug-candidates. In this paper a series of functionalized 3-aminothiophene-2-acylhydrazone derivatives 5a–i were designed, synthesized and bioassayed. These new derivatives showed great anti-inflammatory and analgesic potency and efficacy. Compounds 5a and 5d stand out in this respect, and were also active in CFA-induced arthritis in rats. After daily treatment for seven days with 5a and 5d (50 µmol/Kg, by oral administration, these compounds were not renal or hepatotoxic nor immunosuppressive. Compounds 5a and 5d also displayed good drug-scores and low risk toxicity calculated in silico using the program OSIRIS Property Explorer.

  9. Comparison Relation to Analgesics Between Nurses and Patients Perception in Pain in Patients who had Undergone Coronary Bypass Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karamporian

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Pain is the most important and current nursing diagnosis at I.C.U of heart surgery. So it must be relive for its acute complication. The purpose of this study was to compare nurses and patients perception of pain and its relation to analgesics in patients undergone coronary bypass surgery in one of the selected hospital in Iran medical university in 2000 and to give some suggestions according to results of this study. This research was a descriptive study. In this study 30 patients with30 nurses caring of them in cardiac surgery I.C.U in one of the hospital of Iran medical university were participated .The materials in this study included question forms, scale of intensity of pain and analgesic dose check list. The first part included questions related to personal specifications of nurses and patients participating in study. The second part included 25 sentences about patients and nurses understanding of pain. For evaluating the degree of pain and severity of its perception in patients the statistical method was used. According to its"10" scores column the "o" was for no pain perception and "10" was for the most possible sense pain. The result of this study was summarized in 6 figures. The " T " statistical analysis showed that the patients average of pain perception was more than pain perception of nurses (P=0.001. The "pair t-test" detected significant differences between degree of perception of pain in patients before and after injection of analgesics and also perception of patients pain in their nurses (P=0.001. In addition according to "t-test" there was significant differences between the degree of pain in patients and degree of perception of this pain in nurses before and after the injection of analgesics (P=0.001. But, there was no relation between dose of analgesics with the patients’ and nurses’ perception of pain, and also the degree of patients pain before and after the injection of analgesics and degree of nurses perception of

  10. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the hydroalcoholic extract from Gloriosa superba Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jomy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gloriosa supberba (family: Liliaceae is widely used as a medicinal plant, and the alkaloids from the plant (Colchicines and Gloriosine are used in the treatment of gout and rheumatism. We evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of hydroalcoholic extract (50% v/v of dried aerial parts of G. superba. The analgesic activity of the extract was evaluated by using Eddy′s hot plate method and acetic acid-induced writhing method. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by using the cotton wool granuloma model and the carrageenan-induced paw edema model. The percentage inhibitions of writhes or percentage protection were found to be 64.09%, 78.56% and 81.45% for extract at a dose 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight, respectively, in the acetic acid-induced writhing method (P < 0.01 when compared with control. The percentage increase in reaction time at 90 minutes were 21.02%, 79.96% and 158.05% for extract at a dose of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight, respectively, in Eddy′s hot plate method (P < 0.01 when compared with control. The percentage inhibition of paw edema was increased with time and gave maximum effect at 2 hours, then declined in case of standard extract 400 mg/kg body weight. Only the 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight extracts exhibited significant result (P < 0.05 when compared with control. The rats exhibited 9.59%, 28.72% and 45.8% inhibition of granuloma mass formation after the 7 days treatment with 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight of extract when compared with control (P < 0.05 in cotton pellet granuloma.

  11. Analgesic effect of minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bruckert, Mitchell; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N

    2014-03-15

    The present study investigates the analgesic effect of minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, in a rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Inflammation was induced in male rats by intracolonic administration of tri-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Visceral hyperalgesia was assessed by comparing the viscero-motor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) prior and post 7 days after TNBS treatment. Electrophysiology recordings from CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) and lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal neurons were performed in naïve and inflamed rats. Colonic inflammation produced visceral hyperalgesia characterized by increase in the VMRs to CRD accompanied with simultaneous activation of microglia in the spinal cord and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Selectively inhibiting the glial activation following inflammation by araC (Arabinofuranosyl Cytidine) prevented the development of visceral hyperalgesia. Intrathecal minocycline significantly attenuated the VMR to CRD in inflamed rats, whereas systemic minocycline produced a delayed effect. In electrophysiology experiments, minocycline significantly attenuated the mechanotransduction of CRD-sensitive PNAs and the responses of CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons in TNBS-treated rats. While the spinal effect of minocycline was observed within 5min of administration, systemic injection of the drug produced a delayed effect (60min) in inflamed rats. Interestingly, minocycline did not exhibit analgesic effect in naïve, non-inflamed rats. The results demonstrate that intrathecal injection of minocycline can effectively attenuate inflammation-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Minocycline might as well act on neuronal targets in the spinal cord of inflamed rats, in addition to the widely reported glial inhibitory action to produce analgesia. PMID:24485889

  12. Antimicrobial properties of analgesic kyotorphin peptides unraveled through atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Marta M.B.; Franquelim, Henri G.; Torcato, Ines M. [Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, Av. Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa (Portugal); Ramu, Vasanthakumar G.; Heras, Montserrat; Bardaji, Eduard R. [Laboratori d' Innovacio en Processos i Productes de Sintesi Organica (LIPPSO), Departament de Quimica, Universitat de Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Castanho, Miguel A.R.B., E-mail: macastanho@fm.ul.pt [Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, Av. Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New kyotorphin derivatives have antimicrobial properties against S. aureus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic force microscopy show membrane disturbing effects of KTP-NH{sub 2} and IbKTP-NH{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer None of the KTP derivatives are hemolytic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The minimal peptidic sequence with antimicrobial activity is Tyr-Arg, if amidated. -- Abstract: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates as alternatives to conventional antibiotics for the treatment of resistant pathogens. In the last decades, new AMPs have been found from the cleavage of intact proteins with no antibacterial activity themselves. Bovine hemoglobin hydrolysis, for instance, results in AMPs and the minimal antimicrobial peptide sequence was defined as Tyr-Arg plus a positively charged amino acid residue. The Tyr-Arg dipeptide alone, known as kyotorphin (KTP), is an endogenous analgesic neuropeptide but has no antimicrobial activity itself. In previous studies new KTP derivatives combining C-terminal amidation and Ibuprofen (Ib) - KTP-NH{sub 2}, IbKTP, IbKTP-NH{sub 2} - were designed in order to improve KTP brain targeting. Those modifications succeeded in enhancing peptide-cell membrane affinity towards fluid anionic lipids and higher analgesic activity after systemic injection resulted therefrom. Here, we investigated if this affinity for anionic lipid membranes also translates into antimicrobial activity because bacteria have anionic membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that KTP derivatives perturbed Staphylococcus aureus membrane structure by inducing membrane blebbing, disruption and lysis. In addition, these peptides bind to red blood cells but are non-hemolytic. From the KTP derivatives tested, amidated KTP proves to be the most active antibacterial agent. The combination of analgesia and antibacterial activities with absence of toxicity is highly appealing from the clinical point of view

  13. MECHANISM OF ANALGESIC EFFECTS OF PROPOFOL ON INCISIONAL PAIN: A RAT MODEL STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhi-hua; SONG Xiao-xing; HU Jiong; YU Bu-wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective To clarify the role of propofol in controlling incisional pain and its potential effects on the spinal opioid receptor expression.Methods A postoperative model of nociception was established in male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 g. A total of 96 rats were randomly divided into 8 groups. All drugs were administered intravenously either 5min pre-operation or 5min post-operation. The analgesic effects of systemic propofol were demonstrated by the measurement of a cumulative pain score (CPS). After that, the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord was removed to evaluate the mRNA level of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) by RT-PCR.Results CPS and DOR mRNA expressions significantly increased after the operation. Both propofol post-treatment and propofol pre-treatment groups showed significant suppression of the increased CPS and the expression of DOR mRNA evoked by pain stimulation. Interestingly, propofol pre-treatment had a more pronounced effect in decreasing CPS and the expression of DOR mRNA. Furthermore, these observations were dose-dependent. MOR mRNA expression significantly increased after operation in all animals and propofol treatment had no impact on it.Conclusion Based on these findings, we suggest that propofol can serve as a valuable adjunct in acute postoperative pain management. Systemic propofol induces an analgesic effect on acute incisional pain in a dose-dependant manner, and this effect is mediated in the spinal cord and may be associated with the spinal DOR.

  14. Antimicrobial properties of analgesic kyotorphin peptides unraveled through atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► New kyotorphin derivatives have antimicrobial properties against S. aureus. ► Atomic force microscopy show membrane disturbing effects of KTP–NH2 and IbKTP–NH2. ► None of the KTP derivatives are hemolytic. ► The minimal peptidic sequence with antimicrobial activity is Tyr-Arg, if amidated. -- Abstract: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates as alternatives to conventional antibiotics for the treatment of resistant pathogens. In the last decades, new AMPs have been found from the cleavage of intact proteins with no antibacterial activity themselves. Bovine hemoglobin hydrolysis, for instance, results in AMPs and the minimal antimicrobial peptide sequence was defined as Tyr-Arg plus a positively charged amino acid residue. The Tyr-Arg dipeptide alone, known as kyotorphin (KTP), is an endogenous analgesic neuropeptide but has no antimicrobial activity itself. In previous studies new KTP derivatives combining C-terminal amidation and Ibuprofen (Ib) – KTP–NH2, IbKTP, IbKTP–NH2 – were designed in order to improve KTP brain targeting. Those modifications succeeded in enhancing peptide-cell membrane affinity towards fluid anionic lipids and higher analgesic activity after systemic injection resulted therefrom. Here, we investigated if this affinity for anionic lipid membranes also translates into antimicrobial activity because bacteria have anionic membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that KTP derivatives perturbed Staphylococcus aureus membrane structure by inducing membrane blebbing, disruption and lysis. In addition, these peptides bind to red blood cells but are non-hemolytic. From the KTP derivatives tested, amidated KTP proves to be the most active antibacterial agent. The combination of analgesia and antibacterial activities with absence of toxicity is highly appealing from the clinical point of view and broadens the therapeutic potential and application of kyotorphin peptides.

  15. Analgesic therapy of skeletal metastases with radionuclides; Schmerztherapie von Skelettmetastasen mit offenen radioaktiven Stoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinke, R.; Hartung, D.; Helmholz, T.; Otto, H.J. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Fakultaet

    2000-03-01

    The radionculide therapy of bone metastases is an unspecific palliative treatment of metastatic skeletal pain especially useful in patients suffering in multiple sites. In these cases the long-term administration of increasing doses of analgesics such as opiate which have important side effects can be reduced. The aim of this therapy is pain relief and improvement of quality of life in patients with advanced cancer. This report is focusing on options, indications and contraindications of the radionuclide therapy of metastases and on used radionuclides such as Strontium-89, Yttrium-90, Rhenium-186 (188) and Samarium-153. In oncology, the analgesic therapy using boneseeking radiopharmaceuticals in combination to drug adminstration shoud gain more importance because this therapy can be administered on an outpatient basis. (orig.) [German] Die nuklearmedizinische Strahlentherapie von Skelettmetastasen ist eine unspezifische, symptomatisch-palliative Schmerztherapie von ossaeren Metastasen. Sie ist insbesondere bei multiplen Lokalisationen eine erfolgreiche und kostenguenstige Therapieoption, die zu einer Einsparung von Analgetika, v.a. von stark nebenwirkungsbehafteten Opiaten, fuehren kann. Die palliative Schmerztherapie hat das primaere Ziel, bei einem in der Regel fortgeschrittenen Tumorleiden durch die Schmerzlinderung die Lebensqualitaet des Patienten deutlich zu verbessern. In der vorliegenden Arbeit werden die Moeglichkeiten, Indikationen und Kontraindikationen der Radionuklidtherapie vorgestellt und die einzelnen Radiopharmaka, die zur Anwendung kommen koennen (Sr-89, Y-90, Re-186[188], Sm-153), einander gegenuebergestellt. Die nuklearmedizinische Schmerztherapie, die haeufig noch zu weit im Hintergrund steht, sollte als Ergaenzung zur medikamentoesen Therapie weiter in den Blickpunkt der Onkologie gerueckt werden, da sie ohne stationaeren Aufenthalt auch von erfahrenen niedergelassenen Nuklearmedizinern durchgefuehrt werden kann. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of flupirtine maleate and ibuprofen in gynaecological ambulatory surgeries: A randomized controlled trial

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    Vanita Ahuja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Flupirtine maleate is a centrally acting, non-opioid analgesic with unique muscle relaxant properties as compared to common analgesics. The aim of this study was to compare post-operative analgesic efficacy of flupirtine maleate and ibuprofen in patients undergoing gynaecological ambulatory surgeries. Methods: This prospective, randomised controlled study was conducted in 60 women of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I/II, 18-70 years of age and scheduled to undergo gynaecological ambulatory surgeries. The participants were randomised to receive either 100 mg oral flupirtine maleate (group flupirtine, n = 30 or 800 mg oral ibuprofen (group ibuprofen, n = 30, 1 h prior to surgery and then every 8 h for 48 h. Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS on movement was assessed at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h following surgery. Following discharge from hospital, the patients were interviewed telephonically at 12, 24 and 48 h post-operatively. VNRS was statistically analysed using Mann-Whitney test. Results: VNRS on movement was statistically reduced at 2 h after surgery (P = 0.04 in group flupirtine as compared to group ibuprofen. The analgesic efficacy was similar in both the groups at 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after surgery. The satisfaction scores at 24 and 48 h post-operatively were superior in group flupirtine as compared to group ibuprofen (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Analgesic efficacy of flupirtine maleate was comparable with ibuprofen in patients in ambulatory gynaecological patients up to 48 h postoperatively with superior satisfaction scores.

  17. Analgesic activity and safety of ash of silver used in Indian system of medicine in mice: A reverse pharmacological study

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    Deep Inder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the analgesic activity of ash of silver used in Indian system of medicine and to explore its safety. Materials and Methods: Albino mice of either sex (20-30 gm were used to investigate the role of ash of silver against noxious stimuli: thermal (Eddy′s hot plate and analgesiometer, mechanical (tail clip, and chemical (0.6% acetic acid induced writhing. An effort was made to find nature and site of action of ash of silver following naloxone pre-treatment. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD and lethal dosage 50 (LD50 were also studied along with toxicological aspects of ash of silver. Results: Test drug (ash of silver at a dose of 50 mg/kg p.o exhibited analgesic activity against thermal, mechanical, and chemical stimuli. Analgesic effects were compared with the standard drug, morphine, in thermal and mechanical noxious stimuli and to aspirin in chemical stimulus. Analgesic activity of the test drug was reduced following naloxone pre-treatment. MTD was found out to be greater than 1.5 g/kg p.o. LD50 was 2 g/kg p.o. Fraction of mice showed symptoms of argyria as explained by autopsy reports. Conclusion: Test drug exhibited moderate analgesic activity at 50 mg/kg p.o against all type of noxious stimuli, also suggesting a role of opioidergic system. The ash of silver was been found to be safe upto a dose of 1.5 g/kg p.o. in mice without any untoward toxicity. Further studies are required to explore the effect of ash of silver on pain mediators and excitatory neurotransmitters like glutamate, aspartate, or N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA.

  18. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects of Securidaca longepedunculata (Fresen.) [Polygalaceae] root-bark aqueous extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojewole, J A O

    2008-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties of Securidaca longepedunculata (Fresen.) root-bark aqueous extract (SLE) in mice and rats. The analgesic effect of SLE was evaluated by 'hot-plate' and 'acetic acid' analgesic test methods in mice; while its anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects were examined in rats, using fresh egg albumin-induced pedal oedema, and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus models. Morphine (MPN, 10 mg/kg), diclofenac (DIC, 100 mg/kg) and chlorpropamide (250 mg/kg) were used as reference drugs for comparison. SLE (50-800 mg/kg i. p.) produced dose-dependent, significant (p < 0.05-0.001) analgesic effects against thermally- and chemically-induced nociceptive pain in mice. The plant's extract (SLE, 50-800 mg/kg p. o.) also dose-dependently and significantly inhibited (p < 0.05-0.001) fresh egg albumin-induced acute inflammation, and caused significant hypoglycaemia (p < 0.05-0.001) in normal (normoglycaemic) and STZ-treated diabetic (hyperglycaemic) rats. The results of this experimental animal study indicate that S. longepedunculata root-bark aqueous extract (SLE) possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties. These findings lend pharmacological credence to the anecdotal, folkloric and ethnomedical uses of S. longepedunculata root-bark in the treatment, management and/or control of painful, arthritic, inflammatory conditions, as well as in the management and/or control of type 2 diabetes mellitus in some rural communities of South Africa. PMID:18046514

  19. Single-patient data meta-analysis of 3453 postoperative patients: oral tramadol versus placebo, codeine and combination analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R A; McQuay, H J

    1997-02-01

    The analgesic effectiveness and safety of oral tramadol were compared with standard analgesics using a meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomised controlled trials in patients with moderate or severe pain after surgery or dental extraction. Calculation of %maxTOTPAR from individual patient data, and the use of > 50%maxTOTPAR defined clinically acceptable pain relief. Number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for one patient to have > 50%maxTOTPAR compared with placebo was used to examine the effectiveness of different single oral doses of tramadol and comparator drugs. Eighteen randomised, double-blind, parallel-group single-dose trials with 3453 patients using categorical pain relief scales allowed the calculation of %maxTOTPAR. The use of > 50%maxTOTPAR was a sensitive measure to discriminate between analgesics. Tramadol and comparator drugs gave significantly more analgesia than placebo. In postsurgical pain tramadol 50, 100 and 150 mg had NNTs for > 50%maxTOTPAR of 7.1 (95% confidence intervals 4.6-18), 4.8 (3.4-8.2) and 2.4 (2.0-3.1), comparable with aspirin 650 mg plus codeine 60 mg (NNT 3.6 (2.5-6.3)) and acetaminophen 650 mg plus propoxyphene 100 mg (NNT 4.0 (3.0-5.7)). With the same dose of drug postsurgical patients had more pain relief than those having dental surgery. Tramadol showed a dose-response for analgesia in both postsurgical and dental pain patients. With the same dose of drug postsurgical pain patients had fewer adverse events than those having dental surgery. Adverse events (headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, somnolence) with tramadol 50 mg and 100 mg had a similar incidence to comparator drugs. There was a dose response with tramadol, tending towards higher incidences at higher doses. Single-patient meta-analysis using more than half pain relief provides a sensitive description of the analgesic properties of a drug, and NNT calculations allow comparisons to be made with standard analgesics. Absolute ranking of analgesic performance

  20. Combined analgesics in (headache pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

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    Fiebich Bernd L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix" are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, paracetamol (acetaminophen and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden

  1. Comparative study of intrathecal pethidine versus lignocaine as an anaesthetic and a postoperative analgesic for perianal surgery.

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    Chaudhari L

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available 100 patients with ASA risk I & II and undergoing perianal surgery were studied for anaesthetic effects and postoperative analgesia following either intrathecal pethidine or lignocaine. Saddle block was performed either with intrathecal pethidine 5% (50 mg/ml 0.5 mg/kg or 1 ml of 5% lignocaine. Sensory and motor block postoperative analgesia, need for additional analgesia were studied. The onset of sensory and motor blockade with lignocaine was faster than pethidine. However the sensory and motor blockade lasted longer with pethidine. The duration of postoperative analgesia was 15.39 +/- 5.14 hours as against duration of postoperative analgesia with lignocaine which was 1.3 +/- 0.53 hours. Only 10% of patients in the pethidine group required intramuscular analgesic supplementation whereas 30% of patients in the lignocaine group required intramuscular analgesic supplementation.

  2. PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING AND THE EVALUATION OF THE ANTIOXIDANT, ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANALGESIC PROPERTIES OF THE PLANT IPOMOEA MAURITANA (FAMILY: CONVOVULACEAE

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    Mahadhi Hasan Md.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ipomoea mauritiana is an important medicinal plant having widespread application in a variety of disorders. The aim of this study was the phytochemical investigation and evaluation of the anti-oxidant, anti-microbial and analgesic activities of the whole plant Ipomoea mauritiana. Phytochemical screening of the ethanolic extract of Ipomoea mauritiana ensured the presence of Alkaloids, Tannins, Steroids, Gums, Glycosides, Carbohydrate and Saponins. The anti-oxidant activity was measured by DPPH free radical scavenging activity (IC50 = 164 µg/ml. The crude ethanolic extract did not reveal any significant anti-microbial activity. The crude ethanolic extract of the tubers of Ipomoea mauritiana exhibited significant analgesic activity at a dose of 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg with 71.15% and 80.77 % inhibition of writhing respectively.

  3. EVALUATION OF ANALGESIC AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF DIFFERENT FRACTIONS OF CRUDE METHANOL EXTRACT OF TINOSPORA CRISPA STEM.

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    Md. Ariful Islam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tinospora crispa, a plant belonging to the family of Menispermaceae is a well-known traditional medicinal plant used in Bangladesh. This study has carried out to evaluate the analgesic (by acetic acid induced writhing test activities by using Swiss albino mice as a test animal. At a dose of 400 mg/kg body weight, the crude methanol extract and its other fractions of stem significantly (p<0.05 produced inhibition of writhing compared to the Standard (Diclofenac Sodium. Among all the fractions, Petroleum ether soluble fraction showed most significant analgesic activity (51.94% compare with standard (65.12%. In addition the crude extract and its fraction showed no significant antimicrobial activities against five gram-positive, eight gram-negative bacteria and three fungi compare to the standard (kanamycin.

  4. The experience of childbrith in first-time mothers who received narcotic analgesics during the first stage of labour

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    L. Jantjes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This research has focused on the birthing experience of first-time mothers who received the narcotic analgesic combination of Pethidine and Hydroxyzine during the first stage of labour. A qualitative research methodology was used to collect data. Unstructured interviews were held with first-time mothers to obtain accounts of their experience of childbirth. These narrations were audio-taped while the participants were still being cared for in the postnatal ward of the hospital where delivery took place. Nine interviews were conducted with first-time mothers who gave birth normally vaginally after a normal pregnancy and who received a narcotic analgesic in the first stage of labour. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using Tesch’s method of descriptive analysis (in Creswell, 1994:115.

  5. EXTRACTION AND PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF MIKANIA SCANDENS LINN. AND EVALUATION OF ITS METHANOLIC EXTRACT FOR ANALGESIC ACTIVITY

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    Raja Chakraverty and Sudeshna Saha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mikania scandens is a rapidly growing herbaceous to semi-woody, perennial vine. It grows quickly over other plants such as young trees, smothering them; it can climb trees up to 25 m tall. Although not as serious a weed as M. chordate, in Southeast Asia it has become a hard to eradicate weed of tea, rubber, and other plantation crops. It also reduces the carrying capacity of pasture. The achenes are spread by wind, water and animals. The plant also reproduces by old rootstocks, runners and suckers. It is still under investigation. Although it has some analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, but these uses are not widely accepted till now. Folkloric uses include utilisation of the herb as an anticoagulant or other medicinal purpose. The aim of the undertaken work is to identify and isolate the chemical constituents of the plant Mikania scandens and to evaluate its reported analgesic activity.

  6. [Study of analgesic efficacy of propacetamol in the postoperative period using a double blind placebo controlled method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoda, V V; Maiachkin, R B

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency and safety of postoperative use of propacetamol was estimated in 30 patients by means of double blind placebo controlled method. The first group consisted of 15 patients to whom propacetamol was introduced intravenously in single dose of 2 g along with patient controlled anesthesia with promedol. Placebo in combination with patient control anesthesia were used in 15 patients from the 2nd group. Intravenous introducing of propacetamol in dose of 2 g in 15 minutes provides relief of pain intensity in postoperative period. So it permits to consider propacetamol as basic non-opioid analgesic. In early postoperative period combination of propacetamol and opioid analgesic (promedol) reduces demands in the latter by 44%. PMID:12462772

  7. Pharmacological screening of plants recommended by folk medicine as anti-snake venom: I. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

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    Bettina M. Ruppelt

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available We have observed that several plants used popularly as anti-snake venom show anti-inflammatory activity. From the list prepared by Rizzini, Mors and Pereira some species have been selected and tested for analgesic activity (number of contortions and anti-inflammatory activity (Evans blue dye diffusion - 1% solution according to Whittle's technique (intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 N-acetic acid 0.1 ml/10 g in mice. Previous oral administration of a 10% infusion (dry plant or 20% (fresh plant corresponding to 1 or 2 g/Kg of Apuleia leiocarpa, Casearia sylvestris, Brunfelsia uniflora, Chiococca brachiata, Cynara scolymus, Dorstenia brasiliensis, Elephantopus scaber, Marsypianthes chamaedrys, Mikania glomerata and Trianosperma tayuya demonstrated analgesic and/or anti-inflammatory activities of varied intensity

  8. PRELIMINARY PHYTOCHEMICAL, ANTI-BACTERIAL, ANALGESIC, ANTI-DIARRHOEAL AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF METHANOLIC EXTRACT OF POLYALTHIA SUBEROSA LEAVES

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    S.M. Moazzem Hossen et al.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The MeOH extract of leaves of Polyalthia suberosa Roxb. (Annonaceae was screened for its antibacterial, analgesic, Antidiarrhoeal and cytotoxic activities. The extract showed moderate anti-bacterial activity against Vibrio cholerae, Sheigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus saprophyticus. It also produced significant (P<0.01 writhing inhibition in acetic acid induced writhing in mice at dose of 250 and 500 mg/kg, which was comparable to the standard drug diclofenac sodium. Moreover, when tested for its antidiarrhoeal effects on castor oil induced diarrhea in mice, it decreased the frequency of defecation and increased mean latent period significantly (P<0.01 at the dose of 500 mg/kg comparable to the standard drug loperamide. The extract also exhibited high level of cytotoxicity in brine shrimp lethality bioassay (LC50: 30 µg/ml. The overall results tend to suggest the antibacterial, analgesic, antidiarrhoeal and cytotoxic activities of the extract.

  9. A comparative study of efficacy of gabapentin in inflammation induced neuropathic animal pain models with conventional analgesic diclofenac

    OpenAIRE

    Arunim Swarup; Ruchika Agarwal; Sunil Malhotra; Abhay Shankar Dube

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some antiepileptic drugs have been shown to be clinically efficacious in treatment of neuropathic pain and are being used by clinicians. This study is proposed to evaluate the efficacy of these drugs as compared to conventional analgesics. Methods: Formalin test has been used as the model of acute and chronic inflammatory pain. Formalin has been characterized by the occurrence of two characteristic phases of increased pain sensitivity in rats. The ...

  10. Intrathecal ziconotide: a review of its use in patients with chronic pain refractory to other systemic or intrathecal analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Ziconotide (Prialt(®)) is a synthetic conopeptide analgesic that acts by selectively antagonizing N-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Intrathecal ziconotide is the only non-opioid intrathecal analgesic that is FDA-approved for use in patients with treatment-refractory, chronic pain. The efficacy of intrathecal ziconotide was demonstrated in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in patients with treatment-refractory noncancer-related pain or cancer- or AIDS-related pain. Across trials, ziconotide recipients had significantly greater reductions in pain intensity during ziconotide treatment than those receiving placebo (primary endpoint). At the end of the titration period, approximately one-sixth to one-third of patients with noncancer chronic pain and one-half with cancer- or AIDS-related pain who received ziconotide reached a pain response threshold (≥30 % reduction in the pain intensity score). In ziconotide responders, analgesic effects were enduring, with some patients continuing treatment over extended periods. Across trials, the chief tolerability concerns in ziconotide recipients during the titration phase and during extended treatment were related to CNS adverse events. These were mostly of mild to moderate intensity, although serious adverse events were commonly attributed to ziconotide treatment, especially in trials with rapid ziconotide titration and that permitted higher dosages. In general, clinically important non-CNS adverse events were infrequent, and during the ziconotide titration phase, relatively few patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events. Ongoing research will assess various strategies for selecting patients for ziconotide treatment and for enhancing its efficacy and tolerability. At the present time, intrathecal ziconotide provides a treatment option for patients with severe, unremitting pain who have failed to respond to other intensive analgesic regimens. PMID:23999971

  11. Effect of single dose pretreatment analgesia with three different analgesics on postoperative endodontic pain: A randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Priyank Sethi; Manish Agarwal; Hemant Ramesh Chourasia; Mahesh Pratap Singh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the aims of root canal treatment is to prevent or eliminate pain. Postoperative endodontic pain control continues to be a significant challenge. Aim: To compare and evaluate the effect of single oral dose of 100 mg of tapentadol, 400 mg of etodolac, or 10 mg of ketorolac as a pretreatment analgesic for the prevention and control of postoperative endodontic pain in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The incidence of side effects was recorded as secondary ...

  12. Assessment of an Orofacial Operant Pain Assay as a Preclinical Tool for Evaluating Analgesic Efficacy in Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Harvey E; Queeney, Timothy J; Dunbar, Misha L; Eichner, Michael C; Del Castillo, Dania I; Battles, August H; Neubert, John K.

    2015-01-01

    A model system capable of providing clinically relevant analgesic doses with minimal trauma has been elusive in laboratory animal medicine. Our laboratory has developed an orofacial operant pain system that effectively discriminates between nonnoxious and noxious thermal stimuli in rats and mice. Male and female rats (Crl:SD) and mice (Crl:SKR-HRhr) were trained to perform a task (placing their face through an opening and having their cheeks stay in contact with thermodes) to receive a reward...

  13. Comparing the analgesic effect of heat patch containing iron chip and ibuprofen for primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Navvabi Rigi, Shahindokht; Kermansaravi, Fatihe; Navidian, Ali; Safabakhsh, Leila; Safarzadeh, Ameneh; Khazaian, Somaye; Shafie, Shahla; Salehian, Tahmineh

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary dysmenorrhea is a common and sometimes disabling condition. In recent years, some studies aimed to improve the treatment of dysmenorrhea, and therefore, introduced several therapeutic measures. This study was designed to compare the analgesic effect of iron chip containing heat wrap with ibuprofen for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. Methods In this randomized (IRCT201107187038N2) controlled trial, 147 students (18–30 years old) with the diagnosis of primary dysmenorr...

  14. Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) have a clinically relevant analgesic effect on different pain conditions? A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Asami Naka; Mohammed Keilani; Stefan Loefler; Richard Crevenna

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a standard therapy used in different painful conditions such as low back pain, diabetic polyneuropathy or arthrosis. However, literature reviews focusing on the effects and the clinical implication of this method in various painful conditions are yet scarce. The purpose of this literature research was to determine, whether TENS provides an analgesic effect on common painful conditions in clinical practice. Literature research was performed u...

  15. Evaluation of ethanol and aqueous extracts of cinnamomum verum leaf galls for potential antioxidant and analgesic activity

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    Minakshi Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, ethanol and aqueous extracts of leaf galls of Cinnamomum verum were prepared to evaluate the antioxidant activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging assay and superoxide radical scavenging assay with ascorbic acid as a standard, and analgesic activity by tail immersion test and acetic acid-induced writhing test methods using diclofenac sodium as the reference drug. Swiss albino mice maintained under standard laboratory conditions were used for analgesic tests. In the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay it was found that the aqueous and the ethanol extract possessed almost equal capacity to inhibit free radicals (IC 50 =13.3 and 13.53 µg/ml but found less than ascorbic acid (IC 50 =9.96 µg/ml. And in superoxide assay the ethanol extract was found to be more potent in scavenging super oxide radicals when compared to ascorbic acid and the aqueous extract (IC 50 =237.1 and 197.8 µg/ml with the IC 50 =119.7 µg/ml. For analgesic activity, ethanol extract showed the maximum time required for response against thermal stimuli (6.75±0.47 s and maximum % of writhing inhibition (44.57% when compared to aqueous extract (5.25±0.48 s and 32.61%, whereas diclofenac showed response in 7.25±0.25 s 67.39% inhibition in tail immersion and writhing tests, respectively. These results demonstrate that the ethanol extracts of leaf galls possessed high antioxidant and analgesic activity.

  16. Evaluation of Ethanol and Aqueous extracts of Cinnamomum verum Leaf Galls for Potential Antioxidant and Analgesic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Minakshi; Chandra, D R

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, ethanol and aqueous extracts of leaf galls of Cinnamomum verum were prepared to evaluate the antioxidant activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging assay and superoxide radical scavenging assay with ascorbic acid as a standard, and analgesic activity by tail immersion test and acetic acid-induced writhing test methods using diclofenac sodium as the reference drug. Swiss albino mice maintained under standard laboratory conditions were used for analgesic tests. In the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay it was found that the aqueous and the ethanol extract possessed almost equal capacity to inhibit free radicals (IC50=13.3 and 13.53 µg/ml) but found less than ascorbic acid (IC50=9.96 µg/ml). And in superoxide assay the ethanol extract was found to be more potent in scavenging super oxide radicals when compared to ascorbic acid and the aqueous extract (IC50=237.1 and 197.8 µg/ml) with the IC50=119.7 µg/ml. For analgesic activity, ethanol extract showed the maximum time required for response against thermal stimuli (6.75±0.47 s) and maximum % of writhing inhibition (44.57%) when compared to aqueous extract (5.25±0.48 s and 32.61%), whereas diclofenac showed response in 7.25±0.25 s 67.39% inhibition in tail immersion and writhing tests, respectively. These results demonstrate that the ethanol extracts of leaf galls possessed high antioxidant and analgesic activity. PMID:26009661

  17. To study the pattern, efficacy and tolerability of analgesic self medication among undergraduate medical students: a questionnaire based survey

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    Krishna Tanwar; Shobhana Mathur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-medication is widely prevalent among medical students. Sufficient data is still lacking in India. The present study was aimed to determine the pattern, efficacy and, tolerability of analgesic self-medication among undergraduate medical students. Methods: This was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. A structured questionnaire was given to medical students aged 18-24 years. Results were expressed in numbers and percentage. Results: In the present study, 130 stude...

  18. To study the pattern, efficacy and tolerability of analgesic self medication among undergraduate medical students: a questionnaire based survey

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    Krishna Tanwar

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Our study showed a high prevalence (77.8% of analgesic self medication among medical students. Paracetamol was the most common drug consumed, followed by other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. A high incidence of side effects observed. It is necessary to create more awareness regarding possible harmful effects of self-medication and ways to minimize them. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 446-448

  19. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of low-level laser therapy on the postoperative healing process

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    Fabre, Hebert S. C.; Navarro, Ricardo L.; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula V.P.; Oliveira, Rodrigo F.; Pires-Oliveira, Deise A. A.; Andraus, Rodrigo A. C.; Fuirini, Nelson; Fernandes, Karen B. P.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of intraoral application of low-level laser therapy (660 nm) to control pain, swelling and interincisal opening following the extraction of mandibular third molars. [Subjects and Methods] Ten patients underwent removal of lower third molars using the same surgical protocol and pharmacological approach. In the postoperative period, all patients received four consecutive daily sessions of low-level laser therapy,...

  20. Effects of the extracts from Mitragyna speciosa Korth. leaves on analgesic and behavioral activities in experimental animals

    OpenAIRE

    Kitja Sawangjaroen; Wantana Reanmongkol; Niwat Keawpradub

    2007-01-01

    The leaves of Mitragyna speciosa Korth. (M. speciosa) were extracted with methanol to give methanol extract. The methanol extract was made in acid and then in alkaline and extracted with chloroform to give alkaloid extract. The effects of the methanol and alkaloid extracts on analgesic activities in hot plate test in mice and tail flick test in rats and behavioral activities in locomotor activity and pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice, were examined. In acute toxicity test, the LD50 values o...

  1. Analgesic activity of a novel use-dependent sodium channel blocker, crobenetine, in mono-arthritic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Laird, J M A; Carter, A J; Grauert, M; Cervero, F

    2001-01-01

    Although sodium channel blockers are effective analgesics in neuropathic pain, their effectiveness in inflammatory pain has been little studied. Sodium channels are substantially up-regulated in inflamed tissue, which suggests they play a role in maintenance of chronic inflammatory pain. We have examined the effects of sodium channel blockers on mobility, joint hyperalgesia and inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injected in one ankle joint of adult rats. The clinically effecti...

  2. Effects of lidocaine and esmolol infusions on hemodynamic changes, analgesic requirement, and recovery in laparoscopic cholecystectomy operations

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    Serpil Dagdelen Dogan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: We compared the effects of lidocaine and esmolol infusions on intraoperative hemodynamic changes, intraoperative and postoperative analgesic requirements, and recovery in laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. METHODS: The first group (n = 30 received IV lidocaine infusions at a rate of 1.5 mg/kg/min and the second group (n = 30 received IV esmolol infusions at a rate of 1 mg/kg/min. Hemodynamic changes, intraoperative and postoperative analgesic requirements, and recovery characteristics were evaluated. RESULTS: In the lidocaine group, systolic arterial blood pressures values were lower after the induction of anesthesia and at 20 min following surgical incision (p < 0.05. Awakening time was shorter in the esmolol group (p < 0.001; Ramsay Sedation Scale scores at 10 min after extubation were lower in the esmolol group (p < 0.05. The modified Aldrete scores at all measurement time points during the recovery period were relatively lower in the lidocaine group (p < 0.05. The time to attain a modified Aldrete score of ≥9 points was prolonged in the lidocaine group (p < 0.01. Postoperative resting and dynamic VAS scores were higher in the lidocaine group at 10 and 20 min after extubation (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively. Analgesic supplements were less frequently required in the lidocaine group (p < 0.01. CONCLUSION: In laparoscopic cholecystectomies, lidocaine infusion had superiorities over esmolol infusions regarding the suppression of responses to tracheal extubation and postoperative need for additional analgesic agents in the long run, while esmolol was more advantageous with respect to rapid recovery from anesthesia, attenuation of early postoperative pain, and modified Aldrete recovery (MAR scores and time to reach MAR score of 9 points.

  3. Analgesic action of suspended moxibustion in rats with chronic visceral hyperalgesia correlates with enkephalins in the spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Yi; Li Qi; Huangan Wu; Xiaopeng Ma; Huirong Liu; Xiaomei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Rats that modeled chronic visceral hyperalgesia received suspended moxibustion at bilateral Tianshu (ST25) and Shangjuxu (ST37) once daily over a period of 7 days. Results show that suspended moxibustion significantly depressed abdominal withdrawal reflex scores and increased enkephalin concentration in the spinal cord. The experimental findings suggest that spinal enkephalins contributed to the analgesic effect of suspended moxibustion in rats with chronic visceral hyperalgesia.

  4. Is there a clinical interaction between low molecular weight heparin and non-steroidal analgesics after total hip replacement?

    OpenAIRE

    Weale, A. E.; Warwick, D. J.; Durant, N; Prothero, D.

    1995-01-01

    The benefits of parenteral non-steroidal analgesic drugs and low molecular weight heparin anticoagulants have been shown before, but there is concern that the use of these agents in combination may potentiate haemorrhagic side-effects because of simultaneous inhibition of the clotting cascade and platelet mechanisms of haemostasis. In a prospective controlled trial, 60 patients undergoing total hip replacement were randomised into two groups. Those in one group received intramuscular ketorola...

  5. Microbial and physicochemical assays of paracetamol in different brands of analgesic syrups sold in Sana’a City-Yemen

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    Ali G. Al−Kaf

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Contamination of pharmaceuticals with microorganisms irrespective whether they are harmful or nonpathogenic can bring about changes in physicochemical characteristics of the drugs. Aims: To assay the microbial and physicochemical characteristics of paracetamol of two hundreds samples of different brands of analgesic syrups sold in Sana’a City, Yemen. Methods: Total viable aerobic count, type of isolated microorganisms, physical properties, and content of active ingredients were identified and evaluated by standard methods and techniques. The SPSS program was used to statistical analysis of variance for results obtained. Results: The total bacterial count of <10 CFU/mL and <100 CFU/mL in 179 (89.5% and 21 (10.5% samples, respectively was recorded, while the total fungal count was ≤10 CFU/mL in all analyzed syrup samples. The isolated bacteria were Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus fulvum, and Staphylococcus epidermidis while isolated fungi were Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Penicillium notatum. Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger were the predominant bacteria and fungi isolated. The color results had a light red liquid with a sweet taste in the analyzed analgesic syrups. The pH values were ranged from 4.44–5.88. However, the density fluctuated from 1.149–1.184 g/mL. The paracetamol concentration as an active ingredient in the analgesic syrup was recorded from 98.19% – 106.53%. Conclusions: This finding showed that all analgesic syrups sold in Sana’a City followed Pharmacopeia specifications on microbial and physicochemical qualities.

  6. A drug utilization study of analgesics for management of postoperative pain in patients admitted at a tertiary care teaching hospital

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    Jignesh S. Chaudhari

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: 112 patients from diclofenac only received group and 13 patients from diclofenac + tramadol received group complain of post operative pain. Post-operative pain control at 12 hours is sufficient but high post-operative pain scores at 18 hour of post-operative time interval suggesting needs of additional pain control. Majority of study patients received single analgesic (Diclofenac sodium. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(6.000: 757-762

  7. Superior Analgesic Effect of an Active Distraction versus Pleasant Unfamiliar Sounds and Music: The Influence of Emotion and Cognitive Style

    OpenAIRE

    Garza Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Brattico, Elvira; Vase, Lene; Østergaard, Leif; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Listening to music has been found to reduce acute and chronic pain. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood; however, emotion and cognitive mechanisms have been suggested to influence the analgesic effect of music. In this study we investigated the influence of familiarity, emotional and cognitive features, and cognitive style on music-induced analgesia. Forty-eight healthy participants were divided into three groups (empathizers, systemizers and balanced) and received acute pain indu...

  8. Superior Analgesic Effect of an Active Distraction versus Pleasant Unfamiliar Sounds and Music: The Influence of Emotion and Cognitive Style.

    OpenAIRE

    Garza Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Elvira Brattico; Lene Vase; Leif Østergaard; Peter Vuust

    2012-01-01

    Listening to music has been found to reduce acute and chronic pain. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood; however, emotion and cognitive mechanisms have been suggested to influence the analgesic effect of music. In this study we investigated the influence of familiarity, emotional and cognitive features, and cognitive style on music-induced analgesia. Forty-eight healthy participants were divided into three groups (empathizers, systemizers and balanced) and received acute pain indu...

  9. Correlation of Pain Scores, Analgesic Use, and Beck Anxiety Inventory Scores During Hospitalization in Lower Extremity Amputees

    OpenAIRE

    Trame, Cathy D; Greene, Erin; Moddeman, Gail; Booth, Branyan A; Konstantakos, Emmanuel K; Parada, Stephen; Siebuhr, Karl; Laughlin, Richard T.

    2008-01-01

    Post amputation pain can be debilitating for patients and families. Chronic pain is a common phenomenon after lower extremity amputation, occurring in up to 80% of this population. The purpose of this pilot study was to correlate post amputation pain scores to opioid analgesic consumption and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) scores. Twenty-three patients with lower extremity amputation at an 827-bed acute care inner-city hospital were surveyed pre-operatively and post-operatively to determine if ...

  10. Perioperative analgesic requirements in severely obese adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted gastric sleeve resection

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    Anita Joselyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: One of the major advantages for patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery as compared to an open surgical procedure is the improved recovery profile and decreased opioid requirements in the perioperative period. There are no definitive studies comparing the analgesic requirements in patients undergoing two different types of minimally invasive procedure. This study retrospectively compares the perioperative analgesic requirements in severely obese adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted, laparoscopic gastric sleeve resection. Materials and Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, the medication administration records of all severely obese patients who underwent gastric sleeve resection were retrospectively reviewed. Intra-operative analgesic and adjuvant medications administered, postoperative analgesic requirements, and visual analog pain scores were compared between those undergoing a laparoscopic procedure versus a robotic-assisted procedure. Results: This study cohort included a total of 28 patients who underwent gastric sleeve resection surgery with 14 patients in the laparoscopic group and 14 patients in the robotic-assisted group. Intra-operative adjuvant administration of both intravenous acetaminophen and ketorolac was similar in both groups. Patients in the robotic-assisted group required significantly less opioid during the intra-operative period as compared to patients in the laparoscopic group (0.15 ± 0.08 mg/kg vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 mg/kg morphine, P = 0.024. Cumulative opioid requirements for the first 72 postoperative h were similar in both the groups (0.64 ± 0.25 vs. 0.68 ± 0.27 mg/kg morphine, P = NS. No difference was noted in the postoperative pain scores. Conclusion: Although intraoperative opioid administration was lower in the robotic-assisted group, the postoperative opioid requirements, and the postoperative pain scores were similar in both groups.

  11. Pharmacological evaluation of Mallotus philippinensis (Lam. Muell.-Arg. fruit hair extract for Anti-Inflammatory, Analgesic and Hypnotic Activity

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    Mayank Gangwar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently we observed wound healing activity of 50% ethanol extract of Mallotus philippinensis Muell. Arg (MP fruit hairs extract (MPE. In several intestinal infections, localized inflammation is of common occurrence and hence we evaluated the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE in different rat experimental models. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan (acute and turpentine oil induced formalin (subacute induced paw oedema and while, granuloma pouch (subacute in rats. Analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE was undertaken by tail-flick, hot and ndash;plate and acetic acid-induced writhing tests while pentobarbitone-induced hypnotic potentiation respectively in rats.\tMPE at a dose of 200 mg/kg at 3 hr after their administration showed inhibition of formalin-induced paw oedema by 41.60% (P<0.001 and carrageenan-induced paw oedema by 55.30% (P<0.001. After 7 days of treatments, MPE showed 38.0% (P<0.001 inhibition against formalin-induced paw oedema and reduced weight of turpentine-induced granuloma pouch by 29.6% (P<0.01 and volume of exudates by 26.1% (P<0.01 respectively. MPE (200 mg/kg showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 120 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail flick method and increased reaction time in hot-plate test while reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 45.7% (P<0.001. The pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis model showed potentiation, as defined by increased duration of sleep in treated group rats as compared to control. Thus, the study revealed MPE is effective in reducing acute and sub-acute inflammation and showed effective and similar analgesic activity. This seemed to be safe in the treatment of pain and inflammation. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 14-21

  12. ANALGESIC, PHYTOCHEMICAL AND ACUTE TOXICITY EVALUATION OF THE METHANOL EXTRACT OF THE LEAVES OF PTEROCARPUS SANTALINOIDES- FAMILY FABACEA

    OpenAIRE

    C.F. Anowi

    2012-01-01

    Pterocarpus santalinoides, family- Fabaceae was claimed to have analgesic properties. The people of Ogidi in Idemili North Local Government Area of Anambra State, Nigeria used it in the management of aches and pains. This study is therefore aimed at determining this claim of the activities of Pterocarpus santalinoides using the leaves which will serve as a criterion to recommend the ethno pharmacological use of the plant. The leaves of Pterocarpus santalinoides family Fabaceae were dried, pow...

  13. Therapeutic potential of vanilloid receptor TRPV1 agonists and antagonists as analgesics: Recent advances and setbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gilbert Y; Gavva, Narender R

    2009-04-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is a homotetrameric, non-selective cation channel abundantly expressed in the nociceptors (c-fibers). TRPV1 is considered as a highly validated pain target because, i) its agonists such as capsaicin cause desensitization of TRPV1 channels that relieves pain behaviors in preclinical species, and ii) its antagonists relieve pain behaviors in rodent models of inflammation, osteoarthritis, and cancer. Hence, both agonists and antagonists of TRPV1 are being evaluated as potential analgesics in clinical trials. Clinical trial results of TRPV1 agonists such as resiniferatoxin in interstitial cystitis, NGX 4010 in post-herpetic neuralgia, and 4975 (Adlea) in osteoarthritis, bunionectomy, and Morton's neuroma have been reported. Similarly, clinical trial results of TRPV1 antagonists such as SB-705498 and AMG 517 have also been published recently. Overall, some molecules (e.g., capsaicin) demonstrated potential analgesia in certain conditions (postsurgical pain, postherpetic neuralgia, pain in diabetic neuropathy, osteoarthritis, bunionectomy, and Morton's neuroma), whereas others fell out of the clinic due to on-target liabilities or failed to demonstrate efficacy. This review summarizes recent advances and setbacks of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists in the clinic and predicts future directions. PMID:19150372

  14. Effects of some analgesic anaesthetic drugs on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, Murat; Irfan Kufrevioglu, O; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2009-04-01

    Inhibitory effects of some analgesic and anaesthetic drugs on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase were investigated. For this purpose, human erythrocyte glutathione reductase was initially purified 2139-fold in a yield of 29% by using 2', 5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity gel and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed the purity of the enzyme by sharing a single band. A constant temperature (+4 degrees C) was maintained during the purification process. Diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, lornoxicam, tenoxicam, etomidate, morphine and propofol exhibited inhibitory effects on the enzyme in vitro using the Beutler assay method. K(i) constants and IC(50) values for drugs were determined from Lineweaver-Burk graphs and plotting activity % versus [I] graphs, respectively. The IC(50) values of diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, lornoxicam, propofol, tenoxicam, etomidate and morphine were 7.265, 6.278, 0.3, 0.242, 0.082, 0.0523 and 0.0128 mM and the K(i) constants were 23.97 +/- 2.1, 22.14 +/- 7.6, 0.42 +/- 0.18, 0.418 +/- 0.056, 0.13 +/- 0.025, 0.0725 +/- 0.0029 and 0.0165 +/- 0.0013 mM, respectively. While diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, lornoxicam, tenoxicam etomidate and morphine showed competitive inhibition, propofol displayed noncompetitive inhibition. PMID:18608753

  15. Analgesic and Antioxidant Activities of Algerian Retama raetam (Forssk. Webb & Berthel Extracts

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    Samah Djeddi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Part of this work deals with t he isolation and structure elucidation of the main polar secondary metabolites of the aerial parts of Retama raetam (Forssk. Webb & Berthel, as well as the evaluation of their potential analgesic properties , while the rest deals with the antioxidant activities of the aqueous extracts of roots, stem, fruits and flowers of the plant . It was found that the isoflavones g enistein 1, 6-hydroxygenistein 2, 3'-O-methylorobol 3, pratensein 4, biochanin A 8, the flavones 6-hydroxyapigenin 7 and luteolin 5, the flavonol kaempferol 6,as well as the phenolic compound p-coumaric acid 9 reduce significantly the pain at a concentration dose of 1 mg/kg. The most active compounds were 3 and 8 (86.19% and 75.23%, respectively. The obtained aqueous extracts of R. raetam were also evaluated for their antioxidant activities using two different photometric methods; the results revealed that all extracts exerted very low free radical scavenging activity compared to the well-known butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT and lower hydrogen peroxide blocking activity than positive control gallic acid.

  16. Analgesic, Anxiolytic and Anaesthetic Effects of Melatonin: New Potential Uses in Pediatrics

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    Lucia Marseglia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous melatonin is used in a number of situations, first and foremost in the treatment of sleep disorders and jet leg. However, the hypnotic, antinociceptive, and anticonvulsant properties of melatonin endow this neurohormone with the profile of a drug that modulates effects of anesthetic agents, supporting its potential use at different stages during anesthetic procedures, in both adults and children. In light of these properties, melatonin has been administered to children undergoing diagnostic procedures requiring sedation or general anesthesia, such as magnetic resonance imaging, auditory brainstem response tests and electroencephalogram. Controversial data support the use of melatonin as anxiolytic and antinociceptive agents in pediatric patients undergoing surgery. The aim of this review was to evaluate available evidence relating to efficacy and safety of melatonin as an analgesic and as a sedative agent in children. Melatonin and its analogs may have a role in antinociceptive therapies and as an alternative to midazolam in premedication of adults and children, although its effectiveness is still controversial and available data are clearly incomplete.

  17. Analgesic activity of catalpol in rodent models of neuropathic pain, and its spinal mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingbin; Zhang, Rongzhi; Xie, Jianqin; Lu, Jianzhong; Yue, Zhongjin

    2014-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a major health issue that represents considerable social and economic burden worldwidely. In this study, we investigated the potential of catalpol, an iridoid glucoside of Rehmannia glutinosa Steud, to alleviate neuropathic pain. The potential analgesic effects of catalpol were evaluated by chronic constriction injury (CCI) and lumbar 5 spinal nerve ligation (L5 SNL) model. In addition, we explored whether catalpol altered the degree of microglia activation and neuroinflammation in rat spinal cord after CCI induction. Repeated administration of catalpol (1, 5, 25, and 125 mg/kg) reversed mechanical allodynia induced by CCI and L5 SNL in a dose-dependent manner in rats. Levels of activated microglia, activated NF-κB, and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α) in lumber spinal cord were elevated in rats following CCI induction, and catalpol significantly inhibited these effects. Our results demonstrated that catalpol produces significant antinociceptive action in rodent behavioral models of neuropathic pain and that this effect is associated with modulation of neuroinflammation in spinal cord. PMID:24980862

  18. Pharmacology of kratom: an emerging botanical agent with stimulant, analgesic and opioid-like effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozialeck, Walter C; Jivan, Jateen K; Andurkar, Shridhar V

    2012-12-01

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a plant indigenous to Thailand and Southeast Asia. Kratom leaves produce complex stimulant and opioid-like analgesic effects. In Asia, kratom has been used to stave off fatigue and to manage pain, diarrhea, cough, and opioid withdrawal. Recently, kratom has become widely available in the United States and Europe by means of smoke shops and the Internet. Analyses of the medical literature and select Internet sites indicate that individuals in the United States are increasingly using kratom for the self-management of pain and opioid withdrawal. Kratom contains pharmacologically active constituents, most notably mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. Kratom is illegal in many countries. Although it is still legal in the United States, the US Drug Enforcement Administration has placed kratom on its "Drugs and Chemicals of Concern" list. Physicians should be aware of the availability, user habits, and health effects of kratom. Further research on the therapeutic uses, toxic effects, and abuse potential of kratom and its constituent compounds are needed. PMID:23212430

  19. Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Extract from Roots and Leaves of Citrullus lanatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Jia-gang; WANG Shuo; GUO Li-cheng; FAN Li-li

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of extract from the roots and leaves of Citrulluslanatus and assess their acute toxicity in animals.Methods The mouse model with ear edema induced by xyleneand the rat model with paw edema or granuloma by carrageenin or cotton pellet were used for anti-inflammatoryeffects of the extract.Effects of the extract on analgesia was tested respectively by measuring the latency of micelicking hind foot from hot plates and by counting the times of body twisting in response to acetic acid.The acutetoxicity of the extract was determined with the method of Bliss.Results The extract significantly inhibited the earedema,granuloma hyperplasia,and paw edema.It significantly lifted the pain threshold on mouse hot-plateresponses and reduced their writhing times.During the 7 d observation period in its acute toxicity assay,no apparenttoxic reaction was shown and all mice survived at a dose of 87 g extract per kg body weight.Conclusion Theextract could protecte mice/rates from inflammation and analgesia,and may be safe as an orally administered naturalproduct for humans.

  20. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of lavender essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gabriela L da; Luft, Carolina; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Amaral, Robson H; Melo, Denizar A da Silva; Donadio, Márcio V F; Nunes, Fernanda B; de Azambuja, Marcos S; Santana, João C; Moraes, Cristina M B; Mello, Ricardo O; Cassel, Eduardo; Pereira, Marcos Aurélio de Almeida; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have investigated the antinociceptive, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of compounds found in the lavender essential oil (LEO), however to date, there is still lack of substantial data. The objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of lavender essential oil. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical decolorization assay was used for antioxidant activity evaluation. The anti-inflammatory activity was tested using two models of acute inflammation: carrageenan-induced pleurisy and croton oil-induced ear edema. The antinociceptive activity was tested using the pain model induced by formalin. LEO has antioxidant activity, which is dose-dependent response. The inflammatory response evoked by carrageenan and by croton oil was reduced through the pre-treatment of animals with LEO. In the pleurisy model, the drug used as positive control, dexamethasone, was more efficacious. However, in the ear swelling, the antiedematogenic effect of the oil was similar to that observed for dexamethasone. In the formalin test, LEO consistently inhibited spontaneous nociception and presented a similar effect to that of tramadol. The results of this study reveal (in vivo) the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of LEO and demonstrates its important therapeutic potential. PMID:26247152

  1. Opioid Analgesics and Depressive Symptoms in Burn Patients: What Is the Real Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Narei; Jung, Myung Hun; Kim, Jee Wook; Chun, Wook; Choi, Ihn-Geun; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kee, Baik Seok; Lee, Boung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Major burn injuries are strongly associated with both psychological trauma and severe pain, and opioids are the mainstay analgesics for the treatment of severe burn pain. The objectives of this study are to find the complex relationship between opioid dose, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms during the acute management of pain in burn patients. Methods The symptoms of depression and PTSD were assessed in 43 burn patients immediately following wound stabilization and 2 weeks after the initial evaluation. Results Total opioid doses and Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores obtained during the second evaluation were positively but weakly correlated after controlling for age and total burn surface area (R=0.33, p=0.03). Moreover, pain management with opioids was significantly more common in burn patients with low Clinician Administered PTSD Scale scores (evaluation 1) and high HAMD scores (evaluation 2) (F=6.66, p=0.001). Conclusion High opioid dose following acute burn trauma might have correlation with depressive symptoms. Monitoring of depressive symptoms may be important following acute burn trauma and consequent opioids pain management, particularly when PTSD symptoms appear minimal during the early stabilization of patients. PMID:27489384

  2. A forensic toxicological dilemma: the interpretation of post-mortem concentrations of central acting analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daldrup, Th

    2004-06-10

    Dora V., a 88-year-old pensioner suffering from a hiatus hernia, died at the home of an orthopaedist and his wife, an anaesthetist, immediately after she had received a dose of 300 mg pethidine via intravenous infusion in a timeframe of about 90 min. One day before her death a befriended notary of the couple visited Dora V. and obtained a blank signature. After her death, a will was forged using this signature, rendering the couple sole heirs of Dora V.'s estate with a value of several million euros. Post-mortem toxicology was performed in three different institutes of legal medicine. The concentrations of pethidine in peripheral venous blood were between 6.1 and 6.5mg/l and 9.5 and 17.2mg/kg in brain. Pharmacokinetic calculation confirms the given dose. There was no doubt that the cause of death was acute pethidine intoxication. The accused couple claimed that this dose of pethidine was indicated to relief pain, and as the pathologists said in their expert opinions that the hiatus hernia could explain her death, the court had to acquit the accused. This very special case demonstrates that preconceived murder of a sick person with suitable analgesics cannot be proven--at least not with the methods available to forensic toxicology and pathology. This has to be taken into consideration if euthanasia will be legalised under special circumstances. PMID:15172078

  3. ANALGESIC AND ANTI INFLAMMATORY EFFECT OF LEECH THERAPY (JALAUKAVCHARAN IN THE PATIENTS OF OSTEOARTHRITIS (SANDHIGATA VATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Akhilesh Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease is the most common joint disorder. It mostly affects cartilage. The top layer of cartilage breaks down and wears away. Osteoarthritis is of two types, primary (idiopathic and secondary. In idiopathic osteoarthritis, the most common form of the disease, no predisposing factor is apparent. Secondary OA is pathologically indistinguishable from idiopathic OA but is attributable to an underlying cause. The NSAID’S are main drug of choice in modern medicine which have lots of side effect therefore are not safe for long term therapy. Raktamokshan viz bloodletting is one of the ancient and important parasurgical procedure described in Ayurveda for treatment of various diseases. Of them, Jalaukavacharana or Leech Therapy has gained greater attention globally, because of its medicinal values. The saliva of leech contains numerous biologically active substances, which has anti-inflammatory, analgesic as well as anesthetic property. Keeping this view in mind we have started leech therapy in the patients of osteoarthritis and found encouraging results.

  4. Comparison of analgesic effects of nimesulide, paracetamol, and their combination in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mushtaq

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the analgesic activity of nimesulide and paracetamol alone and their combination in animal models for the degree of analgesia and the time course of action. Materials and Methods: Analgesia was studied in albino rats using formalin test and in albino mice using writhing test and the radiant heat method. For each test, four groups of six animals each were orally fed with a single dose of nimesulide, paracetamol, and combination of nimesulide + paracetamol and gum acacia as control, respectively. Results: In all the three test models, all three drug treatments showed significant analgesia (P < 0.001 as compared to control, but there was no significant difference in the analgesia produced by either drugs alone or in combination. The radiant heat method demonstrated a quicker onset and longer duration of action with nimesulide, whereas writhing test showed a quicker onset of action with paracetamol. In formalin test, greater degree of analgesia was seen with individual drugs than that of the combination, though this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Nimesulide and paracetamol combination offers no advantage over nimesulide alone or paracetamol alone, either in terms of degree of analgesia or onset of action. Therefore, our study supports the reports claiming irrationality of the fixed dose combination of nimesulide and paracetamol.

  5. [Analgesic effect of TES therapy in the early postoperative period in patients who underwent tonsillectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semënov, F V; Kade, A Kh; Banashek-Meshchiarkova, T V; Vartanian, M S

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study peculiarities of the analgesic action of therapeutic electrical stimulation (TES therapy) in the early postoperative period in the patients who underwent tonsillectomy. A total of 60 patients admitted for this surgery to the specialized otorhinolaryngological department were available for observation. They were divided into two groups depending on the pain relief strategy. The patients of the study group (n=30) underwent courses of transcranial electrical stimulation on a daily basis (from the onset of hospitalization) in addition to the administration of a standard analgetic. The standard dose of tramadol (2.0 ml) was given to the patients of the control group (n=30) who complained of strong pain. The results of the objective and subjective estimations indicate that the degree of pharyngeal pain in the patients treated with TES therapy and the standard analgetic was significantly different. The patients receiving TES therapy could sooner resume their habitual diet and required smaller amounts of the analgetic which makes this modality a cost-effective supplement to the standard postoperative treatment. PMID:23887374

  6. Analgesic effect of high intensity focused ultrasound in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinjin Tan; Jian Chen; Li Ren; Ruilu Lin; Zailian Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic ef ect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods:A total of 106 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer accompanied by abdominal pain were treated by HIFU. Pain intensities and quantities of morphine consumption before and after treatment were observed and compared. Results:The average pain intensities before treatment, and at d3, d7 after treatment were 5.80 ± 2.14, 2.73 ± 2.68, 2.45 ± 2.43 respectively (P<0.01). Fifty-nine cases (55.7%) got to extremely ef ective, and 29 cases (27.4%) ef ective. Total ef icient rate was 83.0%. The average quantities of morphine consumption before and after treatment in the patients with grade III pain were 114.9 ± 132.5 mg, 16.8 ± 39.7 mg each person everyday respectively (P<0.01). Conclusion:HIFU can relieve pain suf ered by patients with pancreatic cancer ef ectively. It is a new adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer pain.

  7. The relative efficacy of indoprofen compared with opioid-analgesic combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S A; Breen, J F; Giuliani, R L

    1981-01-01

    This double-blind, parallel-design study used postsurgical dental outpatients as subjects. The patients self-administered a single dose of one of the study medications when they estimated their pain to be of moderate or severe intensity. The study medications were 200 mg of indoprofen, 650 mg of acetaminophen, 650 of acetaminophen with 60 mg of codeine, 650 mg of acetaminophen with 100 mg of d-propoxyphene N, and a placebo. On a report form, data were recorded on baseline pain and then hourly for four hours, intensity of pain, relief of pain, and side effects were reported. Also, an overall evaluation was recorded. Data were analyzed with the use of analysis of variance and Duncan's Multiple Range test. All four active treatments were statistically superior to placebo for sum pain intensity difference, total relief of pain, and overall evaluation parameters. Both opioid-analgesic combinations showed small additive effects over acetaminophen alone, and indoprofen was superior to both combination treatments and acetaminophen alone. PMID:6935400

  8. Acute analgesic effects of nicotine and tobacco in humans: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditre, Joseph W; Heckman, Bryan W; Zale, Emily L; Kosiba, Jesse D; Maisto, Stephen A

    2016-07-01

    Although animal models have consistently demonstrated acute pain inhibitory effects of nicotine and tobacco, human experimental studies have yielded mixed results. The main goal of this meta-analysis was to quantify the effects of nicotine/tobacco administration on human experimental pain threshold and tolerance ratings. A search of PubMed and PsycINFO online databases identified 13 eligible articles, including k = 21 tests of pain tolerance (N = 393) and k = 15 tests of pain threshold (N = 339). Meta-analytic integration for both threshold and tolerance outcomes revealed that nicotine administered through tobacco smoke and other delivery systems (eg, patch, nasal spray) produced acute analgesic effects that may be characterized as small to medium in magnitude (Hedges g = 0.35, 95% confidence interval = 0.21-0.50). Publication bias-corrected estimates remained significant and indicated that these effects may be closer to small. Sex composition was observed to be a significant moderator, such that pain threshold effects were more robust among samples that included more men than women. These results help to clarify a mixed literature and may ultimately help to inform the treatment of both pain and nicotine dependence. Pain and tobacco smoking are both highly prevalent and comorbid conditions. Current smoking has been associated with more severe chronic pain and physical impairment. Acute nicotine-induced analgesia could make smoking more rewarding and harder to give up. Future research should use dynamic measures of experimental pain reactivity and further explore biopsychosocial mechanisms of action. PMID:27023418

  9. MULTIMODAL ANALGESIC EFFECT ON PROINFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES SERUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ramli Ahmad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of combination epidural bupivacaine and intravenous parecoxib analgesia on immune response in patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation of the lower limb under epidural anesthesia. Methods: This research was conducted using the randomized, placebo-controlled double blind trial method on 52 patients who were randomly divided into 2 groups: the Parecoxib group which received 40 mg intravenous parecoxib for 30 minutes before incision and the control group which received an equal volume of 0.9% normal saline. Both groups received epidural anesthesia and postoperative epidural 0.125% bupivacaine analgesia continously. Venous blood samples were obtained before parecoxib administration, 2 and 24 hours after the surgery. The data were analyzed using Mann Whitney U and independent t tests (p<0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.05 in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 levels and proinflammatory to anti-inflammatory ratio, 2 hours after surgery. Conclusions: Multimodal analgesic combination of 40 mg IV parecoxib and 0.125% bupivacaine epidural analgesia have the effect to alter and stabilize the systemic immune response.

  10. Cadmium, analgesics, and the chronic progressive nephrosis in the female Sprague-Dawley rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viau, C.; Bernard, A.; Lauwerys, R.; Maldague, P.

    1984-10-01

    Female Sprague-Dawley rats received phenacetin or aspirin at average daily doses of 135 and 27 mg/kg respectively in the diet and either demineralized water (DMW) or a 100 ppm cadmium (Cd) solution as their drinking water for 12 months. This dose of Cd produced borderline tubular toxicity, as measured by the excretion of IV-injected human ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin. The kidney accumulation of Cd just reached the critical level of 200 ppm in all groups at the end of the study. The various treatments did not significantly affect growth, creatinine clearance, urine osmolality and the urinary excretion of ..beta..-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase and aminoacids. No interaction resulted from the concomitant administration of analgesics and Cd. Both aspirin subgroups (receiving DMW or Cd) showed an attenuation of the age-related decline of the renal function as revealed by a lower urinary excretion of albumin and total protein. The accentuation of the mesangial matrix seen upon aging was also partly inhibited in the aspirin rats.

  11. Combined parecoxib and I.V. paracetamol provides additional analgesic effect with better postoperative satisfaction in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Zeinab Ahmed Elseify; Salwa Omar El-Khattab; Ahmed Metwally Khattab; Eman Mohammed Atta; Layal Fares Ajjoub

    2011-01-01

    Background : Adequacy of postoperative analgesia is one of the most important factors that determine early hospital discharge and patients′ ability to resume their normal activities postoperatively. The optimal non-opioid analgesic technique for postoperative pain management would reduce pain and enhance patient satisfaction, and it also facilitates earlier mobilization and rehabilitation by reducing pain-related complications after surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic...

  12. Rehabilitation of total knee arthroplasty: clinical and rehabilitation differences between two analgesic treatments (Riabilitazione di artroprotesi totale di ginocchio: differenze cliniche e riabilitative tra due trattamenti analgesici)

    OpenAIRE

    Germana Mojica; Luisa Patrevita; Annalisa Coppo; Federica Taddei; Giuseppe Massazza

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a significant problem in a patient who has undergone total knee arthroplasty (PTG), since it influences the quality of life and the rehabilitation and functional recovery of the patient. In our study, we compared due different treatments with opioid analgesics in patients operated of PTG, with the aim of determining any clinical and rehabilitation differences. 56 post-PTG rehabilitative inpatients were chosen and randomised into two groups of analgesic treatment with a fixed administr...

  13. Analysis of Adverse Reaction of Analgesics, Antipyretics and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Prescribed by Physicians of Health Care Facilities in Podilskyi Region during 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Stepaniuk, N. H.; Hladkykh, F. V.; Basarab, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of medicines rational use exists all over the world. It concerns particularly analgesics, antipyretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In Ukraine the side effects caused by non-steroidal antiphlogistics rank the second place according to the prevalence among all registered cases.The objective of the research was to analyze adverse drug reaction report forms concerning adverse reactions caused by the use of NSAIDs, analgesics, antipyretics, and were submitted du...

  14. Anti-nociceptive Activity of Ethnomedicinally Important Analgesic Plant Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth: Mechanistic Study and Identifications of Bioactive Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Anwar; Ahmad, Sajjad; Ullah, Farhat; Ayaz, Muhammad; Sadiq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth. is extensively used as traditional medicine for the management of various types of pain including tooth ache, gastric pain, abdominal pain, ear ache, and generalized body pain. The current study is designed to scientifically verify the purported uses of I. rugosus as analgesic agent and to figure out its possible mechanism of action. Bioactive compounds responsible for analgesic activity were identified using GC and GC-MS analysis. Analgesic potentials were evaluated using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate test, and formalin induced paw licking test. In acetic acid induced writhing chloroform fraction (Ir.Chf) exhibited 53% analgesia while formalin test displayed 61% inhibition at phase-I and 45% at phase-II respectively at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Similarly, in hot plate test Ir.Chf displayed average reaction time of 7 min at 15, 30, 45, and 60 min intervals. The possible mechanism of action was found to be the central pathway via opioidergic receptors as the mice showed morphine like analgesic activity at pre-administration of naloxone (opioid antagonist) in hot plate and formalin tests. In GC-MS analysis, 83 compounds were identified among which eight compounds including benzyl alcohol, sebacic acid, myristic acid, phytol, sugiol, Tocopherol, α-Amyrin, and stigmasterol were sorted out as previously reported analgesic compounds. Current study revealed that analgesic potential of I. rugosus can attributed to the presence of analgesic compounds. It may also be concluded that opioids receptors are involved in the analgesic mechanism of I. rugosus due to effective antagonism of nalaxone. PMID:27458379

  15. The Analgesic Effect Of Oxytocin In Humans:A Double-Blinded Placebo Controlled Cross-Over Study Using Laser-Evoked Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Paloyelis, Yannis; Krahé, Charlotte; Maltezos, Stefanos; Williams, Steven C.; Howard, Matthew A.; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin is a neuropeptide regulating social-affiliative and reproductive behavior in mammals. Despite robust preclinical evidence for exogenous oxytocin's antinociceptive effects and mechanisms of action, human studies have produced mixed results regarding oxytocin's analgesic role and are yet to show a specific modulation of neural processes involved in pain perception. Here we investigated the analgesic effects of 40IU of intranasal oxytocin in 13 healthy male volunteers using a double-bli...

  16. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of the 5-benzyl analogue of 14-methoxymetopon, a novel μ opioid analgesic with reduced propensity to alter motor function

    OpenAIRE

    Spetea, Mariana; Bohotin, Catalina R.; Asim, Muhammad F; Stübegger, Kurt; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Opioids are the most effective analgesics for pain management, and efficient pain control is a therapeutic priority. Herein, we describe the synthesis and pharmacological activities of the 5-benzyl analogue of the μ opioid analgesic 14-methoxymetopon (14-MM). The result of the replacement of the 5-methyl in 14-MM with a benzyl group on in vitro opioid receptor binding and functional profiles, and in vivo behavioural properties, i.e. nociception and motor activity, was investigated. In rodent ...

  17. Evaluation of Analgesic & Anti-inflammatory activity of Hydro-alcoholic Extract of Desmostachya bipinnata (L.) Stapf root on Experimental Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod Kumar; Rajeev Kumar; Sanjay Yadav; Satyawan Singh; Surendra Nath Pandeya

    2010-01-01

    Desmostachia bipinnata (L.) Stapf (Gramineae) occurs widely in Egypt. This plant used traditionally as analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, asthma, thirst, jaundice, vaginal discharges, vesicle calculi, diseases of bladder, skin eruptions, vomiting, and sedative to pregnant uterus. So, in the present study, Desmostachia bipinnata roots were explored for their anti-inflammatory (carrageenan induced paw oedema) and analgesic potential (Hot plate method) on experimental model and compared ...

  18. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of methanolic leaf extract of the endangered tree species, Hildegardia populifolia (Roxb.) Schott and Endl

    OpenAIRE

    Saradha Maran; Paulsamy Subramanium

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of methanolic leaf extracts of the endangered medicinal tree species, Hildegardia populifolia on laboratory animal. Methods: The anti-inflammatory potential of the extract has been determined by using carrageenan, formalin and histamine induced paw edema assays in Wistar rats. Indomethacin was used as a reference drug. The analgesic activity was tested by using acetic acid induced writhing res...

  19. EVALUATION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF METHANOLIC EXTRACT OF STEM BARK OF MILLINGTONEA HORTENSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J V C Sharma

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Methanolic extract of Millingtonea hortensis stem bark was studied for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in animal models. The anti-inflammatory activity was studied by using acute model viz. Carrageenan induced rat?s paw edema using two doses (200 and 400 mg/kg of methanolic extract of Millingtonea hortensis and Indomethacin (10 mg/kg as standard drug and paw volume and % inhibition was measured plethysmometrically at different time intervals; In this methanolic extract of Millingtonea hortensis showed significant reduction in paw volume and increase in % inhibition in paw volume in dose dependent manner. The analgesic activity was studied using tail-flick method using 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of methanolic extract of Millingtonea hortensis and Diclofenac sodium (1.0 mg/Kg Body weight intraperitoneally as standard drug. The extract significantly increased the reaction time in tailflick response test. Results conclude that methanolic extract of stem bark of Millingtonea hortensis possess significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity.

  20. STUDIES OF ANTI INFLAMMATORY, ANTIPYRETIC AND ANALGESIC EFFECTS OF AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF TRADITIONAL HERBAL DRUG ON RODENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Mradu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous extract of combination of stems of Tinospora cordifolia, fruits of Emblica officinalis and rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus has been used as traditional herbal drug in Indian medicine system for treatment of fever, body ache, joint pain and inflammation. The collected botanicals were subject to physiochemical, pharmacognostical & phytochemical screening before animal experiments. After acute toxicity studies, anti-inflammatory effect was assessed using carrageen induced paw oedema test and antipyretic effect using yeast induced pyrexia method. Tail immersion, hot plate and writhings test were used for determining the analgesic properties. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of polyphenolic flavonoids, tannin and saponins. Significant anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties were noticed in dose dependant manner after aqueous extract administration especially at 600 mg/kg dose. These test drug activities were sustained and comparable to the standard drugs while exhibiting no acute toxicity. Aqueous extract of test drug possesses significantly high anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties without any acute toxicity possibly due to presence of flavonoids.

  1. ANALGESIC, ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-ULCER ACTIVITY OF ETHANOL AND ETHYL ACETATE EXTRACTS OF TECOMARIA CAPENSIS LEAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tamil Jothi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of leaves of Tecomaria capensis were screened for analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer activity. The analgesic activity was performed by two thermal models. One is hot plate method and another one is tail flick method. The two extracts of Tecomaria capensis leaves have showed analgesic activity in both methods. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated by two methods. One is carrageenan induced paw edema method (in-vivo and other is HRBC stabilization method (in-vitro. In both methods ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts showed anti-inflammatory activity. Anti-ulcer activity was done by aspirin induced method. In this, various biochemical parameters like ulcer index, gastric juice, pH, free acidity, total acidity and percentage protection has been investigated. Further, histopathological studies have also been examined. Ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts have showed anti-ulcer activity. In all the activities ethyl acetate showed a comparable activity to that of standard.

  2. #Biological evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Argemone mexicana Linn. (Papaveraceae aqueous leaf extract#

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOURABIE T.S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with evaluation of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of a lyophilized leaf extract of Argemone mexicana Linn. on laboratory animal. The anti-inflammatory study was done by using carrageenan-induced paw edema method. It was found that lyophilized extract can be effective in acute inflammatory disorders and in that case, it showed significant anti-inflammatory dose-dependent effect (p<0,001 at the dose level of 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg. The plant extract was equally tested for its analgesic potential by using the hot plate test method and acetic acid Writhing method. The lyophilized extract was found to exhibit significant (p<0,01; p<0,001 analgesic activity in tested model. By the hot plate method, the drug extract showed significant (p<0,001 increased latency period than the control group at oral dose of 250 and 500 mg/kg. In acetic acid induced writhing test, the lyophilized extract (250 & 500mg/kg presented reduced number of writhes at the two dose levels, which were found significant (p<0,05; p<0,001 if compared to control group. These results support the use of Argemone mexicana Linn. for the treatment of pain and inflammation sickness.

  3. Attitude of Dentists Towards the Administration of Analgesics for Management of Post-Endodontic Pain in Hamadan

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    Jamshidi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Prevention or management of pain is an important objective in root canal treatment. Post-endodontic pain has always been an important concern for patients and clinicians. Informing patients regarding the possibility of postendodontic pain and drug administration for its management can improve their trust in dentists, raise their pain threshold and increase their tendency to seek further dental treatments. Objectives This study aimed to assess the attitude of Hamadan dentists towards the administration of analgesics for the management of postendodontic pain. Patients and Methods This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011 in Hamadan city, Iran. Data was collected using a questionnaire including demographic information and questions about administration of analgesics for endodontic patients. All participants filled out the questionnaires anonymously. Collected data was analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 and descriptive statistics. Results Eighty questionnaires were completed by dentists. Most dentists reported to use ibuprofen mostly to alleviate mild to moderate and severe endodontic pain in healthy individuals. Only 42 dentists (52.5% used intracanal medicaments to relieve pain. Conclusions The overall level of knowledge of general dentists in Hamadan city about the prescription of analgesics was satisfactory. Dentists should be aware of the latest advancements in their field and maintain their level of knowledge by regularly participating in continuous education programs and accessing relevant scientific resources.

  4. Optimization of Analgesics for Greater Exercise Therapy Participation Among Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis and Severe Pain - A Feasibility Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Tunen, Joyce; van der Leeden, Marike; Bos, Wouter H;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Severe pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis hampers the ability to exercise. A protocol for the standardized optimization of analgesics in combination with exercise therapy was developed. The purpose of this protocol was to reduce pain, thereby allowing the patient to participate ...... osteoarthritis and severe pain to participate in exercise therapy, leading to reduction of pain and activity limitations. These promising results need to be confirmed in a randomized controlled trial. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......OBJECTIVE: Severe pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis hampers the ability to exercise. A protocol for the standardized optimization of analgesics in combination with exercise therapy was developed. The purpose of this protocol was to reduce pain, thereby allowing the patient to participate in...... exercise therapy. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of the protocol. METHODS: Forty-nine patients with knee osteoarthritis and severe knee pain (NRS-pain≥7) were included. Analgesics were prescribed following an incremental protocol. After 6 weeks a 12-week...

  5. Synthesis and Analgesic Effects of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on Models of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

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    Yu Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available μ-TRTX-Hhn1b (HNTX-IV is a 35-amino acid peptide isolated from the venom of the spider, Ornithoctonus hainana. It inhibits voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, which has been considered as a therapeutic target for pain. The goal of the present study is to elucidate the analgesic effects of synthetic μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on animal models of pain. The peptide was first synthesized and then successfully refolded/oxidized. The synthetic peptide had the same inhibitory effect on human Nav1.7 current transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells as the native toxin. Furthermore, the analgesic potentials of the synthetic peptide were examined on models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. μ-TRTX-Hhn1b produced an efficient reversal of acute nociceptive pain in the abdominal constriction model, and significantly reduced the pain scores over the 40-min period in the formalin model. The efficiency of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on both models was equivalent to that of morphine. In the spinal nerve model, the reversal effect of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on allodynia was longer and higher than mexiletine. These results demonstrated that μ-TRTX-Hhn1b efficiently alleviated acute inflammatory pain and chronic neuropathic pain in animals and provided an attractive template for further clinical analgesic drug design.

  6. Fluorine bearing sydnones with styryl ketone group: synthesis and their possible analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Shreenivas Ramachandrarao; Pai, Karkala Vasantakumar

    2012-04-01

    In continuation of structure activity relationship studies, a panel of fluorine containing sydnones with styryl ketone group 4-[1-oxo-3-(substituted aryl)-2-propenyl]-3-(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)sydnones 2a-i, was synthesized as better analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents. The title compounds were formed by condensing 4-acetyl-3-(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)sydnone with various substituted aryl aldehydes, characterized by spectral studies and evaluated at 100 mg\\kg b.w., p.o. for analgesic, anti-inflammatory and ulcerogenic activities. Compounds 2c and 2e showed good analgesic effect in acetic acid-induced writhing while none showed significant activity in hot plate assay in mice. In carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema test, compound 2c and 2f exhibited good anti-inflammatory effect at 3rd h, whereas compounds 2c, 2e, 2d, 2g and 2h showed activity in croton oil induced ear oedema assay in mice. Compounds 2c and 2e were less ulcerogenic than ibuprofen in rats, when tested by ulcer index method. Compounds with electron attracting substituents such as 2c and 2e were found to be promising in terms of the ratio of efficacy and adverse effect. These compounds generally exhibited better activity than those of earlier series signifying fluorine substitution. PMID:21657951

  7. Evaluation of analgesic, anti-inflammatory and CNS depressant activities of methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis barks in mice

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    Luthfun Nesa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study was carried out to assess the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant activity of the methanolic extract of  the Lawsonia inermis barks(MELIB. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory effects of MEBLI were studied using carrageenan-induced inflammatory method at the dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg b.wt., p.o. Analgesic activity was measured using acetic acid-induced writhing model and formalin-induced licking and biting in mice. The CNS depressant activity was evaluated by observing the reduction of locomotor and exploratory activities in the open field and hole cross tests at a dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Results: Statistical analysis showed that dose  of 500 mg/kg  exhibited higher analgesic activity against acetic acid-induced pain in mice than the standard drug diclofenac sodium. Furthermore, doses of 300 and 500 mg/kg caused higher percent of protection (91.16% and 95.03%, respectively of licking and biting of formalin-induced mice than diclophenac sodium (70.72%. The Lawsonia inemis methanolic extract (300 and 500 mg/kg alsoexhibited sustained inhibition (54.97% and 65.56% of paw edema at the 4th hour compared with standard indomethacin (74.17%. Besides, the plant extract also had significant (p

  8. Evaluation of the analgesic, sedative-anxiolytic, cytotoxic and thrombolytic potentials of the different extracts ofKalanchoe pinnata leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Razibul Habib; Mohammad Mustakim Billah; Mohammad Mahfuz-E-Alam; Kashfia Nawrin; Md Rakibul Hasan; Md Mominur Rahman; Md Anisul Islam; Irfan Newaz Khan

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the analgesic, neuropharmacological, cytotoxic and thrombolytic potentials of the aqueous, ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts ofKalanchoe pinnata leaves. Methods: At the dose of 400 mg/kg body weight, the analgesic activity of the extracts were evaluated by the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced persistent pain tests while neuropharmacological activity was evaluated by the open field, hole cross and elevated plus maze tests. The cytotoxic potential was observed by brine shrimp lethality bioassay and the thrombolytic potential was investigated by clot lysis test. Results: The aqueous extract significantly suppressed the number of writhing (96.78%) as well as the formalin-induced persistent pain on the early phase (46.92%) and on the late phase (40.98%). Again in case of hole cross and open field tests, the locomotor activity was decreased significantly (P < 0.001) mostly by the ethyl acetate extract. Furthermore, the sedative-anxiolytic activity was supported by the increased percent (P < 0.01) of frequency into the open arm on elevated plus maze test. Besides, the extracts showed moderate lethality and thrombolytic activity. Conclusions: The findings showed that activities are comparable to the standards and in some cases are stronger than the standards. Therefore, based on the results, it is evident that it has great analgesic and sedative-anxiolytic activity with moderate cytotoxic and thrombolytic potential.

  9. 评《硫酸软骨素》%Study on Analgesic Effect of Headache Zhijing Extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁勤生

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the analgesic effect and mechanism of headache zhijing extract. Methods The evaluation was performed by acetic acid writhing test in mice, nitroglycerin-induced migraine test in rats and dextran-induced blood stasis test in rabbits. Results After 7 days with the administration of headache zhijing extract (0.36-1.44g/kg), the animals could significantly prolong the pain threshold, reduce the number of writhing within 15min after administration, and increase analgesic efficacy. Compared with the control group, the number of scratching heads, scratching cheek, climbing the cage were significantly reduced in headache zhijing extract (0.5-1.0g/kg) group, and the appearance of scratching heads and scratching cheek was significantly later and the disappearance was significantly earlier in a dose-dependent manner. Headache zhijing extract (0.448g/kg) could significantly reduce the low and high shearing stress of blood viscosity, and as well as the low and high shearing stress of blood reduced viscosity and plasma viscosity in rabbits. Conclusion Headache zhijing extract has strong analgesic effect on writhing mice induced by acetic acid and migraine rats induced by nitroglycerin, and it can significantly improve the hemorheology in blood stasis model of rabbit.

  10. Analgesic and thermic effects, and cerebrospinal fluid and plasma pharmacokinetics, of intracerebroventricularly administered morphine in normal and sensitized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, H N; Villar, V M; Cortijo, J; Morcillo, E J

    1998-02-01

    The relationship between asthma and opioids has barely been investigated. This study examines whether active sensitization of rats changes the analgesic and thermic effects of intracerebroventricular morphine or the pharmacokinetics of the drug. Morphine (5, 10 and 20 microg) was given intracerebroventricularly to sensitized (active immunization to ovalbumin and Al(OH)3 then airway challenge with ovalbumin after 12 days) and normal (i.e. non-sensitized) male Sprague-Dawley rats. The tail-flick latencies and changes in colon temperature were determined before morphine injection and at 30 min intervals for a period of 300 min afterwards. Results were expressed as the area under the time-response curve. The analgesic and hyperthermic response to morphine for sensitized rats was less than that obtained for normal rats. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood samples were collected periodically for a period of 240 min and morphine levels were determined by a highly sensitive radioimmunoassay. The pharmacokinetic parameters half-life, terminal elimination rate constant and the mean residence time were determined in both cerebrospinal fluid and plasma by non-compartmental analysis. The area under the cerebrospinal fluid concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity was higher for sensitized rats than for normal rats for all three doses of morphine but these differences did not correspond with similar changes in pharmacological responses. In conclusion, the attenuated analgesic and thermic responses to intracerebroventricular morphine in the sensitized rats might be a result of pharmacodynamic alterations rather than to pharmacokinetic changes. PMID:9530988

  11. Analgesic effect of simultaneous exposure to infrared laser radiation and μT magnetic field in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslar, Grzegorz; Mrowiec, Janina; Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Sieron-Stoltny, Karolina; Sieron, Aleksander

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the experiment was to estimate the effect of repeated simultaneous exposures to infrared laser radiation and μT variable magnetic field used in magnetostimulation on pain perception in rats, as well as the involvement of endogenous opioid system in the mechanism of this effect. In experimental group clean-shaven scull of male Wistar rats placed individually in a specially designed plastic chamber were simultaneously exposed to infrared laser radiation (wavelength - 855 nm, mean power - 4,1 mW, energy density - 30 J/cm2) and variable magnetic field of saw-like shape of impulse, at a frequency of basic impulse 180-195 Hz and mean induction value of 120 μT generated by magneto-laser applicator of device for magnetostimulation Viofor JPS (Med & Life, Poland) 12 minutes daily for 2 periods of 5 consecutive days, with 2 days-lasting break between them, while control animals were sham-exposed. The pain perception was determined by means of "hot plate" test on the basis of calculated analgesic index. As a result of repeated exposures a significant increase in analgesic index persisting also till 14 th day after the end of a cycle of exposures was observed. This analgesic effect was inhibited by prior i.p. injection of opioid antagonist - Naloxone.

  12. ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF PET ETHER, AQUEOUS, AND HYDRO-ETHANOLIC LEAF EXTRACTS OF ASPILIA AFRICANA (PERS C.D. ADAMS (ASTERACEAE IN RODENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffuor George Asumeng

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, Aspilia africana is used in the management of pain in Ghana and most parts of West Africa. This study therefore investigated the analgesic effect of the petroleum ether, aqueous, and hydro-ethanolic leaf extracts of Aspilia africana using rodent models. Preliminary phytochemical screening was done on all the extracts, which showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, glycosides, phytosterols and terpenoids. The extracts (40-400 mg/kg p.o. were administered to Sprague-Dawley rats and tail flick latencies (Tail flick analgesic model were measured in a preliminary analgesic study. The order of analgesic efficacy established was hydro-ethanolic > aqueous > petroleum ether extract. Thin layer and high performance liquid chromatographic analyses were carried out on the hydro-ethanolic extract to obtain chromatograms as fingerprints for identification purposes. These revealed seven spots (TLC and two peaks (HPLC. Acetic acid-induced writhing and Capsaicin-induced nociception analgesic tests were carried out in ICR mice using the hydro-ethanolic leaf extract. This significantly (P ≤ 0.001 and dose-dependently suppressed the time-course of acetic acid-induced writhing and capsaicin-induced nociception similar to 10 mg/kg Diclofenac sodium (P ≤ 0.001 and 5 mg/kg, Ketamine (P ≤ 0.001. In conclusion, the leaf extracts of Aspilia africana has significant analgesic activity with the hydro-ethanolic extract being the most potent.

  13. Investigation of the Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Ethanol Extract of Stem Bark of Sonapatha Oroxylum indicum In Vivo

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    K. Lalrinzuali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is all a pervasive phenomenon, which is elicited by the body in response to obnoxious stimuli as a protective measure. However, sustained inflammation leads to several diseases including cancer. Therefore it is necessary to neutralize inflammation. Sonapatha (Oroxylum indicum, a medicinal plant, is traditionally used as a medicine in Ayurveda and other folk systems of medicine. It is commonly used to treat inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Despite this fact its anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects are not evaluated scientifically. Therefore, the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Sonapatha (Oroxylum indicum were studied in Swiss albino mice by different methods. The hot plate, acetic acid, and tail immersion tests were used to evaluate the analgesic activity whereas xylene-induced ear edema and formalin induced paw edema tests were used to study the anti-inflammatory activity of Sonapatha. The administration of mice with 250 and 300 mg/kg b.wt. of O. indicum reduced pain and inflammation indicating that Sonapatha possesses analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The maximum analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities were observed in mice receiving 300 mg/kg b.wt. of O. indicum ethanol extract. Our study indicates that O. indicum possesses both anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and it may be useful as an anti-inflammatory agent in the inflammation related disorders.

  14. Analgesic efficacy of continuous femoral nerve block commenced prior to operative fixation of fractured neck of femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szucs Szilard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve blocks are effective in treating acute pain, thereby minimizing the requirement for opiate analgesics. Fractured neck of femur (FNF is a common, painful injury. The provision of effective analgesia to this cohort is challenging but an important determinant of their functional outcome. We investigated the analgesic efficacy of continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB in patients with FNF. Methods Following institutional ethical approval and with informed consent, patients awaiting FNF surgery were randomly allocated to receive either standard opiate-based analgesia (Group 1 or a femoral perineural catheter (Group 2. Patients in Group 1 received parenteral morphine as required. Those in Group 2 received a CFNB comprising a bolus of local anaesthetic followed by a continuous infusion of 0.25% bupivacaine. For both Groups, rescue analgesia consisted of intramuscular morphine as required and all patients received paracetamol regularly. Pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale at rest and during passive movement (dynamic pain score at 30 min following first analgesic intervention and six hourly thereafter for 72 hours. Patient satisfaction with the analgesic regimen received was recorded using verbal rating scores (0-10. The primary outcome measured was dynamic pain score from initial analgesic intervention to 72 hours later. Results Of 27 recruited, 24 patients successfully completed the study protocol and underwent per protocol analysis. The intervals from recruitment to the study until surgery were similar in both groups [31.4(17.7 vs 27.5(14.2 h, P = 0.57]. The groups were similar in terms of baseline clinical characteristics. For patients in Group 2, pain scores at rest were less than those reported by patients in Group 1 [9.5(9.4 vs 31(28, P = 0.031]. Dynamic pain scores reported by patients in Group 2 were less at each time point from 30 min up to 54 hours [e.g at 6 h 30.7(23.4 vs 67

  15. Analgesic efficacy of continuous femoral nerve block commenced prior to operative fixation of fractured neck of femur

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szucs, Szilard

    2012-06-27

    AbstractBackgroundPeripheral nerve blocks are effective in treating acute pain, thereby minimizing the requirement for opiate analgesics. Fractured neck of femur (FNF) is a common, painful injury. The provision of effective analgesia to this cohort is challenging but an important determinant of their functional outcome. We investigated the analgesic efficacy of continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB) in patients with FNF.MethodsFollowing institutional ethical approval and with informed consent, patients awaiting FNF surgery were randomly allocated to receive either standard opiate-based analgesia (Group 1) or a femoral perineural catheter (Group 2). Patients in Group 1 received parenteral morphine as required. Those in Group 2 received a CFNB comprising a bolus of local anaesthetic followed by a continuous infusion of 0.25% bupivacaine. For both Groups, rescue analgesia consisted of intramuscular morphine as required and all patients received paracetamol regularly. Pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale at rest and during passive movement (dynamic pain score) at 30 min following first analgesic intervention and six hourly thereafter for 72 hours. Patient satisfaction with the analgesic regimen received was recorded using verbal rating scores (0-10). The primary outcome measured was dynamic pain score from initial analgesic intervention to 72 hours later.ResultsOf 27 recruited, 24 patients successfully completed the study protocol and underwent per protocol analysis. The intervals from recruitment to the study until surgery were similar in both groups [31.4(17.7) vs 27.5(14.2) h, P = 0.57]. The groups were similar in terms of baseline clinical characteristics. For patients in Group 2, pain scores at rest were less than those reported by patients in Group 1 [9.5(9.4) vs 31(28), P = 0.031]. Dynamic pain scores reported by patients in Group 2 were less at each time point from 30 min up to 54 hours [e.g at 6 h 30.7(23.4) vs 67.0(32.0), P = 0

  16. Analgesic profile of peroral and topical ketoprofen upon low pH-induced muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, K H; Wegner, H; Meller, S T

    2001-07-01

    Topical analgesics are widely marketed for treatment of muscle and joint pain. We have recently developed a model of muscle pain and have used this model to evaluate the efficacy of commercially available topical and peroral ketoprofen in order to evaluate the time- and dose-dependence of analgesia. In the present study, we examined the dose- (0, 50, and 100 mg) and time-dependence (hourly to 8 h) of commercially available peroral and topical ketoprofen. In order to achieve infusion times of 8 h (and thus study the time course of analgesic action), we adapted the model of low pH-induced muscle pain in humans to these requirements by applying the infusions continuously for 10 min every hour for 8 h. We found that the 10 min infusion produced reliable and consistent pain levels that were reproducible over the 8 h of the study. The study was performed double-blind, randomized, and with a 1-week interval between each of five different sessions (cross-over). Altogether six volunteers underwent intramuscular infusions of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline solution of pH 5.2; during each 8 h session the infusion was switched on eight times with a duration of 10 min at 50 min intervals (there was no infusion during the 50 min interval). The intramuscular infusion of low pH phosphate buffer induced a localized dull-aching or stinging muscle pain sensation; the flow rate of the pH infusion was individually adjusted to induce pain of a magnitude of 20% on a visual analogue scale (ranging from "no pain" (0%) to "unbearable pain" (100%)). Twenty minutes after starting the infusion the volunteers received a capsule with either a placebo or 50 or 100 mg ketoprofen perorally and, in addition, either placebo gel or 50 or 100 mg of a 2.5% commercial ketoprofen gel was applied topically to the skin. One of the sessions included a placebo gel and an oral placebo. The intensity of the recurrent pain stimulus was significantly reduced by 59% following administration of 100 mg peroral

  17. Analgesic and cardiopulmonary effects of intrathecally administered romifidine or romifidine and ketamine in goats (Capra hircus

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    H.P. Aithal

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of romifidine alone (50 µg/kg and a combination of romifidine (50 µg/kg and ketamine (2.5 mg/kg after intrathecal administration in goats. Ten adult goats of either sex weighing between 15 and 20 kg were randomly placed in 2 groups (groups I and II. The agents were administered at the lumbosacral subarachnoid space. Clinico-physiological parameters such as analgesia, motor incoordination, sedation, salivation, heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial pressure, central venous pressure and rectal temperature were studied. Other haematobiochemical parameters monitored were packed cell volume, haemoglobin, plasma proteins, glucose, urea and creatinine. The onset of analgesia was faster in group II (35.5 ±6.25 s compared to that of group I (5.2 ±0.54 min. Analgesia of the tail, perineum, hind limbs, flank and thorax was mild to moderate in group I, but complete analgesia of tail, perineum and hind limbs was recorded in group II. Motor incoordination was mild in group I and severe in group II. Significant reduction in heart rate (more pronounced in group I and respiratory rate (more pronounced in group II, and a significant increase in central venous pressure were recorded in both groups. Mean arterial pressure was reduced in both groups, but more markedly in group I. Sedation, electro-cardiogram, rectal temperature and haemato-biochemical parameters did not show significant differences between the 2 groups. The results of this study indicated a possible synergistic analgesic interaction between intrathecally administered romifidine and ketamine, without causing any marked systemic effects in goats.

  18. Antispasmodic/analgesic associations in primary dysmenorrhea double-blind crossover placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Santos, A R; Zmijanovich, R; Pérez Macri, S; Martí, M L; Di Girolamo, G

    2001-01-01

    We studied 125 patients with primary dysmenorrhea in a prospective randomized double-blind crossover study. After an admission pretreatment period without medication, the patients completed three consecutive randomized treatment phases with lysine clonixinate 125 mg plus propinox 10 mg or paracetamol 500 mg plus hyoscine N-butylbromide 10 mg or placebo, according to a fixed-dose schedule of 1 tablet every 6 h, 3 days before onset of menses and for 5 days thereafter. Changes in menstrual pain intensity and duration, amount of bleeding measured according to the number of daily pads used and concomitant symptoms were assessed on the fifth day of each cycle. Every night, the patients recorded the average intensity of menstrual pain during the first 4 days of menstruation in a diary The follow-up visit carried out at day 5 showed significant reduction in pain intensity with both active treatments vs. the other two phases: baseline: 2.72 +/- 0.61; placebo: 1.85 +/- 0.87; lysine clonixinate plus propinox 1.36 +/- 0.81, and paracetamol plus hyosine N-butylbromide: 1.45 +/- 0.87. The patients' diaries showed increasingly lower pain intensities starting from day 1 with the three treatments. Active treatments revealed significantly higher analgesic efficacy from the outset compared with baseline and placebo; however, only the lysine clonixinate plus propinox combination reached a statistically significant difference by days 3 and 4. No changes in duration or intensity of menstrual bleeding or in the incidence of adverse effects were observed during the four study periods. PMID:11708572

  19. Enhanced analgesic effects of propacetamol and tramadol combination in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyang; Du, Lili; Pan, He; Li, Li; Su, Xing

    2011-01-01

    Drug combinations have more potential advantage of greater analgesia than monotherapy. By the combination of analgesics with different mechanism, potency of analgesia can be maximized while the incidence of adverse effects is minimized. This study was aimed to assess a possible interaction in the antinociceptive effects between tramadol (T) and propacetamol (P) when administered in combination against nociceptive effects induced by physical or chemical injury in mice and rats. Three series of experiments were performed. The first was to determine effects of P and T alone or in combination in the acetic acid (AA)-induced writhing test in mice. Combination of T/P (3.9/67.5, 7.8/135, 15.6/271 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) elicited dose-dependent antinociception. The second determined whether the antinociceptive effects of the drugs observed in a test of persistent chemical pain could be seen in a test of acute thermal pain and the back-paw licking response was tested on the hot plate. The back-paw licking latency at different times after drugs obtained with the combination (16/270, 32/540 mg/kg, i.p. T/P) was longer than the respective values obtained with the individual agents. The third was designed to compare the antinociceptive effects between the drugs, either alone or in combination in the rat tail-flicks test. Combination of T/P (5.5/96, 11/192 mg/kg i.p.) both showed effects of higher potency than T and P, respectively. The data obtained confirmed that propacetamol is able to enhance the antinociceptive activity of tramadol. PMID:21372383

  20. Correlation versus causation? Pharmacovigilance of the analgesic flupirtine exemplifies the need for refined spontaneous ADR reporting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Anderson

    Full Text Available Annually, adverse drug reactions result in more than 2,000,000 hospitalizations and rank among the top 10 causes of death in the United States. Consequently, there is a need to continuously monitor and to improve the safety assessment of marketed drugs. Nonetheless, pharmacovigilance practice frequently lacks causality assessment. Here, we report the case of flupirtine, a centrally acting non-opioid analgesic. We re-evaluated the plausibility and causality of 226 unselected, spontaneously reported hepatobiliary adverse drug reactions according to the adapted Bradford-Hill criteria, CIOMS score and WHO-UMC scales. Thorough re-evaluation showed that only about 20% of the reported cases were probable or likely for flupirtine treatment, suggesting an incidence of flupirtine-related liver injury of 1∶100,000 when estimated prescription data are considered, or 0.8 in 10,000 on the basis of all 226 reported adverse drug reactions. Neither daily or cumulative dose nor duration of treatment correlated with markers of liver injury. In the majority of cases (151/226, an average of 3 co-medications with drugs known for their liver liability was observed that may well be causative for adverse drug reactions, but were reported under a suspected flupirtine ADR. Our study highlights the need to improve the quality and standards of ADR reporting. This should be done with utmost care taking into account contributing factors such as concomitant medications including over-the-counter drugs, the medical history and current health conditions, in order to avoid unjustified flagging and drug warnings that may erroneously cause uncertainty among healthcare professionals and patients, and may eventually lead to unjustified safety signals of useful drugs with a reasonable risk to benefit ratio.

  1. Analgesic tone conferred by constitutively active mu opioid receptors in mice lacking β-arrestin 2

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    Hales Tim G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hedonic reward, dependence and addiction are unwanted effects of opioid analgesics, linked to the phasic cycle of μ opioid receptor activation, tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of recombinant G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs over expressed in cell lines reveal an alternative tonic signaling mechanism that is independent of agonist. Such studies demonstrate that constitutive GPCR signaling can be inhibited by inverse agonists but not by neutral antagonists. However, ligand-independent activity has been difficult to examine in vivo, at the systems level, due to relatively low levels of constitutive activity of most GPCRs including μ receptors, often necessitating mutagenesis or pharmacological manipulation to enhance basal signaling. We previously demonstrated that the absence of β-arrestin 2 (β-arr2 augments the constitutive coupling of μ receptors to voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in primary afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons from β-arr2-/- mice. We used this in vitro approach to characterize neutral competitive antagonists and inverse agonists of the constitutively active wild type μ receptors in neurons. We administered these agents to β-arr2-/- mice to explore the role of constitutive μ receptor activity in nociception and hedonic tone. This study demonstrates that the induction of constitutive μ receptor activity in vivo in β-arr2-/- mice prolongs tail withdrawal from noxious heat, a phenomenon that was reversed by inverse agonists, but not by antagonists that lack negative efficacy. By contrast, the aversive effects of inverse agonists were similar in β-arr2-/- and β-arr2+/+ mice, suggesting that hedonic tone was unaffected.

  2. Analgesic efficacy of the ultrasound-guided blockade of the transversus abdominis plane - a systematic review

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    Javier Ripollés

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transverse abdominal plan blockade is a block of abdominal wall that has diffused rapidly in the clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesia for abdominal surgery. The performance of the ultrasound-guided technique has allowed the lowering of potential complications, as well as new approaches that were carried out according to the descriptions, and the prospective studies would make it possible to utilize the transverse abdominal plan blockade in different surgical interventions; however, the results obtained in randomized clinical trials are inconsistent.OBJECTIVES: To prepare a systematic review aiming to determine the efficacy of the ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockade for different surgical interventions, as well as the indications according to the approaches and their influences.METHODS: Two research approaches, one manual, and the other in Pubmed returned 28 randomized clinical trials where intervention with ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockades was performed to compare the analgesic efficacy in contrast to another technique in adults, published between 2007 and October 2013, in English or Spanish, with Jadad score > 1, according to the inclusion criteria for this review. The authors analyzed independently all the randomized clinical trials.CONCLUSIONS: The transverse abdominal plan blockades have been shown to be an effective technique in colorectal surgery, cesarean section, cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, appendectomy, donor nephrectomy, retropubic prostatectomy, and bariatric surgery. However, the data found in randomized clinical trial are not conclusive, and as a result, it is necessary to develop new and well designed randomized clinical trial, with enough statistical power to compare different approaches, drugs, doses, and volumes for the same intervention, aiming to answer the current questions and their effects in the habitual clinical practice.

  3. ANALGESIC AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF LEECH THERAPY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ARTHRITIS

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    Singh Akhilesh Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The day-to-day advancement in each and every aspect has made human’s life very fast, hectic and full of stress. In such an outfit every person is compelled to make the life fast and mechanical even shifted their food habits to fast food, altered their social structure and life style, having various negative impacts on the body. Occurrence of arthritis on large scale is one of the outcomes of this modification. It is commonest among acute as well as chronic inflammatory joint disease in which joint become painful, swollen and stiff. This study was designed to access the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Leech Therapy in the treatment Arthritis. The study was randomized open phase clinical trial. Jalauka used for the therapy were obtained from fresh water pond of Madhyam Akara (4-6gms weight. Jalaukas were applied once in every week for six weeks duration.The patients of age group 18 to 60 were selected on the basis of Ayurvedic signs and symptoms of Sandhigata Vata. Observations were recorded for Pain, Swelling, Stiffness, Score of ACR, RA index, ARA joint count, Tenderness. The laboratory values of ESR, CRP and S.uric Acid were also recorded before and after the treatment. Since the assessment criteria was Quantitative, paired 't' test was applied. In the current Study the treatment was found significantly effective in treating arthritis. The effect of treatment was 44% patients were of Uttam Upashya in relieving Pain, 40% in swelling, 28% in stiffness, 32% in restricted movement, 16% in deformity. So, we can conclude that leech therapy is effective in the treatment of arthritis.

  4. Evaluation of analgesic effects of intrathecal clonidine along with bupivacaine in cesarean section

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    Nikhil Kothari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Context: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the analgesic and adverse effects of intrathecal clonidine with hyperbaric bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia. Settings and Design : Randomized single blind trial. Methods: 210 ASA I-II pregnant females undergoing emergency cesarean section were randomized in a single-blind fashion to one of the three groups. In group I (n=70 patients received 12.5 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine intrathecally. In group II (n=70 patients received intrathecal mixture of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (8 mg and clonidine 50 μg. In group III (n=70 , patients received 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (10 mg intrathecally along with 50 μg of clonidine. Statistical Analysis Used: Groups were compared using one-way ANOVA with the Bonferroni multiple comparison post hoc test. The proportion of adverse events was compared using the chi-square test (χ2 =57.2410. Results: On adding 50 μg clonidine, we were able to reduce intrathecal dose of bupivacaine for cesarean section to 8 mg. Patients receiving intrathecal clonidine along with bupivacaine had significantly long lasting analgesia with lower bupivacaine dose [246.21±5.15 min. (group II vs 146.0±4.55 min (group I, P=0.021; 95% confidence interval: 238.01-257.40, group II and 134.99-157.0 group I]. Conclusions: Addition of intrathecal clonidine causes some sedation in the postoperative period, but it provides adequate analgesia and motor paralysis at lower dose of bupivacaine. It also significantly prolongs postoperative pain relief.

  5. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705

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    Koreny Maria

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department. Methods/Design This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1 the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2 this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1 it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2 results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3 conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. Conclusion We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain.

  6. Analgesic efficacy of diazepam and placebo in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A double blind randomized clinical trial

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    G V Pramod

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the analgesic efficacy of placebo and diazepam in patients with temporomandibular disorder. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients were recruited with a diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder based on standard clinical diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorder. The patients were put in to one of the two groups: placebo or diazepam at random. The average pain intensity was recorded with visual analog scale (VAS at pretreatment, at weekly interval till the completion of a three-week trial and at post-treatment visit on the eighth week from baseline. The secondary outcome measures were changes in masticatory muscle tenderness, viz. massater muscle, lateral pterygoid muscle, medial pterygoid muscle and temporalis muscle and changes in mouth opening. Statistical Analysis: Intra-group comparison for analgesic efficacy and mouth opening was carried out by Wilcoxon′s signed ranked test. Inter-group comparison for analgesic efficacy was also carried out using Mann-Whitney′s test. Results: A statistically significant (P<0.01 decrease in temporomandibular disorder pain in the placebo group (65% and statistically highly significant (P<0.001 decrease in the diazepam group (72% were observed on VAS after three weeks of treatment. The inter-group comparison demonstrated no statistically significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: This study suggests that the placebo can give near similar results as diazepam can. So the role of placebo should also be considered as one of the important management strategies. In the short term, reduction in the masticatory muscle tenderness and significant improvement in the mouth opening in both the groups were observed.

  7. Assessment of an Orofacial Operant Pain Assay as a Preclinical Tool for Evaluating Analgesic Efficacy in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Harvey E; Queeney, Timothy J; Dunbar, Misha L; Eichner, Michael C; Del Castillo, Dania I; Battles, August H; Neubert, John K

    2015-07-01

    A model system capable of providing clinically relevant analgesic doses with minimal trauma has been elusive in laboratory animal medicine. Our laboratory has developed an orofacial operant pain system that effectively discriminates between non-noxious and noxious thermal stimuli in rats and mice. Male and female rats (Crl:SD) and mice (Crl:SKR-HR(hr)) were trained to perform a task (placing their face through an opening and having their cheeks stay in contact with thermodes) to receive a reward (a solution of sweetened condensed milk). Currently accepted doses of buprenorphine were tested by using a crossover design. Pain was induced in both species by sensitizing the depilated skin over both cheeks with capsaicin cream or by creating a surgical incision (rats only) and then allowing the animals to contact a temperature-regulated thermode while obtaining a reward. Optimal antinociceptive doses included 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg in male mice but only 0.05 mg/kg in female mice. In rats, optimal antinociceptive doses included 0.03 and 0.05 mg/kg for male rats but only 0.03 mg/kg for female rats. The 2 pain-induction models in rats (capsaicin cream and surgical incision) did not differ. Our orofacial operant pain assay can determine clinically relevant analgesic doses for rodents in a preclinical assay. The automated, investigator-independent nature of the assay, in conjunction with its high sensitivity, makes this method an improvement over traditional noninvasive methods, providing better data for developing optimal analgesic recommendations for rats and mice. PMID:26224444

  8. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified

  9. The anti-inflammatory action of the analgesic kyotorphin neuropeptide derivatives: insights of a lipid-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Katia; Magalhães, Pedro R; Campos, Sara R R; Domingues, Marco M; Ramu, Vasanthakumar G; Michalek, Matthias; Bertani, Philippe; Baptista, António M; Heras, Montserrat; Bardaji, Eduard R; Bechinger, Burkhard; Ferreira, Mônica Lopes; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a designed class of efficient analgesic drugs derived from an endogenous neuropeptide, kyotorphin (KTP, Tyr-Arg) combining C-terminal amidation (KTP-NH2) and N-terminal conjugation to ibuprofen (Ib), IbKTP-NH2, was developed. The Ib moiety is an enhancer of KTP-NH2 analgesic action. In the present study, we have tested the hypothesis that KTP-NH2 is an enhancer of the Ib anti-inflammatory action. Moreover, the impact of the IbKTP-NH2 conjugation on microcirculation was also evaluated by a unified approach based on intravital microscopy in the murine cremasteric muscle. Our data show that KTP-NH2 and conjugates do not cause damage on microcirculatory environment and efficiently decrease the number of leukocyte rolling induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the drugs bind to LPS directly thus contributing to LPS aggregation and subsequent elimination. In a parallel study, molecular dynamics simulations and NMR data showed that the IbKTP-NH2 tandem adopts a preferential "stretched" conformation in lipid bilayers and micelles, with the simulations indicating that the Ib moiety is anchored in the hydrophobic core, which explains the improved partition of IbKTP-NH2 to membranes and the permeability of lipid bilayers to this conjugate relative to KTP-NH2. The ability to bind glycolipids concomitant to the anchoring in the lipid membranes through the Ib residue explains the analgesic potency of IbKTP-NH2 given the enriched glycocalyx of the blood-brain barrier cells. Accumulation of IbKTP-NH2 in the membrane favors both direct permeation and local interaction with putative receptors as the location of the KTP-NH2 residue of IbKTP-NH2 and free KTP-NH2 in lipid membranes is the same. PMID:26347373

  10. Efficacy of Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic of Superpulsed Low Level Laser Therapy After Impacted Mandibular Third Molars Extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Renato; Ruggiero, Tiziana; Gallesio, Giorgia; Riso, Massimo; Bergamasco, Laura; Mortellaro, Carmen; Mozzati, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate anti-inflammatory and analgesic efficacy of superpulsed low level laser therapy (SLLLT) after bilateral extraction of impacted mandibular third molars. Many studies in the literature show the anti-inflammatory and analgesic efficacy of laser therapy after oral surgery.The authors report the preliminary results of 25 patients who underwent bilateral extraction of mandibular eighths included in a single surgery. This is a split-mouth study, a site was randomized chosen to be treated with SLLLT at T0, 24 hours and 48 hours with a GaAs laser diode, whereas the other surgical site was evaluated as control. The suture was removed at 7 days and healing was controlled at 14 days. During the sessions were monitored and recorded the pain, using visual analog scale, and oedema with the visual analog scale and cephalometric measurements of cutaneous points (TR-GO, GO-CA, GO-SP, GO-PO). Each patient received only antibiotic prophylaxis and analgesic therapy as needed.Results indicate that in the treated site SLLLT determines a reduction in pain and swelling statistically significant compared with the control site (P laser therapy is in the first 5 days after surgery, showing a significant reduction of pain and swelling in the treated site than the control site.This study suggests that the SLLLT has a potential in reducing the postoperative discomfort after impacted third molar extractions, due to a reduction in postoperative pain and swelling. Superpulsed low level laser therapy has no side effects and is well tolerated by patients. It also seems to have a role in reducing the intake of drugs. PMID:27159857

  11. Phytochemical constituents,analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of methanol extract of Triumfetta rhomboidea leaves in animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Uche FI; Okunna BU

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract of the leaves of Triumfetta rhomboidea on mice and rats respectively.And to screen the phytochemical constituent of the ex-tract.Methods:The analgesic effect was determined by acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice.While the anti-inflammatory activity was determined by egg albumin-induced oedema of the rat paw.Phytochemical screening was done by standard procedures.Results:Triumfetta rhomboidea leaf extract (50 -400 mg/kg) caused a statistically significant inhibition on the egg albumin-induced eodema or inflammation in Wister albino rats with P <0.001 (ANOVA).This effect was higher than the observed effect with Piroxicam (0.5 mg/kg) which was used as a standard.The effect was also dose-dependent.Furthermore,Triumfetta rhomboidea ex-tract caused a statistically significant reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhing in mice,with P<0.001 (ANOVA).These effects were also does-dependent and greater than the analgesic effects by parac-etamol which was used as a reference drug.Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of flavonoids,ster-oids,triterpenoids alkaloids,tannins and saponins in Truimfetta rhomboidea leaf extract.Conclusion:Trium-fetta rhomboidea can be recommended for acute inflammatory disorders and diseases associated with pains.This also supports its traditional use as an anti-snake bite and anti-cancer or anti-tumor agent.Further study is on the way to find out the mechanism of its action and also to isolate,identify and characterize the active principle responsible for these effects in this plant.

  12. Evolution in pharmacologic thinking around the natural analgesic palmitoylethanolamide: from nonspecific resistance to PPAR-α agonist and effective nutraceutical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keppel Hesselink JM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jan M Keppel Hesselink Department of Pharmacology, University of Witten/Herdecke, Witten, Germany Abstract: The history of development of new concepts in pharmacology is a highly interesting topic. This review discusses scientific insights related to palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and its progression over a period of six decades, especially in light of the work of the science sociologists, Ludwig Fleck and Thomas Kuhn. The discovery of the cannabis receptors and the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors was the beginning of a completely new understanding of many important homeostatic physiologic mechanisms in the human body. These discoveries were necessary for us to understand the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of PEA, a body-own fatty amide. PEA is a nutrient known already for more than 50 years. PEA is synthesized and metabolized in animal cells via a number of enzymes and has a multitude of physiologic functions related to metabolic homeostasis. PEA was identified in the 1950s as a therapeutic principle with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Since 1975, its analgesic properties have been noted and explored in a variety of chronic pain states. Since 2008, PEA has been available as a nutraceutical under the brand names Normast® and PeaPure®. A literature search on PEA meanwhile has yielded over 350 papers, all referenced in PubMed, describing the physiologic properties of this endogenous modulator and its pharmacologic and therapeutic profile. This review describes the emergence of concepts related to the pharmacologic profile of PEA, with an emphasis on the search into its mechanism of action and the impact of failing to identify such mechanism in the period 1957–1993, on the acceptance of PEA as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic compound. Keywords: palmitoylethanolamide, sociology, science, paradigm, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, nutraceutical

  13. Huwentoxin-XVI, an analgesic, highly reversible mammalian N-type calcium channel antagonist from Chinese tarantula Ornithoctonus huwena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meichun; Luo, Xuan; Xiao, Yucheng; Sun, Zhenghua; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Zhonghua; Zeng, Xiongzhi; Chen, Hanchun; Tang, Jianhua; Zeng, Weimin; Songping Liang

    2014-04-01

    N-type calcium channels play important roles in the control of neurotransmission release and transmission of pain signals to the central nervous system. Their selective inhibitors are believed to be potential drugs for treating chronic pain. In this study, a novel neurotoxin named Huwentoxin-XVI (HWTX-XVI) specific for N-type calcium channels was purified and characterized from the venom of Chinese tarantula Ornithoctonus huwena. HWTX-XVI is composed of 39 amino acid residues including six cysteines that constitute three disulfide bridges. HWTX-XVI could almost completely block the twitch response of rat vas deferens to low-frequency electrical stimulation. Electrophysiological assay indicated that HWTX-XVI specifically inhibited N-type calcium channels in rat dorsal root ganglion cells (IC50 ∼60 nM). The inhibitory effect of HWTX-XVI on N-type calcium channel currents was dose-dependent and similar to that of CTx-GVIA and CTx-MVIIA. However, the three peptides exhibited markedly different degrees of reversibility after block. The toxin had no effect on voltage-gated T-type calcium channels, potassium channels or sodium channels. Intraperitoneal injection of the toxin HWTX-XVI to rats elicited significant analgesic responses to formalin-induced inflammation pain. Toxin treatment also changed withdrawal latency in hot plate tests. Intriguingly, we found that intramuscular injection of the toxin reduced mechanical allodynia induced by incisional injury in Von Frey test. Thus, our findings suggest that the analgesic potency of HWTX-XVI and its greater reversibility could contribute to the design of a novel potential analgesic agent with high potency and low side effects. PMID:24467846

  14. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jian-Bo [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Wang, Hao [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Zhi-Liang, E-mail: appo@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified.

  15. Antitussive, expectorant and analgesic effects of the ethanol seed extract of Picralima nitida (Stapf) Th. & H. Durand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapaah, Gabriel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Mante, Priscilla Kolibea; Ben, Inemesit Okon

    2016-01-01

    Picralima nitida is used traditionally for management of cough. This study, therefore, investigated the antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties of the ethanolic seed extract of Picralima nitida (PNE), and ascertained its safety for use. Presence of secondary metabolites, and safety of PNE (10-2000 mg/kg) were evaluated by preliminary phytochemical screening, and by Irwin's test respectively. Percentage reduction in cough count, percentage increase in latency of cough, and percentage protection offered by PNE were established by the citric acid-induced cough, acetylcholine- and Histamine-induced bronchoconstriction models. Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were treated with 100-500 mg/kg PNE or reference drugs, dihydrocodiene, atropine, mepyramine. Expectorant property of PNE (100-1000 mg/kg) was determined using the tracheal phenol red secretion; with ammonium chloride as a reference medication. Percentage maximal possible analgesic effect in the tail immersion test and the total nociceptive score in acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes, after treatment of BALB/c mice with PNE (100-500 mg/kg), diclofenac, and morphine were also estimated. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of tannins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, steroids, terpenoids and anthraquinones. PNEdid not cause any extract-related physical, pharmacological and CNS toxicities or mortality; sedation was observed at doses 1000-2000 mg/kg. It showed significant dose-dependent reduction in cough count, and increased cough latency. PNE (1000 mg/kg) enhanced tracheal phenol red secretion. PNE (100–500 mg/kg) significantly and dose dependently increased tail withdrawal latencies, and nociceptive score. PNE has antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties, with an LD50>2000 mg/kg. PMID:27168749

  16. Antitussive, expectorant and analgesic effects of the ethanol seed extract of Picralima nitida (Stapf) Th. & H. Durand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapaah, Gabriel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Mante, Priscilla Kolibea; Ben, Inemesit Okon

    2016-01-01

    Picralima nitida is used traditionally for management of cough. This study, therefore, investigated the antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties of the ethanolic seed extract of Picralima nitida (PNE), and ascertained its safety for use. Presence of secondary metabolites, and safety of PNE (10-2000 mg/kg) were evaluated by preliminary phytochemical screening, and by Irwin's test respectively. Percentage reduction in cough count, percentage increase in latency of cough, and percentage protection offered by PNE were established by the citric acid-induced cough, acetylcholine- and Histamine-induced bronchoconstriction models. Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were treated with 100-500 mg/kg PNE or reference drugs, dihydrocodiene, atropine, mepyramine. Expectorant property of PNE (100-1000 mg/kg) was determined using the tracheal phenol red secretion; with ammonium chloride as a reference medication. Percentage maximal possible analgesic effect in the tail immersion test and the total nociceptive score in acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes, after treatment of BALB/c mice with PNE (100-500 mg/kg), diclofenac, and morphine were also estimated. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of tannins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, steroids, terpenoids and anthraquinones. PNEdid not cause any extract-related physical, pharmacological and CNS toxicities or mortality; sedation was observed at doses 1000-2000 mg/kg. It showed significant dose-dependent reduction in cough count, and increased cough latency. PNE (1000 mg/kg) enhanced tracheal phenol red secretion. PNE (100-500 mg/kg) significantly and dose dependently increased tail withdrawal latencies, and nociceptive score. PNE has antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties, with an LD50>2000 mg/kg. PMID:27168749

  17. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the water extract from the fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Jaijoy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The fresh or dry fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. is used in traditional medicines for the treatment of diarrhea, jaundice and inflammatory disorder. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the standardized water extract from the fruit of Phyllanthus emblica was prepared according to the Thai Herbal Pharmacopoeia (THP. P. emblica water extract was evaluated for its anti-inflammatory activity in rats using ethyl phenylpropiolate (EPP-induced and arachidonic acid (AA-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema as well as cotton pellet-induced granuloma models, and its analgesic activity in mice using formalin test. The extract at 1 mg/ear exhibited anti-inflammatory effect on EPP-induced ear edema, but not on AA-induced ear edema. Oral administration of P. emblica at the doses of 150, 300 and 600 mg/kg caused dose-dependent inhibition of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. P. emblica at 600 mg/kg did reduce neither transudative and proliferative phases nor body weight gain and thymus weight in cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation. The extract at the doses of 150, 300 and 600 mg/kg elicited a significant analgesic activity in a dose-dependent manner on both the early and late phase of formalin test. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic mechanism of activity of the standardized water extract of P. emblica seems to be similar to NSAIDs rather than to steroidal drugs. Inhibitory effect on the synthesis and/or release of inflammatory or pain mediators may be the main mechanisms of action of P. emblica water extract.   Industrial relevance: Medicinal plants have long been recognized as an important source of therapeutically effective treatment for inflammatory diseases. Many patients are turning to herbal medicine as their primary, complementary or alternative therapies because of the adverse effects of the pharmaceutical drugs. P. emblica fruit has been used in traditional management

  18. The Analgesic Effect of Obturator Nerve Block Added to a Femoral Triangle Block After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Charlotte; Børglum, Jens; Jensen, Jan Mick;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with severe pain, and effective analgesia is essential for the quality of postoperative care and ambulation. The analgesic effects of adding an obturator nerve block (ONB) to a femoral triangle block (FTB) after TKA have not...... been tested previously. We hypothesized that combined ONB and FTB will reduce opioid consumption and pain compared with those of a single FTB or local infiltration analgesia (LIA). METHODS: Seventy-eight patients were randomized to combined ONB and FTB, single FTB, or LIA after primary unilateral TKA...

  19. Evaluation of the Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic, and Anti-pyretic Effects of Origanum majorana Ethanolic Extract in Experimental Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present investigation, various biological studies (toxicological, pharmacological, biochemical and histopathological) were carried out on Origanum majorana ethanolic extract. The acute toxicity study revealed that 0. majorana ethanolic extract is quietly safe. Both doses (0.25 and 0.5 g/kg b.wt.) of 0. majorana ethanolic extract showed a significant anti-inflammatory (acute and systemic), analgesic, and anti-pyretic effect. Moreover, histopathological findings of stomach and intestine of irradiated rats revealed that both doses of tested extract possess a gastrointestinal protective effect against radiation induced gastritis and enteritis

  20. Efficacy and safety of 3 versus 5 days of meloxicam as an analgesic for feline onychectomy and sterilization

    OpenAIRE

    Ingwersen, Walt; Fox, Ronald; Cunningham, Gail; Winhall, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Three- or 5-day courses of meloxicam [0.2 mg/kg body weight (BW) subcutaneously pre- or postoperatively on Day 1 followed by 0.05 mg/kg BW, PO per day thereafter] were assessed for analgesic efficacy and safety in 50 client-owned cats undergoing onychectomy and sterilization. Primary outcome parameters were analgesia score, gait/lameness score, and need for rescue analgesia assessed at times 0, 1, 4, 7, 24, 28, 35, 48, 52, 57 hours and on Day 5. Packed cell volume/total solids and serum bioch...