WorldWideScience

Sample records for anaesthetics

  1. Tuberous sclerosis Anaesthetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    SYNDROMIC VIGNETTES IN ANAESTHESIA. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia - May 2003. 4. Tuberous sclerosis. Anaesthetic considerations. Tuberous sclerosis. Tuberous sclerosis(TS) was first described by Bourneville in. 1880.1 TS is said to be one of the commonest autosomal domi- nant diseases.

  2. Monitoring volatile anaesthetic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The methods that have been used for monitoring volatile anaesthetic agents depend on some physical property such as Density, Refractometry, Mass, Solubility, Raman scattering, or Infra-red absorption. Today, refractometry and infra-red techniques are the most common. Refractometry is used for the calibration of vaporizers. All anaesthetic agents increase the refractive index of the carrier gas. Provided the mixture is known then the refractive change measures the concentration of the volatile anaesthetic agent. Raman Scattering is when energy hits a molecule a very small fraction of the energy is absorbed and re-emitted at one or more lower frequencies. The shift in frequency is a function of the chemical bonds and is a fingerprint of the substance irradiated. Electromagnetic (Infra-red) has been the commonest method of detection of volatile agents. Most systems use a subtractive system, i.e. the agent in the sampling cell absorbed some of the infrared energy and the photo-detector therefore received less energy. A different approach is where the absorbed energy is converted into a pressure change and detected as sound (Acoustic monitor). This gives a more stable zero reference. More recently, the detector systems have used multiple narrow-band wavelengths in the infrared bands and by shape matching or matrix computing specific agent identification is achieved and the concentration calculated. In the early Datex AS3 monitors, a spectral sweep across the 3 micron infrared band was used to create spectral fingerprints. The recently released AS3 monitors use a different system with five very narrow band filters in the 8-10 micron region. The transmission through each of these filters is a value in a matrix which is solved by a micro computer to identify the agent and its concentration. These monitors can assist in improving the safety and efficiency of our anaesthetics but do not ensure that the patient is completely anaesthetized. Copyright (2000

  3. Inhalation anaesthetics and climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Sander, S P; Nielsen, O J

    2010-01-01

    Although the increasing abundance of CO(2) in our atmosphere is the main driver of the observed climate change, it is the cumulative effect of all forcing agents that dictate the direction and magnitude of the change, and many smaller contributors are also at play. Isoflurane, desflurane......, and sevoflurane are widely used inhalation anaesthetics. Emissions of these compounds contribute to radiative forcing of climate change. To quantitatively assess the impact of the anaesthetics on the forcing of climate, detailed information on their properties of heat (infrared, IR) absorption and atmospheric...

  4. The 'simple' general dental anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient who receives dental treatment under general anaesthesia is usually a child, one with special needs, or one who requires an extensive dental procedure. The term 'simple' general dental anaesthetic is therefore a misnomer. The concept of procedural sedation for dentistry is beyond the scope of this article. It.

  5. Tuberous sclerosis Anaesthetic considerations | Bosenberg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Tuberous sclerosis Anaesthetic ...

  6. Cellular targets of inhalational anaesthetic- and opioid receptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several anaesthetics and anaesthetic adjuvants have been shown to limit the extent of myocardial injury due to ischaemia and reperfusion, a protective phenomenon known as anaesthetic-induced cardioprotection. Inhalational anaesthetics and opioid receptor agonists are among the key players in anaesthetic-induced ...

  7. An audit of anaesthetic record keeping

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    One of the duties of any medical practitioner is to keep records ... It is concluded that the standard of record-keeping in this random sample falls far .... trend. It is, of course, possible that some of these practitio- ners regard the anaesthetic record as their personal document, and made their own anaesthetic records which they ...

  8. Anaesthetic considerations for paediatric laparoscopy | Lasersohn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children, infants and neonates represent an anaesthetic challenge because of age-specific anatomical and physiological issues. Apart from paediatric-specific anaesthetic considerations, the paediatric anaesthetist must understand the implications of laparoscopic surgery, and prevent and react appropriately to changes ...

  9. Rural anaesthetic audit 2006 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, P D; Newbury, J

    2012-03-01

    In order to review anaesthetic morbidity in our remote rural hospital, a retrospective audit of all anaesthetic records was undertaken for a five-year period between 2006 and 2010. Eight hundred and eighty-nine anaesthetic records were reviewed. The patients were all American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I to III. Ninety-eight percent of the anaesthetics were performed by general practitioner (non-specialist) anaesthetists. There were no anaesthetic deaths or serious adverse outcomes reported over this period. Sixteen intraoperative and seven postoperative problems were documented, but all were resolved uneventfully. The most common problems documented were difficult intubation (n=9) and respiratory depression (n=3). Within the limitations of this retrospective audit, these findings indicate that general practitioner anaesthetists provided safe anaesthesia in a remote rural hospital. It is our opinion that the case selection, prior experience of anaesthetic and theatre staff, stable nursing workforce and the use of protocols were important factors in determining the low rate of adverse events. However, we caution against over-interpretation of the data, given its retrospective nature, relatively small sample size, reliance on case records and the absence of agreed definitions for adverse events. We would also like to encourage all anaesthetic services, however remote, to audit their results as part of ongoing quality assurance.

  10. Anaesthetic management of intussusception in pregnancy | Nwasor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teamwork will win and effective communication between obstetrician, surgeon, anesthesiologist and neonatologist is obligatory. Good knowledge of the simplest and fastest anaesthetic techniques available will ensure a fruitful outcome. Keywords: anaesthesia, intussusception, obstetric patients. Annals of African Medicine ...

  11. Analysis of cricoid pressure application: anaesthetic trainee doctors vs. nursing anaesthetic assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Nurul Haizam; Teo, Rufinah; Izaham, Azarinah; Tang, Shereen; Mohamad Yusof, Aliza; Abdul Manap, Norsidah

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of anaesthetic trainee doctors compared to nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage, applying the appropriate cricoid pressure and producing an adequate laryngeal inlet view. Eighty-five participants, 42 anaesthetic trainee doctors and 43 nursing anaesthetic assistants, were asked to complete a set of questionnaires which included the correct amount of force to be applied to the cricoid cartilage. They were then asked to identify the cricoid cartilage and apply the cricoid pressure on an upper airway manikin placed on a weighing scale, and the pressure was recorded. Subsequently they applied cricoid pressure on actual anaesthetized patients following rapid sequence induction. Details regarding the cricoid pressure application and the Cormack-Lehane classification of the laryngeal view were recorded. The anaesthetic trainee doctors were significantly better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage (95.2% vs. 55.8%, p=0.001). However, both groups were equally poor in the knowledge about the amount of cricoid pressure force required (11.9% vs. 9.3% respectively) and in the correct application of cricoid pressure (16.7% vs. 20.9% respectively). The three-finger technique was performed by 85.7% of the anaesthetic trainee doctors and 65.1% of the nursing anaesthetic assistants (p=0.03). There were no significant differences in the Cormack-Lehane view between both groups. The anaesthetic trainee doctors were better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in cricoid cartilage identification but both groups were equally poor in their knowledge and application of cricoid pressure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of cricoid pressure application: anaesthetic trainee doctors vs. nursing anaesthetic assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Haizam Yahaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of anaesthetic trainee doctors compared to nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage, applying the appropriate cricoid pressure and producing an adequate laryngeal inlet view. METHODS: Eighty-five participants, 42 anaesthetic trainee doctors and 43 nursing anaesthetic assistants, were asked to complete a set of questionnaires which included the correct amount of force to be applied to the cricoid cartilage. They were then asked to identify the cricoid cartilage and apply the cricoid pressure on an upper airway manikin placed on a weighing scale, and the pressure was recorded. Subsequently they applied cricoid pressure on actual anaesthetized patients following rapid sequence induction. Details regarding the cricoid pressure application and the Cormack-Lehane classification of the laryngeal view were recorded. RESULTS: The anaesthetic trainee doctors were significantly better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage (95.2% vs. 55.8%, p = 0.001. However, both groups were equally poor in the knowledge about the amount of cricoid pressure force required (11.9% vs. 9.3% respectively and in the correct application of cricoid pressure (16.7% vs. 20.9% respectively. The three-finger technique was performed by 85.7% of the anaesthetic trainee doctors and 65.1% of the nursing anaesthetic assistants (p = 0.03. There were no significant differences in the Cormack-Lehane view between both groups. CONCLUSION: The anaesthetic trainee doctors were better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in cricoid cartilage identification but both groups were equally poor in their knowledge and application of cricoid pressure.

  13. Pre-anaesthetic screening of geriatric dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Pre-anaesthetic screening has been advocated as a valuable tool for improving anaesthetic safety and determining anaesthetic risk. This study was done determine whether pre-anaesthetic screening result in cancellation of anaesthesia and the diagnosis of new clinical conditions in geriatric dogs. One hundred and one dogs older than 7 years of age provided informed owner consent were included in the study. Each dog was weighed, and its temperature, pulse and respiration recorded. An abdominal palpation, examination of the mouth, including capillary refill time and mucous membranes, auscultation, body condition and habitus was performed and assessed. A cephalic catheter was placed and blood drawn for pre-anaesthetic testing. A micro-haematocrit tube was filled and the packed cell volume determined. The blood placed was in a test tube, centrifuged and then analysed on an in-house blood analyser. Alkaline phosphatase, alanine transferase, urea, creatinine, glucose and total protein were determined. A urine sample was then obtained by cystocentesis, catheterisation or free-flow for analysis. The urine specific gravity was determined with a refractometer. A small quantity of urine was then placed on a dip stick. Any new diagnoses made during the pre-anaesthetic screening were recorded. The average age of the dogs was 10.99+2.44 years and the weight was 19.64+15.78 kg. There were 13 dogs with pre-existing medical conditions. A total of 30 new diagnoses were made on the basis of the pre-anaesthetic screening. The most common conditions were neoplasia, chronic kidney disease and Cushing's disease. Of the 30 patients with a new diagnosis, 13 did not undergo anaesthesia as result of the new diagnosis. From this study it can be concluded that screening of geriatric patients is important and that sub-clinical disease could be present in nearly 30 % of these patients. The value of screening before anaesthesia is perhaps more questionable in terms of

  14. Extended release formulations for local anaesthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiniger, C F; Golovanevski, L; Domb, A J; Ickowicz, D

    2012-08-01

    Systemic toxicity through overdose of local anaesthetic agents is a real concern. By encapsulating local anaesthetics in biodegradable carriers to produce a system for prolonged release, their duration of action can be extended. This encapsulation should also improve the safety profile of the local anaesthetic as it is released at a slower rate. Work with naturally occurring local anaestheticss has also shown promise in the area of reducing systemic and neurotoxicity. Extended duration local anaesthetic formulations in current development or clinical use include liposomes, hydrophobic based polymer particles such as Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres, pasty injectable and solid polymers like Poly(sebacic-co-ricinoleic acid) P(SA:RA) and their combination with synthetic and natural local anaesthetic. Their duration of action, rationale and limitations are reviewed. Direct comparison of the different agents is limited by their chemical properties, the drug doses encapsulated and the details of in vivo models described. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. Anaesthetic Management of Conjoined Twins′ Separation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolli S Chalam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia for conjoined twins, either for separation surgery, or for MRI or other evaluation procedures is an enormous challenge to the paediatric anaesthesiologist. This is an extra challenging surgery because we the anaesthesiologists need to care for two patients at the same time instead of just one. Anaesthesia for conjoined twins ′separation surgery mainly centered on the following concerns: 1.Conjoined Twins′ physiology like crossed circulation. distribution of blood volume and organ sharing with their anaesthetic implications. 2.Long marathon surgery with massive fluid shifts and loss of blood & blood components and their rapid replenishment. 3.Meticulous planning for organized management of long hours of anaesthetic administration in two paediatric subjects simultaneously with multi surgical specialties involvement and their unique requirements.We report the anaesthetic and intensive care management of one pair of Pygopagus separation surgery and also the review of literature and world statistics.

  16. Local anaesthetics and chondrotoxicty: What is the evidence?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, Joseph F

    2012-11-01

    Recent reports have suggested that local anaesthetic agents have a toxic effect on articular chondrocytes. This is despite the widespread intra-articular use of local anaesthetic agents following arthroscopic procedures for a number of years.

  17. Periodic Classification of Local Anaesthetics (Procaine Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Castellano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Algorithms for classification are proposed based on criteria (information entropyand its production. The feasibility of replacing a given anaesthetic by similar ones in thecomposition of a complex drug is studied. Some local anaesthetics currently in use areclassified using characteristic chemical properties of different portions of their molecules.Many classification algorithms are based on information entropy. When applying theseprocedures to sets of moderate size, an excessive number of results appear compatible withdata, and this number suffers a combinatorial explosion. However, after the equipartitionconjecture, one has a selection criterion between different variants resulting fromclassification between hierarchical trees. According to this conjecture, for a given charge orduty, the best configuration of a flowsheet is the one in which the entropy production is mostuniformly distributed. Information entropy and principal component analyses agree. Theperiodic law of anaesthetics has not the rank of the laws of physics: (1 the properties ofanaesthetics are not repeated; (2 the order relationships are repeated with exceptions. Theproposed statement is: The relationships that any anaesthetic p has with its neighbour p 1are approximately repeated for each period.

  18. Anaesthetic Challenges Associated with Achondroplasia: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report the anaesthetic management of two achondroplastic patients who presented for emergency cesarean section. Regional anaesthesia could not be done in both cases as a result of technical difficulties and general anaesthesia was performed. Airway management was done with two different techniques following ...

  19. Local anaesthetics: Characteris tics, uses and toxicities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharmacological properties and are used in various techniques of local anaesthesia administration, i.e. ... As always, good judgement is necessary – an insulin- dependent, diabetic vasculopathic patient with ... He entered private practice in Bloemfontein and has risen to senior partner in a large private anaesthetic practice.

  20. Anaesthetic management of endoscopic resection of juvenile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients had preoperative embolisation of the feeding vessel. Standard anaesthesia induction technique, together with invasive monitoring, was used. Controlled hypotension (mean arterial pressure of 60 ± 5 mmHg) was achieved with the help of inhalational anaesthetics, vasodilators and beta blockers. Mean duration ...

  1. Anaesthetic gases: environmental impact and alternatives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review Article: Anaesthetic gases: environmental impact and alternatives. 345. 2011;17(5). South Afr J Anaesth Analg. Introduction. In recent times there has been a surge in interest in our contribution to climate change. Human activity results in increased atmospheric levels of a variety of gaseous chemicals that are able to ...

  2. Anaesthetic management for ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dandy–Walker Syndrome (DWS) is a rare congenital brain anomaly affecting the cerebellum and the fourth ventricle. The chief ... describes the successful anaesthetic management of an infant with Dandy–Walker Syndrome without postoperative intensive .... Involvement of respiratory centres in the brainstem may result in.

  3. Anaesthetic genetics and genomics | Welch | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some common genetically determined anaesthetic conditions, such as malignant hyperthermia, “scoline apnoea”, “halothane hepatitis” and porphyria, are fairly well described, and the genetic differences in enzyme, receptor and ion channel systems are slowly being elucidated. These genomic differences allow some ...

  4. Anaesthetic potency and physiological effects of refrigerated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several in vitro studies have justified the use of thiopentone solutions beyond the period recommended by the manufacturer. We conducted this in vivo study to investigate the anaesthetic potency and physiological effect of refrigerated thiopentone solution. Rabbits in four groups designated A, B, C and D were ...

  5. Achondroplasia: anaesthetic challenges for caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiel, L; Scott, G A; Agaram, R; McGrady, E; Duncan, A; Litchfield, K N

    2014-08-01

    Pregnancy in women with achondroplasia presents major challenges for anaesthetists and obstetricians. We report the case of a woman with achondroplasia who underwent general anaesthesia for an elective caesarean section. She was 99cm in height and her condition was further complicated by severe kyphoscoliosis and previous back surgery. She was reviewed in the first trimester at the anaesthetic high-risk clinic. A multidisciplinary team was convened to plan her peripartum care. Because of increasing dyspnoea caesarean section was performed at 32weeks of gestation. She received a general anaesthetic using a modified rapid-sequence technique with remifentanil and rocuronium. The intraoperative period was complicated by desaturation and high airway pressures. The woman's postoperative care was complicated by respiratory compromise requiring high dependency care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Congenital lobar emphysema in neonates: Anaesthetic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridu Paban Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital lobar emphysema (CLE is a potentially reversible, though possibly life-threatening, cause of respiratory distress in the neonate. It poses dilemma in diagnosis and management. We are presenting a 6-week-old baby who presented with a sudden onset of respiratory distress related to CLE affecting the left upper lobe. Lobectomy was performed under general anaesthesia with one lung ventilation. The details of anaesthetic challenges and management are described here.

  7. Peri-anaesthetic complications in an equine referral hospital: Risk factors for post anaesthetic colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, R C; Corletto, F; Wright, I M

    2015-11-01

    Peri-anaesthetic complications are relatively common in equine patients and further investigations are warranted to identify manageable risk factors. To report morbidity and mortality rates and identify associated risk factors for horses undergoing general anaesthesia, within a predominantly racing Thoroughbred (TB) population. Single centre retrospective observational study. Anaesthetic and case records of all horses ≥12 months old undergoing general anaesthesia at Newmarket Equine Hospital between August 2010 and April 2012 were analysed, excluding emergency abdominal/dystocia procedures or traumatology cases with cardiovascular compromise. Mortality and morbidity rates were calculated and described. Uni- and multivariable analyses were used to investigate the relationship between the principal complication, post anaesthetic colic (PAC) and risk factors. A total of 1067 anaesthetic records of 1021 horses were included in the study; of these, 702 horses (65.8%) were TB, 169 (15.8%) developed a complication within 7 days of general anaesthesia and 10 (0.94%) died as a result. The most prevalent morbidity was PAC, 111 horses (10.5%) developed colic within 7 days of general anaesthesia. Thoroughbred horses (odds ratio [OR] 2.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.73-4.96) and horses receiving sodium benzylpenicillin (NaBP) (OR 2.77, 95% CI 1.69-4.50) were at increased risk of PAC. Thoroughbred racehorses were identified as at increased risk of PAC in this study and might benefit from more critical evaluation of post anaesthetic gastrointestinal function. An alternative to the administration of NaBP for prophylactic antimicrobial therapy needs to be further investigated if its role in PAC is confirmed by other studies. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  8. The anaesthetic potency of benzocaine-hydrochloride in three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marking (1967) and Houston & Woods (1976) also showed that the anaesthetic potency of a drug depends on the temperature of the water at which anaesthesia is in- duced. The results of this study confmn these fmdings because the induction of anaesthesia at different water temperatures resulted in different anaesthetic ...

  9. The long-term consequences of anaesthetic management | Sessler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, it is reasonable to ask to what extent anaesthetic management might influence long-term outcomes. The distinction being made here is between the classical definition of anaesthetic complications, which is restricted to the immediate perioperative period, perhaps extending to a few days after surgery, and the ...

  10. Accidental deposition of local anaesthetic in the subdural space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-16

    Jan 16, 2013 ... local anaesthetic occurs rarely and few anaesthesiologists are familiar with its clinical presentation.2-4 We report on a case of suspected subdural deposition of local anaesthetic in an infant who was administered caudal anaesthesia for postoperative pain relief. The case report and a review of literature are ...

  11. Anaesthetic indices and vital parameters of PPR-infected West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study, was to assess and compare the anaesthetic indices and vital parameters of West African Dwarf (WAD) goats naturally infected with PPR before and after epidural anaesthesia with plain lignocaine and also to compare the measured anaesthetic indices with those of healthy goats. Ten goats were used ...

  12. What is anaesthetic death? | Tudjegbe | Annals of Biomedical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic death” is often defined as the death of a patient who has had an anaesthetic, within 24 hours of the procedure. This is irrespective of the contribution of anaesthesia to the cause of death. Many people disagree with this definition. We illustrate this point by presenting the case of a 5-year old boy who had ...

  13. Accidental deposition of local anaesthetic in the subdural space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of accidental injection of local anaesthetic into the subdural space during neuraxial blockade is rare. The presentation of unexplainable clinical signs that do not match the clinical picture of subarachnoid or intravascular injection of the local anaesthetic agent should invoke high suspicion of unintentional ...

  14. Anaesthetic management of appendectomy in a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of anaesthetic management for appendectomy in a patient with cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is to maintain a stable cardiovascular system. As this condition is rare, there are no definitive guidelines regarding the anaesthetic management of such patients. Case report: We report a case of ...

  15. Anaesthetic manpower development in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyannwo, O A; Elegbe, E O

    1999-01-01

    Advances in surgery have been possible worldwide largely due to specialized manpower, innovations in modern anaesthetic techniques and drugs. Shortage of specialist manpower in anaesthesia has continued in West Africa despite various available local postgraduate training programmes. This paper examines the impact of the West African Postgraduate Medical College (WAPMC) training programme on anaesthetic manpower development in the West Africa subregion. Data collected from the records of the WAPMC revealed that from April 1992 to October 1996 a total number of 2,963 candidates attempted the primary examination of the various surgical faculties compared to 93 candidates for anaesthesia--a ratio of 32 prospective surgeons to one anaesthetist. The end point of the training produced 292 Fellows in the five-year period with only six in anaesthesia, i.e., 1 anaesthetist to 49 surgeons. Although the diploma programme of the same College produced 56 graduates in the study period, 53.6% of them were pursuing the Fellowship programme in tertiary institutions. Suggestions are proposed to redress the ever-widening gap between the number of specialist surgeons and anaesthetists in the West Africa subregion.

  16. Influence of pre-anaesthetic thoracic radiographs on ASA physical status classification and anaesthetic protocols in traumatized dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigrist, N.; Mosing, M.; Iff, I.; Larenza, M.P.; Lang, J.; Spreng, D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if pre-anaesthetic thoracic radiographs contribute to the anaesthetic management of trauma patients by comparing American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification (ASA grade) with and without information from thoracic radiography findings. Case records of 157 dogs and cats being anaesthetized with or without post-traumatic, pre-anaesthetic chest radiographs were retrospectively evaluated for clinical parameters, radiographic abnormalities and anaesthetic protocol. Animals were retrospectively assigned an ASA grade. ASA grades, clinical signs of respiratory abnormalities and anaesthesia protocols were compared between animals with and without chest radiographs. The group of animals without pre-anaesthetic radiographs was anaesthetized earlier after trauma and showed less respiratory abnormalities at presentation. The retrospectively evaluated ASA grade significantly increased with the information from thoracic radiography. Animals with a higher ASA grade were less frequently mechanically ventilated. Pre-anaesthetic radiographs may provide important information to assess the ASA grade in traumatized patients and may therefore influence the anesthesia protocol

  17. Non-Anaesthetic Effects of Volatile Anaesthetics: A Short Trip on the Sea of Translational Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzych, Lukasz J; Szczepanska, Anna J

    2017-10-13

    Volatile anaesthetics (VA) are commonly used worldwide for induction and/or maintenance of general anaesthesia. They act in the central nervous system to reduce sensation and motor response during surgical and invasive diagnostic procedures. VAs also have some non-anaesthetic properties in the brain when administrated to patients at the extremes of age. Their biological impact on other organs should be taken into account during administration of anaesthesia. In this review we summarize the recent knowledge on the non-anaesthetic effects of inhaled halogenic ethers on cells and tissues. Exposure to VAs may promote lasting neuro-behavioural deficits in the brains of developing children and deterioration in cognitive performance in elderly individuals. Preconditioning with VAs can prevent or minimise tissue ischaemia in the heart and brain. VAs act as an anti-inflammatory in response to tissue damage during surgery and may attenuate both local and systemic inflammatory response. Further research is needed to elucidate a link between laboratory findings and their possible effects in humans. Because many questions remain unanswered in this field, translational medicine should be more focused on safety in anaesthesia for the improvement public health. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. The concept of anaesthetic-induced cardioprotection: clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, Stefan G.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental evidence has clearly demonstrated that volatile anaesthetic agents have direct protective properties against reversible and irreversible ischaemic myocardial damage. These properties have been related to a direct preconditioning effect but also to an effect on the extent of reperfusion

  19. Description of surgical and anaesthetic services provided at two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Description of surgical and anaesthetic services provided at two district hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal in relation to the surgical norms and standards outlined in the Service Package for District Hospitals.

  20. Variation of tumour radiosensitivity with time after anaesthetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nias, A.H.W.; Perry, P.M. (Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (UK). Richard Dimbleby Research Lab.)

    1989-10-01

    Transplanted C{sub 3}H mouse mammary tumours were given single doses of X irradiation in air or oxygen at 1 atmosphere (atm) with or without anaesthesia of recipient mice by ketamine and diazepam. The radiation response to single doses of 25 Gy was determined in terms of time taken to reach 3.5 times the treatment volume. Under all conditions there was more growth delay in tumours irradiated in pure oxygen than in air. In air and oxygen, the radiation response for anaestheitized animals tended to fall below the level for non-anaesthetized ones when only 10 min had elapsed after administration of anaesthesia. After 25 min, the response in air was back to the level for non-anaesthetized animals but the oxygen group then showed significant sensitization compared with the oxygen without anaesthetic group. After 40 min, the air group showed slight sensitization and the oxygen group still showed significant sensitization by the anaesthetic. (author).

  1. The effects of some prostaglandins on respiration in anaesthetized cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, D.S.

    1974-01-01

    1 Some prostaglandins have been found to be capable of affecting respiration in anaesthetized cats. 2 Prostaglandins E1, E2, F2α, A1 and A2 all elicited increases in respiratory frequency when administered to cats anaesthetized with either pentobarbitone or α-chloralose. This effect was abolished by bilateral vagotomy. 3 Prostaglandins of the E and A series, but not prostaglandin F2α, elicited increases in tidal volume which were accompanied by falls in systemic blood pressure in cats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone. The changes in blood pressure were also obtained in cats anaesthetized with α-chloralose, but not the tidal volume changes. 4 It is unlikely that the prostaglandins influenced respiration by direct actions on arterial chemoreceptors or baroreceptors. 5 Mechanisms by which the prostaglandins may be acting to affect respiration are discussed. PMID:4447858

  2. Local anaesthetic medication for the treatment of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A Siqueira

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available It is presumed that drugs able to prevent bronchial spasm and/or inflammation may have therapeutic potential to control asthma symptoms. The local anaesthetic lidocaine has recently received increased attention as an alternative form of treatment for asthmatic patients. This paper reviews the major findings on the topic and summarizes the putative mechanisms underlying the airway effects of local anaesthetic agents. We think that lidocaine extends the spectrum of options in asthma therapy, probably by counteracting both spasmogenic and inflammatory stimuli in the bronchial airways. The possibility of development of new anti-asthma compounds based on the synthesis of lidocaine derivatives is also on the horizon.

  3. The Lack, Magill and Bain anaesthetic breathing systems: a direct comparison in spontaneously-breathing anaesthetized adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Humphrey, D

    1982-01-01

    The performances of the Lack (Mapleson A), Magill (Mapleson A) and Bain (Mapleson D) anaesthetic breathing systems were compared in each of 20 anaesthetized adult patients breathing spontaneously with fresh gas flows of 70 ml kg-1 min-1. In every patient the Lack system caused the least rebreathing, as seen by the lowest inspired and end-expired CO2 tensions using capnography. The Magill caused more rebreathing than the Lack though less than the Bain. Comparative fresh gas flows for each syst...

  4. Local anaesthetics: Characteris tics, uses and toxicities | Du Plessis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgeons currently perform more and larger procedures in an ambulatory setting. Local anaesthesia is an important aspect of office-based surgery. Local anaesthetics (LAs) vary in their pharmacological properties and are used in various techniques of local anaesthesia administration, i.e. topical, infiltrative, epidural, spinal, ...

  5. Lavage drain extension for local anaesthetic instillation into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-one patients who had undergone abdominoplasty procedures were selected for instillation of a local anaesthetic preparation, ropivacaine (Naropin, AstraZeneca) into the wound site on day 1 and 2 after surgery, followed by early mobilisation. Efficacy of the system, patient comfort and mobilisation were documented.

  6. Cardiac Arrest after Local Anaesthetic Toxicity in a Paediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Maria Torres de Araújo Azi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a paediatric patient undergoing urological procedure in which a possible inadvertent intravascular or intraosseous injection of bupivacaine with adrenaline in usual doses caused subsequent cardiac arrest, completely reversed after administration of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion. Early diagnosis of local anaesthetics toxicity and adequate cardiovascular resuscitation manoeuvres contribute to the favourable outcome.

  7. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications: case report. Mallika Balakrishnan, Renju Kuriakose, Rachel Cherian Koshy. Abstract. Radiation induces a variety of changes in the airway that can potentially lead to difficult intubation. Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible, a severe consequence of ...

  8. Case Report: Anaesthetic management of a Rare Oesophageal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foreign body impaction is a common and potentially fatal condition encountered by both anaesthetists and surgeons. Skilled airway management is vital to avoid catastrophic outcomes. Children less than five years of age are particularly vulnerable. We report the anaesthetic challenges and management of a 2 year old boy ...

  9. Iatrogenic greenhouse gases: the role of anaesthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoigwe, Chika E; Sanchez Franco, Luis C; Forrest, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of health-care activity to climate change is not negligible and is increasing. Anaesthetic greenhouse gases, in particular the fluranes, have a much more potent global warming capacity, volume for volume, than carbon dioxide, but their emissions remain completely unregulated.

  10. Cleft lip and palate surgery in children: Anaesthetic considerations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Care of cleft patients is very challenging. Team cleft care is usually lacking in many developing countries due to shortage of qualified manpower. This study is aimed at highlighting anaesthetic challenges in the management of cleft in children. Patients and Methods: This was a study of cleft lip and palate ...

  11. Bronchoscopy for foreign body removal in children: anaesthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bronchoscopy for foreign body removal in children: anaesthetic challenges in a tertiary health Centre. ... Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective review of cases of foreign body aspiration in children treated at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, Nigeria, between 2002 and 2008. Foreign body ...

  12. Anaesthetic management of a patient with sick sinus syndrome for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic management of a patient with sick sinus syndrome for exploratory laparotomy. S Alex, JP Saneesh, R Rao, M Upadya. Abstract. Sick sinus syndrome is a generalised abnormality of cardiac impulse formation that may be caused either by an intrinsic disease of the sinus node, which makes it unable to perform its ...

  13. Anaesthetic Management of Homozygous Sickle Cell Patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sickle cell disease is a common comorbidity in patient presenting for surgical care in our hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anaesthetic management of sickle cell disease patients in our hospital. Patients and method: A prospective audit was conducted for a period of 12 months, ...

  14. Comparative Analysis Of The Effects Of Topical Anaesthetic Agents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, of these three topical anaesthetic agents, 0.5% tetracaine hydrochloride may be the preferred choice in optometric practice particularly in patients with Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS) in order to facilitate their tear film stability;while the use of proparacaine should be discouraged in patients with dry eye syndrome.

  15. The influence of anaesthetic drug selection for scoliosis surgery on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Aim: The aim of this study was to conduct a pharmaceutical care programme for two different anaesthetic methods used during scoliosis surgery, to investigate which method ensured better intraoperative haemodynamic stability and postoperative pain control. Methods: A clinical pharmacist actively participated in a ...

  16. Paravertebral block as a sole technique for the anaesthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) is a multifaceted organic disease which, owing to its non-specific multiple symptoms that include incapacitating fatigue, deeply affects the quality of life of diseased patients. It carries a perceived risk of an adverse reaction to drugs, including anaesthetics. However, there is very little ...

  17. Anaesthetic effects of xylazine/ketamine combination in New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anaesthetic effects of xylazine/ketamine drug combination was studied using New-Zealand white (NZW) rabbits. The animals were grouped into three as follows; Group A (Control) animals were pre-medicated with 5mg/kg xylazine (X) intramuscularly (i/m), followed 10 minutes later with 35mg/kg Ketamine(K) i/m .

  18. comparative analysis of the effects of topical anaesthetic agents on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    influx of sodium ions into the nerve cytoplasm. It binds to the specific ... 0.5% proparacaine hydrochloride had a statistically significant decrease in tear quantity produced after instillation, using the ... topical anaesthetic agents, 0.5% tetracaine hydrochloride may be the preferred choice in optometric practice particularly in ...

  19. Anaesthetic Challenges in the Surgical Management of Diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic Challenges in the Surgical Management of Diabetic Foot Disease at Enugu. ... Themortality in this study was seen only in males, and all related to delay in accepting the operation, the degree of sepsis and fasting blood sugar level. Conclusion: Diabetics for gangrenous lower limb amputation are high risk ...

  20. special position for the anaesthetic management of a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... was too huge to allow adoption of the supine position for induction of anaesthesia. In order to achieve a suit- ... Keywords: Anaesthetic position, Operating table, Gi- ant mass, Airway management, General .... tions of stroke and death related to shoulder sur- gery in the sitting position. Arthroscopy 2008.

  1. Caesarean section wound infiltration with local anaesthetic for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For outcome in terms of the visual analogue pain score (0 - 10) over 24 hours, no advantage was demonstrated in the single study of 50 participants who had wound infiltration with a mixture of local analgesia and narcotics versus local analgesia. Conclusions. Local anaesthetic infiltration and abdominal nerve blocks as ...

  2. The anaesthetic potency of benzocaine-hydrochloride in three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anaesthetic potency of benzocaine-hydrochloride in three freshwater fish species. J.T. Ferreira, H.J. Schoonbee and G.L. Smit. Research Unit for Fish Biology, Rand Afrikaans University, Johannesburg. Anaesthesia was induced in the common carp, Cyprinus carpio, tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus and rainbow trout, ...

  3. Chronic fluorosis: The disease and its anaesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fluorosis is a widespread disease-related to the ingestion of high levels of fluoride through water and food. Prolonged ingestion of fluoride adversely affects the teeth, bones and other organs and alters their anatomy and physiology. Fluoride excess is a risk factor in cardiovascular disease and other major diseases, including hypothyroidism, diabetes and obesity. Although anaesthesiologists may be aware of its skeletal and dental manifestations, other systemic manifestations, some of which may impact anaesthetic management are relatively unknown. Keeping this in mind, the topic of chronic fluorosis was hand searched from textbooks, scientific journals and electronically through Google, PubMed and other scientific databases. This article concentrates on the effect of chronic fluorosis on various organ systems, its clinical features, diagnosis and the anaesthetic implications of the disease.

  4. Anaesthetic Efficacy of Sodium Bicarbonate and its Effects on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic efficacy of Sodium bicarbonate (NaHC03) and its effects on haematology of African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in five different concentrations [0.00 g/L (control), 50.00, 100.00, 150.00 and 200.00 g/L] were determined in two sizes: juvenile (mean length 26.64 cm ± 3.11SD; mean weight 356.21 g ± 12.91SD) ...

  5. Inhibition of protein kinase C by alcohols and anaesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Cox, K J; Lombardi, J V; Ho, C; Kelly, M B; Rubin, E; Stubbs, C D

    1993-07-01

    Despite almost a century of research, the mechanism of anaesthesia remains obscure and there is still no agreement on the location of the site(s) of action. Because the potencies of general anaesthetics increase in proportion to their solubility in olive oil, this led to a consensus that the site is within the cell membrane. This led to theories that lipid bilayer perturbation was the primary event, which was then transmitted to a membrane protein. But at the concentrations used clinically, such perturbations are small. A plausible site would be in or on ion channels at the synapse, where a number of modulatory effects have been described. A possible location for such a site would be at the protein-lipid interface. We report here that anaesthetics inhibit protein kinase C, a key component in signal transduction. The potency is a linear function of the octanol-water partition coefficient (the Meyer-Overton rule of anaesthesia). The effect was obtained in a lipid-free assay, implicating a hydrophobic site in the protein, supporting the contention that a (membrane) protein may be a target for anaesthetic interactions. In a lipid-dependent assay, a potential role of lipids in the protein-site model was demonstrated. The inhibition was absent in the isolated catalytic domain, suggesting that the site of inhibition is on the regulatory subunit, which is unique to protein kinase C.

  6. Evaluation of halothane as an anaesthetic in camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R; Peshin, P K; Patil, D B; Sharda, R; Singh, J; Singh, A P; Sharifi, D

    1994-06-01

    Halothane as an anaesthetic was evaluated in 12 adult camels, thiopentone being used as an induction agent. In six camels, clinical signs and haematological and blood biochemical changes were investigated while in other six haemodynamic, acid base and blood gas changes were monitored. The dose of thiopentone required to ensure intubation for halothane anaesthesia was 7.25 +/- 0.33 mg/kg. A modified technique of tracheal intubation was found to be safe and quick. During halothane administration all anaesthetic effects were predictable. Complete recovery occurred in 39.5 +/- 9.8 min after discontinuation of halothane administration. Halothane moderated the thiopentone-induced tachycardia. The mean arterial pressure decreased significantly. There was an increase in the arterial carbon dioxide and venous oxygen tension during halothane anaesthesia and development of hypoxaemia after its discontinuation. The alanine aminotransferase values increased during recovery, while plasma sodium, potassium and calcium decreased. Halothane appears to be safe for camels. However, to avoid hypoxaemia in the immediate post-anaesthetic period, oxygen administration should be continued.

  7. Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Pseudo-TORCH Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Berk

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudo-TORCH syndrome is a rare, chronic disorder that is characterised by dimorphic features such as microcephaly, intracranial calcification, seizures, mental retardation, hepatosplenomegaly and coagulation disorders. Case Report: We present the anaesthetic management of a forty day-old boy with Pseudo-TORCH syndrome during magnetic resonance imaging. Microcephaly, growth failure, high palate and bilateral rales in the lungs were detected in pre-anaesthetic physical examination. The peripheral oxygen saturation was 88-89% in room-air and was 95% in a hood with 5 L/min oxygen. We planned general anaesthesia to ensure immobility during magnetic resonance imaging. After standard monitoring, general anaesthesia was induced with 8% sevoflurane in 100% O2. After an adequate depth of anaesthesia was reached, we inserted a supraglottic airway device to avoid intubation without the use of a muscle relaxant. Conclusion: In patients with Pseudo-TORCH syndrome, the perioperative anaesthetic risk was increased. We believe that using a supraglottic airway device to secure the airway is less invasive than intubation, and can be performed without the need of muscle relaxants.

  8. Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Pseudo-TORCH Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Derya; Kuş, Alparslan; Sahin, Tülay; Solak, Mine; Toker, Kamil

    2013-09-01

    Pseudo-TORCH syndrome is a rare, chronic disorder that is characterised by dimorphic features such as microcephaly, intracranial calcification, seizures, mental retardation, hepatosplenomegaly and coagulation disorders. We present the anaesthetic management of a forty day-old boy with Pseudo-TORCH syndrome during magnetic resonance imaging. Microcephaly, growth failure, high palate and bilateral rales in the lungs were detected in pre-anaesthetic physical examination. The peripheral oxygen saturation was 88-89% in room-air and was 95% in a hood with 5 L/min oxygen. We planned general anaesthesia to ensure immobility during magnetic resonance imaging. After standard monitoring, general anaesthesia was induced with 8% sevoflurane in 100% O2. After an adequate depth of anaesthesia was reached, we inserted a supraglottic airway device to avoid intubation without the use of a muscle relaxant. In patients with Pseudo-TORCH syndrome, the perioperative anaesthetic risk was increased. We believe that using a supraglottic airway device to secure the airway is less invasive than intubation, and can be performed without the need of muscle relaxants.

  9. Can anaesthetic and analgesic techniques affect cancer recurrence or metastasis?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heaney, A

    2012-12-01

    Summary Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the ratio of incidence is increasing. Mortality usually results from recurrence or metastases. Surgical removal of the primary tumour is the mainstay of treatment, but this is associated with inadvertent dispersal of neoplastic cells into the blood and lymphatic systems. The fate of the dispersed cells depends on the balance of perioperative factors promoting tumour survival and growth (including surgery per se, many anaesthetics per se, acute postoperative pain, and opioid analgesics) together with the perioperative immune status of the patient. Available evidence from experimental cell culture and live animal data on these factors are summarized, together with clinical evidence from retrospective studies. Taken together, current data are sufficient only to generate a hypothesis that an anaesthetic technique during primary cancer surgery could affect recurrence or metastases, but a causal link can only be proved by prospective, randomized, clinical trials. Many are ongoing, but definitive results might not emerge for a further 5 yr or longer. Meanwhile, there is no hard evidence to support altering anaesthetic technique in cancer patients, pending the outcome of the ongoing clinical trials.

  10. Development of anaesthetic protocols for lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus L.: Effect of anaesthetic concentrations, sea water temperature and body weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene W Skår

    Full Text Available In recent years, use of lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus L. as cleaner-fish to remove sea-lice have been chosen by many salmon farmers in Europe and Canada as an alternative to medical treatment, which has led to large scale production of lumpfish. At present, there is limited knowledge of how lumpfish respond upon anaesthesia, which anaesthetics and concentrations that are efficient and conditions for euthanasia. We have therefore tested and developed protocols for bath immersion for three commonly used anaesthetics metacaine (Finquel, buffered tricaine methanesulfonate, MS-222 and Tricaine Pharmaq, benzocaine (Benzoak vet and isoeugenol (Aqui-S, determined concentration for normal and fast anaesthesia and evaluated safety margin for each condition. Also, a behavioral matrix has been developed. We have examined the effect of fish size (10-20 g, 200-400 g and 600-1300 g and sea water temperature (6°C and 12°C. We found that 200 mg L-1 metacaine is an efficient dose for deep narcosis independently for fish size and temperature due to good safety margins with regards to both exposure times and doses. However, for many tasks lighter anaesthesia is sufficient, and then 100 mg L-1 metacaine can be used. Benzocaine is less efficient than metacaine, but can be used as anaesthetic of fish 600 g, benzocaine is not suitable. Isoeugenol cannot be recommended for full anesthesia of lumpfish. The conditions for lethal doses varied with chosen anaesthetic, fish size and temperature. For small fish (10-20 g, exposure to 1600 mgL-1 of metacaine in 10 minutes it lethal. Guided protocols for non-lethal anaesthesia will contribute to ensure safe treatment of lumpfish according to an ethical standard for good fish welfare.

  11. Patterns of anaesthetic pericranial nerve block in headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Lasaosa, S; Gago Veiga, A; Guerrero Peral, Á L; Viguera Romero, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    2018-04-01

    Anaesthetic blocks, whether used alone or combined with other treatments, are a therapeutic resource for many patients with headaches. However, usage patterns by different professionals show significant heterogeneity. The Headache Study Group of the Spanish Society of Neurology (GECSEN) designed a self-administered cross-sectional survey and sent it to all group members through the SEN's scientific area web platform in February 2016. The objective was to ascertain the main technical and formal aspects of this procedure and compare them with data obtained in a similar survey conducted in 2012. A total of 39 neurologists (mean age 41.74 years; SD: 9.73), 23 men (43.7 years; SD: 9.92) and 16 women (38.94 years; SD: 9.01) participated in this survey. Of these respondents, 76.9% used anaesthetic block in their clinical practice (79.16% in a tertiary-care hospital). The main indications were diagnosis and treatment of neuralgia (100%), prevention of chronic migraine (61.7%), episodic cluster headache (51.3%), and chronic cluster headache (66.7%). AB was used by 31% of the respondents to block only the lateral occipital complex, 13% also infiltrated the supraorbital nerve, and another 13% infiltrated the auriculotemporal nerve as well. The indications for anaesthetic blocks and the territories most frequently infiltrated are similar to those cited in the earlier survey. However, we observed increased participation in this latest survey and a higher percentage of young neurologists (35.89% aged 35 or younger), indicating that use of this technique has entered mainstream clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Anaesthetic Impairment of Immune Function Is Mediated via GABAA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel W.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Corletto, Federico; Reckless, Jill; Loke, Justin C. T.; Lapaque, Nicolas; Grant, Andrew J.; Mastroeni, Pietro; Grainger, David J.; Padgett, Claire L.; O'Brien, John A.; Miller, Nigel G. A.; Trowsdale, John

    2011-01-01

    Background GABAA receptors are members of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter receptors, proteins which are responsible for fast synaptic transmission, and are the site of action of wide range of drugs [1]. Recent work has shown that Cys-loop receptors are present on immune cells, but their physiological roles and the effects of drugs that modify their function in the innate immune system are currently unclear [2]. We are interested in how and why anaesthetics increase infections in intensive care patients; a serious problem as more than 50% of patients with severe sepsis will die [3]–[6]. As many anaesthetics act via GABAA receptors [7], the aim of this study was to determine if these receptors are present on immune cells, and could play a role in immunocompromising patients. Principal Findings We demonstrate, using RT-PCR, that monocytes express GABAA receptors constructed of α1, α4, β2, γ1 and/or δ subunits. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiological studies show that GABA can activate these receptors, resulting in the opening of a chloride-selective channel; activation is inhibited by the GABAA receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not enhanced by the positive modulator diazepam. The anaesthetic drugs propofol and thiopental, which can act via GABAA receptors, impaired monocyte function in classic immunological chemotaxis and phagocytosis assays, an effect reversed by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Significance Our results show that functional GABAA receptors are present on monocytes with properties similar to CNS GABAA receptors. The functional data provide a possible explanation as to why chronic propofol and thiopental administration can increase the risk of infection in critically ill patients: their action on GABAA receptors inhibits normal monocyte behaviour. The data also suggest a potential solution: monocyte GABAA receptors are insensitive to diazepam, thus the use of benzodiazepines as an alternative anesthetising agent may be

  13. Anaesthetic management of a child with massive extracranial arteriovenous malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Shamim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular tumors affect the head and neck commonly but arteriovenous malformations are rare. Vascular malformations are often present at birth and grow with the patient, usually only becoming significant later in childhood. Embolization has been the mainstay of treatment in massive and complex arteriovenous malformations. We present a case of massive extracranial arteriovenous malformation in a 7-year-old boy causing significant workload on right heart and respiratory distress. The management of angioembolization under general anaesthesia and anaesthetic concerns are presented.

  14. IgE-mediated reaction to local anaesthetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartal, O.; Gulec, M.; Sener, O.; Caliskaner, A.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Local anaesthetics (LAs) are essential agents in daily practices of dentistry, minor surgery and dermatology. Although they have an impressive history of safety and efficacy, LAs also have the potential to produce adverse events, which are mainly of non-immune nature. The true IgE-mediated allergies are quite rare, but are more considerable in terms of ability to cause life-threatening outcomes. In this report, we present a case of IgE-mediated systemic reaction to LAs occurring during epidural anaesthesia for Cesarean section. (author)

  15. Distinct molecular sites of anaesthetic action: pentobarbital block of human brain sodium channels is alleviated by removal of fast inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wartenberg, H. C.; Urban, B. W.; Duch, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    Fast inactivation of sodium channel function is modified by anaesthetics. Its quantitative contribution to the overall anaesthetic effect is assessed by removing the fast inactivation mechanism enzymatically. Sodium channels from human brain cortex were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. After

  16. Strain-specific response to anaesthetics and analgesics in rat and rabbit : A pharmacogenetic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avsaroglu, H.

    2008-01-01

    The response of (laboratory) animals to anaesthetics and analgesics is known to show intraspecies variability. Apart from environmental influences, this may also be caused by genetic factors. In this thesis, rabbit and rat inbred strains were used to identify differences in response to anaesthetics

  17. Anaesthetic dilemma: spinal anaesthesia in an eclamptic patient with mild thrombocytopenia and an "impossible" airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafiu, O O; Salam, R A; Elegbe, E O

    2004-04-01

    We present our anaesthetic management of a 27-year-old woman with antepartum eclampsia, mild thrombocytopenia, difficult airway and clinical evidence of impending upper airway obstruction. She required urgent delivery by caesarean section, which was conducted uneventfully under spinal anaesthesia. We discuss the management conundrums presented by this case and why we chose spinal anaesthesia over other anaesthetic options.

  18. Fentanyl bolus induces muscle tremors in sevoflurane-anaesthetized piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, S K; Spielmann, N; Weiss, M; Mauch, J Y

    2016-08-01

    Intravenous fentanyl (10 mcg/kg) or saline (control) was randomly administered to 10 healthy sevoflurane-mono-anaesthetized piglets. Trembling was assessed by two blinded observers using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a simple ordinal scale at baseline and 5 min (T5) after drug administration. If no trembling was observed at that time point, the opposite treatment was administered and piglets were re-evaluated after another 5 min (T10). Four out of five piglets showed trembling after fentanyl (T5), while none given saline showed any trembling. With fentanyl the VAS scores were significantly higher at T5 compared either with baseline or with the control treatment. Control animals received fentanyl after the 5 min evaluation and all piglets showed clear trembling afterwards. The median time after fentanyl administration until first muscle tremors was 51 (20-840) s. In summary, nine out of 10 sevoflurane-anaesthetized piglets showed muscle tremors after intravenous fentanyl. Tremors subsided over time and no specific treatment was necessary. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Pressure and volume controlled mechanical ventilation in anaesthetized pregnant sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J; Musk, G C

    2014-10-01

    Optimal mechanical ventilation of the pregnant ewe during anaesthesia is of vital importance for maintaining fetal viability. This study aimed to compare peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), oxygenation and cardiovascular parameters with pressure-control (PCV) or volume-control (VCV) mechanical ventilation of anaesthetized pregnant sheep. Twenty ewes at 110 days gestation underwent general anaesthesia in dorsal recumbency for fetal surgery in a research setting. All the sheep were mechanically ventilated; one group with PCV (n = 10) and another with VCV (n = 10) to maintain normocapnia. PIP, direct arterial blood pressure, heart rate, arterial pH and arterial oxygen tension were recorded. PIP was lower in the PCV group (P pressures were lower in the PCV group (P = 0.029 and P = 0.047, respectively). Both VCV and PCV provide adequate oxygenation of pregnant sheep anaesthetized in dorsal recumbency, though PCV may provide superior oxygenation at a lower PIP. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. The incidence of unpleasant dreams after sub-anaesthetic ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagrove, Mark; Morgan, Celia J A; Curran, H Valerie; Bromley, Leslie; Brandner, Brigitte

    2009-03-01

    Ketamine is an N-methyl-D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist with psychotogenic effects and for which there are diverse reports of whether pleasant or unpleasant dreams result during anaesthesia, post-operatively or after sub-anaesthetic use. To assess in healthy volunteers the incidence of unpleasant dreams over the three nights after receiving a sub-anaesthetic dose of ketamine, in comparison to placebo, and with retrospective home nightmare frequency as a covariate. Thirty healthy volunteers completed questionnaires about retrospective home dream recall and were then given either ketamine (n = 19, males = 9, mean age = 23.5 years; mean ketamine blood plasma = 175.29 ng/mL) or placebo (n = 11, males = 5, mean age = 25.4 years). Dream recall and pleasantness/unpleasantness of dream content were recorded by questionnaire at home for the three nights after infusion. Ketamine resulted in significantly more mean dream unpleasantness relative to placebo and caused a threefold increase in the odds ratio for the incidence of an unpleasant dream. The number of dreams reported over the three nights did not differ between the groups. The incidence of unpleasant dreams after ketamine use was predicted by retrospectively assessed nightmare frequency at home. Ketamine causes unpleasant dreams over the three post-administration nights. This may be evidence of a residual psychotogenic effect that is not found on standard self-report symptomatology measures or a result of disturbed sleep electrophysiology.

  1. Burnout and the learning environment of anaesthetic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanelli, D J; Wickramaarachchi, S A; Wallis, S

    2017-11-01

    Burnout has a high prevalence among healthcare workers and is increasingly recognised as an environmental problem rather than reflecting a personal inability to cope with work stress. We distributed an electronic survey, which included the Maslach Burnout Inventory Health Services Survey and a previously validated learning environment instrument, to 281 Victorian anaesthetic trainees. The response rate was 50%. We found significantly raised rates of burnout in two of three subscales. Ninety-one respondents (67%) displayed evidence of burnout in at least one domain, with 67 (49%) reporting high emotional exhaustion and 57 (42%) reporting high depersonalisation. The clinical learning environment tool demonstrated a significant negative correlation with burnout (r=-0.56, P Burnout was significantly more common than when previously measured in Victoria in 2008 (62% versus 38%). Trainees rated examination preparation the most stressful aspect of the training program. There is a high prevalence of burnout among Victorian anaesthetic trainees. We have shown a significant correlation exists between the clinical learning environment measure and the presence of burnout. This correlation supports the development of interventions to improve the clinical learning environment, as a means to improve trainee wellbeing and address the high prevalence of burnout.

  2. Anaesthetic management of a patient with familial normokalaemic periodic paralysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, F

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: We describe the anaesthetic management of a patient with the autosomal dominant inherited disease, normokalaemic periodic paralysis. The disease results in intermittent bouts of limb and respiratory muscular weakness in association with hypothermia, stress, prolonged fasting or exercise. Unlike hypokalaemic and hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis, the more common variants of the disease, normokalaemic periodic paralysis is not accompanied by alterations in the plasma potassium concentration. CLINICAL FEATURES: A five-year-old boy presented for emergency scrotal exploration. He had a family history of periodic paralysis and had experienced previous episodes of weakness, two of which had required hospitalization for respiratory distress. On admission there was no evidence of weakness and serum potassium concentration was 4.2 mMol.L-1. A spinal anaesthetic was performed and the procedure was uncomplicated by muscle paralysis above the level of the spinal block. CONCLUSION: Avoidance of known precipitating factors and judicious use of neuromuscular blocking drugs has been advocated in patients with this disorder presenting for surgery. In appropriate circumstances, spinal anaesthesia represents a useful option in patients with normokalaemic periodic paralysis.

  3. The Lack, Magill and Bain anaesthetic breathing systems: a direct comparison in spontaneously-breathing anaesthetized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, D

    1982-01-01

    The performances of the Lack (Mapleson A), Magill (Mapleson A) and Bain (Mapleson D) anaesthetic breathing systems were compared in each of 20 anaesthetized adult patients breathing spontaneously with fresh gas flows of 70 ml kg-1 min-1. In every patient the Lack system caused the least rebreathing, as seen by the lowest inspired and end-expired CO2 tensions using capnography. The Magill caused more rebreathing than the Lack though less than the Bain. Comparative fresh gas flows for each system at the point where rebreathing started to occur were examined in 10 further patients. The Lack system required approximately 51 ml kg-1 min-1, the Magill 72 ml kg-1 min-1 while the Bain required 153 ml kg-1 min-1. Of the three systems the Lack is concluded to be the most efficient and economical system for spontaneous respiration in adults, with the additional advantages of convenient access to the exhaust valve, easy scavenging and low expiratory resistance. In addition, it also offers many useful advantages over the circle absorber system. Images Figure 1. PMID:6806473

  4. [Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; de Oliveira, Mariliza Casanova; de Oliveira Tavares, Graziela; Pereira, Laís Fabrício Fonseca; Soares, Nádia Derli Salvador Lemes; Silva, Patrícia Gatti

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0mg/kg); group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (plocal anaesthetic groups (p=0.0001), but not between the negative control group and the local anaesthetic groups (p>0.05). No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Anaesthetic Management of Caesarean Section in an Achondroplastic Dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti N Saxena

    2008-01-01

    A twenty year old parturient with short stature presented to the hospital in early labour. An elective lower segment caesarean section(LSCS was planned in view of cephalopelvic disproportion. She had papers which suggested that she had been diagnosed as a case of achondroplasia though details were not available. Combined spinal epidural(CSE anaesthesia was planned in the patient in view of the death of her first baby following caesarean section under general anaesthesia. Repeatedly dry taps were achieved on attempting dural puncture. Dural puncture was abandoned and an 18 G epidural catheter was threaded via the Tuohy needle. Sensory block till T 6 was achieved with 6ml of local anaesthetic solution. The patient was stable during the intraoperative and postoperative period.

  6. Anaesthetic considerations for liver transplantation in propionic acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akila Rajakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Propionic acidemia (PA is an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism due to deficiency of the enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC that converts propionyl-CoA to methylmalonyl-CoA with the help of the cofactor biotin inside the mitochondria. The resultant accumulation of propionyl-CoA causes severe hyperammonaemia and life-threatening metabolic acidosis. Based on the positive outcomes, liver transplantation is now recommended for individuals with recurrent episodes of hyperammonaemia or acidosis that is not adequately controlled with appropriate medical therapies. We report anaesthetic management of two children with PA for liver transplantation at our institution. It is essential for the anaesthesiologist, caring for these individuals to be familiar with the manifestations of the disease, the triggers for decompensation and management of an acute episode.

  7. Anaesthetic considerations for liver transplantation in propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakumar, Akila; Kaliamoorthy, Ilankumaran; Reddy, Mettu Srinivas; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism due to deficiency of the enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) that converts propionyl-CoA to methylmalonyl-CoA with the help of the cofactor biotin inside the mitochondria. The resultant accumulation of propionyl-CoA causes severe hyperammonaemia and life-threatening metabolic acidosis. Based on the positive outcomes, liver transplantation is now recommended for individuals with recurrent episodes of hyperammonaemia or acidosis that is not adequately controlled with appropriate medical therapies. We report anaesthetic management of two children with PA for liver transplantation at our institution. It is essential for the anaesthesiologist, caring for these individuals to be familiar with the manifestations of the disease, the triggers for decompensation and management of an acute episode.

  8. Regional haemodynamic effects of urocortin in the anaesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Aly M; Pang, Catherine C Y

    2003-04-18

    Urocortin is an endogenous vasodilator peptide that is related to corticotrophin-releasing factor. We examined the haemodynamic effects of urocortin in thiobutabarbital-anaesthetized rats, via the triple-isotope microspheres technique. Urocortin (3 nmol/kg, i.v. bolus) reduced mean arterial pressure (-25 mm Hg) through a decrease in total peripheral resistance (-43%). This was associated with an increase in cardiac output (+24%) and vasodilatation of the following tissues: heart and stomach (approximately 300% of baseline); liver, intestine, caecum/colon, skeletal muscle and skin (approximately 200%); and testes (approximately 150%). Arterial conductances of the kidneys, spleen and brain were unaffected by urocortin. Neither the vehicle (0.9% NaCl) nor a low dose of urocortin (0.3 nmol/kg) altered any measurements. Therefore, urocortin causes generalized vasodilatation as follows: heart and stomach>liver, intestine, caecum/colon, skeletal muscle and skin>testes.

  9. Prostaglandins release plasma 'reciprocal coupling factor' in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoult, J. R.; Moore, P. K.

    1981-01-01

    1. Prostaglandins E1, E2, I2 and endoperoxide analogue U46619 injected intra-arterially (i.a.) into anaesthetized rats at 2 micrograms/kg caused a substantial increase within 60 min of the plasma activity of prostaglandin 'reciprocal coupling factor' (RCF). RCF is the provisional name for the component(s) of plasma which inhibit microsomal prostaglandin synthesis and enhance cytosolic prostaglandin breakdown. 2. RCF is not released by inactive metabolite 13,14-dihydro-15-keto prostaglandin E2 (10 micrograms/kg, i.a.) or acetylcholine or histamine (2 micrograms/kg, i.a.). 3. We suggest that release by prostaglandins of RCF would provide the basis in vivo for a negative feedback mechanism controlling the activity of the prostaglandin system. PMID:7032632

  10. Anaesthetic management of two different cases of mediastinal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Subbanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the management of two paediatric cases undergoing median sternotomy and right lateral thoracotomy for mediastinal mass. An 8-year-old boy presented with a history of intermittent fever and episodes of respiratory illness since 3 years and a 16-year-old girl presented with dyspnoea, cough, fever and dysphagia for solid foods. Radiological investigation confirmed the diagnoses. Absence of pressure symptoms pointed towards a compressible mass in the boy and indicated a non-compressible mass in the girl. We discuss the anaesthetic management of the younger patient with an uneventful course as opposed to the older patient where airway obstruction ensued soon after induction and led to near-cardiopulmonary arrest necessitating rescue measures. Swift measures at securing airway while simultaneously resuscitating the patient served to successfully revert an otherwise fateful eventuality.

  11. Rapid cerebral vasodilatation in brief hypoxia in anaesthetized animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennett, S; Pitts, L H; North, J B

    1981-10-01

    In anaesthetized dogs, cats and rabbits, intracranial pressure was measured continuously during brief or transient hypoxia, induced by (a) lowering inspired O2 to 9--10% for 2--3 min, or (b) giving 2--3 breaths of nitrogen. In almost all instances there was an increase in i.c.p. which started in less than 20 s; this occurred with either spontaneous or controlled ventilation, and whether or not there was also a rise in arterial blood pressure; the time course was similar to that of the arterial chemoreceptor reflex responses of ventilation and blood pressure. Division bilaterally of the sinus and vagus nerves in six cats showed that the intracranial pressure response was not dependent on these chemoreceptor afferent pathways. The results suggest a rapid vasodilatation starting at a time when cerebral arterial oxygen tension is unlikely to be below 7 kPa (50 mmHg). The mechanism remains unexplained.

  12. The effects of multiple anaesthetic episodes on equine recovery quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J P; Simon, B T; Coleman, M; Martinez, E A; Lepiz, M A; Watts, A E

    2018-01-01

    Although rare, 70% of equine fatalities during recovery from general anaesthesia (GA) are due to catastrophic fractures from poor recovery quality. To determine the effect of repeated GA recovery on GA recovery quality. Experimental blinded trial. Eight adult horses underwent six GA events on sevoflurane for distal limb MRI examination over a 14-week period. Prior to GA recovery, xylazine was administered. Randomly ordered video-recorded GA recoveries were scored by three blinded board certified veterinary anaesthesiologists, unaware of patient identity or GA event number, for nine parameters using a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) where 0 = worst and 100 = best. The number of attempts to stand, duration of lateral and sternal recumbency, total recovery duration and physiologic parameters during each GA event were recorded. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to detect differences. Agreement between observer VAS scores was determined via inter-rater reliability using an intraclass correlation. With GA recovery experience, VAS scores for balance and coordination, knuckling, and overall quality of recovery were improved and the duration of lateral recumbency was increased. There were no differences in total recovery duration, number of attempts to stand, physiologic parameters other than heart rate during GA, or VAS scores for activity in lateral recumbency, move to sternal, move to stand, or strength. Each GA event was relatively short and there was no surgical stimulation. The same results may not occur if there was surgical stimulation and pain during each GA event. Recovery from GA improves with multiple anaesthetic episodes in horses. Clinicians can advise clients that horses are likely to have better GA recovery on repeated GA recovery due to improved balance and coordination and reduced knuckling. Additionally, there is no change in anaesthetic morbidity with six repeated GA events over a 14-week period. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  13. Interference of anaesthetics with radioligand binding in neuroreceptor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfving, Betina; Knudsen, Gitte Moos [Neurobiology Research Unit N9201, University hospital Rigshospitalet, 9 Blegdamsvej, 2100, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bjoernholm, Berith [Department of Computational Chemistry, H. Lundbeck A/S, Copenhagen-Valby (Denmark)

    2003-06-01

    Evaluations of new emission tomography ligands are usually carried out in animals. In order to keep the animals in a restricted position during the scan session, anaesthesia is almost inevitable. In ex vivo rat studies we investigated the interference of ketamine/xylazine, zoletile mixture, isoflurane and halothane with the serotonin re-uptake site, the serotonin{sub 2A} receptor and the dopamine re-uptake site by use of [{sup 3}H]-(S)-citalopram, [{sup 18}F]altanserin and [{sup 125}I]PE2I, respectively. Ketamine/xylazine decreased the target-to-background ratio (mean {+-} SD) of [{sup 3}H]-(S)-citalopram from 1.5{+-}0.19 to 0.81{+-}0.19 (P<0.05), whereas isoflurane and halothane increased the ratio from 1.5{+-}0.19 to 1.9{+-}0.24 and 2.1{+-}0.13 (P<0.05), respectively. Only with the zoletile mixture did the ratio remain unaltered. None of the tested anaesthetics affected the target-to-background ratio of [{sup 18}F]altanserin. The [{sup 125}I]PE2I target-to-background ratio decreased with both ketamine/xylazine (from 12.4{+-}0.81 to 10.1{+-}1.4, P<0.05) and isoflurane (from 12.4{+-}0.81 to 9.5{+-}1.1, P<0.05) treated rats, whereas treatment with zoletile mixture and halothane left the ratio unaltered. It is concluded that prior to performance of neuroreceptor radioligand studies, the possible interaction between radioligands and anaesthetics should be carefully evaluated. (orig.)

  14. The electrocardiogram of anaesthetized southern sea lion (Otaria flavescens) females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassis, M; Rodríguez, D H; Rodríguez, E; Ponce de León, A; Castro, E

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize for the first time the electrocardiogram (ECG) of the southern sea lion (SSL) Otaria flavescens. Thirteen wild SSL females were captured at Isla de Lobos (Uruguay) and anaesthetized with isoflurane. Electrocardiographic recording was performed on anaesthetized animals at ventral recumbence following standardized procedures. The ECG recordings showed normal sinus rhythm. Amplitude and duration of P and T waves, QRS complex, PR interval, QT interval and ST segment (STS) were determined for all animals in all leads. QT corrected was determined in lead II. P wave polarity was consistent among animals (positive in LI, LII, LIII and AVF leads and negative in AVL and AVR leads for all animals), but T wave polarity did not present any constant pattern among animals, being either positive, negative or biphasic in different leads and different animals. The PR interval (0.15 ± 0.2 s) was similar to the allometric prediction for most of mammalian species including humans. The STS were normal in 10 of the SSL but showed STS depression in three of the animals. Almost all animals had a negative electrical axis (-30° to -120°), with one exception that showed a positive electrical axis (120°). Mean eupnoeic heart rate was 104.61 ± 10.06 (range = 88-120) beats per minute. This study was the first ECG description for this species, and provides valuable information for cardiac monitoring during anaesthesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analgesic efficacy of local anaesthetic wound administration in knee arthroplasty: volume vs concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L Ø; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Kristensen, B B

    2010-01-01

    Wound administration of local anaesthetic may be effective for postoperative pain management in knee arthroplasty, but the analgesic efficacy of local anaesthetic in relation to volume vs concentration has not been determined. In a double-blinded trial, 48 patients scheduled for total knee...... was 12.5 (10-19 [0-35]) mg in the high volume/low concentration group, and 20 mg (16-40 [0-65]) mg in the low volume/high concentration group (p = 0.005). In conclusion, intracapsular administration of local anaesthetic may have limited analgesic efficacy with no volume vs concentration relationship...

  16. Foundation doctors in Anaesthesia: should they be taught to administer an anaesthetic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Sean

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthetic pre-registration house officer posts have been available since 1997. With the change to postgraduate medical training introduced in 2005, these posts have become vital building blocks for Foundation Programmes. Discussion We debate the skills that new Foundation Programme doctors in such posts should be taught, particularly whether administration of an anaesthetic holds an important place. The opinion of college tutors prior to the institution of the foundation programme is included. These were obtained from a postal questionnaire. Summary We maintain that teaching how to administer an anaesthetic remains an important learning objective and something that should be actively pursued.

  17. Assessment of anaesthetic depth by clustering analysis and autoregressive modelling of electroencephalograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C E; Rosenfalck, A; Nørregaard Christensen, K

    1991-01-01

    The brain activity electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 30 healthy women scheduled for hysterectomy. The patients were anaesthetized with isoflurane, halothane or etomidate/fentanyl. A multiparametric method was used for extraction of amplitude and frequency information from the EEG...

  18. In vitro toxicity of local anaesthetics and corticosteroids on supraspinatus tenocyte viability and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton W. Nuelle

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This data confirms that peritendinous injection of commonly used local anaesthetics and corticosteroids results in significant supraspinatus tenotoxicity in vitro. Further in vivo studies are required before making definitive clinical recommendations.

  19. The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with local anaesthetics after breast surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byager, N; Hansen, Mads; Mathiesen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    significant reduction in post-operative, supplemental opioid consumption that was, however, of limited clinical relevance. CONCLUSION: Wound infiltration with local anaesthetics may have a modest analgesic effect in the first few hours after surgery. Pain after breast surgery is, however, generally mild......BACKGROUND: Wound infiltration with local anaesthetics is commonly used during breast surgery in an attempt to reduce post-operative pain and opioid consumption. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effect of wound infiltration with local anaesthetics compared with a control group on post......-operative pain after breast surgery. METHODS: A systematic review was performed by searching PubMed, Google Scholar, the Cochrane database and Embase for randomised, blinded, controlled trials of wound infiltration with local anaesthetics for post-operative pain relief in female adults undergoing breast surgery...

  20. Anaesthetic management of a child with panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN (Hallervorden-Spatz disease is a rare autosomal recessive chromosomal disorder characterised by progressive neuroaxonal dystrophy. The characteristic features include involuntary movements, rigidity, mental retardation, seizures, emaciation. The anaesthetic concerns include difficult airway, aspiration pneumonia, dehydration, and post-operative respiratory, and renal insufficiency. We report successful anaesthetic management of a 9-year-old intellectually disabled male child with PKAN, scheduled for ophthalmic surgery under general anaesthesia.

  1. Anaesthetic significance and management of a child with neonatal purpura fulminans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Kumar Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein C deficiency is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder of varying severity. Patients with homozygous and compound heterozygous protein C deficiency present with neonatal purpura fulminans (NPF. Other presentations usually include disseminated intravascular coagulation and venous thromboembolism. This disorder usually poses a unique anaesthetic challenge to the anaesthesiologist, requiring special precautions to prevent various intra- and post-operative complications. We hereby report the successful anaesthetic management of a 1-month-old infant who presented with NPF.

  2. Analgesic efficacy of local anaesthetic wound administration in knee arthroplasty: volume vs concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L Ø; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Kristensen, B B

    2010-01-01

    Wound administration of local anaesthetic may be effective for postoperative pain management in knee arthroplasty, but the analgesic efficacy of local anaesthetic in relation to volume vs concentration has not been determined. In a double-blinded trial, 48 patients scheduled for total knee...... was reduced in both groups with ropivacaine administration 24 h postoperatively (p observed with ropivacaine injection 6 h postoperatively. The median (IQR [range]) dose of oxycodone administered...

  3. Role of Human Factors and Non-Technical Skills in Anaesthetic Nursing Practice: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Daphne; Melarkey, Noelle; Hoy, Leontia

    2018-01-01

    The role of the anaesthetic nurse specialist is about to change and the adaptation, consisting of many skills including educator, advisor, change agent and innovator. Expertise, knowledge and skills acquired, range not only from years of experience but now through a m ore formal educational specialist pathway at graduate level. The anaesthetic specialised role is to enhance patient outcomes and experience by delivering individually tailored care in the perioperative phase. The need to improve...

  4. Efficacy of paediatric anaesthetic trolleys: A call for a basic standard and layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Sian E; Boleat, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Alison; Sheikh, Asme; Goonasekera, Chulananda

    2015-01-01

    Providing safe anaesthesia to children especially in emergency situations goes hand in hand with instant availability of appropriately sized equipment and monitoring. This is best achieved using a designated paediatric anaesthetic trolley containing essential equipment. Guidance for the contents of such trolleys is neither explicit nor standard. We used a survey and a qualitative enquiry to develop a checklist suitable for standardisation of contents and layout of paediatric anaesthetic trolleys. We conducted an observational study of our current practice and paediatric anaesthetic trolleys in a tertiary care hospital. We also performed a qualitative enquiry from experienced paediatric anaesthetists and operating department practitioners.We developed an empirical checklist to ensure the minimum 'essential' equipment is available on these trolleys and implemented a standard layout to facilitate its use. We identified 11 areas in our hospital where anaesthesia is provided to children, each with a designated paediatric anaesthetic trolley. There were considerable deficiencies of items in all areas with no standard pattern or layout. Different types of trolleys contributed to the confusion. In addition, overstocking of inappropriate items hindered its efficient use. Standardising the contents and layout of the paediatric anaesthetic trolley is an essential pre-requisite for safer paediatric anaesthetic practice.

  5. Pancreatic exocrine responses to parasympathetic stimulation in anaesthetized pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfacree, Z J; Read, P A; Edwards, A V

    2001-03-23

    Pancreatic exocrine responses to stimulation of the peripheral ends of the vagus nerves intermittently have been investigated in anaesthetized pigs and compared with the effects of continuous stimulation at corresponding frequencies. At relatively low frequencies Hz in bursts or 2 Hz continuously) both the flow of pancreatic juice and the output of protein therein were potentiated by stimulating in bursts. Thus stimulation at 20 Hz in bursts produced a significantly greater flow of pancreatic juice than stimulation at 2 Hz continuously (10.9+/-0.9 compared to 4.8+/-0.7 microl min(-1) (g gland)-1 , respectively; PHz (144+/-23 microg min(-1) (g gland)-1) far exceeded that produced during continuous stimulation at 2 Hz (49+/-9 microg min(-1) (g gland)-1; PHz) and substantially reduced the output of protein during intermittent stimulation (to 27+/-7 ng min(-1) (g gland)-1; PHz in bursts). These results show that a variety of pancreatic exocrine responses can be enhanced by stimulating the parasympathetic innervation in bursts. They are also consistent with the contention that the secretion of protein from the gland, in response to parasympathetic stimulation, is dependent mainly on activation of muscarinic receptors. They confirm that the flow of pancreatic juice is due mainly to the release of VIP and show that, in the absence of atropine, this is restricted by muscarinic inhibition which may be presynaptic as elsewhere.

  6. Nasogastric tube insertion in anaesthetized patients: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaie, Sarvin; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Najafi, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    Nasogastric tubes (NGT) still remain the easiest and the best way for gastrointestinal tract access. There are various indications for the insertion of a nasogastric tube in anaesthetized and critically ill patients. Although many techniques have been introduced to facilitate nasogastric tube insertion using anatomic landmarks and a group of devices, there is no consensus on a standard method. Moreover, there are different methods for the assessment of the correct placement of a nasogastric tube. In addition to these challenges in insertion and assessment methods, there are varieties of major life-threatening and minor complications to be addressed. Thus, selecting the most appropriate approach requires enough knowledge in this area, considering patient condition and clinical factors, as well as the practitioners' sufficient education and experience, along with skill in performance. This is a comprehensive review of the literature evidence on different methods for nasogastric tube insertion, on the assessment of correct placement and the evaluation of complications, in addition to an approach to the effect of education on the quality of routine practice and patients' outcome.  .

  7. Volatile anaesthetics and cardiac protection in abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopić, Jasminka

    2015-07-01

    Clinical studies have shown that sevoflurane is cardio-protective in cardiac surgery patients, but this effect is doubtful in general surgery patients. This study has researched the influence of sevoflurane on the perioperative cardiac function and the incidence of cardiac ischaemic events in abdominal surgical patients. Out of 80 patients scheduled for elective colorectal surgery, 42 received balanced sevoflurane-fentanyl anaesthesia, while 38 received intravenous midazolam-fentanyl anaesthesia. The cardiac index (CI) and cardiac function index (CFI) were measured by the PiCCO device, and Troponin I levels were measured at the beginning of surgery, as well as 4, 12 and 24 h afterwards. BNP was measured at the beginning of surgery, and 24 h afterwards. The data analysis was conducted using the Mann-Whitney nonparametric test, with statistical significance set at p abdominal surgical patients. Further research on the preconditioning effect of volatile anaesthetics in general surgical population should be concentrated on the population of patients with a high perioperative cardiac risk.

  8. Patients' Reactions to Local Anaesthetic Application Devices in Paediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajrić, Elmedin; Kobasglija, Sedin; Jurić, Hrvoje

    2015-09-01

    Local anaesthesia is the most common medium for pain control in most dental treatments. Physical appearance of syringe itself can be considered as a provoking factor for the emergence of dental fear and anxiety (DFA). In this research the patient reactions to local anaesthesia application devices, as one of the main causes for DFA emergence, were inquired. The sample comprised of 120 patients, divided in three age groups, formed of 40 patients aged 8, 12 and 15 years. DFA prevalence was quantified by Children Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS). Three different syringes were offered to the patients. Reasons for choosing one of the syringes were detected. Patients assigned statistically highest rank to plastic syringe. Boys chose metal and intraligamental syringe statistically more often than girls. Patients with higher CFSS-DS scores chose metal syringe as last option. None of the reasons for selection was dominant, except pain that could be caused by usage of any of the three syringes. A large number of patients did not mention any of the reasons for choosing particular syringes. Plastic syringe represented the most acceptable device for local anaesthetic application to our patients. Patients often linked pain with dental syringes.

  9. A review of an anaesthetic led vascular access list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, S; Sharma, A; Ward, J; Bodenham, A R

    2005-08-01

    The demand for insertion of long-term central venous (Hickman type) catheters is thought to be increasing. Organisation is required to meet this demand in a safe and efficient manner. This report reviews the results from a dedicated, anaesthetic led vascular access list over the initial 61-month period. One thousand procedures were performed. Nine hundred and twenty catheters were inserted under local anaesthesia, with or without intravenous sedation and analgesia. Eighty catheters were removed. All procedures were performed during a dedicated once weekly, morning list. A total of 53% of all procedures were performed on a day-case basis, 43% on in-patients. Only 1.5% of patients required an unexpected overnight stay (usually medically unfit patients). There were 81 (9%) cancellations on the day of procedure due to neutropaenia, pneumonia or urinary tract infections. Ultrasound guidance was used initially selectively in 14%, latterly in 100% of procedures and fluoroscopy in all insertions to confirm or adjust catheter position. This service has been well received by patients and oncology services. In addition it provides an interesting area of practice for anaesthetists and an ideal environment for teaching more advanced aspects of central venous access. It may provide a template of service for other centres.

  10. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of cisplatin treatment combined with anaesthetics on EAT cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovic, Gordana; Orsolic, Nada; Knezevic, Fabijan; Horvat Knezevic, Anica; Benkovic, Vesna; Sakic, Katarina; Hrgovic, Zlatko; Bendelja, Kreso; Fassbender, Walter J

    2009-06-01

    In this study, DNA damage in tumour cells, as well as irreversible cell damage leading to apoptosis induced in vivo by the combined application of cisplatin and inhalation anaesthetics, was investigated. The genotoxicity of anaesthetics on Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells of mice, alone or in combined application with cisplatin, was estimated by using the alkaline comet assay. The percentage of EAT cell apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Groups of EAT-bearing mice were (i) treated intraperitoneally with cisplatin, (ii) exposed to repeated anaesthesia with inhalation anaesthetic, and (iii) subjected to combined treatment of exposure to anaesthetics after cisplatin for 3 days. Sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane caused strong genotoxic effects on tumour cells in vivo. The tested anaesthetics alone showed no direct effect on programmed cell death although sevoflurane and especially halothane decreased the number of living EAT cells in peritoneal cavity lavage. Repeated anaesthesia with isoflurane had stimulatory effects on EAT cell proliferation and inhibited tumour cell apoptosis (6.11%), compared to the control group (10.26%). Cisplatin caused massive apoptosis of EAT cells (41.14%) and decreased the number of living EAT cells in the peritoneal cavity. Combined cisplatin and isoflurane treatment additionally increased EAT cell apoptosis to 51.32%. Combined treatment of mice with cisplatin and all anaesthetics increased the number of living tumour cells in the peritoneal cavity compared to cisplatin treatment of mice alone. These results suggest that the inhalation of anaesthetics may protect tumour cells from the cisplatin-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Comparative efficacy and patient preference of topical anaesthetics in dermatological laser treatments and skin microneedling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhen Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Topical anaesthetics are effective for patients undergoing superficial dermatological and laser procedures. Our objective was to compare the efficacy and patient preference of three commonly used topical anaesthetics: (2.5% lidocaine/2.5% prilocaine cream (EMLA ® , 4% tetracaine gel (Ametop TM and 4% liposomal lidocaine gel (LMX4 ® in patients undergoing laser procedures and skin microneedling. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, double-blind study of patients undergoing laser and skin microneedling procedures at a laser unit in a tertiary referral dermatology centre. Materials and Methods: All 29 patients had three topical anaesthetics applied under occlusion for 1 hour prior to the procedure, at different treatment sites within the same anatomical zone. A self-assessment numerical pain rating scale was given to each patient to rate the pain during the procedure and each patient was asked to specify their preferred choice of topical anaesthetic at the end of the procedure. Statistical Analysis: Parametric data (mean pain scores and frequency of topical anaesthetic agent of choice were compared using the paired samples t-test. A P-value of ≤0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results and Conclusions: Patients reported a mean (±SD; 95% confidence interval pain score of 5 (±2.58; 3.66-6.46 with Ametop TM , 4.38 (±2.53; 2.64-4.89 with EMLA ® and 3.91 (±1.95; 2.65-4.76 with LMX4 ® . There was no statistically significant difference in pain scores between the different topical anaesthetics. The majority of patients preferred LMX4 ® as their choice of topical anaesthetic for dermatological laser and skin microneedling procedures.

  12. Interaction of local and general anaesthetics with liposomal membrane models: a QCM-D and DSC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, José Gabriel; Paradiso, Patrizia; Serro, Ana Paula; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2012-06-15

    The behaviour of four local anaesthetics (lidocaine, levobupivacaine, ropivacaine and tetracaine) and one general anaesthetic (propofol) is compared when interacting with two types of model membranes: supported layers of liposomes and liposomes in solution. Several liposomal compositions were tested: dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), binary mixtures of DMPC with cholesterol (CHOL), and ternary mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), DMPC, and CHOL. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, QCM-D, was used to assess changes in the properties of supported layers of liposomes. The effect of the anaesthetics on the phase behaviour of the liposomes in suspension was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Both techniques show that all anaesthetics have a fluidizing effect on the model membranes but, apparently, the solid supported liposomes are less affected by the anaesthetics than the liposomes in solution. Although the different anaesthetics were compared at different concentrations, tetracaine and propofol seem to induce the strongest perturbation on the liposome membrane. The resistance of the liposomes to the anaesthetic action was found to increase with the presence of cholesterol, while adding DPPC to the binary mixture DMPC+CHOL does not change its behaviour. The novelty of the present work resides upon three points: (1) the use of supported layers of liposomes as model membranes to study interactions with anaesthetics; (2) application of QCM-D to assess changes of the adsorbed liposomes; (3) a comparison of the effect of local and general anaesthetics interacting with various model membranes in similar experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The perils of dental vacation: possible anaesthetic and medicolegal consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltracco, Paolo; Gaudio, Rosa Maria; Barbieri, Stefania; Tiano, Letizia; Iacobone, Maurizio; Viel, Giovanni; Tonetti, Tommaso; Galligioni, Helmut; Bortolato, Andrea; Ori, Carlo; Avato, Francesco Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to emphasize anaesthesiologists' difficulty in detecting poor dentition in cases of poorly applied prostheses and/or advanced periodontal disease, and to establish whether it is possible, and in which conditions, to calculate compensation in cases of dental damage postlaryngoscopy and/or intubation. The main complex problem here lies in trying to reconstruct exactly what the dental situation was before the teeth were damaged. For this reason the important preoperative factors (dental prostheses, crown fractures, parodontal disease, etc.) must be clearly shown before surgery on a dental chart. Two cases of interest, both to anaesthesiologists practising intubation and medicolegal physicians who have to deal with potential claims, are briefly reported. The first patient was a 55-year-old diabetic patient, who underwent emergency surgery for acute abdominal pathology. He had gone outside Italy for dental treatment three years previously and now presented with very poor pre-existing dentition, carefully noted on an anaesthetic chart. He now demanded compensation for dental damage due to intubation in Italy; the resulting dental treatment was very expensive because substantial remedial work was required. The second patient had received treatment outside Italy, work which involved cosmetic coating of the teeth. After surgery in Italy, she demanded compensation because one tooth, which had been coated and appeared to be healthy, was broken after emergency intubation. In both cases, the patients demanded very high compensation. Dental tourism alone accounts for more than 250,000 patients each year who combine a holiday with dental treatment in Eastern Europe. However, if prosthetic devices or conservative treatments are not applied correctly, it should be noted that durability may be poorer than expected, but iatrogenic damage may also be caused.

  14. The effects of cremophor EL in the anaesthetized dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudy, J H; Sicard, J F; Lhoste, F; Boitier, J F

    1987-03-01

    The effects of cremophor EL were studied in 13 anaesthetized, paralyzed and ventilated dogs. Twenty per cent cremophor EL in a dose of 4.3 +/- 0.92 ml was infused at a rate of 30 ml X hr-1. In seven dogs, thoracopulmonary compliance, heart rate, systemic arterial pressure (SAP), pulmonary pressures (PAP, PCWP, RAP), cardiac output (CO) and platelet and white cell counts, were measured before the injection of cremophor EL, at the end of infusion and 5, 10, 30 and 150 minutes after the end of infusion. In six dogs, SAP, CO, and blood volume were measured before the injection of cremophor EL, at the end of infusion and 10, 30, 90 and 150 minutes after the end of infusion. Plasma histamine and catecholamines were assayed before the injection of cremophor EL and 2, 5, 10, 30, 90 and 150 minutes after starting the infusion. Cremophor EL induced a marked, sustained and significant decrease in SAP at the end of infusion and at 5, 10 and 30 minutes after the completion of the infusion (-68, -71, -70 and -43 per cent respectively), in PCWP, RAP and CO (-78 per cent at the end of infusion, -32 per cent 150 minutes after the end of infusion). Heart rate and systemic vascular resistance did not vary significantly. Pulmonary vascular resistance increased at the end of infusion, five and ten minutes after the end of infusion (+734, +548 and +439 per cent respectively). Plasma volume decreased 10 and 30 minutes after the end of infusion (-28 and -30.5 per cent respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Post-anaesthetic myelomalacia in a horse : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a rare neurological complication of anaesthesia in a 2 year-old Clydesdale colt undergoing castration. Anaesthesia was induced with glyceryl guaiacol ether and ketamine and maintained with halothane. Following an uneventful anaesthetic of 40 minutes, the horse recovered from anaesthesia in a padded recovery stall. After approximately 70 minutes in the recovery stall, the horse attempted to stand and adopted a dog sitting position. One hundred and fifty minutes later, the horse became distressed and was sedated with xylazine. Clinical examination of the horse did not reveal any evidence of myositis or fractures. A neurological examination revealed an intact anal reflex, deep pain response in the hind legs, tail tone and voluntary movement of the hind legs was possible. The horse deteriorated neurologically over the next 24 hours and was euthanased on humane grounds. The horse was submitted for necropsy. Gross pathology was unremarkable except for a small amount of haemorrhage around the right kidney. Histopathology revealed no abnormalities in any muscle groups or peripheral nerves. Congestion and axonal swelling of the spinal cord was evident from T16 to S1. Ischaemic neurons were evident from L 1 to L 6. The most prominent lesions were at L4 and L5. A diagnosis of myelomalacia was made. This is a rare complication of anaesthesia in horses with 9 case studies appearing in the literature since 1979. This is the 1st case to be reported in South Africa. The speculated pathophysiology and risk factors for this complication are discussed.

  16. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by repetitive administration of local anaesthetics: an experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies regarding the effects of some local anaesthetics have suggested that these agents can cause genetic damage. However, they have not been tested for genotoxicity related to repetitive administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of local anaesthetics upon repetitive administration. METHODS: 80 male Wistar rats were divided into: group A - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with lidocaine hydrochloride 2%; group B - 16 rats IP injected with mepivacaine 2%; group C - 16 rats intraperitoneally injected with articaine 4%; group D - 16 rats IP injected with prilocaine 3% (6.0 mg/kg; group E - 8 rats subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide; and group F - 8 rats intraperitoneally injected with saline. Eight rats from groups A to D received a single dose of anaesthetic on Day 1 of the experiment; the remaining rats were dosed once a day for 5 days. RESULTS: The median number of micronuclei in the local anaesthetics groups exposed for 1 or 5 days ranged from 0.00 to 1.00, in the cyclophosphamide-exposed group was 10.00, and the negative control group for 1 and 5 days was 1.00 and 0.00, respectively (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: No genotoxicity effect was observed upon repetitive exposure to any of the local anaesthetics evaluated.

  17. A lack of anaesthetic clinical attachments for emergency medicine advanced trainees in New Zealand: perceptions of directors of emergency medicine training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Alexander

    2015-08-07

    Anaesthetic skills are a core competency for emergency physicians. Anecdotally, there are limited anaesthetic attachments specifically available for Emergency Medicine Advanced Trainees (ATs). This study had several aims: Firstly, to quantify anaesthetic terms set aside for ATs; secondly, to gauge the opinions of Directors of Emergency Medicine Training (DEMTs) regarding the importance and difficulty in securing and maintaining anaesthetic training terms for ATs in their institutions; thirdly, to outline strategies that DEMTs used to get or maintain these posts and their opinions about what institutions should do to provide anaesthetic training for ATs. An online qualitative survey was emailed to all DEMTs of hospitals accredited for vocational ED training within New Zealand. Registered Medical Officer (RMO) units at accredited hospitals were asked to provide numbers of anaesthetic places available specifically for ATs. Annually there are 15 anaesthetic training posts set aside for 145 ATs. Most DEMTs thought that an anaesthetic term was important for progression of vocational training, and a majority thought that term availability was a significant barrier to progression of training. A number of DEMTs felt that procuring and maintaining anaesthetic posts was difficult, some citing a lack of collegiality from anaesthetic departments. Some DEMTs and ATs used novel approaches to procure anaesthetic attachments. Anaesthetic skills are an essential component of emergency medicine vocational training. It is in the best interests of hospitals to provide anaesthetic training positions for ATs. There are few training positions currently available.

  18. Anaesthetic considerations in children with congenital heart disease undergoing non-cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish Menghraj Shahani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to provide an updated and comprehensive review on current perioperative anaesthetic management of paediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD coming for non-cardiac surgery. Search of terms such as "anaesthetic management," "congenital heart disease" and "non-cardiac surgery" was carried out in KKH eLibrary, PubMed, Medline and Google, focussing on significant current randomised control trials, case reports, review articles and editorials. Issues on how to tailor perioperative anaesthetic management on cases with left to right shunt, right to left shunt and complex heart disease are discussed in this article. Furthermore, the author also highlights special considerations such as pulmonary hypertension, neonates with CHD coming for extracardiac surgery and the role of regional anaesthesia in children with CHD undergoing non-cardiac operation.

  19. Assessment of anaesthetic depth by clustering analysis and autoregressive modelling of electroencephalograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C E; Rosenfalck, A; Nørregaard Christensen, K

    1991-01-01

    The brain activity electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 30 healthy women scheduled for hysterectomy. The patients were anaesthetized with isoflurane, halothane or etomidate/fentanyl. A multiparametric method was used for extraction of amplitude and frequency information from the EEG....... The method applied autoregressive modelling of the signal, segmented in 2 s fixed intervals. The features from the EEG segments were used for learning and for classification. The learning process was unsupervised and hierarchical clustering analysis was used to construct a learning set of EEG amplitude......-frequency patterns for each of the three anaesthetic drugs. These EEG patterns were assigned to a colour code corresponding to similar clinical states. A common learning set could be used for all patients anaesthetized with the same drug. The classification process could be performed on-line and the results were...

  20. Anaesthetic considerations for patients undergoing pre-surgical embolization of intracranial and spinal tumours: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparna Bharadwaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical embolization of vascular brain and spinal tumours is an effective method of reducing intraoperative bleeding. Many technological developments of the microcatheters and embolic materials that are used have led to better outcomes in tumour embolization. Pre-operative embolization has become a standard of practice in the management of many vascular brain and spinal tumours. Anaesthesiologists are generally involved with these procedures which may be performed with general anaesthesia, conscious sedation or monitored anaesthesia care. The choice of the anaesthetic technique usually depends on the patient characteristics, tumour location, vascularity of the tumour and most importantly the neuroradiologist and/or institutional preferences. There is limited information in the literature on the anaesthetic considerations for these patients. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of the indications, techniques, complications and relevant anaesthetic considerations for patients undergoing pre-surgical embolization of intracranial and spinal tumours.

  1. The effect of dexmedetomidine on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in healthy piglets with normal and lowered blood pressure anaesthetized with propofol-remifentanil total intravenous anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mai Louise Grandsgaard; Ambrus, Rikard; Rasmussen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    Background During anaesthesia and surgery, in particular neurosurgery, preservation of cerebral perfusion and oxygenation (CPO) is essential for normal postoperative brain function. The isolated effects on CPO of either individual anaesthetic drugs or entire anaesthetic protocols are of importance...

  2. Post anaesthetic myopathy/neuropathy in horses undergoing magnetic resonance imaging compared to horses undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franci, P; Leece, E A; Brearley, J C

    2006-11-01

    Patient positioning and long anaesthetic duration required for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may result in a higher frequency of post anaesthetic myopathy/neuropathy syndrome (PAMNS) as compared to horses undergoing anaesthesia for surgery. Equine anaesthesia for MRI is associated with a higher frequency of PAMNS than anaesthesia for nonemergency, nonabdominal surgery. Anaesthetic and medical records of horses (n = 633) undergoing MRI or surgery between January 2001 and January 2005 (inclusive), were reviewed. Information obtained included patient details (breed, sex, age, bodyweight), area of body scanned or involved in surgery, body position, anaesthetic and inotropic agents administered, anaesthetic duration, adverse events during anaesthesia and outcome at 7 days. Data were examined by cross tabulation and Chi-square or Fisher's exact test of association. The influence of individual variables was examined by univariant and multivariant analysis models. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in parameters examined, except that horses in the MRI group were heavier (Phorses (2.3%, 95% Confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-4.2) in the MRI group had clinical signs of PAMNS in the post anaesthetic period, whereas only 2 horses (0.98%, 95% CI: 0.2-2.8) in the surgery group were affected. This was not statistically significantly different (odds ratio = 2.7, 95% CI: 0.8-13, P = 0.3). Two horses undergoing MRI were subjected to euthanasia due to the severity of PAMNS. There was no difference in the occurrence of PAMNS between the 2 groups. The risk of performing general anaesthesia for diagnostic procedures such as MRI may not be greater than that for a surgical procedure. However, the benefits should be carefully weighed against the risks involved.

  3. Method development for the enantiomeric purity determination of low concentrations of adrenaline in local anaesthetic solutions by capillary electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sänger-Van De Griend, Cari E.; Ek, Anders G.; Widahl-Näsman, Monica E.; Andersson, E. K Margareta

    2006-01-01

    L-Adrenaline is often included in local anaesthetic (LA) solutions for injection to improve the quality of the anaesthetic block. The concentration of the LA is between 2.5 and 20 mg/ml and the concentration of adrenaline is typically ≤0.1% of the LA concentration. In order to follow the

  4. Preparation of the Drager Fabius CE and Drager Zeus anaesthetic machines for patients susceptible to malignant hyperthermia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Hiliary

    2012-05-01

    Malignant hyperthermia may follow exposure to trace quantities of inhalational anaesthetics. In susceptible patients, the complete avoidance of these triggers is advised when possible; however, failing this, it is essential to washout or purge the anaesthesia machine of residual inhalational anaesthetics.

  5. Tubulo-glomerular feedback response: enhancement in adult spontaneously hypertensive rats and effects of anaesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leyssac, P P; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1989-01-01

    ) and stop-flow pressures (40.0-42.4 mm Hg) were similar in the four groups, but systemic arterial pressure was significantly lower in WKY, and significantly higher in SHR than in SPRD. The turning point (Tp) of the feedback curve was 9.87 nl/min in SHR, significantly lower than the 13.04 nl/min found in WKY......Open-loop tubulo-glomerular feedback (TGF) responses were measured in halothane anaesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague-Dawley rats (SPRD), and in inactin anaesthetized SPRD. Proximal intratubular free flow pressures (FFP) (13.8-14.7 mm Hg...

  6. Local anaesthetic toxicity in a pregnant patient undergoing lignocaine-induced intravenous regional anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, M

    2012-02-03

    A pregnant patient at 38 weeks\\' gestation developed symptoms of local anaesthetic toxicity following intravenous regional anaesthesia (IVRA) for hand surgery, using a standard dose of lignocaine. Reports suggest that a number of factors, both physiological and pharmacological, combine to increase the likelihood of local anaesthetic (LA) toxicity in pregnancy despite employment of a conventional "safe" IVRA technique. It is suggested that for IVRA, pregnant patients are premedicated with a benzodiazepine, the tourniquet time is increased and the concentration of LA is decreased to reduce the risks of LA toxicity.

  7. Analgesic efficacy of local anaesthetic wound administration in knee arthroplasty: volume vs concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L Ø; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Kristensen, B B

    2010-01-01

    Wound administration of local anaesthetic may be effective for postoperative pain management in knee arthroplasty, but the analgesic efficacy of local anaesthetic in relation to volume vs concentration has not been determined. In a double-blinded trial, 48 patients scheduled for total knee...... arthroplasty were randomly assigned to receive either a high volume/low concentration solution of ropivacaine (20 ml, 0.5%) or a low volume/high concentration solution of ropivacaine (10 ml, 1%), 6 and 24 h postoperatively through an intracapsular catheter. Pain was assessed for 2 h after administration. Pain...... was reduced in both groups with ropivacaine administration 24 h postoperatively (p

  8. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABAA receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    GABAA receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanol were investigated on recombinant human '-aminobutyric acid (GABAA, a1ß2'2s) r...

  9. Monitoring variables affecting positron emission tomography measurements of cerebral blood flow in anaesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Simonsen, Mette

    2018-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of anaesthetized pig brains is a useful tool in neuroscience. Stable cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential for PET, since variations can affect the distribution of several radiotracers. However, the effect of physiological factors regulating...

  10. Anaesthetic implications of laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with sickle cell anaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doodnath, R

    2012-02-01

    With the increasing immigrant population in the Republic of Ireland, the number of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) seen in the paediatric hospitals is climbing. In this case report, we review the anaesthetic implications and outcome of the first two paediatric patients with SCD to have a laparoscopic splenectomy due to repeated splenic infarcts in the Republic of Ireland.

  11. Anaesthetic implications of laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with sickle cell anaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doodnath, R.

    2010-04-01

    With the increasing immigrant population in the Republic of Ireland, the number of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) seen in the paediatric hospitals is climbing. In this case report, we review the anaesthetic implications and outcome of the first two paediatric patients with SCD to have a laparoscopic splenectomy due to repeated splenic infarcts in the Republic of Ireland.

  12. Quantitative EEG in assessment of anaesthetic depth: comparative study of methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C. E.; Prior, P. F.

    1996-01-01

    features. We have compared the performance of four techniques using tape-recorded data from 23 patients anaesthetized with either halothane or isoflurane using standardized regimens. The techniques were: (1) median frequency, (2) spectral edge frequency, (3) the cerebral function analysing monitor (CFAM1...

  13. Local anaesthetics modifying the dermal response of irradiation. An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlsen, L.; Evers, H.; Segerstroem, K.; Hagelqvist, E.; Graffman, S.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of experiments in rabbits the dermal reaction, provoked by a single dose or intermittent doses of irradiation, was prevented or modified by topical or parenteral administration of local anaesthetics, compared to irradiated control animals. The topical application of a eutectic lidocaine/prilocaine cream, EMLA 5%, was found to be more effective than intravenously injected lidocaine (Xylocain 1%).

  14. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of eltanolone (pregnanolone), a new steroid intravenous anaesthetic, in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Peder; Høgskilde, S; Lang-Jensen, T

    1994-01-01

    Eltanolone, a new intravenous steroid anaesthetic agent was administered intravenously in a dose of 0.6 mg.kg-1 over 45 s to eight healthy male volunteers to evaluate some of its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects. Drug concentration-time data were analysed by PCNONLIN, a non-linear regr...

  15. Anaesthetic safety of the Macintosh® oral laryngeal spray device

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-14

    Jan 14, 2013 ... Regular checks of the remaining Macintosh® atomiser apparatus have been instituted. Inflammation of the oral mucosa may increase the absorption of local anaesthetic. Markedly elevated plasma lignocaine levels have been described in an adult with oral candidiasis after receiving topical lignocaine.5 ...

  16. [The profitability of various methods of desinfection for anaesthetic equipment (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, H

    1975-06-01

    This is a presentation of the three most utilized methods of desinfection - steam, acethylenoxide aldehyde solution - for anaesthetic equipment as to their costs. During series of tests the wear and tear has been checked. The desinfection by aldehyde solution is worth the price as to the investigation, the current costs and the wear and tear.

  17. A Parturient with Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Anaesthetic Management for Caesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma KS

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP accounts for 4-5% of cases of pregnancy with thrombocytopenia. Their clinical condition may deteriorate during pregnancy subjecting these patients at high risk of bleeding. We report anaesthetic management of a parturient with chronic ITP for caesarean section.

  18. Comparative efficacy of four anaesthetic agents in the yellow seahorse, Hippocampus kuda (Bleeker, 1852)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pawar, H.B.; Sanaye, S.V.; Sreepada, R.A.; Harish, V.; Suryavanshi, U.; Tanu; Ansari, Z.A.

    -bred yellow seahorse, Hippocampus kuda (Bleeker, 1852). The lowest effective concentrations based on the efficacy criteria of complete anaesthetic induction within 180 s and recovery within 300 s were determined to be 125 mg L sup(-1) (induction 115 + or - 16...

  19. Effects of chronic occupational exposure to anaesthetic gases on the rate of neutrophil apoptosis among anaesthetists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tyther, R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Volatile anaesthetic agents are known to influence neutrophil function. The aim was to determine the effect of chronic occupational exposure to volatile anaesthetic agents on the rate of neutrophil apoptosis among anaesthetists. To test this hypothesis, we compared the rate of neutrophil apoptosis in anaesthetists who had been chronically exposed to volatile anaesthetic agents with that in unexposed volunteers. METHODS: Venous blood (20 mL) was withdrawn from 24 ASA I-II volunteers, from which neutrophils were isolated, and maintained in culture. At 1, 12 and 24 h in culture, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was assessed by dual staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. RESULTS: At 1 h (but not at 12 and 24 h) in culture, the rate of neutrophil apoptosis was significantly less in the anaesthetists--13.8 (12.9%) versus 34.4 (12.1%) (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Chronic occupational exposure to volatile anaesthetic agents may inhibit neutrophil apoptosis. This may have implications for anaesthetists and similarly exposed healthcare workers in terms of the adequacy of their inflammatory response.

  20. Prepubertal gonadectomy in cats: different injectable anaesthetic combinations and comparison with gonadectomy at traditional age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porters, Nathalie; de Rooster, Hilde; Moons, Christel P H; Duchateau, Luc; Goethals, Klara; Bosmans, Tim; Polis, Ingeborgh

    2015-06-01

    Anaesthetic and analgesic effects of three different injectable anaesthetic combinations for prepubertal gonadectomy (PPG) in cats were studied. One anaesthetic protocol was compared with a similar one for gonadectomy at traditional age (TAG). Kittens were randomly assigned to PPG or TAG. For PPG, three different protocols were compared: (1) intramuscular (IM) administration of 60 μg/kg dexmedetomidine plus 20 μg/kg buprenorphine followed by an IM injection of the anaesthetic agent (20 mg/kg ketamine) (DB-IM protocol); (2) oral transmucosal (OTM) administration of 80 μg/kg dexmedetomidine plus 20 μg/kg buprenorphine followed by an IM injection of 20 mg/kg ketamine combined with 20 µg/kg dexmedetomidine (DB-OTM protocol); (3) IM injection of a 40 μg/kg medetomidine-20 μg/kg buprenorphine-20 mg/kg ketamine combination (MBK-IM protocol). For TAG, a DB-IM protocol was used, but with different doses for dexmedetomidine (40 μg/kg) and ketamine (5 mg/kg). All cats (PPG and TAG) received a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory before surgery. Anaesthetic and analgesic effects were assessed pre- and postoperatively (until 6 h). Cumulative logit, linear and logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. Compared with the DB-OTM protocol, the DB-IM and MBK-IM protocols provided better anaesthesia with fewer adverse effects in PPG cats. Postoperative pain was not significantly different between anaesthetic protocols. PPG and TAG cats anaesthetised with the two DB-IM protocols differed significantly only for sedation and pain scores, but sedation and pain scores were generally low. Although there were no anaesthesia-related mortalities in the present study and all anaesthetic protocols for PPG in cats provided a surgical plane of anaesthesia and analgesia up to 6 h postoperatively, our findings were in favour of the intramuscular (DB-IM and MBK-IM) protocols. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  1. Interaction between carbon dioxide absorbents and volatile anaesthetics in a closed anaesthesia breathing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljenko Križmarić

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Desiccation of the carbon dioxide (CO2 absorbent in an anaesthetic breathing system results in a discrepancy between the desired (selected and actual (measured levels of volatile anaesthetic; the measured value is lower than the selected value, which may make the induction of anaesthesia difficult. Moreover, because of a complicated interaction between the absorbent and the anaesthetic agent, toxic gases are formed within the system, which cannot be detected by standard monitoring during anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to check if the personnel responsible for changing the absorbent are aware of this problem, and to provide guidelines for its prevention. Method: A descriptive pilot study was conducted on a sample of 25 anaesthesia nurses from five Slovene hospitals performing surgical procedures under general anaesthesia. Data was gathered with an open-type questionnaire. Results: We found that 92 % of the study participants had noticed discrepancies between the selected and measured levels of anaesthetic agent in the breathing system, which ranged between 10 % and 50 %. A large proportion of the nurses (64 % did not consider CO2 absorber to be a possible source of the observed discrepancies. Only one nurse knew that the problem was caused by absorbent desiccation. Guidelines for absorbent replacement vary among hospitals, and so absorbents are changed at different intervals.Conclusion: The majority of nurses in our study were not aware that absorbent desiccation can significantly reduce the level of volatile anaesthetics in the breathing system. The problem can be prevented by adopting appropriate guidelines, which guarantee that absorbents are changed regularly as required.

  2. ANAESTHETIC CHALLENGES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PEDIATRIC ENCEPHALOCOELE REPAIR: RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Giri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Encephalocele is the protrusion of the cranial contents beyond the normal confines of the skull through a defect in the calvarium and is far less common than spinal dysraphism. 1 Anaesthetic challenges in management of occipital meningoencephalocele include securing the airway with intubation in lateral position, intraoperative prone position and its associated complications, careful securing of the endotracheal tube and accurate assessment of blood loss. These babies also have associated congenital anomalie s, gastrointestinal malrotation, renal anomalies, cardiac malformations and tracheoesophageal fistula, making anaesthetic management even more difficult. Meticulous anaesthetic management is crucial for early repair of encephalocoele to prevent any sequel. 2 METHODS: To identify the anaesthetic challenges, perioperative and postoperative complications during encephalocele repair, 20 cases were studied retrospectively from 2012 to 2014 at Department of Anaesthesia , Department of Neurosurgery, MR Medical College, Gulbarga. RESULTS: 20 cases of encephalocoele repair were undertaken during the study period. Out of these 12 (60% were male and 8(40% female. Age range was 1 day to 6 years. Most common type of encephalocele was occipital 12(60%, which posed a difficulty during positioning & intubation, followed by occipito - cervical 4(20%, Parietal 2(10%, Fronto - nasal 1(5% & Fronto - naso - ethmoidal 1(5%. Most of the patients were extubated successfully on table, only one patient required post - operative ventilator support for a day. Peri - operative complications included bronchospasm (15%, followed by hypotension, tachycardia, laryngospasm, hypoxia, accidental extubation (10% each & bradycardia, endobronchial intubation (5%. CONCLUSION: Children with Encephalocoele are prone to have peri - operative complications which can be managed by meticulous anaesthetic managenement. 3 Early surgical management of encephalocoele is not

  3. Clarifying the role of activated charcoal filters in preparing an anaesthetic workstation for malignant hyperthermia-susceptible patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilmen, J G; Gillies, R I

    2014-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a life-threatening condition caused by exposure of susceptible individuals to volatile anaesthetics or suxamethonium. MH-susceptible individuals must avoid exposure to these drugs, so accurate and reproducible processes to remove residual anaesthetic agents from anaesthetic workstations are required. Activated charcoal filters (ACFs) have been used for this purpose. ACFs can reduce the time for preparing an anaesthetic workstation for MH patients. Currently, the only commercially available ACFs are the Vapor-Clean$trade; (Dynasthetics, Salt Lake City, UT, USA) filters which retail at approximately AUD$130 per set of two, both of which are to be used in a single anaesthetic. Anaesthetic workstations were saturated with anaesthetic vapours and connected to a Miran ambient air analyser (SapphRe XL, ThermoScientific, Waltham, MA, USA) to measure vapour concentration. Various scenarios were tested in order to determine the most economical configurations of machine flushing, component change and activated charcoal filter use. We found that placement of filters in an unprepared, saturated circuit was insufficient to safely prepare an anaesthetic workstation. Following flushing of the anaesthetic workstation with high-flow oxygen for 90 seconds, a circuit and soda lime canister change and the placement of an ACF on the inspiratory limb, we were able to safely prepare a workstation in less than three minutes. A single filter on the inspiratory limb was able to maintain a clean circuit for 12 hours, with gas flows dropped from 10 lpm to 3 lpm after 90 minutes or removal of the filter after 90 minutes if high gas flows were maintained.

  4. An observational study of patient care outcomes sensitive to handover quality in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Nichole; Botti, Mari; Wood, Beverley; Redley, Bernice

    2017-12-01

    To identify patient care outcome indicators sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover between the anaesthetist and the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit nurse. The relationship between interprofessional clinical handover when patients are transferred from the operating theatre to the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes of subsequent patient care delivery is not well understood. Naturalistic, exploratory descriptive design using observation. Observations of 31 patient journeys through Post-Anaesthetic Care Units across three public and private hospitals. Characteristics of interprofessional handover on arrival in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, the trajectory of patient care activities in Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes were observed. Of the 821 care activities observed across 31 "patient journeys" in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, observations (assessments and vital signs) (52.5 %), communication (15.8 %) and pain management (assessment of pain and analgesic administration) (10.3%) were most common. Examination of patterns in handover communications and subsequent trajectories of patient care activities revealed three patient trajectory typologies and two patient outcome indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit: pain on discharge from the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and timely response to clinical deterioration. An additional process indicator, seeking missing information, was also identified. Patient's pain on discharge from Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, escalation of care in response to early signs of deterioration and the need for nurses to seek out missing information to deliver care are indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit. Future research should test these indicators. Patient outcomes sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover on patient

  5. Comparing charcoal and zeolite reflection filters for volatile anaesthetics: A laboratory evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturesson, Louise W; Frennström, Jan O; Ilardi, Marcella; Reinstrup, Peter

    2015-08-01

    A modified heat-moisture exchanger that incorporates a reflecting filter for use with partial rebreathing of exhaled volatile anaesthetics has been commercially available since the 1990 s. The main advantages of the device are efficient delivery of inhaled sedation to intensive care patients and reduced anaesthetic consumption during anaesthesia. However, elevated arterial CO2 values have been observed with an anaesthetic conserving device compared with a conventional heat and moisture exchanger, despite compensation for larger apparatus dead space. The objective of this study is to thoroughly explore the properties of two reflecting materials (charcoal and zeolites). A controlled, prospective, observational laboratory study. Lund University Hospital, Sweden, from December 2011 to December 2012. None. Three filters, with identical volumes, were compared using different volatile anaesthetics at different conditions of temperature and moisture. The filtering materials were charcoal or zeolite. Glass spheres were used as an inert control. Consumption of volatile anaesthetics using different reflecting materials in filters at different conditions regarding temperature and moisture. CO2 reflection by the filtering materials: glass spheres, charcoal or zeolite. Isoflurane consumption in an open system was 60.8 g h(-1). The isoflurane consumption in dry, warm air was 39.8 g h(-1) with glass spheres. Changing to charcoal and zeolite had a profound effect on isoflurane consumption, 11.8 and 10.7 g h(-1), respectively. Heating and humidifying the air as well as the addition of N2O created only minor changes in consumption. The percentage of isoflurane conserved by the charcoal filter was independent of the isoflurane concentration (0.5 to 4.5%). Reflection of sevoflurane, desflurane and halothane by the charcoal filter was similar to reflection of isoflurane. Both charcoal and zeolite filters had CO2 reflecting properties and end-tidal CO2 increased by 3 to 3.7% compared

  6. Anaesthetic management of a patient with microvillus inclusion disease for intestinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Luis J; Santamaría, Manuel López; Gámez, Manuel

    2002-03-01

    We report the anaesthetic management of a 3-year-old-child with microvillus inclusion disease undergoing isolated small bowel transplantation. He required long-term total parenteral nutrition which was complicated with numerous episodes of catheter related sepsis. This resulted in thrombosis of the major blood vessels which critically restricted vascular access available for intravenous nutrition, becoming a life-threatening condition for the patient. Haemodynamic, respiratory parameters and urinary output were well preserved throughout the procedure. Besides a transitory increase in potassium following graft revascularization, biochemical changes were small. Anaesthetic management included comprehensive preoperative assessment, central venous angiography to depict accessibility of central and peripheral veins, assurance of additional vascular access through the intraoperative catheterization of the left renal vein, perioperative epidural analgesia and preservation of splanchnic perfusion to ensure implant viability.

  7. Anaesthetic Management of Caesarean Section in a Patient with Large Mediastinal Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashif, S.; Saleem, J.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with both anatomical and physiological changes in the body, especially in cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Patients with anterior and middle mediastinal masses are recognized to be at risk for cardiorespiratory compromise. Likewise, pregnancy has a widely known constellation of potential complications that confront the anaesthesiologist. The combination of both (pregnancy and mediastinal mass) in a single patient presents an unusual anaesthetic challenge. Caesarean sections are usually the mode of delivery, therefore, the cardio-respiratory stability is very important. The following is the report of a 31 weeks pregnant patient with a large, symptomatic anterior and middle mediastinal mass, who required anaesthesia for emergency caesarean section. The anaesthetic management entailed Combined Spinal and Epidural (CSE) technique with safe feto-maternal outcome. (author)

  8. Anaesthetic Management of A Child with Multiple Congenital Anomalies Scheduled for Cataract Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Kulkarni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In infants& children variety of conditions and syndromes are associated with difficult Airway. Anaesthetic management becomes a challenge if it remains unrecognized until induction and sometimes results in disaster, leading to oropharyngeal trauma, laryngeal oedema, cardiovascular& neurological complications. A 4-month-old child with multiple congenital anomalies was posted for cataract extraction for early and better development of vision. He had history of post birth respiratory distress, difficulty in feeding, breath holding with delayed mile stones. He was treated as for Juvenile asthma. This child was induced with inhalation anaesthesia. There was difficulty in laryngoscopic intubation and could pass much smaller size of the tube than predicted. He developed post operative stridor and desaturation. The problems which we faced during the anaesthetic management and during postoperative period are discussed with this case.

  9. Emergency Surgery in a Patient with Scleroderma - Anaesthetic Challenges: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teena Bansal Sarla Hooda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma (progressive systemic sclerosis is a multisystem disease involving the skin, airway, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, renal and cardiac systems that can pose a significant challenge for the anaesthetist. The multisystem involvement of scleroderma can impact on every aspect of anaesthetic care especially airway management. There are no specific contraindications to the use of any type of anaesthesia, although the selection must be guided by identification of organ dysfunction. The anaesthetist must be aware of the organs involved, the severity of the disease and the associated anaesthetic considerations and potential risks in order to safely & skilfully manage the patient with scleroderma. We hereby present a case report of a patient with scleroderma for emergency orbital decompression because of orbital cellulitis.

  10. Anaesthetic management of patients with congenital heart disease presenting for non-cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohindra R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of congenital heart disease is about one percent of all live births in the United States. Treatment is being performed at a younger age and these children are showing improved survival. It is not unusual for children with congenital heart disease to present for non-cardiac surgery. Their management depends on their age, type of lesion, extent of corrective procedure, the presence of complications and other congenital anomalies. Each patient needs a detailed pre-operative evaluation to understand the abnormal anatomy and physiology, and related anaesthetic implications. No anaesthetic agent is an absolute contraindication, although drugs beneficial for one lesion may be detrimental for another. Regional anaesthesia has also been safely used in children with congenital heart disease. However the anaesthesiologist must have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology of the lesion and the pharmacology of drugs being used to be able to provide safe anaesthesia for children with congenital heart disease.

  11. Robot Assisted Renal Auto Transplantation: A Case Based Discussion of Unique Anaesthetic Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Gupta

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic renal autotransplantation has serious perturbations on the body's homeostasis due to its non physiological positioning, use of pneumoperitoneum, changing fluid strategy at different points of time and on-going steps to maintain optimal environment for the transplanted kidney. Generally speaking, the anaesthetic management of renal auto-transplantation by open technique is not very complex and the perioperative management can be categorized in the intermediate level of clinical skill requirement. Adding to the comfort of the anaesthesiologist is the fact that these patients are not in end stage renal disease state and does not manifest the comorbidities, multisystem involvement and technical complexities of long term renal dysfunction and renal replacement therapy. In our case report surgeons used the da Vinci surgical robotic system for laparoscopic transplantation of the kidney at a new site. In this article we discuss the anaesthetic challenges of robot assisted laparoscopic renal auto-transplantation along with a description of our index case.

  12. Volatile anaesthetics enhance the metastasis related cellular signalling including CXCR2 of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Masae; Zhao, Hailin; Jaffer, Tanweer; Unwith, Sandeep; Benzonana, Laura; Lian, Qingquan; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro; Ma, Daqing

    2016-05-03

    The majority of ovarian cancer patients relapse after surgical resection. Evidence is accumulating regarding the role of surgery in disseminating cancer cells; in particular anaesthesia may have an impact on cancer re-occurrence. Here, we have investigated the metastatic potential of volatile anaesthetics isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on ovarian cancer cells. Human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV3) were exposed to isoflurane (2%), sevoflurane (3.6%) or desflurane (10.3%) for 2 hours. Metastatic related gene expression profiles were measured using the Tumour Metastasis PCR Array and qRT-PCR. Subsequently vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), matrix metalloproteinase 11 (MMP11), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) proteins expression were determined using immunofluorescent staining. The migratory capacities of SK-OV3 cells were assessed with a scratch assay and the potential role of CXCR2 in mediating the effects of volatile anaesthetics on cancer cell biology were further investigated with CXCR2 knockdown by siRNA. All three volatile anaesthetics altered expression of 70 out of 81 metastasic related genes with significant increases in VEGF-A, MMP-11, CXCR2 and TGF-β genes and protein expression with a magnitude order of desflurane (greatest), sevoflurane and isoflurane. Scratch analysis revealed that exposure to these anesthetics increased migration, which was abolished by CXCR2 knockdown. Volatile anaesthetics at clinically relevant concentrations have strong effects on cancer cell biology which in turn could enhance ovarian cancer metastatic potential. This work raises the urgency for further in vivo studies and clinical trials before any conclusions can be made in term of the alteration of clinical practice.

  13. Perioperative Anaesthetic Management of Caesarean Delivery in a Parturient with Portal Gastropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini H Ramaswamy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Portal hypertensive gastropathy occurs both in cirrhotic and non cirrhotic patients leading to haemetemesis secondary to oesophageal varices. The hyper dynamic circulatory state of pregnancy in these patients poses special problems necessitating specialized care preferably in a tertiary care centre. We report the perioperative anaesthetic management for elective caesarean section in a 32-year-old pregnant lady at 39 weeks gestation with portal gastropathy secondary to periportal fibrosis of the liver.

  14. Usefulness of an injectable anaesthetic protocol for semen collection through urethral catheterisation in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisu, Maria Carmela; Ponzio, Patrizia; Rovella, Chiara; Baravalle, Michela; Veronesi, Maria Cristina

    2017-10-01

    Objectives Although less often requested in comparison with dogs, the collection of semen in cats can be necessary for artificial insemination, for semen evaluation in tom cats used for breeding and for semen storage. Urethral catheterisation after pharmacological induction with medetomidine has proved to be useful for the collection of semen in domestic cats. However, most of the previously used protocols require the administration of high doses of medetomidine that can increase the risk of side effects, especially on the cardiovascular system. In routine clinical practice, one safe and useful injectable anaesthetic protocol for short-term clinical investigations or surgery in cats involves premedication with low intramuscular doses of dexmedetomidine with methadone, followed by intravenous propofol bolus injection. We aimed to assess the usefulness of this injectable anaesthetic protocol for semen collection, via urethral catheterisation, in domestic cats. Methods The study was performed on 38 purebred, adult cats, during the breeding season, and semen was collected via urethral catheterisation using an injectable anaesthesia protocol with methadone (0.2 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (5 µg/kg) premedication, followed by induction with propofol. Results The anaesthetic protocol used in the present study allowed the collection of large-volume semen samples, characterised by good parameters and without side effects. Conclusions and relevance The results from the present study suggest that the injectable anaesthetic protocol using methadone and dexmedetomidine premedication, followed by induction with propofol, could be suitable and safe for the collection of a good-quality semen sample, via urethral catheterisation, in domestic cats. It can therefore be used as an alternative to previous medetomidine-based sedation protocols.

  15. Theory versus Practice in the Twentieth-Century Search for the Ideal Anaesthetic Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Ian D

    2016-02-01

    At the beginning of the twentieth century, an anaesthetist could choose between nitrous oxide, chloroform, and ether (diethyl ether) for the induction of painrelieving unconsciousness. By the end of century, the choice was between a small number of fluorinated aliphatic ethers such as Enflurane, Desflurane, and Sevoflurane, and (in some jurisdictions) the rare gas, xenon. Between these endpoints researchers had identified a surprisingly broad range of hydrocarbons, noble gases, organohalogens, and aliphatic ethers that possessed anaesthetic properties. None was entirely satisfactory, but clinicians at various times and in various places employed substances in each of these categories. Behind the search for new anaesthetic gases was a theory of action (Meyer- Overton theory) that was known to be inadequate, but as no alternative was strong enough to displace it the search continued on purely empirical grounds, while lip-service was paid to the theory. By the time a theory couched in more modern terms was proposed, a suite of modern anaesthetic gases was in place, and there have been no attempts to use that theory to drive a new search.

  16. Tubulo-glomerular feedback response: enhancement in adult spontaneously hypertensive rats and effects of anaesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leyssac, P P; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1989-01-01

    Open-loop tubulo-glomerular feedback (TGF) responses were measured in halothane anaesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague-Dawley rats (SPRD), and in inactin anaesthetized SPRD. Proximal intratubular free flow pressures (FFP) (13.8-14.7 mm Hg......) and stop-flow pressures (40.0-42.4 mm Hg) were similar in the four groups, but systemic arterial pressure was significantly lower in WKY, and significantly higher in SHR than in SPRD. The turning point (Tp) of the feedback curve was 9.87 nl/min in SHR, significantly lower than the 13.04 nl/min found in WKY...... anaesthetized control group of SPRD, the feedback response was lower, and the feedback curve was displaced to the right with the Tp at 15.9 nl/min, significantly higher than in the control group (p less than 0.001). Although the steady state level also was reached within 2 min, the clearly biphasic pattern...

  17. THE USE OF SELECTED ANAESTHETIC DRUGS IN SEARCH OF A METHOD FOR IMPROVING EARTHWORMS’ WELFARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Podolak-Machowska

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes selected effects of body contact of earthworms Dendrobaena veneta Rosa with local anaesthetic (LA drugs used for human anesthesia (lidocaine and prilocaine and anaesthetics for aquatic animals (MS-222. The findings showed safe and effective immobilization of earthworms with prilocaine at a concentration of 0.25-1%. At the applied concentrations lidocaine was safe, but less effective. On the other hand, MS-222, at the applied concentrations had a strongly irritating effect for earthworms and induced convulsive body movements connected with a discharge of coelomic fluid. The results may be relevant both for improving the welfare of earthworms during experiments and for the organization of research involving testing drugs on invertebrates. In this case, by using earthworms as an experimental model and by applying the method for measuring their mobility after contact with anaesthetics, which has been described in this article, it might be possible to replace experiments on guinea pigs, rabbits, rats and mice, which are expensive and require an approval of an ethics committee, with laboratory tests on earthworms.

  18. Scimitar syndrome: Anaesthetic management for pulmonary resection of the unaffected lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Torres, B; Fernández-López, A; Congregado, M

    2017-12-01

    Scimitar syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by anomalous drainage of the right pulmonary veins in the inferior vena cava, frequently associated with right lung and pulmonary artery hypoplasia, dextrocardia and abnormal systemic arterial supply to the lower lobe. Pulmonary resection surgery on healthy lung is exceptional, and there are no published records of it, as far as we know. A man with scimitar syndrome diagnosed with a lung nodule with malignant features in the contralateral lung. This situation implies huge anaesthetic complexity, mainly for intraoperative ventilation. Although spirometry and stress test did not contraindicate the planned lobectomy, scintigraphy showed a hypoplastic right lung with an uptake of 15%. From an anaesthetic point of view we discarded selective ventilation of the right lung, since the shunt made it functionally non-existent. In consequence we proposed four anaesthetic possibilities. After the placement of an epidural catheter and left selective intubation, thoracoscopy with intermittent apnoeas was our first choice, and we could complete the extirpation and avoid excessive complexity. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Job satisfaction, stress and burnout in anaesthetic technicians in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, M T; Bryant, J

    2008-03-01

    Anaesthetic technicians play a key role in the operating room, yet little is known about their levels of job satisfaction or workplace stress. A blinded, confidential single mail-out survey was posted to anaesthetic technicians in New Zealand. The survey consisted of demographic information, a job satisfaction survey, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Short Form 12. At total of 154 forms were returned (51% response rate). Respondents worked predominantly in public hospitals and many had duties outside the operating room. Job satisfaction was related to teamwork, practical nature of work and patient contact, while dissatisfaction was related to lack of respect from nurses and limited career pathway. High to moderate levels of emotional exhaustion (48%), depersonalisation (39%) and low levels of personal accomplishment (58%) were indicators of burnout. The Short Form 12 revealed high levels of physical impairment in 24% and emotional impairment in 35% of respondents. These data suggest that work is needed to evaluate anaesthetic assistants' job structure and actively manage their important physical and emotional sequelae.

  20. Anaesthetic properties of carbon monoxide and other gases in relation to plants, insects, and centipedes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, P.W.

    1935-01-01

    The anaesthetic effect of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, propylene, butylene, ethylene, and acetylene, when mixed with oxygen, was tested on ten different species of insects and centipedes. The lowest concentrations found to cause anaesthesia are given in per cent by volume as follows: propylene, for centipede, 30; katydid, 75; rose chafer, 60. Carbon monoxide, for centipede, 81.5; katydid, 89, rose chafer, 85. Butylene, for centipede, 5; katydid, 10; rose chafer, 40. Ethylene or acetylene, for centipede, katydid, and rose chafer, 100. Carbon dioxide, for rose chafer, 30. Ethylene was the most effective plant anaesthetic, 0.0005 per cent stopping growth movements of tomato and sunflower plants as shown by motion pictures; 0.001 per cent stopped elongation of sweet pea seedlings, while 0.00001 per cent retarded elongation nearly 50 per cent. The degree of retardation in growth from ethylene gas varied with the concentration and the plant species. Acetylene and propylene were about equally effective as plant anaesthetics. Both were approximately 10 times as effective as carbon monoxide. Mimosa pudica lost its capacity to respond to external stimuli while being exposed to 0.25 per cent of carbon monoxide, but became normal again upon being removed from the gas. 3 references, 4 tables.

  1. The analysis of fresh gas flow in a circle anaesthetic breathing system, and its influence on CO2 absorbent desiccation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljenko Križmarić

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: If at the end of anaesthesia, the gases on the anaesthetic machine are not turned off, they continue to flow through the breathing circuit and may dry out the carbon dioxide absorbent in the absorber. At the beginning of the next anaesthetic procedure, the desiccated absorbent decomposes the volatile anaesthetic, resulting in the formation of toxic gas mixtures, which are dangerous for the patient. In such circumstances, the measured level of the volatile anaesthesic in the breathing circuit differs from the selected value. In the paper, we analyse potentially dangerous possible directions of continuous flow of fresh gas mixture in different anaesthetic breathing circuits. Methods: In the first part of the study, we simulated the continuous flow of gases in a Sulla anaesthesia machine using an experimental method in a simulation setting. In the second part, we analysed whether a retrograde flow through the absorber was possible in a convential anaesthetic breathing circuit and in the Fabius GS, Cato, Julian and Primus circuits with the Y-piece connector open or closed. Information on users’ requests for maintenance services due to discrepancies between the desired and measured levels of the volatile anaesthetic in the breathing circuit were obtained from the manufacturer’s local servicing agent. Results: In a Dräger ISO 8 circle system (Sulla anaesthetic machine with a standard gas supply connector, a retrograde flow is not possible. If the Y-piece connector is left open, the gases are vented to the outside via the absorber and the inspiratory tube. If the Y-piece connector is closed or open, the absorbent in the canister dries because of the continuous flow of gas. A retrograde flow is possible only in those Sulla anaesthetic machines where the fresh gas inlet is located below the inspiratory valve. A retrograde flow of gases causing absorbent desiccation can occur in a Cato, Julian, Fabius GS, or Primus anaesthetic machines

  2. Anaesthetic management of patients undergoing surgery for Moyamoya disease - our institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek B Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Moyamoya disease (MMD is a chronic cerebrovascular disorder, defined as the progressive stenosis or occlusion of the intracranial vessels. Because of the insecure cerebral circulation, these patients represent an anaesthetic challenge. Literature is scarce on the anaesthetic management of MMD, especially from the Indian subcontinent. The main objective of our study was to evaluate the peri-operative course and outcome of patients undergoing surgery for MMD. Materials and Methods: We analysed available medical records of all patients who underwent revascularisation surgeries for MMD over a period of 10 years (January 2002 to June 2012. Various intra- and post-operative data related to anaesthesia were recorded. The patients for the analysis were divided into two groups: Group 1, paediatrics (<18 years and group 2, adults (≥18 years. Data are presented as number (% or mean ± SD or median (range. Results: There were 36 patients (12 adults and 24 children. Normotension, normovolaemia, normo- or mild-hypercapnia and normothermia were maintained in all patients. No patient developed complications or new neurological deficit in the post-operative period. All patients were discharged with a full Glasgow coma scale (GCS and no new neurologic deficit. Conclusion: Although the incidence of MMD is not high in India, it is an important cause of cerebral stroke in children and adults. Proper pre-operative evaluation is the most effective method to achieve good results. Anaesthetic management of MMD should focus on the maintenance of adequate cerebral blood flow and cerebral perfusion pressure ensuring adequate cerebral oxygenation to avoid ischaemic complications.

  3. Mefloquine inhibits voltage dependent Nav1.4 channel by overlapping the local anaesthetic binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiz-Candia, Bertin; Islas, Angel A; Sánchez-Solano, Alfredo; Mancilla-Simbro, Claudia; Scior, Thomas; Millan-PerezPeña, Lourdes; Salinas-Stefanon, Eduardo M

    2017-02-05

    Mefloquine constitutes a multitarget antimalaric that inhibits cation currents. However, the effect and the binding site of this compound on Na + channels is unknown. To address the mechanism of action of mefloquine, we employed two-electrode voltage clamp recordings on Xenopus laevis oocytes, site-directed mutagenesis of the rat Na + channel, and a combined in silico approach using Molecular Dynamics and docking protocols. We found that mefloquine: i) inhibited Na v 1.4 currents (IC 50 =60μM), ii) significantly delayed fast inactivation but did not affect recovery from inactivation, iii) markedly the shifted steady-state inactivation curve to more hyperpolarized potentials. The presence of the β1 subunit significantly reduced mefloquine potency, but the drug induced a significant frequency-independent rundown upon repetitive depolarisations. Computational and experimental results indicate that mefloquine overlaps the local anaesthetic binding site by docking at a hydrophobic cavity between domains DIII and DIV that communicates the local anaesthetic binding site with the selectivity filter. This is supported by the fact that mefloquine potency significantly decreased on mutant Na v 1.4 channel F1579A and significantly increased on K1237S channels. In silico this compound docked above F1579 forming stable π-π interactions with this residue. We provide structure-activity insights into how cationic amphiphilic compounds may exert inhibitory effects by docking between the local anaesthetic binding site and the selectivity filter of a mammalian Na + channel. Our proposed synergistic cycle of experimental and computational studies may be useful for elucidating binding sites of other drugs, thereby saving in vitro and in silico resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A preliminary study evaluating cardiac output measurement using Pressure Recording Analytical Method (PRAM) in anaesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briganti, Angela; Evangelista, Flavia; Centonze, Paola; Rizzo, Annaliso; Bentivegna, Francesco; Crovace, Antonio; Staffieri, Francesco

    2018-03-06

    Haemodynamic variations normally occur in anaesthetized animals, in relation to the animal status, administered drugs, sympathetic and parasympathetic tone, fluid therapy and surgical stimulus. The possibility to measure some cardiovascular parameters, such as cardiac output (CO), during anaesthesia would be beneficial for both the anaesthesia management and its outcome. New techniques for the monitoring of CO are aimed at finding methods which are non invasive, accurate and with good trending ability, which can be used in a clinical setting. The aim of this study was to compare the Pressure Recording Analytical Method (PRAM) with the pulmonary artery thermodilution (TD) for the measurement of cardiac output in 6 anaesthetized critically ill dogs. Fifty-four pairs of CO measurements were obtained with a median (range) of 3.33 L/min (0.81-7.21) for PRAM-CO and 3.48 L/min (1.41-6.56) for TD-CO. The Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean bias of 0.17 L/min with limits of agreement (LoA) of - 0.46 to 0.81 L/min. The percentage error resulted 18.2%. The 4-quadrant plot analysis showed an acceptable concordance (93%) between the 2 methods. The polar plot showed a good trending ability with the mean angular bias of 3.9° and radial LoA ± 12.1°. The PRAM resulted in good precision, acceptable concordance and good trending ability for the measure of CO in the anaesthetized dog, representing a promising alternative to thermodilution for the measurement of CO. Among all the pulse contour methods available on the market it is the only one that does not require any calibration or adjustment of the measurement. Further studies are required to verify the ability of this method to accurately measure cardiac output even during unstable hemodynamic conditions.

  5. Leakage of volatile anaesthetics from agent-specific keyed vapourizer filling devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J M; Strunin, L; Craig, D B

    1982-09-01

    Agent-specific keyed vapourizer filling devices were designed to ensure that an anaesthetic vapourizer is filled with the correct agent. Since there appear to be no reports of possible loss of volatile agent or operating room pollution resulting from either the design or patterns of use of these devices, measurements were made with three anaesthetic agents and two methods of use. First, two bottles each of methoxyflurane, enflurane and halothane were fitted with a suitable filling device and the weight of agent lost from each bottle over six weeks was measured. Bottle #1 of each agent remained without agitation between weighings; bottle #2 was tipped to mimic filling of a vapourizer. Weight loss over the six week period was 2.76 and 3.15 per cent of the halothane, 2.22 and 2.43 per cent of the enflurane, and 0.58 and 0.96 per cent of the methoxyflurane, for bottles #1 and #2, respectively. Second, pollution was measured with an infra-red analyser for halothane, using bottles #1 and #2, as described above, and a third bottle on which the filling device was replaced by the screw-on cap after each filling of the vapourizer. Vapour loss was undetectable for bottle #1, between 25 and 30 ppm for bottle #2, and between 350 and 400 ppm for bottle #3. Thus, although the design of the filling devices results in loss of the anaesthetic agent, this loss represents potential pollution only when the device is replaced by the screw-on cap between use. Therefore, when using filling devices, these should be left on the bottle of volatile agent between fillings to decrease operating room pollution.

  6. Anaesthetic impairment of immune function is mediated via GABA(A receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Wheeler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available GABA(A receptors are members of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter receptors, proteins which are responsible for fast synaptic transmission, and are the site of action of wide range of drugs. Recent work has shown that Cys-loop receptors are present on immune cells, but their physiological roles and the effects of drugs that modify their function in the innate immune system are currently unclear. We are interested in how and why anaesthetics increase infections in intensive care patients; a serious problem as more than 50% of patients with severe sepsis will die. As many anaesthetics act via GABA(A receptors, the aim of this study was to determine if these receptors are present on immune cells, and could play a role in immunocompromising patients.We demonstrate, using RT-PCR, that monocytes express GABA(A receptors constructed of α1, α4, β2, γ1 and/or δ subunits. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiological studies show that GABA can activate these receptors, resulting in the opening of a chloride-selective channel; activation is inhibited by the GABA(A receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not enhanced by the positive modulator diazepam. The anaesthetic drugs propofol and thiopental, which can act via GABA(A receptors, impaired monocyte function in classic immunological chemotaxis and phagocytosis assays, an effect reversed by bicuculline and picrotoxin.Our results show that functional GABA(A receptors are present on monocytes with properties similar to CNS GABA(A receptors. The functional data provide a possible explanation as to why chronic propofol and thiopental administration can increase the risk of infection in critically ill patients: their action on GABA(A receptors inhibits normal monocyte behaviour. The data also suggest a potential solution: monocyte GABA(A receptors are insensitive to diazepam, thus the use of benzodiazepines as an alternative anesthetising agent may be advantageous where infection is a life

  7. Anaesthetic impairment of immune function is mediated via GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel W; Thompson, Andrew J; Corletto, Federico; Reckless, Jill; Loke, Justin C T; Lapaque, Nicolas; Grant, Andrew J; Mastroeni, Pietro; Grainger, David J; Padgett, Claire L; O'Brien, John A; Miller, Nigel G A; Trowsdale, John; Lummis, Sarah C R; Menon, David K; Beech, John S

    2011-02-24

    GABA(A) receptors are members of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter receptors, proteins which are responsible for fast synaptic transmission, and are the site of action of wide range of drugs. Recent work has shown that Cys-loop receptors are present on immune cells, but their physiological roles and the effects of drugs that modify their function in the innate immune system are currently unclear. We are interested in how and why anaesthetics increase infections in intensive care patients; a serious problem as more than 50% of patients with severe sepsis will die. As many anaesthetics act via GABA(A) receptors, the aim of this study was to determine if these receptors are present on immune cells, and could play a role in immunocompromising patients. We demonstrate, using RT-PCR, that monocytes express GABA(A) receptors constructed of α1, α4, β2, γ1 and/or δ subunits. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiological studies show that GABA can activate these receptors, resulting in the opening of a chloride-selective channel; activation is inhibited by the GABA(A) receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not enhanced by the positive modulator diazepam. The anaesthetic drugs propofol and thiopental, which can act via GABA(A) receptors, impaired monocyte function in classic immunological chemotaxis and phagocytosis assays, an effect reversed by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Our results show that functional GABA(A) receptors are present on monocytes with properties similar to CNS GABA(A) receptors. The functional data provide a possible explanation as to why chronic propofol and thiopental administration can increase the risk of infection in critically ill patients: their action on GABA(A) receptors inhibits normal monocyte behaviour. The data also suggest a potential solution: monocyte GABA(A) receptors are insensitive to diazepam, thus the use of benzodiazepines as an alternative anesthetising agent may be advantageous where infection is a life

  8. Adrenaline reveals the torsadogenic effect of combined blockade of potassium channels in anaesthetized guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, G; Kane, K A; Coker, S J

    2008-08-01

    Torsade de pointes (TdP) can be induced in several species by a reduction in cardiac repolarizing capacity. The aim of this study was to assess whether combined I(Kr) and I(Ks) blockade could induce TdP in anaesthetized guinea pigs and whether short-term variability (STV) or triangulation of action potentials could predict TdP. Experiments were performed in open-chest, pentobarbital-anaesthetized, adrenaline-stimulated male Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs, which received three consecutive i.v. infusions of either vehicle, the I(Kr) blocker E-4031 (3, 10 and 30 nmol kg(-1) min(-1)), the I(Ks) blocker HMR1556 (75, 250, 750 nmol kg(-1) min(-1)) or E-4031 and HMR1556 combined. Phenylephrine-stimulated guinea pigs were also treated with the K(+) channel blockers in combination. Arterial blood pressure, ECGs and epicardial monophasic action potential (MAP) were recorded. TdP was observed in 75% of adrenaline-stimulated guinea pigs given the K(+) channel blockers in combination, but was not observed in guinea pigs treated with either I(K) blocker alone, or in phenylephrine-stimulated guinea pigs. Salvos and ventricular tachycardia occurred with adrenaline but not with phenylephrine. No changes in STV or triangulation of the MAP signals were observed before TdP. Combined blockade of both I(Kr) and I(Ks) plus the addition of adrenaline were required to induce TdP in anaesthetized guinea pigs. This suggests that there must be sufficient depletion of repolarization reserve and an appropriate trigger for TdP to occur.

  9. Possible mechanisms of hypotension produced 70% alcoholic extract of Terminalia arjuna (L. in anaesthetized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodagala Durga S

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bark of Terminalia arjuna L. (Combretaceae is used in Ayurveda since ancient times for the treatment of cardiac disorders. Previous laboratory investigations have demonstrated the use of the bark in cardiovascular complications. The present study was aimed to find the effect of 70% alcoholic extract of Terminalia arjuna on anaesthetized dog blood pressure and probable site of action. Methods Six dogs were anaesthetized with intraperitoneal injection of thiopental sodium and the blood pressure of each dog (n = 6 was measured from the left common carotid artery connected to a mercury manometer on kymograph. The femoral vein was cannulated for administration of drug solutions. The extract of T. arjuna (dissolved in propylene glycol in the dose range of 5 to 15 mg/kg were administered intravenously in a pilot study and the dose (6 mg/kg which produced appreciable hypotension was selected for further studies. Results Intravenous administration of T. arjuna produced dose-dependent hypotension in anaesthetized dogs. The hypotension produced by 6 mg/kg dose of the extract was blocked by propranolol but not by atropine or mepyramine maleate. This indicates that muscarinic or histaminergic mechanisms are not likely to be involved in the hypotension produced by the extract. The blockade by propranolol of the hypotension produced by T. arjuna indicates that the extract might contain active compound(s possessing adrenergic ß2-receptor agonist action and/or that act directly on the heart muscle. Conclusion The results indicated the likely involvement of peripheral mechanism for hypotension produced by the 70% alcoholic extract of Terminalia arjuna and lends support for the claims of its traditional usage in cardiovascular disorders.

  10. Anaesthetic Management of Supratentorial Tumor Craniotomy Using Awake-Throughout Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Faraz; Salim, Fahad; Enam, Ather; Parkash, Jai; Faheem, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    The authors are reporting an anaesthetic management of patient presenting with left parietal lobe space occupying lesion and scheduled for Awake-craniotomy. Awake-throughout approach using scalp block was planned. Among techniques reported for keeping patient awake during the surgery, this one is really underutilized. The successful conduct requires thorough preoperative assessment and psychological preparation. We used powerpoint presentation as a preoperative teaching tool. The anatomical landmark technique was used to institute scalp block, where individual nerves were targeted bilaterally. Patient remained stable throughout and participated actively in intraoperative neurological monitoring. Postoperative period showed remarkable recovery, better pain control, and shorter length of stay in hospital.

  11. Morbidly obese patient with obstructive sleep apnoea for major spine surgery: An anaesthetic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Redhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidly obese patients with clinical features of obstructive sleep apnoea can present a myriad of challenges to the anaesthesiologists which must be addressed to minimise the perioperative risks. Initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy early in the pre- and post-operative period along with appropriate anaesthetic planning is of paramount importance in such patients. This case report emphasises the usefulness of CPAP therapy, even for a short duration, to minimise morbidity, improve recovery and hasten early discharge from the hospital after major surgery.

  12. Effectiveness of Two Topical Anaesthetic Agents used along with Audio Visual Aids in Paediatric Dental Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nidhi; Dhawan, Jayata; Kumar, Dipanshu; Anand, Ashish; Tangri, Karan

    2017-01-01

    Topical anaesthetic agents enable pain free intraoral procedures, symptomatic pain relief for toothache, superficial mucosal lesions and pain related to post extraction time. Most common anxiety provoking and fearful experience for children in dental operatory is administration of local anaesthesia because on seeing the needle, children usually become uncooperative. One of recent trend of behaviour management technique is using non-aversive techniques out of which audiovisual distraction has emerged as a very successful technique for managing children in dental settings. Audio visual distraction could decrease the procedure related anxiety of patients undergoing dental treatment and can be very relaxing for highly anxious patients. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of topical anaesthetics EMLA (Eutectic Mixture of Local Anaesthetics) cream and benzocaine (20%) gel in reducing the pain during the needle insertion with and without the use of Audio Visual (AV) aids. The study was conducted on 120 children, the age range of 3-14 years attending the outpatient department for their treatment. EMLA and benzocaine gel (20%) were assessed for their effectiveness in reducing the pain on needle insertion during local anaesthesia administration. Based on the inclusion and the exclusion criteria, children requiring local anaesthesia for the dental treatment were randomly divided into four equal groups of 30 children based upon whether AV aids were used or not. AV aids were given using Sony Vaio laptop with earphones with nursery rhymes and cartoon movies DVD. The pain assessment was done by using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale and measurement of the physiological responses of pulse rate and oxygen saturation were done by pulse oximeter. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean pain score, pulse rate and mean oxygen saturation rate when it was compared between the four groups. EMLA with AV aids was found to be a better topical

  13. Efficacy of 2-Phenoxyethanol as an Anaesthetic for Adult Redline Torpedo Fish, Sahyadria denisonii (Day 1865

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mercy Thoranam Varkey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of 2-phenoxyethanol for redline torpedo fish exposed to five concentrations (200, 300, 400, 500, and 600 μlL−1 was evaluated. The time periods necessary for each characteristic stage of induction and recovery were recorded. Results indicated that the induction time of the fish exposed to five anaesthetic concentrations significantly (P<0.05 decreased with increasing concentration but recovery time was independent of concentration. Concentration of 500 μlL−1 (induction time: 173 ± 7 and recovery time: 129 ± 41 seconds was determined as the minimum effective concentration that induces anaesthesia in less than 3 minutes.

  14. Anaesthetic management of a patient with Liddle's syndrome for emergency caesarean hysterectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, N E

    2012-02-01

    We describe the anaesthetic management of a patient with Liddle\\'s syndrome during caesarean section and emergency hysterectomy for placenta accreta associated with significant intrapartum haemorrhage. Liddle\\'s syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterised by early onset arterial hypertension and hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis. Additional issues were the presence of short stature, limb hypertonicity and preeclampsia. Initial management with a low-dose combined spinal-epidural technique was subsequently converted to general anaesthesia due to patient discomfort. The management of Liddle\\'s syndrome in the setting of neuraxial and general anaesthesia in a patient undergoing caesarean section is discussed.

  15. Anaesthetic management of a patient with Liddle's syndrome for emergency caesarean hysterectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, N E

    2011-04-01

    We describe the anaesthetic management of a patient with Liddle\\'s syndrome during caesarean section and emergency hysterectomy for placenta accreta associated with significant intrapartum haemorrhage. Liddle\\'s syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterised by early onset arterial hypertension and hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis. Additional issues were the presence of short stature, limb hypertonicity and preeclampsia. Initial management with a low-dose combined spinal-epidural technique was subsequently converted to general anaesthesia due to patient discomfort. The management of Liddle\\'s syndrome in the setting of neuraxial and general anaesthesia in a patient undergoing caesarean section is discussed.

  16. Financial and environmental costs of reusable and single-use anaesthetic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGain, F; Story, D; Lim, T; McAlister, S

    2017-06-01

    An innovative approach to choosing hospital equipment is to consider the environmental costs in addition to other costs and benefits. We used life cycle assessment to model the environmental and financial costs of different scenarios of replacing reusable anaesthetic equipment with single-use variants. The primary environmental costs were CO 2 emissions (in CO 2 equivalents) and water use (in litres). We compared energy source mixes between Australia, the UK/Europe, and the USA. For an Australian hospital with six operating rooms, the annual financial cost of converting from single-use equipment to reusable anaesthetic equipment would be an AUD$32 033 (£19 220), 46% decrease. In Australia, converting from single-use to reusable equipment would result in an increase of CO 2 emissions from 5095 (95% CI: 4614-5658) to 5575 kg CO 2 eq (95% CI: 5542-5608), a 480 kg CO 2 eq (9%) increase. Using the UK/European power mix, converting from single-use (5575 kg CO 2 eq) to reusable anaesthetic equipment (802 kg CO 2 eq) would result in an 84% reduction (4873 kg CO 2 eq) in CO 2 emissions, whilst in the USA converting to reusables would have led to a 2427 kg CO 2 eq (48%) reduction. In Australia, converting from single-use to reusable equipment would more than double water use from 34.4 to 90.6 kilolitres. For an Australian hospital with six operating rooms, converting from single-use to reusable anaesthetic equipment saved more than AUD$30 000 (£18 000) per annum, but increased the CO 2 emissions by almost 10%. The CO 2 offset is highly dependent on the power source mix, while water consumption is greater for reusable equipment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Anaesthetic Implications in Primary Hyperparathyroidism with Severe Hypercalcaemia; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Bansal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare endocrinal disorder of excess production of parathormone. A wide array of presenting symptoms may occur from parathormone induced hypercalcaemia leading to nephrolithiasis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness and cardiac arrhythmias. We present a case of young female who presented with non union of an operated fracture femur and generalized bony pains and frequent complaints of vomiting, polyuria and polydipsia. She was diagnosed to have primary hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcaemia and underwent parathyroidectomy. The potential perioperative problems and anaesthetic concerns require a focused management and are discussed.

  18. Anaesthetic Implications in Primary Hyperparathyroidism with Severe Hypercalcaemia: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Bansal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare endocrinal disorder of excess production of parathormone. A wide array of presenting symptoms may occur from parathormone induced hypercalcaemia leading to nephrolithiasis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness and cardiac arrhythmias. We present a case of young female who presented with non union of an operated fracture femur and generalized bony pains and frequent complaints of vomiting, polyuria and polydipsia. She was diagnosed to have primary hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcaemia and underwent parathyroidectomy. The potential perioperative problems and anaesthetic concerns are discussed.

  19. Efficacy of the ejector flow-meter. A scavenging device for anaesthetic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obel, D.; Jorgensen, S.; Ferguson, A.; Frandsen, K.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of air concentrations of nitrous oxide and halothane in the breathing zone of the anaesthetist and the operating-room nurse were carried out during inhalation anaesthesia with a Mapleson D system. Gas removal was performed from inside the breathing system at the same rate as that of the fresh gas inflow by means of an ejector flow-meter. The concentrations of nitrous oxide and halothane were maintained below the Danish Threshold Limit Values of 100 and 5 parts per million, respectively, by using this type of scavenging. When these anaesthetics were used simultaneously, the reduced Threshold Limit Values were not exceeded during endotracheal anaesthesia.

  20. Monitoring variables affecting positron emission tomography measurements of cerebral blood flow in anaesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Simonsen, Mette

    2018-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of anaesthetized pig brains is a useful tool in neuroscience. Stable cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential for PET, since variations can affect the distribution of several radiotracers. However, the effect of physiological factors regulating...... and the monitoring parameters. Results No significant statistical correlations were found between CBF and the nine monitoring variables. However, we found that arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) and body temperature were important predictors of CBF that should be observed and kept constant. In addition, we...

  1. The value of decision tree analysis in planning anaesthetic care in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, J H; Evans, S A

    2016-08-01

    The use of decision tree analysis is discussed in the context of the anaesthetic and obstetric management of a young pregnant woman with joint hypermobility syndrome with a history of insensitivity to local anaesthesia and a previous difficult intubation due to a tongue tumour. The multidisciplinary clinical decision process resulted in the woman being delivered without complication by elective caesarean section under general anaesthesia after an awake fibreoptic intubation. The decision process used is reviewed and compared retrospectively to a decision tree analytical approach. The benefits and limitations of using decision tree analysis are reviewed and its application in obstetric anaesthesia is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging targeted transperineal prostate biopsy: a local anaesthetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, E J; Donaldson, I A; Freeman, A; Jameson, C; Punwani, S; Moore, C; Arya, M; Emberton, M; Ahmed, H U

    2017-09-01

    Despite high rates of disease misclassification and sepsis, the use of transrectal biopsy remains commonplace. Transperineal mapping biopsies mitigate these problems but carry increased cost and patient burden. Local anaesthetic, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted transperineal biopsy may offer an alternative. Here, we aim to determine the feasibility, tolerability and detection rates of clinically significant prostate cancer using a local anaesthetic, transperineal, MRI-targeted biopsy technique. Tertiary referral centre in which 181 consecutive men underwent local anaesthetic, transperineal MRI-targeted prostate biopsy (September 2014 to January 2016). A standardized local anaesthetic technique was used to obtain targeted biopsies using visual estimation with the number of targeted cores determined by each of a number of users. We assessed adverse events, patient visual analogue pain scores and detection rates of clinically significant cancer (defined by University College London (UCL) definitions one and two and separately by the presence of dominant and non-dominant Gleason pattern 4). We secondarily assessed detection of any cancer, rates of detection by MRI (Likert) score and by presenting PSA. Differences were assessed using Chi-squared tests (P<0.05). One hundred eighty-one men with 243 lesions were included. There were no episodes of sepsis or re-admissions and one procedure was abandoned owing to patient discomfort. Twenty-three out of 25 (92%) men would recommend the procedure to another. Median visual analogue pain score was 1.0 (interquartile range: 0.0-2.4). A total 104/181 (57%) had UCL definition 1 disease (Gleason ⩾4+3 and/or maximum cancer length ⩾6 mm) and 129/181 (71%) had UCL definition 2 cancer (Gleason ⩾3+4 and/or maximum cancer length ⩾4 mm). Fifty-four out of 181 (30%) and 124/181 (69%) had dominant and non-dominant pattern 4 disease or greater (irrespective of cancer length). Any cancer was

  3. Anaesthetic management of a patient with deep brain stimulation implant for radical nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Khetarpal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old man with severe Parkinson′s disease (PD who had been implanted with deep brain stimulators into both sides underwent radical nephrectomy under general anaesthesia with standard monitoring. Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an alternative and effective treatment option for severe and refractory PD and other illnesses such as essential tremor and intractable epilepsy. Anaesthesia in the patients with implanted neurostimulator requires special consideration because of the interaction between neurostimulator and the diathermy. The diathermy can damage the brain tissue at the site of electrode. There are no standard guidelines for the anaesthetic management of a patient with DBS electrode in situ posted for surgery.

  4. The analysis of variance in anaesthetic research: statistics, biography and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, J J

    2010-12-01

    Multiple t-tests (or their non-parametric equivalents) are often used erroneously to compare the means of three or more groups in anaesthetic research. Methods for correcting the p value regarded as significant can be applied to take account of multiple testing, but these are somewhat arbitrary and do not avoid several unwieldy calculations. The appropriate method for most such comparisons is the 'analysis of variance' that not only economises on the number of statistical procedures, but also indicates if underlying factors or sub-groups have contributed to any significant results. This article outlines the history, rationale and method of this analysis.

  5. Systems analysis of voluntary reported anaesthetic safety incidents occurring in a university teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Matthew W; Lehnus, Kristina S

    2018-01-01

    To identify factors contributing to the development of anaesthetic safety incidents. Prospective, descriptive, voluntary reporting audit of safety incidents with subsequent systems analysis. All animals anaesthetized in a multispecies veterinary teaching hospital from November 2014 to October 2016. Peri-anaesthetic incidents that risked or caused unnecessary harm to an animal were reported by anaesthetists alongside animal morbidity and mortality data. A modified systems analysis framework was used to identify contributing factors from the following categories: Animal and Owner, Task and Technology, Individual, Team, Work Environmental, and Organizational and Management. The outcome was graded using a simple descriptive scale. Data were analysed using Pearson's Chi-Square test for association and univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis. Totally, 3379 anaesthetics were performed during the audit period. Of these, 174 incident reports were analysed, 163 of which impacted safe veterinary care and 26 incidents were considered to have had major or catastrophic outcomes. Incident outcome was believed to have been limited by anaesthetist intervention in 104 (63.8%) cases. Various factors were identified as: Individual in 123 (70.7%), Team in 108 (62.1%), Organizational and Management in 94 (54.0%), Task and Technology in 80 (46.0%), Work Environmental in 53 (30.5%) and Animal and Owner in 36 (20.7%) incidents. Individual factors were rarely seen in isolation. Significant associations were identified between Experience and Supervision, X 2 (1, n=174)=54177, p=0.001, Failure to follow a standard operating procedure and Task Management, X 2 (2, n=174)=11318, p=0.001, and Staffing and Poor Scheduling, X 2 (1, n=174)=36742, p=0.001. Animal Condition [odds ratio (OR)=16210, 95% confidence interval (CI)=5573-47147)] and anaesthetist Decision Making (OR=3437, 95% CI=1184-9974) were risk factors for catastrophic and major outcomes. Individual factors contribute

  6. Anaesthetic Management of a patient with Myasthenia Gravis and Small Bowel Intussusception for Jejuno-Ileal Anastomoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting voluntary skeletal muscles. The altered sensitivity of acetylcholine receptors to muscle relaxants and concomitant treatment with anticholinesterase in these patients affect their anaesthetic management. Patients who have undergone bowel anastomosis and are on regular anticholinesterase treatment are susceptible to anastomotic leaks. We report successful anaesthetic management of class I myasthenic patient with coexisting small bowel intussusception operated for jejuno-ileal anastomoses using regional, inhalational and intravenous (i.v anaesthesia based on train of four responses, and avoiding the use of reversal (anticholinesterase.

  7. [Anaesthetic management in a paediatric patient with a difficult airway due to epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez Gómez, E; Garcés Aletá, A; Monclus Diaz, E; Manen Berga, F; García-Aparicio, L; Ontanilla López, A

    2015-05-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by blistering after minimal trauma. These blisters tend to form dystrophic scars, leading to limiting and life-threatening sequelae. The anaesthetic management of patients with DEB is a challenge, even for the most experienced anaesthesiologists, but basic principles can help us prepare the plan of care. The main goals are to prevent trauma/infection of skin/mucous, and to establish a secure airway without causing bullae. Patient positioning and the instruments used to monitor vital signs and administering anaesthetic agents can cause new lesions. It is advisable to lubricate the instruments and to avoid adhesive material and shearing forces on the skin. Besides the implications of the comorbidities, there is a potential difficult intubation and difficult vascular access. Acute airway obstruction can occur due to airway instrumentation. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with EBD difficult airway and undergoing correction of syndactylyl and dental extractions. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Drug distribution in spinal cord during administration with spinal loop dialysis probes in anaesthetized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uustalu, Maria; Abelson, Klas S P

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H]Epibatid......The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H......]Epibatidine in concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 nM was dissolved in Ringer's solution and administered through the dialysis membrane into the dorsal region of the cervical spinal cord. First, the outflow of [(3)H]epibatidine from the probe into the spinal cord was examined with respect to different concentrations and changes....... The administered [(3)H]epibatidine was found to be distributed to the area closest to the dialysis probe and not dispersed along the spinal cord, and the distribution was equal for all concentrations. The data presented in this investigation provide information, which is important for interpretation of data from...

  9. Robotic invasion of operation theatre and associated anaesthetic issues: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem N Kakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A Robotic device is a powered, computer controlled manipulator with artificial sensing that can be reprogrammed to move and position tools to carry out a wide range of tasks. Robots and Telemanipulators were first developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA for use in space exploration. Today′s medical robotic systems were the brainchild of the United States Department of Defence′s desire to decrease war casualties with the development of ′telerobotic surgery′. The ′master-slave′ telemanipulator concept was developed for medical use in the early 1990s where the surgeon′s (master manual movements were transmitted to end-effector (slave instruments at a remote site. Since then, the field of surgical robotics has undergone massive transformation and the future is even brighter. As expected, any new technique brings with it risks and the possibility of technical difficulties. The person who bears the brunt of complications or benefit from a new invention is the ′Patient′. Anaesthesiologists as always must do their part to be the patient′s ′best man′ in the perioperative period. We should be prepared for screening and selection of patients in a different perspective keeping in mind the steep learning curves of surgeons, long surgical hours, extreme patient positioning and other previously unknown anaesthetic challenges brought about by the surgical robot. In this article we have tried to track the development of surgical robots and consider the unique anaesthetic issues related to robot assisted surgeries.

  10. Comparison of work of breathing using drawover and continuous flow anaesthetic breathing systems in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, G T; McEwen, J P J; Beaton, S J; Young, D

    2007-04-01

    We compared the work of breathing under general anaesthesia in children using drawover and continuous flow anaesthetic systems. A pilot study was conducted in four children weighing > 20 kg in whom it would usually be considered appropriate to use breathing systems designed for adult anaesthesia. The pilot study compared work of breathing using the Mapleson D breathing system and the Triservice Anaesthetic Apparatus (TSAA). Work of breathing was calculated using the modified Campbell technique that calculates work using a pressure volume loop derived from oesophageal pressure and airway gas volume measurements. We found no difference in the work of breathing when comparing the Mapleson D and the TSAA in children > 20 kg. Following completion of the pilot study, we conducted a study on 10 children weighing between 10 and 20 kg comparing work of breathing using the Mapleson F breathing system and the TSAA. We found no significant difference in the work of breathing between the Mapleson F and the TSAA for these children. The TSAA can therefore be recommended for use down to a lower weight limit of 10 kg.

  11. Meningomyelocele Repair in a Premature Newborn with Hydrocephalus: Anaesthetic Confronts and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Ghodke

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Deficit of neural tube closure in the initial phases of intrauterine development leads to a gamut of abnormalities ranging from spina-bifida occulta, a relatively benign condition, to encephalocele and meningomyelocele, an anomaly in vertebral bodies, spinal cord and sometimes involving brainstem (in cervical meningomyelocele. Meningomyelocele is the most common nonlethal malformation in the spectrum of neural tube deficits. The intrinsic challenges associated with the latter disorder warrants tailor-made approaches for providing anaesthesia to the requisite therapeutic surgical interventions. Pediatric patients pose a set of natural barriers because of their ever budding and maturing neurophysiological status, apart from the central neural disease process. Hence, in order to provide optimal neuro-anaesthetic care, the anaesthesiologist must have the knowledge of the outcomes of various pharmacologic interventions on cerebral aerodynamics apart from his professional experience in pediatric neuroanaesthesia. The current case report accounts for a challenging anaesthetic management in a premature newborn having hydrocephalus and lumbosacral meningomyelocele, presented for surgical repair within four hours of delivery.

  12. A New Anaesthetic Protocol for Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio: Propofol Combined with Lidocaine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Valentim

    Full Text Available The increasing use of zebrafish model has not been accompanied by the evolution of proper anaesthesia for this species in research. The most used anaesthetic in fishes, MS222, may induce aversion, reduction of heart rate, and consequently high mortality, especially during long exposures. Therefore, we aim to explore new anaesthetic protocols to be used in zebrafish by studying the quality of anaesthesia and recovery induced by different concentrations of propofol alone and in combination with different concentrations of lidocaine.In experiment A, eighty-three AB zebrafish were randomly assigned to 7 different groups: control, 2.5 (2.5P, 5 (5P or 7.5 μg/ml (7.5P of propofol; and 2.5 μg/ml of propofol combined with 50, (P/50L, 100 (P/100L or 150 μg/ml (P/150L of lidocaine. Zebrafish were placed in an anaesthetic water bath and time to lose the equilibrium, reflex to touch, reflex to a tail pinch, and respiratory rate were measured. Time to gain equilibrium was also assessed in a clean tank. Five and 24 hours after anaesthesia recovery, zebrafish were evaluated concerning activity and reactivity. Afterwards, in a second phase of experiments (experiment B, the best protocol of the experiment A was compared with a new group of 8 fishes treated with 100 mg/L of MS222 (100M.In experiment A, only different concentrations of propofol/lidocaine combination induced full anaesthesia in all animals. Thus only these groups were compared with a standard dose of MS222 in experiment B. Propofol/lidocaine induced a quicker loss of equilibrium, and loss of response to light and painful stimuli compared with MS222. However zebrafish treated with MS222 recovered quickly than the ones treated with propofol/lidocaine.In conclusion, propofol/lidocaine combination and MS222 have advantages in different situations. MS222 is ideal for minor procedures when a quick recovery is important, while propofol/lidocaine is best to induce a quick and complete anaesthesia.

  13. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABA(A) receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adam C; Griffith, Theanne N; Tsikolia, Maia; Kotey, Francesca O; Gill, Nikhila; Humbert, Danielle J; Watt, Erin E; Yermolina, Yuliya A; Goel, Shikha; El-Ghendy, Bahaa; Hall, C Dennis

    2011-09-30

    GABA(A) receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanols were investigated on recombinant human γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A), α(1)β(2)γ(2s)) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and compared to the modulatory effects on GABA currents observed with exposures to the intravenous anaesthetic agent, propofol. Submaximal EC(20) GABA currents were typically enhanced by co-applications of 3-300 μM cyclohexanols. For instance, at 30 μM 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol (a novel compound) GABA responses were increased ~3-fold (although similar enhancements were achieved at 3 μM propofol). As regards rank order for modulation by the cyclohexanol analogues at 30 μM, the % enhancements for 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol~2,6-di-sec-butylcyclohexanol ≫2,6-di-tert-butylcyclohexanol~4-tert-butylcyclohexanol>cyclohexanol~cyclopentanol~2-methylcyclohexanol. We further tested the potencies of the cyclohexanol analogues as general anaesthetics using a tadpole in vivo assay. Both 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol and 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol were effective as anaesthetics with EC(50)s of 14.0 μM and 13.1 μM respectively, while other cyclohexanols with bulkier side chains were less potent. In conclusion, our data indicate that cyclohexanols are both positive modulators of GABA(A) receptors currents and anaesthetics. The positioning and size of the alkyl groups at the 2 and 6 positions on the cyclohexanol ring were critical determinants of activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hypersensitivity to local anaesthetics--update and proposal of evaluation algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil; Elberling, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    Local anaesthetics (LA) are widely used drugs. Adverse reactions are rare but may be caused by delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and probably also immediate-type reactions. As it is not always easy to clinically differ between these subtypes, allergy skin testing should be considered....... Although numerous test protocols have been published, how patients with hypersensitivity reactions to LA are ideally evaluated remains a topic of discussion. This review attempts to generate a comprehensive update on allergic reactions to LA and to present an algorithm that can be used for the evaluation...... of patients suspected with immediate- and delayed-type immune reactions. Literature was examined using PubMed-Medline, EMBASE, Biosis and Science Citation Index. Based on the literature, the proposed algorithm may safely and rapidly distinguish between immediate-type and delayed-type allergic immune reactions....

  15. Conjugates of methylated cyclodextrin derivatives and hydroxyethyl starch (HES: Synthesis, cytotoxicity and inclusion of anaesthetic actives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Markenstein

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The mono-6-deoxy-6-azides of 2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (DIMEB and randomly methylated-β-cyclodextrin (RAMEB were conjugated to propargylated hydroxyethyl starch (HES by Cu+-catalysed [2 + 3] cycloaddition. The resulting water soluble polymers showed lower critical solution temperatures (LCST at 52.5 °C (DIMEB-HES and 84.5 °C (RAMEB-HES, respectively. LCST phase separations could be completely avoided by the introduction of a small amount of carboxylate groups at the HES backbone. The methylated CDs conjugated to the HES backbone exhibited significantly lower cytotoxicities than the corresponding monomeric CD derivatives. Since the binding potentials of these CD conjugates were very high, they are promising candidates for new oral dosage forms of anaesthetic actives.

  16. Quantification of anaesthetic effects on atrial fibrillation rate by partial least-squares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervigón, R; Moreno, J; Pérez-Villacastín, J; Reilly, R B; Castells, F

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism underlying atrial fibrillation (AF) remains poorly understood. Multiple wandering propagation wavelets drifting through both atria under hierarchical models are not understood. Some pharmacological drugs, known as antiarrhythmics, modify the cardiac ionic currents supporting the fibrillation process within the atria and may modify the AF propagation dynamics terminating the fibrillation process. Other medications, theoretically non-antiarrhythmic, may slightly affect the fibrillation process in non-defined mechanisms. We evaluated whether the most commonly used anaesthetic agent, propofol, affects AF patterns. Partial least-squares (PLS) analysis was performed to reduce significant noise into the main latent variables to find the differences between groups. The final results showed an excellent discrimination between groups with slow atrial activity during the propofol infusion. (paper)

  17. Transient neurologic symptoms (TNS) following spinal anaesthesia with lidocaine versus other local anaesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaric, Dusanka; Pace, Nathan Leon

    2009-01-01

    ); and handsearched the reference lists of trials and review articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomized and quasi-randomized studies comparing the frequency of TNS and neurologic complications after spinal anaesthesia with lidocaine as compared to other local anaesthetics. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS......BACKGROUND: Spinal anaesthesia has been in use since 1898. During the last decade there has been an increase in the number of reports implicating lidocaine as a possible cause of temporary and permanent neurologic complications after spinal anaesthesia. Follow up of patients who received...... uncomplicated spinal anaesthesia revealed that some of them developed pain in the lower extremities after an initial full recovery. This painful condition that occurs in the immediate postoperative period was named 'transient neurologic symptoms' (TNS). OBJECTIVES: To study the frequency of TNS and neurologic...

  18. Anaesthetic management of shoulder arthroscopic repair in Parkinson′s disease with deep brain stimulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranju Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the anaesthetic management of arthroscopic repair for complete rotator cuff tear of shoulder in a 59-year-old female with Parkinson′s disease (PD with deep brain stimulator (DBS using a combination of general anaesthesia with interscalene approach to brachial plexus block. The DBS consists of implanted electrodes in the brain connected to the implantable pulse generator (IPG normally placed in the anterior chest wall subcutaneously. It can be programmed externally from a hand-held device placed directly over the battery stimulator unit. In our patient, IPG with its leads was located in close vicinity of the operative site with potential for DBS malfunction. Implications of DBS in a patient with PD for shoulder arthroscopy for anaesthesiologist are discussed along with a brief review of DBS.

  19. Anaesthetic management of two Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris cubs for fracture repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth E. Zeiler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This case series describes the anaesthetic management of two sibling Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris cubs that were found to have spontaneous femur fractures due to severe nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism. Both cubs received a combination of medetomidine (25 µg/kg and ketamine (4 mg/kg intramuscularly and were maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. An epidural injection of morphine (0.1 mg/kg and ropivacaine (1.6 mg/kg was administered to both tigers, which allowed a low end-tidal isoflurane concentration to be maintained throughout the femur fracture reduction operations. Both cubs experienced profound bradycardia and hypotension during general anaesthesia, and were unresponsive to anticholinergic treatment. Possible causes for these cardiovascular complications included: drug pharmacodynamics (medetomidine, morphine, isoflurane, decreased sympathetic tone due to the epidural (ropivacaine and hypothermia. These possible causes are discussed in detail.

  20. Anaesthetic management of craniotomy for intracranial lesion in a child with uncorrected Tetrology of Fallot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafique, N. B.; Hamid, M.

    2013-01-01

    The case of a 16 years old female with uncorrected Tetrology of Fallot, who operated for intracranial lesion in parieto frontal area with midline shift is presented. She had right ventricular hypertrophy, clubbing, central and peripheral cyanosis. Patient was anaesthetized keeping all measures required to avoid haemodynamic swings, tachycardia, desaturation, acidosis and dehydration. Pre-operative antibiotic cover was given to prevent bacterial endocarditis. Neurosurgeon, Paediatric cardiologist, Anaesthesiologist and Intensivist were involved in the preoperative planning and management of the patient. Haemodynamics were maintained and managed by monitoring continuous arterial line secured pre-induction and central line after induction. During surgery pain was controlled with fentanyl boluses intra-operatively and post operatively by tramadol infusion. Patient was extubated post operatively in the recovery room fulfilling the extubation criteria. She remained haemodynamically stable throughout the course. She was discharged on 5th post operative day from the hospital on SpO/sub 2/ of 70-80% at room air. (author)

  1. Anaesthetic management of a patient with Pompe disease for kyphoscoliosis correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kumbar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease (PD is a type II glycogen storage disease, characterised by abnormal glycogen deposition, mainly in heart and skeletal muscles, leading to progressive loss of muscle function. The infantile variety is associated with severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and generally do not reach adulthood. The juvenile variety presents with progressive muscle weakness and respiratory failure. Anaesthetic management concerns in the patient reported here were mainly due to respiratory failure, myopathy and sensitivity to muscle relaxants and significant haemodynamic changes perioperatively. We successfully managed a 13-year-old girl with juvenile PD on respiratory support scheduled for thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis corrective surgery. Ketamine and dexmedetomidine were used for induction of anaesthesia and maintenance. Muscle relaxants were diligently avoided in this case.

  2. Anaesthetic management in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency undergoing neurosurgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Valiaveedan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD deficiency is an X-linked recessive enzymopathy responsible for acute haemolysis following exposure to oxidative stress. Drugs which induce haemolysis in these patients are often used in anaesthesia and perioperative pain management. Neurosurgery and few drugs routinely used during these procedures are known to cause stress situations. Associated infection and certain foodstuffs are also responsible for oxidative stress. Here, we present two patients with G-6-PD deficiency who underwent uneventful neurosurgical procedures. The anaesthetic management in such patients should focus on avoiding the drugs implicated in haemolysis, reducing the surgical stress with adequate analgesia, and monitoring for and treating the haemolysis, should it occur.

  3. Anaesthetic management of two Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris cubs for fracture repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth E. Zeiler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This case series describes the anaesthetic management of two sibling Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris cubs that were found to have spontaneous femur fractures due to severe nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism. Both cubs received a combination of medetomidine (25 µg/kg and ketamine (4 mg/kg intramuscularly and were maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. An epidural injection of morphine (0.1 mg/kg and ropivacaine (1.6 mg/kg was administered to both tigers, which allowed a low end-tidal isoflurane concentration to be maintained throughout the femur fracture reduction operations. Both cubs experienced profound bradycardia and hypotension during general anaesthesia, and were unresponsive to anticholinergic treatment. Possible causes for these cardiovascular complications included: drug pharmacodynamics (medetomidine, morphine, isoflurane, decreased sympathetic tone due to the epidural (ropivacaine and hypothermia. These possible causes are discussed in detail.

  4. Electrically-activated dilator muscles reduce pharyngeal resistance in anaesthetized dogs with upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, H; Odeh, M; Schnall, R P; Gavriely, N; Oliven, A

    1995-09-01

    There is current controversy as to whether electrical stimulation of upper airway musculature can be used us a beneficial treatment modality in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Increased upper airway (UAW) muscle activity decreases UAW resistance (Ruaw) in isolated UAW of dogs. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of UAW muscle contraction on UAW patency in anaesthetized dogs in vivo breathing spontaneously through partially and completely obstructed UAW. Airflow and supraglottic pressure were measured to obtain Ruaw. Ruaw could be regulated by inhalation of a rubber balloon implanted transcutaneously in the pharyngeal submucosa to produce partial or complete obstruction. Wire electrodes were implanted bilaterally into the genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), sternothyroid (ST), and sternohyoid (SH) muscles for electrical stimulation (ES), and into the alae nasi for electromyographic (EMG) recording. Three levels of electrical stimulation were delivered to each muscle before and during partial or complete UAW obstruction. Genioglossus and geniohyoid stimulation both resulted in a significant reduction in Ruaw, which was most pronounced during partial obstruction, reducing Ruaw from 54 +/- 11 to 14 +/- 3 and from 74 +/- 12 to 31 +/- 5 cmH2O.L-1.s, respectively. At low voltage, stimulation of the genioglossus was more effective than stimulation of the geniohyoid in reducing Ruaw. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of the genioglossus but not of the geniohyoid released total obstruction. In contrast, electrical stimulation of the sternohyoid and sternothyroid produced no significant change in Ruaw. These findings demonstrate that selective UAW dilatory muscle contraction in spontaneously breathing anaesthetized dogs reduces Ruaw in the presence of UAW obstruction and releases UAW occlusion, with the genioglossus being the most effective muscle. This favours further attempts to investigate the benefits of electrical stimulation of selected

  5. Anaesthetic induction and recovery characteristics of a diazepam-ketamine combination compared with propofol in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jacques P; Dzikit, T Brighton; Zeiler, Gareth E; Buck, Roxanne; Nevill, Bruce; Gummow, Bruce; Bester, Lynette

    2015-06-01

    Induction of anaesthesia occasionally has been associated with undesirable behaviour in dogs. High quality of induction of anaesthesia with propofol has been well described while in contrast variable induction and recovery quality has been associated with diazepam-ketamine. In this study, anaesthetic induction and recovery characteristics of diazepam-ketamine combination with propofol alone were compared in dogs undergoing elective orchidectomy. Thirty-six healthy adult male dogs were used. After habitus scoring (simple descriptive scale [SDS]), the dogs were sedated with morphine and acepromazine. Forty minutes later a premedication score (SDS) was allocated and general anaesthesia was induced using a combination of diazepam-ketamine (Group D/K) or propofol (Group P) and maintained with isoflurane. Scores for the quality of induction, intubation and degree of myoclonus were allocated (SDS). Orchidectomy was performed after which recovery from anaesthesia was scored (SDS) and times to extubation and standing were recorded. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Kappa Reliability and Kendall Tau B tests. Both groups were associated with acceptable quality of induction and recovery from anaesthesia. Group P, however, was associated with a poorer quality of induction (p = 0.014), prolonged induction period (p = 0.0018) and more pronounced myoclonus (p = 0.003), but had better quality of recovery (p = 0.000002) and shorter recovery times (p = 0.035) compared with Group D/K. Diazepam-ketamine and propofol are associated with acceptable induction and recovery from anaesthesia. Propofol had inferior anaesthetic induction characteristics, but superior and quicker recovery from anaesthesia compared with diazepam-ketamine.

  6. Anaesthetic and other treatments of shell shock: World War I and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, A G

    2012-03-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an important health risk factor for military personnel deployed in modern warfare. In World War I this condition (then known as shell shock or 'neurasthenia') was such a problem that 'forward psychiatry' was begun by French doctors in 1915. Some British doctors tried general anaesthesia as a treatment (ether and chloroform), while others preferred application of electricity. Four British 'forward psychiatric units' were set up in 1917. Hospitals for shell shocked soldiers were also established in Britain, including (for officers) Craiglockhart War Hospital in Edinburgh; patients diagnosed to have more serious psychiatric conditions were transferred to the Royal Edinburgh Asylum. Towards the end of 1918 anaesthetic and electrical treatments of shell shock were gradually displaced by modified Freudian methods psychodynamic intervention. The efficacy of 'forward psychiatry' was controversial. In 1922 the War Office produced a report on shell shock with recommendations for prevention of war neurosis. However, when World War II broke out in 1939, this seemed to have been ignored. The term 'combat fatigue' was introduced as breakdown rates became alarming, and then the value of pre-selection was recognised. At the Maudsley Hospital in London in 1940 barbiturate abreaction was advocated for quick relief from severe anxiety and hysteria, using i.v. anaesthetics: Somnifaine, paraldehyde, Sodium Amytal. 'Pentothal narcosis' and 'narco-analysis' were adopted by British and American military psychiatrists. However, by 1945 medical thinking gradually settled on the same approaches that had seemed to be effective in 1918. The term PTSD was introduced in 1980. In the UK the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for management (2005) recommend trauma-focussed Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and consideration of antidepressants.

  7. Optimised NLC: a nanotechnological approach to improve the anaesthetic effect of bupivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues da Silva, Gustavo H; Ribeiro, Lígia N M; Mitsutake, Hery; Guilherme, Viviane A; Castro, Simone R; Poppi, Ronei J; Breitkreitz, Márcia C; de Paula, Eneida

    2017-08-30

    The short time of action and systemic toxicity of local anaesthetics limit their clinical application. Bupivacaine is the most frequently used local anaesthetic in surgical procedures worldwide. The discovery that its S(-) enantiomeric form is less toxic than the R(+) form led to the introduction of products with enantiomeric excess (S75:R25 bupivacaine) in the market. Nevertheless, the time of action of bupivacaine is still short; to overcome that, bupivacaine S75:R25 (BVC S75 ) was encapsulated in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). In this work, we present the development of the formulation using chemometric tools of experimental design to study the formulation factors and Raman mapping associated with Classical Least Squares (CLS) to study the miscibility of the solid and the liquid lipids. The selected formulation of the nanostructured lipid carrier containing bupivacaine S75:R25 (NLC BVC ) was observed to be stable for 12 months under room conditions regarding particle size, polydispersion, Zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency. The characterisation by DSC, XDR and TEM confirmed the encapsulation of BVC S75 in the lipid matrix, with no changes in the structure of the nanoparticles. The in vivo analgesic effect elicited by NLC BVC was twice that of free BVC S75 . Besides improving the time of action , no statistical difference in the blockage of the sciatic nerve of rats was found between 0.125% NLC BVC and 0.5% free BVC S75 . Therefore, the formulation allows a reduction in the required anaesthesia dose, decreasing the systemic toxicity of bupivacaine, and opening up new possibilities for different clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Intraoperative esmolol infusion reduces postoperative analgesic consumption and anaesthetic use during septorhinoplasty: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Celebi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Esmolol is known to have no analgesic activity and no anaesthetic properties; however, it could potentiate the reduction in anaesthetic requirements and reduce postoperative analgesic use. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of intravenous esmolol infusion on intraoperative and postoperative analgesic consumptions as well as its effect on depth of anaesthesia. Methods: This randomized-controlled double blind study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital between March and June 2010. Sixty patients undergoing septorhinoplasty were randomized into two groups. History of allergy to drugs used in the study, ischaemic heart disease, heart block, bronchial asthma, hepatic or renal dysfunction, obesity and a history of chronic use of analgesic or β-blockers were considered cause for exclusion from the study. Thirty patients received esmolol and remifentanil (esmolol group and 30 patients received normal saline and remifentanil (control group as an intravenous infusion during the procedure. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and bispectral index values were recorded every 10min. Total remifentanil consumption, visual analogue scale scores, time to first analgesia and total postoperative morphine consumption were recorded. Results: The total remifentanil consumption, visual analogue scale scores at 0, 20 and 60 min, total morphine consumption, time to first analgesia and the number of patients who needed an intravenous morphine were lower in the esmolol group. Conclusions: Intravenous infusion of esmolol reduced the intraoperative and postoperative analgesic consumption, reduced visual analogue scale scores in the early postoperative period and prolonged the time to first analgesia; however it did not influence the depth of anaesthesia.

  9. Survey of Emergency and Essential Surgical, Obstetric and Anaesthetic Services Available in Bangladeshi Government Health Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Jonathan; Sachdev, Sonal P; Cherian, Meena N; Katayama, Francisco; Akhtaruzzaman, A K M; Thomas, Joe; Huda, N; Faragher, E Brian; Johnson, Walter D

    2017-07-01

    Evaluate the capacity of government-run hospitals in Bangladesh to provide emergency and essential surgical, obstetric and anaesthetic services. Cross-sectional survey of 240 Bangladeshi Government healthcare facilities using the World Health Organisation Situational Analysis Tool to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care (SAT). This tool evaluates the ability of a healthcare facility to provide basic surgical, obstetric and anaesthetic care based on 108 queries that detail the infrastructure and population demographics, human resources, surgical interventions and reason for referral, and available surgical equipment and supplies. For this survey, the Bangladeshi Ministry of Health sent the SAT to sub-district, district/general and teaching hospitals throughout the country in April 2013. Responses were received from 240 healthcare facilities (49.5% response rate): 218 sub-district and 22 district/general hospitals. At the sub-district level, caesarean section was offered by 55% of facilities, laparotomy by 7% and open fracture repair by 8%. At the district/general hospital level, 95% offered caesarean section, 86% offered laparotomy and 77% offered open fracture treatment. Availability of anaesthesia services, general equipment and supplies reflected this trend, where district/general hospitals were better equipped than sub-district hospitals, though equipment and infrastructure shortages persist. There has been overall impressive progress by the Bangladeshi Government in providing essential surgical services. Areas for improvement remain across all key areas, including infrastructure, human resources, surgical interventions offered and available equipment. Investment in surgical services offers a cost-effective opportunity to continue to improve the health of the Bangladeshi population and move the country towards universal healthcare coverage.

  10. Serum cortisol of Sahel goats following rumenotomy with assorted anaesthetics and sutures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Mshelia Saidu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The utmost need for pragmatic combination of surgical sutures and local anaesthetic that would evoke minimal post-surgical stress response and allow uncomplicated healing is essential for successful surgeries. Fifteen Sahel goats were randomly allocated into three groups A, B and C to quantitatively assay (ELISA serum cortisol profiles following rumenotomy, as markers of surgical stress. Diazepam at 0.2 mg/kg was administered intravenously to groups A and B with subsequent lidocaine HCl and bupivacaine inverted-L block respectively. Group C did not receive any treatment. Chromic catgut (CCG and polyglycolic acid (PGA sutures were used for rumen and abdominal muscles closure for groups A and B respectively and nylon for skin closure. Blood samples were taken at post anaesthetic induction (PAI and post-surgery at 0, 5, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h. The Group A goats expressed serum cortisol that was significantly high 52.76 ± 6.12 ng/mL at 5 h post-surgery. At 8 h post-surgery serum cortisol for both groups A (72.53 ± 3.79 ng/mL and B (61.59 ± 3.90 ng/mL were at their peak. Serum cortisol levels compared to the baseline data were significantly different (P  0.05. Cortisol responses unambiguously indicate that diazepam-bupivacaine induce less stress than Diazepam-lidocaine, hence a preferred anesthesia. Moreover, polyglycolic acid sutures are associated with less inflammatory reaction than chromic catgut.

  11. National survey on perioperative anaesthetic management in the endovascular treatment of acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Kräuchi, O; Valencia, L; Iturri, F; Mariscal Ortega, A; López Gómez, A; Valero, R

    2018-01-01

    To assess the anaesthetic management of treatment for endovascular acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) in Spain. A survey was designed by the SEDAR Neuroscience Section and sent to the Spanish anaesthesiology departments with a primary stroke centre between July and November 2016. Of the 47 hospitals where endovascular treatment of AIS is performed, 37 anaesthesiology departments participated. Thirty responses were obtained; three of which were eliminated due to duplication (response rate of 72.9%). Health coverage for AIS endovascular treatment was available 24hours a day in 63% of the hospitals. The anaesthesiologist in charge of the procedure was physically present in the hospital in 55.3%. There was large inter-hospital variability in non-standard monitoring and type of anaesthesia. The most important criterion for selecting type of anaesthesia was multidisciplinary choice made by the anaesthesiologist, neurologist and neuroradiologist (59.3%). The duration of time from arrival to arterial puncture was 10-15minutes in 59.2%. In 44.4%, systolic blood pressure was maintained between 140-180mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure<105mmHg. Glycaemic levels were taken in 81.5% of hospitals. Intravenous heparinisation was performed during the procedure in 66.7% with different patterns of action. In cases of moderate neurological deterioration with no added complications, 85.2% of the included hospitals awakened and extubated the patients. The wide variability observed in the anaesthetic management and the organization of the endovascular treatment of AIS demonstrates the need to create common guidelines for anaesthesiologists in Spain. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Anaesthetic induction and recovery characteristics of a diazepam-ketamine combination compared with propofol in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques P. Ferreira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Induction of anaesthesia occasionally has been associated with undesirable behaviour in dogs. High quality of induction of anaesthesia with propofol has been well described while in contrast variable induction and recovery quality has been associated with diazepam-ketamine. In this study, anaesthetic induction and recovery characteristics of diazepam-ketamine combination with propofol alone were compared in dogs undergoing elective orchidectomy. Thirty-six healthy adult male dogs were used. After habitus scoring (simple descriptive scale [SDS], the dogs were sedated with morphine and acepromazine. Forty minutes later a premedication score (SDS was allocated and general anaesthesia was induced using a combination of diazepam-ketamine (Group D/K or propofol (Group P and maintained with isoflurane. Scores for the quality of induction, intubation and degree of myoclonus were allocated (SDS. Orchidectomy was performed after which recovery from anaesthesia was scored (SDS and times to extubation and standing were recorded. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Kappa Reliability and Kendall Tau B tests. Both groups were associated with acceptable quality of induction and recovery from anaesthesia. Group P, however, was associated with a poorer quality of induction (p = 0.014, prolonged induction period (p = 0.0018 and more pronounced myoclonus (p = 0.003, but had better quality of recovery (p = 0.000002 and shorter recovery times (p = 0.035 compared with Group D/K. Diazepam-ketamine and propofol are associated with acceptable induction and recovery from anaesthesia. Propofol had inferior anaesthetic induction characteristics, but superior and quicker recovery from anaesthesia compared with diazepam-ketamine.

  13. Prick-test evaluation to anaesthetics in patients attending a general allergy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, E; Rodríguez-Ceron, G; Gómez-Herreras, J I; Fernández, A; Castrodeza, J; Alvarez, F J

    2006-12-01

    To analyse the prevalence of positive prick-tests to all medicaments normally checked in allergy units when a patient is suspected of being allergic to anaesthetics. To establish the degree of agreement between the antecedents of a previous history of an allergic reaction to a medicament and the positive result, or not, to the specific prick-test for the said medicament. This was a prospective study, during 2003 and 2004, which analysed 473 patients referred by their doctors to allergy units to make retrospective diagnoses of an allergy to a drug. The prick-test was done using the undiluted drug. All patients were tested for 41 drugs. These include antibiotics, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and perioperative drugs (PD): neuromuscular blocking drugs, latex, iodine, local anaesthetics, hypnotics, opioids and coadjuvants. Cohen's Kappa Index was used to determine the degree of agreement. 71.5% of patients studied presented a positive prick-test. The largest number of positive cases was found in antibiotics (56.4%), followed by PD (15.6%), NSAIDs (14.4%) and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (12.7%). Among PD, the highest prevalence of positive prick-tests was found for neuromuscular blocking drugs (5.3%). Agreement between the substance suspected of causing the allergic reaction and the positive prick-test was excellent for penicillin (Kappa = 0.74) and other antibiotics (Kappa = 0.721) and good for NSAIDs (Kappa = 0.47) and iodine (Kappa = 0.54). The prevalence of patients with positive prick-tests to PD occurred in 15.6% in this prospective cohort. Neuromuscular blocking drugs were found to have the highest prevalence of positive prick-tests. There is positive agreement when the substance responsible for the allergic reaction is suspected, otherwise agreement is low.

  14. Anaesthetic specialist registrars in Ireland: current teaching practices and perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Teaching is an important responsibility of non-consultant hospital doctors. In Ireland, specialist registrars (SpRs) in anaesthesia are contractually obliged to teach medical students, other doctors and nurses. Both medical students and fellow non-consultant hospital doctors attribute between 30 and 40% of their knowledge gain to non-consultant hospital doctors. METHODS: We carried out a confidential telephone survey of anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland regarding their current teaching practices and the perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers. All the SpRs currently working in clinical practice in Ireland were eligible. RESULTS: Fifty-five of the 79 (70%) SpRs responded to the questionnaire. Only 7 (12.7%) of the respondents said they had been well trained as a teacher. The majority of the respondents stated that they would attend a learning-to-teach course\\/workshop if one was available, and felt that such a course would improve their ability as a teacher. Only 8 (14.5%) agreed that adequate emphasis is placed on commitment to teaching in the assessment of SpRs, both by individual departments and by the College of Anaesthetists. Anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland spend a considerable amount of time each day teaching undergraduate medical students, the majority (68.9%) stated that they had inadequate time to prepare for teaching. CONCLUSION: The majority of the respondents stated that they enjoy teaching, feel that they play an important role in undergraduate teaching but have inadequate time to prepare for teaching. An adequate emphasis is not placed on their commitment to teaching.

  15. Responses of iliac conduit artery and hindlimb resistance vessels to luminal hyperfructosemia in the anaesthetized pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane-O'Hora, T; Edge, D; Shortt, C M; Markos, F; Noble, M I M

    2013-12-01

    High fructose levels are found in diabetes mellitus, associated with high corn syrup diets, and have been claimed to cause hypertension. As the direct effects on conduit and resistance arteries have not been previously reported, we measured these in vivo in the anaesthetized pig with instrumented iliac arteries. Experiments were performed on the iliac artery preparation in the anaesthetized pig: blood flow, diameter and pressure were measured in the iliac. The change in diameter of an occluded iliac artery segment filled with hyperfructosemic (15 μm) blood was 89.5 ± 22.1 μm (mean ± SE), contrasted with 7.7 ± 13.06 μm control (P = 0.005, paired t-test, n = 6). There was no significant difference when compared with blood containing both hyperfructosemic blood and the nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (250 μg mL(-1)). Step changes in pressure and flow were achieved by progressive arterial stenosis during control saline and 15 μm min(-1) fructose downstream intra-arterial infusions. Linear regression of the step changes in blood pressure versus the instantaneous step changes in blood flow showed a statistically significant decrease in slope of the conductance (P resistance. Peripheral autoregulation and conduit artery shear-stress-mediated dilatation were not significantly altered. An elevated level of fructose caused dilatation of a conduit artery but constriction of resistance vessels. The latter effect could account, if maintained long-term, for the hypertension claimed to be due to hyperfuctosemia. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Anaesthetic induction and recovery characteristics of a diazepam-ketamine combination compared with propofol in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques P. Ferreira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Induction of anaesthesia occasionally has been associated with undesirable behaviour in dogs. High quality of induction of anaesthesia with propofol has been well described while in contrast variable induction and recovery quality has been associated with diazepam-ketamine. In this study, anaesthetic induction and recovery characteristics of diazepam-ketamine combination with propofol alone were compared in dogs undergoing elective orchidectomy. Thirty-six healthy adult male dogs were used. After habitus scoring (simple descriptive scale [SDS], the dogs were sedated with morphine and acepromazine. Forty minutes later a premedication score (SDS was allocated and general anaesthesia was induced using a combination of diazepam-ketamine (Group D/K or propofol (Group P and maintained with isoflurane. Scores for the quality of induction, intubation and degree of myoclonus were allocated (SDS. Orchidectomy was performed after which recovery from anaesthesia was scored (SDS and times to extubation and standing were recorded. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Kappa Reliability and Kendall Tau B tests. Both groups were associated with acceptable quality of induction and recovery from anaesthesia. Group P, however, was associated with a poorer quality of induction (p = 0.014, prolonged induction period (p = 0.0018 and more pronounced myoclonus (p = 0.003, but had better quality of recovery (p = 0.000002 and shorter recovery times (p = 0.035 compared with Group D/K. Diazepam-ketamine and propofol are associated with acceptable induction and recovery from anaesthesia. Propofol had inferior anaesthetic induction characteristics, but superior and quicker recovery from anaesthesia compared with diazepam-ketamine.

  17. Chiral separation of local anaesthetics with capillary electrophoresis. Evaluation of the inclusion complex of the enantiomers with heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sänger-van De Griend, C. E.; Gröningsson, K.; Westerlund, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    A chiral capillary electrophoresis system for the high-resolution separation of the enantiomers of the local anaesthetics mepivacaine, ropivacaine, bupivacaine and prilocaine is described. Triethanolamine was added to the background electrolyte to obtain a negative electroosmotic flow and hence

  18. Ensuring availability of in date and fit for purpose emergency guidelines in all anaesthetic areas throughout the South East Scotland deanery

    OpenAIRE

    Hindle, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to institute a system whereby emergency anaesthetic guidelines are available in >90% of appropriate clinical areas throughout each of the acute hospital sites in three health board administrative regions, and whereby >90% of available guidelines are deemed to be in date and fit for purpose. Our objective was to achieve these targets within 6 months. Using quality improvement methodology, we inventoried available emergency anaesthetic guidelines in 132 locations throughout seven ac...

  19. Efficacy of sub-Tenon's block using an equal volume of local anaesthetic administered either as a single or as divided doses. A randomised clinical trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, Ehtesham I

    2009-01-01

    Sub-Tenon\\'s anaesthetic is effective and reliable in producing both akinesia and anaesthesia for cataract surgery. Our clinical experience indicates that it is sometimes necessary when absolute akinesia is required during surgery to augment the block with 1-2 ml of local anaesthetic. Hypothesis was that after first injection some of the volume injected may spill out and before second injection the effect of hyaluronidase has taken place and second volume injectate will have desired effect.

  20. Total spinal anaesthesia as a complication of local anaesthetic test-dose administration through an epidural catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffek, M; Owczuk, R; Szlyk-Augustyn, M; Lasinska-Kowara, M; Wujtewicz, M

    2004-10-01

    We describe a case of total spinal anaesthesia, which occurred after a 3-ml lignocaine (20 mg ml(-1)) test dose was administered through an epidural catheter in a 79-year-old patient scheduled for gastrectomy under combined general and epidural anaesthesia. The surgery was postponed, and the patient required admission to the intensive therapy unit. Spinal MRI from the total spinal cord did not reveal any pathology. During the next 24 h the patient recovered and after 11 days was successfully operated on under general anaesthesia. No late complications followed. We presume that during placement, the epidural catheter had migrated to the spinal canal as a result of technical difficulties. Although controversial, we consider that administering a standard test dose of local anaesthetic via an epidural catheter is recommended, especially in high-risk patients and when epidural space identification or catheter placement poses technical difficulties. A test dose of local anaesthetic does not fully prevent complications.

  1. Anaesthetics modulate tumour necrosis factor α: effects of L-carnitine supplementation in surgical patients. Preliminary results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Delogu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Both anaesthetics and surgical trauma could strongly affect the production of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα. During in vitro experiments the authors found that anaesthetics modulate the production of TNFα by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Notably, Pentothal strongly increased the production of the cytokine as compared to both lipopolysacchride treated and control mononuclear cells, whereas in supernatants from Leptofen driven mononuclear cells TNFα was strongly reduced. On the other hand, Pavulon did not significantly affect the cytokine production. In the in vivo study, in an attempt to ameliorate the metabolic response to surgical trauma, L-carnitine was administered to 20 surgical patients, then the circulating TNFα was measured. The results indicate that the levels of circulating TNFα were strongly increased following surgery and that L-carnitine administration resulted in a strong reduction of TNFα. Thus, the data suggest that L-carnitine could be helpful in protecting surgical patients against dysmetabolism dependent on dysregulated production of TNFα.

  2. Reproducibility of an instrumented measure for passive ankle dorsiflexion in conscious and anaesthetized children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings-Ison, Tandy; Blackburn, Christine; Opie, Nicholas L; Graham, H Kerr; Rawicki, Barry; Wolfe, Rory; Simpson, Pam; Baker, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) determine whether an instrumented measure will reduce measurement error to less than 5° in children with cerebral palsy (CP), (2) determine agreement and reliability of this instrumented measure in both conscious and anaesthetized participants, and (3) compare the method with previously reported measures. Thirty-four ambulant children (15 males, 19 females), aged 3 to 9 years, with spastic CP were studied in a tertiary-care paediatric hospital (21 with hemiplegia, 11 with diplegia, and two with quadriplegia). The majority of children functioned at Gross Motor Function Classification System level I (n=11) or II (n=18), with five children at level III. Ankle dorsiflexion at 50% bodyweight was photographed and measured. Each child was measured when conscious and when under mask anaesthesia by two experienced assessors. The standard error of measurement (SEM) ranged from 3.9° (anaesthetized; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.3-4.0°) to 6.7° (conscious; 95% CI 5.3-8.0°). This compared favourably with previously reported dorsiflexion measures (SEM range 6.5-7.8°) in conscious children with CP. Intrarater reliability was good in both conditions (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]: range 0.95 [anaesthetized; 95% CI 0.92-0.98] to 0.86 [conscious; 95% CI 0.76-0.95]). The ICC for interrater reliability ranged from 0.87 (anaesthetized; 95% CI 0.81-0.93) to 0.65 (conscious; 95% CI 0.50-0.81). Passive ankle dorsiflexion using an instrumented measure has face validity and may assist in the improvement of reproducibility under anaesthesia for clinical research. When an individual is conscious, this technique is not better than trained assessors using conventional goniometry reported in the literature and is not recommended for routine clinical use. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  3. Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors mediate analgesia induced by emulsified inhalation anaesthetics in thermal nociception but not in chemical nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Dai, Ti-Jun; Zeng, Yin-Ming

    2007-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in analgesia induced by emulsified inhalation anaesthetics. After having established the mice model of analgesia by intraperitoneal or subcutaneous injections of appropriate doses of ether, enflurane, isoflurane or sevoflurane, we injected different doses of strychnine intrathecally and then observed the effects on the tail-flick latency using the tail-withdrawal test and the writhing times and acetic acid-induced writhing test. In the tail-withdrawal test, all four emulsified inhalation anaesthetics (intraperitoneally) significantly increased the tail-flick latency (P strychnine. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, writhing times inhibition induced by subcutaneous administration of four emulsified inhalation anaesthetics was not effected by intrathecal strychnine (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 microg). The data presented in this study suggest that glycine receptors are specifically involved in mediating the analgesic effect of ether, enflurane, isoflurane and sevoflurane on thermal-induced nociception but not chemically induced nociception.

  4. An anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic reduces pre-operative inpatient stay in patients requiring major vascular surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, D B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing major vascular surgery (MVS) require extensive anaesthetic assessment. This can require extended pre-operative stays. AIMS: We investigated whether a newly established anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic (PAC) would reduce the pre-operative inpatient stay, avoid unnecessary investigations and facilitate day before surgery (DBS) admissions for patients undergoing MVS. PATIENT AND METHODS: One year following and preceding the establishment of the PAC the records of patients undergoing open or endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy and infra-inguinal bypass were reviewed to measure pre-operative length of stay (LoS). RESULTS: Pre-operative LoS was significantly reduced in the study period (1.85 vs. 4.2 days, respectively, P < 0.0001). Only 12 out of 61 patients in 2007 were admitted on the DBS and this increased to 33 out of 63 patients (P = 0.0002). No procedure was cancelled for medical reasons. CONCLUSION: The PAC has facilitated accurate outpatient anaesthetic assessment for patients requiring MVS. The pre-operative in-patient stay has been significantly reduced.

  5. The impact of internet and simulation-based training on transoesophageal echocardiography learning in anaesthetic trainees: a prospective randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V; Chamos, C; Valencia, O; Meineri, M; Fletcher, S N

    2013-06-01

    With the increasing role of transoesophageal echocardiography in clinical fields other than cardiac surgery, we decided to assess the efficacy of multi-modular echocardiography learning in echo-naïve anaesthetic trainees. Twenty-eight trainees undertook a pre-test to ascertain basic echocardiography knowledge, following which the study subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: learning via traditional methods such as review of guidelines and other literature (non-internet group); and learning via an internet-based echocardiography resource (internet group). After this, subjects in both groups underwent simulation-based echocardiography training. More tests were then conducted after a review of the respective educational resources and simulation sessions. Mean (SD) scores of subjects in the non-internet group were 28 (10)%, 44 (10)% and 63 (5)% in the pre-test, post-intervention test and post-simulation test, respectively, whereas those in the internet group scored 29 (8)%, 59 (10)%, (p = 0.001) and 72 (8)%, p = 0.005, respectively. The use of internet- and simulation-based learning methods led to a significant improvement in knowledge of transoesophageal echocardiography by anaesthetic trainees. The impact of simulation-based training was greater in the group who did not use the internet-based resource. We conclude that internet- and simulation-based learning methods both improve transoesophageal echocardiography knowledge in echo-naïve anaesthetic trainees. Anaesthesia © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. The effect of the anaesthetic agent isoflurane on the rate of neutrophil apoptosis in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tyther, R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Volatile anaesthetic agents influence neutrophil function, and potentially, the inflammatory response to surgery. AIM: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of isoflurane (1-4%) on human polymorphonuclear neutrophil apoptosis in vitro. METHODS: Venous blood from 12 healthy volunteers was exposed to 0, 1, and 4% isoflurane delivered via a 14G Wallace flexihub internal jugular cannula, at a fresh gas flow of 0.51\\/min for 5 minutes. Isolated neutrophils were assessed for apoptosis at 1, 12, and 24 hours in culture using dual staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (Annexin-V FITC assay). Data were analysed using paired, one-tailed Student\\'s t-tests. p<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: At 1 hour apoptosis was inhibited in the 1% (5.1 [6.8]%; p=0.017) and 4% (4.8 [4.5]%; p=0.008) isoflurane groups compared to control (11.3 [6.9]%). At 12 and 24 hours, a dose-dependent inhibition of apoptosis was demonstrated, i.e. 4% > 1% > 0%. CONCLUSION: Human neutrophil apoptosis is inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro by isoflurane in clinical concentrations.

  7. Anaesthetic management of breast surgery in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán Gutiérrez, J C; Fernández Suárez, F E; Miranda García, P; Sopena Zubiria, L A

    2017-01-01

    Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) is a complex combination of cardiovascular abnormalities defined as pulmonary hypertension with investment or bidirectional flow through an intracardiac or aortopulmonary communication, usually secondary to a congenital heart disease not resolved promptly. It carries a significant risk of perioperative mortality, with an incidence close to 30% for non-cardiac surgery. We report the anaesthetic management in a ES patient undergoing breast surgery, which was successfully performed under general anaesthesia combined with thoracic analgesic blocks. The main pathophysiological implications of this syndrome are discussed, emphasizing the importance of appropriate preoperative evaluation with thorough assessment of associated risks, careful intraoperative management, and postoperative care, which should be initially performed in a critical care unit. The need to individualize and tailor the choice of drugs and anesthetic technique to the hemodynamic condition of the patient and the surgical procedure is highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Anaesthetic management for combined emergency caesarean section and craniotomy tumour removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Y Bisri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of primary intracranial tumour during pregnancy is extremely rare. Symptoms of brain tumour include nausea, vomiting, headache and seizures which mimic symptoms of pregnancy-related hyperemesis or eclampsia. In very few cases, craniotomy tumour removal is performed earlier or even simultaneously with foetal delivery. A 40-year-old woman at 32 weeks of gestation in foetal distress presented to the emergency room with decreased level of consciousness Glasgow Coma Scale 6 (E2M2V2. Computed tomographic scan revealed a mass lesion over the left temporoparietal region with midline shift and intratumoural bleeding. In view of high risk of herniation and foetal distress, she underwent emergency caesarean section followed by craniotomy tumour removal. In parturient with brain tumour, combined surgery of tumour removal and caesarean section is decided based on clinical symptoms, type of tumour and foetal viability. Successful anaesthetic management requires a comprehensive knowledge of physiology and pharmacology, individually tailored to control intracranial pressure while ensuring the safety of mother and foetus.

  9. Toxic Chemical from Plastics Attenuates Phenylbiguanide-induced Cardio-respiratory Reflexes in Anaesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Jayanti; Pant, Mahendra K; Chouhan, Shikha; Singh, Surya P; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) attenuated phenylbiguanide (PBG)-induced cardio-respiratory reflexes involving decreased vagal afferent activity. BPA leaches out from plastics thus it is expected that chronic exposure to plastic boiled (PBW) water will also produce similar changes. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of chronic ingestion of PBW on PBG evoked reflexes and were compared with BPA. Adult female rats were ingested BPA containing pellets (2 µg/kg body weight)/PBW/tap water (ad libitum) for 30 days. On day 30, the animals were anaesthetized and BP, ECG and respiratory excursions were recorded. Further, PBG was injected intravenously to evoke cardio-respiratory reflexes and at the end lungs were excised for histopathological examination. BPA concentration in PBW was 6.6 µg/ml estimated by HPLC. In rats receiving tap water, PBG produced bradycardia, hypotension and tachypnoea. In PBW/BPA treated groups, PBG-induced reflexes were attenuated significantly along with emphysematous and consolidative changes in lungs. The present results indicate that PBW attenuates the protective cardio-respiratory reflexes and also produces histopathological changes in lungs.

  10. Design and validation of an oral health questionnaire for preoperative anaesthetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Ruíz-López del Prado

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Dental injuries incurred during endotracheal intubation are more frequent in patients with previous oral pathology. The study objectives were to develop an oral health questionnaire for preanaesthesia evaluation, easy to apply for personnel without special dental training; and establish a cut-off value for detecting persons with poor oral health. Methods: Validation study of a self-administered questionnaire, designed according to a literature review and an expert group's recommendations. The questionnaire was applied to a sample of patients evaluated in a preanaesthesia consultation. Rasch analysis of the questionnaire psychometric properties included viability, acceptability, content validity and reliability of the scale. Results: The sample included 115 individuals, 50.4% of men, with a median age of 58 years (range: 38-71. The final analysis of 11 items presented a Person Separation Index of 0.861 and good adjustment of data to the Rasch model. The scale was unidimensional and its items were not biased by sex, age or nationality. The oral health linear measure presented good construct validity. The cut-off value was set at 52 points. Conclusions: The questionnaire showed sufficient psychometric properties to be considered a reliable tool, valid for measuring the state of oral health in preoperative anaesthetic evaluations.

  11. [Design and validation of an oral health questionnaire for preoperative anaesthetic evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz-López Del Prado, Gema; Blaya-Nováková, Vendula; Saz-Parkinson, Zuleika; Álvarez-Montero, Óscar Luis; Ayala, Alba; Muñoz-Moreno, Maria Fe; Forjaz, Maria João

    Dental injuries incurred during endotracheal intubation are more frequent in patients with previous oral pathology. The study objectives were to develop an oral health questionnaire for preanaesthesia evaluation, easy to apply for personnel without special dental training; and establish a cut-off value for detecting persons with poor oral health. Validation study of a self-administered questionnaire, designed according to a literature review and an expert group's recommendations. The questionnaire was applied to a sample of patients evaluated in a preanaesthesia consultation. Rasch analysis of the questionnaire psychometric properties included viability, acceptability, content validity and reliability of the scale. The sample included 115 individuals, 50.4% of men, with a median age of 58 years (range: 38-71). The final analysis of 11 items presented a Person Separation Index of 0.861 and good adjustment of data to the Rasch model. The scale was unidimensional and its items were not biased by sex, age or nationality. The oral health linear measure presented good construct validity. The cut-off value was set at 52 points. The questionnaire showed sufficient psychometric properties to be considered a reliable tool, valid for measuring the state of oral health in preoperative anaesthetic evaluations. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Design and validation of an oral health questionnaire for preoperative anaesthetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz-López Del Prado, Gema; Blaya-Nováková, Vendula; Saz-Parkinson, Zuleika; Álvarez-Montero, Óscar Luis; Ayala, Alba; Muñoz-Moreno, Maria Fe; Forjaz, Maria João

    Dental injuries incurred during endotracheal intubation are more frequent in patients with previous oral pathology. The study objectives were to develop an oral health questionnaire for preanaesthesia evaluation, easy to apply for personnel without special dental training; and establish a cut-off value for detecting persons with poor oral health. Validation study of a self-administered questionnaire, designed according to a literature review and an expert group's recommendations. The questionnaire was applied to a sample of patients evaluated in a preanaesthesia consultation. Rasch analysis of the questionnaire psychometric properties included viability, acceptability, content validity and reliability of the scale. The sample included 115 individuals, 50.4% of men, with a median age of 58 years (range: 38-71). The final analysis of 11 items presented a Person Separation Index of 0.861 and good adjustment of data to the Rasch model. The scale was unidimensional and its items were not biased by sex, age or nationality. The oral health linear measure presented good construct validity. The cut-off value was set at 52 points. The questionnaire showed sufficient psychometric properties to be considered a reliable tool, valid for measuring the state of oral health in preoperative anaesthetic evaluations. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Resistin increases islet blood flow and decreases subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, T; Fredriksson, L; Jansson, L; Henriksnäs, J

    2009-02-01

    Resistin is an adipokine which has been suggested to participate in the induction of insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether acute administration of resistin influences tissue blood perfusion in rats. Resistin was administered as an intravenous infusion of 7.5 microg h(-1) (1.5 mL h(-1)) for 30 min to rats anaesthetized with thiobutabarbital. A microsphere technique was used to estimate the blood flow to six different depots of white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT), as well as to the pancreas, islets, duodenum, colon, kidneys, adrenal glands and liver. Resistin administration led to an increased blood flow to the pancreas and islets and a decrease in subcutaneous WAT and BAT. Intra-abdominal white adipose tissue blood flow and that to other organs were not affected. Acute administration of resistin markedly affects the blood perfusion of both the pancreas and subcutaneous white adipose tissue depots. At present it is unknown whether resistin exerts a direct effect on the vasculature, or works through local or systemic activation of endothelial cells and/or macrophages. The extent to which this might contribute to the insulin resistance caused by resistin is yet unknown.

  14. Pancreatic islet blood flow during euglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic clamp in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, L; Andersson, A; Bodin, B; Källskog, O

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that pancreatic islet blood flow is crucially dependent on blood glucose concentration. Thus, hyperglycaemia increases and hypoglycaemia decreases islet blood perfusion, by a combination of nervous and metabolic signals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if hyperinsulinaemia, without associated hypoglycaemia, affects islet blood flow. Thiobutabarbital-anaesthetized Wistar-Furth rats were subjected to an euglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic clamp, that is they were infused for 60 min with either saline, insulin (18 mU kg(-1) min(-1)), glucose (27 mg kg(-1) min(-1)) or both glucose and insulin. This was followed by islet blood flow measurements with a microsphere technique. Animals receiving only glucose doubled their blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations, whereas rats receiving only insulin had blood glucose concentrations <2 mmol L(-1) and a 10-fold increase in serum insulin concentrations. Animals given simultaneous glucose and insulin had normal blood glucose concentrations but a 10-fold increase in serum insulin concentrations. Total pancreatic blood flow was unaffected in all animals. Islet blood flow was increased in hyperglycaemic and decreased in hypoglycaemic rats compared with control rats. Islet blood flow did not differ between clamped and control rats. Serum insulin concentration per se does not affect islet blood flow, whereas the ambient blood glucose concentration is of major importance in this context.

  15. Effects of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide on splanchnic blood flow in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, P O; Lindberg, M; Jansson, L

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether inhibition of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase with acetazolamide interfered with pancreatic islet and whole splanchnic blood perfusion in rats. Carbonic anhydrase is present both in the endocrine cells and, in particular, the endothelium of the pancreatic islet. Thiobutabarbital-anaesthetized, male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in all experiments, and acetazolamide (50 mg/kg body weight) was given to untreated control rats or rats pretreated with glucose, i.e. to normoglycaemic and hyperglycaemic animals. No acetazolamide-induced effects on blood glucose or serum insulin concentrations, mean arterial blood pressure, whole pancreatic or islet blood flow were seen in any of the animals. There were no effects on duodenal or colonic blood flow recorded in the control rats, whereas an increase in duodenal blood flow (P<0.02) was observed in the hyperglycaemic animals. A tendency to an increase was seen in colonic blood flow in hyperglycaemic animals, although this was not statistically significant (P = 0.069). Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase seems to induce only minor effects on pancreatic blood flow, while duodenal blood flow is slightly enhanced in hyperglycaemic animals.

  16. Central respiratory and circulatory effects of Gymnodinium breve toxin in anaesthetized cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borison, Herbert L.; Ellis, Sydney; McCarthy, Lawrence E.

    1980-01-01

    1 In cats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone, observations were made on respiration, spontaneous and evoked diaphragmatic electromyograms, blood pressure, heart rate, indirectly-induced contractions of the anterior tibialis muscle and nictitating membrane, and electrical excitability of the inspiratory centre in the medulla oblongata. 2 Gymnodinium breve toxin (GBTX) was administered intravenously, intra-arterially to the brain, and intracerebroventricularly. Physiological effects were recorded while alveolar PCO2 was controlled at a constant level except when changes in gas tension were made in order to measure CO2-ventilatory responsiveness. 3 Adequate doses of GBTX given intravenously by bolus injection elicited a non-tachyphylactic reflex response triad of apnoea, hypotension and bradycardia mediated by the vagus nerves independently of arterial baroreceptor and chemoreceptor innervation. 4 After vagotomy, additional amounts of GBTX (i.v.) resulted in apneustic breathing, hypertension and tachycardia. The cardiovascular effects were abolished by ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium. 5 Smaller doses of GBTX were required intra-arterially and intracerebroventricularly than by the intravenous route of injection to produce respiratory irregularity and cardiovascular hyperactivity. 6 Evoked motor responses, electrical excitability of the medulla oblongata and CO2-ventilatory responsiveness were largely spared even though GBTX caused marked disturbances in respiratory rhythmicity and cardiovascular functions. 7 It is concluded that GBTX acts reflexly on vagally innervated receptors to evoke a Bezold-Jarisch effect but that the toxin further acts centrally to cause irregular breathholding and hypertension with tachycardia, leading ultimately to respiratory and circulatory failure. PMID:7191740

  17. Anaesthetic management for balloon dilation of cor triatriatum dexter in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Monte, Valentina; Staffieri, Francesco; Caivano, Domenico; Bufalari, Antonello

    2015-06-10

    A three-month-old female Rottweiler puppy was referred for intravascular correction of a previously identified cor triatriatum dexter. Echocardiography confirmed the presence of a hyperechoic membrane that divided the right atrium into a cranial and caudal chamber. A foramen in this membrane allowed the blood to flow from the caudal to the cranial chamber. Balloon dilation of the defect under transthoracic echocardiographic guidance was scheduled for the following day. The dog was premedicated with 0.5 μg/kg sufentanil and 0.2 mg/kg midazolam administered intravenously. General anaesthesia was induced with 2 mg/kg propofol and maintained with inhaled isoflurane in oxygen; at the same time, a constant rate infusion of 0.5 μg/kg/h sufentanil was administered by means of an infusion pump. Uneventful ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias developed during the placement of catheters and balloon dilation. At the end of procedure, when the guide wire and balloon catheter were removed, normal sinus rhythm was observed. To the authors' knowledge, no previous reports have described the anaesthetic management of a balloon dilation procedure for cor triatriatum dexter in dogs.

  18. Anaesthetic management in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy undergoing orthopaedic surgery: a review of 232 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenster, Tino; Mueller, Claudia; Forst, Juergen; Huber, Horst; Schmitt, Hubert J

    2012-10-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy are at increased risk of some anaesthesia-related hazards such as rhabdomyolysis, fever and hyperkalaemia. To evaluate the management of anaesthesia in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, including preoperative evaluation, intraoperative performance, critical events and postoperative care. We performed a retrospective case review study of anaesthesia in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy covering the period between April 2000 and December 2008. 91 Duchenne patients undergoing 232 general anaesthetics for orthopaedic surgical interventions. University hospital. Anaesthesia was performed using propofol, opioids and, if required, a non-depolarising muscle relaxant. Eight difficult direct laryngoscopies were reported. All patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery received transfusion of homologous blood products and required postoperative invasive ventilatory support for an average of 19 h. There was no severe anaesthesia-related complication and no case of unexplained fever or rhabdomyolysis. This retrospective survey confirms clinical experience that total intravenous anaesthesia can be used safely in Duchenne patients without major concern. Further prospective studies are necessary to establish evidence-based clinical guidelines for daily practice.

  19. Direct and indirect cardiovascular actions of cathinone and MDMA in the anaesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsufyani, Hadeel A; Docherty, James R

    2015-07-05

    The stimulants cathinone (from Khat leaves) and methylenedioxymeth-amphetamine (MDMA) produce adrenoceptor mediated tachycardia and vasopressor actions that may be the result of direct receptor stimulation, actions on the noradrenaline transporter, and/or displacement of noradrenaline from nerve terminals. Effects of cathinone or MDMA were compared with those of the indirect sympathomimetic tyramine. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetized with pentobarbitone for blood pressure and heart rate recording. Some rats were sympathectomised by treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. In the anaesthetised rat, cathinone, MDMA and tyramine (all 0.001-1 mg/kg) produced marked tachycardia, tyramine produced marked pressor responses and MDMA produced small pressor responses. The tachycardia to cathinone and MDMA was almost abolished by propranolol (1mg/kg). Pretreatment with cocaine (1mg/kg) did not significantly affect the tachycardia to cathinone or MDMA, but reduced the response to tyramine. However, in sympathectomised rats, the tachycardia to cathinone or MDMA was markedly attenuated, but the tachycardia to tyramine was only partially reduced. Blood pressure effects of tyramine and MDMA were also markedly attenuated by sympathectomy. The results demonstrate firstly that cocaine may not be the most suitable agent for assessing direct versus indirect agonism in cardiovascular studies. Secondly, the use of chemical sympathectomy achieved the desired goal of demonstrating that cardiac β-adrenoceptor mediated actions of cathinone and MDMA are probably largely indirect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Anaesthetic management of a paediatric patient with congenital fibre type disproportion myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisán, F; de la Varga, O; Flores, M; Sánchez-Ruano, J

    2018-04-23

    Congenital fibre type disproportion (CFTD) is a rare type of myopathy that is characterised by muscle weakness and hypotonia during childhood. Clinical features include motor delay, feeding difficulties, limb weakness, joint contractures, and scoliosis. A report is presented of the anaesthetic management of a 3-year-old girl with CFTD myopathy associated with a mutation of the TPM3 gene, scheduled for adenotonsillectomy because of obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). The main concerns were the possible susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia, the risk of anaesthesia-induced rhabdomyolysis, a greater sensitivity to non-depolarising muscle relaxants, and the presence of OSAHS. Total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and the use of rocuronium/sugammadex appear to be safe options. Given the high risk of respiratory compromise and other complications, patients should be closely monitored in the post-operative period. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Subcutaneous versus subcutaneous and intraperitoneal local anaesthetic in the management of post appendicectomy pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, K.Z.; Gondal, Z.I.; Raza, A.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of subcutaneous only and combined subcutaneous and peritoneal infiltration of 0.5% bupivacaine during appendicectomy for the management of early post operative pain. Study Design: Randomized controlled study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, CMH Kohat from 13th December 2007 to 20th December 2008. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients of a cute appendicitis, divided into two groups of 30 each, were included in the study. Group A was given 0.5% bupivacaine subcutaneously, whereas group B was given the anaesthetic subcutaneously as well as intraperitoneally during appendectomy. Results: In group A, 24 (80%) were VAS (visual analoguescoring) 3 (uncomfortable) and 6 (20%) were VAS 2 (mild pain) whereas in study group B, 11 (36.6%) were VAS 3, 19 (63.3%) were VAS 2 and 19 (63.3%) were VAS 2 during 1st 12 hrs postoperatively (p=0.001). In 12-24 hrs post operatively, 15 (50%) patients were VAS 3 in group A and same number was VAS 2 and in group B, only 3 (10%) were in VAS 3 and 27 (90%) were VAS 2 (p=0.001). Conclusion: A combination of subcutaneous and peritoneal infiltration with bupivacaine is superior in relieving post appendectomy pain so patients require less dosage of analgesics in early post operative period along with early mobilization. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Masimo signal extraction technology pulse oximetry in anaesthetized pregnant sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Christopher T; Raisis, Anthea L; Musk, Gabrielle C

    2013-03-01

    Evaluation of the accuracy of Masimo signal extraction technology (SET) pulse oximetry in anaesthetized late gestational pregnant sheep. Prospective experimental study. Seventeen pregnant Merino ewes. Animals included in study were late gestation ewes undergoing general anaesthesia for Caesarean delivery or foetal surgery in a medical research laboratory. Masimo Radical-7 pulse oximetry (SpO(2) ) measurements were compared to co-oximetry (SaO(2) ) measurements from arterial blood gas analyses. The failure rate of the pulse oximeter was calculated. Accuracy was assessed by Bland & Altman's (2007) limits of agreement method. The effect of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), perfusion index (PI) and haemoglobin (Hb) concentration on accuracy were assessed by regression analysis. Forty arterial blood samples paired with SpO(2) and blood pressure measurements were obtained. SpO(2) ranged from 42 to 99% and SaO(2) from 43.7 to 99.9%. MAP ranged from 24 to 82 mmHg, PI from 0.1 to 1.56 and Hb concentration from 71 to 114 g L(-1) . Masimo pulse oximetry measurements tended to underestimate oxyhaemoglobin saturation compared to co-oximetry with a bias (mean difference) of -2% and precision (standard deviation of the differences) of 6%. Accuracy appeared to decrease when SpO(2) was oximeter function during extreme hypotension and hypoxaemia. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  3. Effect of gamma-irradiation on disposition of the local anaesthetic, carbisocaine in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallay, Z.; Durisova, M.; Trnovec, T.

    1990-01-01

    14 C Labelled carbisocaine, a local anaesthetic agent, was administered intravenously in a dose of 2 mg kg -1 to rabbits 7 days after whole-body 60 Co gamma-irradiation with a dose of 5 Gy (1.9 Gy min -1 ). The plasma carbisocaine concentration-time courses were approximated by biexponential equations. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters obtained when data were fitted to an open two-compartment model were significantly different for the irradiated group relative to control animals, indicating a radiation-induced slower elimination rate of carbisocaine: AUC: 0.37 vs 0.29% dose min mL -1 , CL tot : 109.8 vs 155.4 mL min -1 Vd ss : 27.6 vs 33.2 ml, kg -1 , k el : 0.0259 vs 0.0307 min -1 , MRT: 251.7 vs 214.6 min. Total excreted amount of 14 C radioactivity in the irradiated group was lower compared with controls: 6.5 vs 8.7% in bile and 18.3 vs 23.7% in urine, but lower carbisocaine concentrations were recorded in heart, lungs, liver, and kidneys of irradiated rabbits compared with controls. (author)

  4. Eye temperature and heart rate variability of calves disbudded with or without local anaesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M; Stafford, K J; Dowling, S K; Schaefer, A L; Webster, J R

    2008-03-18

    The possibility that pain can be detected from changes in eye temperature and heart rate variability (HRV) during disbudding was examined in thirty calves, randomly assigned to four treatments: 1) sham handling (control), 2) local anaesthetic (LA, cornual nerve injection) and sham disbudded, 3) sham LA and disbudded, 4) LA and disbudded. During a 40 min sampling period, maximum eye temperature, behavior and HRV parameters were recorded continuously. One week later, twelve disbudded calves were injected with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or saline and maximum eye temperature was recorded. There was a rapid drop in eye temperature during the 5 min following disbudding without LA (Ptemperature then increased and was higher than baseline over the remaining sampling period following both disbudding procedures (Ptemperature prior to disbudding (Ptemperature did not change following ACTH, suggesting that hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity is not responsible for the changes in eye temperature following disbudding. The increase in LF/HF ratio following disbudding without LA suggests an acute sympathetic response to pain, which could be responsible for the drop in eye temperature via vasoconstriction. HRV and eye temperature together may be a useful non-invasive and more immediate index of pain than HPA activity alone.

  5. Comparison of alfaxalone, ketamine and thiopental for anaesthetic induction and recovery in Thoroughbred horses premedicated with medetomidine and midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakuno, A; Aoki, M; Kushiro, A; Mae, N; Kodaira, K; Maeda, T; Yamazaki, Y; Ohta, M

    2017-01-01

    There is limited information on clinical use of the new injectable anaesthetic agent alfaxalone in Thoroughbred horses. To compare anaesthetic induction and recovery characteristics and cardiopulmonary responses between alfaxalone, ketamine and thiopental in Thoroughbred horses premedicated with medetomidine and midazolam. Randomised blinded experimental cross-over study. Six Thoroughbred horses were anaesthetised 3 times with alfaxalone 1 mg/kg bwt, ketamine 2.5 mg/kg bwt or thiopental 4 mg/kg bwt after premedication with medetomidine 6 μg/kg bwt and midazolam 20 μg/kg bwt. Qualities of anaesthetic induction and recovery were scored on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent). Induction time and recovery time were recorded. Cardiopulmonary values (heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressures, and arterial blood gases) were recorded throughout anaesthesia. Data were analysed with nonparametric methods. The anaesthetic induction (P = 0.2) and recovery (P = 0.1) quality scores (median, range) were not different amongst protocols and were 4.0, 3-5; 5.0, 4-5; 4.5, 3-5; and 4.5, 3-5; 3.5, 2-5; 4.0, 2-5 for alfaxalone, ketamine and thiopental, respectively. Induction time for ketamine (67, 53-89 s) was significantly longer than that for alfaxalone (49, 40-51 s, P = 0.01) and thiopental (48, 43-50 s, P = 0.01). Time to standing for alfaxalone (44, 40-63 min, P = 0.01) and thiopental (39, 30-58 min, P = 0.01) was significantly longer than that for ketamine (25, 18-26 min). Cardiovascular values were maintained within the clinically acceptable level throughout anaesthesia. Respiratory rate significantly decreased during anaesthesia for all 3 drugs; however, spontaneous breathing did not disappear, and PaCO 2 values were maintained at approximately 50 mmHg. All 3 drugs showed similar effects in relation to anaesthetic induction and recovery qualities and cardiopulmonary responses. However, alfaxalone and thiopental prolonged recovery time

  6. Attenuation of pressor response and dose sparing of opioids and anaesthetics with pre-operative dexmedetomidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Alpha-2 agonists are being increasingly used as adjuncts in general anaesthesia, and the present study was carried out to investigate the ability of intravenous dexmedetomidine in decreasing the dose of opioids and anaesthetics for attenuation of haemodynamic responses during laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Methods: One hundred patients scheduled for elective general surgery were randomized into two groups: D and F (n=50 in each group. Group D were administered 1 μg/kg each of dexmedetomidine and fentanyl while group F received 2 μg/kg of fentanyl pre-operatively. Thiopental was given until eyelash reflex disappeared. Anaesthesia was maintained with 33:66 oxygen: nitrous oxide. Isoflurane concentration was adjusted to maintain systolic blood pressure within 20% of the pre-operative values. Haemodynamic parameters were recorded at regular intervals during induction, intubation, surgery and extubation. Statistical analysis was carried out using analysis of variance, chi-square test, Student′s t test and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: The demographic profile was comparable. The pressor response to laryngoscopy, intubation, surgery and extubation were effectively decreased by dexmedetomidine, and were highly significant on comparison (P50% by the administration of dexmedetomidine. The mean recovery time was also shorter in group D as compared with group F (P=0.014. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine is an excellent drug as it not only decreased the magnitude of haemodynamic response to intubation, surgery and extubation but also decreased the dose of opioids and isoflurane in achieving adequate analgesia and anaesthesia, respectively.

  7. Arterial supply, venous drainage and collateral circulation in the nose of the anaesthetized dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, M A; Wang, J C

    1987-01-01

    1. In pentobarbitone-anaesthetized dogs, nasal blood flows were measured with electromagnetic flow sensors. 2. The terminal internal maxillary artery was found to supply 22 +/- 2.2 ml min-1 (one side) to the nasal mucosa via the sphenopalatine and major palatine branches; the artery was found to receive multiple supply routes from common carotid, vertebral and subclavian arteries. 3. Nasal mucosa was found to receive collateral flow from contralateral terminal internal maxillary artery (about 5 to 10% of normal flow) and branches of subclavian arteries (about 36% of normal flow). 4. Nasal mucosa was found to have two venous systems: the low-flow (12 +/- 1.0 ml min-1; both sides) and low-pressure (7 +/- 0.6 mmHg) sphenopalatine veins draining the posterior nasal cavity and the high-flow (30 +/- 1.4 ml min-1; both sides) and high-pressure (17 +/- 1.0 mmHg) dorsal nasal veins draining the anterior nasal cavity. 5. PO2 of nasal venous blood was found to range from 62 +/- 2.9 mmHg to 65 +/- 3.4 mmHg. During nitrogen challenge to the nose, the sphenopalatine venous PO2 dropped to 35 +/- 3.0 mmHg while the dorsal nasal venous PO2 remained unchanged, suggesting that the sphenopalatine veins were responsible for draining capillary flow and dorsal nasal veins arteriovenous anastomotic flow as well. 6. Microscopic examination of the vascular casts confirmed that arteriovenous anastomoses were located only in the anterior nasal cavity. Images Fig. 5 Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:3443958

  8. Bisphenol A attenuates phenylbiguanide-induced cardio-respiratory reflexes in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Jayanti; Pant, Mahendra K; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2012-11-14

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a toxic chemical released from plastics, produces respiratory arrest and hypotension after a latency. The latency was similar to the reflex apnoea induced by the vagal C fibre stimulation. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the effects of chronic and acute exposure to BPA on cardio-respiratory reflexes elicited by phenylbiguanide (PBG). Acute and chronic experiments were performed on adult female rats. In chronic experiments, the animals were ingested with pellets containing BPA (2 μg/kg body weight) or without BPA (time-matched control) for 30 days. Subsequently, the animals were anaesthetized and prepared for recording blood pressure, ECG and respiratory excursions. PBG was injected through jugular vein to evoke reflexes in these animals. In acute experiments, the PBG reflexes were obtained before and after injecting BPA/ethanol. Also vagal afferent activity was recorded in some rats. In time-matched control rats, PBG produced bradycardia, hypotension and tachypnoea over a period of time. The maximal changes were around 50-65%. In BPA treated group, the PBG-induced heart rate and respiratory frequency changes were attenuated significantly. Acute exposure of animals to BPA (35 mg/kg body weight) for 30 min also attenuated the PBG-induced responses significantly. The attenuation of the PBG reflex responses by BPA in acute experiments was associated with decreased vagal afferent activity. The present results indicate that BPA attenuates the protective cardio-respiratory reflexes due to decreased vagal afferent activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Instant centre frequency at anaesthetic induction--a new way to analyse sympathovagal balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Neto, Edmundo Pereira; Cerutti, Catherine; Loufoua, Joseph; Saroul, Christine; Chiari, Pascal; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Lehot, Jean-Jacques

    2003-02-01

    The instant centre frequency (ICF) of RR interval has been proposed as a global index to analyse the sympathovagal interaction in the heart. The aim of this study was to assess the ICF during anaesthesia to test if it can reliably capture the neural control of the cardiovascular system. Twenty-four ASA II or III patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were included in the study. They were allocated in two groups: control, no treatment (group 1, n = 12), and beta-adrenergic blockade by atenolol (group 2, n = 12). Spectra of pulse interval series were computed with a time-frequency method and they were divided into: very low frequency (VLF, 0.000-0.040 Hz), low frequency (LF, 0.050-0.150 Hz) and high frequency (HF, 0.160-0.500 Hz). Normalized power was obtained by dividing the cumulative power within each frequency band (LF or HF) by the sum of LF and HF; the ratio of LF/HF was also calculated. Instant centre frequency is a time-varying parameter that the evolution along time of the gravity centrum of a local spectrum. All spectral indexes were recorded at the following time points: before induction, after induction and before intubation, during intubation, and after intubation. The atenolol group had lower normalized LF and the LF/HF ratio (P ICF was higher in atenolol group at all times. The ICF shifted towards HF frequency after induction and before intubation and shifted towards LF during intubation in both groups. The autonomic nervous system control on the heart through the interaction of sympathetic and parasympathetic reflex mechanisms could be studied by the ICF. The ICF may assess the autonomic cardiac modulation and may provide useful information for anaesthetic management.

  10. Feed forward and feedback control for over-ground locomotion in anaesthetized cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, K. A.; Holinski, B. J.; Everaert, D. G.; Stein, R. B.; Etienne-Cummings, R.; Mushahwar, V. K.

    2012-04-01

    The biological central pattern generator (CPG) integrates open and closed loop control to produce over-ground walking. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically based algorithm capable of mimicking the biological system to control multiple joints in the lower extremities for producing over-ground walking. The algorithm used state-based models of the step cycle each of which produced different stimulation patterns. Two configurations were implemented to restore over-ground walking in five adult anaesthetized cats using intramuscular stimulation (IMS) of the main hip, knee and ankle flexor and extensor muscles in the hind limbs. An open loop controller relied only on intrinsic timing while a hybrid-CPG controller added sensory feedback from force plates (representing limb loading), and accelerometers and gyroscopes (representing limb position). Stimulation applied to hind limb muscles caused extension or flexion in the hips, knees and ankles. A total of 113 walking trials were obtained across all experiments. Of these, 74 were successful in which the cats traversed 75% of the 3.5 m over-ground walkway. In these trials, the average peak step length decreased from 24.9 ± 8.4 to 21.8 ± 7.5 (normalized units) and the median number of steps per trial increased from 7 (Q1 = 6, Q3 = 9) to 9 (8, 11) with the hybrid-CPG controller. Moreover, within these trials, the hybrid-CPG controller produced more successful steps (step length ≤ 20 cm ground reaction force ≥ 12.5% body weight) than the open loop controller: 372 of 544 steps (68%) versus 65 of 134 steps (49%), respectively. This supports our previous preliminary findings, and affirms that physiologically based hybrid-CPG approaches produce more successful stepping than open loop controllers. The algorithm provides the foundation for a neural prosthetic controller and a framework to implement more detailed control of locomotion in the future.

  11. Species of Compassion: Aesthetics, Anaesthetics, and Pain in the Physiological Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Boddice

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the interplay of different species of compassion with regard to physiological practices in the final decades of the nineteenth century. Drawing on the lexicon from which ideals of late-Victorian compassion were formed, it illustrates their contested nature, demonstrating how physiologists developed their own concepts of compassion based on the theories of Darwin and Spencer. Within this purview, the essay examines the historical specificity of antivivisectionist compassion as well as ways in which pain in the laboratory was conceptualized, experienced, and managed ethically. This article explores the interplay of different species of compassion with regard to physiological practices in the last quarter of the nineteenth century in Britain. The lexicographical web of late-Victorian compassion included ‘humanity’, ‘pity’, ‘commiseration’, ‘tenderness’ (or ‘tender sympathy’, and ‘sympathetic pain’, all of which projected contested ideals of both individual character and moral conduct. As well as showing the historical specificity of antivivisectionist compassion – a complex aesthetic of pain closely linked to disgust – the article will principally demonstrate that physiologists (and the community of evolutionary scientists in general were applying their own newly, but no less highly, developed form of compassion that emerged straight from the pages of Darwin and Spencer. There is a story here of pain awareness and pain imagination within physiology, specifically connected to feelings of ‘humanity’. In practice, this story centres on anaesthesia and its role in allowing physiologists to live up to an ideal of ‘imperturbability’. It includes an investigation into what physiologists thought about causing pain in animals, as well as analysis of what changed after the use of anaesthetics became widespread. The article inquires anew about the ways in which pain in the laboratory was conceptualized

  12. Basil, tea tree and clove essential oils as analgesics and anaesthetics in Amphiprion clarkii (Bennett, 1830

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Correia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study were evaluated the anaesthesia and analgesic effects of clove Eugenia caryophyllata, tea tree Melaleuca alternifolia and basil Ocimum basilicum essential oils (EO during handling of yellowtail clownfish Amphiprion clarkii. Juveniles (3.70 ± 0.75 cm and 1.03 ± 0.50 g; mean ± standard deviation were submitted to concentrations of 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 µl L-1 of clove, 150, 200, 250, 300 and 350 µl L-1 of basil and 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 µl L-1 of tea tree oils (n=10/concentration, previously defined in pilot tests. Individually and only once, fish from each treatment were placed in a glass recipient containing 1 L of seawater at a temperature of 25 °C, salinity of 35 g L-1 and the specific concentration of diluted EO (stock solution. Control (only seawater and blank (seawater and ethanol at the highest concentration used to dilute the oils treatments were also conducted. After reaching the stage of surgical anaesthesia, fish were submitted to biometry and a sensibility test. After that, they were transferred to clean seawater for anaesthesia recovery. The times of induction needed to reach each anaesthesia stage and anaesthesia recovery were recorded. Animals were observed for 72 hours after the procedures. All the EO provoked anaesthesia and analgesic effects in A. clarkii, but basil oil is not recommended because it caused involuntary muscle contractions and mortality in 100% and 12% of fish, respectively. The lower concentrations that promote suitable induction and recovery times are 50 µl L-1 of clove oil and 500 µl L-1 of tea tree oil. However, due to its complementary high analgesic efficiency, clove oil is recommended as the ideal anaesthetic for A. clarkii.

  13. Selectivity of oxymetazoline for urethral pressure vs blood pressure in the anaesthetized female rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiri, A R; Fredrickson, M G; Gillberg, P G; Alberts, P

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test alpha-adrenergic reference agonists for tissue selectivity in the urethra and to pharmacologically characterize the functional alpha-adrenoceptor type of the female rabbit urethra in vivo. The effect of alpha-adrenergic agonists and antagonists on the urethral pressure was compared with that on blood pressure and heart rate measured simultaneously in the anaesthetized female rabbit. Oxymetazoline, NS-49, phenylephrine and phenylpropanolamine enhanced the urethral pressure in a dose-dependent manner. Phenylephrine and phenylpropanolamine also enhanced the blood pressure with significantly lower ED50 (dose that gives half of the maximal enhancing effect) values than for the urethral pressure. This was in contrast to oxymetazoline and NS-49. The ED50 values for oxymetazoline on urethral pressure, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 0.00067, 0.0030 and 0.0020 mg/kg, respectively. The ED50 values for NS-49 on urethral pressure, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 0.019, 0.21 and 0.18 mg/kg, respectively. Clonidine and UK 14,304 had no effect on urethral or blood pressure. The oxymetazoline-evoked increase in urethral pressure was inhibited by WB-4101 with an ID50 (dose that gives half of the inhibitory effect) significantly lower than that for rauwolscine. The results suggest that in the female rabbit in vivo activation of alpha1-adrenoceptors increased the urethral pressure. Phenylephrine and phenylpropanolamine, in contrast to oxymetazoline and NS-49, selectively enhanced blood pressure as compared with urethral pressure. Provided that the present results also have validity in humans, it would seem possible to develop urethra-selective drugs for treatment of stress incontinence with few or no cardiovascular side-effects.

  14. Effect of electrical vs. chemical deep brain stimulation at midbrain sites on micturition in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, E; Coote, J H; Lovick, T A

    2015-05-01

    To understand how deep brain stimulation of the midbrain influences control of the urinary bladder. In urethane-anaesthetized male rats, saline was infused continuously into the bladder to evoke cycles of filling and voiding. The effect of electrical (0.1-2.0 ms pulses, 5-180 Hz, 0.5-2.5 V) compared to chemical stimulation (microinjection of D,L-homocysteic acid, 50 nL 0.1 M solution) at the same midbrain sites was tested. Electrical stimulation of the periaqueductal grey matter and surrounding midbrain disrupted normal coordinated voiding activity in detrusor and sphincters muscles and suppressed urine output. The effect occurred within seconds was reversible and not secondary to cardiorespiratory changes. Bladder compliance remained unchanged. Chemical stimulation over the same area using microinjection of D,L-homocysteic acid (DLH) to preferentially activate somatodendritic receptors decreased the frequency of micturition but did not disrupt the coordinated pattern of voiding. In contrast, chemical stimulation within the caudal ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, in the area where critical synapses in the micturition reflex pathway are located, increased the frequency of micturition. Electrical deep brain stimulation within the midbrain can inhibit reflex micturition. We suggest that the applied stimulus entrained activity in the neural circuitry locally, thereby imposing an unphysiological pattern of activity. In a way similar to the use of electrical signals to 'jam' radio transmission, this may prevent a synchronized pattern of efferent activity being transmitted to the spinal outflows to orchestrate a coordinated voiding response. Further experiments to record neuronal firing in the midbrain during the deep brain stimulation will be necessary to test this hypothesis. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A review of the practice of sedation with inhalational anaesthetics in the intensive care unit with the AnaConDa® device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyajeet Misra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensive care unit (ICU environment is often perceived to be hostile and frightening by patients due to unfamiliar surroundings coupled with presence of numerous personnel, monitors and other equipments as well as a loss of perception of time. Mechanical ventilation and multiple painful procedures that often need to be carried out in these critically ill patients add to their overall anxiety. Sedation is therefore required not only to allay the stress and anxiety, but also to allow for mechanical ventilation and other invasive therapeutic and diagnostic procedures to be performed. The conventional intravenous sedative agents used in ICUs suffer from problems of over sedation, tachyphylaxis, drug accumulation, organ specific elimination and often lead to patient agitation on withdrawal. All this tend to prolong the ventilatory as well as ICU and hospital discharge time, which increase the risk for infection and add to the overall increase in morbidity, mortality and hospital costs. In 2005, the anaesthetic conserving device (AnaConDa® was marketed for ICU sedation with volatile anaesthetic agents. A number of trials have shown the effectiveness of using volatile anaesthetic agents for ICU sedation with the AnaConDa device. Compared with intravenous sedatives, use of volatile anaesthetic agents have resulted in shorter wake up and extubation time, lesser duration of mechanical ventilation and faster discharge from hospitals. This review shall focus on the benefits, technical pre-requisites and status of sedation with volatile anaesthetic agents in ICUs with the AnaConDa® device.

  16. The effect of four anaesthetic protocols for maintenance of anaesthesia on trans-diaphragmatic pressure in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiriaki Pavlidou

    Full Text Available The diaphragm is the main inspiratory muscle and the main indicator of diaphragmatic contractility is the trans-diaphragmatic pressure (Pdi. The aim of this clinical study was to determine the effect of four different anaesthetic protocols on Pdi in anaesthetized healthy dogs. Eighty client-owned dogs were recruited in this clinical study. All the animals received dexmedetomidine and morphine as premedication and propofol for induction. Anaesthesia was maintained with one of four protocols: isoflurane (I, isoflurane with CRI of propofol (IP, isoflurane with CRI of fentanyl (IF, and isoflurane with CRI of ketamine (IK. When the surgical plane of anaesthesia was achieved, two balloon catheters were inserted, one into the stomach and one into the mid-third of the oesophagus for Pdi measurement. Pdi value was the highest in groups I (14.9±4.7 mmHg and IK (15.2±3.5 mmHg and the lowest in groups IP (12.2±3.2 mmHg and IF (12.0±5.9 mmHg. There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.029 between groups IK and IF. PE'CO2 was statistically significantly higher (p<0.0005 in group IF (7.7±0.8 kPa than in group IK (6.5±0.7 kPa. Isoflurane alone or isoflurane with ketamine for the maintenance of anaesthesia seem to better preserve the respiratory function and the diaphragmatic contractility than isoflurane with either propofol or fentanyl in dogs. Therefore, the use of isoflurane or isoflurane with ketamine may be of benefit when animals with respiratory problems have to be anaesthetized.

  17. Only a whisper away. A philosophical view of the awake patient's situation during regional anaesthetics and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Ann-Christin; Ekebergh, Margaretha; Larsson Mauléon, Annika; Almerud Österberg, Sofia

    2012-10-01

    In this study the awake patient's intraoperative situation and experiences during regional anaesthetics and surgery are reflected upon by using the work of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological idea of the body as being at the centre of the world highlights the patient's embodied position and bestows significance onto the body as a whole, as a lived body. A case, based on the findings from a previous interview study, is presented as a contextual starting point where a patient goes from having a familiar body recognized as her own to having a partially anaesthetized body experienced as an unknown object. The intraoperative caring space is described in this context as the mutual ground where the awake patient and the nurse anaesthetist (NA) can interact to create meaning. The NA can act as the patient's bodily extension to bridge the gap between the patient's experiences and the situation. This calls for the NA's proximity and genuine presence in order to meet and understand the patient's awake experiences. Learning from the patient's situatedness gives information that is valuable for NAs to share with patients who are less experienced with this contextual situation. The challenge for the NA is not to perform routine-based care, but to acknowledge every patient's lifeworld and uniqueness thus enabling the patient to move easily along the mind-body-world continuum. The core of intraoperative care is to provide support and promote well-being of awake patients in the intraoperative environment. The use of a philosophical perspective is relevant for nurses who work in an intraoperative setting where patients undergo regional anaesthetics. This study shows how nursing research using phenomenological philosophy can help uncover new meanings known only to the patients living the experience. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Sensitivity and Reliability of Halothane-anaesthetized Microminipigs to Assess Risk of Drug-induced Long QT Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xin; Wada, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yuji; Matsukura, Suchitra; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Ando, Kentaro; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2017-12-01

    Using moxifloxacin and terfenadine, which are known to induce benign and malignant QT interval prolongation, respectively, we analysed whether halothane-anaesthetized microminipigs are an appropriate model for assessing the risk of drug-induced long QT syndrome. Moxifloxacin (0.03, 0.3 and 3 mg/kg) and terfenadine (0.03, 0.3 and 3 mg/kg) were intravenously infused over 10 min. with a pause of 20 min. to the halothane-anaesthetized microminipigs (n = 4 for each drug). Moxifloxacin decreased the heart rate, whereas it increased the blood pressure in a dose-related manner. It also prolonged the PR interval and QT/QTc in a dose-related manner without altering the QRS width. Terfenadine decreased the heart rate and blood pressure, whereas it prolonged the PR interval, QRS width and QT/QTc in a dose-related manner. Terfenadine significantly prolonged the beat-to-beat variability of QT interval reflecting its pro-arrhythmic potential, which was not observed with moxifloxacin. The peak plasma concentrations of moxifloxacin and terfenadine after doses of 3 mg/kg were 4.81 and 10.15 μg/mL, respectively, which were both 1.5 times less in microminipigs than those previously reported in dogs. These results indicate that halothane-anaesthetized microminipigs would be useful for detecting drug-induced cardiovascular responses as well as differentiating benign from malignant QT interval prolongation like dogs, although there may be some differences in pharmacokinetic profile between these animals. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  19. Perioperative Anaesthetic Management of a Patient of Gilbert’s Syndrome with Adult Congenital Heart Disease - A Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambhunath Das

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gilbert's syndrome is a hereditary condition with the genetic mutation of the enzyme uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase, characterized by intermittent jaundice in the absence of hemolysis or underlying liver disease. These patients develop jaundice when subjected to fasting, stress and exercise. Majority of anaesthetics are metabolized by liver. Anaesthesia, surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB can act as triggers to hepatic injury. The successful perioperative management of an adult congenital heart disease patient for atrial septal defect closure under cardiopulmonary bypass was discussed in this report.

  20. Anaesthetic injection versus ischemic compression for the pain relief of abdominal wall trigger points in women with chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Mary L L S; Braz, Carolina A; Rosa-e-Silva, Julio C; Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J; Nogueira, Antonio A; Poli-Neto, Omero B

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition among women, and 10 to 30 % of causes originate from the abdominal wall, and are associated with trigger points. Although little is known about their pathophysiology, variable methods have been practiced clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of local anaesthetic injections versus ischemic compression via physical therapy for pain relief of abdominal wall trigger points in women with chronic pelvic pain. We conducted a parallel group randomized trial including 30 women with chronic pelvic pain with abdominal wall trigger points. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two intervention groups. One group received an injection of 2 mL 0.5 % lidocaine without a vasoconstrictor into a trigger point. In the other group, ischemic compression via physical therapy was administered at the trigger points three times, with each session lasting for 60 s, and a rest period of 30 s between applications. Both treatments were administered during one weekly session for four weeks. Our primary outcomes were satisfactory clinical response rates and percentages of pain relief. Our secondary outcomes are pain threshold and tolerance at the trigger points. All subjects were evaluated at baseline and 1, 4, and 12 weeks after the interventions. The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital that was associated with a university providing assistance predominantly to working class women who were treated by the public health system. Clinical response rates and pain relief were significantly better at 1, 4, and 12 weeks for those receiving local anaesthetic injections than ischemic compression via physical therapy. The pain relief of women treated with local anaesthetic injections progressively improved at 1, 4, and 12 weeks after intervention. In contrast, women treated with ischemic compression did not show considerable changes in pain relief after intervention. In the local anaesthetic injection group, pain threshold

  1. The use of Eugenol and electro-narcosis as anaesthetics: transcriptional impacts on the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, S; Daverat, F; Pierron, F; Gonzalez, P; Dufour, S; Lanceleur, L; Schäfer, J; Baudrimont, M

    2011-09-01

    Ecotoxicological studies aim to assess the potential environmental risks of various products. This implies the use of various biological models and tests on live animals. In case of handling fish and mammals, ethical rules have to be respected. The use of anaesthesia is considered to be the best way to ensure animal welfare. Eugenol and electro-narcosis are among the most popular chemical and physical anaesthetics used in fisheries and by field biologists. In this study, the genetic and endocrine impacts of these anaesthetics were assessed in order to establish whether the use of such methods could skew the results of ecotoxicological studies. Twenty yellow European eels (Anguilla anguilla) were submitted to Eugenol (50mg/L) and electro-narcosis until they reached a level of deep anaesthesia, while 20 other eels were kept aware. Five anaesthetized and five unanaesthetized eels were sacrificed and analysed directly after treatment and after 1, 7 and 21 days of recovery. At the brain level, Eugenol triggered an increase in the transcription level of genes encoding proteins involved in oxidative stress responses (catalase expression 2.5-fold, mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression 3-fold), probably due to a hypoxic event during anaesthesia. Later impacts were detected in muscles 21 days after anaesthesia (ATP synthase subunit 6 3-fold, NADH deshydrogenase subunit 5 4-fold and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 3-fold increased) revealing oxidative stress from an accrued mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. Hormone dosages showed that the use of Eugenol reduced the release of plasma cortisol during anaesthesia. However, this impact seemed to be reversible within one day. In case of electro-narcosis, no significant variation in transcriptional levels could be detected between anaesthetized and unanaesthetized eels. Our results suggest that the use of Eugenol as an aesthetic in ecotoxicological studies measuring gene expression or plasma cortisol concentration is

  2. [On a novel Fomocaine synthesis/10th communication: on syntheses of new compounds with local anaesthetic activity (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelschläger, H; Iglesias-Meier, J; Götze, G; Schatton, W

    1977-01-01

    4-[3-(4-phenoxymethyl-phenyl)-propyl]-morpholine (fomocaine, Erbocain) is a very active topical local anaesthetic with low toxicity. A new synthesis starting from 4-phenoxy-methyl-benzonitrile, via a modified Willgerodt-Kindler reaction, is reported. The yield is of the same order as with the known technical process starting from 3-phenylpropanol. The distinct advantage of the new procedure is the avoidance of the C-chloromethylation of 3-phenylpropylchloride during which process the o-chloromethyl derivative is also formed, and this cannot be separated by fractional distillation.

  3. Mutagenicity of inhalation anaesthetics studied by the sister chromatid exchange test in lymphocytes of patients and operating room personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husum, B

    1987-06-01

    Retrospective studies have indicated that operating room personnel may have increased risks of spontaneous abortion, congenital malformations in offspring, and cancer (Cohen et al 1980, Buring et al 1985). Occupational exposure to waste anaesthetic gases may be responsible for these possible adverse health effects, but a cause-effect relationship has never been proved. Induction of changes in the DNA in the chromosomes leading to mutations may play a role in teratogenicity and carcinogenicity. Along with an increasing concern in society regarding occupational diseases and working and living environment in general, cytogenetic methods have been developed for rapid detection of potential mutagenicity in vitro of chemical agents. One such method is the SCE test, which is based on examination of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), i.e. exchanges of chromatid-segments between the two chromatids in a chromosome, during cell replication. SCEs are not mutations, but an increased frequency of SCE is a sensitive indicator of exposure to agents that are capable of producing damage to the DNA and thus possibly mutations. In vitro tests like the SCE test are very useful for evaluation of specific chemical agents, which may be added to the culture in known concentrations. In studies of possible hazards from chemical agents in the working or living environment, the exposure is often poorly defined. Also, biotransformation may be different in different species, and the duration and the level of the exposure may play a role. Examination of SCEs is, therefore, increasingly performed directly on human lymphocytes from peripheral blood. Thus, although the examination of SCEs is still performed in vitro, the exposure has taken place in vivo. Increased SCE levels are then regarded as a non-specific indicator that the donor has been exposed to potentially mutagenic agents in the environment. The author and his associates used the SCE test to investigate the possible mutagenicity of

  4. Convergent and reciprocal modulation of a leak K+ current and Ih by an inhalational anaesthetic and neurotransmitters in rat brainstem motoneurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Jay E; Lynch, Carl; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2002-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and volatile anaesthetics have opposing effects on motoneuronal excitability which appear to reflect contrasting modulation of two types of subthreshold currents. Neurotransmitters increase motoneuronal excitability by inhibiting TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ channels (TASK) and shifting activation of a hyperpolarization-activated cationic current (Ih) to more depolarized potentials; on the other hand, anaesthetics decrease excitability by activating a TASK-like current and inducing a hyperpolarizing shift in Ih activation. Here, we used whole-cell recording from motoneurones in brainstem slices to test if neurotransmitters (serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA)) and an anaesthetic (halothane) indeed compete for modulation of the same ion channels - and we determined which prevails. When applied together under current clamp conditions, 5-HT reversed anaesthetic-induced membrane hyperpolarization and increased motoneuronal excitability. Under voltage clamp conditions, 5-HT and NA overcame most, but not all, of the halothane-induced current. When Ih was blocked with ZD 7288, the neurotransmitters completely inhibited the K+ current activated by halothane; the halothane-sensitive neurotransmitter current reversed at the equilibrium potential for potassium (EK) and displayed properties expected of acid-sensitive, open-rectifier TASK channels. To characterize modulation of Ih in relative isolation, effects of 5-HT and halothane were examined in acidified bath solutions that blocked TASK channels. Under these conditions, 5-HT and halothane each caused their characteristic shift in voltage-dependent gating of Ih. When tested concurrently, however, halothane decreased the neurotransmitter-induced depolarizing shift in Ih activation. Thus, halothane and neurotransmitters converge on TASK and Ih channels with opposite effects; transmitter action prevailed over anaesthetic effects on TASK channels, but not over effects on Ih. These data suggest that

  5. Anaesthetic efficacy of articaine versus lidocaine in children's dentistry: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Huei Jinn; Alzahrani, Fatma Salem; Sim, Yu Fan; Tahmassebi, Jinous F; Duggal, Monty

    2018-04-10

    Over the last few years, numerous reviews and studies have awarded articaine hydrochloride local anaesthetic (LA) a superior reputation, with outcomes of different studies demonstrating a general tendency for articaine hydrochloride to outperform lidocaine hydrochloride for dental treatment. Nevertheless, there seems to be no clear agreement on which LA solution is more efficacious in dental treatment for children. There is no previous publication systematically reviewing and summarising the current best evidence with respect to the success rates of LA solutions in children. To evaluate the available evidence on the efficacy of lidocaine and articaine, used in paediatric dentistry. A systematic search was conducted on Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (OVID; 1950 to June 2017), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; EBSCOhost; 1982 to June 2017), EMBASE (OVID; 1980 to June 2017), SCI-EXPANDED (ISI Web of Knowledge; 1900 to June 2017), key journals, and previous review bibliographies through June 2017. Original research studies that compared articaine with lidocaine for dental treatment in children were included. Methodological quality assessment and assessment of risk of bias were carried out for each of the included studies. Electronic searching identified 525 publications. Following the primary and secondary assessment process, six randomised controlled trials (RCT) were included in the final analysis. There was no difference between patient self-reported pain between articaine and lidocaine during treatment procedures (SMD = 0.06, P-value = 0.614), and no difference in the occurrence of adverse events between articaine and lidocaine injections following treatment in paediatric patients (RR = 1.10, P-value = 0.863). Yet, patients reported significantly less pain post-procedure following articaine injections (SMD = 0.37, P-value = 0.013). Substantial heterogeneity was noted in the reporting of outcomes among studies

  6. Topical intra-pocket anaesthetic gel reduces the risk and intensity of pain during periodontal scaling and root planing and probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Madurantakam, Parthasarathy

    2017-12-22

    Data sourcesMedline, Scopus, Web of Science, LILACS, BBO, Cochrane Library, SIGLE, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Periódicos Capes Theses, Current Controlled Trials, International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, the ClinicalTrials.gov, Rebec (www.rebec.gov.br), EU Clinical Trials Register (www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu), abstracts of the annual conference of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and its regional divisions. Reference lists of primary studies and related articles from PubMed.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials, parallel, crossover or split-mouth designs comparing intra-pocket anaesthesia with an anaesthetic gel with placebo in patients requiring periodontal probing or SRP were considered.Data extraction and synthesisTwo authors shortlisted 11 final articles based on the inclusion criteria. Data extraction was performed by three authors using customised forms after calibration. The risk of bias in the included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias in randomised controlled trials. 1 ResultsThe authors used VAS and Heft-Parker scale to measure pain intensity and reported Hedge's g standardised difference in the means. The mean reduction in VAS and Heft-Parker scale were - 0.576 (CI = - 0.94 to - 0.22; p = 0.002) and - 1.814 (CI = - 3.38 to - 0.245; p = 0.023) respectively. This indicates a positive effect of anaesthetic gel in pain intensity reduction. For risk of pain, the authors reported the odds ratio of 0.025 (CI 0.003-0.25; p = 0.002). As far as the need for rescue anaesthesia using the same anaesthetic gel and/or injected anaesthetics, the odds ratio was 0.358 (95% CI 0.174-0.736; p = 0.005). Both these findings show the efficacy of anaesthetic gel in controlling the risk of pain during SRP and probing.ConclusionsThe risk and intensity of pain during probing and SRP as well as the need for additional rescue anaesthesia using the same anaesthetic gel and

  7. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 2: the use of local anaesthetic lubrication for the catheterisation of males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth; Law, Amelia

    2014-09-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether local anaesthetic lubrication is necessary for urethral catheterisation in men. Two studies were directly relevant to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that the use of local anaesthetic is effective in this population and should form part of the procedure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Local anaesthetic infiltration for peri-operative pain control in total hip and knee replacement: systematic review and meta-analyses of short- and long-term effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Elsa M R; Jones, Hayley E; Elvers, Karen T; Pyke, Mark; Blom, Ashley W; Beswick, Andrew D

    2014-07-05

    Surgical pain is managed with multi-modal anaesthesia in total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR). It is unclear whether including local anaesthetic infiltration before wound closure provides additional pain control. We performed a systematic review of randomised controlled trials of local anaesthetic infiltration in patients receiving THR or TKR. We searched MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane CENTRAL to December 2012. Two reviewers screened abstracts, extracted data, and contacted authors for unpublished outcomes and data. Outcomes collected were post-operative pain at rest and during activity after 24 and 48 hours, opioid requirement, mobilisation, hospital stay and complications. When feasible, we estimated pooled treatment effects using random effects meta-analyses. In 13 studies including 909 patients undergoing THR, patients receiving local anaesthetic infiltration experienced a greater reduction in pain at 24 hours at rest by standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.61 (95% CI -1.05, -0.16; p = 0.008) and by SMD -0.43 (95% CI -0.78 -0.09; p = 0.014) at 48 hours during activity.In TKR, diverse multi-modal regimens were reported. In 23 studies including 1439 patients undergoing TKR, local anaesthetic infiltration reduced pain on average by SMD -0.40 (95% CI -0.58, -0.22; p SMD -0.27 (95% CI -0.50, -0.05; p = 0.018) at 48 hours during activity, compared with patients receiving no infiltration or placebo. There was evidence of a larger reduction in studies delivering additional local anaesthetic after wound closure. There was no evidence of pain control additional to that provided by femoral nerve block.Patients receiving local anaesthetic infiltration spent on average an estimated 0.83 (95% CI 1.54, 0.12; p = 0.022) and 0.87 (95% CI 1.62, 0.11; p = 0.025) fewer days in hospital after THR and TKR respectively, had reduced opioid consumption, earlier mobilisation, and lower incidence of vomiting.Few studies reported long-term outcomes. Local

  9. Presynaptic inhibition of the release of multiple major central nervous system neurotransmitter types by the inhaled anaesthetic isoflurane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, R. I.; Desai, K. M.; Hemmings, H. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Presynaptic effects of general anaesthetics are not well characterized. We tested the hypothesis that isoflurane exhibits transmitter-specific effects on neurotransmitter release from neurochemically and functionally distinct isolated mammalian nerve terminals. Methods Nerve terminals from adult male rat brain were prelabelled with [3H]glutamate and [14C]GABA (cerebral cortex), [3H]norepinephrine (hippocampus), [14C]dopamine (striatum), or [3H]choline (precursor of [3H]acetylcholine; striatum). Release evoked by depolarizing pulses of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) or elevated KCl was quantified using a closed superfusion system. Results Isoflurane at clinical concentrations (neurotransmitters tested in a concentration-dependent manner. Isoflurane was a more potent inhibitor [expressed as IC50 (sem)] of glutamate release [0.37 (0.03) mM; Pneurotransmitters with selectivity for glutamate release, consistent with both widespread inhibition and nerve terminal-specific presynaptic effects. Glutamate release was most sensitive to inhibition compared with GABA, acetylcholine, dopamine, and norepinephrine release due to presynaptic specializations in ion channel expression, regulation, and/or coupling to exocytosis. Reductions in neurotransmitter release by volatile anaesthetics could contribute to altered synaptic transmission, leading to therapeutic and toxic effects involving all major neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23213036

  10. Maternal and foetal cardiovascular effects of the anaesthetic alfaxalone in 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in the pregnant ewe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaluz, Anna; Santos, Laura; García, Félix; Ferrer, Rosa I; Fresno, Laura; Moll, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacodynamics effects of the anaesthetic alfaxalone in 2-hydroxypropyl- β -cyclodextrin in pregnant sheep after the intravenous injection of a 2 mg/kg weight dose. Six pregnant Ripollesa sheep, weighing 47.1 ± 4.4 kg, were used. Twenty-four hours after instrumentation, sheep were anaesthetized with intravenous alfaxalone in cyclodextrin. Time to standing from anaesthesia was 30.0 ± 10.81 min. Foetal heart rate increased significantly during the first 5 min after alfaxalone administration. Significant differences were observed in maternal diastolic arterial blood pressure between minute 10 and minutes 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, and 240. Significant differences were observed for foetal systolic arterial blood pressure between 5 and 30 min after alfaxalone administration. Significant differences in foetal pH were detected during the entire study period, whereas maternal pH returned to baseline values by 60 min after alfaxalone administration. The present study indicated that alfaxalone in 2-hydroxypropyl- β -cyclodextrin administered as an intravenous bolus at 2 mg/kg body weight produced minimal adverse effects and an uneventful recovery from anaesthesia in pregnant sheep and their foetus.

  11. Maternal and Foetal Cardiovascular Effects of the Anaesthetic Alfaxalone in 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in the Pregnant Ewe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Andaluz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacodynamics effects of the anaesthetic alfaxalone in 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in pregnant sheep after the intravenous injection of a 2 mg/kg weight dose. Six pregnant Ripollesa sheep, weighing 47.1 ± 4.4 kg, were used. Twenty-four hours after instrumentation, sheep were anaesthetized with intravenous alfaxalone in cyclodextrin. Time to standing from anaesthesia was 30.0 ± 10.81 min. Foetal heart rate increased significantly during the first 5 min after alfaxalone administration. Significant differences were observed in maternal diastolic arterial blood pressure between minute 10 and minutes 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, and 240. Significant differences were observed for foetal systolic arterial blood pressure between 5 and 30 min after alfaxalone administration. Significant differences in foetal pH were detected during the entire study period, whereas maternal pH returned to baseline values by 60 min after alfaxalone administration. The present study indicated that alfaxalone in 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin administered as an intravenous bolus at 2 mg/kg body weight produced minimal adverse effects and an uneventful recovery from anaesthesia in pregnant sheep and their foetus.

  12. The accuracy of timed maximum local anaesthetic dose calculations with an electronic calculator, nomogram, and pen and paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J D; Williams, N; Williams, D J

    2017-06-01

    Forty anaesthetists calculated maximum permissible doses of eight local anaesthetic formulations for simulated patients three times with three methods: an electronic calculator; nomogram; and pen and paper. Correct dose calculations with the nomogram (85/120) were more frequent than with the calculator (71/120) or pen and paper (57/120), Bayes Factor 4 and 287, p = 0.01 and p = 0.0003, respectively. The rates of calculations at least 120% the recommended dose with each method were different, Bayes Factor 7.9, p = 0.0007: 14/120 with the calculator; 5/120 with the nomogram; 13/120 with pen and paper. The median (IQR [range]) speed of calculation with pen and paper, 38.0 (25.0-56.3 [5-142]) s, was slower than with the calculator, 24.5 (17.8-37.5 [6-204]) s, p = 0.0001, or nomogram, 23.0 (18.0-29.0 [4-100]) s, p = 1 × 10 -7 . Local anaesthetic dose calculations with the nomogram were more accurate than with an electronic calculator or pen and paper and were faster than with pen and paper. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Effects of administration of a local anaesthetic and/or an NSAID and of docking length on the behaviour of piglets during 5 h after tail docking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskin, Mette S.; Di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Thodberg, Karen

    2016-01-01

    In many countries, piglets are tail docked to prevent tail biting. The aim of this study was 1) to evaluate the efficacy of a local anaesthetic and/or NSAID to reduce pain caused by tail docking; and 2) to examine interactions with docking length. This was examined in 295 piglets docked by hot iron...

  14. Gastric mucosal electrical potential difference and blood flow during high FFA/albumin ratios in anaesthetized Göttingen mini-pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bülow, J B; Madsen, J

    1988-01-01

    The gastric blood flow and the gastric mucosal potential difference (p.d.) was studied in anaesthetized Göttingen mini-pigs under normal conditions and during increased FFA/albumin ratios. The antrum mucosal p.d. was measured continuously with a newly developed intragastric microelectrode principle...

  15. Gastric mucosal electrical potential difference and blood flow during high FFA/albumin ratios in anaesthetized Göttingen mini-pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bülow, J B; Madsen, J

    1988-01-01

    The gastric blood flow and the gastric mucosal potential difference (p.d.) was studied in anaesthetized Göttingen mini-pigs under normal conditions and during increased FFA/albumin ratios. The antrum mucosal p.d. was measured continuously with a newly developed intragastric microelectrode princip...

  16. Effects of AL 107, a novel semisynthetic cardiac glycoside, on the cardiovascular system in anaesthetized beagle dogs with pentobarbital-induced cardiac insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogel, B; Schneider, J; Gleitz, J; Wilffert, B; Peters, Thies

    The inotropic efficacy, arrhythmogenicity and cardiohaemodynamic properties of AL 107 (3-alpha-methyl-digitoxigenin glucoside. CAS 62190-59-4), a novel cardiac glycoside, were studied in anaesthetized dogs with pentobarbital-induced acute cardiac insufficiency. Three groups of dogs received AL 107,

  17. The experiences of parents of children with severe autism in connection with their children's anaesthetics, in the presence and absence of the perioperative dialogue: a hermeneutic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Susan; von Post, Iréne; Eriksson, Katie

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain an understanding of what parents of children with severe autism experience in connection with their child's anaesthetics, in the presence and absence of the perioperative dialogue. Twelve parents who had experience of their child receiving anaesthetics on one or more occasions took part in this study, in which anaesthesia care was organized as a perioperative dialogue. Data were collected by means of conversational interviews, and the text was interpreted using a hermeneutic approach. The hermeneutic text interpretation led to a new understanding based on the knowledge that in the absence of the perioperative dialogue, previous anaesthetics had meant the suffering of care by the following: a hopeless struggle, unspeakable suffering and a disgraceful scenario. However, continuity in the perioperative dialogue provided to be a way out of the suffering by being received by warm hands, being received by a known face and a subtle interplay between the child and nurse. Although health and well-being may be unobtainable goals in this special context of care, the findings provided ample descriptions of the positive effects of the perioperative dialogue, which is all the more valuable when dealing with children who will need repeated anaesthetics in the future. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. DNA and chromosomal damage in medical workers exposed to anaesthetic gases assessed by the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. A critical review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vodička, Pavel; Mušák, L.; Fiorito, G.; Vymetálková, Veronika; Vodičková, Ludmila; Naccarati, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 770, SI (2016), s. 26-34 ISSN 1383-5742 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14050; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14789S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : micronuclei * anaesthetics gas exposure * operating room personnel Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.500, year: 2016

  19. Effect of topical anaesthetics on interstitial colloid osmotic pressure in human subcutaneous tissue sampled by wick technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jørgen Timm Guthe

    Full Text Available To measure colloid osmotic pressure in interstitial fluid (COP(i from human subcutaneous tissue with the modified wick technique in order to determine influence of topical application of anaesthetics, dry vs. wet wick and implantation time on COP(i.In 50 healthy volunteers interstitial fluid (IF was collected by subcutaneous implantation of multi-filamentous nylon wicks. Study subjects were allocated to two groups; one for comparing COP(i obtained from dry and saline soaked wicks, and one for comparing COP(i from unanaesthetized skin, and skin after application of a eutectic mixture of local anaesthetic (EMLA®, Astra Zeneca cream. IF was sampled from the skin of the shoulders, and implantation time was 30, 60, 75, 90 and 120 min. Colloid osmotic pressure was measured with a colloid osmometer. Pain assessment during the procedure was compared for EMLA cream and no topical anaesthesia using a visual analogue scale (VAS in a subgroup of 10 subjects.There were no significant differences between COP(i obtained from dry compared to wet wicks, except that the values after 75 and 90 min. were somewhat higher for the dry wicks. Topical anaesthesia with EMLA cream did not affect COP(i values. COP(i decreased from 30 to 75 min. of implantation (23.2 ± 4.4 mmHg to 19.6 ± 2.9 mmHg, p = 0.008 and subsequently tended to increase until 120 min. EMLA cream resulted in significant lower VAS score for the procedure.COP(i from subcutaneous tissue was easily obtained and fluid harvesting was well tolerated when topical anaesthetic was used. The difference in COP(i assessed by dry and wet wicks between 75 min. and 90 min. of implantation was in accordance with previous reports. The use of topical analgesia did not influence COP(i and topical analgesia may make the wick technique more acceptable for subjects who dislike technical procedures, including children.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01044979.

  20. The bite of the honeybee: 2-heptanone secreted from honeybee mandibles during a bite acts as a local anaesthetic in insects and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristoforou, Alexandros; Kagiava, Alexia; Papaefthimiou, Chrisovalantis; Termentzi, Aikaterini; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Watkins, Max; Arnold, Gérard; Theophilidis, George

    2012-01-01

    Honeybees secrete 2-heptanone (2-H) from their mandibular glands when they bite. Researchers have identified several possible functions: 2-H could act as an alarm pheromone to recruit guards and soldiers, it could act as a chemical marker, or it could have some other function. The actual role of 2-H in honeybee behaviour remains unresolved. In this study, we show that 2-H acts as an anaesthetic in small arthropods, such as wax moth larva (WML) and Varroa mites, which are paralysed after a honeybee bite. We demonstrated that honeybee mandibles can penetrate the cuticle of WML, introducing less than one nanolitre of 2-H into the WML open circulatory system and causing instantaneous anaesthetization that lasts for a few minutes. The first indication that 2-H acts as a local anaesthetic was that its effect on larval response, inhibition and recovery is very similar to that of lidocaine. We compared the inhibitory effects of 2-H and lidocaine on voltage-gated sodium channels. Although both compounds blocked the hNav1.6 and hNav1.2 channels, lidocaine was slightly more effective, 2.82 times, on hNav.6. In contrast, when the two compounds were tested using an ex vivo preparation-the isolated rat sciatic nerve-the function of the two compounds was so similar that we were able to definitively classify 2-H as a local anaesthetic. Using the same method, we showed that 2-H has the fastest inhibitory effect of all alkyl-ketones tested, including the isomers 3- and 4-heptanone. This suggests that natural selection may have favoured 2-H over other, similar compounds because of the associated fitness advantages it confers. Our results reveal a previously unknown role of 2-H in honeybee defensive behaviour and due to its minor neurotoxicity show potential for developing a new local anaesthetic from a natural product, which could be used in human and veterinary medicine.

  1. The Bite of the Honeybee: 2-Heptanone Secreted from Honeybee Mandibles during a Bite Acts as a Local Anaesthetic in Insects and Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristoforou, Alexandros; Kagiava, Alexia; Papaefthimiou, Chrisovalantis; Termentzi, Aikaterini; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Watkins, Max; Arnold, Gérard; Theophilidis, George

    2012-01-01

    Honeybees secrete 2-heptanone (2-H) from their mandibular glands when they bite. Researchers have identified several possible functions: 2-H could act as an alarm pheromone to recruit guards and soldiers, it could act as a chemical marker, or it could have some other function. The actual role of 2-H in honeybee behaviour remains unresolved. In this study, we show that 2-H acts as an anaesthetic in small arthropods, such as wax moth larva (WML) and Varroa mites, which are paralysed after a honeybee bite. We demonstrated that honeybee mandibles can penetrate the cuticle of WML, introducing less than one nanolitre of 2-H into the WML open circulatory system and causing instantaneous anaesthetization that lasts for a few minutes. The first indication that 2-H acts as a local anaesthetic was that its effect on larval response, inhibition and recovery is very similar to that of lidocaine. We compared the inhibitory effects of 2-H and lidocaine on voltage-gated sodium channels. Although both compounds blocked the hNav1.6 and hNav1.2 channels, lidocaine was slightly more effective, 2.82 times, on hNav.6. In contrast, when the two compounds were tested using an ex vivo preparation–the isolated rat sciatic nerve–the function of the two compounds was so similar that we were able to definitively classify 2-H as a local anaesthetic. Using the same method, we showed that 2-H has the fastest inhibitory effect of all alkyl-ketones tested, including the isomers 3- and 4-heptanone. This suggests that natural selection may have favoured 2-H over other, similar compounds because of the associated fitness advantages it confers. Our results reveal a previously unknown role of 2-H in honeybee defensive behaviour and due to its minor neurotoxicity show potential for developing a new local anaesthetic from a natural product, which could be used in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:23091624

  2. Post-operative recovery profile after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective, observational study of a multimodal anaesthetic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Kehlet, H; Lund, Claus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is now often an ambulatory procedure, but dependent on short-term post-operative complaints of pain and post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). The efficacy of post-anaesthesia care units (PACUs) is therefore important to facilitate return to normal...... functions. We investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a standardized, evidence-based anaesthesia/analgesic regime to identify residual problems in the early post-operative phase. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-four consecutive patients admitted for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy at Hvidovre...... to discharge (mean, 88 min). There were on average 2.7 treatment interventions (range, 0-11) before discharge. CONCLUSION: An evidence-based, multimodal approach to the anaesthetic/analgesic management in laparoscopic cholecystectomy is feasible and advantageous in the early post-operative phase. Pain and PONV...

  3. Anaesthetic Management of a 1-Month-Old Puppy Undergoing Lateral Thoracotomy for Vascular Ring Anomaly Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Martin Jurado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 1-month-old male flat-coated retriever was anaesthetized for correction of oesophageal constriction caused by a vascular ring anomaly. Anaesthesia was uneventfully induced with intravenous fentanyl, diazepam, and propofol and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and air. An intercostal block with bupivacaine and lidocaine was performed, and additional analgesia with an infusion of fentanyl was provided. Fluid therapy consisted in 5% glucose in lactated Ringer’s solution and hetastarch 6%, which proved adequate to maintain normoglycemia and normovolemia. A lateral thoracotomy was performed, and the ligamentum arteriosum was ligated. Intraoperatively, heart rate (HR varied between 120 and 180 beats min−1 without accompanying changes in blood pressure. No arrhythmias were observed or bleeding occurred. The dog recovered uneventfully. Postoperative analgesia consisted in fentanyl infusion adjusted to the patient's requirement and metamizol. This paper describes for the first time the use of balanced anaesthesia and multimodal analgesia in a paediatric dog undergoing thoracotomy.

  4. Post-operative recovery profile after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective, observational study of a multimodal anaesthetic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Kehlet, H; Lund, Claus Michael

    2007-01-01

    to discharge (mean, 88 min). There were on average 2.7 treatment interventions (range, 0-11) before discharge. CONCLUSION: An evidence-based, multimodal approach to the anaesthetic/analgesic management in laparoscopic cholecystectomy is feasible and advantageous in the early post-operative phase. Pain and PONV......BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is now often an ambulatory procedure, but dependent on short-term post-operative complaints of pain and post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). The efficacy of post-anaesthesia care units (PACUs) is therefore important to facilitate return to normal...... functions. We investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a standardized, evidence-based anaesthesia/analgesic regime to identify residual problems in the early post-operative phase. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-four consecutive patients admitted for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy at Hvidovre...

  5. [Anaesthetic management of patients in the third trimester of pregnancy undergoing urgent laparoscopic surgery. Experience in a general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Collada Estrada, María; Olvera Martínez, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is well accepted as a safe technique when performed on a third trimester pregnant woman. The aim is to describe the anaesthetic management of a group of patients undergoing this type of surgery. An analysis was made of records of 6 patients in their third trimester of pregnancy and who underwent urgent laparoscopic surgery from 2011 to 2013. The study included 6 patients, with a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis in 4 of them. The other 2 patients had acute appendicitis, both of who presented threatened preterm labour. The most frequent indications for laparoscopic surgery during the last trimester of birth were found to be acute cholecystitis and acute appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is related to an elevated risk of presenting threatened preterm labour. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY (SEDATIVE AND ANAESTHETIC OF DETOMIDINE, KETAMINE AND DETOMIDINE-KETAMINE COCKTAIL IN PIGEONS (COLUMBA LIVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UZMA F. DURRANI, M. ARIF KHAN1 AND S. SALEEM AHMAD

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to compare the synergistic efficacy of detomidine, ketamine and their cocktail in pigeons (Columba livia. For this study, 15 adult and healthy pigeons were divided into three equal groups A, B and C. Birds of groups A and B were intramuscularly administered detomidine and ketamine @ 1.4 and 60 mg/kg b. wt., respectively. Pigeons of group C received detomidine + Ketamine cocktail @ 0.7 and 30 mg/kg b. wt. Induction of sedation and anaesthesia was smooth in all groups. Mean duration of induction was 11.1 + 2.03, 11.0 + 1.49 and 1.6 + 0.48 minutes in groups A, B, C, respectively. In groups A and B, smooth but light sedation and anaesthesia were observed accompanied by superficial analgesia, while in group C, birds showed deep anaesthesia alongwith deep analgesia. Birds in groups A and C elicited hypothermia, respiratory depression and bradycardia till complete recovery, while group B showed hyperthermia and tachycardia with rapid respiration. In group A, sedation persisted for 54.2 + 21.82 minutes and mean recovery period was 49.9 + 5.91 minutes, while groups B and C had anaesthesia for 47.7 + 8.06 and 103.5 + 27.52 minutes, and recovery periods were 52.6 + 9.64 and 61.3 + 17.26 minutes, respectively. Recovery was rough in group B and smooth in groups A and C. It was concluded that in pigeons, detomidine (alone is safe for handling and for least painful procedures, while detomidine-ketamine cocktail is safe as intramuscular anaesthetic for major surgical procedures. However, ketamine is not a good anaesthetic to be used alone in pigeons.

  7. The electro-mechanical window in anaesthetized guinea pigs: a new marker in screening for Torsade de Pointes risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guns, P-J; Johnson, DM; Van Op den bosch, J; Weltens, E; Lissens, J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE QT prolongation is commonly used as a surrogate marker for Torsade de Pointes (TdP) risk of non-cardiovascular drugs. However, use of this indirect marker often leads to misinterpretation of the realistic TdP risk, as tested compounds may cause QT prolongation without evoking TdP in humans. A negative electro-mechanical (E-M) window has recently been proposed as an alternative risk marker for TdP in a canine LQT1 model. Here, we evaluated the E-M window in anaesthetized guinea pigs as a screening marker for TdP in humans. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of various reference drugs and changes in body temperature on the E-M window were assessed in instrumented guinea pigs. The E-M window was defined as the delay between the duration of the electrical (QT interval) and mechanical (QLVPend) systole. KEY RESULTS Drugs with known TdP liability (quinidine, haloperidol, domperidone, terfenadine, thioridazine and dofetilide), but not those with no TdP risk in humans (salbutamol and diltiazem) consistently decreased the E-M window. Interestingly, drugs with known clinical QT prolongation, but with low risk for TdP (amiodarone, moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin) did not decrease the E-M window. Furthermore, the E-M window was minimally affected by changes in heart rate or body temperature. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS A decreased E-M window was consistently observed with drugs already known to have high TdP risk, but not with drugs with low or no TdP risk. These results suggest that the E-M window in anaesthetized guinea pigs is a risk marker for TdP in humans. PMID:22122450

  8. Effect of sodium nitrite on ischaemia and reperfusion-induced arrhythmias in anaesthetized dogs: is protein S-nitrosylation involved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Kovács

    Full Text Available To provide evidence for the protective role of inorganic nitrite against acute ischaemia and reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias in a large animal model.Dogs, anaesthetized with chloralose and urethane, were administered intravenously with sodium nitrite (0.2 µmol kg(-1 min(-1 in two protocols. In protocol 1 nitrite was infused 10 min prior to and during a 25 min occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery (NaNO2-PO; n = 14, whereas in protocol 2 the infusion was started 10 min prior to reperfusion of the occluded vessel (NaNO2-PR; n = 12. Control dogs (n = 15 were infused with saline and subjected to the same period of ischaemia and reperfusion. Severities of ischaemia and ventricular arrhythmias, as well as changes in plasma nitrate/nitrite (NOx levels in the coronary sinus blood, were assessed throughout the experiment. Myocardial superoxide and nitrotyrosine (NT levels were determined during reperfusion. Changes in protein S-nitrosylation (SNO and S-glutathionylation were also examined.Compared with controls, sodium nitrite administered either pre-occlusion or pre-reperfusion markedly suppressed the number and severity of ventricular arrhythmias during occlusion and increased survival (0% vs. 50 and 92% upon reperfusion. There were also significant decreases in superoxide and NT levels in the nitrite treated dogs. Compared with controls, increased SNO was found only in NaNO2-PR dogs, whereas S-glutathionylation occurred primarily in NaNO2-PO dogs.Intravenous infusion of nitrite profoundly reduced the severity of ventricular arrhythmias resulting from acute ischaemia and reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs. This effect, among several others, may result from an NO-mediated reduction in oxidative stress, perhaps through protein SNO and/or S-glutathionylation.

  9. Short-term Parameters of Heart Rate Variability During Balanced Anaesthesia with Administration of Two Different Inhalation Anaesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omerbegović, Meldijana

    2014-08-01

    Heart rate variability which denotes variations of the length of consecutive heart cycles has been suggested to reflect the modulation of heart rate by autonomic nervous system. Sixty four patients of ASA I and ASA II status scheduled for elective abdominal surgical procedures were randomly allocated to group 1 and group 2. Premedication and induction of anaesthesia were performed with same agents. After orotracheal intubation maintenance of balanced anaesthesia was based on administration of same induction agents,opioids and muscle relaxant while delivery of gaseous mixture with sevoflurane in the group 1 (n=32) and isoflurane in the group 2(n=32). Haemodynamic parameters were monitored in perioperative and electrocardiogram was recorded by holter ECG recorder, while the analysis of the parameters were performed by corresponding softwares . Data were presented as mean values of logarithmic (natural logarithm) values of the power of the total spectrum of heart rate variability(TP), mean values of the logarithmic values of low frequency band (LF), mean values of the logarithmic values of high frequency range(HF), and mean values of SD1 and SD2 parameters. Analysis of the values of hemodynamic parameters has shown changes of haemodynamic parameters during perioperative period without significant statistical differences between the groups. Analysis of the logarhitmic values of parameters of heart rate variability of frequency domain has shown changes of the total spectrum power and LF and HF spestra with variations of the values of total power spectrum and individual components of the spectrum of heart rate variability during the balanced anaesthesia with administration of two different inhalation anaesthetics, without statistically significant differences between the groups. The results have shown that during balanced anaesthesia with two different inhalation anaesthetics there are variations of haemodynamic variables and parameters of heart rate variability without

  10. Determination of the exposure parameters that maximise the concentrations of the anaesthetic/sedative eugenol in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin-on fillet tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Porcher, Scott T.; Smerud, Justin R.

    2014-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the anaesthetic/sedative concentrations and durations that would maximize anaesthetic/sedative residue concentrations in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin-on fillet tissue. Rainbow trout (167–404 g) were exposed to 50 mg l−1 AQUI-S® 20E (10% active ingredient, eugenol) in 17°C freshwater for durations up to 1440 min, 100 and 250 mg l−1 AQUI-S® 20E for durations up to 240 min, and 500 and 1000 mg l−1 AQUI-S® 20E for durations up to 90 min. Fish exposed to 100 mg l−1 AQUI-S® 20E for durations of 30, 60, 120 and 240 min had the greatest eugenol concentrations in the fillet tissue, 50, 58, 54 and 62 µg g−1, respectively. All other exposure concentrations and durations resulted in significantly lower eugenol concentrations, i.e. all −1.

  11. Local anaesthetic eye drops for prevention of pain in preterm infants undergoing screening for retinopathy of prematurity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dempsey, Eugene

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Screening examinations for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) are performed routinely in the neonatal intensive care unit and are a recognised cause of pain in the newborn. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of instillation of topical anaesthetic eye drops compared with placebo or no treatment on pain in infants undergoing ROP screening. SEARCH STRATEGY: We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. This included a search of the Cochrane Neonatal Group register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 10, 2010). We identified relevant studies by searching the following: (1) computerised bibliographic databases: MEDLINE (1966 to October 2010), EMBASE (1988 to October 2010) and Web of Science (1975 to March 2010; (2) the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials. We searched electronically abstracts from PAS from 2000 to 2010 and handsearched abstracts from ESPR from 2000 to 2009. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised, or quasi-randomised controlled trials, or randomised cross-over trials. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. MAIN RESULTS: We identified two studies for inclusion. Both studies were randomised cross-over trials performed in single centres. Both studies used the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) score as a measure of pain response. Different methods of evaluating PIPP scores are presented including the absolute PIPP score, a PIPP score > 10 or > 12 and an increase in PIPP >\\/= 4 from the baseline value. There is a nonsignificant reduction in pain scores at one minute and a nonsignificant increase at five minutes post insertion of the speculum. PIPP score > 12 at one minute resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the number of patients who experienced pain (typical risk ratio (RR) 0.56, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.89; typical risk difference (RD) -0.23, 95% CI -0.39 to -0.86; number needed to treat to

  12. An embedded checklist in the Anesthesia Information Management System improves pre-anaesthetic induction setup: a randomised controlled trial in a simulation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, Douglas; Goldberg, Andrew; Gandhi, Nishant; Spivack, John; McCormick, Patrick; DeMaria, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    Anaesthesiologists work in a high stress, high consequence environment in which missed steps in preparation may lead to medical errors and potential patient harm. The pre-anaesthetic induction period has been identified as a time in which medical errors can occur. The Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation has developed a Pre-Anesthetic Induction Patient Safety (PIPS) checklist. We conducted this study to test the effectiveness of this checklist, when embedded in our institutional Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS), on resident performance in a simulated environment. Using a randomised, controlled, observer-blinded design, we compared performance of anaesthesiology residents in a simulated operating room under production pressure using a checklist in completing a thorough pre-anaesthetic induction evaluation and setup with that of residents with no checklist. The checklist was embedded in the simulated operating room's electronic medical record. Data for 38 anaesthesiology residents shows a statistically significant difference in performance in pre-anaesthetic setup and evaluation as scored by blinded raters (maximum score 22 points), with the checklist group performing better by 7.8 points (p<0.01). The effects of gender and year of residency on total score were not significant. Simulation duration (time to anaesthetic agent administration) was increased significantly by the use of the checklist. Required use of a pre-induction checklist improves anaesthesiology resident performance in a simulated environment. The PIPS checklist as an integrated part of a departmental AIMS warrant further investigation as a quality measure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Entry-instrument used in the patient's evaluation in a post-anaesthetic recovery room: a matter of great concern: care continuity

    OpenAIRE

    Reda,Elaine; Peniche,Aparecida de Cássia Giani

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To know the nurses' evaluation about the continuity of nursing care. METHODS: Fifty-nine nurses from two Hospitals (I and II) were interviewed. The questions addressed the following issues: the difficulties they face to obtain the necessary information to provide patient care in the immediate post-operative period; what is the best strategy to receive information related to this period; and what is their evaluation about the entry-instrument of the post anaesthetic recovery. RESULT...

  14. Application of a topical vapocoolant spray decreases pain at the site of initial intradermal anaesthetic injection during ultrasound-guided breast needle biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collado-Mesa, F.; Net, J.M.; Arheart, K.; Klevos, G.A.; Yepes, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess whether the application of a topical vapocoolant spray immediately prior to initial intradermal anaesthetic injection during ultrasound-guided breast biopsy decreases pain at the site of the initial injection. Materials and methods: In this institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant study, 50 women aged 49.1 ± 1.6 years (mean ± standard error) were recruited and provided written informed consent. Participants served as their own controls and were blinded as to whether a topical vapocoolant spray or a placebo was used immediately prior to the initial local anaesthetic injection at two separate biopsy sites. With the exception of the application of vapocoolant or placebo, the entire ultrasound-guided procedure was performed according to a routine protocol. Participants recorded pain at initial injection site on a visual analogue scale. General linear mixed models for repeated measures analysis of variance and a 0.05 significance level were used. Results: Application of topical vapocoolant spray was shown to significantly decrease pain at the site of initial intradermal anaesthetic injection as compared to placebo (p<0.001). Treatment effect was independent of age of the subject, race/ethnicity, operator, type of biopsy device, and histopathology result. No complications from vapocoolant spray use were reported. Conclusion: Application of a topical vapocoolant spray immediately prior to initial intradermal anaesthetic injection during ultrasound-guided breast biopsy significantly decreases pain at the site of the initial injection and could contribute to improve the patient's overall procedural experience. -- Highlights: •Topical vapocoolant spray decreased pain at site of initial anesthetic injection (

  15. Influence of different anaesthetic protocols over the sperm quality on the fresh, chilled (4°C) and frozen-thawed epididymal sperm samples in domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, M; Vilar, J; Rosario, I; Terradas, E

    2016-10-01

    This study assessed the influence of three different anaesthetic protocols on semen quality obtained from the epididymis. Sixty male dogs undergoing to routine sterilization were assigned to three anaesthetic protocols: thiopental group (TG, n = 20), propofol group (PG, n = 20) and ketamine-dexmedetomidine group (KDG, n = 20). Immediately after orchidectomy, the cauda epididymides and vas deferent ducts were isolated and then a retrograde flushing was performed to collect spermatozoa. In experiment 1, after the initial evaluation of the semen (sperm concentration, sperm motility and the percentages of live spermatozoa, abnormal spermatozoa and acrosome membrane integrity), semen samples were diluted in Tris-glucose-egg yolk extender and chilled for 48 hr, and the sperm motility was assessed at 6, 24 and 48 hr. In experiment 2, semen samples were diluted in Tris-glucose-egg yolk extender and chilled for 24 hr, and then samples were frozen in two extenders with different glycerol concentrations, to reach a final concentration of 50-100 × 10(6) spermatozoa ml(-1) , 20% egg yolk, 0.5% Equex and 4% and 5% glycerol, respectively. Mean values of total sperm concentration, sperm viability and the percentages of intact acrosome and abnormal spermatozoa were not significantly different between experimental groups, and therefore, the anaesthetic protocols assessed did not affect sperm parameters mentioned above. However, our study confirmed a detrimental effect of the use of thiopental (TG) over the total sperm motility (p sperm motility (p epididymal sperm samples. The anaesthetic protocols including the application of propofol or ketamine-dexmedetomidine can be used to recover sperm in domestic canids without significant changes in sperm quality compared when semen is collected routinely and these techniques could be applicable to endangered wild canids. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. The effect of site (deltoid or gluteus muscle) of intramuscular administration of anaesthetic drugs on the course of immobilisation in macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Hess; Jiří Málek; Alice Kurzová; Martin Votava

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of site of intramuscular administration of anaesthetic drugs on the course of immobilisation in macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Twenty macaque monkeys were given medetomidine (25 µg·kg-1) and ketamine (3 mg·kg-1) intramuscularly to the deltoid (n = 10 animals) or gluteus (n = 10 animals) muscles. Behavioural changes, loss of aggressiveness, immobilisation time and cardiorespiratory changes were recorded. The effect of drugs was reversed after 20 ...

  17. The non-technical skills used by anaesthetic technicians in critical incidents reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring System between 2002 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, J S; Flin, R; Irwin, A

    2015-07-01

    The outcome of critical incidents in the operating theatre has been shown to be influenced by the behaviour of anaesthetic technicians (ATs) assisting anaesthetists, but the specific non-technical skills involved have not been described. We performed a review of critical incidents (n=1433) reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring System between 2002 and 2008 to identify which non-technical skills were used by ATs. The reports were assessed if they mentioned anaesthetic assistance or had the boxes ticked to identify "inadequate assistance" or "absent supervision or assistance". A total of 90 critical incidents involving ATs were retrieved, 69 of which described their use of non-technical skills. In 20 reports, the ATs ameliorated the critical incident, whilst in 46 they exacerbated the critical incident, and three cases had both positive and negative non-technical skills described. Situation awareness was identified in 39 reports, task management in 23, teamwork in 21 and decision-making in two, but there were no descriptions of issues related to leadership, stress or fatigue management. Situation awareness, task management and teamwork appear to be important non-technical skills for ATs in the development or management of critical incidents in the operating theatre. This analysis has been used to support the development of a non-technical skills taxonomy for anaesthetic assistants.

  18. A new anaesthetic breathing system combining Mapleson A, D and E principles. A simple apparatus for low flow universal use without carbon dioxide absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, D

    1983-04-01

    A new simple anaesthetic breathing system is described which has been designed to incorporate into a single system advantages of Mapleson A, D and E type systems. Coaxial and non-coaxial versions are available. The system can be used for adults, children or neonates and allows both spontaneous or controlled ventilation with low fresh gas flows at all times. As a Mapleson A system for spontaneous respiration a considerable saving of anaesthetic gases and vapours is achieved since, for adults, the new system requires a lower fresh gas flow even than that for the Magill. For children breathing spontaneously the system requires only one third of the fresh gas flow necessary for the Jackson Rees modification of Ayre's T-piece. For controlled ventilation the system behaves as a modified Mapleson D/E (Bain type) system with the advantage of predictable CO2 tensions and good humidification. The system is safe, simple in design and operation, and is easily sterilized. Further it offers low resistance to expiration and facilitates scavenging at all times which, with low anaesthetic gas flows, permits complete theatre pollution control. Its potential application in academic and rural environments and major advantages over the circle absorber system are discussed.

  19. Rocuronium reversed by sugammadex versus mivacurium during high-risk eye surgery: an institutional anaesthetic practice evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Quillfeldt, Susanne; Föhre, Bettina; Andrees, Nicolai; Spies, Claudia D; Galvagni, Daniele; Joussen, Antonia M; Wernecke, Klaus D; Boemke, Willehad

    2013-10-01

    This institutional anaesthetic practice evaluation compared patient safety with respect to residual neuromuscular blockade (NMB) at the time of tracheal extubation in patients undergoing high-risk eye surgery. Two muscle relaxation regimens were compared: rocuronium administered via intravenous (i.v.) bolus dosing combined with reversal through sugammadex at end of surgery (group R/S; 17 patients); mivacurium administered via continuous i.v. infusion without antagonization (group M; 22 patients). Train-of-four (TOF) monitoring determined the depth of NMB. The TOF ratio at the time of tracheal extubation was greater in group R/S (median 1.03) than in group M (median 0.62). Time from end of surgery to tracheal extubation was not significantly different. The surgeons were 100% satisfied with the working conditions provided under both relaxation regimens. Residual postoperative curarization at the time of extubation was frequently observed in group M, whereas there was complete recovery in group R/S. Reversal of NMB by sugammadex provides an additional safety dimension to patient care and should thus be considered especially for those at risk of airway complications or aspiration, in addition to frail patients.

  20. Activation of serotonergic neurons in the medullary caudal raphe shortens the laryngeal chemoreflex in anaesthetized neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, William T; Xia, Luxi; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J C

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does activation of serotonergic neurons in the caudal medullary raphe, some of which project to the nucleus of the solitary tract, shorten the laryngeal chemoreflex? What is the main finding and its importance? We found that serotonin originating from neurons in the caudal raphe acts through a 5-HT 3 receptor located in the nucleus of the solitary tract to terminate reflex apnoea. Failure or deficiency of this arousal-related process is likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome. Failure to terminate apnoea and arouse is likely to contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Serotonin is deficient in the brainstems of babies who have died of SIDS. We tested the hypothesis that activation of serotoninergic neurons in the caudal medullary raphe, some of which project to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), would shorten the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR). We studied anaesthetized neonatal rat pups between postnatal days 9 and 17. We injected 5-40 μl of water into the larynx to elicit the LCR and measured the duration of respiratory disruption. Microinjection of 50 nl of 100 μm AMPA into the caudal medullary raphe shortened the apnoeas (P serotonergic termination of apnoea is likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of SIDS. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  1. Anaesthetic efficacy of intraligamentary injection techniques on mandibular molars diagnosed with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Wigler, Ronald; Huber, Ronen; Kaufman, Arieh Y

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the success rate of intraligamentary injections (ILI) using a two- or four-site injection technique. One hundred and fifty-one mandibular molars diagnosed with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis received ILI at the mesiobuccal and distobuccal aspects of the roots. Patients who experienced pain when the access cavity was performed received additional supplemental ILI in the mesiolingual and distolingual aspects. Pulpal anaesthesia was considered successful when complete analgesia was achieved. The data were analysed by means of the Fisher's exact and Pearson's chi-square tests. IL anaesthesia was successful for 92.1% of the teeth. Forty-eight teeth (31.8%) were sufficiently anaesthetised using the two-site ILI and 91 teeth (60.3%) following supplemental IL anaesthesia in two more sites. The results of this study indicate that the use of four-site IL injections as a primary anaesthetic technique may be considered a favourable alternative to the common IANB. © 2016 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  2. Electroencephalographic Changes Associated with Antinociceptive Actions of Lidocaine, Ketamine, Meloxicam, and Morphine Administration in Minimally Anaesthetized Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubedullah Kaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ketamine and lidocaine on electroencephalographic (EEG changes were evaluated in minimally anaesthetized dogs, subjected to electric stimulus. Six dogs were subjected to six treatments in a crossover design with a washout period of one week. Dogs were subjected to intravenous boluses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg, ketamine 3 mg/kg, meloxicam 0.2 mg/kg, morphine 0.2 mg/kg and loading doses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by continuous rate infusion (CRI of 50 and 100 mcg/kg/min, and ketamine 3 mg/kg followed by CRI of 10 and 50 mcg/kg/min. Electroencephalogram was recorded during electrical stimulation prior to any drug treatment (before treatment and during electrical stimulation following treatment with the drugs (after treatment under anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with halothane at a stable concentration between 0.85 and 0.95%. Pretreatment median frequency was evidently increased (P<0.05 for all treatment groups. Lidocaine, ketamine, and morphine depressed the median frequency resulting from the posttreatment stimulation. The depression of median frequency suggested evident antinociceptive effects of these treatments in dogs. It is therefore concluded that lidocaine and ketamine can be used in the analgesic protocol for the postoperative pain management in dogs.

  3. Management of post-traumatic stiffness of the shoulder following upper limb trauma with manipulation under anaesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Sarah T; Grove, Thomas N; Woods, David A

    2017-10-01

    A proportion of patients who sustain upper limb fractures develop post-traumatic stiffness (PTS), which may progress in a similar way to primary frozen shoulder (PFS). We have had success in treating PFS with manipulation under anaesthetic (MUA) and therefore treated PTS using MUA. Oxford Shoulder Scores (OSS), range of motion (ROM) data pre- and post-MUA, and the need for repeat procedure were compared. Sixty-four patients with PTS following an upper limb fracture, unresponsive to conservative measures, were seen between 1 January 1999 and 1 November 2015. Thirty-two patients had sustained a proximal humeral fracture, six of whom had a concurrent shoulder dislocation. MUA was performed using a standard technique. The results were compared with 487 PFS patients undergoing the same procedure. There was no significant difference in ROM change between the groups. Improvement in OSS was slightly greater in the PFS group (17 versus 14, p  = 0.005) but, upon subgroup analysis of the PTS group, no significant difference was found for patients presenting with humeral fractures alone. MUA results for PTS following upper limb fracture are comparable to MUA for PFS. We therefore recommend MUA in PTS cases where conservative methods have failed.

  4. Comparison of Emla cream and lidocaine injection for local anaesthetic before radiofrequency reduction of the inferior turbinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, N; Bülbül, T; Demirkan, A

    2017-11-01

    We compared the effectiveness of local anaesthetic with Emla cream with that of an injection of lidocaine for radiofrequency reduction of the inferior turbinates. We studied 98 consecutive patients with hypertrophied inferior turbinates, 46 of whom were given Emla cream and 52 lidocaine injection. The procedure began five minutes after the injection of lidocaine and 10minutes after the Emla cream had been applied. Patients were asked to indicate on a visual analogue scale (VAS) the degree of perioperative pain, anxiety, sensation of choking, and discomfort on swallowing that they felt after the procedure. Patients treated with Emla had significantly lower VAS scores for discomfort on swallowing than those treated with lidocaine (p=0.001), but there were no other significant differences between the two groups. We conclude that Emla cream is an efficacious alternative to infiltration of lidocaine for radiofrequency reduction of the inferior turbinates. Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anaesthetic management of a child with "cor-triatriatum" and multiple ventricular septal defects - A rare congenital anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Sabade

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cor-triatriatum is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly. It accounts for 0.1% of congenital heart diseases. Its association with multiple ventricular septal defects (VSD is even rarer. A five-month-old baby was admitted with respiratory distress and failure to thrive. Clinical examination revealed diastolic murmur over mitral area. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly. Haematological and biochemical investigations were within normal limits. Electrocardiogram showed left atrial enlargement. 2D echo showed double-chambered left atrium (cor-triatriatum, atrial septal defect (ASD and muscular VSD with moderate pulmonary arterial hypertension. The child was treated with 100% oxygen, diuretics and digoxin and was stabilized medically. We used balanced anaesthetic technique using oxygen, air, isoflurane, fentanyl, midazolam and vecuronium. Patient was operated under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB with moderate hypothermia. Through right atriotomy abnormal membrane in the left atrium was excised to make one chamber. VSD were closed with Dacron patches and ASD was closed with autologous pericardial patch. Patient tolerated the whole procedure well and was ventilated electively for 12h in the intensive care unit. He was discharged on the 10 th postoperative day.

  6. L-β,β-Dimethylcysteine attenuates the haemodynamic responses elicited by systemic injections of peroxynitrite in anaesthetized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Jonathan E; Kooy, Neil W; Lewis, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    There is direct chemical evidence that L-β,β-dimethylcysteine (L-penicillamine (L-PEN)) is a scavenger of peroxynitrite. The aim of this study was to determine whether L-PEN attenuates the haemodynamic responses elicited by peroxynitrite in pentobarbital-anaesthetized rats. Peroxynitrite (1–20 μmol kg−1, i.v.) elicited dose-dependent reductions in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and mesenteric and hindquarter vascular resistances. L-PEN (2 mmol kg−1, i.v.) elicited relatively minor but significant increases in MAP and vascular resistances. The initial reductions in MAP and vascular resistances elicited by peroxynitrite were not diminished after administration of L-PEN whereas they were much shorter in duration. As such, the total reductions in MAP and vascular resistances were markedly reduced by L-PEN. The finding that L-PEN (2 mmol kg−1, i.v.) did not affect the hypotensive or vasodilator responses elicited of the ATP-dependent potassium-channel agonist, cromakalim (3–18 μg kg−1, i.v.), suggests that this dose of L-PEN is not a nonselective inhibitor of vasodilation. These findings suggest that L-PEN may effectively scavenge peroxynitrite in vivo and/or interfere with the mechanisms by which peroxynitrite elicits its vasodilator responses. PMID:16491097

  7. The lethality of tentacle-only extract from jellyfish Cyanea capillata is primarily attributed to cardiotoxicity in anaesthetized SD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Liu, Guan-sheng; Wang, Qian-qian; He, Qian; Liu, Si-hua; Li, Yue; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Li-ming

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that tentacle-only extract (TOE) has similar hypotensive effects with nematocyst venom from jellyfish Cyanea capillata, and the experimental studies on the in vivo cardiovascular effects of TOE were further performed to explore the leading cause of death and analyze the basic physiopathologic change in anaesthztized SD rats. Plots of TOE dose versus time to death showed dose-dependent curvilinear relationship. ECG changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Haemodynamic parameters, including the heart rate, mean femoral arterial pressure, left ventricular developed pressure and the first derivative of left ventricular pressures, decreased, but left ventricular end-diastolic pressure did not increase. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen saturation did not change. Lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase increased significantly. Histopathological examination showed congestion, haemorrhage, edema and denaturation in the heart; congestion, haemorrhage in the lung and acute congestion in the liver. Transmission electron microscopy examination found that parts of sarcomeric filaments disrupted, dissolved and disappeared, and parts of mitochondria swelled in cardiocytes. Laser scanning confocal microscope examination found that ventricular myocytes from adult rat were deformed and ultimately died within 30 min after TOE treatment. Our results reveal that cardiodepressive effect of C. capillata TOE is the leading cause of death and acute total heart failure is the basic physiopathologic change in anaesthetized SD rats. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of pre-emptive gabapentin on anaesthetic and analgesic requirements in patients undergoing rhinoplasty: A prospective randomised study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Ramadan Salama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Hypotensive anaesthesia is necessary in rhinoplasty for better visualisation of surgical field and reduction of surgery time. Gabapentin is a new generation anticonvulsant with anti-hyperalgesic and anti-nociceptive properties. We aimed to investigate the effect of pre-operative administration of oral gabapentin (1200 mg on anaesthetic requirements and post-operative analgesic consumption and its role in hypotensive anaesthesia for rhinoplasty. Methods: Seventy adult patients undergoing rhinoplasty, were randomly allocated to two groups. Group I (G I (n = 35 received gabapentin 1.2 g and Group II (G II (n = 35 received oral placebo capsules 2 h before surgery. General anaesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen-nitrous oxide to maintain bispectral index value between 40 and 60, and remifentanil infusion to keep mean arterial pressure (MAP at 55–60 mmHg. End-tidal sevoflurane concentration, intra-operative remifentanil consumption and time to intended MAP were recorded. Visual analogue scale (VAS scores, post-operative analgesic requirements and side effects for the first 24 h were recorded. Results: G I required significantly lower intra-operative remifentanil (G I = 0.8 ± 0.26 mg and G II = 1.7 ± 0.42 mg; P = 0.001 and end-tidal sevoflurane concentration, with reduced doses of post-operative tramadol and diclofenac sodium. Time to the intended MAP was significantly less in G I than G II (59.1 ± 12.3 vs. 73.6 ± 16.4, respectively, with P = 0.001. Conclusion: Pre-operative oral gabapentin significantly reduced intra-operative remifentanil and sevoflurane requirements during hypotensive anaesthesia along with decreased post-operative analgesic requirement.

  9. Comparison of an infrared anaesthetic agent analyser (Datex-Ohmeda) with refractometry for measurement of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolff, Andrea S; Moens, Yves P S; Driessen, Bernd; Ambrisko, Tamas D

    2014-07-01

    To assess agreement between infrared (IR) analysers and a refractometer for measurements of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane concentrations and to demonstrate the effect of customized calibration of IR analysers. In vitro experiment. Six IR anaesthetic monitors (Datex-Ohmeda) and a single portable refractometer (Riken). Both devices were calibrated following the manufacturer's recommendations. Gas samples were collected at common gas outlets of anaesthesia machines. A range of agent concentrations was produced by stepwise changes in dial settings: isoflurane (0-5% in 0.5% increments), sevoflurane (0-8% in 1% increments), or desflurane (0-18% in 2% increments). Oxygen flow was 2 L minute(-1) . The orders of testing IR analysers, agents and dial settings were randomized. Duplicate measurements were performed at each setting. The entire procedure was repeated 24 hours later. Bland-Altman analysis was performed. Measurements on day-1 were used to yield calibration equations (IR measurements as dependent and refractometry measurements as independent variables), which were used to modify the IR measurements on day-2. Bias ± limits of agreement for isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane were 0.2 ± 0.3, 0.1 ± 0.4 and 0.7 ± 0.9 volume%, respectively. There were significant linear relationships between differences and means for all agents. The IR analysers became less accurate at higher gas concentrations. After customized calibration, the bias became almost zero and the limits of agreement became narrower. If similar IR analysers are used in research studies, they need to be calibrated against a reference method using the agent in question at multiple calibration points overlapping the range of interest. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  10. Comparison between lignocaine hydrochloride and ropivacaine hydrochloride as lumbosacral epidural anaesthetic agents in goats undergoing laparoscopy assisted embryo transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Khajuria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Goats (n=12 undergoing laparoscopy assisted embryo transfer were randomly allotted to two groups (I and II and injected lignocaine hydrochloride (4mg/kg or ropivacaine hydrochloride (1mg/kg at the lumbosacral epidural space. The animals were held with raised hind quarters for first three minutes following injection. Immediately after induction of regional anaesthesia, they were restrained in dorsal recumbency in Trendelenburg position in a cradle. Laparoscopy was performed after creating pneumoperitoneum using filtered room air. The mean (± S.E induction time in animals of group I was significantly shorter (5.33 ± 0.61 min than those belonging to group II (12.66 ±1.99 min. Complete analgesia developed throughout the hind quarters and abdomen for 30 min and 60 min in group I and II animal’s respectively. Unlike animals of group I, group II goats continued to show moderate analgesia for 180 minutes. The motor activity returned after a lapse of 130.00 ± 12.64 min and 405.00 ± 46.31 min respectively. Occasional vocalization and struggling was noticed in two goats one from each group irrespective of the surgical manipulations during laparoscopy. The rectal temperature and respiration rates showed only non-significant increase, but the heart rate values were significantly higher (P < 0.5 up to 150 min in animals of both the groups when compared to their baseline values. From this study, it was concluded that both anaesthetic agents produced satisfactory regional anaesthesia in goats undergoing laparoscopy. However, considering the very long delay in regaining the hind limb motor activity, the use of ropivacaine may not be recommended for this purpose. Supplementation of sedative/tranquilizer with lumbosacral epidural anaesthesia needs evaluation.

  11. Comparison of anaesthetic and kinetic properties of thiobutabarbital, butabarbital and hexobarbital after intravenous threshold doses in the male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, T; Wahlström, G

    1989-03-01

    Due to the exceptionally long duration of action of thiobutbarbital the anaesthetic properties of this barbiturate was reinvestigated with an intravenous threshold technique using butabarbital and hexobarbital as references. Adult male rats were used. The criterion of anaesthesia was a burst suppression in the EEG of 1 sec. or more (the "silent second" = SS). The dose which induced the criterion was used as a threshold. The barbiturates were infused with different rates to obtain dose rate curves. After induction of the threshold criterion the animals were either killed and different tissue concentrations were analyzed with a HPLC method or allowed to survive and duration of SS and duration of loss of righting reflex were recorded. With hexobarbital, duration of SS and of loss of righting reflex increased significantly with increasing dose rate. With increasing rates of thiobutabarbital and butabarbital there was in both cases a stepwise increase in duration of SS. At sacrifice, after induction of SS with slow rates brain concentrations of both thiobutabarbital and butabarbital were lower than values recorded after higher rates. The change between the two concentrations was abrupt and occurred at a rate of 20 mg/kg/min. with thiobutabarbital and at the rate of 1.25 mg/kg/min. with butabarbital. This phenomenon was the reverse of acute tolerance which was recorded with hexobarbital and can thus be denoted acute supersensitivity. A kinetic analysis of serum, muscle and fat indicated considerable differences between the barbiturates. As indicated by mortality figures the induction of acute supersensitivity could be potentially dangerous.

  12. Methadone is a local anaesthetic-like inhibitor of neuronal Na+ channels and blocks excitability of mouse peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoetzer, C; Kistner, K; Stüber, T; Wirths, M; Schulze, V; Doll, T; Foadi, N; Wegner, F; Ahrens, J; Leffler, A

    2015-01-01

    Opioids enhance and prolong analgesia when applied as adjuvants to local anaesthetics (LAs). A possible molecular mechanism for this property is a direct inhibition of voltage-gated Na(+) channels which was reported for some opioids. Methadone is an effective adjuvant to LA and was recently reported to inhibit cardiac Na(+) channels. Here, we explore and compare LA properties of methadone and bupivacaine on neuronal Na(+) channels, excitability of peripheral nerves, and cell viability. Effects of methadone were explored on compound action potentials (CAP) of isolated mouse saphenous nerves. Patch clamp recordings were performed on Na(+) channels in ND7/23 cells, the α-subunits Nav1.2, Nav1.3, Nav1.7, and Nav1.8, and the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 (HCN2). Cytotoxicity was determined using flow cytometry. Methadone (IC50 86-119 µM) is a state-dependent and unselective blocker on Nav1.2, Nav1.3, Nav1.7, and Nav1.8 with a potency comparable with that of bupivacaine (IC50 177 µM). Both bupivacaine and methadone also inhibit C- and A-fibre CAPs in saphenous nerves in a concentration-dependent manner. Tonic block of Nav1.7 revealed a discrete stereo-selectivity with a higher potency for levomethadone than for dextromethadone. Methadone is also a weak blocker of HCN2 channels. Both methadone and bupivacaine induce a pronounced cytotoxicity at concentrations required for LA effects. Methadone induces typical LA effects by inhibiting Na(+) channels with a potency similar to that of bupivacaine. This hitherto unknown property of methadone might contribute to its high efficacy when applied as an adjuvant to LA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Anaesthetic management of a 10-month-old white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum calf for emergency exploratory celiotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth E. Zeiler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A 10-month-old, 580 kg, hand-reared white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum calf was presented for emergency exploratory celiotomy. Anaesthesia was safely induced with three successive intravenous (IV boluses of diazepam (10 mg and ketamine (100 mg until the trachea could be intubated. Anaesthesia was adequately maintained with isoflurane-inoxygen (mean end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.1% ± 0.2% on a circle anaesthetic machine with carbon dioxide absorption and an intravenous infusion of ketamine and medetomidine at a mean rate of 0.02 mg/kg/min and 0.02 µg/kg/min, respectively. Mean values recorded during anaesthesia and surgery were heart rate (56.9 ± 11 beats/min, mean arterial blood pressure (6.16 kPa ± 1.75 kPa, end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (6.23 kPa ± 0.30 kPa. Abdominal gas distension contributed to hypoventilation that resulted in hypercapnoea, confirmed by arterial blood gas analysis (PaCO2 14.69 kPa, which required controlled ventilation for correction. Blood volume was maintained with the intravenous infusion of a balanced electrolyte solution at 10 mL/kg/h and blood pressure supported with a continuous infusion of dobutamine and phenylephrine. Duration of anaesthesia was 3.5 h. It was concluded that anaesthesia was safely induced in a compromised white rhinoceros calf with a combination of diazepam and ketamine. A constant-rate infusion of medetomidine and ketamine allowed for a reduction in the dose of isoflurane required during maintenance of anaesthesia and improved intra-operative blood pressure management.

  14. Anaesthetic management of a 10-month-old white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum calf for emergency exploratory celiotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth E. Zeiler

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 10-month-old, 580 kg, hand-reared white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum calf was presented for emergency exploratory celiotomy. Anaesthesia was safely induced with three successive intravenous (IV boluses of diazepam (10 mg and ketamine (100 mg until the trachea could be intubated. Anaesthesia was adequately maintained with isoflurane-inoxygen (mean end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.1% ± 0.2% on a circle anaesthetic machine with carbon dioxide absorption and an intravenous infusion of ketamine and medetomidine at a mean rate of 0.02 mg/kg/min and 0.02 µg/kg/min, respectively. Mean values recorded during anaesthesia and surgery were heart rate (56.9 ± 11 beats/min, mean arterial blood pressure (6.16 kPa ± 1.75 kPa, end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (6.23 kPa ± 0.30 kPa. Abdominal gas distension contributed to hypoventilation that resulted in hypercapnoea, confirmed by arterial blood gas analysis (PaCO2 14.69 kPa, which required controlled ventilation for correction. Blood volume was maintained with the intravenous infusion of a balanced electrolyte solution at 10 mL/kg/h and blood pressure supported with a continuous infusion of dobutamine and phenylephrine. Duration of anaesthesia was 3.5 h. It was concluded that anaesthesia was safely induced in a compromised white rhinoceros calf with a combination of diazepam and ketamine. A constant-rate infusion of medetomidine and ketamine allowed for a reduction in the dose of isoflurane required during maintenance of anaesthesia and improved intra-operative blood pressure management.

  15. Anaesthetic management of a 10-month-old white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) calf for emergency exploratory celiotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Gareth E; Stegmann, George F

    2012-11-29

    A 10-month-old, 580 kg, hand-reared white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) calf was presented for emergency exploratory celiotomy. Anaesthesia was safely induced with three successive intravenous (IV) boluses of diazepam (10 mg) and ketamine (100 mg) until the trachea could be intubated. Anaesthesia was adequately maintained with isoflurane-inoxygen (mean end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.1% ± 0.2%) on a circle anaesthetic machine with carbon dioxide absorption and an intravenous infusion of ketamine and medetomidine at a mean rate of 0.02 mg/kg/min and 0.02 µg/kg/min, respectively. Mean values recorded during anaesthesia and surgery were heart rate (56.9 ± 11 beats/min), mean arterial blood pressure (6.16 kPa ± 1.75 kPa), end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (6.23 kPa ± 0.30 kPa). Abdominal gas distension contributed to hypoventilation that resulted in hypercapnoea, confirmed by arterial blood gas analysis (PaCO2 14.69 kPa), which required controlled ventilation for correction. Blood volume was maintained with the intravenous infusion of a balanced electrolyte solution at 10 mL/kg/h and blood pressure supported with a continuous infusion of dobutamine and phenylephrine. Duration of anaesthesia was 3.5 h. It was concluded that anaesthesia was safely induced in a compromised white rhinoceros calf with a combination of diazepam and ketamine. A constant-rate infusion of medetomidine and ketamine allowed for a reduction in the dose of isoflurane required during maintenance of anaesthesia and improved intra-operative blood pressure management.

  16. β2-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol reduces infarct size and myocardial apoptosis after myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion in anaesthetized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiufang; Xiang, Jizhou; Wang, Xuanbin; Liu, Hui; Hu, Benrong; Feng, Mei; Fu, Qin

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Considerable evidence indicates that the β2-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol decreases apoptosis in a rodent model of ischaemic cardiomyopathy. In this study, we investigated the effects of clenbuterol on infarct size caused by myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) in anaesthetized rats. Experimental approach: Rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: (i) sham (ii) I/R (iii) clenbuterol + I/R (iv) ICI 118551 + clenbuterol + I/R (v) metoprolol + clenbuterol + I/R (vi) metoprolol + I/R (vii) pertussis toxin + clenbuterol + I/R. Under anaesthesia, left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 2 h. Key results: Compared with the control I/R group,the clenbuterol (0.5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) group had reduced infarct size, improved diastolic function and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) activity, increased superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level and LDH, CK release. Clenbuterol increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which resulted in inhibition of myocardial apoptosis as indicated by the reduction of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase end labelling-positive staining, Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA and caspase-3 protein expression. The Gi-protein inhibitor pertussis toxin blocked the clenbuterol-induced improvement in cardiac function and infarct size. Pretreatment with ICI 118551(a selective β2-adrenoceptor antagonist) inhibited the effects of clenbuterol mentioned above. The β1-adrenoceptor agonist metoprolol had similar effects to clenbuterol but failed to reduce MDA and improve SERCA activity. When administered together, metoprolol and clenbuterol did not induce synergistic effects. Conclusions and implications: Clenbuterol pretreatment provides significant cardioprotection against ischaemia/reperfusion injury and this is mediated by the β2-adrenoceptor–Gi-protein signalling. A combination of the β2-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol and the

  17. The effect of pre-anaesthetic fasting time and type of food on gastric content volume and acidity in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvas, Ioannis; Rallis, Timoleon; Raptopoulos, Dimitris

    2009-11-01

    To investigate the effect of pre-anaesthetic fasting time and variety of food on gastric content (GC) volume and pH in dogs. Randomized, cross-over, prospective experimental study. Fifteen mongrel dogs (nine females and six males 1-4 years old, weighing 10-24.5 kg). Each dog received the same seven treatments in random order: dry food 3 hours before anaesthesia (BA) (treatment 3D), canned food (half daily rate) 3 hours BA (treatment 3C), 0% fat cow milk 3 hours BA (treatment 3M), dry food 10 hours BA (treatment 10D), canned food 10 hours BA (treatment 10C), low fat canned food 10 hours BA (treatment 10F) and low protein canned food 10 hours BA (treatment 10P). All animals were pre-medicated with propionyl promazine and anaesthesia was induced with thiopental sodium and maintained with halothane. GC was aspirated using an orogastric catheter and its volume and pH were measured. Treatment 10F had significantly lower GC pH than all the 3-hour treatments. Treatments 10D and 10P had significantly lower pH than treatments 3D and 3C. Treatment 3M had significantly lower pH than the other 3-hour treatments. Treatment 3D had significantly greater gastric volume than treatments 3M, 10C, 10F and 10P. Canned food at half the daily rate administered 3 hours before anaesthesia did not increase significantly the GC volume compared to the other types of food used. The GC pH was also high. This type of food fed 3 hours before induction of anaesthesia may be of benefit in reduction of the incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux during anaesthesia in dogs.

  18. Acute effects of a sarin-like organophosphorus agent, bis(isopropyl methyl)phosphonate, on cardiovascular parameters in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Itoh, Takeo; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Arima, Yosuke; Torikoshi, Aiko; Namera, Akira; Makita, Ryosuke; Yoshizumi, Masao; Nagao, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    The organophosphorus compound sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholinesterase. We examined the acute cardiovascular effects of a sarin-like organophosphorus agent, bis(isopropyl methyl)phosphonate (BIMP), in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated rats. Intravenous administration of BIMP (0.8 mg/kg; the LD50 value) induced a long-lasting increase in blood pressure and tended to increase heart rate. In rats pretreated with the non-selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist atropine, BIMP significantly increased both heart rate and blood pressure. In atropine-treated rats, hexamethonium (antagonist of ganglionic nicotinic receptors) greatly attenuated the BIMP-induced increase in blood pressure without changing the BIMP-induced increase in heart rate. In rats treated with atropine plus hexamethonium, intravenous phentolamine (non-selective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist) plus propranolol (non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) completely blocked the BIMP-induced increases in blood pressure and heart rate. In atropine-treated rats, the reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine (1 mg/kg) induced a transient increase in blood pressure, but had no effect on heart rate. These results suggest that in anaesthetized rats, BIMP induces powerful stimulation of sympathetic as well as parasympathetic nerves and thereby modulates heart rate and blood pressure. They may also indicate that an action independent of acetylcholinesterase inhibition contributes to the acute cardiovascular responses induced by BIMP. - Highlights: • A sarin-like agent BIMP markedly increased blood pressure in anaesthetized rats. • Muscarinic receptor blockade enhanced the BIMP-induced increase in blood pressure. • Ganglionic nicotinic receptor blockade attenuated the BIMP-induced response. • Blockade of α- as well as β-receptors attenuated the BIMP-induced response

  19. Size-relative Effectiveness of Clove Oil as an Anaesthetic for Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum, 1792 and Goldfish (Carassius auratus Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Perdikaris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to investigate the size-relative effectiveness of clove oil as an anaesthetic for rainbow trout and goldfish. In total, 128 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss (two groups of 20-23 and 30-33 cm mean fork length and 160 goldfish (Carassius auratus (four size groups of 1.5-2.5, 5-7, 11-15 and 20-25 cm were anaesthetized at different clove oil concentrations of 50, 100, 150 mg·l-1 for trouts and 75, 100, 150 mg·l-1 for goldfish. Rainbow trout exhibited total loss of balance and no response to external stimuli with shorter induction time as dosage increased (120.5 s, 64.4 s and 44.3 s, respectively. Goldfish exhibited total loss of balance and no response to external stimuli after induction time that varied with dosage used and body size of fish. The small fish (1.5-7 cm exhibited shorter induction time which ranged from 84.28 s at 75 mg·l-1 clove oil to 41.14 s at 150 mg·l-1 clove oil. The larger fish had a longer induction time inversely related to the dosage. Recovery time was longer than induction time in both species. Both species recovered within 6 min after anaesthesia at 150 mg·l-1 clove oil. Clove oil did not produce marked changes (P compared to the control. However, marked changes (P P > 0.05. For both fish species, clove oil was effective, producing minimum stress and zero mortalities, and can be recommended as an effective anaesthetic.

  20. Study protocol for a double blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial of continuous subpectoral local anaesthetic infusion for pain and shoulder function following mastectomy: SUB-pectoral Local anaesthetic Infusion following MastEctomy (SUBLIME) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, R; Brown, I; Vickery, J; Mitchell, K; Pritchard, C; Creanor, S

    2014-09-30

    Over 16 000 mastectomies are performed in England and Wales annually. Acute postoperative pain and nausea are common. The most frequently occurring long-term complications are chronic pain (up to 50%) and reduced shoulder function (reported at 35%). Regional techniques that improve acute postoperative pain relief may reduce the incidence of these complications. This study assesses the effectiveness of a 24-hour continuous local anaesthetic in the subpectoral plane in improving postoperative pain and quality of life in patients undergoing mastectomy. This is a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled, two-centre, parallel group trial in women undergoing mastectomy with or without axillary involvement. One hundred and sixty participants will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either 0.25% levobupivacaine or 0.9% saline by subpectoral infusion postoperatively for 24 h. All participants will be provided with an intravenous morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system. Participants will be followed-up for 24 h in hospital and at approximately 14 days and 6 months postoperatively. Joint primary outcome measures are total morphine consumption and total pain score (captured via patient-recorded visual analogue scale (VAS) 4 hourly) during the first 24 h postoperatively. Primary statistical analysis of total pain is based on the area under the curve of pain versus time graph. Secondary outcomes include PCA attempts in first 24 h; VAS pain scores and shoulder function by goniometry at 24 h, 14 days (approximately) and 6 months; Verbal Rating Scale pain scores in first 24 h; Brief Pain Inventory and Oxford Shoulder Score at 6 months; duration of hospital stay; incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting; cost-effectiveness. The study is approved by the South West England Research Ethics Committee (12/SW/0149). will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at local, national and international scientific meetings. ISRCTN

  1. Differences between state entropy and bispectral index during analysis of identical electroencephalogram signals: a comparison with two randomised anaesthetic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilge, Stefanie; Kreuzer, Matthias; Karatchiviev, Veliko; Kochs, Eberhard F; Malcharek, Michael; Schneider, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    It is claimed that bispectral index (BIS) and state entropy reflect an identical clinical spectrum, the hypnotic component of anaesthesia. So far, it is not known to what extent different devices display similar index values while processing identical electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. To compare BIS and state entropy during analysis of identical EEG data. Inspection of raw EEG input to detect potential causes of erroneous index calculation. Offline re-analysis of EEG data from a randomised, single-centre controlled trial using the Entropy Module and an Aspect A-2000 monitor. Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich. Forty adult patients undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia. Blocked randomisation of 20 patients per anaesthetic group (sevoflurane/remifentanil or propofol/remifentanil). Isolated forearm technique for differentiation between consciousness and unconsciousness. Prediction probability (PK) of state entropy to discriminate consciousness from unconsciousness. Correlation and agreement between state entropy and BIS from deep to light hypnosis. Analysis of raw EEG compared with index values that are in conflict with clinical examination, with frequency measures (frequency bands/Spectral Edge Frequency 95) and visual inspection for physiological EEG patterns (e.g. beta or delta arousal), pathophysiological features such as high-frequency signals (electromyogram/high-frequency EEG or eye fluttering/saccades), different types of electro-oculogram or epileptiform EEG and technical artefacts. PK of state entropy was 0.80 and of BIS 0.84; correlation coefficient of state entropy with BIS 0.78. Nine percent BIS and 14% state entropy values disagreed with clinical examination. Highest incidence of disagreement occurred after state transitions, in particular for state entropy after loss of consciousness during sevoflurane anaesthesia. EEG sequences which led to false 'conscious' index values often showed high

  2. Assessment of Common Anaesthetic and Clinical Indices of Multimodal Therapy of Propofol, Xylazine, and Ketamine in Total Intravenous Anaesthesia in West African Dwarf Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukwueze Celestine Okwudili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of anaesthetic and clinical indices of multimodal therapy of propofol, xylazine, and ketamine was done in West African Dwarf (WAD goat. Sixteen healthy male WAD goats were assigned into four treatment groups, namely, control (group A (ketamine 5 mg/kg + xylazine 0.05 mg/kg, group B (propofol 5 mg/kg + xylazine 0.05 mg/kg, group C (propofol 5 mg/kg + ketamine 5 mg/kg, and group D (propofol 2.5 mg/kg + ketamine 2.5 mg/kg + xylazine 0.05 mg/kg. All drugs were administered intravenously. The multimodal therapy decreased significantly (P<0.05 the heart rate in groups A, B, and D. Also respiratory rate significantly (P<0.05 decreased in groups A, B, and D but significantly (P<0.05 increased at 20 min after induction in group C. However, temperature significantly (P<0.05 decreased in groups A, B, and C. The induction was good and smooth in groups B and D. Surgical anaesthetic time was longer in groups B and D and shorter in group C. The quality of recovery was good in groups B and D. Side effects such as salivation and apnoea were observed in all groups. In conclusion, the multimodal therapy could be used successfully. However, group D could be the best combination considering the parameters measured.

  3. General anaesthetics do not impair developmental expression of the KCC2 potassium-chloride cotransporter in neonatal rats during the brain growth spurt

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoh, Claudia Marvine

    2013-03-26

    BackgroundThe developmental transition from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated neurotransmission is primarily mediated by an increase in the amount of the potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 during early postnatal life. However, it is not known whether early neuronal activity plays a modulatory role in the expression of total KCC2 mRNA and protein in the immature brain. As general anaesthetics are powerful modulators of neuronal activity, the purpose of this study was to explore how these drugs affect KCC2 expression during the brain growth spurt.MethodsWistar rat pups were exposed to either a single dose or 6 h of midazolam, propofol, or ketamine anaesthesia at postnatal days 0, 5, 10, or 15. KCC2 expression was assessed using immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, or quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis up to 3 days post-exposure in the medial prefrontal cortex.ResultsThere was a progressive and steep increase in the expression of KCC2 between birth and 2 weeks of age. Exposure to midazolam, propofol, or ketamine up to 6 h at any investigated stages of the brain growth spurt did not influence the expression of this cotransporter protein.ConclusionI.V. general anaesthetics do not seem to influence developmental expression of KCC2 during the brain growth spurt. © 2013 © The Author [2013].

  4. Data fabrication and other reasons for non-random sampling in 5087 randomised, controlled trials in anaesthetic and general medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, J B

    2017-08-01

    Randomised, controlled trials have been retracted after publication because of data fabrication and inadequate ethical approval. Fabricated data have included baseline variables, for instance, age, height or weight. Statistical tests can determine the probability of the distribution of means, given their standard deviation and the number of participants in each group. Randomised, controlled trials have been retracted after the data distributions have been calculated as improbable. Most retracted trials have been written by anaesthetists and published by specialist anaesthetic journals. I wanted to explore whether the distribution of baseline data in trials was consistent with the expected distribution. I wanted to determine whether trials retracted after publication had distributions different to trials that have not been retracted. I wanted to determine whether data distributions in trials published in specialist anaesthetic journals have been different to distributions in non-specialist medical journals. I analysed the distribution of 72,261 means of 29,789 variables in 5087 randomised, controlled trials published in eight journals between January 2000 and December 2015: Anaesthesia (399); Anesthesia and Analgesia (1288); Anesthesiology (541); British Journal of Anaesthesia (618); Canadian Journal of Anesthesia (384); European Journal of Anaesthesiology (404); Journal of the American Medical Association (518) and New England Journal of Medicine (935). I chose these journals as I had electronic access to the full text. Trial p values were distorted by an excess of baseline means that were similar and an excess that were dissimilar: 763/5015 (15.2%) trials that had not been retracted from publication had p values that were within 0.05 of 0 or 1 (expected 10%), that is, a 5.2% excess, p = 1.2 × 10 -7 . The p values of 31/72 (43%) trials that had been retracted after publication were within 0.05 of 0 or 1, a rate different to that for unretracted trials, p = 1.03

  5. Anaesthetic-Associated Mortality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Whatever advances are .... 100 = 2,3% (2,8%). Looked at against the background of the total care of the surgical patient, anaesthesia and .... relapsed into unconsciousness and apnoea while in the care of a nurse in a busy theatre corridor.

  6. Developmental paediatric anaesthetic pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing

    2015-01-01

    Safe and effective drug therapy in neonates, infants and children require detailed knowledge about the ontogeny of drug disposition and action as well how these interact with genetics and co-morbidity of children. Recent advances in developmental pharmacology in children follow the increased...

  7. Local anaesthetic toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    specific back pain. The definition now states that buttock/ leg pain is to be viewed as part of the syndrome. ..... Hypertension. Tinnitus. Tachycardia during CNS excitatory phase. Confusion. Excitatory phase. Intermediary phase. Convulsions. Myocardial depression. Decreased cardiac output. Hypotension. Depressive phase.

  8. More about … Anaesthetics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early symptoms of neurological toxicity include tinnitus, blurred vision, circumoral numbness, metalic taste, tongue paraesthesia and dizziness. Agitation, restlessness, nervousness or seizures (excitatory signs) may precede drowsiness, slurred speech and loss of consciousness (from central nervous system depression).

  9. Anaesthetic genetics and genomics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chlorinated agents (halothane, enflurane and isoflurane) have a faster onset and higher incidence of MH than the unchlorinated agents (desflurane and sevoflurane). Data from the North. American MH registry show .... a: The atypical or dibucaine-resistant variant. • k: The Kalow variant has two thirds of the activity of the.

  10. Diabetic parturient - Anaesthetic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Nibedita Pani; Shakti Bedanta Mishra; Shovan Kumar Rath

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy induces progressive changes in maternal carbohydrate metabolism. As pregnancy advances insulin resistance and diabetogenic stress due to placental hormones necessitate compensatory increase in insulin secretion. When this compensation is inadequate gestational diabetes develops. ?Gestational diabetes mellitus? (GDM) is defined as carbohydrate intolerance with onset or recognition during pregnancy. Women diagnosed to have GDM are at increased risk of future diabetes predominantly typ...

  11. The safe spinal anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anticoagulation. Refusal. Severe hypovolaemia or shock. Localised sepsis .... Side-effects and complications of spinal anaesthesia. Side-effect/complication. Mechanism. Treatment. Hypotension. Sympathetic block causes vasodilatation.

  12. Diabetic parturient - Anaesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Pani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy induces progressive changes in maternal carbohydrate metabolism. As pregnancy advances insulin resistance and diabetogenic stress due to placental hormones necessitate compensatory increase in insulin secretion. When this compensation is inadequate gestational diabetes develops. ′Gestational diabetes mellitus′ (GDM is defined as carbohydrate intolerance with onset or recognition during pregnancy. Women diagnosed to have GDM are at increased risk of future diabetes predominantly type 2 DM as are their children. Thus GDM offers an important opportunity for the development, testing and implementation of clinical strategies for diabetes prevention. Timely action taken now in screening all pregnant women for glucose intolerance, achieving euglycaemia in them and ensuring adequate nutrition may prevent in all probability, the vicious cycle of transmitting glucose intolerance from one generation to another. Given that diabetic mothers have proportionately larger babies it is likely that vaginal delivery will be more difficult than in the normal population, with a higher rate of instrumentally assisted delivery, episiotomy and conversion to urgent caesarean section. So an indwelling epidural catheter is a better choice for labour analgesia as well to use, should a caesarean delivery become necessary. Diabetes in pregnancy has potential serious adverse effects for both the mother and the neonate. Standardized multidisciplinary care including anaesthetists should be carried out obsessively throughout pregnancy. Diabetes is the most common endocrine disorder of pregnancy. In pregnancy, it has considerable cost and care demands and is associated with increased risks to the health of the mother and the outcome of the pregnancy. However, with careful and appropriate screening, multidisciplinary management and a motivated patient these risks can be minimized.

  13. Evaluation of the anaesthetic properties and tolerance of 1:100,000 articaine versus 1:100,000 lidocaine. A comparative study in surgery of the lower third molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, N; Barona-Dorado, C; Martín-Arés, M; Cortés-Bretón-Brinkman, J; Martínez-González, J-M

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the anaesthetic properties and tolerance of articaine versus lidocaine at equal vasoconstrictor concentration. A total of 96 male and female patients who underwent surgical treatment of the lower third molar participated. Patients were randomly assigned to articaine hydrochloride with epinephrine 1:100,000 and lidocaine hydrochloride with epinephrine 1:100,000. The variables analysed were latency period, duration of anaesthetic effect, tolerance and adverse reactions. Both the latency period and the duration of anaesthetic effect were greater for articaine, although the differences were not statistically significant. Latency: mean difference of 2.70 ± 2.12 minutes (95%CI of -1.51 minutes - 6.92 minutes). mean difference of -33 minutes 5 seconds ± 31 minutes (95% CI -1 hour 35 minutes - 29 minutes). There were 4 adverse events that did not require the patients to be withdrawn from the study. The anaesthetics in this study have very similar properties for use in surgery and have demonstrated a good safety and tolerability profile.

  14. Gastric mucosal electrical potential difference, pH, blood flow, and morphology during hypoxia and selective gastric ischaemia with and without allopurinol pretreatment in anaesthetized dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bülow, J B; Madsen, J

    1990-01-01

    Ischaemia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal disorders. The aim of this investigation was to study the gastric mucosal electrical potential difference (PD), pH, blood flow and morphology during hypoxia, gastric ischaemia, and gastric ischaemia following inhibition of free...... radical formation with allopurinol. PD and pH were measured simultaneously with an intragastric microelectrode, and the PD values were corrected for the liquid junction potentials created by the intragastric pH variation. Blood flow was measured by the radiolabelled microsphere technique in 18...... anaesthetized dogs. Short general hypoxia and short ischaemia caused reversible declines in PD, increases in pH, and no morphological damage. Ischaemia for 1 h caused a significant decline in PD persistent after reperfusion, an increase in pH, and morphological PD, but after reperfusion PD was normalized. Gross...

  15. Ensuring availability of in date and fit for purpose emergency guidelines in all anaesthetic areas throughout the South East Scotland deanery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to institute a system whereby emergency anaesthetic guidelines are available in >90% of appropriate clinical areas throughout each of the acute hospital sites in three health board administrative regions, and whereby >90% of available guidelines are deemed to be in date and fit for purpose. Our objective was to achieve these targets within 6 months. Using quality improvement methodology, we inventoried available emergency anaesthetic guidelines in 132 locations throughout seven acute care hospitals. Five guidelines were then randomly selected per site per month and assessed for three process markers: was the guideline available in all appropriate areas, was it in-date (i.e. within date of review as specified on guideline or on consultation with author) and was it fit for purpose. Fitness for purpose was assessed by asking a junior colleague to simulate the emergency in a table top exercise using the guideline to aid management. This project was also used as a surveillance system to highlight outdated, unfit or missing guidance. Interventions included iterative revision of the master guideline lists, removal of outdated or unfit guidelines and creation or updating of guideline folders. 30 guidelines were assessed pre-intervention and 203 post-intervention. 52% of guidelines were available in appropriate areas pre-intervention rising to 76% post intervention, 67% of guidelines were in date pre-intervention rising to 82% post-intervention and 87% of guidelines were deemed fit for purpose pre-intervention rising to 92% post-intervention. We have demonstrated that regular review of emergency guidelines to maintain their currency is achievable and also demonstrated the feasibility of recruiting over 20 trainees across a training deanery to complete a QI project. We believe that organisations should maximise the resource of highly motivated trainees to achieve their QI goals.

  16. Anaesthetic efficacy of supplemental lingual infiltration of mandibular molars after inferior alveolar nerve block plus buccal infiltration in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, L; Luo, J; Yang, D

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effect of supplemental lingual infiltration (LI) of mandibular molars following an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) plus buccal infiltration (BI) in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Eighty adult patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis participated in this prospective study. All patients received standard IANB via injection of 4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. Ten minutes after the IANB, patients with numbness of the lower lip were randomly divided into two groups. In the BI group, 40 patients received supplemental BI of 0.9 mL of 4% articaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. In the buccal plus lingual infiltration (BLI) group, 40 patients received supplemental BI of 0.9 mL of 4% articaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine and, subsequently, LIs with the same anaesthetic solution and dose. Endodontic access cavity preparation began 15 min after the IANB. Pain during treatment was recorded using a Heft-Parker visual analogue scale. Success was defined when pain was 'none' or 'mild' on endodontic access and initial instrumentation. The pain was estimated and statistically analysed by the chi-squared test (α = 0.05). The success rates for the BI and BLI groups were 70% and 62.5%, respectively. No statistical difference was found between the two groups (P = 0.478). Supplemental LIs are not recommended for administration in mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis, because they do not improve the anaesthetic success after IANB plus BI. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Behavioural Effects of the Commonly Used Fish Anaesthetic Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS-222) on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Its Relevance for the Acetic Acid Pain Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgreen, Janicke; Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Janczak, Andrew M.; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2014-01-01

    The pros and cons of using anaesthesia when handling fish in connection with experiments are debated. A widely adopted practice is to wait thirty minutes after anaesthesia before behavioural observations are initiated, but information about immediate effects of a treatment is then lost. This is pertinent for responses to acute stressors, such as acid injection in the acetic acid pain test. However, omission of anaesthetics in order to obtain data on immediate responses will compromise the welfare of fish and contribute to experimental noise due to stress. We therefore tested the effect of tricaine methanesulfonate on the behaviour of zebrafish. We predicted that tricaine (MS 222) would decrease swimming velocity and that the control fish would show an increased level of anxiety- and stress-related behaviours compared to the tricaine group. Following acclimatization to the test tank, baseline behaviour was recorded before immersion in either tricaine (168 mg l−1, treatment group, N = 8) or tank water (control group, N = 7). Latencies to lose equilibrium and to lose response to touch were registered. The fish was then returned to the test tank, and the latency to regain equilibrium was registered in anaesthetized fish. When equilibrium was regained, and at five, thirty and sixty minutes after the fish had been returned to the test tank, behaviour was recorded. The tricaine fish showed the following responses (mean ± sd): latency to lose equilibrium 22.6 s±3.9; latency to lose response to touch 101.9 s±26.8; latency to regain equilibrium 92.0 s±54.4. Contrary to our predictions, neither treatment caused a change in any of the behaviours registered. This indicates that tricaine has no effect on several commonly used behavioural parameters, and that it may be unnecessary to postpone behavioural observations to 30 min after anaesthesia. PMID:24658262

  18. Técnicas anestésicas injetáveis em capivaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, Linné Anaesthetic techniques in capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, Linné

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariângela Lozano Cruz

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Neste experimento objetivou-se avaliar diferentes técnicas anestésicas em capivaras. Foram utilizadas 50 capivaras, sendo 23 machos e 27 fêmeas, adultas, de peso médio estimado em 36 ± 7kg. Foram realizados 3 grupos experimentais: G1(n=20 - xilazina (1mg/kg e quetamina (15mg/kg; G 2 (n=15 - midazolam (0.5mg/kg e quetamina (15mg/kg e G 3 (n=15 - romifidina (0,1mg/kg e quetamina (15mg/kg. Todas as drogas acima citadas foram associadas na mesma seringa e administradas pela via intramuscular com a utilização de dardos e zarabatana confeccionados artesanalmente. A freqüência cardíaca e respiratória e a temperatura retal foram avaliadas a cada 15 minutos, por até 60 minutos após a administração dos anestésicos. Também foi observado o período de latência, de analgesia e de recuperação. Cinco animais do grupo tratado com xilazina e quetamina apresentaram óbito, provavelmente relacionado com a alta temperatura ambiente. Os animais deste grupo apresentaram maiores períodos de analgesia e recuperação e o grupo de animais tratados com midazolam e quetamina, os menores períodos. Houve uma redução gradativa da freqüência cardíaca nos grupos l e 3 e de temperatura em todos os grupos. A freqüência respiratória manteve-se estável em todos os grupos. Com os três protocolos foi possível tatuar e colocar brincos nos animais, bem como realizar punção venosa, porém cuidados devem ser tomados quando do uso de xilazina em casos de temperatura ambiente elevada, bem como há necessidade de novos estudos para se melhor adequar a dose do midazolam em capivaras.The aim of this study was to investigate three anaesthetic techniques in capybaras. Twenty three male and 27 female adult capybaras weighing 36 ± 7 kg were divided in three groups: G 1(n =20 - xylazine (1mg/kg and ketamine (20mg/kg, G2 (n=l5 - midazolam (0,5mg/kg and ketamine (20mg/kg and G3 (n=15 - romifidine (0,1 mg/kg and ketamine (20mg/kg. All drugs were given

  19. Effect of fentanyl target-controlled infusions on isoflurane minimum anaesthetic concentration and cardiovascular function in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavez, Juan C; Hawkins, Michelle G; Pascoe, Peter J; Knych, Heather K DiMaio; Kass, Philip H

    2011-07-01

    To determine the impact of three different target plasma concentrations of fentanyl on the minimum anaesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane in the red-tailed hawk and the effects on the haemodynamic profile. Experimental study. Six healthy adult red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) of unknown sex with body weights (mean ± SD) of 1.21 ± 0.15 kg. This study was undertaken in two phases. In the first phase anaesthesia was induced with isoflurane in oxygen via facemask and maintained with isoflurane delivered in oxygen via a Bain circuit. Following instrumentation baseline determination of the MAC for isoflurane was made for each animal using the bracketing method and a supramaximal electrical stimulus. End-tidal isoflurane concentration (E'Iso) was then set at 0.75 × MAC and after an appropriate equilibration period a bolus of fentanyl (20 μg kg(-1)) was administered intravenously (IV) in order to determine the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl in the isoflurane-anaesthetized red-tailed hawk. During the second phase anaesthesia was induced in a similar manner and E'Iso was set at 0.75 × MAC for each individual. Fentanyl was infused IV to achieve target plasma concentrations between 8 and 32 ng mL(-1). At each fentanyl plasma concentration, the MAC for isoflurane and cardiovascular variables were determined. Data were analyzed by use of repeated-measures anova. Mean ± SD fentanyl plasma concentrations and isoflurane MACs were 0 ± 0, 8.51 ± 4, 14.85 ± 4.82 and 29.25 ± 11.52 ng mL(-1), and 2.05 ± 0.45%, 1.42 ± 0.53%, 1.14 ± 0.31% and 0.93 ± 0.32% for the target concentrations of 0, 8, 16 and 32 ng mL(-1), respectively. At these concentrations fentanyl significantly (p = 0.0016) decreased isoflurane MAC by 31%, 44% and 55%, respectively. Dose had no significant effect on heart rate, systolic, diastolic or mean arterial blood pressure. Fentanyl produced a dose-related decrease of isoflurane MAC with minimal effects on measured cardiovascular parameters in

  20. The Direct Actions of GABA, 2'-Methoxy-6-Methylflavone and General Anaesthetics at β3γ2L GABAA Receptors: Evidence for Receptors with Different Subunit Stoichiometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Han Chow; Absalom, Nathan L; Hanrahan, Jane R; Viswas, Raja; Chebib, Mary

    2015-01-01

    2'-Methoxy-6-methylflavone (2'MeO6MF) is an anxiolytic flavonoid which has been shown to display GABAA receptor (GABAAR) β2/3-subunit selectivity, a pharmacological profile similar to that of the general anaesthetic etomidate. Electrophysiological studies suggest that the full agonist action of 2'MeO6MF at α2β3γ2L GABAARs may mediate the flavonoid's in vivo effects. However, we found variations in the relative efficacy of 2'MeO6MF (2'MeO6MF-elicited current responses normalised to the maximal GABA response) at α2β3γ2L GABAARs due to the presence of mixed receptor populations. To understand which receptor subpopulation(s) underlie the variations observed, we conducted a systematic investigation of 2'MeO6MF activity at all receptor combinations that could theoretically form (α2, β3, γ2L, α2β3, α2γ2L, β3γ2L and α2β3γ2L) in Xenopus oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. We found that 2'MeO6MF activated non-α-containing β3γ2L receptors. In an attempt to establish the optimal conditions to express a uniform population of these receptors, we found that varying the relative amounts of β3:γ2L subunit mRNAs resulted in differences in the level of constitutive activity, the GABA concentration-response relationships, and the relative efficacy of 2'MeO6MF activation. Like 2'MeO6MF, general anaesthetics such as etomidate and propofol also showed distinct levels of relative efficacy across different injection ratios. Based on these results, we infer that β3γ2L receptors may form with different subunit stoichiometries, resulting in the complex pharmacology observed across different injection ratios. Moreover, the discovery that GABA and etomidate have direct actions at the α-lacking β3γ2L receptors raises questions about the structural requirements for their respective binding sites at GABAARs.

  1. The effect of local anaesthetic wound infiltration on chronic pain after lower limb joint replacement: A protocol for a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Alison J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the majority of patients with osteoarthritis (OA, joint replacement is a successful intervention for relieving chronic joint pain. However, between 10-30% of patients continue to experience chronic pain after joint replacement. Evidence suggests that a risk factor for chronic pain after joint replacement is the severity of acute post-operative pain. The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT is to determine if intra-operative local anaesthethic wound infiltration additional to a standard anaethesia regimen can reduce the severity of joint pain at 12-months after total knee replacement (TKR and total hip replacement (THR for OA. Methods 300 TKR patients and 300 THR patients are being recruited into this single-centre double-blind RCT. Participants are recruited before surgery and randomised to either the standard care group or the intervention group. Participants and outcome assessors are blind to treatment allocation throughout the study. The intervention consists of an intra-operative local anaesthetic wound infiltration, consisting of 60 mls of 0.25% bupivacaine with 1 in 200,000 adrenaline. Participants are assessed on the first 5 days post-operative, and then at 3-months, 6-months and 12-months. The primary outcome is the WOMAC Pain Scale, a validated measure of joint pain at 12-months. Secondary outcomes include pain severity during the in-patient stay, post-operative nausea and vomiting, satisfaction with pain relief, length of hospital stay, joint pain and disability, pain sensitivity, complications and cost-effectiveness. A nested qualitative study within the RCT will examine the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention for both patients and healthcare professionals. Discussion Large-scale RCTs assessing the effectiveness of a surgical intervention are uncommon, particulary in orthopaedics. The results from this trial will inform evidence-based recommendations for both short-term and long-term pain

  2. Anaesthetic, procedure and complications management of serial whole-lung lavage in an obese patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Helena Marta; Guedes, Luisa; Veiga, Dalila; Fiuza, Antonio C; Abelha, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The first case of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) was described by Rose in 1958, but it is still a rare disorder. PAP is characterized by deposition of lipoproteinaceous material secondary to abnormal processing of surfactant by macrophages. Patients may suffer from progressive dyspnea and cough that at times is accompanied by worsening hypoxia and its course can vary from progressive deterioration to spontaneous improvement. Many therapies have been used to treat PAP including antibiotics, postural drainage, and intermittent positive pressure breathing with aerosolized Acetylcysteine, heparin and saline. At present, the mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage (WLL). Although generally well tolerated, WLL can be associated with some complications. We report a case of severe PAP through the anaesthetic, procedure and complications management of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in one patient who has undergone multiple, alternating, single-lung lavages over the past seven years, the last three in our hospital, with improvements in her symptoms following each therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of Anaesthetic Efficacy of 4 percent Articaine Primary Buccal Infiltration Versus 2 percent Lidocaine Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Symptomatic Mandibular First Molar Teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zain, M.; Khattak, S. U. R.; Shah, S. A.; Fayyaz, M.; Sikandar, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate success of pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular 1st molar by using 4 percentage articaine in buccal infiltration versus 2 percentage lidocaine in inferior alveolar nerve block. Study Design: Randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Operative Dentistry, Sardar Begum Dental College, Gandhara University, Peshawar, from March to August 2014. Methodology: One hundred and fifty-six emergency patients, who had 1st molar diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis, participated in the study. Subjects were divided into two groups by random allocation. One group received 4 percentage articaine buccal infiltration and the other group received inferior alveolar nerve block of 2 percentage lidocaine. Subjects self-reported pain response was recorded on Heft Parker Visual Analogue Scale after local anaesthetic administration during access cavity preparation and pulp extirpation. Results: Mean age of subjects was 31.46 ±10.994 years. The success rate of 4 percentage buccal infiltration was 76.9 percentage; whereas the success rate of 2 percentage lidocaine inferior alveolar nerve block was 62.8 percentage. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: 4 percentage articaine buccal infiltration can be considered a viable alternative to 2 percentage lidocaine inferior alveolar nerve block in securing successful pulpal anaesthesia for endodontic therapy. (author)

  4. A comparison of the 'cost per child treated' at a primary care-based sedation referral service, compared to a general anaesthetic in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, K; Averley, P A; Shackley, P; Steele, J

    2007-09-22

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of dental sedation techniques used in the treatment of children, focusing on hospital-based dental general anaesthetic (DGA) and advanced conscious sedation in a controlled primary care environment. Data on fees, costs and treatment pathways were obtained from a primary care clinic specialising in advanced sedation techniques. For the hospital-based DGA cohort, data were gathered from hospital trusts in the same area. Comparison was via an average cost per child treated and subsequent sensitivity analysis. Analysing records spanning one year, the average cost per child treated via advanced conscious sedation was pound245.47. As some treatments fail (3.5% of cases attempted), and the technique is not deemed suitable for all patients (4-5%), DGA is still required and has been factored into this cost. DGA has an average cost per case treated of pound359.91, 46.6% more expensive than advanced conscious sedation. These cost savings were robust to plausible variation in all parameters. The costs of advanced conscious sedation techniques, applied in a controlled primary care environment, are substantially lower than the equivalent costs of hospital-based DGA, informing the debate about the optimum way of managing this patient group.

  5. Time spent by patients in a pre-anaesthetic clinic and the factors affecting it: An audit from a tertiary care teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Justin P; Thampi, Suma Mary

    2018-01-01

    Patient satisfaction from a pre-anaesthetic clinic (PAC) visit is greatly influenced by time spent there. We aimed to determine time spent in a PAC without an appointment system and the factors affecting the same. Four hundred and eight patients coming to PAC were tracked using a time-motion study model. Time spent in waiting and consultation was recorded. Independent variables potentially affecting time spent were documented. Patients were grouped based on independent variables, and the groups were compared for significant differences using appropriate statistical tests. Workload pending on physicians was calculated on an hourly basis by counting number of patients waiting and number of physicians in PAC. Non-parametric statistical tests were used for analysis because the data were not normally distributed. The median and inter-quartile range for waiting time, consultation time and total time were 60 (30-90) minutes, 17 (12-26) minutes and 79 (53-111) minutes, respectively. There was considerable variation in all three. Waiting time was significantly lower in patients posted for same-day surgery or those arriving on a stretcher or wheelchair. Consultation time was correlated with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status and grade of surgery. Most patients arrived in the morning rather than at equal intervals. Waiting time and workload were therefore maximum in the midmorning and dropped rapidly in the afternoon. Large variability in waiting time is linked to lack of an appointment system, and to patients being seen out of turn.

  6. Clove oil as anaesthetic for juveniles of matrinxã Brycon cephalus (Gunther, 1869 Óleo de cravo como anestésico para juvenis de matrinxã Brycon cephalus (Gunther, 1869

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Antônio Kioshi Aoki Inoue

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Many chemicals have been used as anaesthetics in fish farms and fish biology laboratories to keep the fish immobilized during handling procedures and to prevent accidents and animal stress. In Brazil, tricaine methane sulfonate (MS 222, quinaldine sulfate, benzocaine, and phenoxyethanol are the most common fish anaesthetics used to prevent fish stress during handling, but many side effects such as body and gill irritations, corneal damage and general risks of intoxication have been reported. Clove oil is a natural product proposed as an alternative fish anaesthetic by many researchers and it has been used in many countries with great economic advantages and no apparent toxic properties. In this work, we assessed the suitability of clove oil to anaesthetize matrinxã. Sixty-three juveniles of matrinxã were exposed to seven anaesthetic batches of clove oil (pharmaceutical grade namely 18, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 mg/L. The times to reach total loss of equilibrium and to recover the upright position were measured. Clove oil concentration about 40 mg/L was enough to anaesthetize the fish in approximately one minute and the recovery time was independent in regard to anaesthetic concentration.Diversos produtos químicos têm sido empregados como anestésicos para peixes nas estações de piscicultura e laboratórios de biologia de peixes para a devida imobilização dos organismos, afim de se prevenir acidentes e ferimentos na superfície do corpo dos próprios peixes, que podem ficar susceptíveis a patógenos e taxas altas de mortalidade. A tricaina metano sulfonato (MS 222, a quinaldina, a benzocaina e o phenoxyethanol têm sido amplamente utilizados no Brasil, mas alguns efeitos colaterais são observados como perda de muco, irritação nas brânquias e olhos, e também alguns incômodos aos trabalhadores como a necessidade do uso de luvas. Dessa forma, o óleo de cravo é proposto como um anestésico alternativo por ser um produto natural de

  7. UK-414,495, a selective inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase, potentiates pelvic nerve-stimulated increases in female genital blood flow in the anaesthetized rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayman, CP; Baxter, D; Turner, L; Van Der Graaf, PH; Naylor, AM

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Female sexual arousal consists of a number of physiological responses resulting from increased genital blood. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y and to a lesser extent nitric oxide are neurotransmitters found in the vasculature of the genitalia. Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) modulates the activity of neuropeptides including VIP. The aim of this study was to investigate the control of genital blood flow by VIP and endogenous neuropeptides using a selective NEP inhibitor [UK-414,495, ((R)-2-({1-[(5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl) carbamoyl]cyclopentyl}methyl) valeric acid)]. Experimental approach: Vaginal and clitoral blood flow (VBF and CBF) were monitored using laser Doppler in terminally anaesthetized New Zealand rabbits. Increases in VBF and CBF were induced by either electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve or by i.v. infusion of VIP. Key results: Stimulation of the pelvic nerve increased VBF and CBF, compared with basal flow. Increases were mimicked by infusion of exogenous VIP. UK-414,495 dose-dependently potentiated pelvic nerve-stimulated increases in VBF (EC50= 37 ± 9 nM; 3.6 × IC50 rabbit NEP). Nerve-stimulated increases in VBF and CBF were both enhanced after UK-414,495. UK-414,495 increased the amplitude and duration of VIP-induced increases in VBF. UK-414,495 had no effect on basal VBF or cardiovascular parameters. Conclusions and implications: Inhibition of NEP potentiates pelvic nerve-stimulated increases in genital blood flow. This suggests that the endogenous neurotransmitter mediating genital blood flow is a substrate for NEP (most likely VIP). NEP inhibitors may restore sexual arousal in women adversely affected by female sexual arousal disorder. This article is commented on by Angulo, pp. 48–50 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00693.x PMID:20412068

  8. Effects of volatile anaesthetics on heme metabolism in a murine genetic model of acute intermittent porphyria. A comparative study with other porphyrinogenic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruspini, Silvina Fernanda; Zuccoli, Johanna Romina; Lavandera, Jimena Verónica; Del Carmen Martínez, Marìa; Olivieri, Leda María; Gerez, Esther Noemí; Del Carmen Batlle, Alcira María; Buzaleh, Ana María

    2018-02-21

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited disease produced by a deficiency of Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of Isoflurane and Sevoflurane on heme metabolism in a mouse genetic model of AIP to further support our previous proposal for avoiding their use in porphyric patients. A comparative study was performed administering the porphyrinogenic drugs allylisopropylacetamide (AIA), barbital and ethanol, and also between sex and mutation using AIP (PBG-D activity 70% reduced) and T1 (PBG-D activity 50% diminished) mice. The activities of 5-Aminolevulinic synthetase (ALA-S), PBG-D, Heme oxygenase (HO) and CYP2E1; the expression of ALA-S and the levels of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were measured in different tissues of mice treated with the drugs mentioned. Isoflurane increased liver, kidney and brain ALA-S activity of AIP females but only affected kidney AIP males. Sevoflurane induced ALA-S activity in kidney and brain of female AIP group. PBG-D activity was further reduced by Isoflurane in liver male T1; in AIP male mice activity remained in its low basal levels. Ethanol and barbital also caused biochemical alterations. Only AIA triggered neurological signs similar to those observed during human acute attacks in male AIP being the symptoms less pronounced in females although ALA-S induction was greater. Heme degradation was affected. Biochemical alterations caused by the porphyrinogenic drugs assayed were different in male and female mice and also between T1 and AIP being more affected the females of AIP group. This is the first study using volatile anaesthetics in an AIP genetic model confirming Isoflurane and Sevoflurane porphyrinogenicity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Ventricular remodelling is a prerequisite for the induction of dofetilide-induced torsade de pointes arrhythmias in the anaesthetized, complete atrio-ventricular-block dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnink, Albert; van Opstal, Jurren M; Oosterhoff, Peter; Winckels, Stephan K G; Beekman, Jet D M; van der Nagel, Roel; Cora Verduyn, S; Vos, Marc A

    2012-03-01

    A number of predisposing factors have been suggested to be contributing to drug-induced torsade de pointes (TdP) arrhythmias: short-long-short (SLS) sequence, bradycardia, timing of drug administration, anaesthesia, ventricular remodelling, and altered ventricular activation due to ventricular ectopic beats (SLS) or idioventricular rhythm (IVR). Chronic atrio-ventricular (AV)-block (CAVB) dogs are susceptible to dofetilide-induced TdP. In 32 anaesthetized animals, the relevance of ventricular remodelling for TdP susceptibility was studied by dofetilide [0.025 mg/kg/5 min intravenously (iv)] during bradycardia in the presence (CAVB, n= 18) or absence [acute atrio-ventricular block (AVB), n= 32] of ventricular remodelling. In sub-protocols, the possible pro-arrhythmic effects of timing of dofetilide administration: prior to (n= 11), or after creation of AVB (n= 9) and relevance of SLS pacing (n= 17) was investigated during IVR. Dofetilide was also given after AVB when the activation of the ventricles was normal: pacing (1000 ms) from the high septum (n= 7) or abnormal but fixed from the left ventricular apex (n= 5). Torsade de pointes inducibility was defined as reproducible (≥ 3 times) occurrence. In acute AV block (AAVB), dofetilide did not induce TdP spontaneously (0 of 32), whereas TdP was seen in 10 out of 18 serially tested dogs in CAVB (P< 0.001). The other factors: timing of dofetilide (0 of 11 vs. 0 of 9), SLS pacing (0 of 17 vs. 1 of 17), or ventricular activation (0 of 7 vs. 0 of 5) did not increase TdP susceptibility. Beat-to-beat variability of repolarization increased after ventricular remodelling and was highest prior to TdP induction. In AAVB dogs, TdP is not spontaneously seen, whereas it is present in CAVB. This implies that ventricular remodelling is a prerequisite for TdP induction in this model.

  10. Steroid administration after anaesthetic induction with etomidate does not reduce in-hospital mortality or cardiovascular morbidity after non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, R; You, J; Rajan, S; Kasuya, Y; Sessler, D I; Turan, A

    2018-03-01

    We tested the primary hypothesis that corticosteroid administration after etomidate exposure reduces a composite of in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular morbidity after non-cardiac surgery. We evaluated ASA physical status III and IV patients who had non-cardiac surgery with general anaesthesia at the Cleveland Clinic. Amongst 4275 patients in whom anaesthesia was induced with etomidate, 804 were also given steroid intraoperatively, mostly dexamethasone at a median dose of 6 mg. We successfully matched 582 steroid patients with 1023 non-steroid patients. The matched groups were compared on composite of in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular morbidity using a generalized-estimating-equation model. Secondly, the matched groups were compared on length of hospital stay using a Cox proportional hazard model, and were descriptively compared on intraoperative blood pressures using a standardized difference. There was no significant association between intraoperative steroid administration after anaesthetic induction with etomidate and the composite of in-hospital mortality or cardiovascular morbidity; the estimated common odds ratio across the two components of the composite was 0.86 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64, 1.16] for steroid vs non-steroid, P=0.33. The duration of postoperative hospitalisation was significantly shorter amongst steroid patients [median (Q1, Q3): 6 (3, 10) days] than non-steroid patients [7 (4, 11) days], with an estimated hazard ratio of 0.89 (0.80, 0.98) for steroid vs non-steroid, P=0.01. Intraoperative blood pressures were similar in steroid and non-steroid patients. Steroid administration after induction of anaesthesia with etomidate did not reduce mortality or cardiovascular morbidity. Copyright © 2017 British Journal of Anaesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Anaesthetic management of emergency pacemaker implantation in a case of neonatal lupus erythematosus with complete congenital heart block & severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Kiran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-week old 3-kilogram male baby was brought to this tertiary care hospital with respiratory distress, marked tracheal tug, poor feeding and a heart rate of 46/minute. The child had been referred from a peripheral hospital as a case of neonatal lupus with complete congenital heart block. The mother was seropositive for systemic lupus erythematosus with a history of two abortions. Evaluation on admission revealed a heart rate between 40-60/ minute, respiratory rate 40-50/ minute, inspiratory stridor, bilateral crepitations, chest retrac-tion and a marked tracheal tug that improved with prone positioning. Electrocardiography and echocardiography confirmed complete congenital heart block with cardiomegaly and mild left ventricular dysfunction. Keeping in view the impending congestive heart failure, possible early cardiomyopathy and the bad obstetric history ur-gent pacemaker implantation was planned to allow early recovery of the child. The anaesthetic risk was high due to the heart block, ventricular dysfunction, laryngomalacia, severe tracheal tug and anticipated difficult weaning from controlled ventilation. General anaesthesia was administered with endotracheal tube and con-trolled ventilation using ketamine, rocuronium and sufentanil. For patient safety invasive monitoring was pro-vided and external pacing was kept standby. Epicardial pacemaker leads were implanted onto the left ventricu-lar wall through a left anterior 6th intercostal space thoracotomy. The child was electively ventilated for two post operative days. The tracheal tug and secretions gradually subsided over 2 weeks with oxygen, antibiotics, steroids, bronchodilators and physiotherapy. At the time of discharge from hospital 2 weeks after the implant the child was feeding well, tracheal tug was minimal and the lungs were clear.

  12. Nitric oxide impacts on angiotensin AT2 receptor modulation of high-pressure baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, M H; Johns, E J

    2014-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) interacts with the local brain renin-angiotensin system to modulate sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular homoeostasis. This study investigated whether NO influenced the ability of angiotensin AT2 receptor activation to modify the high-pressure baroreceptor regulation of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and heart rate (HR). Anaesthetized (chloralose/urethane) rats were prepared to allow generation of baroreflex gain curves for RSNA or HR following intracerebroventricular (I.C.V.) CGP42112 (AT2 receptor agonist), PD123319 (AT2 receptor antagonist) or losartan (AT1 receptor antagonist), and then in combination with L-NAME (NO synthase inhibitor). I.C.V. PD123319, CGP42112, and Losartan did not change baseline mean arterial pressure, HR or RSNA. Baroreflex sensitivities for RSNA and HR were increased following AT2 receptor activation with CGP42112 by 112 and 157%, respectively, but were reduced following PD123319 by 20% (all P baroreflex sensitivity for both RSNA and HR, by 62 and 158%, respectively, but when co-infused with either CGP42112 or PD123319, the baroreflex sensitivity fell to values comparable to those obtained during I.C.V. saline infusion. The baroreflex sensitivities for RSNA and HR were increased by losartan by 92% and 192%, respectively, but in the presence of L-NAME were no different from those obtained during I.C.V. saline infusion. There is an important facilitatory role for AT2 receptors in the high-pressure baroreflex regulation of RSNA and HR which is dependent on a functional NO/NOS system. Conversely, AT1 receptors have an inhibitory effect on the baroreflex, an action that relies on a tonic inhibition of NO. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Physiologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  13. Time spent by patients in a pre-anaesthetic clinic and the factors affecting it: An audit from a tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin P James

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Patient satisfaction from a pre-anaesthetic clinic (PAC visit is greatly influenced by time spent there. We aimed to determine time spent in a PAC without an appointment system and the factors affecting the same. Methods: Four hundred and eight patients coming to PAC were tracked using a time-motion study model. Time spent in waiting and consultation was recorded. Independent variables potentially affecting time spent were documented. Patients were grouped based on independent variables, and the groups were compared for significant differences using appropriate statistical tests. Workload pending on physicians was calculated on an hourly basis by counting number of patients waiting and number of physicians in PAC. Results: Non-parametric statistical tests were used for analysis because the data were not normally distributed. The median and inter-quartile range for waiting time, consultation time and total time were 60 (30–90 minutes, 17 (12–26 minutes and 79 (53–111 minutes, respectively. There was considerable variation in all three. Waiting time was significantly lower in patients posted for same-day surgery or those arriving on a stretcher or wheelchair. Consultation time was correlated with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status and grade of surgery. Most patients arrived in the morning rather than at equal intervals. Waiting time and workload were therefore maximum in the midmorning and dropped rapidly in the afternoon. Conclusion: Large variability in waiting time is linked to lack of an appointment system, and to patients being seen out of turn.

  14. Behavioural Responses of Heterobranchus longifilis Juveniles. Val (Pisces: 1840 Exposed to Freeze–dried Bark Extract of Tephrosia vogelii as an Anaesthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Solomon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the anaesthetic properties of freeze-dried leaf extract of Tephrosia vogelii on the African catfish Heterobranchus longifilis juveniles. Experimental fish of Mean weight 115.00 were obtained from River Benue at Makurdi, Nigeria and acclimatized at the hatchery of University of Agriculture Makurdi for two weeks. Four H. longifilis were selected randomly for both control and treatment groups. Each treatment fish was weighed and injected intramuscularly 0.05ml of the extract at concentrations of 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04, 0.05 and 0.06g/l using a 2ml heparinized syringe. The result showed that H. longifilis in treatment group passed sequentially through the first three stages of anaesthesia but could not attain total loss of equilibrium (stage 4 of anaesthesia. The result showed that treatment group of fishes passed sequentially through the first three stages of anaesthesia but could not attain total loss of equilibrium (stage 4 of anaesthsia. Behavioural responses included mucus secretion, slow and erratic swimming, excrement discharge, increase in opercular beat rate, strong retention of reflex action, partial loss of equilibrium and colour change. The induction time showed a declining pattern with increasing concentration of the extract in the treatment levels with significant differences (P0.05. The most effective concentration was 0.06g/l with an induction time of 32.00±1.76 seconds and a recovery time of 182.00±3.46 minutes. The result of this study revealed that the freeze-dried bark extract of T. vogelii can be used as a tranquilizer for transporting fish over average distances, biopsy and morphological evaluation.

  15. The effect of site (deltoid or gluteus muscle of intramuscular administration of anaesthetic drugs on the course of immobilisation in macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Hess

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of site of intramuscular administration of anaesthetic drugs on the course of immobilisation in macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta. Twenty macaque monkeys were given medetomidine (25 µg·kg-1 and ketamine (3 mg·kg-1 intramuscularly to the deltoid (n = 10 animals or gluteus (n = 10 animals muscles. Behavioural changes, loss of aggressiveness, immobilisation time and cardiorespiratory changes were recorded. The effect of drugs was reversed after 20 min by i.m. administration of atipamezole at the dose of 250 µg·kg-1. Highly significant differences (P < 0.001 were found between groups with gluteal or deltoid administration of drugs on the onset of immobilisation effect (71.3 s and 108.3 s, respectively, and immobilisation time (152.7 s and 254.4 s, respectively. In the gluteus muscle group, the grasp reflex was still present at the beginning of immobilisation and slowly wore off in 15–45 s. The same was valid for muscle tone. There were no differences in cardiorespiratory parameters in any of the groups. Animals of both groups recovered in 3–6 min after atipamezole administration. Administration of drugs to the deltoid muscle resulted in a more rapid onset and increased effect of immobilisation than administration to the gluteus muscle. Both in veterinary and human medicine, injection to the deltoid muscle may be more convenient in all cases, when rapid and more prominent effect is desirable as in premedication before surgery or in emergency medicine. The study is the first to compare the effect of administering drugs to different muscles and the results may improve the practice of intramuscular injections in animals and in humans.

  16. Effect of oral premedication on the anaesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis - A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikkotil, S J; Nagendrababu, V; Veettil, S K; Jinatongthai, P; Setzer, F C

    2018-02-26

    This systematic review (SR; PROSPERO database: CRD42017075160) and network meta-analysis (NMA) identified the most effective oral premedication for anaesthetic success of inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB) in cases of irreversible pulpitis. Medline and Ebscohost databases were searched up until 10/2017. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) studying the effect of oral premedication, alone or in combination, on the success of IANB for cases of irreversible pulpitis, compared to placebo or other oral premedications, were included. Quality of the included studies was appraised by the revised Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized trials. Pairwise analysis, NMA and quality of evidence assessment using GRADE criteria were performed. Nineteen studies (n = 1654 participants) were included. NMA demonstrated that compared to placebo, dexamethasone was most effective in increasing anaesthetic success (RR, 2.92 [95% CI 1.74,4.91]; SUCRA = 0.96), followed by NSAIDs (RR, 1.92 [95% CI 1.63,2.27], SUCRA = 0.738) and Tramadol (RR, 2.03 [95% CI 1.18,3.49], SUCRA = 0.737). Premedication with acetaminophen added to NSAIDs demonstrated similar efficacy as NSAIDs alone (RR, 1.06 [95% CI 0.79,1.43]). Sensitivity analyses proved the superiority of dexamethasone or NSAIDs over any other premedications. Subgroup analyses of specific dosages in comparison with placebo demonstrated that dexamethasone 0.5 mg was most effective, followed by ketorolac 10 mg, piroxicam 20 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg + acetaminophen 500 mg and Tramadol 50 mg. Ibuprofen 400 mg, 600 mg and 800 mg had a significantly improved IANB success, while Ibuprofen 300 mg had no effect. Oral premedication with dexamethasone, NSAIDs or Tramadol significantly increased anaesthetic success. More trials are needed to evaluate the premedication effects of dexamethasone or Tramadol for improved anaesthetic success of IANB when treating irreversible pulpitis. © 2018 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John

  17. Anaesthetic, analgesic and cardiorespiratory effects of intramuscular medetomidine-ketamine combination alone or with morphine or tramadol for orchiectomy in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Gareth E; Dzikiti, Brighton T; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Stegmann, Frik G; Venter, Frans J; Rioja, Eva

    2014-07-01

    To compare the anaesthetic, analgesic and cardiorespiratory effects of intramuscular (IM) medetomidine and ketamine administered alone or combined with morphine or tramadol, for orchiectomy in cats. Randomised, blinded, prospective clinical study. Thirty client-owned cats. Cats (n = 10 in each group) received a combination of medetomidine (60 μgkg(-1) ) and ketamine (10 mg kg(-1) ) alone (MedK); combined with morphine (0.2 mg kg(-1) ) (MedKM), or combined with tramadol (2 mg kg(-1) ) (MedKT) IM. Time of induction, surgical and recovery events were recorded, and physiological parameters measured and recorded. Analgesia was evaluated with a visual analogue scale, a composite scoring system and the von Frey mechanical threshold device, every hour from three to eight hours post-drug administration injection. Data were analyzed with a linear mixed model, Kruskal-Wallis or Chi-square tests (p < 0.05). Median (IQR) induction and recovery times (minutes) were not significantly (p = 0.125) different between groups: 5.6 (2.7-8.0), 7.4 (5.1-9.6) and 8.0 (5.8-14.9) for induction and 128.5 (95.1-142.8), 166.4 (123.1-210.0) and 142.9 (123.4-180.2) for recovery, with MedK, MedKT and MedKM, respectively. Two cats (MedKM) required alfaxalone for endotracheal intubation. In all groups, three or four cats required additional isoflurane for surgery. Arterial oxygen tension overall (mean ± SD: 66 ± 2 mmHg) was low. Surgery resulted in increased systolic arterial blood pressure (p < 0.001), haemoglobin saturation (p < 0.001), respiratory (p = 0.003) and heart rates (p = 0.002). Pain scores did not differ significantly between groups. Von Frey responses decreased over time; changes over time varied by treatment (p < 0.001), MedK returning to baseline values more rapidly than MedKM and MedKT. No cat required rescue analgesics. All three protocols can provide adequate anaesthesia and analgesia for orchiectomy in cats. However, rescue intervention to maintain surgical anaesthesia may be

  18. Comparison of the anaesthetic efficacy of epinephrine concentrations (1 : 80 000 and 1 : 200 000) in 2% lidocaine for inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, V; Singla, M; Miglani, S; Kohli, S

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled, double-blind trial was to comparatively evaluate the anaesthetic efficacy and injection pain of 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with different concentrations of epinephrine (1 : 80 000 and 1 : 200 000) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Sixty-two adult volunteers, actively experiencing pain, were randomly allocated into 2 groups and received 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with either 1 : 80 000 or 1 : 200 000 epinephrine concentration. Endodontic access preparation was initiated 15 min after the initial IANB. Pain during treatment was recorded using the Heft-Parker visual analogue scale (HP VAS). The primary outcome measure, and the definition of 'success', was the ability to undertake pulp access and canal instrumentation with no or mild pain (HP VAS score <55 mm). Secondary outcome measure was the pain experienced during LA solution deposition. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U-test and chi-square test. The anaesthetic success rates of 2% lidocaine solutions containing 1 : 80 000 and 1 : 200 000 epinephrine concentrations were 20% and 28%, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant. There was also no significant difference in the pain experienced during deposition of the solutions. Two percent lidocaine solution used for IANB achieved similar success rates when used with 1 : 80 000 or 1 : 200 000 epinephrine concentration. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The PINE study: rationale and design of a randomised comparison of epidural injection of local anaesthetics and steroids versus care-as-usual to prevent postherpetic neuralgia in the elderly [ISRCTN32866390

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verheij Theo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN is by far the most common complication of herpes zoster (HZ and one of the most intractable pain disorders. Since PHN is seen most often in the elderly, the number of patients with this disorder is expected to increase in our ageing society. PHN may last for months to years and has a high impact on the quality of life. The results of PHN treatment are rather disappointing. Epidural injection of local anaesthetics and steroids in the acute phase of HZ is a promising therapy for the prevention of PHN. Since randomised trials on the effectiveness of this intervention are lacking, the PINE (Prevention by epidural Injection of postherpetic Neuralgia in the Elderly study was set up. The PINE study compares the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a single epidural injection of local anaesthetics and steroids during the acute phase of HZ with that of care-as-usual (i.e. antivirals and analgesics in preventing PHN in elderly patients. Methods / design The PINE study is an open, multicenter clinical trial in which 550 elderly (age ≥ 50 yr. patients who consult their general practitioner in the acute phase of HZ (rash Conclusion The PINE study is aimed to quantify the (cost- effectiveness of a single epidural injection during the acute phase of HZ on the prevention of PHN.

  20. Assessment of the production of analgesia induced by application of a rubber ring or local anaesthetic to the antler pedicle of yearling stags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, A M; Barrell, G K; Gibbs, S J; Frizzell, A N; McPhee, J F

    2009-06-01

    of application of a ring the minimum electrical stimulation required distal to the ring to elicit a reflex response increased from around 16 to 55 mA by 60 minutes. In contrast, the electrical stimulation required proximal to the ring remained low (approximately 17.0 mA) throughout. No stag subjected to either of the methods of application responded to the nick test 60 minutes after application of the ring. The electrical stimulation required to produce a behavioural response increased very rapidly in stags treated with local anaesthetic and at a slower rate in those treated with the cable-tie method but showed no significant increase in control stags. After 4 and 30 minutes, for local anaesthesia and the cable-tie method, respectively, 95% of stags were not responding to 80 mA. A significantly greater proportion of stags with antlers treated with local anaesthetic and the cable-tie method did not respond to the nick test than controls, and there was no significant difference in the frequency of the response between stags with treated antlers. The minimum current required to produce a response proximal to a rubber ring was slightly higher on average for train-of-four electrical stimulus (mean 18.1 (SD 2.6) mA) than for the tetanic mode (mean 11.9 (SD 2.5) mA). The increase in minimum current required to produce the respective response to stimulation distal to the ring was similar for both methods, although the maximum predicted value (67.4 mA) was lower for train-of-four than for the tetanic mode (84.5 mA). No stag responded to the nick test > or = 60 minutes after application of the ring. The cable-tie method was no different from the standard method as a procedure for producing analgesia in the antlers of yearling stags and should be accepted as an appropriate procedure for applying analgesic rings to yearling stags. The analgesia produced in the antlers of yearling stags by rubber rings applied by the cable-tie method to the pedicle was similar to that of a

  1. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome.

  2. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Sankar Nath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist′s concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients′ experience and surgical outcome.

  3. Anaesthetic Monitoring - the Pulse Oximeter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    peg, which is conveniently clipped to the thumb or finger and connected to a compact battery and mains operated display unit. The finger probe is set to detect the two different wavelengths of reflected light in capillary blood and the display shows the amount of oxy-Hb compared with the sum of the oxy- and de-oxy-Hb ...

  4. Anaesthetic management of paediatric adenotonsillectomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy is one of the most frequent surgical procedures that are carried out globally. There has been an increase in the rate of adenotonsillectomies in recent years. The two most common indications for tonsillectomy are recurrent throat infections and pharyngeal obstruction causing ...

  5. Mucopolysaccharidoses -An Adventurous Anaesthetic Encounter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS, though rare, may pose many challenges for the anaesthesiologist. Maintaining the airway may be extremely difficult even in the most experienced hands. We present here, two breath taking airway securing experiences-one emergency and the other elective- in a 10 year old child of Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS who presented to us for repair of an irreducible umbilical hernia.

  6. Local Anaesthetic Neurotoxicity Mimicking Anaphylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Özçeker; Zeynep Tamay; Nermin Güler

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine and articaine are commonly used in infiltration anesthesia, extremity blockage, topical anesthesia and intravenous regional anesthesia due to high activity and rapid onset effect. Although commonly administered, the allergic drug reactions of local anesthetics are rarely reported. However, reactions related to systemic toxicity can be seen Hereby, we reported two cases related to drug allergy and convulsion after administering of lidocaine and articaine.

  7. Caesarean section and anaesthetic mortality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia is co-published by Medpharm Publications, NISC (Pty) Ltd and Cogent, Taylor & Francis Group. LETTER TO THE EDITOR. Caesarean section and ... births there are 3.1 maternal deaths,2 13 neonatal deaths, 28 infantile deaths and 40 deaths under the age of 5 ...

  8. Tuberous sclerosis Anaesthetic considerations | Bosenberg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected ...

  9. Intrarenal Mas and AT1 receptors play a role in mediating the excretory actions of renal interstitial angiotensin-(1-7) infusion in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Julie; Healy, Vincent; Johns, Edward J

    2017-12-01

    What is the central question of this study? Dietary sodium manipulation alters the magnitude of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]-induced natriuresis. The present study sought to determine whether this was related to relative changes in the activity of intrarenal Mas and/or AT 1 receptors. What is the main finding and its importance? Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced diuresis and natriuresis is mediated by intrarenal Mas receptors. However, intrarenal AT 1 receptor blockade also had an inhibitory effect on Ang-(1-7)-induced natriuresis and diuresis. Thus, Ang-(1-7)-induced increases in sodium and water excretion are dependent upon functional Mas and AT 1 receptors. We investigated whether angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]-induced renal haemodynamic and excretory actions were solely dependent upon intrarenal Mas receptor activation or required functional angiotensin II type 1 (AT 1 ) receptors. The renin-angiotensin system was enhanced in anaesthetized rats by prior manipulation of dietary sodium intake. Angiotensin-(1-7) and AT 1 and Mas receptor antagonists were infused into the kidney at the corticomedullary border. Mas receptor expression was measured in the kidney. Mean arterial pressure, urine flow and fractional sodium excretion were 93 ± 4 mmHg, 46.1 ± 15.7 μl min -1  kg -1 and 1.4 ± 0.3%, respectively, in the normal-sodium group and 91 ± 2 mmHg, 19.1 ± 3.3 μl min -1  kg -1 and 0.7 ± 0.2%, respectively, in the low-sodium group. Angiotensin-(1-7) infusion had no effect on mean arterial pressure in rats receiving a normal-sodium diet but decreased it by 4 ± 5% in rats receiving a low-sodium diet (P < 0.05). Interstitial Ang-(1-7) infusion increased urine flow twofold and fractional sodium excretion threefold (P < 0.05) in rats receiving a normal-sodium diet and to a greater extent, approximately three- and fourfold, respectively, in rats receiving the low-sodium diet (both P < 0.05). Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced increases in urine flow and

  10. An experienced physiotherapist prescribing and administering corticosteroid and local anaesthetic injections to the shoulder in an Australian orthopaedic service, a non-inferiority randomised controlled trial and economic analysis: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Darryn; Bisset, Leanne; Thomas, Michael; O'Leary, Shaun; Comans, Tracy; Ng, Shu Kay; Conaghan, Philip G; Scuffham, Paul

    2014-12-21

    The early management of orthopaedic outpatients by physiotherapists may be useful in reducing public hospital waiting lists. Physiotherapists in Australia are prevented by legislation and funding models from investigating, prescribing, injecting and referring autonomously. This gap in service is particularly noticeable in the management of shoulder pain in early-access physiotherapy services, as patients needing corticosteroid injection face delays or transfer to other services for this procedure. This trial will investigate the clinical (decision making and outcomes) and economic feasibility of a physiotherapist prescribing and delivering corticosteroid and local anaesthetic injections for shoulder pain in an Australian public hospital setting. A double-blinded (patient and assessor) non-inferiority randomised controlled trial will compare an orthopaedic surgeon and a physiotherapist prescribing and delivering corticosteroid injections to the shoulder. Agreement in decision making between the two clinicians will be investigated, and economic information will be obtained for estimating disease burden and an economic evaluation. The surgeon and the physiotherapist will independently assess patients, and 64 eligible participants will be randomised to receive subacromial injection of corticosteroid and local anaesthetic from either the surgeon or the physiotherapist. Post-injection, all participants will receive physiotherapy. The primary outcome measure will be the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index measured at baseline, and at 6 and 12 weeks post-injection. Analysis will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis and compared to a per-protocol analysis. A cost-utility analysis will be undertaken from the perspective of the health funder. Findings will assist policy makers and services in improving access for orthopaedic patients. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: 12612000532808 First registered: 21 May 2012. First participant randomized: 16

  11. Does topical Amethocaine cream increase first-time successful cannulation in children compared with a eutectic mixture of local anaesthetics (EMLA) cream? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pywell, Alison; Xyrichis, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Cannulation of children is often required for administration of intravenous fluids and medications, but can cause pain and anxiety. Amethocaine and a eutectic mixture of local anaesthetics (EMLA) cream are two of the most commonly used local anaesthetic creams. To examine the evidence for the superiority of Amethocaine cream compared with EMLA cream in facilitating successful first-time cannulation in children. A systematic search was undertaken in MEDLINE and EMBASE in June 2014. Studies examining cannulation, undertaken with children and providing data about first-time cannulation success rates were considered for inclusion. Three randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Data extraction was undertaken independently by the two authors using predefined data fields. Pooled analysis was based on a random effects model. Low statistical heterogeneity was observed. Amethocaine cream increased the likelihood of successful first-time cannulation (RR 1.046, CI 0.975 to 1.122), although this did not reach statistical significance (p=0.211). Amethocaine cream does not appear to significantly facilitate successful first-time cannulation. Lack of precision and design weaknesses of the included studies hinder the formation of a strong recommendation for either cream. Based on the evidence reviewed here and considering analgesic properties and cost-savings associated with both creams, a weak recommendation can be issued in favour of Amethocaine cream for cannulation in children based on high-quality evidence but where the treatment choice will depend on other factors including cost and provider preference. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. The C-terminal extension of exendin-4 provides additional metabolic stability when added to GLP-1, while there is minimal effect of truncating exendin-4 in anaesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Holst, Jens Juul; Madsen, K

    2013-01-01

    The most striking sequence difference between glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(2) and the longer-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4 (Ex-4),(3) is the nine-amino acid COOH-terminal extension of Ex-4. We investigated the contribution of this extension to the survival time of Ex-4. We assessed...... the overall metabolism of GLP-1, Ex-4, a COOH-terminally extended GLP-1 peptide (GLP-1+Ex(31-39); GLP-Ex),(4) and a COOH-terminally truncated exendin peptide (Ex(1-30)) in anaesthetized, catheterized pigs, with focus on the extraction across the kidneys and a peripheral tissue (a hindleg, representing muscle......, adipose- and connective tissue). Peptide analysis was carried out with assays against the mid-region of the peptides, whereby the role of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4)(5) mediated NH(2)-terminal degradation could be disregarded. The half-life of GLP-1 was significantly increased when the COOH...

  13. A randomised field study evaluating the effectiveness of buccal meloxicam and topical local anaesthetic formulations administered singly or in combination at improving welfare of female Merino lambs undergoing surgical mulesing and hot knife tail docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Alison Holdhus; Marini, Danila; Dyall, Tim; Paull, David; Lee, Caroline

    2018-03-08

    This study was a field-based behavioural assessment of the pain responses to surgical mulesing modulated by a buccal formulation of meloxicam (Buccalgesic) and a topical local anaesthetic wound dressing (Tri-Solfen). 20 lambs were randomly allocated to each of: 1) Placebo and sham handled (Sham); 2) Placebo and mulesing (Mules); 3) Buccalgesic and mulesing (Mules+B); 4) Tri-Solfen and mulesing (Mules+T); 5) Placebo, Tri-Solfen and mulesing (Mules+T+P); 6) Buccalgesic, Tri-Solfen and mulesing (Mules+T+B). Lamb behaviour was observed by scan sampling every 15 min for 6 h post mulesing then for 1.5 h daily over the subsequent 10 days. Wound score, wound sensitivity and body weight were recorded on day 4, 7 and 10. On the day of mulesing, abnormal behaviours were reduced for all groups that received the analgesic drugs compared to the Mules group (P < 0.05). Tri-Solfen reduced expression of abnormal behaviours in the first 4 h; Buccalgesic reduced expression of abnormal behaviours between 2 and 6 h; and combination treatment reduced expression of abnormal behaviours over the entire observation period. On the subsequent two days, the drug combination resulted in fewer abnormal postures than Tri-Solfen alone. The drug combination tended to result in lower pain sensitivity (965.3 g tolerated) than either Mules+T+P (828.8 g), or Mules+B (791.2 g) on day 7 (P < 0.05). Use of Tri-Solfen and Buccalgesic singly or in combination improved the welfare of lambs undergoing surgical mulesing. The residual effect of pain and discomfort caused by mulesing, were evident despite provision of analgesic drugs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anaesthetic Management of Mentosternal Contractures Where ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six of the cases had laryngeal mask airway (LMA) inserted while one patient had a tracheostomy under local anaesthesia. After adequate release endotracheal tubes were inserted except in those who had LMA which were maintained to the end of the surgery. The rest of the procedure was then continued under general ...

  15. Caesarean section in Eisenmenger's syndrome: anaesthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reflect pulmonary artery pressure and can significantly under- or over-estimate it in individual patients.18. We elected not to use a pulmonary artery catheter because of its inherent risks,19 the restricted availability and the difficulty of inserting it in the correct position. Incorrect placement has the potential of tip advancement ...

  16. Post-anaesthetic Respiratory Complaints Following Endotracheal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Postanaesthetic respiratory complications represent a significant negative aspect of surgical care. Objective: To assess the incidence and possible associated risk factors for postanaesthestic respiratory complaints following endotracheal anaesthesia in lower abdominal surgery in obstetric and gynecology ...

  17. Anaesthetic management of tracheobronchial disruption during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-29

    Jan 29, 2011 ... 7.5 mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube. A left-sided chest tube was also inserted and the ... following: pH 7.20, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). 48.5 mmHg, partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) ... 7.0 mm PVC endotracheal tube on the third postoperative day. There was minimal leakage from the chest ...

  18. 40 ANAESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF SURGICAL EMERGENCIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... ABSTRACT. Anaesthesia for surgical procedures carries some risks. These risks are accentuated when the surgical operation is performed as an emergency procedure. The value of emergency in risk stratification underscores its relevance in clinical anaesthesia. Limited time for evaluation of patient ...

  19. Haemodynamic and anaesthetic advantages of dexmedetomidine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Supplementation with end-tidal sevoflurane 1-2% was considered when heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure exceeded 20% of baseline values. On completion of surgery, the time taken to discontinue dexmedetomidine infusion and the extubation time were recorded. Outcome ... It had an acceptable recovery profile.

  20. Emergency Anaesthetic Management of Extensive Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Chandola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed vehicles, drug abuse, alcohol and easy availability of handguns are the main reasons of increasing number of trauma especially thoracic trauma. Anaesthesiologist plays an important role in the management of extensive thoracic trauma. Thoracic trauma, penetrating or blunt, may cause damage to organs suspended in thorax viz. pleura, lungs, heart, great vessels, trachea and oesophagus. It may lead to pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade or life threatening haemorrhage. With aggressive care and management of these factors, majority of patients can survive and return to normal life.

  1. Anaesthetic challenges in emergency peripartum hysterectomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with 16 emergency peripartum hysterectomies. The incidence of emergency peripartum hysterectomy was 0.23% of all deliveries (2.3/1 000 deliveries). The causes of emergency hysterectomies were ruptured uterus (11 patients or 69%), placenta accreta/morbidly adherent placenta (4 patients or 25%) and uncontrollable ...

  2. Haemodynamic and anaesthetic advantages of dexmedetomidine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-27

    Jan 27, 2012 ... The results are comparable to those of. Ozkose et al, who also found that at a loading dose of. 1 µg/kg dexmedetomidine was effective in controlling the haemodynamic response to tracheal intubation.22 Jakkola et al reported that dexmedetomidine significantly reduced the blood pressure and HR response ...

  3. Anaesthetic management of children with craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srilata Moningi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The perioperative management of craniopharyngioma in children is quite challenging not only to the neurosurgeons and anaesthesiologists but also to the oncologists, endocrinologists and intensivists. The various concerns include size of the tumour and its effects on intracranial pressure, vicinity of the tumour to nearby vessels and neural structures, endocrine disturbances, compressive symptoms, paediatric age, obesity-related problems, high recurrence rate of the tumour, undesired effects of radiotherapy, high morbidity and mortality. As anaesthesiologists, we deal with most of the challenges. The success of the outcome depends on the proper identification of the patient, pre-operative optimisation, surgical decision, awareness of the complications, timely intervention and optimal post-operative care.

  4. Marijuana use in Pregnancy: Anaesthetic Implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    gesting drug use in pregnancy (including marijuana) include ab- sence of prenatal care, ... used for recreational purposes in many developed societies.1 Its health- and psychological effects ... Key words: Marijuana, Cannabis, Cannabinoids, Drug abuse, Chemical dependency, Drug addiction, Pregnancy. Correspondence:.

  5. Anaesthetic management of nesidioblastosis in a newborn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares A

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This report details the management of a newborn with nesidioblastosis who underwent a 95% pancreatectomy under general anaesthesia. The baby presented with hypoglycemic convulsions, due to hyperinsulinism, and was treated with 12.5% dextrose infusions, glucagon and anticonvulsants. Intraoperatively and postoperatively the baby remained hyperglycemic. A postoperative osmotic diuresis necessitated the use of insulin for brief period. The infant remained euglycemic and convulsion free, following discontinuation of the dextrose infusions and starting of oral feeds. Recovery was uneventful.

  6. Anaesthetic Challenges Associated with Achondroplasia: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IFEOMA

    editors. Achondroplasia. In: Fetology: diagnosis and management of the fetal patient. New York: McGraw. Hill; 2000: 665–671. 15. McArthur R D A. Obstetric anaesthesia in an achondroplastic dwarf at a regional hospital. Anaesth. Intensive Care 1992; 20: 376–378. 16. Harmer M. Difficult and failed intubation in obstetric.

  7. An/Aesthetics : A Lecture-Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, Luis-Manuel; LaBelle, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    What is an experience? Seemingly numb due to the overload of information, stimuli, and sensory possibilities that characterize our contemporary world, where experiences are packaged, sold, and consumed, the question of “aesthetics” emerges with ever greater urgency today. What is good and beautiful,

  8. Anaesthetic considerations for the HIV positive parturient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The HIV epidemic in children parallels that among women on account of perinatal transmission. A combination of antiretroviral therapy and elective caesarean section reduces the rate of vertical transmission to <2%. Elective caesarean section independent of antiretroviral therapy decreases the risk of HIV vertical ...

  9. Anaesthetic hazards of the 'passion gap'

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    slaves imported by the Dutch East India Company from the. East, the early white settJers and, later, blacks. Within this population there are two small distinctive communities: the. Griquas and the Cape Malays.3,4. Why does the 'passion gap' exist among the Cape Coloureds? The popular belief is that the teeth are removed ...

  10. Anaesthetic implications of a parturient with antiphospholipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-09-03

    Sep 3, 2010 ... systemic lupus erythematosus (secondary).6,7 The diagnosis of APS is based upon the presence of one clinical and one laboratory criterion. Clinical criteria include venous or arterial thrombosis, and foetal loss. Laboratory criteria are the detection of positive antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus.

  11. Anaesthetic management of a patient with thoracopagus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-07-19

    Jul 19, 2009 ... normal co-twin (autosite) by attaching to it internally. In the case of an exoparasite twin, the parasite is attached .... twins ranges from 50% to 75%. In view of this poor prognosis, it is often recommended ... Arterial Pco2, Po2 and pH should also be monitored during surgery. While operating on thoracopagus,.

  12. Vasoplegic syndrome: A challenge to anaesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarjyoti Hazarika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative hypotension is a well-recognized and relatively common problem during surgery. Vasoplegic syndrome is one such condition which is characterized by severe persistent hypotension with normal to high cardiac output and low systemic resistance. It is commonly seen in patients undergoing cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass. However, this syndrome has also been reported in off pump surgeries. Management of intraoperative hypotension may be challenging for an anaesthesiologist, if it does not respond or poorly respond to conventional therapy. We report the management of a hypertensive patient posted for spine surgery in prone position, who developed severe hypotension under anaesthesia refractory to treatment.

  13. Anaesthetic considerations in patients with transverse myelitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transverse myelitis is an acute or subacute inflammatory disorder involving the spinal cord. Clinical signs are due to the involvement of the ascending and descending tracts in the transverse plane of the spinal cord. The most common cause is autoimmune. These patients may present with various clinical findings with ...

  14. Anaesthetic challenges in emergency peripartum hysterectomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-17

    Sep 17, 2009 ... and colloid availability is often limited. The major cause for emergency peripartum hysterectomy in this study was ruptured uterus, which is avoidable with proper counselling of the patient, especially those with a history of previous Caesarean section. The roles of poverty, poor transport logistics.

  15. anaesthetic registrars' experiences of perioperative death

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    you didn't anticipate the death, I know it would affect me … I can see myself finding that harder to come to grips with.' Compared with elective cases, participants seemed to find the deaths caused by trauma-related injuries easier to bear: 'It was a stab heart so we knew that we were fighting a losing battle from the start, so ...

  16. Anaesthetic Management Of Surgical Emergencies | Imarengiaye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 11, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Post-anaesthetic emergence delirium in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, L; Andersen, G; Møller, A M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergence delirium (ED) after general anaesthesia (GA) is a well-known phenomenon, yet the risk factors are still unclear. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence and independent predictors of ED and secondly to determine to which degree ED has any relevant, clinical...

  18. New trends in sample preparation: on-line microextraction in packed syringe (MEPS) for LC and GC applications Part III: Determination and validation of local anaesthetics in human plasma samples using a cation-exchange sorbent, and MEPS-LC-MS-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Zeki; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Blomberg, Lars G

    2004-12-25

    The need for on-line sample preparation for high-throughput applications in bioanalysis has increased during the past decade. In this paper a robust and on-line sample preparation technique, micro extraction in packed syringe (MEPS) has been developed and validated. The method is a miniaturized, fully automated, solid-phase extraction (SPE) technique that can be connected on-line to GC or LC without any modification of the chromatographs. The performance of MEPS as sample preparation method is illustrated by the determination of local anaesthetics in human plasma samples on-line with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and tandem mass spectrometry. The sampling sorbent was 1mg silica based benzenesulphonic acid cation exchanger that was inserted in a 250 microl syringe. Ropicavine and two of its metabolites (PPX and 3-OH-ropivacine), lidocaine and bupivacine were used as model substances. The accuracy values of quality control samples (QC) were between 95% and 109%, and precision (relative standard deviation, R.S.D.) had a maximum deviation of 9% for the analytes.

  19. Anaesthetic Techniques for Thyroidectomy in Patients with Giant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preoperative tracheostomy was carried out on two patients. Four patients were intubated awake following inhalation of nebulized lidocaine. Inhalational induction and intubation after spraying the cords with lidocaine was carried out on six patients. These techniques were respectively related to pre-operative stridor at rest, ...

  20. anaesthetic challenges in a high risk parturient with myasthenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-10

    Oct 10, 2013 ... diclofenac suppository 200 mg 12 hourly and titrable doses of pentazocine (a benzomorphan derivative). 30-45 mg four to six hourly for 48 hours. She had a .... Wilson, J.T. Pharmacokinetics of drug excretion. In Wilson JT, ed. Drugs in Breast Milk. Balgowlah,. Australia: ADIS Press, 1981: 17. 16. Schweitz r ...

  1. Anaesthetic Challenges In An Untreated Grave's Disease Parturient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    hyperthyroidism in pregnancy is challenging to perioperative care ... pregnant patient. It is more challenging when a thyrotoxic parturient needs to be delivered by an emergency caesarean section. In this report we present an unregistered pregnant woman with .... as high blood pressure and tachy-arrhythmias in our patient.

  2. Anaesthetic Challenges In Gunshot Injury To The Neck | Adegboye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Health Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. AIthesin (eT 1341) - A New Intravenous Anaesthetic Agent*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... procedures halothane. Scope and retrograde pyelogram. 31. D + C. 0. Bilat. Cockett. 0. Bronchoscopy. 0. Oesophagoscopy. 0. Abd. lipectomy. 0. Commando operation 0. Mastectomy. 0. Biopsy vulva. 0. Removal tumour leg. 0. Abd. hysterectomy. 0. Ant. + post. vag. repair. 0. Circumcision. 0. Transurethral.

  4. Cellular targets of inhalational anaesthetic- and opioid receptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004), but its involvement in mediating the actions of other agents is still not known. The preconditioning and postconditioning effects of sevoflurane are proposed to protect the endothelial glycocalyx from degradation by minimizing endothelial cell adhesion (Chappell et al.,. 2011) and by decreasing the activity of lysosomal.

  5. AIthesin (eT 1341) - A New Intravenous Anaesthetic Agent*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... Althesin (CT 1341), a new intravenous steroid anaes':he- tic agent without steroid activity, was given as ... by competent nursing staff who immediately reported any unfavourable side-effects. The time when the ..... A.) (ply) Ltd, for their expert advice, and for the liberal supplies of Althesin. REFERENCES. 1.

  6. Anaesthetic management in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-13

    oximetry, were placed on the patient. The. Figure 1: Showing the patient with bow deformity of the lower limbs. Figure 2: An X-ray showing a previous intramedullary nail in situ and the fractured femur. Figure 3: An X-ray showing ...

  7. The anaesthetic management of microgravity-exposed individuals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mankind's imminent occupation of low Earth orbit beyond that of a scientific outpost and daring engineering nature that will land astronauts on Mars, will pose significant challenges to anaesthesia providers. The increased number of space tourists and workers who spend extended periods in zero gravity will present with ...

  8. The concept of anaesthetic-induced cardioprotection: mechanisms of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Nina C.; Schlack, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms by which ischaemia reperfusion injury can be influenced have been the subject of extensive research in the last decades. Early restoration of arterial blood flow and surgical measures to improve the ischaemic tolerance of the tissue are the main therapeutic options currently in

  9. Anaesthetic management of a rare variety of cardiac myxoma for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary cardiac tumours are rare. Right ventricular myxomas and a combination of right atrial and ventricular myxomas are very rare. A patient with myxoma has several problems, including haemodynamic compromise in a particular position, embolisation and hypoxaemia because of low output and possible shunts.

  10. Comparison of anaesthetic cost in open and laparoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Appendectomy is generally conducted as open or by laparoscopic surgical techniques under general anesthesia. Aims: This study aims to compare the anesthetic costs of the patients, who underwent open or laparoscopic appendectomy under general anesthesia. Settings and Design: The design is retrospective ...

  11. Comparison of anaesthetic cost in open and laparoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-04

    Apr 4, 2014 ... the instructions book of Dräger Cato anesthesia device manufacturer (...ml = 3× concentration × fresh gas flow× hour) and their costs were calculated taking into consideration the termination of anesthesia. Amounts of neostigmine (50 μg/kg) and atropine (20 μg/kg) used for reversing the effects of relaxants ...

  12. Anaesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the cervical spine may have devastating consequences. Timely interventions are essential to prevent avoidable neurological deterioration. In the initial stabilization of patients with acute cervical spine injuries, physiological disturbances, especially those involving cardiac and respiratory function require careful attention. Early surgery, which facilitates rapid mobi-lization of the patient, is fraught with important management considerations in the intraopoerative period and the subsequent critical care. Airway management poses a crucial challenge at this stage. Those patients who survive the injury with quadriplegia or quadriparesis may present themselves for incidental surgical procedures. Chronic systemic manifestations in these patients require attention in providing anaesthesia and postoperative care at this stage. The current review provides an insight into the physiological disturbances and the management issues in both acute and chronic phases of traumatic cervical spine injury.

  13. Alstrom syndrome: A rare genetic disorder and its anaesthetic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Tiwari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alstrom syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that was first described in 1959, by Carl Henry Alstrom, characterised by multiorgan system involvement ranging from ocular, aural, endocrinal, hepatorenal, gastrointestinal, respiratory and cardiac to the musculoskeletal system, among many others. It exposes the patient to various risks ranging from pulmonary aspiration and increased cardiac morbidity to separational anxiety, and may necessitate postoperative elective ventilation. We hereby present the successful management of one such diagnosed case in a 12-year-old boy, who presented to us for incision and drainage of an abscess present over the nape of his neck, along with foreign body removal from his right ear.

  14. Paravertebral block as a sole technique for the anaesthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinsley Enohumah

    2016-04-11

    Apr 11, 2016 ... with substantial energy loss, impaired vision, tinnitus, balance impairment and headaches which lasted for two years thereafter. On this occasion, she was diagnosed with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ, under the auspices of the breast screening programme, and scheduled for a wide local excision.

  15. Knowledge and attitudes of pregnant women towards anaesthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As caesarean deliveries increase globally, more women will be exposed to anaesthesia as part of the surgical procedures. Evaluation of the knowledge and attitudes of parturient will guide patient education and counselling and may improve overall satisfaction with caesarean delivery. This was a cross sectional study ...

  16. Anaesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis Ataol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by reduced activity of the C1 esterase inhibitor. Patients with hereditary angioedema are clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, airways and abdominal organs. Attacks may occur either spontaneously or following trauma, stress, surgery, infections and hormonal fluctuations. The most common cause of death is asphyxia related to laryngeal edema. Giving C1 esterase inhibitor is the most effective method of treatment. Also fresh frozen plasma, androgen steroids, quinine pathway inhibitors, antifibrinolytics and bradykinin receptor antagonists can be used as treatment. In this paper, the anesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema undergoing inguinal hernia repair surgery is reported.

  17. A review of paediatric anaesthetic-related mortality, serious adverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neonatal and paediatric perioperative risk models.16,41–44. Incidence and morbidity risks in paediatric .... perioperative mortality is 50-fold45 greater in neonates, and approximately 20-fold45 greater in infants, and may ... Poor cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) technique.68. • Inexperienced or untrained practitioners.5 ...

  18. Anaesthetic management for awake craniotomy in brain glioma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The awake brain surgery is an innovative approach in the treatment of tumors in the functional areas of the brain. There are various anesthetic techniques for awake craniotomy (AC), including asleep-awake-asleep technique, monitored anesthesia care, and the recent introduced awakeawake- awake method. We describe ...

  19. Use of EMLA cream as a topical anaesthetic before venepuncture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Needle phobia is a recognised medical disorder, affecting approximately 10% of the world population and resulting in fear and avoidance behaviour.[12] In the current study, 13.0% of the children who received EMLA cream were anxious about the procedure v. 60.0% in the control group. In an era when health of children.

  20. Effect of lidocaine-prilocaine eutectic mixture of local anaesthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neonatal circumcision is one of the oldest and most frequently performed surgical procedures on males. Newborns demonstrate strong endogenous reaction to pain and therefore modalities are being explored for optimum pain relief during circumcision. Pediatric nurses have a vital role for the use of these ...

  1. An audit of the perioperative anaesthetic management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of cerebrospinal fluid shunts is the standard treatment for hydrocephalus, but this is prone to complications, with 16% of shunts requiring revision within one month of insertion.12. Complications include infection, obstruction, haematoma, valve malfunction, disconnection, overdrainage, an outgrown shunt, shunt fracture, an ...

  2. Evaluation of local anaesthetic efficacy of the crude extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Assessment of pain induced by castration in piglets: behavioural and physiologic responses over the subsequent five days. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 82: 201-. 218. Horn T, Marx G & Borell E (1999). Behaviours of piglets during castration with and without local anaesthesia. Deutsche Tierarztliche. Wochenschrift ...

  3. Secrets of safe laparoscopic surgery: Anaesthetic and surgical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Arati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, laparoscopic surgery has gained popularity in clinical practice. The key element in laparoscopic surgery is creation of pneumoperitoneum and carbon dioxide is commonly used for insufflation. This pneumoperitoneum perils the normal cardiopulmonary system to a considerable extent. Every laparoscopic surgeon should understand the consequences of pneumoperitoneum; so that its untoward effects can be averted. Pneumoperitoneum increases pressure on diaphragm, leading to its cephalic displacement and thereby decreasing venous return, which can be aggravated by the position of patient during surgery. There is no absolute contraindication of laparoscopic surgery, though we can anticipate some problems in conditions like obesity, pregnancy and previous abdominal surgery. This review discusses some aspects of the pathophysiology of carbon dioxide induced pneumoperitoneum, its consequences as well as strategies to counteract them. Also, we propose certain guidelines for safe laparoscopic surgery.

  4. 2D3 Pilotstudy: Accelerated learning in anaesthetic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Claus Hedebo; Holdgaard, Hans Ole; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck

    2011-01-01

    to 6 and insertion of a epidural catheter from week 20 to 10. Following the simulation based course in airway management, general anaesthesia and spinal anaesthesia the residents seemed more confident with the procedures in clinical practice. It is still too early to get a clear impression about...

  5. Ventricular rhythm in atrial fibrillation under anaesthetic infusion with propofol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervigón, R; Moreno, J; Pérez-Villacastín, J; Reilly, R B; Castells, F

    2009-01-01

    Changes in patients' autonomic tone and specific pharmacologic interventions may modify the ventricular response (actual heart rate) during atrial fibrillation (AF). Hypnotic agents such as propofol may modify autonomic balance as they promote a sedative state. It has been shown that propofol slightly slows atrial fibrillatory activity, but the net global effect on the ventricular response remains unknown. We aimed to evaluate in patients in AF the effect of a propofol bolus on the ventricular rate and regularity at ECG. We analysed the possible relation with local atrial fibrillatory activities, as ratios between atrial and ventricular rates (AVRs), analysing atrial activity from intracardiac electrograms at the free wall of the right and left atria and at the interatrial septum. We compared data at the baseline and after complete hypnosis. Propofol was associated with a more homogeneous ventricular response and lower AVR values at the interatrial septum

  6. Oral Pre-anaesthetic Medication with a New Benzodiazepine Hypnotic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new benzodiazepine derivative (Ro 5-4200) was used as a hypnotic in a pilot study on 30 patients the night before an operation. The dosage used was 2 mg (1 tablet). Results proved very encouraging, and it was then decided to conduct a controlled double-blind trial comparing Ro 5-4200, phenobarbital 100 mg and a ...

  7. Oral Pre-anaesthetic Medication with a New Benzodiazepine Hypnotic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-20

    Jan 20, 1973 ... A new benzodiazepine derivative (Ro 5-4200) was used as a hypnotic in a pilot study on 30 patients the night before an operation. The dosage used was 2 mg (1 tablet). Results proved very encouraging, and it was then decided to conduct a controlled double-blind trial com- paring Ro 5-4200, ...

  8. Anaesthetic management of a case of neonatal tetanus undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient was given a diazepam based general anaesthesia with muscle relaxation and manually ventilated with 70% oxygen in air. Oxygen saturation, pulse, temperature and blood pressure were maintained at stable levels during the operation which lasted two and half hours. Early recovery of spontaneous respiration ...

  9. Anaesthetic management of a case of schwannoma with intraoral extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Bhardwaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign nerve sheath tumour. This benign lesion frequently occurs in the soft tissues of head and neck region and has various complicated growth patterns. These patients can present a challenge to the anaesthesiologist due to intraoral extension, leading to difficult mask ventilation and intubation. We report a 16 year old male with mandibular nerve schwannoma with intraoral extension. Intraoral examination revealed a diffuse swelling in the left side of soft palate with deviation of uvula to right side. He was advised gargles with 4 ml of 2% xylocaine viscous and 2–3 puffs of 10% xylocaine spray done in oral cavity and oropharynx. Check laryngoscopy revealed Cormack and Lehane grade 1 view. Patient was intubated using standard induction technique and successfully managed

  10. Anaesthetic Challenges In An Untreated Grave's Disease Parturient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Following a 500mls preload with normal saline, patient received 10mg of plain bupivacaine in the lateral position. Continuous monitoring of blood pressure, pulse rate, ECG, temperature, oxygen saturation was carried out throughout the procedure and into the post-operative period.Hypno-sedation was applied as ...

  11. Special position for the anaesthetic management of a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to achieve a suitable supine position which is fundamental during airway management, we created a hole in the operating table to fit her giant back mass. Exhibition of this special operating table may help to achieve a suitable position and ease airway management which is not possible with routine tables in cases ...

  12. Pattern of post-anaesthetic shivering at the Lagos University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perioperative thermal care was not routine; 27(77.1%) received oxygen therapy and 84.8% described it as unbearable (p<0.05). Conclusion: PAS was associated with the female gender, obstetric surgery and RA. Hypothermia recorded in shivering patients was not statistically significant. A high mean ATT contributed to the ...

  13. Anaesthetic accidents: an experience in sub-saharan Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    awaiting further oxygen therapy. However, poor breathing post-operatively despite good analgesia and adequate reversal, in the presence of continued unconsciousness necessitated re-intubation. Humidified oxygen was introduced via the ETT about 2 hrs later and this was continued for a further 48 hrs. When there was ...

  14. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    patient had no history of airway compromise during sleep or in the supine position, intramuscular morphine 4.5mg and ... he gave a history of having had radiotherapy for carcinoma of the lip, detected 7 years previously. He had .... tubation; an approach to airway assessment. Ma Zui Xue Za Zhi 1993;. 31 (3): 165 – 78. 4.

  15. Oral Pre-anaesthetic Medication with a New Benzodiazepine Hypnotic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-20

    Jan 20, 1973 ... phenobarbital and the placebo as an oral, sleep-inducing premedication. S. Afr. Med. J., 47, 109 (1973). The investigation of Ro 5-4200 (fiunitrazepam) as a pre- medication before surgery was undertaken when, on com- pletion of a pilot study, it was noted that Ro 5-4200 had interesting possibilities.

  16. Evaluation of anaesthetic characteristics of propofol in non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total serum protein (TSP) and blood urea nitrogen levels of the three groups of rabbits increased PPI though not significantly (p>0.05). Serum potassium, chlorine and bicarbonate levels of rabbits in all the three study groups increased PPI. Propofol at the dose used in this study induced rapid induction and recovery from ...

  17. Anaesthetic Challenges in a High Risk Parturient with Myasthenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of myasthenia gravis is low. The management implications of this disease in pregnant women are very challenging for anaesthetists. The objective is to highlight some of the challenges, the management and the lessons learnt during the management of this patient. This is a case report of a 31-year old ...

  18. Anaesthetic management of a patient with Crouzon syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-28

    Jun 28, 2011 ... with flat occiput and microcephaly, a prominent forehead with frontal bossing, mild exophthalmos, mild divergent strabismus, a slightly beaked nose, a compressed nasal bridge, mild mandibular prognathism, a V-shaped maxillary dental arch, a narrow and high palate, malformed, widely spaced upper teeth ...

  19. Anaesthetic and Obstetric challenges of morbid obesity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other findings included macrosomia (7 or 25.8%), gestational diabetes (13%) and pregnancy induced hypertension (7 or 22.5%).There were two neonatal deaths but no maternal deaths. Conclusion: The prevalence rate of morbid obesity is about 10% in Nigerian women of child bearing age. This mirrors a World Health ...

  20. Administering an eye anaesthetic: principles, techniques, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fahmi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The trigeminal nerve carries the sensory innervation of the eye and adnexa in three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular. The sensory fibres of the eye and adnexa are found in the ophthalmic division – with the exception of a portion of the sensory input from the lower lid, which is carried by the maxillary division. Blocking the sensory fibres provides anaesthesia so that no pain is felt.The motor supply of the extraocular muscles and levator palpebrae superioris is carried by the oculomotor (III, trochlear (IV, and abducens (VI nerves. Paralysing these muscles by blocking their motor supply provides akinesia so that the eye does not move during surgery.The motor supply of the orbicularis oculi, which is responsible for the gentle and forcible closure of the eye, is carried by the facial nerve (VII. Blocking these fibres will provide better surgical exposure. It also reduces the risk of forcing out the ocular contents if the patient tries to close his eyelids forcibly after the surgeon opens the globe.

  1. Strengthening Surgical and Anaesthetic Services at District Level in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    combined.4Poor access to timely surgical services, particularly at rural facilities, turns minor surgical pathologies into lethal conditions and a broad range of .... provision of surgical services is yet to benefit from the extensive use of telemedicine and e- health. Furthermore, although surgical services are recognized as a ...

  2. Anaesthetic considerations in a prematurely born infant with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conditions such as congenital bilateral cataract and congenital hypothyroidism may be associated with other birth defects and syndromes. Recommendations for early cataract surgery may necessitate anaesthetising premature infants with postconceptional ages less than 60 weeks, or those who have had recently ...

  3. Anaesthetic management of a patient with multiple system atrophy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parkinsonian medications. BM MNC is also being used as a modality of treatment for MSA. It exerts neuroprotective effects against dopaminergic neuronal death. Disease progression is much faster in MSA than in Parkinson's disease (PD) ...

  4. Anaesthetic considerations for liver resections in paediatric patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    morbidities that require adequate preoperative assessment and planning to improve postoperative outcomes. With the development of new surgical equipment and techniques, the anaesthestist is in a precarious position in which a delicate ...

  5. Anaesthetic management of a patient with multiple system atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. Symptoms vary from autonomic dysfunction to Parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, in any combination. MSA affects many organ systems with many possible complications and makes perioperative management of a patient with this condition ...

  6. Defining an anaesthetic curriculum for medical undergraduates. A Delphi study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rohan, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Anaesthesia is commonly taught to medical students. The duration and content of such teaching varies however and no consensus exists as to what constitutes an optimal curriculum. Anaesthetists possess the necessary knowledge and skills and operate in clinical settings suitable to provide training for medical undergraduates, especially in areas where deficiencies have been identified. This Delphi study was directed towards developing a consensus on an optimal anaesthesia, intensive care and pain medicine curriculum for medical undergraduates.

  7. Strengthening surgical and anaesthetic services at district level in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health care delivery systems are organized at several levels with the district hospital serving as the first referral for comprehensive care in the majority of countries worldwide. The provision of comprehensive surgical services requires several inputs and tools to be in place, among which are an adequately trained surgical, ...

  8. Ludwig's angina. The anaesthetic management of nine cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughnan, T E; Allen, D E

    1985-03-01

    We reviewed nine patients with Ludwig's angina who required surgical drainage over a 24-month period. This represents the largest series reported in world literature. All of these patients were managed successfully by a combination of tracheal intubation and early surgical intervention. None required tracheostomy, which is the previously recommended procedure of choice for airway management.

  9. LUDWIG’S ANGINA AND ANAESTHETIC DIFFICULTIES: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Sarda Devi; Ibemhal

    2015-01-01

    Patients with deep neck infections present challenging airways for an anesthesiologist . Ludwig’s angina is potentially lethal, rapidly spreading cellulitis involving the floor of the mouth and neck. Without aggressive management it often results in life th reatening upper airway obstruction. Securing the airway remains the top priority in treatment of Ludwig’s angina. Although awake fibreoptic intubation remains the ideal method for securing the airway, but it is not ava...

  10. special position for the anaesthetic management of a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    18.9. She was fully alert but her oxy- gen saturation (SpO2) was low (87%) without any ox- ygen supplementation. Clinically the patient had multi- ple huge masses in her neck and back and the latter was so huge that adoption of ...

  11. Ethanol and tobacco abuse in pregnancy: Anaesthetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-08

    May 8, 2003 ... arrhythmias, nausea, vomiting, insomnia and confusion with agitation and hallucinations.28 Symptoms of acute withdrawal usually begin 6 to 48 ... in the urine in 71% of newborns of parturients who smoked during pregnancy.36 The chemical composition of tobacco smoke seems more closely related to ...

  12. William James, Nitrous Oxide, and the Anaesthetic Revelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jane S; Kuza, Catherine M; Desai, Manisha S

    2018-01-01

    William James greatly influenced the fields of psychology, philosophy, and religion during the late 19 th and early 20 th centuries. This was the era of Modernism, a time when many writers rejected the certainty of Enlightenment ideals. Positivism, which rose to prominence in the early 19th century, had emphasized physical phenomena, empirical evidence, and the scientific method. Darwin's On the Origin of Species (1859), with its theory of natural selection, provided an explanation for the evolution of species apart from a divine Creator. Within this context, William James served as a "mediator between scientific agnosticism and the religious view of the world." James' own experience inhaling nitrous oxide played an important role in shaping his views. For James, the use of nitrous oxide served a key role in elucidating some of his most central ideas: 1) the value of religion, and the emphasis on mysticism and revelation (as opposed to theology and doctrine) as religion's foundation; 2) the universe as pluralistic (as opposed to absolutist, constant, eternal), driven by chance, experience, and change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Medication errors in anaesthetic practice: A report of two cases and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mistakes in the identification and administration of drugs may be fatal. This is especially so in the practice of anaesthesia. This is a report of 2 cases of near fatality due to mistakes in drug administration from look-alike medications. Objective: To highlight the significance of medication errors in our practice and ...

  14. Limited-Form Wegener Granulomatosis Case: Anaesthetic Approach and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıtaş, Tuba Berra; Şahin, Osman; Borazan, Hale; Otelcioğlu, Şeref

    2014-12-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a kind of vasculitis that affects small and medium-sized arteries. Necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis of the upper and lower respiratory tracts and necrotizing glomerulonephritis of the kidneys are present. WG affects mainly Caucasian individuals between 15-75 years old, with a mean age of onset of 41 years. It affects both males and females equally. Kidney involvement is not present in the limited form of WG. Peripheral nerve blocks are good alternatives when general anaesthesia is risky. Popliteal block is blockade of the sciatic nerve at the popliteal region. Popliteal block is a kind of peripheral block for surgeries below the knee level. In this article, we report on the anaesthesia management of a 61-year-old limited-form WG patient for whom general anaesthesia was risky because of lung involvement.

  15. Microdialysis as a tool for drug quantification in the bronchioles of anaesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottbøll, Lisa Amanda Holm; Friis, Christian

    2014-01-01

    through a tracheostomy into the distal bronchioles using an insertion tube. Intravenously administered inulin served as a marker of extracellular fluid contamination of PELF. Concentrations of free drug in MD fractions were compared to total and non-protein-bound drug concentrations in plasma. Rising...

  16. Ear acupuncture or local anaesthetics as pain relief during postpartum surgical repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindberg, S; Klünder, L; Strøm, J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate two methods of pain relief during postpartum surgical repair in regard to effectiveness, wound healing and patient evaluation. Design A randomised controlled trial testing a pragmatic set-up of brief training of clinicians. Setting Delivery ward at a Danish district hospital...

  17. ANAESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF BOCHDALEK HERNIA IN A 72-YEAR-OLD PATIENT- A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basheer Ahmed Khan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available PRESENTATION OF CASE A 72-year-old female was admitted to the hospital with the complaints of difficulty in breathing and chest discomfort after food intake since 7 months. She also complained of reflux vomiting after a regular meal for the same duration. Other complaints included weight loss, cough after taking even water and recurrent upper respiratory tract infection. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS Chest x-ray PA view shows elevated diaphragm on the left side. At this point, our differential diagnosis included hiatal hernia (fundic gas shadow, left lower lobe abscess (air fluid level and infected bulla (air fluid level.

  18. A comparison of anaesthetic recoveries in cats following induction with either alfaxalone or ketamine and diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseg, Ma; Hon, H; Bridges, J; Walsh, V

    2014-05-01

    To determine if cats anaesthetised with alfaxalone have different recoveries to cats anaesthetised with a combination of ketamine and diazepam. Anaesthesia for ovariohysterectomy was induced in cats with either alfaxalone (n=23) or a combination of ketamine and diazepam (n=22). All cats were premedicated with combinations of acepromazine and morphine. Recoveries were scored using a categorical grading scheme applied to 18 parameters over 60 minutes following extubation. The parameters scored covered movement, sensitivity to touch, sound and light, body position, sneezing and vocalisation. One person scored all recoveries and they were blinded to the induction drug used. Scores were compared between drugs at different times using the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Recovery scores were not normally distributed. Analysis of the data using the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test revealed that cats induced with alfaxalone showed an increase in recovery scores at 5 minutes for pawing at the head (p=0.001). No parameters differed significantly at 10 and 20 minutes. For cats anaesthetised with ketamine and diazepam there was an increase at 30 minutes in pacing, jerky sudden movements, unsettledness and increased sensitivity to touch at the surgical site and on the head (p≤0.01). At 60 minutes cats anaesthetised with ketamine and diazepam still showed an increase in unsettledness compared to those cats anaesthetised with alfaxalone (p=0.005). The results suggest that recoveries of cats following alfaxalone induction are significantly different to recoveries after induction with ketamine and diazepam. Overall, cats induced with ketamine and diazepam had more active and unsettled recoveries than alfaxalone over the 60-minute period observed. Cats recovering from alfaxalone anaesthesia have more settled recoveries than cats recovering from ketamine and diazepam anaesthesia. If a quiet settled recovery is desired following a surgical procedure, alfaxalone is likely to be a better choice than ketamine and diazepam.

  19. Central inhibition of initiation of swallowing by systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Sakai, Shogo; Suzuki, Taku; Ujihara, Izumi; Tsuji, Kojun; Magara, Jin; Canning, Brendan J; Inoue, Makoto

    2017-05-01

    Dysphagia is caused not only by neurological and/or structural damage but also by medication. We hypothesized memantine, dextromethorphan, diazepam, and baclofen, all commonly used drugs with central sites of action, may regulate swallowing function. Swallows were evoked by upper airway (UA)/pharyngeal distension, punctate mechanical stimulation using a von Frey filament, capsaicin or distilled water (DW) applied topically to the vocal folds, and electrical stimulation of a superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in anesthetized rats and were documented by recording electromyographic activation of the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles and by visualizing laryngeal elevation. The effects of intraperitoneal or topical administration of each drug on swallowing function were studied. Systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen, but not memantine or dextromethorphan, inhibited swallowing evoked by mechanical, chemical, and electrical stimulation. Both benzodiazepines and GABA A receptor antagonists diminished the inhibitory effects of diazepam, whereas a GABA B receptor antagonist diminished the effects of baclofen. Topically applied diazepam or baclofen had no effect on swallowing. These data indicate that diazepam and baclofen act centrally to inhibit swallowing in anesthetized rats. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen, but not memantine or dextromethorphan, inhibited swallowing evoked by mechanical, chemical, and electrical stimulation. Both benzodiazepines and GABA A receptor antagonists diminished the inhibitory effects of diazepam, whereas a GABA B receptor antagonist diminished the effects of baclofen. Topical applied diazepam or baclofen was without effect on swallowing. Diazepam and baclofen act centrally to inhibit swallowing in anesthetized rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Anaesthetic management of the child with co-existing pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, R; Vadi, M; Mason, L

    2012-12-01

    Children with co-existing pulmonary disease have a wide range of clinical manifestations with significant implications for anaesthetists. Although there are a number of pulmonary diseases in children, this review focuses on two of the most common pulmonary disorders, asthma and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). These diseases share the physiology of bronchoconstriction and variably decreased flow in the airways, but also have unique physiological consequences. The anaesthetist can make a difference in outcomes with proper preoperative evaluation and appropriate preparation for surgery in the context of a team approach to perioperative care with implementation of a stepwise approach to disease management. An understanding of the importance of minimizing the risk for bronchoconstriction and having the tools at hand to treat it when necessary is paramount in the care of these patients. Unique challenges exist in the management of pulmonary hypertension in BPD patients. This review covers medical treatment, intraoperative management, and postoperative care for both patient populations.

  1. Monitoring variables affecting positron emission tomography measurements of cerebral blood flow in anaesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Simonsen, Mette

    Background: Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of anaesthetised pig brains is a useful tool in neuroscience. Stable cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential for PET, since variations can affect the kinetics of several radiotracers. However, the impact of physiological factors regulating CBF...

  2. ANAESTHETIC MANAGEMENT IN A PATIENT WITH ARNOLD-CHI ARI MALFORMATION TYPE I AND SYRINGOMYELIA

    OpenAIRE

    Kartika; Pratap; Vijayalaxmi; Kalyan Chakravarthy; Nagaraju

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Syringomyelia is an unusual neurological condition characterised by the the presence of cystic cavity in the spinal cord resultin g in neurological manifestations. Here, we report a safe anesthetic management of patient with Arnold-Ch iari malformation type I and syringomyelia posted for foramen magnum decompression . INTRODUCTION: Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM) is a developmental malformation characterised by downward displacement of cere...

  3. Standards for labelling and storage of anaesthetic medications--an audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Khan, Fauzia Anis; Abbasi, Shemila

    2009-12-01

    To check compliance of anaesthetist to current policies set for the use of medication within operation room and for induction room floor stock. The initial audit was conducted from 1st October to 31st November 2006 and reaudit after dissemination and sharing of results within the department repeated in July-August 2007. In each audit four operating rooms were visited twice a week. Syringes were checked for standard drug labelling for narcotic and non narcotic preparations. Drug trolley was checked for any expired drugs and whether the trolley was locked in case of operating room (OR) where list was ended or was on hold. Any unattended drug was noted and Induction room was checked twice weekly for accurate drug inventory and for standard drug storage recommendations. Labels were according to standard in non narcotic drugs on 25% syringes in first audit and 63% in second audit, likewise, narcotics labels were according to standards in 41% in first and 57% in second audit. Unattended drugs were present once in first and twice in second audit. There was 100% compliance in other drug storage policy parameters in both audits. Poor compliance of drug labelling standards for both narcotic and non narcotic drugs was present. However, second audit revealed improvement in all areas of drug handling. Dissemination of policies and reminders are important for continuing improvement in use of medication within operation room and within induction room floor stock.

  4. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: review of three cases and anaesthetic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R; Jacob, A; Brooks, H

    2012-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 1000-3000 pregnancies. Gallstones are the commonest cause. Mortality and morbidity associated with pancreatitis have declined as diagnosis and management options improve. Presentation usually occurs in the third trimester or early postpartum period with severe epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, anorexia and fever. Blood investigations show an elevated white cell count and increased liver enzyme concentrations. Ultrasound is safe but has lower sensitivity than computerised tomography for detecting gallstones. Management during pregnancy has traditionally been conservative, followed by cholecystectomy after delivery. Recurrence of pancreatitis during pregnancy may necessitate more urgent surgery. The second trimester is considered the safest for surgery, with early involvement of intensive care as the condition can deteriorate rapidly. We present three cases managed in our unit over a six-month period that illustrate the spectrum of disease and the successful use of a multidisciplinary team approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrocardiogram assessment in non-anaesthetized clinically healthy agouti (Dasyprocta primnolopha, Wagler 1831

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaemilia das N. Diniz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The agouti is one of the most intensely hunted species throughout the Amazon and the semiarid regions of north-eastern Brazil. Considering the current tendency of wild animal management in captivity, the objective of this study was to determine heart reference values for agouti raised in captivity, based on electrocardiographic assessments (ECG. Adult agouti were selected without clinical signs of heart disease (n=30. The animals were restrained physically and then the ECG was performed. Standardized measurements were taken to establish the statistical analysis of the data. Analysis of the QRS complex showed values compatible with previous reports in peer animals and the limited data available for other wild and exotic species, except for the T wave that showed similar amplitude to the R wave in all the animals studied. The data obtained provided the first reference values for ECG tracings in agouti, contributing to a better understanding of heart electrophysiology in identifying myocardial pathology in these animals.

  6. Vocalizations during electroejaculation in anaesthetized adult and young pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus) males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, F; Damián, J P; Ungerfeld, R

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the vocalizations produced during electroejaculation under general anaesthesia in pampas deer males and to determine whether the characteristics of those vocalizations differ in adult and young pampas deer males. Electroejaculation was applied to 13 adults (AM) and 13 young (YM) males under general anaesthesia. Vocalizations were digitally recorded, and the number and duration of vocalizations, the latency in relation to each voltage, the total time vocalizing, and the structure of the fundamental frequency (F0) [initial frequency (F(start)), maximal frequency (F(max)), minimal frequency (F(min)) and final frequency (F(end))] were analysed. No male vocalized with 0 V; the number of animals that vocalized increased at 2 and 3 V and increased again at 4, 5 and 6 V (p V (p V (p p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). Similarly, the fundamental frequencies were higher in YM than AM (p ≤ 0.05). Overall, we concluded that the vocalizations emitted during electroejaculation in pampas deer under general anaesthesia are related to the voltage applied during the process. Young males vocalize more time, probably due to a greater sensibility to the electric stimulation. The differences in the characteristics of the vocalizations between adult and young males may be related to the anatomic differences in the neck of adult or young males. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. No cases of perioperative allergy to local anaesthetics in the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisselgaard, A D; Krøigaard, M; Mosbech, H F

    2017-01-01

    E-mediated immediate type perioperative allergic reactions to LA. METHODS: In the period 2004-2013, a total of 409 patients (244 women/165 men; median age 49 years, range 1-86 years) were investigated in DAAC on suspicion of allergy associated with anaesthesia and surgery. A total of 162 (40%) patients were exposed...... were carried out on 162 patients (89 women/73 men; mean age 49 years, range 2-85 years) with the following drugs: Lidocaine n = 80 (49%), bupivacaine n = 82 (51%), ropivacaine n = 31 (19%) and mepivacaine n = 10 (6%). All 162 patients had negative subcutaneous provocation for all tested LA (95% CI: 0-1...

  8. Anaesthetic efficacy of lidocaine/clonidine for inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadmehr, E; Aminozarbian, M G; Akhavan, A; Mahdavian, P; Davoudi, A

    2017-06-01

    This prospective, randomized, double-blind study aimed to compare the efficacy of lidocaine with epinephrine versus lidocaine with clonidine for inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) and hemodynamic stability (heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure) in patients with irreversible pulpitis. One hundred patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molar teeth randomly received 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with clonidine (15 μg mL -1 ) or 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine (12.5 μg mL -1 ), using a conventional IANB technique. Endodontic access cavities were prepared 15 min after solution deposition, and all patients were required to have profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analog scale recording) upon endodontic access cavity preparation or initial canal instrumentation. The hemodynamic parameters were measured before, during and 5, 10 and 30 min after administration. Finally, the collected data were subjected to independent t-test, chi-square and Fisher's exact test using spss software ver.20 at a significant level of 0.05. The success rates for IANB using lidocaine with epinephrine and lidocaine with clonidine solutions were 29% and 59%, respectively. The clonidine group exhibited a significantly higher success rate (P irreversible pulpitis, addition of clonidine to lidocaine improved the success rate of IANB compared to a standard lidocaine/epinephrine solution. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A retrospective study of anaesthetic management of foreign bodies in airway- a two & half years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti V Kulkarni

    2007-01-01

    In 17 % patients foreign body was located in subglottic region, in 59 % patients FB was in right main bronchus and in 24% patients it was in left main bronchus. In 33 % patients bronchoscopy was done within 72 hours of appearance of symptoms while in 51% patients bronchoscopy was done after 72 hours to one week of appearance of symptoms. In 16% patients bronchoscopy was done after one week. Twenty percent patients required tracheostomy and 3% patients required bronchodilators, nebuliza-tion and ventilatory support in immediate post operative period. All patients were managed under general anaesthesia using ketamine, suxamethonium, oxygen and halothane. All patients were ventilated through side arm of ventilating bronchoscope.All patients were discharged from hospital & no death was reported.

  10. Penetrating abdomino-thoracic injury with an iron rod: An anaesthetic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiranpreet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating abdomino-thoracic injuries are potentially life-threatening due to the associated haemorrhagic shock and visceral injury. The management of these injuries poses specific challenges in pre-hospital care, transport, and management strategies. We report a 35-year-old male having impalement injury of the left thorax and left upper arm with a metallic rod used for construction of the house after a fall from height. One rod penetrated thorax from left shoulder and exit point was present just above the iliac crest and second rod was seen piercing left upper arm. Patient was successfully managed without any intraoperative, post-operative surgical complications, neurological damage or permanent injuries.

  11. The effect of transversus abdominis plane block or local anaesthetic infiltration in inguinal hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Pernille Lykke; Mathiesen, Ole; Stjernholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    measure was pain scores while coughing between group TAP and group placebo calculated as area under the curve for the first 24 h (AUC24 h). Secondary outcomes were pain scores while coughing and at rest, opioid consumption and side effects in groups TAP, infiltration and placebo. RESULTS: Visual analogue...... pain scores while coughing and at rest demonstrated no difference between groups. Pain scores in groups infiltration, TAP and placebo were 19 versus 22 versus 15 mm at rest (P = 1.00) and 37 versus 41 versus 37 mm while coughing (P = 1.00). Pain scores at 6 h (AUC6 h) were significantly lower in group...

  12. Efficacy of Clove flower bud powder as anaesthetic for three life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In S. melanotheron- The range of the induction time for the fingerlings, juveniles and adults from 5mg/l to 30mg/l were: 52.00 ± 4.71 - 107.40 ± 12.43s, 43.00 ± 4.83 - 98.70 ± 3.92s, and 45.60 ± 4.48 - 89.80 ± 3.93s, respectively. The recovery time at 5mg/l compared with that at 30 mg/l were: fingerlings- 62.0 ± 4.45 and ...

  13. Quantitative EEG in assessment of anaesthetic depth: comparative study of methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C. E.; Prior, P. F.

    1996-01-01

    ) and (4) a depth of anaesthesia monitor based on EEG pattern recognition (ADAM). Dose-response curves are presented for stepwise increases in stable end-tidal concentrations of each agent. Results indicated considerable inter-patient variability and the limitations of single EEG measures, particularly......Methodology for assessment of depth of anaesthesia based on analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) is controversial. Techniques range from display of single measures, for example median value of the frequency spectrum, to dedicated pattern recognition systems based on measures of several EEG...

  14. Immobilisation of southern elephant seals and leopard seals with cyclohexamine anaesthetics and xylazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, P J; Burton, H R

    1991-10-12

    Ketamine and xylazine were given to 55 southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) for stomach lavaging, and to three leopard seals (Hydrurga leptonyx). The elephant seals showed prolonged apnoea and two of them died owing to aspiration of stomach contents. Two of the leopard seals died from unknown causes. Tiletamine and zolazepam were given to five elephant seals and one leopard seal. Two of the elephant seals and the leopard seal died from unknown causes. Xylazine alone was administered to 34 leopard seals. Sedation was poor at low dose rates (less than 1.7 mg/kg) but four of the seals given higher dose rates died owing to the aspiration of stomach contents.

  15. The ultrasound guided psoas-compartment-block fundamentals and technique for a new regional anaesthetic procedure

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchmair, L P M

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has proven to be an useful adjunct during the performance of peripheral nerve blocks. This study is the first dealing with the application of US guidance for the psoas-compartment-block which is used to achieve lumbar plexus blockades. A pilot study was carried out to establish the US anatomy of the lumbar paravertebral region and its blood vessels. Moreover, suitable transducers and US frequencies were assessed. The feasibility of US imaging of the psoas-compartment was studied on healthy volunteers (N=21) of varying body types (normal weight: N= 13; overweight: N=5; obese: N=3) in a first volunteer study. Additionally, the skin-plexus distances were measured. A second volunteer study (N=21) was carried out to investigate the US anatomy of the paravertebral blood vessels by means of power Doppler sonography. The technique of an US guided approach to the psoas-compartment was tested on embalmed cadavers (N=10) at the levels L2/L3, L3/L4 and L4/L5. Accuracy and safety of this technique were ver...

  16. Is it safe to inject local anaesthetic with adrenaline into the pinna and external nose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Emma; Henderson, Arthur; Waddell, Angus

    2018-02-09

    Adrenaline containing lidocaine preparations such as lignospan are routinely used in ear, nose and throat (ENT) care. Despite this, textbooks and internet resources warn against their use in peripheries, including the nose and ear. As a result, they are commonly avoided by other specialties, such as emergency medicine. This article reports on the findings of a review undertaken to assess the evidence of harm associated with using lignospan in the pinna and external nose. A literature search was carried out, and retrospective data were collected on all elective facial skin lesion surgery in the ENT department at the Great Western Hospital in Swindon between 2005 and 2015. Cases using lignospan in the pinna and nose were included. The literature search revealed no reports of ischaemic complications of the pinna or nose following use of lignospan, or similar preparation. Of the 1,409 cases collected, no ischaemic complications were recorded. The article concludes that adrenaline containing lidocaine preparations such as lignospan are safe for use in the pinna and nose, and should be considered for use in emergency departments. ©2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  17. A survey of anaesthetic practice in predicting difficult intubation in UK and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Duncan; Vaughan, Ralph S; Wilkes, Antony R; Mapleson, William W; Hodzovic, Iljaz

    2012-05-01

    Unexpected difficulty in tracheal intubation is an intermittent and often terrifying problem for all practising anaesthetists. There are many preoperative assessment tests to predict a difficult laryngeal view or a difficult intubation, but we found no published evidence of how frequently these predictive tests are used or how useful they are perceived to be by anaesthetists. We decided to ask UK and non-UK anaesthetists attending the Annual Scientific Meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology about their practice in predicting difficult intubation. The study was conceived as a survey. The airway tests were compiled into a questionnaire, hand distributed among anaesthetists at Euroanaesthesia - the European group (after excluding UK attendees) - and posted to randomly selected anaesthetists in the UK - the UK group. Overall, 888 of 1230 (72%) questionnaires were completed. The response rate from the UK group of anaesthetists was 69% (481 of 700) and from the European group was 77% (407 of 530). On a scale 1 (never) to 5 (always), the mean score for frequency of use was similar for both groups of anaesthetists and ranged from about 4 for mouth opening to about 1 for Nodding Donkey. The mean score for usefulness (1 = useless, 5 = extremely useful) ranged from about 3.7 to 2 for the same two tests. The UK group found most tests slightly less useful than did the European group. With regard to the frequency of assessing the airway, 9% of the European group, but 16% of the UK group, failed always (score 5) or regularly (score 4) to assess the airway before general anaesthesia. Furthermore, 21 and 36% of the UK and European groups, respectively, failed to do so before regional anaesthesia. These results are a cause for concern with regard to both airway management training and patient safety.

  18. The power of words: sources of anxiety in patients undergoing local anaesthetic plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddick, J; Jawad, S; Southern, S; Majumder, S

    2012-03-01

    With local or regional anaesthesia being employed for more as well as more complex surgical procedures, an increasing number of patients remain fully conscious during their operation. This is generally perceived as being advantageous to the patient as less time is spent in hospital and the side effects of general anaesthesia are avoided. However, there is no direct measure of the patient experience during 'awake surgery', in particular of which aspects of the process may be distressing. Seventy patients undergoing day case plastic surgery under local anaesthesia were asked to complete a short questionnaire immediately following their operation. This was designed to identify specific factors likely to either increase or reduce anxiety during surgery. The questionnaire was initially validated on a pilot group of ten patients. Unsurprisingly, painful stimuli such as injections were identified as potential stressors. More interestingly, the data highlighted that some commonly used surgical terms such as 'knife' and 'scalpel' provoke considerable anxiety in the conscious patient. This varied according to age and sex with younger and female patients being most vulnerable. Other events identified as potential stressors, such as casual conversations and movements among theatre staff, were actually shown to be non-stressful and, in some cases, stress relieving. Technical jargon used by surgical staff can elevate anxiety levels among patients who are awake for their operation. Careful consideration of the words we use may reduce this, particularly in female patients.

  19. The insulinotropic effect of exogenous GLP-1 is not affected by acute vagotomy in anaesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veedfald, Simon; Hansen, Marie; Christensen, Louise Wulff

    2016-01-01

    -arterially(mesenteric) for 1 h at 3 pmol kg(-1) min(-1) or 30 pmol kg(-1) min(-1) . During steady state (21 min into the GLP-1 infusion), glucose (0.2 g/kg, iv) was administered over 9 min to stimulate beta cell secretion. 30 min after the glucose infusion GLP-1 infusions were discontinued. Following a washout period...... the vagal trunks were severed in 4/6 groups (vagal trunks were left intact in 2/6 groups), whereupon all infusions were repeated. We found no effect of vagotomy on insulin or glucagon secretion during administration of exogenous GLP-1 in any experiment. We speculate that the effect of exogenous GLP-1...

  20. Anaesthetic neurotoxicity and neuroplasticity : an expert group report and statement based on the BJA Salzburg Seminar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, V.; Absalom, A. R.; Blomgren, K.; Brambrink, A.; Crosby, G.; Culley, D. J.; Fiskum, G.; Giffard, R. G.; Herold, K. F.; Loepke, A. W.; Ma, D.; Orser, B. A.; Planel, E.; Slikker, W.; Soriano, S. G.; Stratmann, G.; Vutskits, L.; Xie, Z.; Hemmings, H. C.

    Although previously considered entirely reversible, general anaesthesia is now being viewed as a potentially significant risk to cognitive performance at both extremes of age. A large body of preclinical as well as some retrospective clinical evidence suggest that exposure to general anaesthesia

  1. Fractured Tracheostomy Tube in Left Main Bronchus with No Mouth Opening: An Anaesthetic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghya Mukherjee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body aspiration is a serious medical condition that demands prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent fatal complications. This is a case report of a 42 year male with history of surgery for carcinoma tongue, hemiglossectomy and tracheostomy. He presented with dislodged fractured metallic tracheostomy tube in left main bronchus. Patient was breathing through stenosed tracheostomy stoma with bilateral normal air entry in chest. He was haemodynamically stable. Rigid bronchoscopic removal was impossible due to no mouth opening. After securing airway, general anaesthesia was induced and thoracotomy was performed to remove dislodged tube. Proper planning and coordinated team work resulted in good outcome.

  2. [Legal characteristics of expert opinions of anaesthetic cases of the North German Arbitration Board].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffartzik, Walter; Hachenberg, Thomas; Kols, Kerstin; Neu, Johann

    2016-05-01

    The Arbitration Board for Medical Liability Issues of the State Medical Councils of Northern Germany in Hannover (North German Arbitration Board, NGAB) settles about 100 cases in the area of anaesthesiology per year. In these proceedings the patient carries the burden of proof. I. e. the patient has to prove that its health damage was caused by a medical error. Nevertheless, for individual cases the NGAB examines also whether facilitation of the burden of proof can be granted to the patient. This article exemplifies cases, for which the NGAB recognized such facilitation of the burden of proof. In each of these cases, the NGAB asserted the damage claim. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Effect of warming anaesthetic solutions on pain during dental injection. A randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Christian Aravena

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effectiveness of warming anesthetic solutions on pain produced during the administration of anesthesia in maxillary dental infiltration technique. Material and Methods: A double-blind cross-over clinical study was designed. Fifty-six volunteer students (mean age 23.1±2.71 years of the Dental School at Universidad Austral de Chile (Valdivia, Chile participated in the study. Subjects were given 0.9ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:100.000 epinephrine (Alphacaine®; Nova DFL - Brazil by two punctions at buccal vestibule of lateral incisor. Warm anesthesia at 42°C (107.6°F was administered in a hemi-arch; and after one week anesthesia at room temperature (21°C; 69.8°F and at a standardized speed was administered at the contralateral side. The intensity of pain felt during injection was registered and compared using visual analog scale (VAS of 100mm (Wilcoxon test p<0.05. Results: The use of anesthesia at room temperature caused a VAS-pain intensity of 34.2±16.6mm, and anesthesia at 42°C a VAS-pain intensity of 15.7±17.4mm (p<0.0001. Conclusion: The use of anesthesia at 42°C resulted in a significantly lower pain intensity perception during injection compared with the use of anesthesia at room temperature during maxillary infiltration technique.

  4. [McArdle disease or glycogen storage disease type v: Should it affect anaesthetic management?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerza-Casas, V; Ferreira-Laso, L; Alloza-Fortun, M C; Fraile-Jimenez, A E

    2015-02-01

    McArdle disease is a metabolic myopathy that can may lead to severe perioperative problems. A case is reported of a woman with a history of McArdle disease, who was scheduled for a mastectomy. An understanding of the physiology and pathology, and the application of appropriate preventive measures can avoid complications. A overview of the complications and the management are described. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of premedicants and general anaesthetics on gastrointestinal motility in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamski, J.

    1990-01-01

    In experiments with 27 dogs aged 2 to 5 years, in three groups, morphine 1 mg/kg body weight. Eunarcon 50 mg/kg and Tranquiline 5 mg/kg slowed down the peristalsis of the digestive tract, as shown by radiological monitoring of barium sulfate passage. In dogs treated with morphine 12 hours on average were required for the contrast substance to arrive in the rectum, for Eunarcon 9 hours and for Tranquiline 6 hours

  6. Anaesthetic Management of A Patient with Sturge-Weber Syndrome Undergoing Oophorectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Gandhi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by leptomeningeal and facial angiomas, neurologic and ocular manifestations. We report a case of oophorectomy for ovarian dermoid in a 14 year -old girl who was a diagnosed case of Sturge-Weber Syndrome. General anaesthesia was given for the procedure. The perioperative anaesthestic management is discussed in the present report.

  7. Analgesic, Anxiolytic and Anaesthetic Effects of Melatonin: New Potential Uses in Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Marseglia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous melatonin is used in a number of situations, first and foremost in the treatment of sleep disorders and jet leg. However, the hypnotic, antinociceptive, and anticonvulsant properties of melatonin endow this neurohormone with the profile of a drug that modulates effects of anesthetic agents, supporting its potential use at different stages during anesthetic procedures, in both adults and children. In light of these properties, melatonin has been administered to children undergoing diagnostic procedures requiring sedation or general anesthesia, such as magnetic resonance imaging, auditory brainstem response tests and electroencephalogram. Controversial data support the use of melatonin as anxiolytic and antinociceptive agents in pediatric patients undergoing surgery. The aim of this review was to evaluate available evidence relating to efficacy and safety of melatonin as an analgesic and as a sedative agent in children. Melatonin and its analogs may have a role in antinociceptive therapies and as an alternative to midazolam in premedication of adults and children, although its effectiveness is still controversial and available data are clearly incomplete.

  8. Postoperative recovery profile after elective abdominal hysterectomy: a prospective, observational study of a multimodal anaesthetic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Kehlet, Henrik; Lund, Claus M

    2009-01-01

    epidural analgesia (bupivacaine, morphine) was feasible in more than 90% of all patients. In the postanaesthesia care unit, 64% did not require opioids, but 25% experienced severe pain. Mean length of stay was 2 h with a mean discharge readiness of 80 min. Half the patients required supplemental oxygen...... for 1 h or more to sustain an SpO2 greater than 92%, and 8% experienced nausea or vomiting. A complicated recovery, defined as the presence of severe complaints (pain, nausea or vomiting), with more than five treatment interventions in the postanaesthesia care unit, or a length of stay more than 2 h...... patients scheduled for the procedure at a major university hospital in Denmark. Perioperative treatments and postoperative complaints were recorded continuously until discharge from the postanaesthesia care unit. Main outcome measures were treatment regimen adherence, pain, nausea and vomiting, respiratory...

  9. Efficacy of sodium bicarbonate as anaesthetic for yellow seahorse, Hippocampus kuda (Bleeker, 1852)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pawar, H.B.; Ingole, B.S.; Sreepada, R.A.

    In the present investigation anesthetic efficacy of sodium bicarbonate on yellow seahorse Hippocampus kuda was studied. Captive bred two years old (163.2±10.2 mm height and 12.22±1.94 g weight) yellow seahorses were exposed to 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6...

  10. Medication errors in anaesthetic practice: a report of two cases and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... and packaging of drugs is a major source of mistakes in our practice just as was illustrated in these case reports. The difference in drug appearance between the generic and the brand name product as well as differences in drug ... relationship with red and relaxants, it was decided to try to get a red syringe ...

  11. The effects of relocation to a new hospital on the first anaesthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Relocation of a hospital is a big challenge anywhere in the world. The aim of this study is to document our regional experience, highlight the challenges faced and crisis management with the possibility of identifying features of relocation strategy that can be employed in the future. Methods: This is a prospective ...

  12. Anaesthetic Management of Parturient with Acute Atrial Fibrillation for Emergency Caesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-antenatal lady with critical mitral stenosis presented for emergency caesarean section with fetal distress. She had acute onset atrial fibrillation. She was given a combined spinal epidural (CSE anaesthesia and her arrhythmia was successfully managed after delivery of the baby with intravenous calcium channel blocker. Mitral stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease complicating pregnancy in developing countries. The physiological changes during pregnancy may exacerbate their cardiac symptoms. They may present with complications like congestive cardiac failure, atrial fibrillation, or pulmonary thromboembolism during the antenatal, intrapartum, or postpartum period. Here we discuss the management of parturient woman with high maternal and fetal risk presenting for emergency caesarean. The merits of regional anaesthesia and the importance of invasive monitoring are also discussed.

  13. What to do in the event of an adverse anaesthetic event or medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An “adverse event” is harm, injury or a complication. It may or may not result from error. A “medical error” can be serious (has the potential to cause permanent injury or is transient, but potentially constitutes life-threatening harm), minor (does not cause harm or have the potential to do so), a “near miss” (an error that could ...

  14. Efficacy of Clove flower bud powder as anaesthetic for three life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    and eugenol, 2.86 - 3.4min (Charoendat, et al., 2009). Considering the various induction (1.23-1.78mins) and recovery (1.1-2mins) times, at 10-30mg/l clove powder obtained in this study, for the three life stages of S. melantheron, O. niloticus and T. guineensis, the powder can be said to meet the ideal criteria for an.

  15. Recovery at the post anaesthetic care unit after breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gärtner, Rune; Callesen, Torben; Kroman, Niels Thorndahl

    2010-01-01

    Extant literature shows that women having undergone breast cancer surgery have substantial problems at the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU). Based on nursing reports and elements of the discharge scoring system recommended by The Danish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine...

  16. The Food Contaminant Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Inhibits the Swallowing Reflex in Anaesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abysique, Anne; Tardivel, Catherine; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Félix, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on cereals, is known to be implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and animals. Among the symptoms, anorexia, reduction of weight gain and decreased nutrition efficiency were described, but the mechanisms underlying these effects on feeding behavior are not yet totally understood. Swallowing is a major motor component of ingestive behavior which allows the propulsion of the alimentary bolus from the mouth to the esophagus. To better understand DON effects on ingestive behaviour, we have studied its effects on rhythmic swallowing in the rat, after intravenous and central administration. Repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve or of the tractus solitarius, induces rhythmic swallowing that can be recorded using electromyographic electrodes inserted in sublingual muscles. Here we provide the first demonstration that, after intravenous and central administration, DON strongly inhibits the swallowing reflex with a short latency and in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, using c-Fos staining, a strong neuronal activation was observed in the solitary tract nucleus which contains the central pattern generator of swallowing and in the area postrema after DON intravenous injection. Our data show that DON modifies swallowing and interferes with central neuronal networks dedicated to food intake regulation.

  17. The Food Contaminant Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Inhibits the Swallowing Reflex in Anaesthetized Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Abysique, Anne; Tardivel, Catherine; Troadec, Jean-Denis; F?lix, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on cereals, is known to be implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and animals. Among the symptoms, anorexia, reduction of weight gain and decreased nutrition efficiency were described, but the mechanisms underlying these effects on feeding behavior are not yet totally understood. Swallowing is a major motor component of ingestive behavior which allows the propulsion of the alimentary bolu...

  18. Pathological muscle activation patterns in patients with massive rotator cuff tears, with and without subacromial anaesthetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, F.; Groot, J.H.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; van de Sande, M.A.; Rozing, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    A mechanical deficit due to a massive rotator cuff tear is generally concurrent to a pain-induced decrease of maximum arm elevation and peak elevation torque. The purpose of this study was to measure shoulder muscle coordination in patients with massive cuff tears, including the effect of

  19. The Food Contaminant Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Inhibits the Swallowing Reflex in Anaesthetized Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Abysique

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on cereals, is known to be implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and animals. Among the symptoms, anorexia, reduction of weight gain and decreased nutrition efficiency were described, but the mechanisms underlying these effects on feeding behavior are not yet totally understood. Swallowing is a major motor component of ingestive behavior which allows the propulsion of the alimentary bolus from the mouth to the esophagus. To better understand DON effects on ingestive behaviour, we have studied its effects on rhythmic swallowing in the rat, after intravenous and central administration. Repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve or of the tractus solitarius, induces rhythmic swallowing that can be recorded using electromyographic electrodes inserted in sublingual muscles. Here we provide the first demonstration that, after intravenous and central administration, DON strongly inhibits the swallowing reflex with a short latency and in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, using c-Fos staining, a strong neuronal activation was observed in the solitary tract nucleus which contains the central pattern generator of swallowing and in the area postrema after DON intravenous injection. Our data show that DON modifies swallowing and interferes with central neuronal networks dedicated to food intake regulation.

  20. Anaesthetic management of case of Ludwig’s angina: Forewarned is forearmed

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh, Safiya Imtiaz; B M, Sarala; Bhosale, Raghavendra

    2014-01-01

    Ludwig's angina and deep neck infections are potentially lethal entities because of their tendency to cause oedema, distortion, and obstruction of the airway and may arise as a consequence of airway management mishaps. In the early stages of the disease, patients may be managed with observation and intravenous antibiotics. Advanced infections, however, require the airway to be secured in addition to immediate surgical drainage. This is complicated by pain, trismus, airway oedema, and tongue d...