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Sample records for anaerobically induced small

  1. Translational regulation of gene expression by an anaerobically induced small non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H.

    2010-01-01

    of at least one sRNA regulator. Here, we extend this view by the identification and characterization of a highly conserved, anaerobically induced small sRNA in E. coli, whose expression is strictly dependent on the anaerobic transcriptional fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR). The sRNA, named Fnr......Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as important elements of gene regulatory circuits. In enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella many of these sRNAs interact with the Hfq protein, an RNA chaperone similar to mammalian Sm-like proteins and act in the post....... Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating...

  2. SLEEP DEPRIVATION INDUCED ANXIETY AND ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Arzu Vardar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1 following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements, (2 following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3 following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02 whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance

  3. Anaerobic exercise - Induced changes in serum mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaerobic exercise, a non 02 – dependent energy metabolism leads to transient metabolic changes, which are corrected gradually by homestatic mechanism. We investigated in eight male subjects, the effects of anaerobic exercise after a day sedentary activity on serum mineral concentration. There was significant ...

  4. Trace elements induce predominance among methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babett Wintsche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trace elements play an essential role in all organisms due to their functions in enzyme complexes. In anaerobic digesters, control and supplementation of trace elements lead to stable and more efficient methane production processes while trace element deficits cause process imbalances. However, the underlying metabolic mechanisms and the adaptation of the affected microbial communities to such deficits are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the microbial community dynamics and resulting process changes induced by trace element deprivation. Two identical lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with distiller’s grains and supplemented with trace elements (cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, tungsten and a commercial iron additive were operated in parallel. After 72 weeks of identical operation, the feeding regime of one reactor was changed by omitting trace element supplements and reducing the amount of iron additive. Both reactors were operated for further 21 weeks. Various process parameters (biogas production and composition, total solids and volatile solids, trace element concentration, volatile fatty acids, total ammonium nitrogen, total organic acids/alkalinity ratio, and pH and the composition and activity of the microbial communities were monitored over the total experimental time. While the methane yield remained stable, the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, total ammonia nitrogen, and acetate increased in the trace element-depleted reactor compared to the well-supplied control reactor. Methanosarcina and Methanoculleus dominated the methanogenic communities in both reactors. However, the activity ratio of these two genera was shown to depend on trace element supplementation explainable by different trace element requirements of their energy conservation systems. Methanosarcina dominated the well-supplied anaerobic digester, pointing to acetoclastic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway. Under trace element

  5. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions.

  6. Decentralized application of anaerobic digesters in small poultry farms: performance analysis of high rate self mixed anaerobic digester and conventional fixed dome anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A Gangagni; Gandu, Bharath; Sandhya, K; Kranti, K; Ahuja, Shruti; Swamy, Y V

    2013-09-01

    Biomethanation of poultry litter was studied in conventional fixed dome anaerobic digester (CFDAD) and high rate self mixed anaerobic digester (SMAD) for possible decentralized application in poultry farms generating litter in the range of 500 kg/day. The performance of CFDAD and SMAD was compared. The study revealed that optimized hydraulic residence time (HRT), volatile solids (VS) loading rate, VS reduction, methane yield was 24 days, 4.0 kg VS/m(3)/day, 64%, 0.15 m(3)/(kg VS fed) and 40 days, 2.15 kg/m(3)/day, 42%, 0.083 m(3)/(kg VS fed) for SMAD and CFDAD, respectively. Better results with SMAD could be attributed to specific design features and intermittent mixing of the digester contents due to self-mixing mechanism. Preliminary cost estimates revealed that installation of SMAD would be remunerative for the farmer in terms of biogas and bio-manure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Life cycle assessment of a small-scale anaerobic digestion plant from cattle waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezzullo, William G.; McManus, Marcelle C.; Hammond, Geoff P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Emissions from plant manufacture contributed little towards the lifecycle impacts. ► The use phase of the AD plant could have significant impacts. ► Production of biogas and fertiliser created significant impacts. ► The consequential displacement of kerosene showed a net-benefit. ► The study concluded that it is essential to cover the digestate storage tank. -- Abstract: This paper outlines the results of a comprehensive life cycle study of the production of energy, in the form of biogas, using a small scale farm based cattle waste fed anaerobic digestion (AD) plant. The life cycle assessment (LCA) shows that in terms of environmental and energy impact the plant manufacture contributes very little to the whole life cycle impacts. The results show that compared with alternative energy supply the production and use of biogas is beneficial in terms of greenhouse gases and fossil fuel use. This is mainly due to the replacement of the alternative, kerosene, and from fertiliser production from the AD process. However, these benefits come at a cost to ecosystem health and the production of respiratory inorganics. These were found to be a result of ammonia emissions during the production phase of the biogas. These damages can be significantly reduced if further emission control measures are undertaken.

  8. Anaerobic Digestion of Cattle Manure Influenced by Swirling Jet Induced Hydrodynamic Cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, Michela; Soldano, Mariangela; Fabbri, Claudio; Pirozzi, Francesco; Andreottola, Gianni

    2017-10-04

    In this work, a modified swirling jet-induced cavitation has been employed for increasing anaerobic digestion efficiency of cattle manure. The hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) treatment improved the organic matter solubilization and the anaerobic biodegradability of cattle manure. The degree of disintegration increased by 5.8, 8.9, and 15.8% after the HC treatment at 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 bars, respectively. However, the HC treatment at 7.0 bars had better results in terms of methane production. This result may be attributed to the possible formation of toxic and refractory compounds at higher inlet pressures, which could inhibit the methanization process. Further, total Kjeldahl nitrogen content was found to decrease with increasing inlet pressures, as the pH and the turbulent mixing favored the ammonia stripping processes. HC treatment decreased the viscosity of the treated cattle manure, favoring the manure pumping and mixing. Considerations on the energy input due to the HC pre-treatment and the energy output due to the enhanced methane yield have been presented. A positive energy balance can be obtained looking at the improved operational practices in the anaerobic digesters after the implementation of the HC pre-treatment.

  9. Microbial Community Response to Seasonal Temperature Variation in a Small-Scale Anaerobic Digester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Michel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Bacterial and Archaeal communities in a 1.14 m3 ambient temperature anaerobic digester treating dairy cow manure were investigated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP and direct sequencing of the cloned polymerase chain reaction (PCR products. Results indicate shifts in the structure of the both the Archaeal and Bacterial communities coincided with digester re-inoculation as well as temperature and loading rate changes. Following re-inoculation of the sour digester, the predominant Archaea shifted from Methanobrevibacter to Methanosarcina, which was the most abundant Archaea in the inoculum. Methonosarcina was replaced by Methanosaeta after the resumption of digester loading in the summer of 2010. Methanosaeta began to decline in abundance as the digester temperature cooled in the fall of 2010 while Methanobrevibacter increased in abundance. The microbial community rate of change was variable during the study period, with the most rapid changes occurring after re-inoculation.

  10. Biogeochemical changes induced in uranium mining waste pile samples by uranyl nitrate treatments under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, A; Merroun, M; Geipel, G; Reuther, H; Selenska-Pobell, S

    2009-06-01

    Response of the subsurface soil bacterial community of a uranium mining waste pile to treatments with uranyl nitrate over different periods of time was studied under anaerobic conditions. The fate of the added U(VI) without supplementation with electron donors was investigated as well. By using 16S rRNA gene retrieval, we demonstrated that incubation with uranyl nitrate for 4 weeks resulted in a strong reduction in and even disappearance of some of the most predominant bacterial groups of the original sample. Instead, a strong proliferation of denitrifying and uranium-resistant populations of Rahnella spp. from Gammaproteobacteria and of Firmicutes occurred. After longer incubations for 14 weeks with uranyl nitrate, bacterial diversity increased and populations intrinsic to the untreated samples such as Bacteroidetes and Deltaproteobacteria propagated and replaced the above-mentioned uranium-resistant groups. This indicated that U(VI) was immobilized. Mössbauer spectroscopic analysis revealed an increased Fe(III) reduction by increasing the incubation time from four to 14 weeks. This result signified that Fe(III) was used as an electron acceptor by the bacterial community established at the later stages of the treatment. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that no detectable amounts of U(VI) were reduced to U(IV) in the time frames of the performed experiments. The reason for this observation is possibly due to the low level of electron donors in the studied oligotrophic environment. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that most of the added U(VI) was bound by organic or inorganic phosphate phases both of biotic origin.

  11. Exercise- and Hypoxia-Induced Anaerobic Metabolism and Recovery: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Teleost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, B. B.; Boily, P.; Williamson, L. A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism is recruited in vertebrates under conditions of intense exercise or lowered environmental oxygen availability (hypoxia), typically resulting in the accumulation of lactate in blood and tissues. Lactate will be cleared over time after the reoxygenation of tissues, eventually returning to control levels. Here, we present a…

  12. Hypercholesterolemia induced cerebral small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Peter; Schuhmann, Michael K; Garz, Cornelia; Jandke, Solveig; Urlaub, Daniela; Mencl, Stine; Zernecke, Alma; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Carare, Roxana O; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Schreiber, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    While hypercholesterolemia plays a causative role for the development of ischemic stroke in large vessels, its significance for cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) remains unclear. We thus aimed to understand the detailed relationship between hypercholesterolemia and CSVD using the well described Ldlr-/- mouse model. We used Ldlr-/- mice (n = 16) and wild-type (WT) mice (n = 15) at the age of 6 and 12 months. Ldlr-/- mice develop high plasma cholesterol levels following a high fat diet. We analyzed cerebral capillaries and arterioles for intravascular erythrocyte accumulations, thrombotic vessel occlusions, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and microbleeds. We found a significant increase in the number of erythrocyte stases in 6 months old Ldlr-/- mice compared to all other groups (P hypercholesterolemia is related to a thrombotic CSVD phenotype, which is different from hypertension-related CSVD that associates with a hemorrhagic CSVD phenotype. Our data demonstrate a relationship between hypercholesterolemia and the development of CSVD. Ldlr-/- mice appear to be an adequate animal model for research into CSVD.

  13. Sublethal Concentrations Of Antibiotics Cause Shift To Anaerobic Metabolism In Listeria Monocytogenes And Induce Phenotypes Linked To Antibiotic Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Ng, Yin; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    to the coexistence with antibiotic-producing organisms during its saprophytic lifestyle. To determine if tolerance could be induced or potentially alter virulence, we investigated the transcriptome after exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Results: Four antibiotics caused induction of the alcohol...... dehydrogenase gene lmo1634 and repression of alsA and lmo1992, which are involved in acetoin production leading to more ethanol and less acetoin production. This shift in central metabolism indicates a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, that could reduce oxidative stress and be a survival strategy...... in response to antibiotics. We investigated the antibiotic tolerance of a Δlmo1634 mutant, however; it was comparable with the wild-type in a killing assay. L. monocytogenes encodes a second alcohol dehydrogenase lmo1179, which potentially could cause a redundant pathway and this is under further...

  14. Xylose-induced dynamic effects on metabolism and gene expression in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae in anaerobic glucose-xylose cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alff-Tuomala, Susanne; Salusjärvi, Laura; Barth, Dorothee; Oja, Merja; Penttilä, Merja; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka; Ruohonen, Laura; Jouhten, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Xylose is present with glucose in lignocellulosic streams available for valorisation to biochemicals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has excellent characteristics as a host for the bioconversion, except that it strongly prefers glucose to xylose, and the co-consumption remains a challenge. Further, since xylose is not a natural substrate of S. cerevisiae, the regulatory response it induces in an engineered strain cannot be expected to have evolved for its utilisation. Xylose-induced effects on metabolism and gene expression during anaerobic growth of an engineered strain of S. cerevisiae on medium containing both glucose and xylose medium were quantified. The gene expression of S. cerevisiae with an XR-XDH pathway for xylose utilisation was analysed throughout the cultivation: at early cultivation times when mainly glucose was metabolised, at times when xylose was co-consumed in the presence of low glucose concentrations, and when glucose had been depleted and only xylose was being consumed. Cultivations on glucose as a sole carbon source were used as a control. Genome-scale dynamic flux balance analysis models were simulated to analyse the metabolic dynamics of S. cerevisiae. The simulations quantitatively estimated xylose-dependent flux dynamics and challenged the utilisation of the metabolic network. A relative increase in xylose utilisation was predicted to induce the bi-directionality of glycolytic flux and a redox challenge even at low glucose concentrations. Remarkably, xylose was observed to specifically delay the glucose-dependent repression of particular genes in mixed glucose-xylose cultures compared to glucose cultures. The delay occurred at a cultivation time when the metabolic flux activities were similar in the both cultures.

  15. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  16. Mass spectrometric comparison of swift heavy ion-induced and anaerobic thermal degradation of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, V.; Hossain, U. H.; Walbert, T.; Seidl, T.; Ensinger, W.

    2018-03-01

    The study of polymers irradiated by highly energetic ions and the resulting radiation-induced degradation is of major importance for space and particle accelerator applications. The mechanism of ion-induced molecular fragmentation of polyethylene, polyethyleneimine and polyamide was investigated by means of mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the introduction of nitrogen and oxygen into the polymer influences the stability rendering aliphatic polymers with heteroatoms less stable. A comparison to thermal decomposition data from literature reveals that ion-induced degradation is different in its bond fracture mechanism. While thermal degradation starts at the weakest bond, which is usually the carbon-heteroatom bond, energetic ion irradiation leads in the first step to scission of all types of bonds creating smaller molecular fragments. This is due to the localized extreme energy input under non-equilibrium conditions when the ions transfer kinetic energy onto electrons. These findings are of relevance for the choice of polymers for long-term application in both space and accelerator facilities.

  17. Dissolution Coupled Biodegradation of Pce by Inducing In-Situ Biosurfactant Production Under Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominic, J.; Nambi, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have proven to enhance the bioavailability and thereby elevate the rate of degradation of Light Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) such as crude oil and petroleum derivatives. In spite of their superior characteristics, use of these biomolecules for remediation of Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) such as chlorinated solvents is still not clearly understood. In this present study, we have investigated the fate of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by inducing in-situ biosurfactants production, a sustainable option which hypothesizes increase in bioavailability of LNAPLs. In order to understand the effect of biosurfactants on dissolution and biodegradation under the inducement of in-situ biosurfactant production, batch experiments were conducted in pure liquid media. The individual influence of each process such as biosurfactant production, dissolution of PCE and biodegradation of PCE were studied separately for getting insights on the synergistic effect of each process on the fate of PCE. Finally the dissolution coupled biodegradation of non aqueous phase PCE was studied in conditions where biosurfactant production was induced by nitrate limitation. The effect of biosurfactants was differentiated by repeating the same experiments were the biosurfactant production was retarded. The overall effect of in-situ biosurfactant production process was evaluated by use of a mathematical model. The process of microbial growth, biosurfactant production, dissolution and biodegradation of PCE were translated as ordinary differential equations. The modelling exercise was mainly performed to get insight on the combined effects of various processes that determine the concentration of PCE in its aqueous and non-aqueous phases. Model simulated profiles of PCE with the kinetic coefficients evaluated earlier from individual experiments were compared with parameters fitted for observations in experiments with dissolution coupled biodegradation process using optimization

  18. Thermophilic anaerobes in arctic marine sediments induced to mineralize complex organic matter at high temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Arnosti, Carol; Brüchert, Volker

    2010-01-01

    temperature-induced food chain mirrors sediment microbial processes occurring at cold in situ temperatures (near 0°C), yet it is catalysed by a completely different set of microorganisms. Using sulfate reduction rates (SRR) as a proxy for organic matter mineralization showed that differences in organic matter......Marine sediments harbour diverse populations of dormant thermophilic bacterial spores that become active in sediment incubation experiments at much higher than in situ temperature. This response was investigated in the presence of natural complex organic matter in sediments of two Arctic fjords...... enzymatic capacities for organic polymer degradation could allow specific heterotrophic populations like these to play a role in sustaining microbial metabolism in the deep, warm, marine biosphere....

  19. Autophagonizer, a novel synthetic small molecule, induces autophagic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, In-Kwon; Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-19

    Autophagy is an apoptosis-independent mechanism of cell death that protects the cell from environmental imbalances and infection by pathogens. We identified a novel small molecule, 2-(3-Benzyl-4-oxo-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d] pyrimidin-2-ylsulfanylmethyl)-oxazole-4-carboxylic acid (2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethyl)-amide (referred as autophagonizer), using high-content cell-based screening and the autophagosome marker EGFP-LC3. Autophagonizer inhibited growth and induced cell death in the human tumor cell lines MCF7, HeLa, HCT116, A549, AGS, and HT1080 via a caspase-independent pathway. Conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to autophagosome-associated LC3-II was greatly enhanced by autophagonizer treatment. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed increased autophagy in the cytoplasm of autophagonizer-treated cells. In conclusion, autophagonizer is a novel autophagy inducer with unique structure, which induces autophagic cell death in the human tumor cell lines.

  20. Evaluation of nano zero valent iron effects on fermentation of municipal anaerobic sludge and inducing biogas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amen, Tareq W. M.; Eljamal, Osama; Khalil, Ahmed M. E.; Matsunaga, Nobuhiro

    2017-05-01

    The application of nano size materials on wastewater is going extensive because its high reactivity compared with other materials. As a result, numerous research studies investigated the effectiveness of dosing nano zero valent iron (nZVI) or micro zero valent iron (mZVI) on anaerobic digestion (AD) of sludge and production of biogas as promising renewable energy but inconsistent outcomes have appeared. In this paper, different dosing concentrations of nZVI were applied on anaerobic activated municipal sludge to examine the impact of nZVI on sludge fermentation, biogas generation, and methane (CH4) content stimulation. The results showed that addition 250 mg/L nZVI nanoparticles could enhance 25.23% biogas production and the methane content reached 94.05% after one week of digestion compared with 62.67% without adding iron nanoparticles.

  1. Quantifying seismic anisotropy induced by small-scale chemical heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, C.; Bodin, T.; Ricard, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Debayle, E.; Montagner, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy are usually used as a proxy for lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of anisotropic minerals in the Earth's mantle. In this way, seismic anisotropy observed in tomographic models provides important constraints on the geometry of mantle deformation associated with thermal convection and plate tectonics. However, in addition to LPO, small-scale heterogeneities that cannot be resolved by long-period seismic waves may also produce anisotropy. The observed (i.e. apparent) anisotropy is then a combination of an intrinsic and an extrinsic component. Assuming the Earth's mantle exhibits petrological inhomogeneities at all scales, tomographic models built from long-period seismic waves may thus display extrinsic anisotropy. In this paper, we investigate the relation between the amplitude of seismic heterogeneities and the level of induced S-wave radial anisotropy as seen by long-period seismic waves. We generate some simple 1-D and 2-D isotropic models that exhibit a power spectrum of heterogeneities as what is expected for the Earth's mantle, that is, varying as 1/k, with k the wavenumber of these heterogeneities. The 1-D toy models correspond to simple layered media. In the 2-D case, our models depict marble-cake patterns in which an anomaly in shear wave velocity has been advected within convective cells. The long-wavelength equivalents of these models are computed using upscaling relations that link properties of a rapidly varying elastic medium to properties of the effective, that is, apparent, medium as seen by long-period waves. The resulting homogenized media exhibit extrinsic anisotropy and represent what would be observed in tomography. In the 1-D case, we analytically show that the level of anisotropy increases with the square of the amplitude of heterogeneities. This relation is numerically verified for both 1-D and 2-D media. In addition, we predict that 10 per cent of chemical heterogeneities in 2-D marble-cake models can

  2. Anaerobic biodegradability of macropollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    A variety of test procedures for determination of anaerobic biodegradability has been reported. This paper reviews the methods developed for determination of anaerobic biodegradability of macro-pollutants. Anaerobic biodegradability of micro-pollutants is not included. Furthermore, factors...

  3. A cytokine-inducing hemagglutinin from small taros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yau Sang; Wong, Jack Ho; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2010-07-01

    A 22.4-kDa dimeric hemagglutinin was isolated from tubers of Colocasia esculenta cv. 'Small Taro' by employing a purification protocol that involved ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-ion exchange chromatography on Mono Q, and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 75. The hemagglutinin was isolated from the fraction of the taro extract adsorbed on Q-Sepharose and subsequently adsorbed on Mono Q. The major absorbance peak from the Superdex 75 column constituted purified hemagglutinin. Its hemagglutinating activity could not be inhibited by simple sugars, and was stable after exposure for 30 minutes to temperatures up to 40 degrees C and to ambient pH in the range of pH 2 to pH 13. The activity decreased progressively when the ambient temperature was raised from 40 degrees C to 100 degrees C. Negligible activity was detected at 100 degrees C. The activity plummeted, with about 40% and 10% remaining, 4 minutes and 20 minutes after exposure to 100 degrees C, respectively. About half of the activity remained at pH 0 and pH 1 whereas the activity was completely abolished at pH 14. The hemagglutinin exhibited slight anti-tumor activity toward hepatoma HepG2 cells, and weak mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes. It induced expression of the cytokines interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-2, interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. However, it was devoid of anti-fungal activity toward a number of fungal species.

  4. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  5. The prevention of radiation-induced small bowel complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letschert, J.G.J. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis

    1995-07-01

    Moderate dose pelvic radiotherapy is associated with a 5% severe complication risk related to the small bowel. Strictures and/or fistulation can occur many years after treatment. These complications are difficult to treat, and surgical treatment (excision, bypass) bears a significant morbidity risk. The risk of chronic diarrhoea or malabsorption may increase to 40%, depending on the irradiated small bowel volume. Late small bowel complications are generally irreversible due to vascular aetiology. Prevention of these complications can be achieved by limiting the volume of small bowel treated. Consequence for radiotherapeutic techniques in treatment for rectal cancer are multiple beam set-up, customised blocking based on visualisation of the small bowel in the treatment position, and the use of a special open table-top device that results in a small bowel shift from the treatment field. (author).

  6. Titanium dioxide induced inflammation in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Carolina Maciel; de Azevedo, Walter Mendes; Dagli, Maria Lucia Zaidan; Toma, Sérgio Hiroshi; Leite, André Zonetti de Arruda; Lordello, Maria Laura; Nishitokukado, Iêda; Ortiz-Agostinho, Carmen Lúcia; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Ferreira, Marcelo Alves; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2012-09-14

    To investigate the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanoparticles (NPTiO₂) and microparticles (MPTiO₂) on the inflammatory response in the small intestine of mice. Bl 57/6 male mice received distilled water suspensions containing TiO₂ (100 mg/kg body weight) as NPTiO₂ (66 nm), or MPTiO₂ (260 nm) by gavage for 10 d, once a day; the control group received only distilled water. At the end of the treatment the duodenum, jejunum and ileum were extracted for assessment of cytokines, inflammatory cells and titanium content. The cytokines interleukin (IL)-1b, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in segments of jejunum and ileum (mucosa and underlying muscular tissue). CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells were evaluated in duodenum, jejunum and ileum samples fixed in 10% formalin by immunohistochemistry. The titanium content was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. We found increased levels of T CD4+ cells (cells/mm²) in duodenum: NP 1240 ± 139.4, MP 1070 ± 154.7 vs 458 ± 50.39 (P NP 908.4 ± 130.3, MP 813.8 ± 103.8 vs 526.6 ± 61.43 (P NP 818.60 ± 123.0, MP 640.1 ± 32.75 vs 466.9 ± 22.4 (P NP 33.98 ± 11.76, MP 74.11 ± 25.65 vs 19.06 ± 3.92 (P NP 17.36 ± 9.96, MP 22.94 ± 7.47 vs 2.19 ± 0.65 (P NP 157.20 ± 75.80, MP 134.50 ± 38.31 vs 22.34 ± 5.81 (P NP 3.71 ± 1.33, MP 5.44 ± 1.67 vs 0.99 ± 019 (P NP 15.85 ± 9.99, MP 34.08 ± 11.44 vs 2.81 ± 0.69 (P NP 780.70 ± 318.50, MP 1409.00 ± 502.20 vs 205.50 ± 63.93 (P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that TiO₂ particles induce a Th1-mediated inflammatory response in the small bowel in mice.

  7. Titanium dioxide induced inflammation in the small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Carolina Maciel; de Azevedo, Walter Mendes; Dagli, Maria Lucia Zaidan; Toma, Sérgio Hiroshi; Leite, André Zonetti de Arruda; Lordello, Maria Laura; Nishitokukado, Iêda; Ortiz-Agostinho, Carmen Lúcia; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Ferreira, Marcelo Alves; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2012-01-01

    .99, MP 34.08 ± 11.44 vs 2.81 ± 0.69 (P < 0.05); and TGF-β: NP 780.70 ± 318.50, MP 1409.00 ± 502.20 vs 205.50 ± 63.93 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that TiO2 particles induce a Th1-mediated inflammatory response in the small bowel in mice. PMID:23002342

  8. Mucus reduction promotes acetyl salicylic acid-induced small intestinal mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yosuke; Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Takayama, Shun; Mukai, Rieko; Ushiroda, Chihiro; Majima, Atsushi; Yasuda-Onozawa, Yuriko; Higashimura, Yasuki; Fukui, Akifumi; Dohi, Osamu; Okayama, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Naohisa; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2018-03-25

    Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) is a useful drug for the secondary prevention of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases, but it has adverse effects on the small intestinal mucosa. The pathogenesis and prophylaxis of ASA-induced small intestinal injury remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the intestinal mucus, as the gastrointestinal tract is covered by mucus, which exhibits protective effects against various gastrointestinal diseases. ASA was injected into the duodenum of rats, and small intestinal mucosal injury was evaluated using Evans blue dye. To investigate the importance of mucus, Polysorbate 80 (P80), an emulsifier, was used before ASA injection. In addition, rebamipide, a mucus secretion inducer in the small intestine, was used to suppress mucus reduction in the small intestine of P80-administered rats. The addition of P80 reduced the mucus and exacerbated the ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Rebamipide significantly suppressed P80-reduced small intestinal mucus and P80-increased intestinal mucosal lesions in ASA-injected rats, demonstrating that mucus is important for the protection against ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Mucus secretion-increasing therapy might be useful in preventing ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anaerobic Digestion: Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Batstone, Damien J.

    2011-01-01

    Organic waste may degrade anaerobically in nature as well as in engineered systems. The latter is called anaerobic digestion or biogasification. Anaerobic digestion produces two main outputs: An energy-rich gas called biogas and an effluent. The effluent, which may be a solid as well as liquid...... with very little dry matter may also be called a digest. The digest should not be termed compost unless it specifically has been composted in an aerated step. This chapter describes the basic processes of anaerobic digestion. Chapter 9.5 describes the anaerobic treatment technologies, and Chapter 9.......6 addresses the mass balances and environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion....

  10. Deep sequencing-based analysis of the anaerobic stimulon in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Virginia L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance of an anaerobic denitrification system in the obligate human pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, suggests that an anaerobic lifestyle may be important during the course of infection. Furthermore, mounting evidence suggests that reduction of host-produced nitric oxide has several immunomodulary effects on the host. However, at this point there have been no studies analyzing the complete gonococcal transcriptome response to anaerobiosis. Here we performed deep sequencing to compare the gonococcal transcriptomes of aerobically and anaerobically grown cells. Using the information derived from this sequencing, we discuss the implications of the robust transcriptional response to anaerobic growth. Results We determined that 198 chromosomal genes were differentially expressed (~10% of the genome in response to anaerobic conditions. We also observed a large induction of genes encoded within the cryptic plasmid, pJD1. Validation of RNA-seq data using translational-lacZ fusions or RT-PCR demonstrated the RNA-seq results to be very reproducible. Surprisingly, many genes of prophage origin were induced anaerobically, as well as several transcriptional regulators previously unknown to be involved in anaerobic growth. We also confirmed expression and regulation of a small RNA, likely a functional equivalent of fnrS in the Enterobacteriaceae family. We also determined that many genes found to be responsive to anaerobiosis have also been shown to be responsive to iron and/or oxidative stress. Conclusions Gonococci will be subject to many forms of environmental stress, including oxygen-limitation, during the course of infection. Here we determined that the anaerobic stimulon in gonococci was larger than previous studies would suggest. Many new targets for future research have been uncovered, and the results derived from this study may have helped to elucidate factors or mechanisms of virulence that may have otherwise been overlooked.

  11. Role of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria in the acidogenesis of glucose: changes induced by discontinuous or low-rate feed supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, A.; Distel, B.; van Deursen, A.; Breure, A. M.; van Andel, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    A mineral salts medium containing 1% (w/v) glucose providing carbon-limited growth conditions was subjected to anaerobic acidogenesis by mixed populations of bacteria in chemostat cultures. The formation of butyrate was shown to be dependent on the presence of saccharolytic anaerobic sporeformers in

  12. Surgical management of irradiation-induced small bowel damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.T.; Seski, J.C.; Copeland, L.J.; Gershenson, D.M.; Edwards, C.L.; Herson, J.

    1985-04-01

    Seventy-seven patients, presenting with radiation small bowel injuries at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston between 1962 and 1978, were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two categories: bowel bypass without resection, and resection of irradiated bowel. Each group was then analyzed for its short- and long-term complications. Ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis was the surgical procedure of choice in those people undergoing resection. There was no difference in short-term complications noted between the two groups. The long-term complications of fistula formation and continued small bowel necrosis could be prevented by resection, as a primary procedure. The surgical details of ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis are presented, along with an analysis of the complications encountered in both groups.

  13. Surgical management of irradiation-induced small bowel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.T.; Seski, J.C.; Copeland, L.J.; Gershenson, D.M.; Edwards, C.L.; Herson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients, presenting with radiation small bowel injuries at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston between 1962 and 1978, were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two categories: bowel bypass without resection, and resection of irradiated bowel. Each group was then analyzed for its short- and long-term complications. Ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis was the surgical procedure of choice in those people undergoing resection. There was no difference in short-term complications noted between the two groups. The long-term complications of fistula formation and continued small bowel necrosis could be prevented by resection, as a primary procedure. The surgical details of ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis are presented, along with an analysis of the complications encountered in both groups

  14. Livestock Anaerobic Digester Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Anaerobic Digester Database provides basic information about anaerobic digesters on livestock farms in the United States, organized in Excel spreadsheets. It includes projects that are under construction, operating, or shut down.

  15. Potent small molecule Hedgehog agonists induce VEGF expression in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Katrin; Büttner, Anita; Rigol, Stephan; Eilert, Nicole; Wandel, Elke; Giannis, Athanassios

    2012-11-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis, SAR studies as well as biological investigations of the known Hedgehog signaling agonist SAG and a small library of its analogues. The SAG and its derivatives were analyzed for their potency to activate the expression of the Hh target gene Gli1 in a reporter gene assay. By analyzing SAR important molecular descriptors for Gli1 activation have been identified. SAG as well as compound 10c proven to be potent activators of VEGF expression in cultivated dermal fibroblasts. Importantly and in contrast to SAG, derivative 10c displayed no toxicity in concentrations up to 250 μm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Waterpipe smoking induces epigenetic changes in the small airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Walters

    Full Text Available Waterpipe (also called hookah, shisha, or narghile smoking is a common form of tobacco use in the Middle East. Its use is becoming more prevalent in Western societies, especially among young adults as an alternative form of tobacco use to traditional cigarettes. While the risk to cigarette smoking is well documented, the risk to waterpipe smoking is not well defined with limited information on its health impact at the epidemiologic, clinical and biologic levels with respect to lung disease. Based on the knowledge that airway epithelial cell DNA methylation is modified in response to cigarette smoke and in cigarette smoking-related lung diseases, we assessed the impact of light-use waterpipe smoking on DNA methylation of the small airway epithelium (SAE and whether changes in methylation were linked to the transcriptional output of the cells. Small airway epithelium was obtained from 7 nonsmokers and 7 light-use (2.6 ± 1.7 sessions/wk waterpipe-only smokers. Genome-wide comparison of SAE DNA methylation of waterpipe smokers to nonsmokers identified 727 probesets differentially methylated (fold-change >1.5, p<0.05 representing 673 unique genes. Dominant pathways associated with these epigenetic changes include those linked to G-protein coupled receptor signaling, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and xenobiotic metabolism signaling, all of which have been associated with cigarette smoking and lung disease. Of the genes differentially methylated, 11.3% exhibited a corresponding significant (p<0.05 change in gene expression with enrichment in pathways related to regulation of mRNA translation and protein synthesis (eIF2 signaling and regulation of eIF4 and p70S6K signaling. Overall, these data demonstrate that light-use waterpipe smoking is associated with epigenetic changes and related transcriptional modifications in the SAE, the cell population demonstrating the earliest pathologic abnormalities associated with chronic cigarette smoking.

  17. Seismic risk analysis of small earthquakes induced by hydrocarbon production in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassing, B.B.T.; Waarts, P.H.; Roos, W.; Nepveu, M.; Muntendam-Bos, A.G.; Eck, T. van

    2010-01-01

    In the northern parts of The Netherlands, the exploitation of gas fields has induced small earthquakes. These induced earthquakes have occasionally caused damage to buildings. A workflow was developed in order to evaluate the seismic risk of the exploitation of hydrocarbon fields. A Bayesian

  18. Physical exercise induces rapid release of small extracellular vesicles into the circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Frühbeis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs by default and in response to diverse stimuli for the purpose of cell communication and tissue homeostasis. EVs are present in all body fluids including peripheral blood, and their appearance correlates with specific physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we show that physical activity is associated with the release of nano-sized EVs into the circulation. Healthy individuals were subjected to an incremental exercise protocol of cycling or running until exhaustion, and EVs were isolated from blood plasma samples taken before, immediately after and 90 min after exercise. Small EVs with the size of 100–130 nm, that carried proteins characteristic of exosomes, were significantly increased immediately after cycling exercise and declined again within 90 min at rest. In response to treadmill running, elevation of small EVs was moderate but appeared more sustained. To delineate EV release kinetics, plasma samples were additionally taken at the end of each increment of the cycling exercise protocol. Release of small EVs into the circulation was initiated in an early phase of exercise, before the individual anaerobic threshold, which is marked by the rise of lactate. Taken together, our study revealed that exercise triggers a rapid release of EVs with the characteristic size of exosomes into the circulation, initiated in the aerobic phase of exercise. We hypothesize that EVs released during physical activity may participate in cell communication during exercise-mediated adaptation processes that involve signalling across tissues and organs.

  19. Effective macroscopic adhesive contact behavior induced by small surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesari, Haneesh; Lew, Adrian J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we study a model contact problem involving adhesive elastic frictionless contact between rough surfaces. The problem's most notable feature is that it captures the phenomenon of depth-dependent-hysteresis (DDH) (e.g., see Kesari et al., 2010), which refers to the observation of different contact forces during the loading and unloading stages of a contact experiment. We specifically study contact between a rigid axi-symmetric punch and an elastic half-space. The roughness is represented as arbitrary periodic undulations in the punch's radial profile. These undulations induce multiple equilibrium contact regions between the bodies at each indentation-depth. Assuming that the system evolves so as to minimize its potential energy, we show that different equilibrium contact regions are selected during the loading and unloading stages at each indentation-depth, giving rise to DDH. When the period and amplitude of our model's roughness is reduced, we show that the evolution of the contact force and radius with the indentation-depth can be approximated with simpler curves, the effective macroscopic behavior, which we compute. Remarkably, the effective behavior depends solely on the amplitude and period of the model's roughness. The effective behavior is useful for estimating material properties from contact experiments displaying DDH. We show one such example here. Using the effective behavior for a particular roughness model (sinusoidal) we analyze the energy loss during a loading/unloading cycle, finding that roughness can toughen the interface. We also estimate the energy barriers between the different equilibrium contact regions at a fixed indentation-depth, which can be used to assess the importance of ambient energy fluctuations on DDH.

  20. Sublethal Concentrations of Antibiotics Cause Shift to Anaerobic Metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes and Induce Phenotypes Linked to Antibiotic Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Fromberg, Arvid; Ng, Yin

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is exposed to antibiotics both during clinical treatment and in its saprophytic lifestyle. As one of the keys to successful treatment is continued antibiotic sensitivity, the purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to sublethal...... antibiotic concentrations would affect the bacterial physiology and induce antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that each of the four antibiotics tested caused an antibiotic-specific gene expression pattern related to mode-of-action of the particular antibiotic. All four antibiotics...... in Imo1179 (eutE) encoding an aldehyde oxidoreductase where rerouting caused increased ethanol production was tolerant to three of four antibiotics tested. This shift in metabolism could be a survival strategy in response to antibiotics to avoid generation of ROS production from respiration by oxidation...

  1. Anaerobe Reinigung von Abwasser

    OpenAIRE

    Sternad, W.; Mohr, M.; Spork, C.; Troesch, W.; Trick, I.; Krischke, W.

    2007-01-01

    WO 2007076953 A1 UPAB: 20070822 NOVELTY - The municipal wastewater purification comprises anaerobic biological purification of the wastewater by using a biomass (15-100 g/l) from psychrophilic microorganisms, concentrating the sludge by separating the wastewater and feeding back the sludge into the anaerobic biological purification. The psychrophilic microorganisms exhibit an optimum temperature of less than 25degreesC. The anaerobic purification takes place as single- or two-step methanizati...

  2. Optimal network structure to induce the maximal small-world effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zheng-Zhen; Xu Wen-Jun; Lin Jia-Ru; Zeng Shang-You

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the general efficiency, which is the average of the global efficiency and the local efficiency, is defined to measure the communication efficiency of a network. The increasing ratio of the general efficiency of a small-world network relative to that of the corresponding regular network is used to measure the small-world effect quantitatively. The more considerable the small-world effect, the higher the general efficiency of a network with a certain cost is. It is shown that the small-world effect increases monotonically with the increase of the vertex number. The optimal rewiring probability to induce the best small-world effect is approximately 0.02 and the optimal average connection probability decreases monotonically with the increase of the vertex number. Therefore, the optimal network structure to induce the maximal small-world effect is the structure with the large vertex number (> 500), the small rewiring probability (≍ 0.02) and the small average connection probability (< 0.1). Many previous research results support our results. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  3. Water and oxygen induced degradation of small molecule organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermenau, Martin; Riede, Moritz; Leo, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Small molecule organic solar cells were studied with respect to water and oxygen induced degradation by mapping the spatial distribution of reaction products in order to elucidate the degradation patterns and failure mechanisms. The active layers consist of a 30 nm bulk heterojunction formed...

  4. Anaerobic sludge granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Castro Lopes, de S.I.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades
    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades. The initial

  5. The myogenic component in distention-induced peristalsis in the guinea pig small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, G; Jackson, T D; Ambrous, K; Ye, J; Safdar, A; Farraway, L; Huizinga, J D

    2001-03-01

    In an in vitro model for distention-induced peristalsis in the guinea pig small intestine, the electrical activity, intraluminal pressure, and outflow of contents were studied simultaneously to search for evidence of myogenic control activity. Intraluminal distention induced periods of nifedipine-sensitive slow wave activity with superimposed action potentials, alternating with periods of quiescence. Slow waves and associated high intraluminal pressure transients propagated aborally, causing outflow of content. In the proximal small intestine, a frequency gradient of distention-induced slow waves was observed, with a frequency of 19 cycles/min in the first 1 cm and 11 cycles/min 10 cm distally. Intracellular recording revealed that the guinea pig small intestinal musculature, in response to carbachol, generated slow waves with superimposed action potentials, both sensitive to nifedipine. These slow waves also exhibited a frequency gradient. In addition, distention and cholinergic stimulation induced high-frequency membrane potential oscillations (~55 cycles/min) that were not associated with distention-induced peristalsis. Continuous distention produced excitation of the musculature, in part neurally mediated, that resulted in periodic occurrence of bursts of distally propagating nifedipine-sensitive slow waves with superimposed action potentials associated with propagating intraluminal pressure waves that caused pulsatile outflow of content at the slow wave frequency.

  6. Aerobic and anaerobic cellulase production by Cellulomonas uda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Willink, Fillip Wolfgang; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2016-10-01

    Cellulomonas uda (DSM 20108/ATCC 21399) is one of the few described cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. Based on these characteristics, we initiated a physiological study of C. uda with the aim to exploit it for cellulase production in simple bioreactors with no or sporadic aeration. Growth, cellulase activity and fermentation product formation were evaluated in different media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in experiments where C. uda was exposed to alternating aerobic/anaerobic growth conditions. Here we show that C. uda behaves as a true facultative anaerobe when cultivated on soluble substrates such as glucose and cellobiose, but for reasons unknown cellulase activity is only induced under aerobic conditions on insoluble cellulosic substrates and not under anaerobic conditions. These findings enhance knowledge on the limited number of described facultative cellulolytic anaerobes, and in addition it greatly limits the utility of C. uda as an 'easy to handle' cellulase producer with low aeration demands.

  7. A small angle neutron study of irradiation induced microstructures in Cr-Mo-V WWER steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levit, Vladimir I.; Santos, Ari S.; Louzada, Ana R.R.; Silveira, Cristina M.; Vaniel, Ana Paula H.; Odette, George R.; Mader, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has proven to be a very effective technique for characterizing the ultrafine (∼1 nm) irradiation induced microstructures which are responsible for hardening and the concomitant embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. SANS measurement were carried out on three irradiated and unirradiated weld materials of WWER- type on 8 m instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Washington, USA. Small (r m < 1 nm) irradiation induced features were found for all three materials. Were found volume fractions, number densities and ratios of magnetic to nuclear scattering. Some analyses of the irradiation induced precipitation nature and possible chemical composition were made by comparison of the results with other reactor materials SANS and Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy data. (author)

  8. Dunnione ameliorates cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage by modulating NAD{sup +} metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit, Arpana; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Lee, SeungHoon [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation & Department of Microbiology, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kang-Beom [Department of Oriental Medical Physiology, School of Oriental Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Tae Hwan [PAEAN Biotechnology, 160 Techno-2 Street, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-500 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation & Department of Microbiology, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); So, Hong-Seob, E-mail: jeanso@wku.ac.kr [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation & Department of Microbiology, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-27

    Although cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug for the treatment of a variety of tumors, its use is critically limited because of adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, neuropathy, and gastrointestinal damage. Cisplatin treatment increases oxidative stress biomarkers in the small intestine, which may induce apoptosis of epithelial cells and thereby elicit damage to the small intestine. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) is a cofactor for various enzymes associated with cellular homeostasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that the hyper-activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is closely associated with the depletion of NAD{sup +} in the small intestine after cisplatin treatment, which results in downregulation of sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity. Furthermore, a decrease in SIRT1 activity was found to play an important role in cisplatin-mediated small intestinal damage through nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, facilitated by its acetylation increase. However, use of dunnione as a strong substrate for the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme led to an increase in intracellular NAD{sup +} levels and prevented the cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage correlating with the modulation of PARP-1, SIRT1, and NF-κB. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD{sup +} levels by pharmacological NQO1 substrates could be a promising therapeutic approach for protecting against cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage. - Highlights: • NAD{sup +} acts as a cofactor for numerous enzymes including Sirtuins and PARP. • Up-regulation of SIRT1 could attenuate the cisplatin-induced intestinal damage. • Modulation of the cellular NAD{sup +} could be a promising therapeutic approach.

  9. Light-Induced Structural Flexibility of Thylakoid Membranes - Investigated using Small-Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Aagaard, Thomas Helverskov

    2005-01-01

    Using small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering the light-induced structural changes in pea thylakoids have been investigated. It is shown that light-induced shinkage in the thylakoids is connected to photosynthetic electron transduction. Using small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering the light-induced structural changes in pea thylakoids have been investigated. It is shown that light-induced shinkage in the thylakoids is connected to photosynthetic electron transduction.

  10. Base substitutions, frameshifts, and small deletions constitute ionizing radiation-induced point mutations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; de Boer, J.G.; de Jong, P.J.; Drobetsky, E.A.; Glickman, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    The relative role of point mutations and large genomic rearrangements in ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis has been an issue of long-standing interest. Recent studies using Southern blotting analysis permit the partitioning of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in mammalian cells into detectable deletions and major genomic rearrangements and into point mutations. The molecular nature of these point mutations has been left unresolved; they may include base substitutions as well as small deletions, insertions, and frame-shifts below the level of resolution of Southern blotting analysis. In this investigation, we have characterized a collection of ionizing radiation-induced point mutations at the endogenous adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) locus of Chinese hamster ovary cells at the DNA sequence level. Base substitutions represented approximately equal to 2/3 of the point mutations analyzed. Although the collection of mutants is relatively small, every possible type of base substitution event has been recovered. These mutations are well distributed throughout the coding sequence with only one multiple occurrence. Small deletions represented the remainder of characterized mutants; no insertions have been observed. Sequence-directed mechanisms mediated by direct repeats could account for some of the observed deletions, while others appear to be directly attributable to radiation-induced strand breakage

  11. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  12. Noise-induced hearing loss in small-scale metal industry in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, J D; Robinson, T; Acharya, A; Singh, D; Smith, M

    2014-10-01

    There has been no previous research to demonstrate the risk of noise-induced hearing loss in industry in Nepal. Limited research on occupational noise-induced hearing loss has been conducted within small-scale industry worldwide, despite it being a substantial and growing cause of deafness in the developing world. The study involved a cross-sectional audiometric assessment, with questionnaire-based examinations of noise and occupational history, and workplace noise level assessment. A total of 115 metal workers and 123 hotel workers (control subjects) were recruited. Noise-induced hearing loss prevalence was 30.4 per cent in metal workers and 4.1 per cent in hotel workers, with a significant odds ratio of 10.3. Except for age and time in occupation, none of the demographic factors were significant in predicting outcomes in regression analyses. When adjusted for this finding, and previous noise-exposed occupations, the odds ratio was 13.8. Workplace noise was significantly different between the groups, ranging from 65.3 to 84.7 dBA in metal worker sites, and from 51.4 to 68.6 dBA in the control sites. Metal workers appear to have a greater risk of noise-induced hearing loss than controls. Additional research on occupational noise-induced hearing loss in Nepal and small-scale industry globally is needed.

  13. Traditional Herbal Medicine, Rikkunshito, Induces HSP60 and Enhances Cytoprotection of Small Intestinal Mucosal Cells as a Nontoxic Chaperone Inducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Tamaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing incidence of small intestinal ulcers associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has become a topic with recent advances of endoscopic technology. However, the pathogenesis and therapy are not fully understood. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of Rikkunshito (TJ-43, a traditional herbal medicine, on expression of HSP60 and cytoprotective ability in small intestinal cell line (IEC-6. Effect of TJ-43 on HSP60 expression in IEC-6 cells was evaluated by immunoblot analysis. The effect of TJ-43 on cytoprotective abilities of IEC-6 cells against hydrogen peroxide or indomethacin was studied by MTT assay, LDH-release assay, caspase-8 activity, and TUNEL. HSP60 was significantly induced by TJ-43. Cell necrosis and apoptosis were significantly suppressed in IEC-6 cells pretreated by TJ-43 with overexpression of HSP60. Our results suggested that HSP60 induced by TJ-43 might play an important role in protecting small intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and necrosis in vitro.

  14. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  15. Prognostic value of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia in small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Cui-Cui; Li, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chemotherapy is the standard treatment for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), and leukopenia is a common side effect. This study assesses whether chemotherapy-induced leukopenia is a predictor of efficacy and whether it is associated with the survival of SCLC patients. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on data from 445 patients with SCLC who received standard chemotherapy for 4 to 10 cycles. The World Health Organization grading system classifies leukopenia during chemother...

  16. Anaerobic Digestion Foaming Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water utilities due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been suggested over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases site specific. The present report aimed to provide a better understanding of the anaerobic di...

  17. Asbestos-induced lung disease in small-scale clutch manufacturing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothi, Dipti; Gahlot, Tanushree; Sah, Ram B; Saxena, Mayank; Ojha, U C; Verma, Anand K; Spalgais, Sonam

    2016-01-01

    The crocidolite variety of asbestos is banned. However, chrysotile, which is not prohibited, is still used in developing countries in making products such as clutch plate. Fourteen workers from a small-scale clutch plate-manufacturing factory were analyzed for asbestos-induced lung disease as one of their colleagues had expired due to asbestosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the awareness of workers, the prevalence and type of asbestos-induced lung disease, and the sensitivity and specificity of diffusion test. History, examination, chest radiograph, spirometry with diffusion, and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) thorax was performed in all the workers. The diagnosis of asbestos-induced lung disease was suspected on the basis of HRCT. This was subsequently confirmed on transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB). None of the workers had detailed information about asbestos and its ill effects. Eleven out of 14 (71.42%) workers had asbestos-induced lung disease. All 11 had small airway disease (SAD). Three had SAD alone, 6 had additional interstitial lung disease (ILD), and 2 patients had additional ILD and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Sensitivity and specificity of residual volume (RV) or total lung capacity (TLC) for detecting SAD was 90% and 100%, respectively, and that of diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) for detecting ILD was 100%. The awareness about asbestos in small-scale clutch-plate manufacturing industry is poor. The usage of chrysotile should be strictly regulated as morbidity and mortality is high. DLCO and RV/TLC are sensitive and specific in detecting nonmalignant asbestos induced lung disease.

  18. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debin Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy.

  19. Inhibition experiments on anaerobic methane oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alperin, M.J.; Reeburgh, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation is a general process important in controlling fluxes of methane from anoxic marine sediments. The responsible organism has not been isolated, and little is known about the electron acceptors and substrates involved in the process. Laboratory evidence indicates that sulfate reducers and methanogens are able to oxidize small quantities of methane. Field evidence suggests anaerobic methane oxidation may be linked to sulfate reduction. Experiments with specific inhibitors for sulfate reduction (molybdate), methanogenesis (2-bromoethanesulfonic acid), and acetate utilization (fluoroacetate) were performed on marine sediments from the zone of methane oxidation to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria are responsible for methane oxidation. The inhibition experiment results suggest that methane oxidation in anoxic marine sediments is not directly mediated by sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria. Our results are consistent with two possibilities: anaerobic methane oxidation may be mediated by an unknown organism or a consortium involving an unknown methane oxidizer and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  20. Aldose reductase regulates acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in human small airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Umesh CS; Ramana, KV; Srivastava, SK

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR), a glucose metabolizing enzyme, reduces lipid aldehydes and their glutathione conjugates with more than 1000-fold efficiency (Km aldehydes 5-30μM) than glucose. Acrolein, a major endogenous lipid peroxidation product as well as component of environmental pollutant and cigarette smoke, is known to be involved in various pathologies including atherosclerosis, airway inflammation, COPD, and age-related disorders but the mechanism of acrolein-induced cytotoxicity is not clearly understood. We have investigated the role of AR in acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in primary human small airway epithelial cells SAECs. Exposure of SAECs to varying concentrations of acrolein caused cell-death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. AR inhibition by fidarestat prevented the low (5 to 10 μM) but not high (>10 μM) concentrations of acrolein-induced SAECs cell death. AR inhibition protected SAECs from low dose (5 μM) acrolein-induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Inhibition of acrolein-induced apoptosis by fidarestat was confirmed by decreased condensation of nuclear chromatin, DNA fragmentation, comet tail-moment, and annexin-V fluorescence. Further, fidarestat inhibited acrolein-induced translocation of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad from cytosol to the mitochondria, and that of Bcl2 and BclXL from mitochondria to cytosol. Acrolein-induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria was also prevented by AR inhibition. The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) such as extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), stress-activated protein kinases/c-jun NH2-terminal kinases (SAPK/JNK) and p38MAPK, and c-jun were transiently activated in airway epithelial cells by acrolein in a concentration and time-dependent fashion, which were significantly prevented by AR inhibition. These results suggest that AR inhibitors could prevent acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in the lung epithelial cells. PMID:23770200

  1. Aldose reductase regulates acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in human small airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Umesh C S; Ramana, K V; Srivastava, Satish K

    2013-12-01

    Aldose reductase (AR), a glucose-metabolizing enzyme, reduces lipid aldehydes and their glutathione conjugates with more than 1000-fold efficiency (Km aldehydes 5-30 µM) relative to glucose. Acrolein, a major endogenous lipid peroxidation product as well as a component of environmental pollutants and cigarette smoke, is known to be involved in various pathologies including atherosclerosis, airway inflammation, COPD, and age-related disorders, but the mechanism of acrolein-induced cytotoxicity is not clearly understood. We have investigated the role of AR in acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs). Exposure of SAECs to varying concentrations of acrolein caused cell death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. AR inhibition by fidarestat prevented the low-dose (5-10 µM) but not the high-dose (>10 µM) acrolein-induced SAEC death. AR inhibition protected SAECs from low-dose (5 µM) acrolein-induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Inhibition of acrolein-induced apoptosis by fidarestat was confirmed by decreased condensation of nuclear chromatin, DNA fragmentation, comet tail moment, and annexin V fluorescence. Further, fidarestat inhibited acrolein-induced translocation of the proapoptotic proteins Bax and Bad from the cytosol to the mitochondria and that of Bcl2 and BclXL from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Acrolein-induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria was also prevented by AR inhibition. The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, and p38MAPK, and c-Jun were transiently activated in airway epithelial cells by acrolein in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion, which was significantly prevented by AR inhibition. These results suggest that AR inhibitors could prevent acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in the lung epithelial cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Impaired folding of the mitochondrial small TIM chaperones induces clearance by the i-AAA protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael J; Mooga, Ved P; Guiard, Bernard; Langer, Thomas; Ryan, Michael T; Stojanovski, Diana

    2012-12-14

    The intermembrane space of mitochondria contains a dedicated chaperone network-the small translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) family-for the sorting of hydrophobic precursors. All small TIMs are defined by the presence of a twin CX(3)C motif and the monomeric proteins are stabilized by two intramolecular disulfide bonds formed between the cysteines of these motifs. The conserved cysteine residues within small TIM members have also been shown to participate in early biogenesis events, with the most N-terminal cysteine residue important for import and retention within the intermembrane space via the receptor and disulfide oxidase, Mia40. In this study, we have analyzed the in vivo consequences of improper folding of small TIM chaperones by generating site-specific cysteine mutants and assessed the fate of the incompletely oxidized proteins within mitochondria. We show that no individual cysteine residue is required for the function of Tim9 or Tim10 in yeast and that defective assembly of the small TIMs induces their proteolytic clearance from mitochondria. We delineate a clearance mechanism for the mutant proteins and their unassembled wild-type partner protein by the mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease, Yme1 (yeast mitochondrial escape 1). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurogenic contraction induced by the antiarrhythmic compound, AVE 0118, in rat small mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Attila; Seprényi, György; Varró, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Pataricza, János

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vasoactivity of two inhibitors of potassium ion (K(+) ) channels, a potential antiarrhythmic compound, AVE 0118, and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Basal and stimulated tones of rat small mesenteric arteries as well as the possible involvement of KV 1.5 ion channel in the mechanism of vascular effect induced by the compounds were analysed. The standard organ bath technique for vascular tone and immunohistochemistry for the localization of ion channels in the arterial tissue were performed. Third- or fourth-order branch of arterial segments was mounted in myographs for recording the isometric tension. AVE 0118 (10(-5) M) and 4-AP (10(-5) M) modulated neither the basal tone nor the contraction induced by noradrenaline but increased the contraction evoked by electrical field stimulation, sensitive to the block of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. KV 1.5 ion channel-specific immunostaining demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive nerves, and Schwann-cell-specific (S100) immunostaining confirmed the presence of myelin sheath in rat small mesenteric arteries. The study supports an indirect, sympathetic effect of AVE 0118 similar to that of 4-AP, which is mediated, at least in part, by blocking neuronal KV 1.5 type potassium ion channels in the medio-adventitial layer of rat small mesenteric artery. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  4. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the

  5. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-01-01

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the

  6. ACh-induced relaxations of rabbit small mesenteric arteries: role of arachidonic acid metabolites and K+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David X; Gauthier, Kathryn M; Chawengsub, Yuttana; Campbell, William B

    2007-07-01

    ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in rabbit small mesenteric arteries is resistant to N-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) and indomethacin but sensitive to high K+, indicating the relaxations are mediated by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs). The identity of the EDHFs in this vascular bed remains undefined. Small mesenteric arteries pretreated with L-NA and indomethacin were contracted with phenylephrine. ACh (10(-10) to 10(-6) M) caused concentration-dependent relaxations that were shifted to the right by lipoxygenase inhibition and the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel inhibitors apamin (100 nM) or charybdotoxin (100 nM) and eliminated by the combination of apamin plus charybdotoxin. Relaxations to ACh were also blocked by a combination of barium (200 microM) and apamin but not barium plus charybdotoxin. Addition of K+ (10.9 mM final concentration) to the preconstricted arteries elicited small relaxations. K+ addition before ACh restored the charybdotoxin-sensitive component of relaxations to ACh. K+ (10.9 mM) also relaxed endothelium-denuded arteries, and the relaxations were inhibited by barium but not by charybdotoxin and apamin. With the use of whole cell patch-clamp analysis, ACh (10(-7) M) stimulated voltage-dependent outward K+ current from endothelial cells, which was inhibited by charybdotoxin, indicating K+ efflux. Arachidonic acid (10(-7) to 10(-4) M) induced concentration-related relaxations that were inhibited by apamin but not by charybdotoxin and barium. Addition of arachidonic acid after K+ (10.9 mM) resulted in more potent relaxations to arachidonic acid compared with control without K+ (5.9 mM). These findings suggest that, in rabbit mesenteric arteries, ACh-induced, L-NA- and indomethacin-resistant relaxation is mediated by endothelial cell K+ efflux and arachidonic acid metabolites, and a synergism exists between these two separate mechanisms.

  7. Intestinal Radiation-Induced Stricture Favours Small Bowel Obstruction by Phytobezoar: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Quercioli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bezoars represent the fifth most frequent cause of acute small bowel obstruction. Phytobezoar is the most common type of bezoar. It is a concretion of undigestible fibers derived from ingested vegetables and fruits. We report a case of a woman with a 1-year history of recurrent epigastric and periumbilical abdominal pain with intermittent vomiting caused by phytobezoar of the terminal ileum. After careful investigation of the case and review of literature, we identified the factor involved in bezoar formation as radiation-induced ileal stenosis due to previous treatment for a pelvic tumour. This report provides evidence to consider phytobezoar as a possible cause of small bowel obstruction in patients previously treated with abdominal radiotherapy.

  8. Ascaris lumbricoides-induced acute pancreatitis: diagnosis during EUS for a suspected small pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Carrara, Silvia; Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2009-09-04

    Ascaris lumbricoides is the second most common intestinal parasite world-wide and, although the infection can be asymptomatic, in some cases it can present with complications, such as acute pancreatitis. We describe the case of a 37-year-old man, with a history of travelling in Eastern countries who presented with Ascaris lumbricoides-induced acute pancreatitis mimicking a small pancreatic cancer, diagnosed during an upper EUS. The endoscopy revealeda roundworm floating in the duodenum; its endoultrasonographic appearance showed a diffuse inhomogeneous pattern, with hypoechoic echotexture, such as in acute pancreatitis. Microbiological examination of the worm revealed a 20 cm long Ascaris lumbricoides. In non endemic countries, acute pancreatitis induced by Ascaris lumbricoides is an unusual diagnosis, and should be suspected especially in patients with history of traveling in endemic areas.

  9. Analyzing LED-induced haemal fluorescent spectra on laboratory small albino rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shumei; Luo, Xiaosen; Lan, Xiufeng; Jiao, Fangxiang; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu; Xu, Jiaying; Lu, Shiyue; Shen, Jian; Liu, Jiangang

    2002-04-01

    Native fluorescence spectral characteristics of red blood cells were studied in the visible region in this paper. Blood samples were collected from normal small albino rats. Native fluorescence spectra of the erythrocyte were induced using Light Emitting Diode (LED) at yellow wavelength about 570+/- 16 nm ((Delta) (lambda) 0.5approximately equals 32nm). As the rat's erythrocyte content of in physiological water is increasing, the fluorescent primary emission peak is red shifted from 588 nm to above 615 nm. Furthermore, the fluorescence intensity at about 600 nm was found to be maximal while the rat's erythrocyte consistence is 1%. Moreover, it is shown in large numbers of experiments that LED-induced fluorescence spectra of the erythrocyte are similar with the whole blood. It may make sense for low- intensity light therapy.

  10. Chaos in complex motor networks induced by Newman—Watts small-world connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Du-Qu; Luo Xiao-Shu; Zhang Bo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate how dynamical behaviours of complex motor networks depend on the Newman—Watts small-world (NWSW) connections. Network elements are described by the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) with the values of parameters at which each individual PMSM is stable. It is found that with the increase of connection probability p, the motor in networks becomes periodic and falls into chaotic motion as p further increases. These phenomena imply that NWSW connections can induce and enhance chaos in motor networks. The possible mechanism behind the action of NWSW connections is addressed based on stability theory. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  11. Small-world effect induced by weight randomization on regular networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Menghui; Fan, Ying; Wang, Dahui; Li, Daqing; Wu, Jinshan; Di, Zengru

    2007-01-01

    The concept of edge weight provides additional depth for describing and adjusting the properties of networks. Redistribution of edge weight can effectively change the properties of networks even though the corresponding binary topology remains unchanged. Based on regular networks with initially homogeneous dissimilarity weights, random redistribution of edge weight can be enough to induce small world phenomena. The effects of random weight redistribution on both static properties and dynamical models of networks are investigated. The results reveal that randomization of weight can enhance the ability of synchronization of chaotic systems dramatically

  12. Numerically induced stochasticity and long-time behavior of numerical trajectories - small ΔT analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.; Auerbach, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    In a one-dimensional anharmonic potential well, the period of an orbit is a function of its energy. The true motion in such a well is regular, since energy conservation constrains the velocity at each value of the coordinate. Nontheless, when the orbit is computed numerically, stochastic behavior can result. The phenomenon of numerically induced stochasticity has significance in several contexts. Firstly, a numerical investigation of the regions of phase space accessible to an orbit may lead to erroneous results, if the timestep is too large or the mover inappropriate. Furthermore, conclusions about orbital stability based on numerical integrations may be erroneous, since neighboring chaotic orbits diverge exponentially, even if the chaos is numerically induced. When studying the dynamics of a physical system, one should demonstrate that any chaos observed is not numerically induced. Also, linearized simulations of collective phenomena must avoid numerically induced stochasticity, since the zero-order and perturbed trajectories are 'neighboring'. Finally, trajectory crossings in PIC simulations can lead to enhanced noise and other errors. In addition to these investigations, an analysis is also made of the long-term behavior of numerical trajectories (small ΔT analysis). (Nogami, K.)

  13. Small molecule CP-31398 induces reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis in human multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arihara, Yohei; Takada, Kohichi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Hayasaka, Naotaka; Nakamura, Hajime; Murase, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2017-09-12

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are normal byproducts of a wide variety of cellular processes. ROS have dual functional roles in cancer cell pathophysiology. At low to moderate levels, ROS act as signaling transducers to activate cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. In contrast, high levels of ROS induce cell death. In multiple myeloma (MM), ROS overproduction is the trigger for apoptosis induced by several anticancer compounds, including proteasome inhibitors. However, no drugs for which oxidative stress is the main mechanism of action are currently used for treatment of MM in clinical situations. In this study, we demonstrate that the p53-activating small molecule CP-31398 (CP) effectively inhibits the growth of MM cell lines and primary MM isolates from patients. CP also suppresses the growth of MM xenografts in mice. Mechanistically, CP was found to induce intrinsic apoptosis in MM cells via increasing ROS production. Interestingly, CP-induced apoptosis occurs regardless of the p53 status, suggesting that CP has additional mechanisms of action. Our findings thus indicate that CP could be an attractive candidate for treatment of MM patients harboring p53 abnormalities; this satisfies an unmet clinical need, as such individuals currently have a poor prognosis.

  14. The p53-reactivating small molecule RITA induces senescence in head and neck cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ching Chuang

    Full Text Available TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in head and neck cancer (HNSCC, with mutations being associated with resistance to conventional therapy. Restoring normal p53 function has previously been investigated via the use of RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis, a small molecule that induces a conformational change in p53, leading to activation of its downstream targets. In the current study we found that RITA indeed exerts significant effects in HNSCC cells. However, in this model, we found that a significant outcome of RITA treatment was accelerated senescence. RITA-induced senescence in a variety of p53 backgrounds, including p53 null cells. Also, inhibition of p53 expression did not appear to significantly inhibit RITA-induced senescence. Thus, this phenomenon appears to be partially p53-independent. Additionally, RITA-induced senescence appears to be partially mediated by activation of the DNA damage response and SIRT1 (Silent information regulator T1 inhibition, with a synergistic effect seen by combining either ionizing radiation or SIRT1 inhibition with RITA treatment. These data point toward a novel mechanism of RITA function as well as hint to its possible therapeutic benefit in HNSCC.

  15. Anaerobic and aerobic acetylene hydratase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Acetaldehyde is the first metabolite produced during acetylene degradation by bacteria either aerobically or anaerobically. Conversion of acetylene into acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate, and biomass occurs in anaerobic cultures of Palobacter acetylinicus or aerobically with Mycobacterium lacticola, Nocardia rhodochrous, ...

  16. Gastroprotective effect of small centaury (Centaurium erythraea L) on aspirin-induced gastric damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuluce, Yasin; Ozkol, Halil; Koyuncu, Ismail; Ine, Hatice

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antiulcer and antioxidant activities of Centaurium erythraea L (small centaury) in aspirin (ASA) induced acute gastric ulcer model. The gastroprotective effect of the 50% aqueous-ethanolic small centaury (SC) extract was investigated in rats at a dose of ASA 200 mg/kg body weight. Twenty-one Sprague-Dawley albino rats were divided into three groups of seven rats each as follows: (1) control group; (2) acute ASA-treated group and (3) ASA plus SC group. At the end of the 4-h drug administration, ulcer index, oxidant and antioxidant levels were measured and compared between the groups. The percentage of lesion area to total gastric surface area (ulcer index) was significantly reduced (77%) in ASA plus SC group as compared with acute ASA-treated group. The oral administration of ASA decreased catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels. Although myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was increased by ASA, it was found to be lower in the ASA plus SC group. GSH and Vitamin A levels were determined higher in the ASA plus SC group compared with ASA group. These results suggest that SC extract protects against ASA-induced damage due to its antioxidizing activity.

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor Induces Developmental Stage-Dependent Structural Changes in the Immature Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Premature infants are commonly subject to intestinal inflammation. Since the human small intestine does not reach maturity until term gestation, premature infants have a unique challenge, as either acute or chronic inflammation may alter the normal development of the intestinal tract. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF has been shown to acutely alter goblet cell numbers and villus length in adult mice. In this study we tested the effects of TNF on villus architecture and epithelial cells at different stages of development of the immature small intestine. Methods. To examine the effects of TNF-induced inflammation, we injected acute, brief, or chronic exposures of TNF in neonatal and juvenile mice. Results. TNF induced significant villus blunting through a TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1 mediated mechanism, leading to loss of villus area. This response to TNFR1 signaling was altered during intestinal development, despite constant TNFR1 protein expression. Acute TNF-mediated signaling also significantly decreased Paneth cells. Conclusions. Taken together, the morphologic changes caused by TNF provide insight as to the effects of inflammation on the developing intestinal tract. Additionally, they suggest a mechanism which, coupled with an immature immune system, may help to explain the unique susceptibility of the immature intestine to inflammatory diseases such as NEC.

  18. Clozapine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Yin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia have a lower incidence of cancer than the general population, and several antipsychotics have been demonstrated to have cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these results remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of clozapine, which is often used to treat patients with refractory schizophrenia, on the growth of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines and to examine whether autophagy contributes to its effects. Methods: A549 and H1299 cells were treated with clozapine, and cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle and autophagy were then assessed. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and siRNA-targeted Atg7 were used to determine the role of autophagy in the effect of clozapine. Results: Clozapine inhibited A549 and H1299 proliferation and increased p21 and p27 expression levels, leading to cell cycle arrest. Clozapine also induced a high level of autophagy, but not apoptosis, in both cell lines, and the growth inhibitory effect of clozapine was blunted by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or with an siRNA targeting atg7. Conclusions: Clozapine inhibits cell proliferation by inducing autophagic cell death in two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. These findings may provide insights into the relationship between clozapine use and the lower incidence of lung cancer among patients with schizophrenia.

  19. Cytoprotective effect of selective small-molecule caspase inhibitors against staurosporine-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu J

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jianghong Wu, Yuren Wang, Shuguang Liang, Haiching Ma Reaction Biology Corp, Malvern, PA, USA Abstract: Caspases are currently known as the central executioners of the apoptotic pathways. Inhibition of apoptosis and promotion of normal cell survival by caspase inhibitors would be a tremendous benefit for reducing the side effects of cancer therapy and for control of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. The objective of this study was to discover small-molecule caspase inhibitors with which to achieve cytoprotective effect. We completed the high-throughput screening of Bionet's 37,500-compound library (Key Organics Limited, Camelford, Cornwall, UK against caspase-1, -3, and -9 and successfully identified 43 initial hit compounds. The 43 hit compounds were further tested for cytoprotective activity against staurosporine-induced cell death in NIH3T3 cells. Nineteen compounds were found to have significant cytoprotective effects in cell viability assays. One of the compounds, RBC1023, was demonstrated to protect NIH3T3 cells from staurosporine-induced caspase-3 cleavage and activation. RBC1023 was also shown to protect against staurosporine-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that staurosporine treatment induced broad global gene expression alterations, and RBC1023 co-treatment significantly restored these changes, especially of the genes that are related to cell growth and survival signaling such as Egr1, Cdc25c, cdkn3, Rhob, Nek2, and Taok1. Collectively, RBC1023 protects NIH3T3 cells against staurosporine-induced apoptosis via inhibiting caspase activity, restoring mitochondrial membrane potential, and possibly upregulating some cell survival-related gene expressions and pathways. Keywords: cell death, caspase inhibition, mitochondria, RBC1023

  20. Combined electrical-alkali pretreatment to increase the anaerobic hydrolysis rate of waste activated sludge during anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, Guangyin; Lu, Xueqin; Li, Yu-You; Zhao, Youcai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Combined electrical-alkali pretreatment for improving sludge anaerobic digestion was proposed. • Combined process enhanced the cell lysis, biopolymers releases, and thus sludge disintegration. • Increased solubilization of sludge increased the anaerobic hydrolysis rate. • Increased solubilization does not always induce an improved anaerobic digestion efficiency. - Abstract: Pretreatment can be used prior to anaerobic digestion to improve the efficiency of waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion. In this study, electrolysis and a commonly used pretreatment method of alkaline (NaOH) solubilization were integrated as a pretreatment method for promoting WAS anaerobic digestion. Pretreatment effectiveness of combined process were investigated in terms of disintegration degree (DD SCOD ), suspended solids (TSS and VSS) removals, the releases of protein (PN) and polysaccharide (PS), and subsequent anaerobic digestion as well as dewaterability after digestion. Electrolysis was able to crack the microbial cells trapped in sludge gels and release the biopolymers (PN and PS) due to the cooperation of alkaline solubilization, enhancing the sludge floc disintegration/solubilization, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays showed the highest methane yield was achieved with 5 V plus pH 9.2 pretreatment with up to 20.3% improvement over the non-pretreated sludge after 42 days of mesophilic operation. In contrast, no discernible improvements on anaerobic degradability were observed for the rest of pretreated sludges, probably due to the overmuch leakage of refractory soluble organics, partial chemical mineralization of solubilized compounds and sodium inhibition. The statistical analysis further indicated that increased solubilization induced by electrical-alkali pretreatment increased the first-order anaerobic hydrolysis rate (k hyd ), but had no, or very slight enhancement on WAS ultimate

  1. Role of dietary fiber in formation and prevention of small intestinal ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in endoscopic techniques such as capsule endoscopy have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often cause ulcers in the small intestine in humans, but there are few effective agents for treatment of small intestinal ulcers. Although the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced intestinal ulcer has been widely studied, dietary factors have seldom been considered. In the present review, the role of dietary fiber (DF) in the formation of NSAID-induced intestinal ulcers is discussed. In previous studies, small intestinal lesions were not observed when NSAIDs were administered to fasted rats, dogs, and cats, but were observed in conventionally-fed animals, suggesting the importance of feeding in the formation of intestinal lesions induced by NSAIDs. However, in animals fed diets containing low or no DF, indomethacin (IND) did not produce lesions in the small intestine, but did produce lesions in animals fed diets supplemented with insoluble dietary fiber (IDF, cellulose). The results suggest that IDF in the diet plays an important role in the formation of NSAID-induced intestinal lesions. On the other hand, addition of soluble dietary fibers (SDFs) such as pectin or mucin to regular diet markedly decreased NSAID-induced intestinal lesions. Thus, IDF and SDF have opposing effects on IND-induced intestinal lesions, i.e., IDF is harmful while SDF is protective. SDFs potentially represent a novel and safe means for protecting the small intestine against NSAID-induced intestinal lesions.

  2. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajka, Cynthia P.; Londry, Kathleen L.

    2006-01-01

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-β-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 μg L -1 day -1 ), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-α-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-α-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments

  3. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajka, Cynthia P. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Londry, Kathleen L. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: londryk@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2006-08-31

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 {mu}g L{sup -1} day{sup -1}), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-{alpha}-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-{alpha}-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments.

  4. The anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Boone, D.R. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  5. Saururus cernuus lignans-Potent small molecule inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Kim, Yong-Pil; Baerson, Scott R.; Zhang Lei; Bruick, Richard K.; Mohammed, Kaleem A.; Agarwal, Ameeta K.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou Yudong

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) represents an important tumor-selective therapeutic target for solid tumors. In search of novel small molecule HIF-1 inhibitors, 5400 natural product-rich extracts from plants, marine organisms, and microbes were examined for HIF-1 inhibitory activities using a cell-based reporter assay. Bioassay-guided fractionation and isolation, followed by structure elucidation, yielded three potent natural product-derived HIF-1 inhibitors and two structurally related inactive compounds. In a T47D cell-based reporter assay, manassantin B 1 , manassantin A, and 4-O-methylsaucerneol inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activation with IC 50 values of 3, 3, and 20 nM, respectively. All three compounds are relatively hypoxia-specific inhibitors of HIF-1 activation, in comparison to other stimuli. The hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes CDKN1A, VEGF, and GLUT-1 were also inhibited. These compounds inhibit HIF-1 by blocking hypoxia-induced nuclear HIF-1α protein accumulation without affecting HIF-1α mRNA levels. In addition, preliminary structure-activity studies suggest specific structural requirements for this class of HIF-1 inhibitors

  6. Remote and reversible inhibition of neurons and circuits by small molecule induced potassium channel stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffenberg, Eva; Jurik, Angela; Mattusch, Corinna; Stoffel, Rainer; Genewsky, Andreas; Namendorf, Christian; Schmid, Roland M; Rammes, Gerhard; Biel, Martin; Uhr, Manfred; Moosmang, Sven; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wotjak, Carsten T; Thoeringer, Christoph K

    2016-01-13

    Manipulating the function of neurons and circuits that translate electrical and chemical signals into behavior represents a major challenges in neuroscience. In addition to optogenetic methods using light-activatable channels, pharmacogenetic methods with ligand induced modulation of cell signaling and excitability have been developed. However, they are largely based on ectopic expression of exogenous or chimera proteins. Now, we describe the remote and reversible expression of a Kir2.1 type potassium channel using the chemogenetic technique of small molecule induced protein stabilization. Based on shield1-mediated shedding of a destabilizing domain fused to a protein of interest and inhibition of protein degradation, this principle has been adopted for biomedicine, but not in neuroscience so far. Here, we apply this chemogenetic approach in brain research for the first time in order to control a potassium channel in a remote and reversible manner. We could show that shield1-mediated ectopic Kir2.1 stabilization induces neuronal silencing in vitro and in vivo in the mouse brain. We also validated this novel pharmacogenetic method in different neurobehavioral paradigms.The DD-Kir2.1 may complement the existing portfolio of pharmaco- and optogenetic techniques for specific neuron manipulation, but it may also provide an example for future applications of this principle in neuroscience research.

  7. The Immunomodulatory Small Molecule Imiquimod Induces Apoptosis in Devil Facial Tumour Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Patchett

    Full Text Available The survival of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is threatened by devil facial tumour disease (DFTD. This transmissible cancer is usually fatal, and no successful treatments have been developed. In human studies, the small immunomodulatory molecule imiquimod is a successful immunotherapy, activating anti-tumour immunity via stimulation of toll-like receptor-7 (TLR7 signaling pathways. In addition, imiquimod is a potent inducer of apoptosis in human tumour cell lines via TLR7 independent mechanisms. Here we investigate the potential of imiquimod as a DFTD therapy through analysis of treated DFTD cell lines and Tasmanian devil fibroblasts. WST-8 proliferation assays and annexin V apoptosis assays were performed to monitor apoptosis, and changes to the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes were analysed using qRT-PCR. Our results show that DFTD cell lines, but not Tasmanian devil fibroblasts, are sensitive to imiquimod-induced apoptosis in a time and concentration dependent manner. Induction of apoptosis was accompanied by down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic BCL2 and BCLXL genes, and up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic BIM gene. Continuous imiquimod treatment was required for these effects to occur. These results demonstrate that imiquimod can deregulate DFTD cell growth and survival in direct and targeted manner. In vivo, this may increase DFTD vulnerability to imiquimod-induced TLR7-mediated immune responses. Our findings have improved the current knowledge of imiquimod action in tumour cells for application to both DFTD and human cancer therapy.

  8. Anaerobic biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speece, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Enso-Fenox process has been very successfully used to remove chlorinated phenolic compounds from pulp bleaching effluents. It is a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic process consisting of a nonmethanogenic anaerobic fluidized bed followed by a trickling filter. Studies have been conducted on reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions with chlorinated phenols as the sole carbon and energy source. Approximately 40% of the added chlorophenols was converted to CH 4 and CO 2 . Substrate loading rates were 20 mg/L/d at hydraulic detention times of 2-4 days with 90% substrate conversion efficiency. Reductive dechlorination of mono, di-, tri-, and pentachlorophenols has been demonstrated in anaerobic sewage sludge. The following constituents were tested in the laboratory at their approximate concentrations in coal conversion wastewater (CCWW) and were anaerobically degraded in serum bottles: 1,000 mg/L phenol; 500 mg/L resorcinol; 1,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 500 mg/L p-cresol; 200 mg/L pyridine; 2,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 250 mg/L 40 methylcatechol; 500 mg/L 4-ethylpyridine; and 2,000 mg/L hexanoic acid. A petrochemical may initially exhibit toxicity to an unacclimated population of methane-fermenting bacteria, but with acclimation the toxicity may be greatly reduced or disappear. In addition, the microorganisms may develop the capacity to actually degrade compounds which showed initial toxicity. Since biomass digestion requires a complete consortium of bacteria, it is relevant to study the effect of a given process as well as to individual steps within the process. A toxicant can inhibit the rate-limiting step and/or change the step that is rate-limiting. Both manifestations of toxicity can severely affect the overall process

  9. Small interfering ribonucleic acid induces liquid-to-ripple phase transformation in a phospholipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. Here, we examine changes in the structure and dynamics of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the presence of a siRNA molecule and mechanical barriers to siRNA transfection in the bilayer. Our all-atom molecular dynamics simulation shows that siRNA induces a liquid crystalline-to-ripple phase transformation in the bilayer. The ripple phase consists of a major region of non-interdigitated and a minor region of interdigitated lipid molecules with an intervening kink. In the ripple phase, hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules have large compressive stresses, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA transfection.

  10. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  11. Self-induced steps in a small Josephson junction strongly coupled to a multimode resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A.; Jensen, H. Dalsgaard; Mygind, Jesper

    1991-01-01

    coupled systems. Based on a single-resonator model, we explain the exceptional size of the steps by the large content of higher harmonics of the Josephson oscillation sustained by the multiple modes of the resonator. The parameters of the junction and the loaded resonator—measured in situ by using......An equally spaced series of very large and nearly constant-voltage self-induced singularities has been observed in the dc I-V characteristics of a small Josephson tunnel junction strongly coupled to a resonant section of a superconducting transmission line. The system allows extremely high values...... of the coupling parameter. The current steps are due to subharmonic parametric excitation of the fundamental mode of the resonator loaded by the junction admittance. Using an applied magnetic field to vary the coupling parameter, we traced out half-integer steps as well as the mode steps known from more weakly...

  12. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Hein-Kristensen, Line; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were...... to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition......I and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections....

  13. Heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a small-world neuronal network system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Ting; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Yang, Xianqing

    2016-06-01

    A neuronal network often involves time delay caused by the finite signal propagation time in a given biological network. This time delay is not a homogenous fluctuation in a biological system. The heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a noisy small-world neuronal network system are numerically studied in this work by calculating synchronization measure and spike interval distribution. We focus on three different delay conditions: double-values delay, triple-values delay, and Gaussian-distributed delay. Our results show the following: 1) the heterogeneity in delay results in asynchronous firing in the neuronal network, and 2) maximum synchronization could be achieved through resonance given that the delay values are integer or half-integer times of each other.

  14. A Review of Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastrointestinal Injury: Focus on Prevention of Small Intestinal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Fujimori

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Capsule endoscopy and balloon endoscopy, advanced modalities that allow full investigation of the entire small intestine, have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs can cause a variety of abnormalities in the small intestine. Recently, several reports show that traditional NSAIDs (tNSAIDs and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA can induce small intestinal injuries. These reports have shown that the preventive effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs does not extend to the small intestine, suggesting that concomitant therapy may be required to prevent small intestinal side effects associated with tNSAID/ASA use. Recently, several randomized controlled trials used capsule endoscopy to evaluate the preventive effect of mucoprotective drugs against tNSAID/ASA-induced small intestinal injury. These studies show that misoprostol and rebamipide reduce the number and types of tNSAID-induced small intestinal mucosal injuries. However, those studies were limited to a small number of subjects and tested short-term tNSAID/ ASA treatment. Therefore, further extensive studies are clearly required to ascertain the beneficial effect of these drugs.

  15. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreiras, Lucas S; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B; Bice, Benjamin D; Bonfert, Brandi L; Pinhancos, Rebeca C; Balloon, Allison J; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T; Simmons, Blake A; Hodge, David B; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Dale, Bruce E; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P; Sato, Trey K

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH.

  16. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas S Parreiras

    Full Text Available The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH.

  17. Engineering and Two-Stage Evolution of a Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate-Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Anaerobic Fermentation of Xylose from AFEX Pretreated Corn Stover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreiras, Lucas S.; Breuer, Rebecca J.; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J.; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B.; Bice, Benjamin D.; Bonfert, Brandi L.; Pinhancos, Rebeca C.; Balloon, Allison J.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M.; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L.; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Hodge, David B.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Dale, Bruce E.; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P.; Sato, Trey K.

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

  18. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Induced Injury to the Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilja Tachecí

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs induced enteropathy represents an important complication of one of the most commonly used drugs worldwide. Due to previous diagnostics difficulties the real prevalence of this disease was underestimated for a long time. The pathogenesis of NSAID-enteropathy is more multifactorial and complex than formerly assumed but has still not been fully uncovered. A combination of the local and systemic effect plays an important role in pathogenesis. Thanks to novel enteroscopy methods (wireless capsule endoscopy, double balloon enteroscopy, small bowel lesions are described in a substantial section of NSAID users although most are clinically asymptomatic. The other non-invasive tests (small bowel permeability, faecal calprotectin, scintigraphy using faecal excretion of 111-indium-labelled leukocytes etc. proposed for diagnostics are not generally used in clinical practice, mainly because of their non-specificity. Despite intensive research into possible treatment, the main measure for patients with NSAID-enteropathy is still withdrawal of NSAIDs. Double balloon enteroscopy plays an important role in the treatment of complications (bleeding, strictures.

  19. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity......Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were...... of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent...

  20. Characteristics of quinolone-induced small colony variants in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuyama, J; Yamada, H; Maehana, J; Fukuda, Y; Kurose, S; Minami, S; Todo, Y; Watanabe, Y; Narita, H

    1997-06-01

    Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to 1 x MIC of the quinolone antibiotic pazufloxacin for 24 h, followed by plating on drug-free media, led to the emergence of small colony variants (SCVs) in addition to large colony variants (LCVs). However, following incubation with 0.25 or 4 x MIC of pazufloxacin, only LCVs were obtained. The SCVs were half as susceptible to pazufloxacin or ciprofloxacin as wild-type S. aureus, while the susceptibilities of LCVs were essentially unchanged. The reduced susceptibilities of SCVs did not result from mutations in the quinolone-resistance-determining regions of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, since the sequences of these genes were identical to those of the wild-type. However, the SCVs accumulated pazufloxacin and ciprofloxacin to a lesser degree than did wild-type. Furthermore, their susceptibility to quinolones was almost unaffected by reserpine or verapamil, suggesting that the reduced uptake resulted from decreased permeability, rather than from an active efflux pump. The ability of various quinolones to induce emergence of SCVs in S. aureus, correlated with the presence of carbon-bonded substituents at the C-7 position of a quinoline or naphthyridine nucleus, or with the presence of a benzoxazine nucleus. In conclusion, pazufloxacin-induced SCVs represent a mutant that one might expect to be rapidly eliminated in vivo and, hence, not to survive as a quinolone-resistant pathogen. This finding suggests a novel approach for development of future quinolones.

  1. Novel small molecule induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Eun; Min, Yong Ki; Ha, Jae Du; Kim, Bum Tae; Lee, Woo Ghil

    2007-01-01

    Using high-throughput screening with small-molecule libraries, we identified a compound, KCG165 [(2-(3-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)ethoxy)-1,10b-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c] quinazolin-5(6H)-one)], which strongly activated p53-mediated transcriptional activity. KCG165-induced phosphorylations of p53 at Ser 6 , Ser 15 , and Ser 20 , which are all key residues involved in the activation and stabilization of p53. Consistent with these findings, KCG165 increased level of p53 protein and led to the accumulation of transcriptionally active p53 in the nucleus with the increased occupancy of p53 in the endogenous promoter region of its downstream target gene, p21 WAF1/CIP . Notably, KCG165-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Furthermore, we suggested topoisomerase II as the molecular target of KCG165. Together, these results indicate that KCG165 may have potential applications as an antitumor agent

  2. Prognostic value of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia in small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Cui-Cui; Li, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chemotherapy is the standard treatment for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), and leukopenia is a common side effect. This study assesses whether chemotherapy-induced leukopenia is a predictor of efficacy and whether it is associated with the survival of SCLC patients. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on data from 445 patients with SCLC who received standard chemotherapy for 4 to 10 cycles. The World Health Organization grading system classifies leukopenia during chemotherapy as follows: absent (grade 0), mild (grades 1 and 2), or severe (grades 3 and 4). The primary endpoint is overall survival (OS). Results The association between chemotherapy-induced leukopenia and OS was assessed. According to a multivariate Cox model with time-varying covariates, the hazard ratio of death was significantly lower among patients with mild leukopenia than among patients with severe leukopenia at 0.687 (0.506 to 0.943) and 1.414 (1.147 to 1.744), respectively. The median survival was 13 months (95% CI: 11 to 15 months) for patients who did not experience leukopenia, 17 months (95% CI: 14 to 18 months) for those with mild leukopenia, and 14 months (95% CI: 13 to 16 months) for those with severe leukopenia (absent vs. mild vs. severe leukopenia, P=0.047). Conclusion Leukopenia during chemotherapy is associated with the survival of SCLC patients. Mild leukopenia is strongly associated with longer survival time. PMID:23882424

  3. Inducing gene expression by targeting promoter sequences using small activating RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vector-based systems comprised of exogenous nucleic acid sequences remain the standard for ectopic expression of a particular gene. Such systems offer robust overexpression, but have inherent drawbacks such the tedious process of construction, excluding sequences (e.g. introns and untranslated regions important for gene function and potential insertional mutagenesis of host genome associated with the use of viral vectors. We and others have recently reported that short double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs can induce endogenous gene expression by targeting promoter sequences in a phenomenon referred to as RNA activation (RNAa and such dsRNAs are termed small activating RNAs (saRNAs. To date, RNAa has been successfully utilized to induce the expression of different genes such as tumor suppressor genes. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for target selection and dsRNA design with associated experiments to facilitate RNAa in cultured cells. This technique may be applied to selectively activate endogenous gene expression for studying gene function, interrogating molecular pathways and reprogramming cell fate.

  4. Green tea extract induces protective autophagy in A549 non-small lung cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Izdebska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: For many decades, polyphenols, including green tea extract catechins, have been reported to exert multiple anti-tumor activities. However, to date the mechanisms of their action have not been completely elucidated. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of green tea extract on non-small lung cancer A549 cells. Material and methods: A549 cells following treatment with GTE were analyzed using the inverted light and fluorescence microscope. In order to evaluate cell sensitivity and cell death, the MTT assay and Tali image-based cytometer were used, respectively. Ultrastructural alterations were assessed using a transmission electron microscope.Results: The obtained data suggested that GTE, even at the highest dose employed (150 μM, was not toxic to A549 cells. Likewise, the treatment with GTE resulted in only a very small dose-dependent increase in the population of apoptotic cells. However, enhanced accumulation of vacuole-like structures in response to GTE was seen at the light and electron microscopic level. Furthermore, an increase in the acidic vesicular organelles and LC3-II puncta formation was observed under the fluorescence microscope, following GTE treatment. The analysis of the functional status of autophagy revealed that GTE-induced autophagy may provide self-protection against its own cytotoxicity, since we observed that the blockage of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 decreased the viability of A549 cells and potentiated necrotic cell death induction in response to GTE treatment.Conclusion: Collectively, our results revealed that A549 cells are insensitive to both low and high concentrations of the green tea extract, probably due to the induction of cytoprotective autophagy. These data suggest that a potential utility of GTE in lung cancer therapy may lie in its synergistic combinations with drugs or small molecules that target autophagy, rather than in monotherapy.

  5. Ulmus davidiana Nakai induces apoptosis and autophagy on non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soon-Oh; Choi, In Keun; Jeong, Wonsik; Lee, Se Ryeon; Sung, Hwa Jung; Hong, Seong Su; Seo, Jae Hong

    2017-04-18

    Ulmus davidiana Nakai (UDN) is frequently used in the treatment of cancer in traditional oriental medicine. Although several reports indicate that UDN has inhibitory effects in some cancers, there has been no report on the inhibitory effects of UDN via both autophagy and apoptosis. Cytotoxicity induced by UDN in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H-1299 and H-460 cell lines was evaluated using the 2, 3-Bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt (XTT) assay and trypan blue exclusion assay. Induction of apoptosis was also investigated using Hoechst staining and annexin-V binding assay and was confirmed with western blot analysis. Induction of autophagy was investigated through observation of autophagy vacuoles under inverted phase-contrast microscopy and was confirmed by observing the formation of autophagy vacuoles under a fluorescence microscope using monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and western blot analysis. The in vivo anti-tumorigenic effect of UDN was investigated in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model using H-1299 NSCLC cells. UDN exhibited a marked inhibitory effect on cell growth in H-1299 and H-460 human NSCLC cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. It induced not only apoptosis, but also autophagy in both H-1299 and H-460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. UDN-mediated autophagy led to the accumulation of autophagosome, resulting in apoptosis induction and cell death. From our current knowledge, we are the first to demonstrate that UDN has the potential to induce both autophagy and apoptosis in H-1299 and H-460 human NSCLC cell lines. We suggest that UDN can be considered a potential candidate for lung cancer-specific chemotherapy with efficacy as a cytotoxic agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Induced abortion and risk of small-for-gestational-age birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzini, F; Cipriani, S; Chiaffarino, F; Sandretti, F; Bortolus, R; Chiantera, V

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the possibility of an association between previous induced abortion and subsequent birth of a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant. Case-control study. General and university hospitals. Cases were 555 women who delivered SGA babies. Controls were 1966 women who gave birth at term (>37 weeks of gestation) to healthy infants of normal weight on randomly selected days at the hospital where cases had been identified. All women in the case and control categories were interviewed on the obstetric wards by one of a team of six interviewers. During the interviews, information was obtained regarding general socio-demographic factors, personal characteristics and habits, gynaecological and obstetric history, general anamnesis, family history of obstetric and gynaecological diseases, and the age of the father of the child. Further information on current pregnancy and delivery was also collected. We used conditional multiple logistic regression (with age as the matching variable), with maximum likelihood fitting, to obtain odds ratios and their corresponding 95% CIs. Included in the regression equations were terms for education, plus terms significantly associated in this data set with the risk of SGA birth (smoking in pregnancy, history of SGA, gestational hypertension and parity). Women admitted to a general and a university hospital. No significant increase in the risk of SGA birth was observed in women with a previous induced abortion [odds ratio (OR) 1.0; 95% CI 0.6-1.7]. The OR for SGA birth was 1.2 (95% CI 0.7-2.1) for preterm and 1.0 (95% CI 0.7-1.4) for term SGA births. This study found no association between risk of SGA birth and induced abortion.

  7. A Chemical Genetics Strategy that Identifies Small Molecules which Induce the Triple Response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Keimei; Hoshi, Tomoki; Tomio, Sumiya; Ueda, Kenji; Hara, Kojiro

    2017-12-19

    To explore small molecules with ethylene-like biological activity, we conducted a triple response-based assay system for chemical library screening. Among 9600 compounds, we found N -[(1,3,5-trimethyl-1 H -pyrazol-4-yl)methyl]- N -methyl-2-naphthalenesulfonamide ( EH-1 ) displayed promising biological activity on inducing a triple response in Arabidopsis seedlings. Chemical synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of EH-1 analogues with different substitution patterns on the phenyl ring structure of the sulfonamide group indicated that 3,4-dichloro- N -methyl- N -(1,3,5-trimethyl-1 H -pyrazol-4-yl-methyl) benzenesulfonamide ( 8 ) exhibits the most potent biological activity. To determine the mechanism of action, we conducted RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of the effect of EH-1 and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC), the precursor of ethylene biosynthesis, following the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmation. Data obtained from RNA-Seq analysis indicated that EH-1 and ACC significantly induced the expression of 39 and 48 genes, respectively (above 20 fold of control), among which five genes are up-regulated by EH-1 as well as by ACC. We also found 67 and 32 genes that are significantly down-regulated, respectively, among which seven genes are in common. For quantitative RT-PCR analysis. 12 up-regulated genes were selected from the data obtained from RNA-Seq analysis. We found a good correlation of quantitative RT-PCR analysis and RNA-Seq analysis. Based on these results, we conclude that the action mechanism of EH-1 on inducing triple response in Arabidopsis is different from that of ACC.

  8. Soccer small-sided games in young players: rule modification to induce higher physiological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halouani, J; Chtourou, H; Dellal, A; Chaouachi, A; Chamari, K

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the physiological responses of 3 forms of players' numbers during two different games rules of small-sided games (SSG: stop-ball vs . small-goals rules). Eighteen youth amateur soccer players (age 13.5±0.7 years; height 168.9±6.1cm; body mass 63.1±7.7 kg) participated in this study and performed 3 SSGs with varying players' number (2 vs .2; 3 vs .3 and 4 vs .4): stop-ball SSG (SB-SSG) vs. small-goals SSG (SG-SSG) in a randomized and counter-balanced order on a constant pitch dimension (20×25m). The players performed 4×4 min SSG with 2-min of passive recovery in-between. Heart rate (HR), (expressed in bpm and % HRmax), lactate ([La - ]), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were collected during each session. SB-SSG induced the higher HR values in comparison with the SG-SSG for the 3 game formats (2 vs .2; 3vs.3 and 4 vs .4). Also, compared with SG-SSG, SB-SSG induced the higher HR values during 2vs.2 compared with 4 vs .4 games rules (178 vs . 174 and 175 vs . 171 bpm, respectively). However, the SB-SSG was more intense compared with SG-SSG in the 2 vs . 2 game rule compared with the two others (3 v s.3 and 4 vs . 4) for [La - ] and RPE (7.58 vs . 7; 7.25 vs . 6.75 and 6.5 vs . 6.16 mmol ∙ L -1 , and 7.75 vs . 7.33; 7.41 vs . 7.08 and 7.16 vs . 6.83, respectively). Therefore, the use of 2 vs . 2 and 3 vs . 3 SSG with SB-SSG seems to represent an alternative to coaches to increase cardiovascular and metabolic demands in youth soccer players.

  9. Soccer small-sided games in young players: rule modification to induce higher physiological responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Halouani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the physiological responses of 3 forms of players’ numbers during two different games rules of small-sided games (SSG: stop-ball vs. small-goals rules. Eighteen youth amateur soccer players (age 13.5±0.7 years; height 168.9±6.1cm; body mass 63.1±7.7 kg participated in this study and performed 3 SSGs with varying players’ number (2vs.2; 3vs.3 and 4vs.4: stop-ball SSG (SB-SSG vs. small-goals SSG (SG-SSG in a randomized and counter-balanced order on a constant pitch dimension (20×25m. The players performed 4×4 min SSG with 2-min of passive recovery in-between. Heart rate (HR, (expressed in bpm and % HRmax, lactate ([La-], and rating of perceived exertion (RPE were collected during each session. SB-SSG induced the higher HR values in comparison with the SG-SSG for the 3 game formats (2vs.2; 3vs.3 and 4vs.4. Also, compared with SG-SSG, SB-SSG induced the higher HR values during 2vs.2 compared with 4vs.4 games rules (178 vs. 174 and 175 vs. 171 bpm, respectively. However, the SB-SSG was more intense compared with SG-SSG in the 2 vs. 2 game rule compared with the two others (3 vs.3 and 4 vs. 4 for [La-] and RPE (7.58 vs. 7; 7.25 vs. 6.75 and 6.5 vs. 6.16 mmol ∙ L-1, and 7.75 vs. 7.33; 7.41 vs. 7.08 and 7.16 vs. 6.83, respectively. Therefore, the use of 2 vs. 2 and 3 vs. 3 SSG with SB-SSG seems to represent an alternative to coaches to increase cardiovascular and metabolic demands in youth soccer players.

  10. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  11. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...... requirements. In fact, most advances were achieved during the last three decades, when high-rate reactor systems were developed and a profound insight was obtained in the microbiology of the anaerobic communities. This insight led to a better understanding of anaerobic treatment and, subsequently, to a broader...

  12. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern requireme......The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...

  13. Soluble dietary fiber protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced damage to the small intestine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Hara, Toshiko; Murakawa, Daisuke; Matsuura, Masashi; Takata, Kenji

    2010-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often cause ulcers in the small intestine in humans, but there are few effective agents for treatment of small intestinal ulcers. We found that soluble dietary fibers (SDFs), such as pectin, could prevent the formation of small intestinal lesions induced by indomethacin (IND) in cats. To elucidate the mechanism of protection by SDFs, we examined the viscosities of SDFs and the effects of pectin on gastrointestinal absorption of IND and intestinal hypermotility induced by IND. Cats were given regular dry food (RFD-Dry) or RFD-Dry supplemented with pectin, guar gum, polydextrose, or mucin twice daily. IND was administered orally once daily for 3 days. Mucosal lesions in the small intestine were examined 24 h after the final dosing of IND. Plasma concentrations of IND were measured by HPLC. GI motilities were measured using a telemetry system in conscious cats implanted with force transducers. Viscosities of the SDFs were measured using a viscosimeter. In cats given RFD-Dry, IND (3 mg/kg) increased motility and produced many lesions in the lower half of the small intestine; the total lesion area (TLA) was 7.5 +/- 2.6 cm(2) (n = 4). Lesions induced by IND were markedly decreased in cats given RFD-Dry supplemented with 3% pectin, guar gum, polydextrose or mucin; TLAs were 0.6 +/- 0.3, 0.0 +/- 0.0, 1.3 +/- 0.8 and 1.6 +/- 0.5 cm(2) (n = 4) (P 1,200, 1 and 4, respectively. Pectin did not affect the absorption of IND nor did it inhibit IND-induced intestinal hypermotility. SDFs protect the small intestine against NSAID-induced damage, probably by compensating a barrier function of the mucin decreased by IND. Viscosities of the SDFs play a role, at least in part, in the protective effects of the SDFs on the small intestine.

  14. Determination of the metal balance shift induced in small fresh water fish by X-ray irradiation using PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, M.; Iso, H.; Kodama, K.; Imaseki, H.; Aoki, K.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The balance of essential elements in organisms can be changed by environmental stresses. A small fresh water fish, the medaka, was irradiated with X-rays (total dose: 17 Gy, which is not a lethal dose for this fish). Essential elements in the liver, gall bladder, kidney, spleen, heart and brain of the fish were measured by the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method and compared with those of a control fish. Various changes in the elemental balance shift were observed. The PIXE method can analyze many elements in a small sample simultaneously, and so the changes in elemental content induced by irradiation were readily determined. (author)

  15. Xenon-induced power oscillations in a generic small modular reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitcher, Evans Damenortey

    As world demand for energy continues to grow at unprecedented rates, the world energy portfolio of the future will inevitably include a nuclear energy contribution. It has been suggested that the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) could play a significant role in the spread of civilian nuclear technology to nations previously without nuclear energy. As part of the design process, the SMR design must be assessed for the threat to operations posed by xenon-induced power oscillations. In this research, a generic SMR design was analyzed with respect to just such a threat. In order to do so, a multi-physics coupling routine was developed with MCNP/MCNPX as the neutronics solver. Thermal hydraulic assessments were performed using a single channel analysis tool developed in Python. Fuel and coolant temperature profiles were implemented in the form of temperature dependent fuel cross sections generated using the SIGACE code and reactor core coolant densities. The Power Axial Offset (PAO) and Xenon Axial Offset (XAO) parameters were chosen to quantify any oscillatory behavior observed. The methodology was benchmarked against results from literature of startup tests performed at a four-loop PWR in Korea. The developed benchmark model replicated the pertinent features of the reactor within ten percent of the literature values. The results of the benchmark demonstrated that the developed methodology captured the desired phenomena accurately. Subsequently, a high fidelity SMR core model was developed and assessed. Results of the analysis revealed an inherently stable SMR design at beginning of core life and end of core life under full-power and half-power conditions. The effect of axial discretization, stochastic noise and convergence of the Monte Carlo tallies in the calculations of the PAO and XAO parameters was investigated. All were found to be quite small and the inherently stable nature of the core design with respect to xenon-induced power oscillations was confirmed. Finally, a

  16. Inhibition of SIRT1 by a small molecule induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, Arunasree M., E-mail: arunasreemk@ilsresearch.org [Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Hyderabad, AP 500 046 (India); Mallika, A. [Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Hyderabad, AP 500 046 (India); Badiger, Jayasree [HKE' s Smt. V.G. College for Women, Aiwan-E-Shahi Area, Gulbarga, KA 585 102 (India); Alinakhi [Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Hyderabad, AP 500 046 (India); Talukdar, Pinaki [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, First Floor, Central Tower, Sai Trinity Building Garware Circle, Sutarwadi, PashanPune, Maharashtra 411 021 (India); Sachchidanand [Lupin Research Park, 46/47, A, Village Nande, Taluka Mulshi, Dist. Pune 411 042 (India)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Novel small molecule SIRT1 inhibitor better than sirtinol. {yields} IC{sub 50} 500 nM. {yields} Specific tumor cytotoxicity towards breast cancer cells. {yields} Restoration of H3K9 acetylation levels to baseline when co-treated with SIRT1 activator (Activator X) and inhibitor (ILS-JGB-1741). -- Abstract: Overexpression of SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III histone deacetylases (HDACs), is implicated in many cancers and therefore could become a promising antitumor target. Here we demonstrate a small molecule SIRT1 inhibitor, ILS-JGB-1741(JGB1741) with potent inhibitory effects on the proliferation of human metastatic breast cancer cells, MDA-MB 231. The molecule has been designed using medicinal chemistry approach based on known SIRT1 inhibitor, sirtinol. The molecule showed a significant inhibition of SIRT1 activity compared to sirtinol. Studies on the antitumor effects of JGB on three different cancer cell lines, K562, HepG2 and MDA-MB 231 showed an IC{sub 50} of 1, 10 and 0.5 {mu}M, respectively. Further studies on MDA-MB 231 cells showed a dose-dependent increase in K9 and K382 acetylation of H3 and p53, respectively. Results also demonstrated that JGB1741-induced apoptosis is associated with increase in cytochrome c release, modulation in Bax/Bcl2 ratio and cleavage of PARP. Flowcytometric analysis showed increased percentage of apoptotic cells, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in multicaspase activation. In conclusion, the present study indicates the potent apoptotic effects of JGB1741 in MDA-MB 231 cells.

  17. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky G.; Hein-Kristensen, Line

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition of antibiotics. Pinpoint isolates had decreased hemolytic activity under stagnant conditions and a changed spectrum of carbohydrate utilization compared to the wild type and isolates from normal-size colonies. Genome sequence comparison revealed that all seven pinpoint isolates had a mutation in a heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more targets than just fabI and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections. PMID:24637686

  18. Inflationary cosmology and the standard model Higgs with a small Hubble-induced mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Kamada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamics of the standard model Higgs field in the inflationary cosmology. Since metastability of our vacuum is indicated by the current experimental data of the Higgs boson and top quark, inflation models with a large Hubble parameter may have a problem: In such models, the Higgs field rolls down towards the unwanted true vacuum due to the large fluctuation in the inflationary background. However, this problem can be relaxed by supposing an additional mass term for the Higgs field generated during and after inflation. We point out that it does not have to be larger than the Hubble parameter if the number of e-folds during inflation is not too large. We demonstrate that a high reheating temperature is favored in such a relatively small mass case and it can be checked by future gravitational wave observations. Such an induced mass can be generated by, e.g., a direct coupling to the inflaton field or nonminimal coupling to gravity.

  19. Hypoxia-inducible genes encoding small EF-hand proteins in rice and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Chie; Minami, Ikuko; Oda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Rice has evolved metabolic and morphological adaptations to low-oxygen stress to grow in submerged paddy fields. To characterize the molecular components that mediate the response to hypoxia in rice, we identified low-oxygen stress early response genes by microarray analysis. Among the highly responsive genes, five genes, OsHREF1 to OsHREF5, shared strong homology. They encoded small proteins harboring two EF-hands, typical Ca(2+)-binding motifs. Homologous genes were found in many land plants, including SlHREF in tomato, which is also strongly induced by hypoxia. SlHREF induction was detected in both roots and shoots of tomato plants under hypoxia. With the exception of OsHREF5, OsHREF expression was unaffected by drought, salinity, cold, or osmotic stress. Fluorescent signals of green fluorescent protein-fused OsHREFs were detected in the cytosol and nucleus. Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of intracellular Ca(2+) release, repressed induction of OsHREF1-4 under hypoxia. The HREFs may be related to the Ca(2+) response to hypoxia.

  20. Comparison of surgically induced astigmatism in various incisions in manual small incision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Jauhari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To determine the surgically induced astigmatism (SIA in Straight, Frown and Inverted V shape (Chevron incisions in manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS.METHODS:A prospective cross sectional study was done on a total of 75 patients aged 40y and above with senile cataract. The patients were randomly divided into three groups (25 each. Each group received a particular type of incision (Straight, Frown or Inverted V shape incisions. Manual SICS with intraocular lens (IOL implantation was performed. The patients were compared 4wk post operatively for uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA and SIA. All calculations were performed using the SIA calculator version 2.1, a free software program. The study was analyzed using SPSS version 15.0 statistical analysis software.RESULTS:The study found that 89.5% of patients in Straight incision group, 94.2% in Frown incision group and 95.7% in Inverted V group attained BCVA post-operatively in the range of 6/6 to 6/18. Mean SIA was minimum (-0.88±0.61D×90 degrees with Inverted V incision which was statistically significant.CONCLUSION:Inverted V (Chevron incision gives minimal SIA.

  1. Hyperbolic periodic orbits in nongradient systems and small-noise-induced metastable transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Molei

    2018-01-01

    Small noise can induce rare transitions between metastable states, which can be characterized by Maximum Likelihood Paths (MLPs). Nongradient systems contrast gradient systems in that MLP does not have to cross the separatrix at a saddle point, but instead possibly at a point on a hyperbolic periodic orbit. A numerical approach for identifying such unstable periodic orbits is proposed based on String method. In a special class of nongradient systems ('orthogonal-type'), there are provably local MLPs that cross such saddle point or hyperbolic periodic orbit, and the separatrix crossing location determines the associated local maximum of transition rate. In general cases, however, the separatrix crossing may not determine a unique local maximum of the rate, as we numerically observed a counter-example in a sheared 2D-space Allen-Cahn SPDE. It is a reasonable conjecture that there are always local MLPs associated with each attractor on the separatrix, such as saddle point or hyperbolic periodic orbit; our numerical experiments did not disprove so.

  2. Small heat shock proteins protect against α-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2006-01-01

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). α-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and αB-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are ∼2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by ∼80% in a culture model while αB-crystallin reduces toxicity by ∼20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model

  3. Small for Gestational Age and Magnesium: Intrauterine magnesium deficiency may induce metabolic syndrome in later life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Takaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium deficiency during pregnancy as a result of insufficient or low intake of magnesium is common in developing and developed countries. Previous reports have shown that intracellular magnesium of cord blood platelets is lower among small for gestational age (SGA groups than that of appropriate for gestational age (AGA groups, suggesting that intrauterine magnesium deficiency may result in SGA. Additionally, the risk of adult-onset diseases such as insulin resistance syndrome is greater among children whose mothers were malnourished during pregnancy, and who consequently had a low birth weight. In a number of animal models, poor nutrition during pregnancy leads to offspring that exhibit pathophysiological changes similar to human diseases. The offspring of pregnant rats fed a magensium restricted diet have developed hypermethylation in the hepatic 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 promoter. These findings indicate that maternal magnesium deficiencies during pregnancy influence regulation of non-imprinted genes by altering the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, thereby inducing different metabolic phenotypes. Magnesium deficiency during pregnancy may be responsible for not only maternal and fetal nutritional problems, but also lifelong consequences that affect the offspring throughout their life. Epidemiological, clinical, and basic research on the effects of magnesium deficiency now indicates underlying mechanisms, especially epigenetic processes.

  4. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, B.K.; Macarie, H.; Moletta, R.; Dohanyos, M.; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Lens, P.N.L.; Verstraete, W.

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern

  5. Anaerobic digestion of piggery waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van A.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes

  6. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  7. Intratumor heterogeneity and chemotherapy-induced changes in EGFR status in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker expression is increasingly being used to customize treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The choice of systemic treatment usually depends on biomarker expression in the initial diagnostic biopsy taken before initiation of first-line treatment. Chemotherapy induces DNA damages...

  8. Anaerobic carbon metabolism by the tricarboxylic acid cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanlerberghe, G.C.; Horsey, A.K.; Weger, H.G.; Turpin, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrogen-limited cells of Selenastrum minutum (Naeg.) Collins are able to assimilate NH 4 + in the dark under anaerobic conditions. Addition of NH 4 + to anaerobic cells results in a threefold increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCAC) CO 2 efflux and an eightfold increase in the rate of anaplerotic carbon fixation via phosphoenspyruvate carboxylase. Both of these observations are consistent with increased TCAC carbon flow to supply intermediates for amino acid biosynthesis. Addition of H 14 CO 3 - to anaerobic cells assimilating NH 4 + results in the incorporation of radiolabel into the α-carboxyl carbon of glutamic acid. Incorporation of radiolabel into glutamic acid is not simply a short-term phenomenon following NH 4 + addition as the specific activity of glutamic acid increases over time. This indicates that this alga is able to maintain partial oxidative TCAC carbon flow while under anoxia to supply αketoglutarate for glutamate production. During dark aerobic NH 4 + assimilation, no radiolabel appears in fumarate or succinate and only a small amount occurs in malate. During anaerobic NH 4 + assimilation, these metabolites contain a large proportion of the total radiolabel and radiolabel accumulates in succinate over time. Also, the ratio of dark carbon fixation to NH 4 + assimilation is much higher under anaerobic than aerobic conditions. These observations suggest the operation of a partial reductive TCAC from oxaloacetic acid to malate, fumarate, and succinate. Such a pathway might contribute to redox balance in an anaerobic cell maintaining partial oxidative TCAC activity

  9. The challenges of anaerobic digestion and the role of biochar in optimizing anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagbohungbe, Michael O; Herbert, Ben M J; Hurst, Lois; Ibeto, Cynthia N; Li, Hong; Usmani, Shams Q; Semple, Kirk T

    2017-03-01

    Biochar, like most other adsorbents, is a carbonaceous material, which is formed from the combustion of plant materials, in low-zero oxygen conditions and results in a material, which has the capacity to sorb chemicals onto its surfaces. Currently, research is being carried out to investigate the relevance of biochar in improving the soil ecosystem, digestate quality and most recently the anaerobic digestion process. Anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic substrates provides both a sustainable source of energy and a digestate with the potential to enhance plant growth and soil health. In order to ensure that these benefits are realised, the anaerobic digestion system must be optimized for process stability and high nutrient retention capacity in the digestate produced. Substrate-induced inhibition is a major issue, which can disrupt the stable functioning of the AD system reducing microbial breakdown of the organic waste and formation of methane, which in turn reduces energy output. Likewise, the spreading of digestate on land can often result in nutrient loss, surface runoff and leaching. This review will examine substrate inhibition and their impact on anaerobic digestion, nutrient leaching and their environmental implications, the properties and functionality of biochar material in counteracting these challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of anaerobic energy expenditure to whole body thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Christopher B

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heat production serves as the standard measurement for the determination of energy expenditure and efficiency in animals. Estimations of metabolic heat production have traditionally focused on gas exchange (oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production although direct heat measurements may include an anaerobic component particularly when carbohydrate is oxidized. Stoichiometric interpretations of the ratio of carbon dioxide production to oxygen uptake suggest that both anaerobic and aerobic heat production and, by inference, all energy expenditure – can be accounted for with a measurement of oxygen uptake as 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen. This manuscript incorporates contemporary bioenergetic interpretations of anaerobic and aerobic ATP turnover to promote the independence of these disparate types of metabolic energy transfer: each has different reactants and products, uses dissimilar enzymes, involves different types of biochemical reactions, takes place in separate cellular compartments, exploits different types of gradients and ultimately each operates with distinct efficiency. The 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen for carbohydrate oxidation includes a small anaerobic heat component as part of anaerobic energy transfer. Faster rates of ATP turnover that exceed mitochondrial respiration and that are supported by rapid glycolytic phosphorylation with lactate production result in heat production that is independent of oxygen uptake. Simultaneous direct and indirect calorimetry has revealed that this anaerobic heat does not disappear when lactate is later oxidized and so oxygen uptake does not adequately measure anaerobic efficiency or energy expenditure (as was suggested by the "oxygen debt" hypothesis. An estimate of anaerobic energy transfer supplements the measurement of oxygen uptake and may improve the interpretation of whole-body energy expenditure.

  11. Design and Fabrication of an Anaerobic Digester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Abubakar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digester is a physical structure that provides a conducive environment for the multiplication of micro-organisms that degrades organic matter to generate biogas energy. Energy is required in agriculture for crop production, processing and storage, poultry production and electricity for farmstead and farm settlements. It is energy that propels agricultural mechanization, which minimizes the use of human and animal muscles and its inherent drudgery in agriculture. The energy demand required to meet up with the agricultural growth in Nigeria is high and growing every year. In this study the design and fabrication of an anaerobic digester was reported which is an attempt to boost energy requirement for small and medium dryland farmers in Nigeria. The design of the digester includes the following concept; the basic principles of anaerobic digestion processes, socio-economic status of the dryland farmers, amount of biogas to be produced. Finally, the digester was fabricated using locally available raw materials within the dryland area of Nigeria. At the end, preliminary flammability test was conducted and the biogas produced was found to be flammable.

  12. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1993-10-01

    Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from deep subsurface sediment samples taken at study sites in Idaho (INEL) and Washington (HR) by culturing on dilute and concentrated medium. Morphologically distinct colonies were purified, and their responses to 21 selected physiological tests were determined. Although the number of isolates was small (18 INEL, 27 HR) some general patterns could be determined. Most strains could utilize all the carbon sources, however the glycerol and melizitose utilization was positive for 50% or less of the HR isolates. Catalase activity (27.78% at INEL, 74.07% at HR) and tryptophan metabolism (11.12% at INEL, 40.74% at HR) were significantly different between the two study sites. MPN and viable counts indicate that sediments near the water table yield the greatest numbers of anaerobes. Deeper sediments also appear to be more selective with the greatest number of viable counts on low-nutrient mediums. Likewise, only strictly obligate anaerobes were found in the deepest sediment samples. Selective media indicated the presence of methanogens, acetogens, and sulfate reducers at only the HR site

  13. Osteopontin induces growth of metastatic tumors in a preclinical model of non-small lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojaei Farbod

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteopontin (OPN, also known as SPP1 (secreted phosphoprotein, is an integrin binding glyco-phosphoprotein produced by a variety of tissues. In cancer patients expression of OPN has been associated with poor prognosis in several tumor types including breast, lung, and colorectal cancers. Despite wide expression in tumor cells and stroma, there is limited evidence supporting role of OPN in tumor progression and metastasis. Using phage display technology we identified a high affinity anti-OPN monoclonal antibody (hereafter AOM1. The binding site for AOM1 was identified as SVVYGLRSKS sequence which is immediately adjacent to the RGD motif and also spans the thrombin cleavage site of the human OPN. AOM1 efficiently inhibited OPNa binding to recombinant integrin αvβ3 with an IC50 of 65 nM. Due to its unique binding site, AOM1 is capable of inhibiting OPN cleavage by thrombin which has been shown to produce an OPN fragment that is biologically more active than the full length OPN. Screening of human cell lines identified tumor cells with increased expression of OPN receptors (αvβ3 and CD44v6 such as mesothelioma, hepatocellular carcinoma, breast, and non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma (NSCLC. CD44v6 and αvβ3 were also found to be highly enriched in the monocyte, but not lymphocyte, subset of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs. In vitro, OPNa induced migration of both tumor and hPBMCs in a transwell migration assay. AOM1 significantly blocked cell migration further validating its specificity for the ligand. OPN was found to be enriched in mouse plasma in a number of pre-clinical tumor model of non-small cell lung cancers. To assess the role of OPN in tumor growth and metastasis and to evaluate a potential therapeutic indication for AOM1, we employed a KrasG12D-LSLp53fl/fl subcutaneously implanted in vivo model of NSCLC which possesses a high capacity to metastasize into the lung. Our data indicated that treatment of tumor

  14. Small quartz silica spheres induced disorder in octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystals: A thermal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinelli, M.; Ghosh, A. K.; Mercuri, F.

    2001-01-01

    A photopyroelectric technique has been applied to the study of specific heat and thermal conductivity of homeotropically aligned mixtures of small quartz spheres (aerosil) and octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) with concentration 0≤ρ s ≤0.04g/cm 3 . Thermal conductivity data show that, even at these very low concentrations, an annealing of the disorder introduced by the aerosil takes place on cooling at the smectic-A - nematic (Sm-A - N) phase transition and not only at the nematic-isotropic (N-I) one. This means that there is some elastic strain in the nematic phase of the sample which is not quenched. Accordingly the suppression of the N-I transition temperature as a function of ρ s does not fit a random field with a random dilution model that accounts for random quenched disorder only. High resolution specific heat measurements at the A-N and N-I transition show the effect of the aerosil is not the same. While in the first case its peak is suppressed with increasing concentration, in the second case there are some indications that outside the two-phase coexistence region it is enhanced. The effect of surface-induced alignment is also discussed to explain some discrepancies between our data and the ones reported in literature. It is concluded that the amount of disorder in the sample does not depend on ρ s only, but also on other variables such as external fields. Finally, a relaxation phenomenon in the aerosil network that partially compensate the disordering effect of the particles is suggested to explain the concentration dependence of the transition temperatures

  15. Anaerobic fungal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookman, J.L.; Nicholson, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of molecular techniques has greatly broadened our view of microbial diversity and enabled a more complete detection and description of microbial communities. The application of these techniques provides a simple means of following community changes, for example, Ishii et al. described transient and more stable inhabitants in another dynamic microbial system, compost. Our present knowledge of anaerobic gut fungal population diversity within the gastrointestinal tract is based upon isolation, cultivation and observations in vivo. It is likely that there are many species yet to be described, some of which may be non-culturable. We have observed a distinct difference in the ease of cultivation between the different genera, for example, Caecomyes isolates are especially difficult to isolate and maintain in vitro, a feature that is likely to result in the under representation of this genera in culture-based enumerations. The anaerobic gut fungi are the only known obligately anaerobic fungi. For the majority of their life cycles, they are found tightly associated with solid digesta in the rumen and/or hindgut. They produce potent fibrolytic enzymes and grow invasively on and into the plant material they are digesting making them important contributors to fibre digestion. This close association with intestinal digesta has made it difficult to accurately determine the amount of fungal biomass present in the rumen, with Orpin suggesting 8% contribution to the total microbial biomass, whereas Rezaeian et al. more recently gave a value of approximately 20%. It is clear that the rumen microbial complement is affected by dietary changes, and that the fungi are more important in digestion in the rumens of animals fed with high-fibre diets. It seems likely that the gut fungi play an important role within the rumen as primary colonizers of plant fibre, and so we are particularly interested in being able to measure the appearance and diversity of fungi on the plant

  16. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, T.L.; Lee, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  17. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester

  18. Homologous leaf mutations induced in small- and large seeded lentils and their effect on some economic characters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.K.; Sharma, B.

    1978-01-01

    Large-seeded 'L 1492' and small-seeded 'L 235' varieties of lentil (Lens culinaris Medic.) were treated with gamma-rays and NMU (N-nitroso-N-methyl urea.). The leaves of the 2 groups are also usually large and small respectively. Some homologous leaf mutations were isolated in both the varieties. In the small-seeded variety, leaf mutations similar to the large-seeded variety were induced and vice versa. The leaf mutations in the 2 groups did not show any change in pod or seed size. Thus the genes responsible for taxonomic differentiation of the small and large-seeded types seem to be different from those reported here, which simply modify the leaf morphology. The seed yield of all the leaf mutants was less than that of the parent varieties. (author)

  19. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2003-01-01

    -rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  20. Isolation and Cultivation of Anaerobes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aragao Börner, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play important roles in different biotechnological processes. Their complex metabolism and special cultivation requirements have led to less isolated representatives in comparison to their aerobic counterparts.In view of that, the isolation and cultivation of anaerobic...... microorganisms is still a promising venture, and conventional methodologies as well as considerations and modifications are presented here. An insight into new methodologies and devices as well as a discussion on future perspectives for the cultivation of anaerobes may open the prospects of the exploitation...... of these microorganisms as a source for biotechnology....

  1. Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors For Cost-Effective Municipal Water Reuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özgün, H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology has been increasingly researched for municipal wastewater treatment as a means to produce nutrient-rich, solids free effluents with low levels of pathogens, while occupying a small footprint. An AnMBR can be used not only for on-site

  2. Measurement of small light absorption in microparticles by means of optically induced rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Bekshaev, A. Ya; Maksimyak, P. P.

    2015-01-01

    The absorption parameters of micro-particles have been associated with the induced spin exerted upon the particle, when embedded in a circularly polarized coherent field. The induced rotational speed is theoretically analyzed, showing the influence of the beam parameters, the parameters of the pa......The absorption parameters of micro-particles have been associated with the induced spin exerted upon the particle, when embedded in a circularly polarized coherent field. The induced rotational speed is theoretically analyzed, showing the influence of the beam parameters, the parameters...

  3. Implementing Livestock Anaerobic Digestion Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page provides information to help make an informed decision about installing an anaerobic digester. Is it a good match for a farm’s organic waste, project financing, development guidelines and permit requirements?

  4. Pharmacological Correction of Stress-Induced Gastric Ulceration by Novel Small-Molecule Agents with Antioxidant Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin V. Kudryavtsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine novel small-molecule agents influencing the pathogenesis of gastric lesions induced by stress. To achieve this goal, four novel organic compounds containing structural fragments with known antioxidant activity were synthesized, characterized by physicochemical methods, and evaluated in vivo at water immersion restraint conditions. The levels of lipid peroxidation products and activities of antioxidative system enzymes were measured in gastric mucosa and correlated with the observed gastroprotective activity of the active compounds. Prophylactic single-dose 1 mg/kg treatment with (2-hydroxyphenylthioacetyl derivatives of L-lysine and L-proline efficiently decreases up to 86% stress-induced stomach ulceration in rats. Discovered small-molecule antiulcer agents modulate activities of gastric mucosa tissue superoxide dismutase, catalase, and xanthine oxidase in concerted directions. Gastroprotective effect of (2-hydroxyphenylthioacetyl derivatives of L-lysine and L-proline at least partially depends on the correction of gastric mucosa oxidative balance.

  5. Pharmacological correction of stress-induced gastric ulceration by novel small-molecule agents with antioxidant profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Konstantin V; Markevich, Anna O; Virchenko, Oleksandr V; Falalyeyeva, Tetyana M; Beregova, Tetyana V; Ostapchenko, Lyudmyla I; Zabolotnev, Dmitry V; Zefirov, Nikolay S

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine novel small-molecule agents influencing the pathogenesis of gastric lesions induced by stress. To achieve this goal, four novel organic compounds containing structural fragments with known antioxidant activity were synthesized, characterized by physicochemical methods, and evaluated in vivo at water immersion restraint conditions. The levels of lipid peroxidation products and activities of antioxidative system enzymes were measured in gastric mucosa and correlated with the observed gastroprotective activity of the active compounds. Prophylactic single-dose 1 mg/kg treatment with (2-hydroxyphenyl)thioacetyl derivatives of L-lysine and L-proline efficiently decreases up to 86% stress-induced stomach ulceration in rats. Discovered small-molecule antiulcer agents modulate activities of gastric mucosa tissue superoxide dismutase, catalase, and xanthine oxidase in concerted directions. Gastroprotective effect of (2-hydroxyphenyl)thioacetyl derivatives of L-lysine and L-proline at least partially depends on the correction of gastric mucosa oxidative balance.

  6. Low-pH induced reversible reorganizations of chloroplast thylakoid membranes - As revealed by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünnep, Renáta; Zsiros, Ottó; Hörcsik, Zsolt; Markó, Márton; Jajoo, Anjana; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Garab, Győző; Nagy, Gergely

    2017-05-01

    Energization of thylakoid membranes brings about the acidification of the lumenal aqueous phase, which activates important regulatory mechanisms. Earlier Jajoo and coworkers (2014 FEBS Lett. 588:970) have shown that low pH in isolated plant thylakoid membranes induces changes in the excitation energy distribution between the two photosystems. In order to elucidate the structural background of these changes, we used small-angle neutron scattering on thylakoid membranes exposed to low p 2 H (pD) and show that gradually lowering the p 2 H from 8.0 to 5.0 causes small but well discernible reversible diminishment of the periodic order and the lamellar repeat distance and an increased mosaicity - similar to the effects elicited by light-induced acidification of the lumen. Our data strongly suggest that thylakoids dynamically respond to the membrane energization and actively participate in different regulatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Field-induced self-assembly of iron oxide nanoparticles investigated using small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhendong; Xiao, Yinguo; Feoktystov, Artem; Pipich, Vitaliy; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Su, Yixi; Feng, Erxi; Jin, Wentao; Brückel, Thomas

    2016-11-03

    The magnetic-field-induced assembly of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) provides a unique and flexible strategy in the design and fabrication of functional nanostructures and devices. We have investigated the field-induced self-assembly of core-shell iron oxide NPs dispersed in toluene by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The form factor of the core-shell NPs was characterized and analyzed using SANS with polarized neutrons. Large-scale aggregates of iron oxide NPs formed above 0.02 T as indicated by very-small-angle neutron scattering measurements. A three-dimensional long-range ordered superlattice of iron oxide NPs was revealed under the application of a moderate magnetic field. The crystal structure of the superlattice has been identified to be face-centred cubic.

  8. A Small Molecule Mimetic of the Humanin Peptide as a Candidate for Modulating NMDA-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Parvez; Bilousova, Tina; Spilman, Patricia; Vadivel, Kanagasabai; Bai, Dongsheng; Elias, Chris J; Evseenko, Denis; John, Varghese

    2018-03-21

    Humanin (HN), a 24-amino acid bioactive peptide, has been shown to increase cell survival of neurons after exposure to Aβ and NMDA-induced toxicity and thus could be beneficial in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The neuroprotection by HN is reported to be primarily through its agonist binding properties to the gp130 receptor. However, the peptidic nature of HN presents challenges in its development as a therapeutic for AD. We report here for the first time the elucidation of the binding site of Humanin (HN) peptide to the gp130 receptor extracellular domain through modeling and the synthesis of small molecule mimetics that interact with the HN binding site on the gp130 receptor and provide protection against NMDA-induced neurotoxicity in primary hippocampal neurons. A brain permeable small molecule mimetic was identified through exploratory medicinal chemistry using microfluidic flow chemistry to facilitate the synthesis of new analogues for screening and SAR optimization.

  9. Microcirculatory effects of L-arginine during acute anaerobic exercise in healthy men: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Pranskunas

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Our findings show that supplementation with L-arginine may cause additional effects on the acute anaerobic exercise-induced transient increase in capillary density in the sublingual mucosa of untrained men.

  10. Small molecule antagonism of oxysterol-induced Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Madsen, Christian M; Arfelt, Kristine N

    2013-01-01

    682753A, which blocks oxysterol-induced G-protein activation, β-arrestin recruitment and B-cell chemotaxis. We furthermore demonstrate that activation triggers pertussis toxin-sensitive MAP kinase phosphorylation, which is also inhibited by GSK682753A. Thus, EBI2 signalling in B cells mediates key...

  11. Dynamics of field-induced ordering processes in ferrofluids studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedenmann, A.; Keiderling, U.; May, R.P.; Dewhurst, C.

    2006-01-01

    The relaxation of the local ordering of nanoparticles induced by an external magnetic field in a concentrated Cobalt ferrofluid was studied by stroboscopic polarised small-angle neutron scattering. Magnetic and nuclear correlations were found to decay exponentially within a characteristic time of few seconds. The local hexagonal particle arrangements with aligned moments transform gradually to uncorrelated segments of dipolar chains. The dynamics is influenced by dipole-dipole interactions

  12. Role of p53 in Anticancer Drug Treatment- and Radiation-Induced Injury in Normal Small Intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Shi

    2012-01-01

    In the human gastrointestinal tract, the functional mucosa of the small intestine has the highest capacity for absorption of nutrients and rapid proliferation rates, making it vulnerable to chemoradiotherapy. Recent understanding of the protective role of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest in the small intestinal mucosa has led researchers to explore new avenues to mitigate mucosal injury during cancer treatment. A traditional p53 inhibitor and two other molecules that exhibit strong protective effects on normal small intestinal epithelium during anticancer drug treatment and radiation therapy are introduced in this work. The objective of this review was to update current knowledge regarding potential mechanisms and targets that inhibit the side effects induced by chemoradiotherapy

  13. Diabetes-induced mechanophysiological changes in the small intestine and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Mirabella; Liao, Donghua; Zhao, Jingbo

    2017-01-01

    they relate to intestinal and colonic abnormalities. Finally the clinical consequences of DM-induced changes in the intestine and colon including diarrhea, constipation, gut microbiota change and colon cancer are discussed. The final goal is to increase the understanding of DM-induced changes in the gut......The disorders of gastrointestinal (GI) tract including intestine and colon are common in the patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM induced intestinal and colonic structural and biomechanical remodeling in animals and humans. The remodeling is closely related to motor-sensory abnormalities...... of the intestine and colon which are associated with the symptoms frequently encountered in patients with DM such as diarrhea and constipation. In this review, firstly we review DM-induced histomorphological and biomechanical remodeling of intestine and colon. Secondly we review motor-sensory dysfunction and how...

  14. A small amount of dietary carbohydrate can promote the HFD-induced insulin resistance to a maximal level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Mei

    Full Text Available Both dietary fat and carbohydrates (Carbs may play important roles in the development of insulin resistance. The main goal of this study was to further define the roles for fat and dietary carbs in insulin resistance. C57BL/6 mice were fed normal chow diet (CD or HFD containing 0.1-25.5% carbs for 5 weeks, followed by evaluations of calorie consumption, body weight and fat gains, insulin sensitivity, intratissue insulin signaling, ectopic fat, and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle. The role of hepatic gluconeogenesis in the HFD-induced insulin resistance was determined in mice. The role of fat in insulin resistance was also examined in cultured cells. HFD with little carbs (0.1% induced severe insulin resistance. Addition of 5% carbs to HFD dramatically elevated insulin resistance and 10% carbs in HFD was sufficient to induce a maximal level of insulin resistance. HFD with little carbs induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle and addition of carbs to HFD dramatically enhanced ectopic fat and oxidative stress. HFD increased hepatic expression of key gluconeogenic genes and the increase was most dramatic by HFD with little carbs, and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis prevented the HFD-induced insulin resistance. In cultured cells, development of insulin resistance induced by a pathological level of insulin was prevented in the absence of fat. Together, fat is essential for development of insulin resistance and dietary carb is not necessary for HFD-induced insulin resistance due to the presence of hepatic gluconeogenesis but a very small amount of it can promote HFD-induced insulin resistance to a maximal level.

  15. The Treewidth of Induced Graphs of Conditional Preference Networks Is Small

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Conditional preference networks (CP-nets are recently an emerging topic as a graphical model for compactly representing ordinal conditional preference relations on multi-attribute domains. As we know, the treewidth, which can decrease the solving complexity for many intractability problems, is exactly a fundamental property of a graph. Therefore, we can utilize treewidth to solve some reasoning tasks on induced graphs, such as the dominance queries on the CP-nets in the future. In this paper, we present an efficient algorithm for computing the treewidth of induced graphs of CP-nets; what we need is to make an assumption that the induced graph of a CP-net has been given. Then, we can leverage the Bucket Elimination technique to solve treewidth within polynomial time. At last, it is revealed that by our experiment, the treewidth of induced graphs of CP-nets is much smaller with regard to the number of vertices. For example, for an induced graph of CP-net with 1024 vertices, its treewidth is only 10. As far as we know, this is the first time, using the Bucket Elimination, to compute the treewidth of an induced graph of a CP-net. This approach for solving the treewidth may lay a good foundation for efficiently solving dominance queries on CP-nets in the future.

  16. Enhanced decolorization of azo dye in a small pilot-scale anaerobic baffled reactor coupled with biocatalyzed electrolysis system (ABR-BES): a design suitable for scaling-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Dan; Guo, Yu-Qi; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Wu, Wei-Min; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2014-07-01

    A four-compartment anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) incorporated with membrane-less biocatalyzed electrolysis system (BES) was tested for the treatment of azo dye (alizarin yellow R, AYR) wastewater (AYR, 200 mg L(-1); glucose, 1000 mg L(-1)). The ABR-BES was operated without and with external power supply to examine AYR reduction process and reductive intermediates with different external voltages (0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 V) and hydraulic retention times (HRT: 8, 6 and 4h). The decolorization efficiency in the ABR-BES (8h HRT, 0.5 V) was higher than that in ABR-BES without electrolysis, i.e. 95.1 ± 1.5% versus 86.9 ± 6.3%. Incorporation of BES with ABR accelerated the consumption of VFAs (mainly acetate) and attenuated biogas (methane) production. Higher power supply (0.7 V) enhanced AYR decolorization efficiency (96.4 ± 1.8%), VFAs removal, and current density (24.1 Am(-3) TCV). Shorter HRT increased volumetric AYR decolorization rates, but decreased AYR decolorization efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Osimertinib induces autophagy and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species generation in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Su, Min-Xia; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Osimertinib (OSI), also known as AZD9291, is a third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR T790M mutation. Herein, we indicated for the first time that OSI increased the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II), and the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta in various cancer cells. The OSI-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased when combined treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and the mRFP-EGFP-LC3 plasmid-transfected cells exposed to OSI led to the production of more red-fluorescent puncta than green-fluorescent puncta, indicating OSI induced autophagic flux in the NSCLC cells. Knockdown of EGFR showed no effect on the OSI-induced expression of LC3-II in NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, OSI increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenge of ROS via pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase (CAT), or vitamin E (Vita E) significantly inhibited OSI-induced the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of LC3-II, as well as the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Combinative treatment with CQ could not remarkably change the OSI-induced cell viability decrease, whereas the OSI-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis could be reversed through pretreatment with NAC, CAT, and Vita E, respectively. Taken together, this is the first report that OSI induces an accompanied autophagy and the generation of ROS is critical for the OSI-induced autophagy, cell viability decrease, and apoptosis in NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Osimertinib induced the expressions of cytoplasmic vacuoles and autophagic markers in different cancer cells. • Osimertinib induced autophagic flux in NSCLC NCI-H1975 and HCC827 cell lines. • ROS generation contributed to osimertinib-induced cytoplasmic

  18. Soccer small-sided games in young players: rule modification to induce higher physiological responses

    OpenAIRE

    Halouani, J; Chtourou, H; Dellal, A; Chaouachi, A; Chamari, K

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the physiological responses of 3 forms of players’ numbers during two different games rules of small-sided games (SSG: stop-ball vs. small-goals rules). Eighteen youth amateur soccer players (age 13.5±0.7 years; height 168.9±6.1cm; body mass 63.1±7.7 kg) participated in this study and performed 3 SSGs with varying players’ number (2vs.2; 3vs.3 and 4vs.4): stop-ball SSG (SB-SSG) vs. small-goals SSG (SG-SSG) in a randomized and counter-balanced order on a c...

  19. Broad-scale small-world network topology induces optimal synchronization of flexible oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovič, Rene; Gosak, Marko; Marhl, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small-world and scale-free properties of many man-made and natural complex networks has attracted increasing attention. Of particular interest is how the structural properties of a network facilitate and constrain its dynamical behavior. In this paper we study the synchronization of weakly coupled limit-cycle oscillators in dependence on the network topology as well as the dynamical features of individual oscillators. We show that flexible oscillators, characterized by near zero values of divergence, express maximal correlation in broad-scale small-world networks, whereas the non-flexible (rigid) oscillators are best correlated in more heterogeneous scale-free networks. We found that the synchronization behavior is governed by the interplay between the networks global efficiency and the mutual frequency adaptation. The latter differs for flexible and rigid oscillators. The results are discussed in terms of evolutionary advantages of broad-scale small-world networks in biological systems

  20. Diabetes-induced mechanophysiological changes in the small intestine and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Mirabella; Liao, Donghua; Zhao, Jingbo

    2017-01-01

    The disorders of gastrointestinal (GI) tract including intestine and colon are common in the patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM induced intestinal and colonic structural and biomechanical remodeling in animals and humans. The remodeling is closely related to motor-sensory abnormalities...... they relate to intestinal and colonic abnormalities. Finally the clinical consequences of DM-induced changes in the intestine and colon including diarrhea, constipation, gut microbiota change and colon cancer are discussed. The final goal is to increase the understanding of DM-induced changes in the gut...... and the subsequent clinical consequences in order to provide the clinicians with a better understanding of the GI disorders in diabetic patients and facilitates treatments tailored to these patients....

  1. Protective Effect of Royal Jelly against Phenylhydrazine-induced Histological Injuries of Small Intestine of Mice: Morphometric Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojat Anbara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Phenylhydrazine (PHZ, as a known hemolytic agent, causes toxicity in different tissues at various levels. The aim of the current study was to examine the possible protective effects of royal jelly (RJ against PHZ-induced histological injuries of small intestine in mice.   Methods: In this experimental study, adult male mice were randomly divided into four groups of 8 mice each. PHZ was administered intraperitoneally to two groups of mice (at a dose of 60mg/kg every 48 hours for 35 days. One of the groups received RJ (100mg/kg orally 4 hours before PHZ administration. The third group only received RJ, and the forth group was considered as control. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, different segments of small intestine were dissected out, then histological sections were prepared and quantitative morphometric assessments were performed. To compare the groups, one-way ANOVA and multiple comparative Tukey tests were used. The significance level was considered to be p<0.05.   Results: In this study, PHZ caused significant decreases in depth of duodenal crypts, distribution rate of the goblet cells in ileal villi, width of duodenal and jejunal villi, and height of villi in all three segments of small intestine. Co-administration of RJ partially improved the changes in the above parameters.   Conclusion: From results of this study, it seems that RJ as a free radical scavenger could reduce PHZ-induced intestinal toxicity in mouse.

  2. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2011-11-01

    Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen-dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene-degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the 'key players' of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. © 2011 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans‐Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Summary Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen‐dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene‐degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ‘key players’ of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:21450012

  4. High-throughput screening system to identify small molecules that induce internalization and degradation of HER2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Masayuki; Asanuma, Daisuke; Namiki, Shigeyuki; Kumagai, Kazuo; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Hirose, Kenzo

    2014-10-17

    Overexpression of growth factor receptors in cancers, e.g., human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in ovarian and breast cancers, is associated with aggressiveness. A possible strategy to treat cancers that overexpress those receptors is blockade of receptor signaling by inducing receptor internalization and degradation. In this study, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) system to identify small molecules that induce HER2 internalization by employing our recently developed acidic-pH-activatable probe in combination with protein labeling technology. Our HTS system enabled facile and reliable quantification of HER2 internalization with a Z' factor of 0.66 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 44.6. As proof of concept, we used the system to screen a ∼155,000 small-molecule library and identified three hits that induced HER2 internalization and degradation via at least two distinct mechanisms. This HTS platform should be adaptable to other disease-related receptors in addition to HER2.

  5. Mutation of FOXC1 and PITX2 induces cerebral small-vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    French, Curtis R.; Seshadri, Sudha; Destefano, Anita L.; Fornage, Myriam; Arnold, Corey R.; Gage, Philip J.; Skarie, Jonathan M.; Dobyns, William B.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Liu, Ting; Dietz, William; Kume, Tsutomu; Hofker, Marten; Emery, Dere; Childs, Sarah J.; Waskiewicz, Andrew J.; Lehmann, Orden J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cerebral small-vessel disease (CSVD) exhibit perturbed end-artery function and have an increased risk for stroke and age-related cognitive decline. Here, we used targeted genome-wide association (GWA) analysis and defined a CSVD locus adjacent to the forkhead transcription factor

  6. Anaerobic digestion of solid material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavilin, V.A.; Lokshina, L.Y.; Flotats, X.

    2007-01-01

    A new multidimensional (3 and 2D) anaerobic digestion model for cylindrical reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions was developed to study the way in which mixing intensity affects the efficiency of continuous-flow anaerobic digestion. Batch experiments reported and simulated....... In the system, the threshold methanogenic biomass concentration existed because of inhibition by high VFA concentration. High methanogenic biomass concentration is required for efficient anaerobic digestion of MSW in order to avoid possible inhibition due to high VFA build-up. Thus, CSTR configuration might...... have unstable dynamics at high organic loading as shown in earlier experiments carried out by Stroot et al. (2001). A gradual increase of organic loading during the start up of a completely mixed digester causing an accumulation of methanogenic biomass is a solution to prevent a probable digester...

  7. Redundancy of anaerobic digestion microbiomes during disturbances by the antibiotic monensin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirito, Catherine M; Daly, Sarah E; Werner, Jeffrey J; Angenent, Largus T

    2018-03-02

    The antibiotic monensin is fed to dairy cows to increase milk production efficiency. A fraction of this monensin is excreted into the cow manure. Previous studies have found that cow manure containing monensin can negatively impact the performance of anaerobic digesters, especially upon first introduction. Few studies have examined whether the anaerobic digester microbiome can adapt to monensin during the operating time. Here, we conducted a long-term, time-series study of four lab-scale anaerobic digesters fed with cow manure. We examined changes in both the microbiome composition and function of the anaerobic digesters when subjected to the dairy antibiotic monensin. In our digesters, monensin was not rapidly degraded at anaerobic conditions. The two anaerobic digesters that were subjected to manure from monensin feed-dosed cows exhibited relatively small changes in microbiome composition and function due to relatively low monensin concentrations. At higher concentrations of monensin, which we dosed directly to control manure (from dairy cows without monensin), we observed major changes in the microbiome composition and function of two anaerobic digesters. Rapid introduction of monensin to one of these anaerobic digesters led to the impairment of methane production. Conversely, more gradual addition of the same concentrations of monensin to the other anaerobic digester led to the adaptation of the anaerobic digester microbiome to the relatively high monensin concentration. A member of the candidate OP11 (Microgenomates) phylum arose in this anaerobic digester and appeared to be redundant with certain Bacteroidetes phylum members, which had previously been dominating. IMPORTANCE Monensin is a common antibiotic given to dairy cows in the United States and is partly excreted with dairy manure. An improved understanding of how monensin affects the anaerobic digester microbiome composition and function is important to prevent process failure for farm-based anaerobic

  8. Oxygen sensitivity of various anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesche, W J

    1969-11-01

    Anaerobes differ in their sensitivity to oxygen, as two patterns were recognizable in the organisms included in this study. Strict anaerobes were species incapable of agar surface growth at pO(2) levels greater than 0.5%. Species that were found to be strict anaerobes were Treponema macrodentium, Treponema denticola, Treponema oralis n. sp., Clostridium haemolyticum, Selenomonas ruminatium, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens, and Lachnospira multiparus. Moderate anaerobes would include those species capable of growth in the presence of oxygen levels as high as 2 to 8%. The moderate anaerobes could be exposed to room atmosphere for 60 to 90 min without appreciable loss of viability. Species considered as moderate anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, B. melaninogenicus, B. oralis, Fusobacteria nucleatum, Clostridium novyi type A, and Peptostreptococcus elsdenii. The recognition of at least two general types of anaerobes would seem to have practical import in regard to the primary isolation of anaerobes from source material.

  9. Instrumentation in anaerobic treatment - research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    High rate anaerobic treatment reactors are able to uncouple solids and liquid retention time, resulting in high biomass concentrations. Principal advantages of anaerobic treatment include: energy efficiency, low biomass yield, low nutrient requirement and high volumetric organic loadings. In order

  10. RISK FACTORS IN NEONATAL ANAEROBIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Tabib

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic bacteria are well known causes of sepsis in adults but there are few studies regarding their role in neonatal sepsis. In an attempt to define the incidence of neonatal anaerobic infections a prospective study was performed during one year period. A total number of 400 neonates under sepsis study were entered this investigation. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were sent. The patients were subjected to comparison in two groups: anaerobic culture positive and anaerobic culture negative and this comparison were analyzed statistically. There were 7 neonates with positive anaerobic culture and 35 neonates with positive aerobic culture. A significant statistical relationship was found between anaerobic infections and abdominal distention and pneumonia. It is recommended for those neonates with abdominal distention and pneumonia refractory to antibiotic treatment to be started on antibiotics with anaerobic coverage.

  11. Small angle X-ray scattering studies on the X-ray induced aggregation of malate synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, P.; Durchschlag, H.

    1980-01-01

    Malate synthase was investigated by the small-angle X-ray scattering technique in aqueous solution. Measurements extending for several hours revealed a continuous increase of the intensity in the innermost portion of the scattering curve. There is clear evidence that this increase was caused by an X-ray induced aggregation of enzyme particles during the performance of the small-angle X-ray scattering experiment. The monitoring of the aggregation process in situ by means of small-angle X-ray scattering led to a model of the way how the aggregation might proceed. The analysis of the scattering curves of malate synthase taken at various stages of aggregation established the retention of the thickness factor of the native enzyme and the occurrence of one and later on of two cross-section factors. The process of aggregation was also reflected by the increase of extension of the distance distribution function. Measurements of enzymic activity and small-angle X-ray scattering on samples, which had been X-irradiated with a defined dose prior to the measurements, established two different series of efficiency for the protection of the enzyme against aggregation and inactivation. The results showed that there is no direct relation between the extent of aggregation and the loss of enzymic activity. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Anaerobic bacterial meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Jun; Lien, Chia-Yi; Chien, Chun-Chih; Huang, Chi-Ren; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2018-01-22

    Anaerobic infection is a very uncommon condition in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM), and its clinical characteristics have yet to be clarified. We enrolled 540 patients with culture-proven bacterial meningitis during a study period of 30 years (1986-2015), of whom 13 (2.4%) had anaerobic infections. These 13 patients were eight men and five women, aged 22-77 years. Among them, 53.8% (7/13) had a postneurosurgical state as the preceding event, and 79.6% (10/13) had underlying medical conditions including diabetes mellitus, malignancy, liver cirrhosis, cerebral infarct and alcoholism. Nosocomial and mixed infections were found in 15.5% (2/13) and 46.1% (6/13) of the patients, respectively. A total of 14 anaerobic strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid specimens, including nine Gram-negative (G(-)) strains: Fusobacterium nucleatum (3), Prevotella species (3) and Bacteroides fragilis (3), and five Gram-positive (G(+)) strains: Propionibacterium acnes (3) and Peptostreptococcus micros (also known as Parvimonas micra) (2). All of the implicated G(+) anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to penicillin, and no multiple drug-resistant strains were found among the implicated G(-) anaerobic bacteria. Despite treatment, 30.8% (4/13) of the patients died. Of the nine survivors, 22.2% (2/9) had a full recovery, while the other 77.8% (7/9) had varying degrees of neurological deficits. Compared with the good outcome group (n = 6, modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores: 0-2), the poor outcome group (n = 7, mRS scores ≧3) had higher incidence of seizure. These results may offer a preliminary view of the clinical characteristics of anaerobic ABM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. First report of small cell lung cancer with PTHrP-induced hypercalcemic pancreatitis causing disconnected duct syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, Eric M; Landreneau, Stephen W; Karlitz, Jordan J

    2017-10-10

    Here we report a patient diagnosed with small cell lung cancer after first presenting with parathyroid hormone-related peptide-induced hypercalcemic pancreatitis and developed walled-off necrosis that resulted in disruption of the main pancreatic duct. Disconnected duct syndrome (DDS) is a rare syndrome that occurs when the main pancreatic duct exocrine flow is disrupted resulting in leakage of pancreatic enzymes and further inflammatory sequela. To date, no prior reports have described DDS occurring with paraneoplastic reactions. Diagnostic imaging techniques and therapeutic interventions are reviewed to provide insight into current approaches to DDS.

  14. Hydrological Regimes of Small Catchments in the High Tatra Mountains Before and After Extraordinary Wind-Induced Deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, Ladislav; Hlavata, Helena; Kostka, Zdenek; Novak, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the results of rainfall-runoff data analysis for small catchments of the upper Poprad River affected by wind-induced deforestation in November 2004. Before-event and afterevent measured data were compared in order to assess the impact of deforestation on hydrological regimes. Several characteristics were used including water balance, minimum and maximum runoff, runoff thresholds, number of runoff events, selected characteristics of events, runoff coefficients, and flashiness indices. Despite increased spring runoff minima, which in one catchment (Velick Creek) exceeded previously observed values after deforestation took place, it can be generally concluded that the impact of the deforestation was not clearly manifested in the analyzed hydrological data.

  15. Small for Gestational Age and Magnesium: Intrauterine magnesium deficiency may induce metabolic syndrome in later life

    OpenAIRE

    Junji Takaya

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium deficiency during pregnancy as a result of insufficient or low intake of magnesium is common in developing and developed countries. Previous reports have shown that intracellular magnesium of cord blood platelets is lower among small for gestational age (SGA) groups than that of appropriate for gestational age (AGA) groups, suggesting that intrauterine magnesium deficiency may result in SGA. Additionally, the risk of adult-onset diseases such as insulin resistance syndrome is greate...

  16. Predator-induced synchrony in population oscillations of coexisting small mammal species

    OpenAIRE

    Korpimäki, Erkki; Norrdahl, Kai; Huitu, Otso; Klemola, Tero

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive analyses of long-term (1977–2003) small-mammal abundance data from western Finland showed that populations of Microtus voles (field voles M. agrestis and sibling voles M. rossiaemeridionalis) voles, bank (Clethrionomys glareolus) and common shrews (Sorex araneus) fluctuated synchronously in 3 year population cycles. Time-series analyses indicated that interspecific synchrony is influenced strongly by density-dependent processes. Synchrony among Microtus and bank voles appeared a...

  17. Dynamics of the optically-induced properties of a small-polaronic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1979-01-01

    The relaxation and recombination of an electronic excitation created by the absorption of a super-band-gap photon is considered for a system in which excitons and charge carriers find it energetically favorable to self-trap. The notions of a barrier to self-trapping, a short-range repulsion between electrons and holes, and the electromodulation of the small-polaron absorption band play a central role in this discussion. The results are consistent with experiments on chalcogenide glasses

  18. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  19. A survey of small RNA population during FR-induced apical hook opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Photomorphogenesis is a mechanism employed by plants to regulate their architecture and developmental program in response to light conditions. As they emerge into light for the first time, dark-grown seedlings employ a rapid and finely-controlled photomorphogenic signaling network. Small RNAs have increasingly been revealed to play an important role in regulating multiple aspects of plant development, by modulating the stability of mRNAs. The rapid alteration of the mRNA transcriptome is a known hallmark of the de-etiolation response, thus we investigated the small RNA transcriptome during this process in specific seedling tissues. Here we describe a survey of the small RNA expression profile in four tissues of etiolated soybean seedlings, the cotyledons, hypocotyl and the convex and concave sides of the apical hook. We also investigate how this profile responds to a one-hour far-red light treatment. Our data suggests that miRNAs show a different global profile between these tissues and treatments, suggesting a possible role for tissue- and treatment-specific expression in the differential morphology of the seedling on de-etiolation. Further evidence for the role of miRNA in light-regulated development is given by the de-etiolation responses of a hypomorphic ago1 mutant, which displays reduced and delayed photomorphogenic responses in apical hook and cotyledon angle to far-red light.

  20. Anaerobic bioprocessing of organic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, W; de Beer, D; Pena, M; Lettinga, G; Lens, P

    1996-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of dissolved, suspended and solid organics has rapidly evolved in the last decades but nevertheless still faces several scientific unknowns. In this review, some fundamentals of bacterial conversions and adhesion are addressed initially. It is argued in the light of ΔG-values of reactions, and in view of the minimum energy quantum per mol, that anaerobic syntrophs must have special survival strategies in order to support their existence: redistributing the available energy between the partners, reduced end-product fermentation reactions and special cell-to-cell physiological interactions. In terms of kinetics, it appears that both reaction rates and residual substrate thresholds are strongly related to minimum ΔG-values. These new fundamental insights open perspectives for efficient design and operation of anaerobic bioprocesses. Subsequently, an overview is given of the current anaerobic biotechnology. For treating wastewaters, a novel and high performance new system has been introduced during the last decade; the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system (UASB). This reactor concept requires anaerobic consortia to grow in a dense and eco-physiologically well-organized way. The microbial principles of such granular sludge growth are presented. Using a thermodynamic approach, the formation of different types of aggregates is explained. The application of this bioprocess in worldwide wastewater treatment is indicated. Due to the long retention times of the active biomass, the UASB is also suitable for the development of bacterial consortia capable of degrading xenobiotics. Operating granular sludge reactors at high upflow velocities (5-6 m/h) in expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) systems enlarges the application field to very low strength wastewaters (chemical oxygen demand system to the thermophilic configuration, as the latter permits higher conversion rates and easier sanitation. Integration of ultrafiltration in anaerobic slurry digestion

  1. Remote and reversible inhibition of neurons and circuits by small molecule induced potassium channel stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Auffenberg, Eva; Jurik, Angela; Mattusch, Corinna; Stoffel, Rainer; Genewsky, Andreas; Namendorf, Christian; Schmid, Roland M.; Rammes, Gerhard; Biel, Martin; Uhr, Manfred; Moosmang, Sven; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Thoeringer, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating the function of neurons and circuits that translate electrical and chemical signals into behavior represents a major challenges in neuroscience. In addition to optogenetic methods using light-activatable channels, pharmacogenetic methods with ligand induced modulation of cell signaling and excitability have been developed. However, they are largely based on ectopic expression of exogenous or chimera proteins. Now, we describe the remote and reversible expression of a Kir2.1 type ...

  2. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement of a small fraction of rhenium in bulk tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, D.; Ueda, Y.; Doerner, R. P.; Baldwin, M. J.; Ibano, K.

    2018-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of bulk rhenium (Re) and tungsten (W)-Re alloy has been performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (wavelength = 1064 nm, pulse width ∼4-6 ns, laser energy = 115 mJ). It is found that the electron temperature, Te, of laser-induced Re plasma is lower than that of W plasma, and that Te of W-Re plasma is in between Re and W plasmas. This indicates that material properties affect Te in a laser-induced plasma. For analysis of W-3.3%Re alloy, only the strongest visible Re I 488.9 nm line is found to be used because of the strong enough intensity without contamination with W lines. Using the calibration-free LIBS method, the atomic fraction of Re, cRe, is evaluated as a function of the ambient Ar gas pressure, PAr. At PAr analysis), while cRe increases with an increase in PAr at >10 Torr due to spectral overlapping of the Re I 488.9 nm line by an Ar II 488.9 nm line.

  4. Random small interfering RNA library screen identifies siRNAs that induce human erythroleukemia cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Cuiqing; Xiong, Yuan; Zhu, Ning; Lu, Yabin; Zhang, Jiewen; Wang, Song; Liang, Zicai; Shen, Yan; Chen, Meihong

    2011-03-01

    Cancers are characterized by poor differentiation. Differentiation therapy is a strategy to alleviate malignant phenotypes by inducing cancer cell differentiation. Here we carried out a combinatorial high-throughput screen with a random siRNA library on human erythroleukemia K-562 cell differentiation. Two siRNAs screened from the library were validated to be able to induce erythroid differentiation to varying degrees, determined by CD235 and globin up-regulation, GATA-2 down-regulation, and cell growth inhibition. The screen we performed here is the first trial of screening cancer differentiation-inducing agents from a random siRNA library, demonstrating that a random siRNA library can be considered as a new resource in efforts to seek new therapeutic agents for cancers. As a random siRNA library has a broad coverage for the entire genome, including known/unknown genes and protein coding/non-coding sequences, screening using a random siRNA library can be expected to greatly augment the repertoire of therapeutic siRNAs for cancers.

  5. Radio frequency-induced temperature elevations in the human head considering small anatomical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, G.; Ueberbacher, R.; Samaras, T.

    2007-01-01

    In order to enable a detailed numerical radio frequency (RF) dosimetry and the computations of RF-induced temperature elevations, high-resolution (0.1 mm) numerical models of the human eye, the inner ear organs and the pineal gland were developed and inserted into a commercially available head model. As radiation sources, generic models of handsets at 400, 900 and 1850 MHz operating in close proximity to the head were considered. The results, obtained by finite-difference time domain-based computations, showed a highly heterogeneous specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution and SAR-peaks inside the inner ear structures; however, the corresponding RF-induced temperature elevations were well below 0.1 deg. C, when considering typical output power values of hand-held devices. In case of frontal exposure, with the radiation sources ∼2.5 cm in front of the closed eye, maximum temperature elevations in the eye in the range of ∼0.2-0.6 deg. C were found for typical device output powers. A reduction in tissue perfusion mainly affected the maximum RF-induced temperature elevation of tissues deep inside the head. Similarly, worst-case considerations regarding pulsed irradiation affected temperature elevations in deep tissue significantly more than in superficial tissues. (authors)

  6. Hydroponic system for the treatment of anaerobic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, K; Nair, J; Bäuml, B

    2012-01-01

    The effluent from anaerobic digestion process has high concentrations of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, essential for plant growth but is not suitable for direct disposal or application due to high chemical oxygen demand (COD), low dissolved oxygen (DO), odour issues and is potentially phytotoxic. This research explored the optimum conditions of anaerobic effluent for application and dilutions of the effluent required to obtain better plant growth. A small-scale hydroponic system was constructed in a glasshouse to test different concentrations of anaerobic effluent against a commercial hydroponic medium as the control for the growth of silverbeet. It was found that the survival of silverbeet was negatively affected at 50% concentration due to low DO and NH(4) toxicity. The concentration of 20% anaerobic liquid was found to be the most efficient with highest foliage yield and plant growth. The hydroponic system with 20% concentrated effluent had better utilisation of nutrients for plant growth and a COD reduction of 95% was achieved during the 50-day growth period. This preliminary evaluation revealed that the growth and development of silverbeet was significantly lower in anaerobic effluent compared with a commercial hydroponic plant growth solution. The nutrient quality of anaerobic effluent could be highly variable with the process and the waste material used and dilution may depend on the nutrient content of the effluent. It is recommended that, a pre-treatment of the effluent to increase DO and reduce ammonium content is required before plant application, and simple dilution by itself is not suitable for optimum plant growth in a hydroponic system.

  7. Anaerobiosis induced virulence of Salmonella typhi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapoor, Sarika; Singh, R D; Sharma, P C

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Anaerobic conditions are frequently encountered by pathogens invading the gastrointestinal tract due to low/limiting oxygen conditions prevalent in the small intestine. This anaerobic stress has been suggested to enhance the virulence of gut pathogens. In the present stud...... dismutase (SOD) and catalase. INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that exposure of S. Typhi to anaerobic conditions enhances its virulence....

  8. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent

  9. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus...

  10. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber. (a) Identification. An anaerobic chamber is a device intended for medical purposes to maintain an anaerobic (oxygen...

  11. New techniques for growing anaerobic bacteria: experiments with Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, H.I.; Crow, W.D.; Hadden, C.T.; Hall, J.; Machanoff, R.

    1983-01-01

    Stable membrane fragments derived from Escherichia coli produce and maintain strict anaerobic conditions when added to liquid or solid bacteriological media. Techniques for growing Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum in membrane-containing media are described. Liquid cultures initiated by very small inocula can be grown in direct contact with air. In solid media, colonies develop rapidly from individual cells even without incubation in anaerobic jars or similar devices. Observations on growth rates, spontaneous mutations, radiation, and oxygen sensitivity of anaerobic bacteria have been made using these new techniques

  12. Plant pathogenic anaerobic bacteria use aromatic polyketides to access aerobic territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabuer, Gulimila; Ishida, Keishi; Pidot, Sacha J; Roth, Martin; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-06

    Around 25% of vegetable food is lost worldwide because of infectious plant diseases, including microbe-induced decay of harvested crops. In wet seasons and under humid storage conditions, potato tubers are readily infected and decomposed by anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium puniceum). We found that these anaerobic plant pathogens harbor a gene locus (type II polyketide synthase) to produce unusual polyketide metabolites (clostrubins) with dual functions. The clostrubins, which act as antibiotics against other microbial plant pathogens, enable the anaerobic bacteria to survive an oxygen-rich plant environment. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Identification of small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-induced dystrophin exon skipping by high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A O'Leary

    Full Text Available One therapeutic approach to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD recently entering clinical trials aims to convert DMD phenotypes to that of a milder disease variant, Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD, by employing antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting splice sites, to induce exon skipping and restore partial dystrophin function. In order to search for small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-dependent and independent exon skipping, we screened approximately 10,000 known small molecule drugs, >17,000 cDNA clones, and >2,000 kinase- targeted siRNAs against a 5.6 kb luciferase minigene construct, encompassing exon 71 to exon 73 of human dystrophin. As a result, we identified several enhancers of exon skipping, acting on both the reporter construct as well as endogenous dystrophin in mdx cells. Multiple mechanisms of action were identified, including histone deacetylase inhibition, tubulin modulation and pre-mRNA processing. Among others, the nucleolar protein NOL8 and staufen RNA binding protein homolog 2 (Stau2 were found to induce endogenous exon skipping in mdx cells in an AON-dependent fashion. An unexpected but recurrent theme observed in our screening efforts was the apparent link between the inhibition of cell cycle progression and the induction of exon skipping.

  14. EZH2-mediated Puma gene repression regulates non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and cisplatin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haidan; Li, Wei; Yu, Xinfang; Gao, Feng; Duan, Zhi; Ma, Xiaolong; Tan, Shiming; Yuan, Yunchang; Liu, Lijun; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Xinmin; Yang, Yifeng

    2016-08-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are highly conserved epigenetic effectors that maintain the silenced state of genes. EZH2 is the catalytic core and one of the most important components of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and primary lung tumors, we found that PRC2 components, including EZH2, are overexpressed. High levels of EZH2 protein were associated with worse overall survival rate in NSCLC patients. RNA interference mediated attenuation of EZH2 expression blunted the malignant phenotype in this setting, exerting inhibitory effects on cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumor development in a xenograft mouse model. Unexpectedly, we discovered that, in the suppression of EZH2, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression was concomitantly induced. This is achieved through EZH2 directly binds to the Puma promoter thus epigenetic repression of PUMA expression. Furthermore, cisplatin-induced apoptosis of EZH2-knocking down NSCLC cells was elevated as a consequence of increased PUMA expression. Our work reveals a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism controlling PUMA expression and suggests that EZH2 offers a candidate molecular target for NSCLC therapy and EZH2-regulated PUMA induction would synergistically increase the sensitivity to platinum agents in non-small cell lung cancers.

  15. Psychological stress exacerbates NSAID-induced small bowel injury by inducing changes in intestinal microbiota and permeability via glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Kurihara, Chie; Furuhashi, Hirotaka; Takajo, Takeshi; Maruta, Koji; Yasutake, Yuichi; Sato, Hirokazu; Narimatsu, Kazuyuki; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Watanabe, Chikako; Komoto, Shunsuke; Tomita, Kengo; Nagao, Shigeaki; Miura, Soichiro; Tajiri, Hisao; Hokari, Ryota

    2017-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are popular painkillers, but they have serious side effects, not only in the upper gastrointestinal tract but also in the small intestine. It is well known that psychological stress may exacerbate various gastrointestinal diseases. The aim of this study was to determine whether psychological stress exacerbates NSAID enteropathy and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms for this. Experiment 1: mice were exposed to water avoidance stress (WAS) or sham stress for 1 h per day for 8 consecutive days, and then enteropathy was induced by indomethacin. Experiment 2: cecal contents from stress (-) or (+) mice were transplanted into mice that had received antibiotics and in which NSAID enteropathy had been induced without WAS. Experiment 3: mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, was injected before WAS for 8 days. Small intestinal injury, mRNA expression of TNFα, intestinal permeability, and the microbial community were assessed. Psychological stress exacerbated NSAID enteropathy and increased intestinal permeability. Psychological stress induced changes in the ileal microbiota that were characterized by increases in the total number of bacteria and the proportion of Gram-negative bacteria. The increased susceptibility to NSAIDs and intestinal permeability due to WAS was transferable via cecal microbiota transplantation. The increased permeability and aggravation of NSAID enteropathy caused by WAS were blocked by the administration of mifepristone. This study demonstrated a relationship between NSAID enteropathy and psychological stress, and showed the utility of studying the intestinal microbiota in order to elucidate the pathophysiology of NSAID enteropathy. It also showed the impact of stress on the intestinal microbiota and the mucosal barrier in gastrointestinal diseases.

  16. Onset of shear thinning in glassy liquids: Shear-induced small reduction of effective density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Akira

    2017-01-01

    We propose a simple mechanism for describing the onset of shear thinning in a high-density glassy liquid. In a shear flow, along the compression axis, the overlap between neighboring particles is more enhanced than that at equilibrium, meaning that the "effective" size is reduced along this axis. On the other hand, along the extension axis perpendicular to the compression axis, the average structural configurations are stretched, but it does not indicate the expansion of the "effective" size itself. This asymmetric shear flow effect for particles results in a small reduction of the "effective" density. Because, in glass-forming liquids, the structural relaxation time τ_{α} strongly depends on the density ρ, even a very small reduction of the effective density should lead to a significant decrease of the relaxation time under shear flow. We predict that the crossover shear rate from Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow behaviors is given by γ[over ̇]_{c}=[ρ(∂τ_{α}/∂ρ)]^{-1}, which can be much smaller than 1/τ_{α} near the glass transition point. It is shown that this prediction is consistent with the results of molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Injury-induced inhibition of small intestinal protein and nucleic acid synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, E.A.; Hatz, R.A.; Yarmush, M.L.; Tompkins, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Small intestinal mucosal weight and nutrient absorption are significantly diminished early after cutaneous thermal injuries. Because these intestinal properties are highly dependent on rates of nucleic acid and protein synthesis, in vivo incorporation of thymidine, uridine, and leucine into small intestinal deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and proteins were measured. Deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis was markedly decreased with the lowest thymidine incorporation in the jejunum (p less than 0.01); these findings were confirmed by autoradiographic identification of radiolabeled nuclei in the intestinal crypts. Protein synthesis was decreased by 6 h postinjury (p less than 0.01) but had returned to normal by 48 h. Consistent with a decreased rate of protein synthesis, ribonucleic acid synthesis was also decreased 18 h postinjury (p less than 0.01). These decreased deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein synthesis rates are not likely a result of ischemia because in other studies of this injury model, intestinal blood flow was not significantly changed by the burn injury. Potentially, factors initiating the acute inflammatory reaction may directly inhibit nucleic acid and protein synthesis and lead to alterations in nutrient absorption and intestinal barrier function after injury

  18. A small molecule screen identifies a novel compound that induces a homeotic transformation in Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauber, Kristine M; Dana, Catherine E; Park, Steve S; Colby, David A; Noro, Yukihiko; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Chamberlin, A Richard; Steele, Robert E

    2013-12-01

    Developmental processes such as morphogenesis, patterning and differentiation are continuously active in the adult Hydra polyp. We carried out a small molecule screen to identify compounds that affect patterning in Hydra. We identified a novel molecule, DAC-2-25, that causes a homeotic transformation of body column into tentacle zone. This transformation occurs in a progressive and polar fashion, beginning at the oral end of the animal. We have identified several strains that respond to DAC-2-25 and one that does not, and we used chimeras from these strains to identify the ectoderm as the target tissue for DAC-2-25. Using transgenic Hydra that express green fluorescent protein under the control of relevant promoters, we examined how DAC-2-25 affects tentacle patterning. Genes whose expression is associated with the tentacle zone are ectopically expressed upon exposure to DAC-2-25, whereas those associated with body column tissue are turned off as the tentacle zone expands. The expression patterns of the organizer-associated gene HyWnt3 and the hypostome-specific gene HyBra2 are unchanged. Structure-activity relationship studies have identified features of DAC-2-25 that are required for activity and potency. This study shows that small molecule screens in Hydra can be used to dissect patterning processes.

  19. A small molecule screen identifies a novel compound that induces a homeotic transformation in Hydra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauber, Kristine M.; Dana, Catherine E.; Park, Steve S.; Colby, David A.; Noro, Yukihiko; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Chamberlin, A. Richard; Steele, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental processes such as morphogenesis, patterning and differentiation are continuously active in the adult Hydra polyp. We carried out a small molecule screen to identify compounds that affect patterning in Hydra. We identified a novel molecule, DAC-2-25, that causes a homeotic transformation of body column into tentacle zone. This transformation occurs in a progressive and polar fashion, beginning at the oral end of the animal. We have identified several strains that respond to DAC-2-25 and one that does not, and we used chimeras from these strains to identify the ectoderm as the target tissue for DAC-2-25. Using transgenic Hydra that express green fluorescent protein under the control of relevant promoters, we examined how DAC-2-25 affects tentacle patterning. Genes whose expression is associated with the tentacle zone are ectopically expressed upon exposure to DAC-2-25, whereas those associated with body column tissue are turned off as the tentacle zone expands. The expression patterns of the organizer-associated gene HyWnt3 and the hypostome-specific gene HyBra2 are unchanged. Structure-activity relationship studies have identified features of DAC-2-25 that are required for activity and potency. This study shows that small molecule screens in Hydra can be used to dissect patterning processes. PMID:24255098

  20. Transient, heat-induced thermal resistance in the small intestine of mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, S.P.; Marigold, J.C.L.

    1980-01-01

    Heat-induced thermal resistance has been investigated in mouse jejunum by assaying crypt survival 24 h after treatment. Hyperthermia was achieved by immersing an exteriorized loop of intestine in a bath of Krebs-Ringer solution. Two approaches have been used. In the first, thermal survival curves were obtained following single hyperthermal treatments at temperatures in the range 42 to 44 0 C. Transient thermal resistance, inducted by a plateau in the crypt survival curve, developed during heating at temperatures around 42.5 0 C after 60 to 80 min. In the second series of experiments, a priming heat treatment (40.0, 41.0, 41.5, or 42.0 0 C for 60 min) was followed at varying intervals by a test treatment at 43.0 0 C. A transient resistance to the second treatment was induced, the extent and time of development being dependent upon the priming treatment. Crypt survival curves for thermally resistant intestine showed an increase in thermal D 0 and a decrease in n compared with curves from previously unheated intestine

  1. Anaerobic Treatment of Methanolic Wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, G.; Geest, van der A.Th.; Hobma, S.W.; Laan, van der J.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although it is well known that methanol can be fermented directly by a specific species of methane bacteria, viz. Methanosarcina barkeri, until now little information was available about the effect of important environmental factors on the anaerobic fermentation of methanol. As methanol can be the

  2. Perspectives of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, J.G.; Runia, W.T.; Molendijk, L.P.G.; Bleeker, P.O.

    2010-01-01

    Biological soil disinfestation is an environmentally friendly method to disinfest soil. From now on we refer to it as anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD). With ASD a green manure crop (40 t/ha) is homogeneously incorporated into the topsoil (0-30 cm) after which the field is lightly compacted and

  3. Inhibition of Anaerobic Biological Treatment: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Ji, Dandan; Zang, Lihua

    2018-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a method for treating living and industrial wastewater by anaerobic degradation of organic compounds, which can produce biogas (carbon dioxide and methane mixture) and microbial biomass. And biogas as a renewable resource, can replace the use of ore fuel. In the process of anaerobic digestion, the problems of low methane yield and unstable reaction process are often encountered, which limits the widespread use of this technology. Various inhibitors are the main limiting factors for anaerobic digestion. In this paper, the main factors limiting anaerobic digestion are reviewed, and the latest research progress is introduced.

  4. Local and global synchronization transitions induced by time delays in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2015-02-01

    Effects of time delay on the local and global synchronization in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses are investigated in this paper. Numerical results show that, for both excitatory and inhibitory coupling types, the information transmission delay can always induce synchronization transitions of spiking neurons in small-world networks. In particular, regions of in-phase and out-of-phase synchronization of connected neurons emerge intermittently as the synaptic delay increases. For excitatory coupling, all transitions to spiking synchronization occur approximately at integer multiples of the firing period of individual neurons; while for inhibitory coupling, these transitions appear at the odd multiples of the half of the firing period of neurons. More importantly, the local synchronization transition is more profound than the global synchronization transition, depending on the type of coupling synapse. For excitatory synapses, the local in-phase synchronization observed for some values of the delay also occur at a global scale; while for inhibitory ones, this synchronization, observed at the local scale, disappears at a global scale. Furthermore, the small-world structure can also affect the phase synchronization of neuronal networks. It is demonstrated that increasing the rewiring probability can always improve the global synchronization of neuronal activity, but has little effect on the local synchronization of neighboring neurons.

  5. Circulating blocking factors of lymphoid-cell cytotoxicity in x-ray-induced rat small-bowel adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.H.; Brooks, G.P.; Osborne, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    Circulating blocking factors capable of abrogating cell-mediated immune responses measured by in vitro lymphoid-cell cytotoxicity were identified in the sera of Holtzman outbred rats 6 to 9 months after a single exposure of only the temporarily exteriorized, hypoxic ileum and jejunum to 1700 to 2000 R of X radiation. Such factors were found to exist in the serum of every animal exposed to the ionizing radiation regardless of whether a visibly identifiable small-bowel adenocarcinoma existed or subsequently would develop. Protection of cultured x-ray-induced rat small-bowel cancer cells from destruction by tumor-sensitized lymphoid cells as measured by the release of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodinated membrane proteins from the tumor target cells was conferred by the action of the blocking factors at both effector and target cell levels. The results of this study demonstrate that exposure of only the rat small intestine to ionizing radiation leads to elaboration of circulating factors identifiable several months postirradiation which will block cell-mediated immune responses directed against cancer cells developing in the exposed tissue

  6. Radiation induced chemotherapy sensitization in trimodality therapy of stage 3 non small cell lung cancer. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takita, H. [Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo (United States); Shin, K. H. [CCS Oncology Center, Kenmore, NY, (United States)

    2000-12-01

    The overall cure rate of locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) remains poor. Although there have been encouraging reports of preoperative use of chemotherapy, more recent trend is the trimodal approach of radiation, chemo, and surgical-therapies. With the trimodal therapy, increased tumor response and resectability are reported, however, there are increased treatment related side effects. It was observed that a relatively small dose of radiation given prior to induction chemotherapy greatly enhanced the tumor response to the chemotherapy without increased toxicity. A total of 18 patients (8 3. A and 10 3.B) were initially given 20 Gy of radiation therapy in 10 fractions and then received 2 courses of Taxol combination chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 83% (15/18) and 13 out of 18 patients underwent surgery. There was one postoperative death (not therapy related). It is speculated that the small dose of radiation therapy may have sensitized the tumor to subsequent chemotherapy, and it was suggested a new hypothesis of radiation therapy induced chemotherapy sensitization.

  7. Fragmentation of small molecules induced by 46 keV/amu N+ and N2+ projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, S.T.S.; Juhasz, Z.; Herczku, P.; Sulik, B.

    2012-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Collisional molecule fragmentation experiments has gain increasing attention in several research and applied fields. In order to understand the fundamental processes of molecule fragmentation one has to start with collisions of small few-atomic molecules. Moreover, fragments of small molecules such as water can cause damages of large molecules (DNA) very effectively in living tissues. In the last few years a new experimental setup was developed at Atomki. It was designed especially for molecule fragmentation experiments. Now the measurements using this system are running routinely. In 2012 the studied targets were water vapor, methane and nitrogen gases, injected into the collision area by an effusive molecular gas jet system. 650 keV N + and 1,3 MeV N 2 + ions were used as projectiles produced by the VdG-5 electrostatic accelerator. The velocity of the two types of projectiles was the same. Energy and angular distribution of the produced fragments was measured by an energy dispersive electrostatic spectrometer. For atomic ionization a symmetric, diatomic molecular projectile (e.g. N 2 + ) yields about twice more electrons compared to those of singly charged ion projectiles of the same atom (N + ) at the same velocity. In such cases the two atomic centers in the molecular ion can be considered as two individual atomic centers. For the fragmentation of molecular targets the picture is not so simple because in this case close collision of two extended systems is investigated. As figure 1 and 2 show, the measured yields for molecular projectile is not simply twice of the ones for atomic projectile. The shape of the energy spectra are different. The measured data are under evaluation. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the Hungarian National Science Foundation OTKA (Grant: K73703) and by the TAMOP-4.2.2/B-10/1-2010-0024 project. The project is cofinanced by the European Union and the European Social Fund.

  8. Characterization of the Zika virus induced small RNA response in Aedes aegypti cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margus Varjak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi controls arbovirus infections in mosquitoes. Two different RNAi pathways are involved in antiviral responses: the PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA and exogenous short interfering RNA (exo-siRNA pathways, which are characterized by the production of virus-derived small RNAs of 25-29 and 21 nucleotides, respectively. The exo-siRNA pathway is considered to be the key mosquito antiviral response mechanism. In Aedes aegypti-derived cells, Zika virus (ZIKV-specific siRNAs were produced and loaded into the exo-siRNA pathway effector protein Argonaute 2 (Ago2; although the knockdown of Ago2 did not enhance virus replication. Enhanced ZIKV replication was observed in a Dcr2-knockout cell line suggesting that the exo-siRNA pathway is implicated in the antiviral response. Although ZIKV-specific piRNA-sized small RNAs were detected, these lacked the characteristic piRNA ping-pong signature motif and were bound to Ago3 but not Piwi5 or Piwi6. Silencing of PIWI proteins indicated that the knockdown of Ago3, Piwi5 or Piwi6 did not enhance ZIKV replication and only Piwi4 displayed antiviral activity. We also report that the expression of ZIKV capsid (C protein amplified the replication of a reporter alphavirus; although, unlike yellow fever virus C protein, it does not inhibit the exo-siRNA pathway. Our findings elucidate ZIKV-mosquito RNAi interactions that are important for understanding its spread.

  9. Regulation of Small RNAs and Corresponding Targets in Nod Factor-Induced Phaseolus vulgaris Root Hair Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formey, Damien; Martín-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Leija, Alfonso; Santana, Olivia; Quinto, Carmen; Cárdenas, Luis; Hernández, Georgina

    2016-06-04

    A genome-wide analysis identified the set of small RNAs (sRNAs) from the agronomical important legume Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), including novel P. vulgaris-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) potentially important for the regulation of the rhizobia-symbiotic process. Generally, novel miRNAs are difficult to identify and study because they are very lowly expressed in a tissue- or cell-specific manner. In this work, we aimed to analyze sRNAs from common bean root hairs (RH), a single-cell model, induced with pure Rhizobium etli nodulation factors (NF), a unique type of signal molecule. The sequence analysis of samples from NF-induced and control libraries led to the identity of 132 mature miRNAs, including 63 novel miRNAs and 1984 phasiRNAs. From these, six miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed during NF induction, including one novel miRNA: miR-RH82. A parallel degradome analysis of the same samples revealed 29 targets potentially cleaved by novel miRNAs specifically in NF-induced RH samples; however, these novel miRNAs were not differentially accumulated in this tissue. This study reveals Phaseolus vulgaris-specific novel miRNA candidates and their corresponding targets that meet all criteria to be involved in the regulation of the early nodulation events, thus setting the basis for exploring miRNA-mediated improvement of the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis.

  10. TRAIN (Transcription of Repeats Activates INterferon) in response to chromatin destabilization induced by small molecules in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, Katerina; Safina, Alfiya; Nesher, Elimelech; Sandlesh, Poorva; Pratt, Rachel; Burkhart, Catherine; Lipchick, Brittany; Gitlin, Ilya; Frangou, Costakis; Koman, Igor; Wang, Jianmin; Kirsanov, Kirill; Yakubovskaya, Marianna G; Gudkov, Andrei V; Gurova, Katerina

    2018-02-05

    Cellular responses to the loss of genomic stability are well-established, while how mammalian cells respond to chromatin destabilization is largely unknown. We previously found that DNA demethylation on p53-deficient background leads to transcription of repetitive heterochromatin elements, followed by an interferon response, a phenomenon we named TRAIN (Transcription of Repeats Activates INterferon). Here, we report that curaxin, an anticancer small molecule, destabilizing nucleosomes via disruption of histone/DNA interactions, also induces TRAIN. Furthermore, curaxin inhibits oncogene-induced transformation and tumor growth in mice in an interferon-dependent manner, suggesting that anticancer activity of curaxin, previously attributed to p53-activation and NF-kappaB-inhibition, may also involve induction of interferon response to epigenetic derepression of the cellular 'repeatome'. Moreover, we observed that another type of drugs decondensing chromatin, HDAC inhibitor, also induces TRAIN. Thus, we proposed that TRAIN may be one of the mechanisms ensuring epigenetic integrity of mammalian cells via elimination of cells with desilenced chromatin. © 2018, Leonova et al.

  11. Mechanisms Involved in Thromboxane A2-induced Vasoconstriction of Rat Intracavernous Small Penile Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grann, Martin; Comerma Steffensen, Simon Gabriel; Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino

    2015-01-01

    by activation of thromboxane receptors concentration-dependently increased calcium and contraction. U46619-induced calcium influx was blocked by nifedipine, a blocker of L-type calcium channels, and by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, a blocker of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Inhibitors of ROCK, Y...... relaxation in rat mesenteric arteries. Our findings suggest that U46619 contraction depends on Ca2+ influx through L-type and TRP channels, and ROCKdependent mechanisms in penile arteries. Inhibition of the ROCK pathway is a potential approach for the treatment of erectile dysfunction associated......Diabetes is associated with erectile dysfunction and with hypercontractility in erectile tissue and this is in part ascribed to increased formation of thromboxane. Rho kinase (ROCK) is a key regulator of calcium sensitization and contraction in vascular smooth muscle. This study investigated...

  12. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy K Sheaffer

    Full Text Available A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16 transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50 values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment.

  13. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaffer, Amy K; Lee, Min S; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment.

  14. PCB dechlorination in anaerobic soil slurry reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasson, K.T.; Evans, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy's, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges, including mixed wastes; however, a practical remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBS. The onset of dechlorination activity can be accelerated by addition of nutritional amendments and inducers. After 15 weeks of incubation with PCB-contaminated soil and nutrient solution, dechlorination has been observed under several working conditions. The best results show that the average chlorine content steadily dropped from 4.3 to 3.5 chlorines per biphenyl over a 15-week period

  15. Anaerobic metabolism of pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, N.B.K.

    1980-01-01

    A manifold assembly system was used to study the metabolism of 14 C labelled PCNB in flooded and moist anaerobic soils. Soil respiration was generally enhanced by PCNB. More CO 2 was produced in moist anaerobic than in flooded anaerobic soil. Flooding reduced the volatilization of pesticide. The extractable radioactivity from the soil was same (70%) in the treatments. Nevertheless, differences were observed in distribution of PCNB and its degradation products. Pentachloroaniline (PCA) was the principal degradation product. Pentachlorothioanisole (PCTA) was more abundant in moist anaerobic than in flooded anaerobic soil. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) was formed from PCNB in anaerobic soil. Degradation of PCA, PCTA and PCP were further studied in soil and a possible pathway for anaerobic degradation of PCNB was proposed. (author)

  16. Determining anaerobic capacity in sporting activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordhof, Dionne A; Skiba, Philip F; de Koning, Jos J

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic capacity/anaerobically attributable power is an important parameter for athletic performance, not only for short high-intensity activities but also for breakaway efforts and end spurts during endurance events. Unlike aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity cannot be easily quantified. The 3 most commonly used methodologies to quantify anaerobic capacity are the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit method, the critical power concept, and the gross efficiency method. This review describes these methods, evaluates if they result in similar estimates of anaerobic capacity, and highlights how anaerobic capacity is used during sporting activities. All 3 methods have their own strengths and weaknesses and result in more or less similar estimates of anaerobic capacity but cannot be used interchangeably. The method of choice depends on the research question or practical goal.

  17. Sludge granulation during anaerobic treatment of pre-hydrolysed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) digester was operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRT) ranging from 26.7 h to 2.2 h, while the organic load rate (OLR) ranged from 0.9 to 7.3 kgCOD/m3·d. Sludge granulation was observed after day 150 of operation, at an HRT of 3.4 h, when small granules of less than 2 ...

  18. Dynamic simulation model for anaerobic digestion of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    A simple yet useful dynamic simulator for the anaerobic digestion of cellulosic feedstock has been developed. The incentive for this simulator is a need for guidance in design and optimization of an anaerobic digestin process for volume reduction and stabilization of low-level radioactive wastes generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These wastes are primarily blotter and other paper and cotton/polyester clothing. Anaerobic digestion will convert a substantial mass (and hence volume) of waste to gaseous products which can be flared or simply released. The remaining sludge will contain the radionuclides and is expected to have only 5 to 10% of the original waste volume. This stabilized sludge will be more suitable for disposal by shallow land burial than is the original untreated waste. The liquid effluent will go to existing treatment facilities for hot liquids at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). An anaerobic digestion process can be scaled to handle small or modest quantities of waste and is expected to be vastly superior to incineration in this regard.

  19. Dynamic simulation model for anaerobic digestion of cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    A simple yet useful dynamic simulator for the anaerobic digestion of cellulosic feedstock has been developed. The incentive for this simulator is a need for guidance in design and optimization of an anaerobic digestin process for volume reduction and stabilization of low-level radioactive wastes generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These wastes are primarily blotter and other paper and cotton/polyester clothing. Anaerobic digestion will convert a substantial mass (and hence volume) of waste to gaseous products which can be flared or simply released. The remaining sludge will contain the radionuclides and is expected to have only 5 to 10% of the original waste volume. This stabilized sludge will be more suitable for disposal by shallow land burial than is the original untreated waste. The liquid effluent will go to existing treatment facilities for hot liquids at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). An anaerobic digestion process can be scaled to handle small or modest quantities of waste and is expected to be vastly superior to incineration in this regard

  20. Identification of anaerobic microorganisms for converting kitchen waste to biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirhossein Malakahmad; Shahrom Mohd Zain; Noor Ezlin Ahmad Basri; Shamsul Rahman Mohamed Kutty; Mohd Hasnain Isa

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion process is one of the alternative methods to convert organic waste into methane gas which is a fuel and energy source. Activities of various kinds of microorganisms are the main factor for anaerobic digestion which produces methane gas. Therefore, in this study a modified Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) with working volume of 50 liters was designed to identify the microorganisms through biogas production. The mixture of 75% kitchen waste and 25% sewage sludge was used as substrate. Observations on microorganisms in the ABR showed that there exists a small amount of protozoa (5%) and fungi (2%) in the system, but almost 93% of the microorganism population consists of bacteria. It is definitely clear that bacteria are responsible for anaerobic biodegradation of kitchen waste. Results show that in the acidification zone of the ABR (front compartments of reactor) fast growing bacteria capable of growth at high substrate levels and reduced pH was dominant. A shift to slower growing scavenging bacteria that grow better at higher pH was occurring towards the end of the reactor. Due to the ability of activity in acetate environment the percentages of Methanococcus, Methanosarcina and Methanotrix were higher than other kinds of methane former in the system. (Author)

  1. HIV-1-Induced Small T Cell Syncytia Can Transfer Virus Particles to Target Cells through Transient Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonides, Menelaos; Murooka, Thomas T; Bellfy, Lauren N; Roy, Nathan H; Mempel, Thorsten R; Thali, Markus

    2015-12-12

    HIV-1 Env mediates fusion of viral and target cell membranes, but it can also mediate fusion of infected (producer) and target cells, thus triggering the formation of multinucleated cells, so-called syncytia. Large, round, immobile syncytia are readily observable in cultures of HIV-1-infected T cells, but these fast growing "fusion sinks" are largely regarded as cell culture artifacts. In contrast, small HIV-1-induced syncytia were seen in the paracortex of peripheral lymph nodes and other secondary lymphoid tissue of HIV-1-positive individuals. Further, recent intravital imaging of lymph nodes in humanized mice early after their infection with HIV-1 demonstrated that a significant fraction of infected cells were highly mobile, small syncytia, suggesting that these entities contribute to virus dissemination. Here, we report that the formation of small, migratory syncytia, for which we provide further quantification in humanized mice, can be recapitulated in vitro if HIV-1-infected T cells are placed into 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels rather than being kept in traditional suspension culture systems. Intriguingly, live-cell imaging in hydrogels revealed that these syncytia, similar to individual infected cells, can transiently interact with uninfected cells, leading to rapid virus transfer without cell-cell fusion. Infected cells were also observed to deposit large amounts of viral particles into the extracellular space. Altogether, these observations suggest the need to further evaluate the biological significance of small, T cell-based syncytia and to consider the possibility that these entities do indeed contribute to virus spread and pathogenesis.

  2. Hydrodynamic cavitation applied to food waste anaerobic digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, David

    2016-01-01

    Innovative pre-treatment methods applied to anaerobic digestion (AD) have developed to enhance the methane yields of food waste. This study investigates hydrodynamic cavitation, which induce disintegration of biomass through microbubble formations, impact on food waste solubilisation and methane production during following AD. Two different sub-streams of food waste (before and after the digestion) pre-treated by hydrodynamic cavitation were evaluated in lab scale for its potential for implem...

  3. Examination of dam induced sedimentation of small reservoir near Brennbergbánya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csáfordi, P.; Kalicz, P.; Gribovszki, Z.; Kucsara, M.

    2009-04-01

    The dams' affects on the stream system also involve accelerated sedimentation of reservoirs, change of water and sediment regime. In consequence of sedimentation the lifetime and the recreational potential of reservoirs decrease and management practices have to be applied. The area of our study is a small forested catchment, where the erosion of forested land and the sedimentation of Brennberg Reservoir were investigated in relationship with each other. The Brennberg Reservoir has been built in 1981. It has been silting up forcefully since that time. It has to be dredged with hydraulic earth-moving to preserve its landscape-aesthetical function for the future. We have surveyed the surface to establish the rate of sedimentation. The results of this measurement were processed with a GIS software (named Digiterra Map). There were several uncertainties during our surveying in the field. Therefore three other methods were applied based on GIS and a simply mathematical calculation. The amount of deposited sediment was determined with these methods. Then we compared the results to each other. The annual specific soil loss was estimated according to results of our measurement. Keywords: dam impact, reservoir sedimentation, GIS

  4. Investigating the threshold properties of very small VCSELs through relaxation-resonance-induced amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Puccioni, G. P.; Lippi, G. L.

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally show how the nonlinear amplification properties of a micro-laser operating in the threshold region, sinusoidally modulated near its resonance (relaxation oscillations), can lead to several important advantages. First, suitably adjusting the bias point and the modulation amplitude, it is possible to obtain reliable trains of large amplitude, synchronous, well-resolved, narrow pulses, with injection currents moderate values of the injection current: the extension to nano-laser modulation is discussed. Second, adjusting the modulation amplitude and the working point it is possible to investigate the threshold properties of the laser: the computation of the second-order autocorrelation as a function of modulation amplitude shows a resonance-like phenomenon where the degree of correlation is degraded by the presence of the external action, only for small modulation amplitude, until true coherence sets in. This allows for a determination, with good accuracy, of the onset of E.M. field coherence. Since this resonance is quite sensitive to the modulation frequency, it also allows for a good determination of the optimal frequency at which the pulse trains can be generated. A physical discussion of these properties, in the context of threshold and coherence, is offered.

  5. Lower limb immobilization device induced small setup errors in the radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuting; Ni, Xinye; Yu, Jingping; Ni, Xinchu; Sun, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jianlin; Sun, Suping; Wang, Jian

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to design a lower limb immobilization device and investigate its clinical application in the radiotherapy of the lower limbs.Around 38 patients who underwent lower limb radiotherapy using the designed immobilization device were included in this study. The setup errors were calculated by comparison of the portal images and the simulator films or digital reconstructed radiographs (DRRs).From all 38 patients accomplished the radiotherapy using this device, 178 anteroposterior portal images and 178 lateral portal images were used for the analysis of the positional accuracy. Significant differences were observed in the setup error of the head-foot direction compared with the left-right direction (t = 3.404, P = .002) and the anterior-posterior directions (t = 3.188, P = .003). No statistical differences were identified in the setup error in the left-right direction and anterior-posterior direction (t = 0.497, P = .622).The use of the in-house designed lower limb immobilization device allowed for relatively small setup errors. Furthermore, it showed satisfactory accuracy and repeatability.

  6. Autopsy findings in a case of a small cell lung cancer complicated by radiotherapy induced acute interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeki, Shigenori; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a 71-year-old man who had been referred to his hospital because of a dry cough and an associated abnormality that had been detected by x-ray. Based on chest x-ray evaluations and the endoscopic bronchial biopsy findings the diagnosis was a small cell lung cancer. The patient thus received a 2 time regimen of cisplatin chemotherapy and subsequent radiotherapy (40 Gy). Two weeks after this radiotherapy, however the patient complained of an increasing dyspnea. Two days later, he was readmitted to hospital because of pneumonia and severe dyspnea, but died of respiratory failure on the same day. The autopsy findings revealed diffuse organized alveolar duct damage that had been induced by radiotherapy directed toward a relatively large area that included the right lower lung and the mediastinum. (author)

  7. The nutrient stress-induced small GTPase Rab5 contributes to the activation of vesicle trafficking and vacuolar activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kanada, Akira; Matsuzaki, Mariko; Byrne, Stuart D; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2014-07-25

    Rab family small GTPases regulate membrane trafficking by spatiotemporal recruitment of various effectors. However, it remains largely unclear how the expression and functions of Rab proteins are regulated in response to extracellular or intracellular stimuli. Here we show that Ypt53, one isoform of Rab5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is up-regulated significantly under nutrient stress. Under non-stress conditions, Vps21, a constitutively expressed Rab5 isoform, is crucial to Golgi-vacuole trafficking and to vacuolar hydrolase activity. However, when cells are exposed to nutrient stress for an extended period of time, the up-regulated Ypt53 and the constitutive Vps21 function redundantly to maintain these activities, which, in turn, prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and maintain mitochondrial respiration. Together, our results clarify the relative roles of these constitutive and nutrient stress-inducible Rab5 proteins that ensure adaptable vesicle trafficking and vacuolar hydrolase activity, thereby allowing cells to adapt to environmental changes.

  8. Effects of aerobic and anaerobic exercise on spatial learning ability in hypothyroid rats: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Song, MinYoung

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This pilot study analyzed the degradation of spatial learning ability caused by hypothyroidism using aerobic and anaerobic exercise. [Subjects and Methods] The experiments were performed on 11, four-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hypothyroidism-induced rats receiving propylthiouracil (PTU) treatment were divided into aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise, and control groups. Each group performed exercise and rest for four weeks. Changes in lethargy, memory deterioration, and thyroid function were measured in each group by blood analysis and open field and Morris water maze tests. [Results] After four weeks, blood analysis revealed that the thyroid hormone levels had returned to normal in the aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise, and control groups, whereas the open field and Morris water maze tests showed that the aerobic and anaerobic exercise groups had faster recovery compared to that of the control group. In addition, comparison of aerobic and anaerobic groups showed that the anaerobic exercise group had faster recovery compared to that of the aerobic group. [Conclusion] The findings of this study suggest that exercise helped to improve lethargy and deteriorated spatial learning ability caused by hypothyroidism and to recover function in rats. Anaerobic exercise was more beneficial than aerobic exercise in alleviating symptoms.

  9. APR-246 (PRIMA-1(MET)) strongly synergizes with AZD2281 (olaparib) induced PARP inhibition to induce apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deben, Christophe; Lardon, Filip; Wouters, An; Op de Beeck, Ken; Van den Bossche, Jolien; Jacobs, Julie; Van Der Steen, Nele; Peeters, Marc; Rolfo, Christian; Deschoolmeester, Vanessa; Pauwels, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    APR-246 (PRIMA-1(Met)) is able to bind mutant p53 and restore its normal conformation and function. The compound has also been shown to increase intracellular ROS levels. Importantly, the poly-[ADP-ribose] polymerase-1 (PARP-1) enzyme plays an important role in the repair of ROS-induced DNA damage. We hypothesize that by blocking this repair with the PARP-inhibitor AZD2281 (olaparib), DNA damage would accumulate in the cell leading to massive apoptosis. We observed that APR-246 synergistically enhanced the cytotoxic response of olaparib in TP53 mutant non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, resulting in a strong apoptotic response. In the presence of wild type p53 a G2/M cell cycle block was predominantly observed. NOXA expression levels were significantly increased in a TP53 mutant background, and remained unchanged in the wild type cell line. The combined treatment of APR-246 and olaparib induced cell death that was associated with increased ROS production, accumulation of DNA damage and translocation of p53 to the mitochondria. Out data suggest a promising targeted combination strategy in which the response to olaparib is synergistically enhanced by the addition of APR-246, especially in a TP53 mutant background. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Small molecule PGC-1α1 protein stabilizers induce adipocyte Ucp1 expression and uncoupled mitochondrial respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.T. Pettersson-Klein

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α1 (PGC-1α1 regulates genes involved in energy metabolism. Increasing adipose tissue energy expenditure through PGC-1α1 activation is potentially beneficial for systemic metabolism. Pharmacological PGC-1α1 activators could be valuable tools in the fight against obesity and metabolic disease. Finding such compounds has been challenging partly because PGC-1α1 is a transcriptional coactivator with no known ligand-binding properties. While, PGC-1α1 activation is regulated by several mechanisms, protein stabilization is a crucial limiting step due to its short half-life under unstimulated conditions. Methods: We designed a cell-based high-throughput screening system to identify PGC-1α1 protein stabilizers. Positive hits were tested for their ability to induce endogenous PGC-1α1 protein accumulation and activate target gene expression in brown adipocytes. Select compounds were analyzed for their effects on global gene expression and cellular respiration in adipocytes. Results: Among 7,040 compounds screened, we highlight four small molecules with high activity as measured by: PGC-1α1 protein accumulation, target gene expression, and uncoupled mitochondrial respiration in brown adipocytes. Conclusions: We identify compounds that induce PGC-1α1 protein accumulation and show that this increases uncoupled respiration in brown adipocytes. This screening platform establishes the foundation for a new class of therapeutics with potential use in obesity and associated disorders. Keywords: Small molecule screening, PGC-1a, PGC-1alpha, PGC-1alpha1, Protein stabilization, UCP1, Mitochondrial respiration, Brown adipose tissue

  11. Tourniquet-induced ischaemia-reperfusion injury: the comparison of antioxidative effects of small-dose propofol and ketamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaca Omer

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the preventive effects of propofol and ketamine as small dose sedation during spinal anaesthesia on tourniquet-induced ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Methods: 30 patients were randomly assigned into two groups of 15 patients. In the propofol group, sedation was performed with propofol 0.2 mg·kg-1 followed by infusion at a rate of 2 mg·kg-1·h-1. In the ketamine group, a continuous infusion of ketamine 0.5 mg·kg-1·h-1 was used until the end of surgery. Intravenous administration of midazolam was not used in any patients. Ramsay sedation scale was used for assessing the sedation level. Venous blood samples were obtained before propofol and ketamine infusion (T1, at 30 minutes (min of tourniquet ischaemia (T2, and 5 min after tourniquet deflation (T3 for malondialdehyde (MDA measurements. Results: No differences were noted between the groups in haemodynamic (p > 0.05 and demographic data (p > 0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of T1, T2 and T3 periods (p > 0.05. There was a statistically increase observed in MDA values respectively both in Group P and Group K between the reperfusion period (1.95 ± 0.59, 2.31 ± 0.48 and pre-ischaemia (1.41 ± 0.38, 1.54 ± 0.45, and ischaemia (1.76 ± 0.70, 1.71 ± 0.38 (µmoL-1 periods (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Small-dose propofol and ketamine has similar potential to reduce the oxidative stress caused by tourniquet-induced ischaemia-reperfusion injury in patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery under spinal anaesthesia.

  12. Small molecule PGC-1α1 protein stabilizers induce adipocyte Ucp1 expression and uncoupled mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson-Klein, A T; Izadi, M; Ferreira, D M S; Cervenka, I; Correia, J C; Martinez-Redondo, V; Southern, M; Cameron, M; Kamenecka, T; Agudelo, L Z; Porsmyr-Palmertz, M; Martens, U; Lundgren, B; Otrocka, M; Jenmalm-Jensen, A; Griffin, P R; Ruas, J L

    2018-03-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α1 (PGC-1α1) regulates genes involved in energy metabolism. Increasing adipose tissue energy expenditure through PGC-1α1 activation is potentially beneficial for systemic metabolism. Pharmacological PGC-1α1 activators could be valuable tools in the fight against obesity and metabolic disease. Finding such compounds has been challenging partly because PGC-1α1 is a transcriptional coactivator with no known ligand-binding properties. While, PGC-1α1 activation is regulated by several mechanisms, protein stabilization is a crucial limiting step due to its short half-life under unstimulated conditions. We designed a cell-based high-throughput screening system to identify PGC-1α1 protein stabilizers. Positive hits were tested for their ability to induce endogenous PGC-1α1 protein accumulation and activate target gene expression in brown adipocytes. Select compounds were analyzed for their effects on global gene expression and cellular respiration in adipocytes. Among 7,040 compounds screened, we highlight four small molecules with high activity as measured by: PGC-1α1 protein accumulation, target gene expression, and uncoupled mitochondrial respiration in brown adipocytes. We identify compounds that induce PGC-1α1 protein accumulation and show that this increases uncoupled respiration in brown adipocytes. This screening platform establishes the foundation for a new class of therapeutics with potential use in obesity and associated disorders. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduced expression of bax in small cell lung cancer cells is not sufficient to induce cisplatin-resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagosch J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance to cisplatin in the course of chemotherapy contributes to the poor prognosis of small cell lung cancer (SCLC. B cell lymphoma-2 is the founding member of a large family of proteins that either promote or inhibit apoptosis. We aimed at investigating if the pro-apoptotic members Bad, Bax, Bim and Bid are involved in cisplatin-resistance. Cisplatin-resistance in the SCLC cell line H1339 was induced by repetitive exposure to cisplatin. Protein expression was quantified by Western Blot and immuno-fluorescence analysis. Protein expression was altered using siRNA interference. Four "cycles" of 0.5 μg/ml cisplatin led to partial cisplatin-resistance in H1339 cells. The expression of Bad, Bim and Bid was comparable in naïve and resistant cells while the expression of Bax was reduced in the resistant clone. But, reducing Bax expression in naïve cells did not lead to altered cisplatin sensitivity neither in H1339 nor in H187 SCLC cells. We conclude that the reduced Bax expression after exposure to cisplatin is not sufficient to induce cis-platin-resistance in SCLC cells.

  14. COMPARISON OF THORACIC ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND RADIOGRAPHY FOR THE DETECTION OF INDUCED SMALL VOLUME PNEUMOTHORAX IN THE HORSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partlow, Jessica; David, Florent; Hunt, Luanne Michelle; Relave, Fabien; Blond, Laurent; Pinilla, Manuel; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Small volume pneumothorax can be challenging to diagnose in horses. The current standard method for diagnosis is standing thoracic radiography. We hypothesized that thoracic ultrasonography would be more sensitive. Objectives of this prospective, experimental study were to describe a thoracic ultrasound method for detection of small volume pneumothorax in horses and to compare results of radiography and ultrasound in a sample of horses with induced small volume pneumothorax. Six mature healthy horses were recruited for this study. For each horse, five 50 ml air boluses were sequentially introduced via a teat cannula into the pleural space. Lateral thoracic radiographs and standardized ultrasound (2D and M-mode) examinations of both hemithoraces were performed following administration of each 50 ml air bolus. Radiographs and ultrasound images/videos were analyzed for detection of pneumothorax by four independent investigators who were unaware of treatment status. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, negative predictive values, and agreement among investigators (Kappa test, κ) were calculated for radiography, 2D and M-mode ultrasound. Comparisons were made using a chi-squared exact test with significance set at P radiography (48%) for pneumothorax detection (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). Specificity and positive predictive values were similar for all three imaging modalities (P = 1). Agreement between investigators for pneumothorax detection was excellent for 2D ultrasound (κ = 1), very good for M-mode ultrasound (κ = 0.87), and good for radiography (κ = 0.79). Findings from this experimental study supported the use of thoracic ultrasonography as a diagnostic method for detecting pneumothorax in horses. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  15. Accumulation of small heat shock proteins, including mitochondrial HSP22, induced by oxidative stress and adaptive response in tomato cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzet, N.; Richaud, C.; Deveaux, Y.; Kazmaier, M.; Gagnon, J.; Triantaphylides, C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression, by application of H2O2, O2.- generating agents (methyl viologen, digitonin) and gamma irradiation to tomato suspension cultures, were investigated and compared to the well-described heat shock response. Two-dimensional gel protein mapping analyses gave the first indication that at least small heat shock proteins (smHSP) accumulated in response to application of H2O2 and gamma irradiation, but not to O2.- generating agents. While some proteins seemed to be induced specifically by each treatment, only part of the heat shock response was observed. On the basis of Northern hybridization experiments performed with four heterologous cDNA, corresponding to classes I-IV of pea smHSP, it could be concluded that significant amounts of class I and II smHSP mRNA are induced by H2O2 and by irradiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in plants some HSP genes are inducible by oxidative stresses, as in micro-organisms and other eukaryotic cells. HSP22, the main stress protein that accumulates following H2O2 action or gamma irradiation, was also purified. Sequence homology of amino terminal and internal sequences, and immunoreactivity with Chenopodium rubrum mitochondrial smHSP antibody, indicated that the protein belongs to the recently discovered class of plant mitochondrial smHSP. Heat shock or a mild H2O2 pretreatment was also shown to lead to plant cell protection against oxidative injury. Therefore, the synthesis of these stress proteins can be considered as an adaptive mechanism in which mitochondrial protection could be essential

  16. The role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, O; Majima, A; Onozawa, Y; Horie, H; Uehara, Y; Fukui, A; Omatsu, T; Naito, Y; Yoshikawa, T

    2014-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been implemented in clinical settings for a long time for their anti-inflammatory effects. With the number of NSAID users increasing, gastroenterological physicians and researchers have worked hard to prevent and treat NSAID-induced gastric mucosal injury, an effort that has for the large part being successful. However, the struggle against NSAID-induced mucosal damage has taken on a new urgency due to the discovery of NSAID-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Although the main mechanism by which NSAIDs induce small intestinal mucosal injury has been thought to depend on the inhibitory effect of NSAIDs on cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, recent studies have revealed the importance of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which occurs independently of COX-inhibition. ROS production is an especially important factor in the increase of small intestinal epithelial cell permeability, an early stage in the process of small intestinal mucosal injury. By clarifying the precise mechanism, together with its clinical features using novel endoscopy, effective strategies for preventing NSAID-induced small intestinal damage, especially targeting mitochondria-derived ROS production, may be developed.

  17. Small RNAs targeting transcription start site induce heparanase silencing through interference with transcription initiation in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosong Jiang

    Full Text Available Heparanase (HPA, an endo-h-D-glucuronidase that cleaves the heparan sulfate chain of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is overexpressed in majority of human cancers. Recent evidence suggests that small interfering RNA (siRNA induces transcriptional gene silencing (TGS in human cells. In this study, transfection of siRNA against -9/+10 bp (siH3, but not -174/-155 bp (siH1 or -134/-115 bp (siH2 region relative to transcription start site (TSS locating at 101 bp upstream of the translation start site, resulted in TGS of heparanase in human prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells in a sequence-specific manner. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing revealed no DNA methylation of CpG islands within heparanase promoter in siH3-transfected cells. The TGS of heparanase did not involve changes of epigenetic markers histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2, histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 or active chromatin marker acetylated histone H3 (AcH3. The regulation of alternative splicing was not involved in siH3-mediated TGS. Instead, siH3 interfered with transcription initiation via decreasing the binding of both RNA polymerase II and transcription factor II B (TFIIB, but not the binding of transcription factors Sp1 or early growth response 1, on the heparanase promoter. Moreover, Argonaute 1 and Argonaute 2 facilitated the decreased binding of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB on heparanase promoter, and were necessary in siH3-induced TGS of heparanase. Stable transfection of the short hairpin RNA construct targeting heparanase TSS (-9/+10 bp into cancer cells, resulted in decreased proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells in vitro and in athymic mice models. These results suggest that small RNAs targeting TSS can induce TGS of heparanase via interference with transcription initiation, and significantly suppress the tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells.

  18. Determination of metal balance shift induced in small fresh water fish by X-ray irradiation using PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, M.; Aoki, K.; Iso, H.; Kodama, K.; Imaseki, H.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the environmental pollution studies, it is very important to detect not only pollutants but also changes induced in organisms in the environment with various environmental stresses such as heavy metal toxicity radiation and agricultural chemicals. In the latter, monitoring is carried out using biological indicators to find out the changes, which have wide spectra from visible like deformity of the body to invisible such as changes in some enzyme activities. Changes of the balance of essential elements could occur in organisms to deal with the stresses. If we detect an elemental balance shift, we may see the environmental pollution in its early stages. Moreover, in the actual environment, combined effects, additive or reductive with coexistent elements or other stresses, is an important subject for investigation. Therefore, measurement of many elements in the biological indicator's simultaneously and determination of the distribution in the organisms are useful in clarifying the action of pollutants at sublethal levels. A small fresh water fish, Medaka can be used as one of the biological-indicators for determination of water quality. In the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), an inbred strain of Medaka Orizias laptipes was established and has been maintained for the research purposes. Since the genetic background of inbred animals is almost uniform, the individual deviation among animals is very small. This characteristic is very useful to investigate the physiological effects of environmental stresses. We have continued to investigate the balance shift of essential elements induced in the bodies of Medaka by several stresses. In this paper, elemental content in various organs of the X-ray irradiated fish determined by PIXE method are reported in comparison with that of the control fish to observe the effect of the X-rays. Body size of Medaka is about 3 cm long, and the internal organs are very small (about l mm on average). PIXE is the most

  19. Key geochemical factors regulating Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Taillefert, Martial

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of Mn(IV) oxides coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of NH4+ has been proposed for more than a decade to contribute to the fixed nitrogen pool in marine sediments, yet the existence of this process is still under debate. In this study, surface sediments from an intertidal salt marsh were incubated with MnO2 in the presence of elevated concentrations of NH4+ to test the hypothesis that the reduction of Mn(IV) oxides catalyzes anaerobic NH4+ oxidation to NO2- or NO3-. Geochemical factors such as the ratio of Mn(IV) to NH4+, the type of Mn(IV) oxides (amorphous or colloidal MnO2), and the redox potential of the sediment significantly affect the activity of anaerobic nitrification. Incubations show that the net production of NO3- is stimulated under anaerobic conditions with external addition of colloidal but not amorphous MnO2 and is facilitated by the presence of high concentrations of NH4+. Mass balance calculations demonstrate that anaerobic NH4+ oxidation contributes to the net consumption of NH4+, providing another piece of evidence for the occurrence of Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments. Finally, anaerobic nitrification is stimulated by the amendment of small concentrations of NO3- or the absence of sulfate reduction, suggesting that moderately reducing conditions favor anaerobic NH4+ oxidation. Overall, these findings suggest that Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in suboxic sediments with high N/Mn concentration ratios and highly reactive manganese oxides may be an important source of NO2- and NO3- for subsequent marine nitrogen loss via denitrification or anammox.

  20. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  1. Potential for anaerobic conversion of xenobiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Dolfing, J.; Haagensen, Frank

    2003-01-01

    This review covers the latest research on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotic compounds, with emphasis on surfactants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalate esters, polychlorinated biphenyls, halogenated phenols, and pesticides. The versatility of anaerobic reactor systems...... regarding the treatment of xenobiotics is shown with the focus on the UASB reactor, but the applicability of other reactor designs for treatment of hazardous waste is also included. Bioaugmentation has proved to be a viable technique to enhance a specific activity in anaerobic reactors and recent research...

  2. Understanding and Predicting Foam in Anaerobic Digester

    OpenAIRE

    I. R. Kanu; T. J. Aspray; A. J. Adeloye

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the ambiguity and complexity surrounding anaerobic digester foaming, efforts have been made by various researchers to understand the process of anaerobic digester foaming so as to proffer a solution that can be universally applied rather than site specific. All attempts ranging from experimental analysis to comparative review of other process has not fully explained the conditions and process of foaming in anaerobic digester. Studying the current available ...

  3. Ascorbic acid and a cytostatic inhibitor of glycolysis synergistically induce apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha B Vuyyuri

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid (AA exhibits significant anticancer activity at pharmacologic doses achievable by parenteral administration that have minimal effects on normal cells. Thus, AA has potential uses as a chemotherapeutic agent alone or in combination with other therapeutics that specifically target cancer-cell metabolism. We compared the effects of AA and combinations of AA with the glycolysis inhibitor 3-(3-pyridinyl-1-(4-pyridinyl-2-propen-1-one (3-PO on the viability of three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines to the effects on an immortalized lung epithelial cell line. AA concentrations of 0.5 to 5 mM caused a complete loss of viability in all NSCLC lines compared to a <10% loss of viability in the lung epithelial cell line. Combinations of AA and 3-PO synergistically enhanced cell death in all NSCLC cell lines at concentrations well below the IC50 concentrations for each compound alone. A synergistic interaction was not observed in combination treatments of lung epithelial cells and combination treatments that caused a complete loss of viability in NSCLC cells had modest effects on normal lung cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Combination treatments induced dramatically higher ROS levels compared to treatment with AA and 3-PO alone in NSCLC cells and combination-induced cell death was inhibited by addition of catalase to the medium. Analyses of DNA fragmentation, poly (ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage, annexin V-binding, and caspase activity demonstrated that AA-induced cell death is caused via the activation of apoptosis and that the combination treatments caused a synergistic induction of apoptosis. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of AA against NSCLC cells and that combinations of AA with 3-PO synergistically induce apoptosis via a ROS-dependent mechanism. These results support further evaluation of pharmacologic concentrations of AA as an adjuvant treatment for NSCLC and that combination of AA with

  4. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  5. PRIMA-1Met/APR-246 induces apoptosis and tumor growth delay in small cell lung cancer expressing mutant p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Selivanova, Galina; Christensen, Camilla Laulund

    2011-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis, necessitating the need to develop new and efficient treatment modalities. PRIMA-1(Met) (p53-dependent reactivation of massive apoptosis), also known as APR-246, is a small molecule, which restores tumor suppressor...... function to mutant p53 and induces cancer cell death in various cancer types. Since p53 is mutated in more than 90% of SCLC, we investigated the ability of PRIMA-1(Met) to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in SCLC with different p53 mutations....

  6. DNA damage response (DDR) induced by topoisomerase II poisons requires nuclear function of the small GTPase Rac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartlick, Friedrich; Bopp, Anita; Henninger, Christian; Fritz, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Here, we investigated the influence of Rac family small GTPases on mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR) stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons. To this end, we examined the influence of the Rac-specific small molecule inhibitor EHT1864 on Ser139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a widely used marker of the DDR triggered by DNA double-strand breaks. EHT1864 attenuated the doxorubicin-stimulated DDR in a subset of cell lines tested, including HepG2 hepatoma cells. EHT1864 reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and increased viability following treatment of HepG2 cells with topo II poisons. Protection by EHT1864 was observed in both p53 wildtype (HepG2) and p53 deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cells and, furthermore, remained unaffected upon pharmacological inhibition of p53 in HepG2. Apparently, the impact of Rac on the DDR is independent of p53. Protection from doxorubicin-induced DNA damage by EHT1864 comprises both S and G2 phase cells. The inhibitory effect of EHT1864 on doxorubicin-stimulated DDR was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of various protein kinases, including JNK, ERK, PI3K, PAK and CK1. EHT1864 and protein kinase inhibitors also attenuated the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Moreover, EHT1864 mitigated the constitutive phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at positions S1106, S1213 and S1247. Doxorubicin transport, nuclear import/export of topoisomerase II and Hsp90-related mechanisms are likely not of relevance for doxorubicin-stimulated DDR impaired by EHT1864. We suggest that multiple kinase-dependent but p53- and heat shock protein-independent Rac-regulated nuclear mechanisms are required for activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II poisons. © 2013.

  7. Small activating RNA induces myogenic differentiation of rat adipose-derived stem cells by upregulating MyoD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenghe Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:RNA activation (RNAa is a mechanism of gene activation triggered by promoter-targeted small double stranded RNAs (dsRNAs, also known as small activating RNAs (saRNAs. Myogenic regulatory factor MyoD is regarded as the master activator of myogenic differentiation cascade by binding to enhancer of muscle specific genes. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI is a condition primarily resulted from urethral sphincter deficiency. It is thus expected that by promoting differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs into myoblasts by activating MyoD gene through RNAa may offer benefits to SUI.Materials and Methods:Rats ADSCs were isolated, proliferated in vitro, and identified by flow cytometry. Purified ADSCs were then transfected with a MyoD saRNA or control transfected. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and western blotting were used to detect MyoD mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Immunocytochemical staining was applied to determine the expression of desmin protein in transfected cells. Cell viability was measured by using CellTiter 96® AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay kit.Results:Transfection of a MyoD saRNA (dsMyoD into ADSCs significantly induced the expression of MyoD at both the mRNA and protein levels, and inhibited cell proliferation. Desmin protein expression was detected in dsMyoD treated ADSCs 2 weeks later.Conclusion:Our findings show that RNAa mediated overexpression of MyoD can promote transdifferentiation of ADSCs into myoblasts and may help treat stress urinary incontinence (SUI–a condition primarily resulted from urethral sphincter deficiency.

  8. Radiation-induced liver disease after stereotactic body radiotherapy for small hepatocellular carcinoma: clinical and dose-volumetric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jinhong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, So Yeon; Cho, Byungchul; Park, Jin-hong; Kim, Su Ssan; Song, Si Yeol; Lee, Sang-wook; Ahn, Seung Do

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and dose–volumetric parameters that predict the risk of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) for patients with small, unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Between March 2007 and December 2009, 92 patients with HCC treated with SBRT were reviewed for RILD within 3 months of completing treatment. RILD was evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. A dose of 10–20 Gy (median, 15 Gy) per fraction was given over 3–4 consecutive days for a total dose of 30–60 Gy (median, 45 Gy). The following clinical and dose–volumetric parameters were examined: age, gender, Child-Pugh class, presence of hepatitis B virus, gross tumor volume, normal liver volume, radiation dose, fraction size, mean dose to the normal liver, and normal liver volumes receiving from < 5 Gy to < 60 Gy (in increments of 5 Gy). Seventeen (18.5%) of the 92 patients developed grade 2 or worse RILD after SBRT (49 patients in grade 1, 11 in grade 2, and 6 in ≥ grade 3). On univariate analysis, Child-Pugh class was identified as a significant clinical parameter, while normal liver volume and normal liver volumes receiving from < 15 Gy to < 60 Gy were the significant dose–volumetric parameters. Upon multivariate analysis, only Child-Pugh class was a significant parameter for predicting grade 2 or worse RILD. The Child-Pugh B cirrhosis was found to have a significantly greater susceptibility to the development of grade 2 or worse RILD after SBRT in patients with small, unresectable HCC. Additional efforts aimed at testing other models to predict the risk of RILD in a large series of HCC patients treated with SBRT are needed

  9. Reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid beta-protein precursor by the small-molecule Differentiation Inducing Factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; Washicosky, Kevin; Moir, Robert D; Tesco, Giuseppina; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Wasco, Wilma

    2009-04-01

    The detection of cell cycle proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains may represent an early event leading to neurodegeneration. To identify cell cycle modifiers with anti-Abeta properties, we assessed the effect of Differentiation-Inducing Factor-1 (DIF-1), a unique, small-molecule from Dictyostelium discoideum, on the proteolysis of the amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP) in a variety of different cell types. We show that DIF-1 slows cell cycle progression through G0/G1 that correlates with a reduction in cyclin D1 protein levels. Western blot analysis of DIF-treated cells and conditioned medium revealed decreases in the levels of secreted APP, mature APP, and C-terminal fragments. Assessment of conditioned media by sandwich ELISA showed reduced levels of Abeta40 and Abeta42, also demonstrating that treatment with DIF-1 effectively decreases the ratio of Abeta42 to Abeta40. In addition, DIF-1 significantly diminished APP phosphorylation at residue T668. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis of APP residue Thr668 to alanine or glutamic acid abolished the effect of DIF-1 on APP proteolysis and restored secreted levels of Abeta. Finally, DIF-1 prevented the accumulation of APP C-terminal fragments induced by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, and calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN). Our findings suggest that DIF-1 affects G0/G1-associated amyloidogenic processing of APP by a gamma-secretase-, proteasome- and calpain-insensitive pathway, and that this effect requires the presence of residue Thr668.

  10. Reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid β-protein precursor by the small-molecule Differentiation Inducing Factor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A.; Washicosky, Kevin; Moir, Robert D.; Tesco, Giuseppina; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Wasco, Wilma

    2013-01-01

    The detection of cell cycle proteins in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains may represent an early event leading to neurodegeneration. To identify cell cycle modifiers with anti-Aβ properties, we assessed the effect of Differentiation-Inducing Factor-1 (DIF-1), a unique, small-molecule from Dictyostelium discoideum, on the proteolysis of the amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) in a variety of different cell types. We show that DIF-1 slows cell cycle progression through G0/G1 that correlates with a reduction in cyclin D1 protein levels. Western blot analysis of DIF-treated cells and conditioned medium revealed decreases in the levels of secreted APP, mature APP, and C-terminal fragments. Assessment of conditioned media by sandwich ELISA showed reduced levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42, also demonstrating that treatment with DIF-1 effectively decreases the ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40. In addition, DIF-1 significantly diminished APP phosphorylation at residue T668. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis of APP residue Thr668 to alanine or glutamic acid abolished the effect of DIF-1 on APP proteolysis and restored secreted levels of Aβ. Finally, DIF-1 prevented the accumulation of APP C-terminal fragments induced by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, and calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN). Our findings suggest that DIF-1 affects G0/G1-associated amyloidogenic processing of APP by a γ-secretase-, proteasome- and calpain-insensitive pathway, and that this effect requires the presence of residue Thr668. PMID:19154786

  11. Systemic disease-induced salivary biomarker profiles in mouse models of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Gao

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Saliva (oral fluids is an emerging biofluid poised for detection of clinical diseases. Although the rationale for oral diseases applications (e.g. oral cancer is intuitive, the rationale and relationship between systemic diseases and saliva biomarkers are unclear.In this study, we used mouse models of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer and compared the transcriptome biomarker profiles of tumor-bearing mice to those of control mice. Microarray analysis showed that salivary transcriptomes were significantly altered in tumor-bearing mice vs. controls. Significant overlapping among transcriptomes of mouse tumors, serum, salivary glands and saliva suggests that salivary biomarkers have multiple origins. Furthermore, we identified that the expression of two groups of significantly altered transcription factors (TFs Runx1, Mlxipl, Trim30 and Egr1, Tbx1, Nr1d1 in salivary gland tissue of melanoma-bearing mice can potentially be responsible for 82.6% of the up-regulated gene expression and 62.5% of the down-regulated gene expression, respectively, in the saliva of melanoma-bearing mice. We also showed that the ectopic production of nerve growth factor (NGF in the melanoma tumor tissue as a tumor-released mediator can induce expression of the TF Egr-1 in the salivary gland.Taken together, our data support the conclusion that upon systemic disease development, significant changes can occur in the salivary biomarker profile. Although the origins of the disease-induced salivary biomarkers may be both systemic and local, stimulation of salivary gland by mediators released from remote tumors plays an important role in regulating the salivary surrogate biomarker profiles.

  12. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF A BIODEGRADABLE MATERIAL UNDER ANAEROBIC - THERMOPHILIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RICARDO CAMACHO-MUÑOZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper dertermined the anaerobic biodegradation of a polymer obtained by extrusion process of native cassava starch, polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Initially a thermophilic - methanogenic inoculum was prepared from urban solid waste. The gas final methane concentration and medium’s pH reached values of 59,6% and 7,89 respectively. The assay assembly was carried out according ASTM D5511 standard. The biodegradation percent of used materials after 15 day of digestion were: 77,49%, 61,27%, 0,31% for cellulose, sample and polyethylene respectively. Due cellulose showed biodegradation levels higher than 70% it’s deduced that the inoculum conditions were appropriate. A biodegradation level of 61,27%, 59,35% of methane concentration in sample’s evolved gas and a medium’s finale pH of 7,71 in sample’s vessels, reveal the extruded polymer´s capacity to be anaerobically degraded under thermophilic- high solid concentration conditions.

  13. Processing anaerobic sludge for extended storage as anaerobic digester inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Zicari, Steven M; Cui, Zongjun; Zhang, Ruihong

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge was processed to reduce the volume and moisture content in order to reduce costs for storing and transporting the sludge as microbial inoculum for anaerobic digester startup. The moisture content of the sludge was reduced from 98.7% to 82.0% via centrifugation and further to 71.5% via vacuum evaporation. The processed sludge was stored for 2 and 4 months and compared with the fresh sludge for the biogas and methane production using food waste and non-fat dry milk as substrates. It was found that fresh unprocessed sludge had the highest methane yield and the yields of both unprocessed and processed sludges decreased during storage by 1-34%, however processed sludges seemed to regain some activity after 4 months of storage as compared to samples stored for only 2 months. Maximum methane production rates obtained from modified Gompertz model application also increased between the 2-month and 4-month processed samples. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. A mouse model of pathological small intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and shedding induced by systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Williams

    2013-11-01

    The gut barrier, composed of a single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs held together by tight junctions, prevents the entrance of harmful microorganisms, antigens and toxins from the gut lumen into the blood. Small intestinal homeostasis is normally maintained by the rate of shedding of senescent enterocytes from the villus tip exactly matching the rate of generation of new cells in the crypt. However, in various localized and systemic inflammatory conditions, intestinal homeostasis can be disturbed as a result of increased IEC shedding. Such pathological IEC shedding can cause transient gaps to develop in the epithelial barrier and result in increased intestinal permeability. Although pathological IEC shedding has been implicated in the pathogenesis of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. We have therefore developed a murine model to study this phenomenon, because IEC shedding in this species is morphologically analogous to humans. IEC shedding was induced by systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration in wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and in mice deficient in TNF-receptor 1 (Tnfr1−/−, Tnfr2 (Tnfr2−/−, nuclear factor kappa B1 (Nfκb1−/− or Nfĸb2 (Nfĸb2−/−. Apoptosis and cell shedding was quantified using immunohistochemistry for active caspase-3, and gut-to-circulation permeability was assessed by measuring plasma fluorescence following fluorescein-isothiocyanate–dextran gavage. LPS, at doses ≥0.125 mg/kg body weight, induced rapid villus IEC apoptosis, with peak cell shedding occurring at 1.5 hours after treatment. This coincided with significant villus shortening, fluid exudation into the gut lumen and diarrhea. A significant increase in gut-to-circulation permeability was observed at 5 hours. TNFR1 was essential for LPS-induced IEC apoptosis and shedding, and the fate of the IECs was also dependent on NFκB, with signaling via NFκB1 favoring cell survival and

  15. The Effects of Small amounts of Methanol on the Ionizing Radiation Induced Polymerization and Photopolymerization of Styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fuh-Wei

    1990-08-01

    The mechanisms whereby ionizing radiation produce the species which initiate neutral free radical and ionic polymerization are investigated. Of particular interest is the remarkable enhancement effect on radiation induced polymerization of styrene by small concentrations of methanol. The approach is to compare the effects of methanol on the steady state polymerization of styrene induced by two different initiation methods: (1) gamma ray; (2) ultraviolet light (UV). In addition to these steady state reaction studies, microsecond pulse radiolysis with 6 MeV electrons is used to study the transient aspects of styrene polymerization and especially, the effect of methanol on the intiation step. The results for photopolymerization initiated with wavelengths above 280 nm, and therefore dominated by free radical polymerization, show that methanol has no sensitizing effect. This leads to eliminate the interaction between methanol and free radical in the initiation stage of a polymerization. By means of studies with different alcohols and an analysis of the dimer and trimer yield, a proton donor mechanism is successfully established for the enhancement effect of methanol on the radiation induced polymerization of styrene. The role of methanol is explained to serve as a rapid proton donor to the anion radical converting the latter to a neutral propagating free radical. The resulting methoxide anion then neutralizes the cation radical converting it to an additional neutral propagating free radical. Trace amounts of methanol (less than 0.05 M) in system with 2-3 mM water is found to have a desensitizing effect because of a quenching influence of methanol on propagating free ionic species; this effect is not observed in the water saturated (35 mM water) system or even at higher concentrations of methanol in the system with 3 mM water. In pulse radiolysis, a quantitative agreement between steady state polymerization and pulse radiolysis is for the first time obtained in the

  16. Barium sulfate aspiration: Severe chemical pneumonia induced by a massive reflux of contrast medium during small bowel barium enema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Xiaowei; Dong, Hongmei; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-08-01

    Barium contrast radiography is a conventional procedure aimed at revealing lesions of the alimentary tract using barium sulfate on X-ray irradiation. Although it is widely used in clinics, adverse effects and complications are observed, such as anaphylaxis, granuloma, fecalithes, abdomen-leaking, embolism, bacterial contamination, and aspiration. We report a case of death due to a massive barium sulfate aspiration resulted from an air-barium double contrast enema radiography. A 25-year-old female patient was hospitalized with symptoms of abdominal distention, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for three days. A progressive respiratory distress presented only 1h after a small bowel air-barium double contrast enema. The patient died 11h later. The result of autopsy revealed the cause of death to be severe chemical pneumonitis induced by gastric fluid which was aspirated into her lungs. Barium sulfate is generally recognized to be chemically inert for the respiratory system, but a mixture of barium sulfate with gastric contents is fatal. Here we intend to suggest that, when determining the potential cause of death, medical examiners should consider a patient's status quo as well as the possible adverse effects and complications caused by the barium sulfate preparation during gastrointestinal radiography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sera from children with autism induce autistic features which can be rescued with a CNTF small peptide mimetic in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazim, Syed Faraz; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria Del Carmen; Arif, Mohammad; Blanchard, Julie; Fayyaz, Fatima; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6), which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism.

  18. Sera from children with autism induce autistic features which can be rescued with a CNTF small peptide mimetic in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Faraz Kazim

    Full Text Available Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6, which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism.

  19. Transcriptional corepressor MTG16 regulates small intestinal crypt proliferation and crypt regeneration after radiation-induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Shenika V; Reddy, Vishruth K; Mittal, Mukul K; Williams, Amanda M; Washington, M Kay; Harris, Elizabeth; Mah, Amanda; Hiebert, Scott W; Singh, Kshipra; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T; Lund, P Kay; Williams, Christopher S

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid translocation genes (MTGs) are transcriptional corepressors implicated in development, malignancy, differentiation, and stem cell function. While MTG16 loss renders mice sensitive to chemical colitis, the role of MTG16 in the small intestine is unknown. Histological examination revealed that Mtg16(-/-) mice have increased enterocyte proliferation and goblet cell deficiency. After exposure to radiation, Mtg16(-/-) mice exhibited increased crypt viability and decreased apoptosis compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Flow cytometric and immunofluorescence analysis of intestinal epithelial cells for phospho-histone H2A.X also indicated decreased DNA damage and apoptosis in Mtg16(-/-) intestines. To determine if Mtg16 deletion affected epithelial cells in a cell-autonomous fashion, intestinal crypts were isolated from Mtg16(-/-) mice. Mtg16(-/-) and WT intestinal crypts showed similar enterosphere forming efficiencies when cultured in the presence of EGF, Noggin, and R-spondin. However, when Mtg16(-/-) crypts were cultured in the presence of Wnt3a, they demonstrated higher enterosphere forming efficiencies and delayed progression to mature enteroids. Mtg16(-/-) intestinal crypts isolated from irradiated mice exhibited increased survival compared with WT intestinal crypts. Interestingly, Mtg16 expression was reduced in a stem cell-enriched population at the time of crypt regeneration. This is consistent with MTG16 negatively regulating regeneration in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that MTG16 loss promotes radioresistance and impacts intestinal stem cell function, possibly due to shifting cellular response away from DNA damage-induced apoptosis and towards DNA repair after injury.

  20. Analysis of sucrose-induced small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans in the presence of different sucrose concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan Shan; Zhu, Wen Hui; Zhi, Qing Hui; Liu, Jia; Wang, Yan; Lin, Huan Cai

    2017-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is the major pathogen contributing to dental caries. Sucrose is an important carbohydrate source for S. mutans and is crucial for dental caries. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are key post-transcriptional regulators of stress adaptation and virulence in bacteria. Here, for the first time, we created three replicate RNA libraries exposed to either 1 or 5% sucrose. The expression levels of sRNAs and target genes (gtfB, gtfC, and spaP) related to virulence were assessed. In addition, some phenotypic traits were evaluated. We obtained 2125 sRNA candidates with at least 100 average reads in 1% sucrose or 5% sucrose. Of these candidates, 2 were upregulated and 20 were downregulated in 1% sucrose. Six of these 22 differentially expressed sRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. The expression level of target gene gtfB was higher in 1% sucrose. The adherence ratio of S. mutans was higher in 1% sucrose than in 5% sucrose. The synthesis of water-insoluble glucans (WIGs) was significantly higher in 5% sucrose than in 1% sucrose. These data suggest that a series of sRNAs can be induced in response to sucrose, and that some sRNAs might be involved in the regulation of phenotypes, providing new insight into the prevention of caries.

  1. Shear- and magnetic-field-induced ordering in magnetic nanoparticle dispersion from small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, V.V.; Bhandar, A.S.; Piao, M.; Zoto, I.; Lane, A.M.; Nikles, D.E.; Wiest, J.M.; Mankey, G.J.; Porcar, L.; Glinka, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments have been performed to investigate orientational ordering of a dispersion of rod-shaped ferromagnetic nanoparticles under the influence of shear flow and static magnetic field. In this experiment, the flow and flow gradient directions are perpendicular to the direction of the applied magnetic field. The scattering intensity is isotropic in zero-shear-rate or zero-applied-field conditions, indicating that the particles are randomly oriented. Anisotropic scattering is observed both in a shear flow and in a static magnetic field, showing that both flow and field induce orientational order in the dispersion. The anisotropy increases with the increase of field and with the increase of shear rate. Three states of order have been observed with the application of both shear flow and magnetic field. At low shear rates, the particles are aligned in the field direction. When increasing shear rate is applied, the particles revert to random orientations at a characteristic shear rate that depends on the strength of the applied magnetic field. Above the characteristic shear rate, the particles align along the flow direction. The experimental results agree qualitatively with the predictions of a mean field model

  2. AG311, a small molecule inhibitor of complex I and hypoxia-induced HIF-1α stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Anja; Matsuzaki, Satoshi; Humphries, Kenneth M; Pharaoh, Gavin A; Doshi, Arpit; Zaware, Nilesh; Gangjee, Aleem; Ihnat, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    Cancer cells have a unique metabolic profile and mitochondria have been shown to play an important role in chemoresistance, tumor progression and metastases. This unique profile can be exploited by mitochondrial-targeted anticancer therapies. A small anticancer molecule, AG311, was previously shown to possess anticancer and antimetastatic activity in two cancer mouse models and to induce mitochondrial depolarization. This study defines the molecular effects of AG311 on the mitochondria to elucidate its observed efficacy. AG311 was found to competitively inhibit complex I activity at the ubiquinone-binding site. Complex I as a target for AG311 was further established by measuring oxygen consumption rate in tumor tissue isolated from AG311-treated mice. Cotreatment of cells and animals with AG311 and dichloroacetate, a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor that increases oxidative metabolism, resulted in synergistic cell kill and reduced tumor growth. The inhibition of mitochondrial oxygen consumption by AG311 was found to reduce HIF-1α stabilization by increasing oxygen tension in hypoxic conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that AG311 at least partially mediates its antitumor effect through inhibition of complex I, which could be exploited in its use as an anticancer agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Induced-Decay of Glycine Decarboxylase Transcripts as an Anticancer Therapeutic Strategy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-renewing tumor-initiating cells (TICs are thought to be responsible for tumor recurrence and chemo-resistance. Glycine decarboxylase, encoded by the GLDC gene, is reported to be overexpressed in TIC-enriched primary non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. GLDC is a component of the mitochondrial glycine cleavage system, and its high expression is required for growth and tumorigenic capacity. Currently, there are no therapeutic agents against GLDC. As a therapeutic strategy, we have designed and tested splicing-modulating steric hindrance antisense oligonucleotides (shAONs that efficiently induce exon skipping (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] at 3.5–7 nM, disrupt the open reading frame (ORF of GLDC transcript (predisposing it for nonsense-mediated decay, halt cell proliferation, and prevent colony formation in both A549 cells and TIC-enriched NSCLC tumor sphere cells (TS32. One candidate shAON causes 60% inhibition of tumor growth in mice transplanted with TS32. Thus, our shAONs candidates can effectively inhibit the expression of NSCLC-associated metabolic enzyme GLDC and may have promising therapeutic implications.

  4. Shear- and magnetic-field-induced ordering in magnetic nanoparticle dispersion from small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, V V; Bhandar, A S; Piao, M; Zoto, I; Lane, A M; Nikles, D E; Wiest, J M; Mankey, G J; Porcar, L; Glinka, C J

    2003-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments have been performed to investigate orientational ordering of a dispersion of rod-shaped ferromagnetic nanoparticles under the influence of shear flow and static magnetic field. In this experiment, the flow and flow gradient directions are perpendicular to the direction of the applied magnetic field. The scattering intensity is isotropic in zero-shear-rate or zero-applied-field conditions, indicating that the particles are randomly oriented. Anisotropic scattering is observed both in a shear flow and in a static magnetic field, showing that both flow and field induce orientational order in the dispersion. The anisotropy increases with the increase of field and with the increase of shear rate. Three states of order have been observed with the application of both shear flow and magnetic field. At low shear rates, the particles are aligned in the field direction. When increasing shear rate is applied, the particles revert to random orientations at a characteristic shear rate that depends on the strength of the applied magnetic field. Above the characteristic shear rate, the particles align along the flow direction. The experimental results agree qualitatively with the predictions of a mean field model.

  5. The Nutrient Stress-induced Small GTPase Rab5 Contributes to the Activation of Vesicle Trafficking and Vacuolar Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kanada, Akira; Matsuzaki, Mariko; Byrne, Stuart D.; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2014-01-01

    Rab family small GTPases regulate membrane trafficking by spatiotemporal recruitment of various effectors. However, it remains largely unclear how the expression and functions of Rab proteins are regulated in response to extracellular or intracellular stimuli. Here we show that Ypt53, one isoform of Rab5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is up-regulated significantly under nutrient stress. Under non-stress conditions, Vps21, a constitutively expressed Rab5 isoform, is crucial to Golgi-vacuole trafficking and to vacuolar hydrolase activity. However, when cells are exposed to nutrient stress for an extended period of time, the up-regulated Ypt53 and the constitutive Vps21 function redundantly to maintain these activities, which, in turn, prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and maintain mitochondrial respiration. Together, our results clarify the relative roles of these constitutive and nutrient stress-inducible Rab5 proteins that ensure adaptable vesicle trafficking and vacuolar hydrolase activity, thereby allowing cells to adapt to environmental changes. PMID:24923442

  6. Cardenolide-Induced Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization Demonstrates Therapeutic Benefits in Experimental Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mijatovic

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs are the leading cause of cancer deaths in most developed countries. Targeting heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 expression and function, together with the induction of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP, could overcome the multiple anti-cell death mechanisms evidenced in NSCLCs that are responsible for the failure of currently used chemotherapeutic drugs. Because cardenolides bind to the sodium pump, they affect multiple signaling pathways and thus have a number of marked effects on tumor cell behavior. The aim of the present study was to characterize in vitro and in vivo the antitumor effects of a new cardenolide (UNBS1450 on experimental human NSCLCs. UNBS1450 is a potent source of in vivo antitumor activity in the case of paclitaxeland oxaliplatin-resistant subcutaneous human NCIH727 and orthotopic A549 xenografts in nude mice. In vitro UNBS1450-mediated antitumor activity results from the induction of nonapoptotic cell death. UNBS1450 mediates the decrease of Hsp70 at both mRNA and protein levels, and this is at least partly due to UNBS1450-induced downregulation of NFAT5/ TonEBP (a factor responsible for the transcriptional control of Hsp70. These effects were paralleled by the induction of LMP, as evidenced by acridine orange staining and immunofluorescence analysis for cathepsin B accumulation.

  7. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, A S; Dhagat, N N

    2001-04-01

    means that a sudden increase in the easily degradable organics will result in increased acid production with subsequent accumulation of acids. This inhibits the methanogenesis step. Acclimatization of the microorganisms to a substrate has been reported to take more than five weeks. Sufficiently acclimated bacteria have shown greater stability towards stress-inducing events such as hydraulic overloads, fluctuations in temperature, fluctuations in volatile acid and ammonia concentrations etc. Several environmental factors can affect anaerobic digestion, by altering the parameters such as specific growth rate, decay rate, gas production, substrate utilization, start-up and response to changes in input. It has long been recognized that an anaerobic process is in many ways ideal for wastewater treatment and has following merits: A high degree of waste stabilization A low production of excess A low nutrient requirements No oxygen requirement Production of methane gas Anaerobic microorganisms, especially methanogens have a slow growth rate. At lower HRTs, the possibility of washout of biomass is more prominent. This makes it difficult to maintain the effective number of useful microorganisms in the system. To maintain the population of anaerobes, large reactor volumes or higher HRTs are required. This may ultimately provide longer SRTs upto 20 days for high rate systems. Thus, provision of larger reactor volumes or higher HRTs ultimately lead to higher capital cost. Among notable disadvantages, it has low synthesis/reaction rate hence long start up periods and difficulty in recovery from upset conditions. Special attention is, therefore, warranted towards, controlling the factors that affect process adversely; important among them being environmental factors such as temperature, pH and concentration of toxic substances. The conventional anaerobic treatment process consists of a reactor containing waste and biological solids (bacteria) responsible for the digestion process

  8. Method for anaerobic fermentation and biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for biomass processing, anaerobic fermentation of the processed biomass, and the production biogas. In particular, the invention relates to a system and method for generating biogas from anaerobic fermentation of processed organic material that comprises...

  9. Integrated anaerobic and aerobic treatment of sewage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, K.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes results of investigations dealing with sequential concept of anaerobic-aerobic treatment of municipal wastewater. The main purposes of the study were 1) to develop a proper anaerobic hydrolytic pretreatment unit, consisting of a Hydrolysis Upflow Sludge Bed (HUSB-)

  10. Anaerobic induction in B. cereus ATCC 14579

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.; Abee, Tjakko

    2008-01-01

    A comparative transcriptome approach was used to assess genes involved in metabolism and pathogenesis that are specifically activated during anaerobic growth of the spore-forming food-borne human pathogen Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. Growth under anaerobic conditions in Brain Heart Infusion broth

  11. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2003-01-01

    The long retention time of the active biomass in the high-rate anaerobic digesters is the key factor for the successful application of the high rate anaerobic wastewater treatment. The long solids retention time is achieved due to the specific reactor configuration and it is enhanced by the immob......The long retention time of the active biomass in the high-rate anaerobic digesters is the key factor for the successful application of the high rate anaerobic wastewater treatment. The long solids retention time is achieved due to the specific reactor configuration and it is enhanced...... by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change...

  12. Consequences of chemoresistance for the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir-induced bystander effect in a human small cell lung cancer cell line model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dillen, IJ; Mulder, NH; Sluiter, WJ; Meijer, C; De Jong, S; Loncarek, J; Mesnil, M; De Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W; Hospers, GAP

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influence of chemoresistance on the herpes simplex virus (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV)-induced bystander effect (BE), as studied in a human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line (GLC(4)) and its sublines with in vitro acquired resistance to adriamycin (GLC(4)/ADR),

  13. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies of metastable intermediates of beta-lactoglobulin isolated after heat-induced aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrotta, R.; Arleth, L.; Pedersen, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering was used for studying intermediate species, isolated after heat-induced aggregation of the A variant of bovine P-lactoglobulin. The intermediates were separated in two fractions, the heated metastable dimer and heated metastable oligomers larger than the dimer. The pa...

  14. Cathepsin B mediates caspase-independent cell death induced by microtubule stabilizing agents in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broker, L.E.; Huisman, C.; Span, SW; Rodriguez, J.A.; Kruyt, F.A.E.; Giaccone, G.

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that the microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs) paclitaxel, epothilone B and discodermolide induce caspase-independent cell death in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Here we present two lines of evidence indicating a central role for the lysosomal protease

  15. Effects of retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors activations and ionizing radiation cotreatment on cytotoxicity against human non-small cell lung cancer in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Hironori; Iwabuchi, Miyu; Kazama, Yuka; Furukawa, Maho; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2018-04-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and induce antiviral immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that RLR activation induces antitumor immunity and cytotoxicity against different types of cancer, including lung cancer. However a previous report has demonstrated that ionizing radiation exerts a limited effect on RLR in human monocytic cell-derived macrophages, suggesting that RLR agonists may be used as effective immunostimulants during radiation therapy. However, it is unclear whether ionizing radiation affects the cytotoxicity of RLR agonists against cancer cells. Therefore, in the present study the effects of cotreatment with ionizing radiation and RLR agonists on cytotoxicity against human non-small cell lung cancer cells A549 and H1299 was investigated. Treatment with RLR agonist poly(I:C)/LyoVec™ [poly(I:C)] exerted cytotoxic effects against human non-small cell lung cancer. The cytotoxic effects of poly(I:C) were enhanced by cotreatment with ionizing radiation, and poly(I:C) pretreatment resulted in the radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer. Furthermore, cotreatment of A549 and H1299 cells with poly(I:C) and ionizing radiation effectively induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner compared with treatment with poly(I:C) or ionizing radiation alone. These results indicate that RLR agonists and ionizing radiation cotreatment effectively exert cytotoxic effects against human non-small cell lung cancer through caspase-mediated apoptosis.

  16. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity

  17. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang, E-mail: lvguoqiangwuxivip@163.com

    2015-08-07

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity.

  18. Expansion due to the anaerobic corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.; Fennell, P.A.H.

    2006-12-01

    , three cells were set up: two contained alternate carbon steel and copper discs, and the third, a control cell, consisted of alternate stainless steel and copper discs. A slight contraction of the control cell was observed but no expansion was measured in the carbon steel-copper cells. Analytical measurements showed that the corrosion products were magnetite and hydrogen, indicating that anaerobic corrosion was occurring. In a second series of experiments, one experiment was carried out in which carbon steel was replaced with cast iron and in a further experiment air was allowed to enter the test chamber. No expansion was detected in either of these additional experiments. However, expansion was detected when a separate stack of copper and steel washers was corroded in ambient atmospheric conditions under very small compressive loads, and subjected to a wet-dry cycle, demonstrating that the experimental technique was capable of detecting corrosion-induced expansion if it were occurring. In parallel with the stress cell experiments, coupons of mild steel and cast iron were corroded in anoxic, artificial groundwater at 50 deg C and 80 deg C for several months. The coupons were examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the mechanical properties and the structure of the corrosion product films, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify the chemical composition of the film. The report presents Young's modulus, thickness and hardness data for the oxides, which were much more compliant than the magnetite films formed at high temperatures, probably because of their high water content. The report considers the application of the results to assessing the performance of the SKB canister in a repository situation

  19. Expansion due to the anaerobic corrosion of iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.; Fennell, P.A.H. [Serco Assurance, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    . Initially, three cells were set up: two contained alternate carbon steel and copper discs, and the third, a control cell, consisted of alternate stainless steel and copper discs. A slight contraction of the control cell was observed but no expansion was measured in the carbon steel-copper cells. Analytical measurements showed that the corrosion products were magnetite and hydrogen, indicating that anaerobic corrosion was occurring. In a second series of experiments, one experiment was carried out in which carbon steel was replaced with cast iron and in a further experiment air was allowed to enter the test chamber. No expansion was detected in either of these additional experiments. However, expansion was detected when a separate stack of copper and steel washers was corroded in ambient atmospheric conditions under very small compressive loads, and subjected to a wet-dry cycle, demonstrating that the experimental technique was capable of detecting corrosion-induced expansion if it were occurring. In parallel with the stress cell experiments, coupons of mild steel and cast iron were corroded in anoxic, artificial groundwater at 50 deg C and 80 deg C for several months. The coupons were examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the mechanical properties and the structure of the corrosion product films, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify the chemical composition of the film. The report presents Young's modulus, thickness and hardness data for the oxides, which were much more compliant than the magnetite films formed at high temperatures, probably because of their high water content. The report considers the application of the results to assessing the performance of the SKB canister in a repository situation.

  20. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    The report describes the work of a two year programme investigating the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel embedded in a range of candidate repository cements and concretes at laboratory temperatures. The factors investigated in the study were the rate of the anaerobic corrosion reaction, the effect of hydrogen overpressure on the reaction rate and the form of the corrosion product. Both electrochemical and sample weight loss corrosion rate measurements were used. The cements and concretes used were prepared both with and without small additions of chloride (2% by weight of mix water). The results indicate that the corrosion rate is low, < 1 μm/year, the effect of hydrogen overpressure is not significant over the range of pressures investigated, 1-100 atmospheres, and that the corrosion product is dependent on the cement used to cast the samples. Magnetite was identified in the case of blast furnace slag replacement cements but for pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cements no corrosion product was evident either from X-ray diffraction or laser Raman measurements. Further work is presently underway to investigate the effects of elevated temperatures and chloride levels on the anaerobic corrosion reaction and the rate of hydrogen gas production. (author)

  1. Polysaccharides derived from Ganoderma lucidum fungus mycelia ameliorate indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury via induction of GM-CSF from macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Kenta; Ueno, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi, Ryohei; Shinagawa, Kei; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2017-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs often cause ulcers in the human small intestine, but few effective agents exist to treat such injury. Ganoderma lucidum Karst, also known as "Reishi" or "Lingzhi", is a mushroom. We previously reported that a water-soluble extract from G. lucidum fungus mycelia (MAK) has anti-inflammatory effects in murine colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, and induction of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by MAK may provide anti-inflammatory effects. However, its effects on indomethacin-induced small intestinal injuries are unknown. The present study investigated the preventative effects of MAK via immunological function and the polysaccharides from MAK on indomethacin-induced ileitis in mice. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs) were stimulated in vitro with MAK and adoptively transferred to C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally, which were then given indomethacin. Intestinal inflammation was evaluated after 24h. We performed in vivo antibody blockade to investigate the preventive role of GM-CSF, which derived from PMs stimulated with MAK. We then used PMs stimulated with MAK pre-treated by pectinase in an adoptive transfer assay to determine the preventive role of polysaccharides. Indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury was inhibited by adoptive transfer of PMs stimulated in vitro with MAK. In this transfer model, pre-treatment with anti-GM-CSF antibody but not with control antibody reversed the improvement of small intestinal inflammation by indomethacin. Pectinase pretreatment impaired the anti-inflammatory effect of MAK. PMs stimulated by MAK appear to contribute to the anti-inflammatory response through GM-CSF in small intestinal injury induced by indomethacin. The polysaccharides may be the components that elicit the anti-inflammatory effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Distinct TrkA and Ret modulated negative and positive neuropathic behaviors in a mouse model of resiniferatoxin-induced small fiber neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Kan, Hung-Wei; Chiang, Hao; Lee, Yi-Chen; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2018-02-01

    Neurotrophic factors and their corresponding receptors play key roles in the maintenance of different phenotypic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, the axons of which degenerate in small fiber neuropathy, leading to various neuropathic manifestations. Mechanisms underlying positive and negative symptoms of small fiber neuropathy have not been systematically explored. This study investigated the molecular basis of these seemingly paradoxical neuropathic behaviors according to the profiles of TrkA and Ret with immunohistochemical and pharmacological interventions in a mouse model of resiniferatoxin (RTX)-induced small fiber neuropathy. Mice with RTX neuropathy exhibited thermal hypoalgesia and mechanical allodynia, reduced skin innervation, and altered DRG expression profiles with decreased TrkA(+) neurons and increased Ret(+) neurons. RTX neuropathy induced the expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), and ATF3(+) neurons were colocalized with Ret but not with TrkA (P<0.001). As a neuroprotectant, 4-Methylcatechol (4MC) promoted skin reinnervation partially with correlated reversal of the neuropathic behaviors and altered neurochemical expression. Gambogic amide, a selective TrkA agonist, normalized thermal hypoalgesia, and GW441756, a TrkA kinase inhibitor, induced thermal hypoalgesia, which was already reversed by 4MC. Mechanical allodynia was reversed by a Ret kinase inhibitor, AST487, which induced thermal hyperalgesia in naïve mice. The activation of Ret signaling by XIB4035 induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia in RTX neuropathy mice in which the neuropathic behaviors were previously normalized by 4MC. Distinct neurotrophic factor receptors, TrkA and Ret, accounted for negative and positive neuropathic behaviors in RTX-induced small fiber neuropathy, respectively: TrkA for thermal hypoalgesia and Ret for mechanical allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Persistence of smoking-induced dysregulation of miRNA expression in the small airway epithelium despite smoking cessation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Wang

    Full Text Available Even after quitting smoking, the risk of the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer remains significantly higher compared to healthy nonsmokers. Based on the knowledge that COPD and most lung cancers start in the small airway epithelium (SAE, we hypothesized that smoking modulates miRNA expression in the SAE linked to the pathogenesis of smoking-induced airway disease, and that some of these changes persist after smoking cessation. SAE was collected from 10th to 12th order bronchi using fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Affymetrix miRNA 2.0 arrays were used to assess miRNA expression in the SAE from 9 healthy nonsmokers and 10 healthy smokers, before and after they quit smoking for 3 months. Smoking status was determined by urine nicotine and cotinine measurement. There were significant differences in the expression of 34 miRNAs between healthy smokers and healthy nonsmokers (p1.5, with functions associated with lung development, airway epithelium differentiation, inflammation and cancer. After quitting smoking for 3 months, 12 out of the 34 miRNAs did not return to normal levels, with Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway being the top identified enriched pathway of the target genes of the persistent dysregulated miRNAs. In the context that many of these persistent smoking-dependent miRNAs are associated with differentiation, inflammatory diseases or lung cancer, it is likely that persistent smoking-related changes in SAE miRNAs play a role in the subsequent development of these disorders.

  4. Computerized detection and analysis of cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis in a small animal model, musk shrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong; Meyers, Kelly; Henry, Séverine; De la Torre, Fernando; Horn, Charles C

    2011-04-30

    Vomiting is a common side effect of cancer chemotherapy and many drug treatments and diseases. In animal studies, the measurement of vomiting usually requires direct observation, which is time consuming and often lacks temporal precision. Musk shrews have been used to study the neurobiology of emesis and have a rapid emetic episode (∼1 s for a sequence of retching and expulsion). The aim of the current study was to develop a method to automatically detect and characterize emetic episodes induced by the cancer chemotherapy agent cisplatin. The body contour in each video frame was tracked and normalized to a parameterized shape basis. The tracked shape was projected to a feature space that maximized the shape variations in the consecutive frames during retching. The resulting one dimensional projection was sufficient to detect most emetic episodes in the acute (peak at 2h) and delayed (peak at 54 h) phases after cisplatin treatment. Emetic episodes were relatively invariant in the number of retches (∼6.2), duration (∼1.2s), inter-retch interval (∼198 ms), and amplitude during the 72 h after cisplatin treatment. This approach should open a new vista into emesis research to permit tracking and analysis of emesis in a small animal model and facilitate the development of new antiemetic therapies. These results also yield a better understanding of the brain's central pattern generator for emesis and indicate that the retching response in the musk shrew (at ∼5.4 Hz) is the fastest ever recorded in a free-moving animal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Persistence of Smoking-Induced Dysregulation of MiRNA Expression in the Small Airway Epithelium Despite Smoking Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Staudt, Michelle R.; Ahmed, Joumana; Tilley, Ann E.; Yee-Levin, Jenny; Hollmann, Charleen; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Kaner, Robert J.; Mezey, Jason G.; Sridhar, Sriram; Pillai, Sreekumar G.; Hilton, Holly; Wolff, Gerhard; Bitter, Hans; Visvanathan, Sudha; Fine, Jay S.; Stevenson, Christopher S.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    Even after quitting smoking, the risk of the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer remains significantly higher compared to healthy nonsmokers. Based on the knowledge that COPD and most lung cancers start in the small airway epithelium (SAE), we hypothesized that smoking modulates miRNA expression in the SAE linked to the pathogenesis of smoking-induced airway disease, and that some of these changes persist after smoking cessation. SAE was collected from 10th to 12th order bronchi using fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Affymetrix miRNA 2.0 arrays were used to assess miRNA expression in the SAE from 9 healthy nonsmokers and 10 healthy smokers, before and after they quit smoking for 3 months. Smoking status was determined by urine nicotine and cotinine measurement. There were significant differences in the expression of 34 miRNAs between healthy smokers and healthy nonsmokers (p1.5), with functions associated with lung development, airway epithelium differentiation, inflammation and cancer. After quitting smoking for 3 months, 12 out of the 34 miRNAs did not return to normal levels, with Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway being the top identified enriched pathway of the target genes of the persistent dysregulated miRNAs. In the context that many of these persistent smoking-dependent miRNAs are associated with differentiation, inflammatory diseases or lung cancer, it is likely that persistent smoking-related changes in SAE miRNAs play a role in the subsequent development of these disorders. PMID:25886353

  6. The small molecule, LLL12, inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and induces apoptosis in medulloblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Ball

    Full Text Available Tumors of the central nervous system represent a major source of cancer-related deaths, with medulloblastoma and glioblastoma being the most common malignant brain tumors in children and adults respectively. While significant advances in treatment have been made, with the 5-year survival rate for medulloblastoma at 70-80%, treating patients under 3 years of age still poses a problem due to the deleterious effects of radiation on the developing brain, and the median survival for patients with glioblastoma is only 15 months. The transcription factor, STAT3, has been found constitutively activated in a wide variety of cancers and in recent years it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LLL12, using structure-based design. LLL12 was able to inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation, decrease cell viability and induce apoptosis in medulloblastoma and glioblastoma cell lines with elevated levels of p-STAT3 (Y705. IC(50 values for LLL12 were found to be between 1.07 µM and 5.98 µM in the five cell lines expressing phosphorylated STAT3. STAT3 target genes were found to be downregulated and a decrease in STAT3 DNA binding was observed following LLL12 treatment, indicating that LLL12 is an effective STAT3 inhibitor. LLL12 was also able to inhibit colony formation, wound healing and decreased IL-6 and LIF secretion. Our results suggest that LLL12 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and that it may be a potential therapeutic treatment for medulloblastoma and glioblastoma.

  7. Abdominal γ-Radiation Induces an Accumulation of Function-Impaired Regulatory T Cells in the Small Intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billiard, Fabienne; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Linard, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and the functional characteristics of one major component of immune tolerance, the CD4 + FoxP3 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) in a mouse model of abdominal irradiation. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to a single abdominal dose of γ-radiation (10 Gy). We evaluated small intestine Treg infiltration by Foxp3 immunostaining and the functional suppressive activity of Tregs isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes. Results: Foxp3 immunostaining showed that radiation induced a long-term infiltration of the intestine by Tregs (levels 5.5 times greater than in controls). Co-culture of Tregs from mesenteric lymph nodes with CD4 + effector cells showed that the Tregs had lost their suppressive function. This loss was associated with a significant decrease in the levels of Foxp3, TGF-β, and CTLA-4 mRNA, all required for optimal Treg function. At Day 90 after irradiation, Tregs regained their suppressive activity as forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression returned to normal. Analysis of the secretory function of mesenteric lymph node Tregs, activated in vitro with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 Abs, showed that this dysfunction was independent of a defect in interleukin-10 secretion. Conclusion: Radiation caused a long-term accumulation of function-impaired Foxp3 + CD4 + Tregs in the intestine. Our study provides new insights into how radiation affects the immune tolerance in peripheral tissues.

  8. Adenovirus-Mediated Small Interfering RNA Targeting TAK1 Ameliorates Joint Inflammation with Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xinjing; Chen, Yongfeng; Lv, Guoju; Zhou, Zhidong; Chen, Jie; Mo, Xuanrong; Xie, Jiangwen

    2017-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1) is a key upstream kinase in cell signaling during inflammation, which regulates the expression of inflammatory mediators. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) against TAK1 offers promise as a potential therapeutic strategy in immune-mediated inflammatory disorder including rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we are to evaluate the therapeutic effects of intra-articular administration of adenoviral-mediated siRNA against TAK1 (ad-siRNA-TAK1) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. Ad-siRNA-TAK1 was constructed. The murine RAW 264.7 macrophages were infected with ad-siRNA-TAK1, and the silencing specificity of TAK1 was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot. DBA/1 mice were injected intra-articularly with ad-siRNA-TAK1. Development and severity of arthritis was assessed histologically. Synovial inflammation and bone destruction were determined by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Articular and serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6 were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Levels of phosphorylated p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were detected by western blot. In vitro, ad--siRNA-TAK1 efficiently inhibited the expression of TAK1 at both mRNA and protein levels. In vivo, intra-articular injection of ad-siRNA-TAK1 efficiently alleviated joint inflammation, decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, and suppressed JNK pathways. Our results demonstrate the efficiency of ad--siRNA-TAK1 in controlling joint inflammation of CIA, which is associated with the suppression of the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and JNK activation.

  9. ANAEROBIC ENDOGENOUS METABOLISM IN STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WALKER, D J; FORREST, W W

    1964-02-01

    Walker, D. J. (CSIRO, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia), and W. W. Forrest. Endogenous metabolism in Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 87:256-262. 1964.-Washed suspensions of Streptococcus faecalis incubated in phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) under anaerobic conditions released amino acids into the suspending medium. Little or no carbohydrate was released in soluble form, and no acid production could be detected. Cell lipid was stable, and only a small amount of nucleotide (material absorbing at 260 mmu) was released. Estimates of total carbon produced in soluble form showed that this could be almost entirely accounted for as amino acid. Over the short period during which amino acid was produced (up to 5 hr), the glycolytic activity of the cells remained fairly constant, and fell slowly thereafter to low values in 24 to 48 hr; the rate of fall depended on cell concentration. Whereas exogenous sources of energy protected against loss of glycolytic activity, arsenate, hydroxylamine, or replacement of phosphate by other buffers accelerated loss of glycolytic activity. Restoration of glycolytic activity in aged cells could be achieved by incubation with amino acids plus an energy source, with concurrent synthesis of protein but no apparent growth. Ammonium ion was not effective in protecting or restoring glycolytic activity. The nature of changes which took place during endogenous metabolism are discussed.

  10. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes: laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1984-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 10 references, 17 figures, 4 tables

  11. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor in pilot scale for treatment of tofu industry wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, Suparni Setyowati; Purwanto, Budiyono

    2015-12-01

    The small industry of tofu production process releases the waste water without being processed first, and the wastewater is directly discharged into water. In this study, Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor in Pilot Scale for Treatment of Tofu Industry was developed through an anaerobic process to produce biogas as one kind of environmentally friendly renewable energy which can be developed into the countryside. The purpose of this study was to examine the fundamental characteristics of organic matter elimination of industrial wastewater with small tofu effective method and utilize anaerobic active sludge with Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR) to get rural biogas as an energy source. The first factor is the amount of the active sludge concentration which functions as the decomposers of organic matter and controlling selectivity allowance to degrade organic matter. The second factor is that HRT is the average period required substrate to react with the bacteria in the Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR).The results of processing the waste of tofu production industry using ASBR reactor with active sludge additions as starter generates cumulative volume of 5814.4 mL at HRT 5 days so that in this study it is obtained the conversion 0.16 L of CH4/g COD and produce biogas containing of CH4: 81.23% and CO2: 16.12%. The wastewater treatment of tofu production using ASBR reactor is able to produce renewable energy that has economic value as well as environmentally friendly by nature.

  12. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to “slow rhythm music”, “fast rhythm music” or “no music”. 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  13. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülin Atan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to “slow rhythm music”, “fast rhythm music” or “no music”. 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p>0.05. On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise.

  14. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible for these ......Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible...... and malfunctions of anaerobic digesters occasionally experienced, leading to sub-optimal methane production and wastewater treatment. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we are able to determine which microorganisms are active, where they are active, and when they are active, but we still need to determine...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  15. Anaerobic co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells and anaerobic pathogens - a new in vitro model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Kriebel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established a model system with oral pathogenic bacterial species and eukaryotic cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. The facultative anaerobe bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were studied. Their effects on hMSCs and primary as well as permanent gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22, HGPEC were comparatively analyzed. We show that hMSCs cope with anoxic conditions, since 40% vital cells remain after 72 h of anaerobic culture. The Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells are significantly more sensitive to lack of oxygen. All bacterial species reveal a comparatively low adherence to and internalization into hMSCs (0.2% and 0.01% of the initial inoculum, respectively. In comparison, the Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells present better targets for bacterial adherence and internalization. The production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8 is higher in both gingival epithelial cell lines compared to hMSCs and Fusobacterium nucleatum induce a time-dependent cytokine secretion in both cell lines. Porphyromonas gingivalis is less effective in stimulating secretion of IL-8 in the co-cultivation experiments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HMSCs are suitable for use in anoxic regions of the oral cavity. The interaction with local pathogenic bacteria does not result in massive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. The test system established in this study allowed further investigation of parameters prior to set up of

  16. Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for treatment of composite fermentation and distillation wastewater. ... Keywords: Composite wastewater, up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic biological treatment, biogas, granulated anaerobic sludge, industrial wastewater. African Journal of ...

  17. A simple anaerobic system for onsite treatment of domestic wastewater

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among several anaerobic treatment processes, high rate anaerobic digesters receive great attention due to its high loading capacity and chemical oxygen demand removal rate. Up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) is getting wide acceptance among several anaerobic processes. However, its application is still ...

  18. Punica granatum (pomegranate) leaves extract induces apoptosis through mitochondrial intrinsic pathway and inhibits migration and invasion in non-small cell lung cancer in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yali; Yang, Fangfang; Zheng, Weidong; Hu, Mingxing; Wang, Juanxiu; Ma, Sisi; Deng, Yuanle; Luo, Yi; Ye, Tinghong; Yin, Wenya

    2016-05-01

    Most conventional treatments on non-small cell lung carcinoma always accompany with awful side effects, and the incidence and mortality rates of this cancer are increasing rapidly worldwide. The objective of this study was to examine the anticancer effects of extract of Punica granatum (pomegranate) leaves extract (PLE) on the non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line A549, H1299 and mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cell line LL/2 in vitro, and explore its mechanisms of action. Our results have shown that PLE inhibited cell proliferation in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry (FCM) assay showed that PLE affected H1299 cell survival by arresting cell cycle progression in G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner and inducing apoptosis. Moreover, PLE could also decrease the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔYm), indicating that PLE may induce apoptosis via mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, PLE blocked H1299 cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed in vitro. These results suggested that PLE could be an effective and safe chemotherapeutic agent in non-small cell lung carcinoma treatment by inhibiting proliferation, inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and impairing cell migration and invasion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. RX-207, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of Protein Interaction with Glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), Reduces Experimentally Induced Inflammation and Increases Survival Rate in Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP)-Induced Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Stefan; Harris, Nicholas; Il'kova, Gabriela; Rehák, Pavol; Zsila, Ferenc; Yurgenzon Kogan, Faina; Lahmy, Orly; Zhuk, Regina; Gregor, Paul; Koppel, Juraj

    2018-02-01

    The fused quinazolinone derivative, RX-207, is chemically and functionally related to small molecule inhibitors of protein binding to glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs). Composed of a planar aromatic amine scaffold, it inhibits protein binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). RX-207 reduced neutrophil migration in thioglycollate-induced peritonitis (37%), inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema (32%) and cerulein-induced pancreatitis (28%), and increased animal survival in the mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis (60%). The mechanism of RX-207 action, analyzed by UV spectroscopy, confirmed that which was elucidated for chemically related anti-inflammatory SMIGs. RX-207 binding to cell surface GAGs can account for the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment via the micro-vasculature and as a consequence, the reduction of neutrophil mediated tissue damage in the animal models of inflammation and improved survival of mice in CLP-induced sepsis.

  20. Curcumin inhibits interferon-α induced NF-κB and COX-2 in human A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeeyun; Im, Young-Hyuck; Jung, Hae Hyun; Kim, Joo Hyun; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Kihyun; Kim, Won Seog; Ahn, Jin Seok; Jung, Chul Won; Park, Young Suk; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Keunchil

    2005-01-01

    The A549 cells, non-small cell lung cancer cell line from human, were resistant to interferon (IFN)-α treatment. The IFN-α-treated A549 cells showed increase in protein expression levels of NF-κB and COX-2. IFN-α induced NF-κB binding activity within 30 min and this increased binding activity was markedly suppressed with inclusion of curcumin. Curcumin also inhibited IFN-α-induced COX-2 expression in A549 cells. Within 10 min, IFN-α rapidly induced the binding activity of a γ- 32 P-labeled consensus GAS oligonucleotide probe, which was profoundly reversed by curcumin. Taken together, IFN-α-induced activations of NF-κB and COX-2 were inhibited by the addition of curcumin in A549 cells

  1. Defect-induced Au precipitation in Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Langelaan, G.; Brück, E.; Zwaag, S. van der; Dijk, N.H. van

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale Au precipitation in high-purity Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys has been studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering during isothermal aging at 550 °C and complementary ex situ transmission electron microscopy. The high temperature precipitation behavior in samples having received different degrees of cold deformation has been studied to explore the potential self-healing of deformation-induced defects by Au precipitation. It is found that dislocations induced by prior plastic deformation strongly facilitate the formation of Au precipitates, as no significant precipitation is observed for undeformed samples. Defect-induced Au precipitates are formed both at dislocations and along grain boundaries where the defect density is high. The fact that the Au atoms only precipitate on deformation-induced defects demonstrates that solute gold atoms act as efficient self-healing agents in the ferrous matrix. The addition of B and N is found to retard the Au precipitation

  2. ISOLATION OF OBLIGATELY ANAEROBIC PSYCHROPHILIC BACTERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SINCLAIR, N A; STOKES, J L

    1964-03-01

    Sinclair, N. A. (Washington State University, Pullman), and J. L. Stokes. Isolation of obligately anaerobic psychrophilic bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:562-565. 1964.-A total of 11 strains of strictly anaerobic psychrophilic bacteria have been isolated from soil, mud, and sewage. The organisms grow well at 0 C in liquid and on solid media, and grow only in the complete absence of oxygen. On the basis of shape, sporulation, flagellation, and strictly anaerobic growth, all of the organisms were classified as strains of Clostridium. Some of the biochemical properties of the strains and the effect of temperature on growth are described.

  3. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Tirsgård, Bjørn; Cordero, Gerardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: (1) gait transition from steady...... to unsteady (i.e., burst-assisted) swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); (2) variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; U crit) correlates with metabolic scope (MS) or anaerobic capacity (i.e., maximum EPOC); (3...

  4. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) found in wastewater is removed in the wastewater treatment facilities by sorption and aerobic biodegradation. The anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has not been shown to contribute to the removal. The concentration of LAS based on dry matter typically...... increases during anaerobic stabilization due to transformation of easily degradable organic matter. Hence, LAS is regarded as resistant to biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. We present data from a lab-scale semi-continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) spiked with linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C...

  5. Accelerated anaerobic hydrolysis rates under a combination of intermittent aeration and anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T. R.; Lastra Milone, T.; Petersen, G.

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic hydrolysis in activated return sludge was investigated in laboratory scale experiments to find if intermittent aeration would accelerate anaerobic hydrolysis rates compared to anaerobic hydrolysis rates under strict anaerobic conditions. The intermittent reactors were set up in a 240 h...... for calculating hydrolysis rates based on soluble COD were compared. Two-way ANOVA with the Bonferroni post-test was performed in order to register any significant difference between reactors with intermittent aeration and strictly anaerobic conditions respectively. The experiment demonstrated a statistically...... significant difference in favor of the reactors with intermittent aeration showing a tendency towards accelerated anaerobic hydrolysis rates due to application of intermittent aeration. The conclusion of the work is thus that intermittent aeration applied in the activated return sludge process (ARP) can...

  6. Stability and activity of anaerobic sludge from UASB reactors treating sewage in subtropical regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seghezzo, L.; Cuevas, C.M.; Trupiano, A.P.; Guerra, R.G.; Gonzalez, S.M.; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2006-01-01

    The production of small amounts of well-stabilized biological sludge is one of the main advantages of upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors over aerobic wastewater treatment systems. In this work, sludge produced in three pilot-scale UASB reactors used to treat sewage under subtropical

  7. Improvement of anaerobic digester performance by wastewater recirculation through an aerated membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swine wastewater from an anaerobic digester was recirculated through a silicone hose located in an external aeration chamber to determine its effect on wastewater malodorants and biogas composition. The silicone hose acted as a semipermeable membrane for the passage of small molecules. In the first...

  8. Celebrating 40 years anaerobic sludge bed reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Lier, J.B.; Van der Zee, F.P.; Frijters, C.T.M.J.; Ersahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 40 years, anaerobic sludge bed reactor technology evolved from localized lab-scale trials to worldwide successful implementations at a variety of industries. High-rate sludge bed reactors are characterized by a very small foot print and high applicable volumetric loading rates. Best

  9. Transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways, alternative respiration and enterotoxin genes in anaerobic growth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, M; Abee, T

    2009-09-01

    To assess genes specifically activated during anaerobic growth that are involved in metabolism and pathogenesis of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Growth under anaerobic conditions in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth revealed a reduced growth rate and lower yield as compared to growth under aerobic conditions. Subsequently, comparative transcriptome analysis showed specific genes induced under anaerobic conditions. These included novel genes identified for anaerobic growth of B. cereus, encoding metabolic pathways, such as the arginine deiminase pathway (ArcABDC), formate dehydrogenase (FdhF) and pyruvate formate lyase (Pfl), and alternative respiratory proteins, such as arsenate reductases. Notably, haemolytic enzyme encoding genes were induced during anaerobic growth, and enterotoxin genes were induced in high cell density transition and stationary phases of aerobic cultures. These data point to induction of stress adaptation and pathogenicity factors and rearrangements of expression of metabolic pathways in response to oxygen limitations in B. cereus. The reported changes in gene expression show that the foodborne pathogen B. cereus can adjust to anaerobic conditions, such as encountered in the human GI-tract.

  10. Transglutaminase 2-specific coeliac disease autoantibodies induce morphological changes and signs of inflammation in the small-bowel mucosa of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Suvi; Piqueras, Victoria Ortín; Frías, Rafael; Sulic, Ana-Marija; Määttä, Juha A E; Kähkönen, Niklas; Viiri, Keijo; Huhtala, Heini; Pasternack, Arja; Laurila, Kaija; Sblattero, Daniele; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R; Mäki, Markku; Caja, Sergio; Kaukinen, Katri; Lindfors, Katri

    2017-03-01

    Coeliac disease is hallmarked by an abnormal immune reaction against ingested wheat-, rye- and barley-derived gluten and the presence of transglutaminase 2 (TG2)-targeted autoantibodies. The small-bowel mucosal damage characteristic of the disorder develops gradually from normal villus morphology to inflammation and finally to villus atrophy with crypt hyperplasia. Patients with early-stage coeliac disease have TG2-autoantibodies present in serum and small-intestinal mucosa and they may already suffer from abdominal symptoms before the development of villus atrophy. Previously, we have shown that intraperitoneal injections of coeliac patient-derived sera or purified immunoglobulin fraction into mice induce a condition mimicking early-stage coeliac disease. In the current study, we sought to establish whether recombinantly produced patient-derived TG2-targeted autoantibodies are by themselves sufficient for the development of such an experimentally induced condition in immune-compromised mice. Interestingly, mice injected with coeliac patient TG2-antibodies had altered small-intestinal mucosal morphology, increased lamina propria cellular infiltration and disease-specific autoantibodies deposited in the small bowel, but did not evince clinical features of the disease. Thus, coeliac patient-derived TG2-specific autoantibodies seem to be sufficient for the induction of subtle small-bowel mucosal alterations in mice, but the development of clinical features probably requires additional factors such as other antibody populations relevant in coeliac disease.

  11. Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus gasseri Mitigates Aspirin-Induced Small Bowel Injuries: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takayoshi; Masui, Aya; Nakamura, Jun; Shiozawa, Hirokazu; Aoki, Jun; Nakae, Hirohiko; Tsuda, Shingo; Imai, Jin; Hideki, Ozawa; Matsushima, Masashi; Mine, Tetsuya; Tamura, Akira; Ohtsu, Toshihiro; Asami, Yukio; Takagi, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Although there is evidence about the beneficial effects of probiotics, their effects on aspirin-induced small bowel injuries have not been well examined. We evaluated the effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 (LG) on aspirin-induced small intestinal lesions, such as ulcers, erosions, reddened lesions, and bleeding. This study enrolled 64 patients who received aspirin for more than 1 month and provided written informed consent to be part of the study. The patients received 112 ml of yogurt containing LG or placebo twice daily for 6 weeks. Small bowel injuries were evaluated by capsule endoscopy before and after consuming the yogurt. The effect of LG on patient symptoms was also assessed using the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (FSSG) and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaires before and after 6 weeks of treatment. There was no significant difference in any baseline characteristics and the number of small bowel mucosal breaks between the 2 groups. In contrast with the placebo group, the LG group had significantly fewer small bowel mucosal breaks and reddened lesions after 6 weeks (p gastrointestinal symptoms. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Chemosensitivity of human small cell carcinoma of the lung detected by flow cytometric DNA analysis of drug-induced cell cycle perturbations in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, S A; Spang-Thomsen, M; Vindeløv, L L

    1986-01-01

    A method based on detection of drug-induced cell cycle perturbation by flow cytometric DNA analysis has previously been described in Ehrlich ascites tumors as a way to estimate chemosensitivity. The method is extended to test human small-cell carcinoma of the lung. Three tumors with different...... sensitivities to melphalan in nude mice were used. Tumors were disaggregated by a combined mechanical and enzymatic method and thereafter have incubated with different doses of melphalan. After incubation the cells were plated in vitro on agar, and drug induced cell cycle changes were monitored by flow...

  13. Anaerobe Tolerance to Oxygen and the Potentials of Anaerobic and Aerobic Cocultures for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Kato

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic treatment processes are considered to be well-established methods for the elimination of easily biodegradable organic matter from wastewaters. Some difficulties concerning certain wastewaters are related to the possible presence of dissolved oxygen. The common belief is that anaerobes are oxygen intolerant. Therefore, the common practice is to use sequencing anaerobic and aerobic steps in separate tanks. Enhanced treatment by polishing off the residual biodegradable oxygen demand from effluents of anaerobic reactors, or the biodegradation of recalcitrant wastewater pollutants, usually requires sequenced anaerobic and aerobic bacteria activities. However, the combined activity of both bacteria can also be obtained in a single reactor. Previous experiments with either pure or mixed cultures showed that anaerobes can tolerate oxygen to a certain extent. The oxygen toxicity to methanogens in anaerobic sludges was quantified in batch experiments, as well as in anaerobic reactors. The results showed that methanogens have a high tolerance to oxygen. In practice, it was confirmed that dissolved oxygen does not constitute any detrimental effect on reactor treatment performance. This means that the coexistence of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria in one single reactor is feasible and increases the potentials of new applications in wastewater treatment

  14. Effects of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) on the murine innate immune microenvironment induced by heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, Roshni; Aachoui, Youssef; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2012-01-01

    The use of biological scaffold materials for wound healing and tissue remodeling has profoundly impacted regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. The porcine-derived small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a licensed bioscaffold material regularly used in wound and tissue repair, often in contaminated surgical fields. Complications and failures due to infection of this biomaterial have therefore been a major concern and challenge. SIS can be colonized and infected by wound-associated bacteria, particularly Staphylococcus aureus. In order to address this concern and develop novel intervention strategies, the immune microenvironment orchestrated by the combined action of S. aureus and SIS should be critically evaluated. Since the outcome of tissue remodeling is largely controlled by the local immune microenvironment, we assessed the innate immune profile in terms of cytokine/chemokine microenvironment and inflammasome-responsive genes. BALB/c mice were injected intra-peritoneally with heat-killed S. aureus in the presence or absence of SIS. Analyses of cytokines, chemokines and microarray profiling of inflammasome-related genes were done using peritoneal lavages collected 24 hours after injection. Results showed that unlike SIS, the S. aureus-SIS interactome was characterized by a Th1-biased immune profile with increased expressions of IFN-γ, IL-12 and decreased expressions of IL-4, IL-13, IL-33 and IL-6. Such modulation of the Th1/Th2 axis can greatly facilitate graft rejections. The S. aureus-SIS exposure also augmented the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β, Tnf-α, CD30L, Eotaxin and Fractalkine. This heightened inflammatory response caused by S. aureus contamination could enormously affect the biocompatibility of SIS. However, the mRNA expressions of many inflammasome-related genes like Nlrp3, Aim2, Card6 and Pycard were down-regulated by heat-killed S. aureus with or without SIS. In summary, our study explored the innate immune

  15. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  16. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Toxicity data for the impact of nano-silver on anaerobic degradation. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Gitipour, A., S. Thiel, K. Scheckel,...

  17. Solar pond for heating anaerobic digesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Kehui; Li Shensheng

    1991-10-01

    A theoretical analysis and numerical results calculated for solar pond heating anaerobic digesters in Beijing area in China are presented. The effect of temperature rise is evident and rather steady. 3 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Anaerobic microbial associations degrading aminoaromatic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotova, I.; Savelieva, O.; Dyakonova, A.T.; Sklyar, V.; Kalyushnyi, S.V.; Stams, A.J.M.; Netrusov, A.

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic microbial associations have been isolated that degrade aminoaromatic acids to methane and carbon dioxide at high rates. Significant differences between the morphological, cytological, and physiological traits of cultures isolated from samples of adapted and unadapted sludge are shown. The

  19. Biogas plasticization coupled anaerobic digestion: the anaerobic pump stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimel, Keith A

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the stoichiometry section of a bioenergetics investigation into the biogas plasticization of wastewater sludge using the Anaerobic Pump (TAP). Three residue samples, an input substrate and two residual products, were collected from two side by side operated AD systems, a conventional continuous flow and stirred reactor, and TAP, and submitted for elemental and calorimetric analyses. The elemental compositions of the residues were fitted to a heterotrophic metabolism model [1] for both systems. To facilitate balanced stoichiometric models, a simple "cell" correction computation separates measured residual composites into "real" residual composition and cell growth (C5H7NO2) components. The elemental data and model results show that the TAP stage II residual composition (C1H0.065O0.0027N0.036) was nearly devoid of hydrogen and oxygen, leaving only fixed carbon and cells grown as the composition of the remaining mass. This quantitative evidence supports prior measurements of very high methane yields from TAP stage II reactor during steady-state experiments [2]. All performance parameters derived from the stoichiometric model(s) showed good agreement with measured steady-state averaged values. These findings are strong evidence that plasticization-disruption (TAP) cycle is the mechanism responsible for the observed increases in methane yield. The accuracy achieved by the stoichiometry models qualifies them for thermodynamic analysis to obtain potentials and bioconversion efficiencies. How applied pressure causes matrix conformation changes triggered by a functional consequence (plasticization and disruption) is this study's essential focus.

  20. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Atan, T.

    2013-01-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-...

  1. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Covering Materials for Anaerobic Digesters Producing Biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itodo, I. N.; Philips, T. K.

    2002-01-01

    The suitability of foam, concrete and clay soil as covering material on anaerobic digesters producing biogas was investigated using four batch-type digesters of 20 litres volume. The methane yield from the digesters was of the order: foam >control> concrete > clay soil. The digester covered with foam had the highest methane yield, best temperature control and most favourable pH conditions. It is most suitable as cover material on anaerobic digesters

  3. Protection of Radiation-Induced Damage to the Hematopoietic System, Small Intestine and Salivary Glands in Rats by JNJ7777120 Compound, a Histamine H4 Ligand

    OpenAIRE

    Martinel Lamas, Diego J.; Carabajal, Eliana; Prestifilippo, Juan P.; Rossi, Luis; Elverdin, Juan C.; Merani, Susana; Bergoc, Rosa M.; Rivera, Elena S.; Medina, Vanina A.

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg) starting 24 h be...

  4. Leachate properties as indicators of methane production process in MSW anaerobic digestion bioreactor landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yunmin; Wang, Li'ao; Xu, Tengtun; Li, Jiaxiang; Song, Xue; Hu, Chaochao

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, bioreactor was used to simulate the municipal solid waste (MSW) biodegradation process of landfill, tracing and testing trash methanogenic process and characteristics of leachate during anaerobic digestion, exploring the relationship between the two processes, aiming to screen out the indicators that can predict the methane production process of anaerobic digestion, which provides the support for real-time adjustment of technological parameters of MSW anaerobic digestion system and ensures the efficient operation of bioreactor landfill. The results showed that MSW digestion gas production rate constant is 0.0259 1/d, biogas production potential is 61.93 L/kg. The concentration of TN in leachate continued to increase, showing the trend of nitrogen accumulation. "Ammonia poisoning" was an important factor inhibiting waste anaerobic digestion gas production. In the anaerobic digestion system, although pH values of leachate can indicate methane production process to some degree, there are obvious lagging behind, so it cannot be used as indicator alone. The TOC/TN value of leachate has a certain indication on the stability of the methane production system. When TOC/TN value was larger than12, anaerobic digestion system was stable along with normal production of biogas. However, when TOC/TN value was lower than 12, the digestive system is unstable and the gas production is small. In the process of anaerobic digestion, the synthesis and transformation of valeric acid is more active. HAc/HVa changed greatly and had obvious inflection points, from which methane production period can be predicted.

  5. Opening of small and intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels induces relaxation mainly mediated by nitric-oxide release in large arteries and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in small arteries from rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankevicius, Edgaras; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Kroigaard, Christel

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether calcium-activated potassium channels of small (SK(Ca) or K(Ca)2) and intermediate (IK(Ca) or K(Ca)3.1) conductance activated by 6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime (NS309) are involved in both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolar......This study was designed to investigate whether calcium-activated potassium channels of small (SK(Ca) or K(Ca)2) and intermediate (IK(Ca) or K(Ca)3.1) conductance activated by 6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime (NS309) are involved in both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium...... in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and calcium concentrations were investigated in both HUVECs and mesenteric arterial endothelial cells. In both superior (∼1093 μm) and small mesenteric (∼300 μm) arteries, NS309 evoked endothelium- and concentration-dependent relaxations. In superior....... In small mesenteric arteries, NS309 relaxations were reduced slightly by ADMA, whereas apamin plus an IK(Ca) channel blocker almost abolished relaxation. Iberiotoxin did not change NS309 relaxation. HUVECs expressed mRNA for SK(Ca) and IK(Ca) channels, and NS309 induced increases in calcium, outward...

  6. The role of the small intestine in the development of dietary fat-induced obesity and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bromhaar Mechteld

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and insulin resistance are two major risk factors underlying the metabolic syndrome. The development of these metabolic disorders is frequently studied, but mainly in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. To gain more insight in the role of the small intestine in development of obesity and insulin resistance, dietary fat-induced differential gene expression was determined along the longitudinal axis of small intestines of C57BL/6J mice. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low-fat or a high-fat diet that mimicked the fatty acid composition of a Western-style human diet. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks of diet intervention small intestines were isolated and divided in three equal parts. Differential gene expression was determined in mucosal scrapings using Mouse genome 430 2.0 arrays. Results The high-fat diet significantly increased body weight and decreased oral glucose tolerance, indicating insulin resistance. Microarray analysis showed that dietary fat had the most pronounced effect on differential gene expression in the middle part of the small intestine. By overrepresentation analysis we found that the most modulated biological processes on a high-fat diet were related to lipid metabolism, cell cycle and inflammation. Our results further indicated that the nuclear receptors Ppars, Lxrs and Fxr play an important regulatory role in the response of the small intestine to the high-fat diet. Next to these more local dietary fat effects, a secretome analysis revealed differential gene expression of secreted proteins, such as Il18, Fgf15, Mif, Igfbp3 and Angptl4. Finally, we linked the fat-induced molecular changes in the small intestine to development of obesity and insulin resistance. Conclusion During dietary fat-induced development of obesity and insulin resistance, we found substantial changes in gene expression in the small intestine, indicating modulations of biological processes, especially related to lipid

  7. FPPS mediates TGF-β1-induced non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion and the EMT process via the RhoA/Rock1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Li, Ming; Lin, Lei; Xu, Xiaolin; Jiang, Gening; Wu, Liang

    2018-02-05

    Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS), a key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, was recently shown to play a role in cancer progression. However, its role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) metastasis and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. In this study, FPPS expression was significantly correlated with TNM stage, and metastasis. Inhibition or knockdown of FPPS blocked TGF-β1-induced cell invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. FPPS expression of FPPS was induced by TGF-β1 and FPPS promoted cell invasion and EMT via the RhoA/Rock1 pathway. In conclusion, FPPS mediates TGF-β1-induced lung cancer cell invasion and EMT via the RhoA/Rock1 pathway. These findings suggest new treatment strategies to reduce mortality associated with metastasis in patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residue: potential for improvement and implementation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewell, W. J.; Capener, H. R.; Dell& #x27; orto, S.

    1978-02-01

    The results of studies designed to evaluate the potential of rapidly improving the technology of anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues and methods of implementing it in existing agricultural operations are reported. The main objectives of this study were to: identify simple and low cost anaerobic fermentor design criteria that would be appropriate in small agricultural operations, develop high rate fermentor concepts that would enable multiple product recovery from the reactor, expand the information base particularly in the area of temperature influence on the process, and to review sociological and economic issues relating to implementation of fermentation technology. This study has identified several major anaerobic fermentation concepts which illustrate that the technology may be rapidly improved. A simple reactor design utilizing an unmixed plug flow concept was shown to be comparable to the more complex completely mixed reactor when using dairy cow residue. A high rate thermophilic reactor designed to encourage flotation of particulate solids illustrated that liquid, solid, and gaseous products can be generated within the anaerobic fermentor thus eliminating an additional dewatering unit process. A third reactor concept involved extension of the anaerobic attached microbial film expanded bed to the treatment of cow manure slurries. A high rate of methane generation was recorded. Comprehensive thermophilic fermentation studies (60/sup 0/C) indicated that the increased temperature resulted in little improvement in total quantity or the rate of yield of gas over that obtained with mesophilic fermentation with reactor retention periods greater than 10 days. Finally, other areas where preliminary date were obtained are noted.

  9. Stimulating retinal blood vessel protection with hypoxia-inducible factor stabilization: identification of novel small-molecule hydrazones to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Jonathan E; Hoppe, George

    2013-09-01

    To discover novel small molecules that inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD), a key enzyme that regulates the posttranslational stability and hence activity of HIF. NIH3T3 cell line stably transfected with firefly luciferase under a HIF-1-inducible promoter was used to screen a Chembridge library of 34,000 small molecules of molecular weight 250 to 550 Da. Positive hits were considered at 4.5-fold higher luminescence than control. Selected compounds were validated in vitro. The most effective dose was then used to treat mice expressing firefly luciferase fused to the oxygen-dependent degradation domain (lucODD) in order to determine the location of the receptor for systemic treatment with small-molecule HIF PHD inhibitors. Twenty-three novel small molecules were discovered, the majority of which were hydrazones and hydrazines. Of the 23 compounds, each had different selectivity for expression of erythropoietin or vascular endothelial growth factor, two angiogenic, HIF-regulated gene products. In addition, each showed different selectivity for hepatocytes or kidney, or both or neither, when injected intraperitoneally in an in vivo reporter gene assay. The discovery of multiple small molecules that inhibit HIF PHD identifies new reagents to develop strategies to prevent the degradation of HIF by its selective PHD. These molecules are novel hypoxia mimetics that may provide new strategies to protect retinovasculature from hyperoxia.

  10. Increased anaerobic production of methane by co-digestion of sludge with microalgal biomass and food waste leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungmin; Kang, Chang-Min

    2015-01-01

    The co-digestion of multiple substrates is a promising method to increase methane production during anaerobic digestion. However, limited reliable data are available on the anaerobic co-digestion of food waste leachate with microalgal biomass. This report evaluated methane production by the anaerobic co-digestion of different mixtures of food waste leachate, algal biomass, and raw sludge. Co-digestion of substrate mixture containing equal amounts of three substrates had higher methane production than anaerobic digestion of individual substrates. This was possibly due to a proliferation of methanogens over the entire digestion period induced by multistage digestion of different substrates with different degrees of degradability. Thus, the co-digestion of food waste, microalgal biomass, and raw sludge appears to be a feasible and efficient method for energy conversion from waste resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling de novo granulation of anaerobic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doloman, Anna; Varghese, Honey; Miller, Charles D; Flann, Nicholas S

    2017-07-17

    A unique combination of mechanical, physiochemical and biological forces influences granulation during processes of anaerobic digestion. Understanding this process requires a systems biology approach due to the need to consider not just single-cell metabolic processes, but also the multicellular organization and development of the granule. In this computational experiment, we address the role that physiochemical and biological processes play in granulation and provide a literature-validated working model of anaerobic granule de novo formation. The agent-based model developed in a cDynoMiCs simulation environment successfully demonstrated a de novo granulation in a glucose fed system, with the average specific methanogenic activity of 1.11 ml C H 4 /g biomass and formation of a 0.5 mm mature granule in 33 days. The simulated granules exhibit experimental observations of radial stratification: a central dead core surrounded by methanogens then encased in acidogens. Practical application of the granulation model was assessed on the anaerobic digestion of low-strength wastewater by measuring the changes in methane yield as experimental configuration parameters were systematically searched. In the model, the emergence of multicellular organization of anaerobic granules from randomly mixed population of methanogens and acidogens was observed and validated. The model of anaerobic de novo granulation can be used to predict the morphology of the anaerobic granules in a alternative substrates of interest and to estimate methane potential of the resulting microbial consortia. The study demonstrates a successful integration of a systems biology approach to model multicellular systems with the engineering of an efficient anaerobic digestion system.

  12. Electrocautery-induced localized colonic injury elicits increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in small bowel and decreases jejunal alanine absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada, Kassem; Mourad, Fadi H; Noutsi, Bakiza; Saadé, Nayef E

    2015-01-01

    Colitis is associated with functional abnormalities in proximal non-inflamed gut areas, but animal models to study small bowel dysfunction in colitis have limitations. This study aims to determine small intestinal alanine absorption and cytokine expression in a novel model of colonic ulceration induced by electro-cautery. A descending colon ulcer was induced in rats by a bipolar electro-cautery probe. Ulcer score was determined using Satoh's criteria. Jejunal alanine absorption was measured immediately and at different time intervals post ulcer induction. Levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) protein and m-RNA were determined in mucosal scrapings obtained from the colon, duodenum, jejunum and ileum at various time intervals after colonic ulcer induction. The mean ulcer score was 3 up to 48h, followed by healing by 96h post ulcer induction. Small bowel histology was normal throughout. Jejunal alanine absorption was reduced by 12-34% immediately and up to 72h after cautery and returned to normal at 96h. IL-1 and TNF-α mRNA increased significantly in the colon, duodenum, jejunum and ileum 3h post electro-cautery and returned to normal at 48h, while that of IL-6 increased significantly at 48h post ulcer induction. Similarly, IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α protein levels increased in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon up to 48h post ulcer induction. Electrically induced localized colonic injury increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in non-inflamed segments of the small intestine and was associated with derangements of jejunal absorptive function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EML4-ALK induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell properties in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Fuchun; Liu, Xiaoke, E-mail: liuxk57@163.com; Qing, Qin, E-mail: qinqingscu@126.com; Sang, Yaxiong, E-mail: yaxiongsang@gmail.com; Feng, Chengjun, E-mail: leymj@163.com; Li, Xiaoyu, E-mail: lixiaoyu2012huaxi@163.com; Jiang, Li, E-mail: summer.jl06@foxmail.com; Su, Pei, E-mail: keyanxiaozhu@163.com; Wang, Yongsheng, E-mail: wangys@scu.edu.cn

    2015-04-10

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4(EML4) – anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene has been identified as a driver mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of EML4-ALK in malignant transformation is not entirely clear. Here, for the first time, we showed that H1299 NSCLC cells stably expressing EML4-ALK acquire EMT phenotype, associated with enhanced invasive migration and increased expression of EMT-inducing transcription factors. H1299-EML4-ALK cells also displayed cancer stem cell-like properties with a concomitant up-regulation of CD133 and enhanced ability of mammospheres formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of ERK1/2 reversed EMT induced by EML4-ALK in H1299 cells. Taken together, these results suggested that EML4-ALK induced ERK activation is mechanistically associated with EMT phenotype. Thus, inhibition of ERK signaling pathway could be a potential strategy in treatment of NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK translocation. - Highlights: • EML4-ALK induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in H1299 cells. • Expression of EML4-ALK promotes invasion and migration in vitro. • EML4-ALK enhanced sphere formation and stem cell-like properties in H1299 cells. • Blockage of ERK1/2 reverse Epithelial–Mesenchymal transition induced by EML4-ALK.

  14. Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer with Erlotinib following Gefitinib-Induced Hepatotoxicity: Review of 8 Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Gefitinib often induces liver damage. A few reports have described that the subsequent administration of erlotinib was associated with less hepatotoxicity, but the safety and efficacy of this treatment are still not fully investigated. Therefore, we evaluated retrospectively the patients with erlotinib following gefitinib-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods and Patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records between December 2007 and March 2010. The patients were evaluated including the following information: age, gender, histology of lung cancer, performance status, smoking status, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation status, liver metastasis, viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver injury, clinical response, and hepatotoxicity due to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Results. We identified 8 patients with erlotinib following gefitinib-induced hepatotoxicity. All achieved disease control by gefitinib. Hepatotoxicity was grades 2 and 3 in 3 and 5 patients, respectively. The median duration of treatment with gefitinib was 112.5 days and the median time to gefitinib-induced hepatotoxicity was 51.5 days. The median duration of treatment with erlotinib was 171.5 days. Grade 1 and 2 erlotinib-induced hepatotoxicity was observed in 2 and 1 patient, respectively. Conclusions. Erlotinib administration with careful monitoring is thought to be a good alternative strategy for patients who respond well to gefitinib treatment but experience hepatotoxicity.

  15. A novel role for small molecule glycomimetics in the protection against lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction: Involvement of Akt/eNOS and Nrf2/ARE signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ayman M; Wilkinson, Fiona L; Jones, Alan M; Wilkinson, James A; Romero, Miguel; Duarte, Juan; Alexander, M Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Glycomimetics are a diverse array of saccharide-inspired compounds, designed to mimic the bioactive functions of glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, glycomimetics represent a unique source of novel therapies to target aberrant signaling and protein interactions in a wide range of diseases. We investigated the protective effects of four newly synthesized small molecule glycomimetics against lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction, with an emphasis on nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress. Four aromatic sugar mimetics were synthesized by the stepwise transformation of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid to derivatives (C1-C4) incorporating sulfate groups to mimic the structure of heparan sulfate. Glycomimetic-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to palmitic acid to model lipid-induced oxidative stress. Palmitate-induced impairment of NO production was restored by the glycomimetics, through activation of Akt/eNOS signaling. Furthermore, C1-C4 significantly inhibited palmitate-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation, and activity and expression of NADPH oxidase. These effects were attributed to activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway and downstream activation of cellular antioxidant and cytoprotective proteins. In ex vivo vascular reactivity studies, the glycomimetics (C1-C4) also demonstrated a significant improvement in endothelium-dependent relaxation and decreased ROS production and NADPH oxidase activity in isolated mouse thoracic aortic rings exposed to palmitate. The small molecule glycomimetics, C1-C4, protect against lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction through up-regulation of Akt/eNOS and Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. Thus, carbohydrate-derived therapeutics are a new class of glycomimetic drugs targeting endothelial dysfunction, regarded as the first line of defense against vascular complications in cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The ketone body metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate induces an antidepression-associated ramification of microglia via HDACs inhibition-triggered Akt-small RhoGTPase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Wang, Peng; Xu, Xing; Zhang, Yaru; Gong, Yu; Hu, Wenfeng; Gao, Minhui; Wu, Yue; Ling, Yong; Zhao, Xi; Qin, Yibin; Yang, Rongrong; Zhang, Wei

    2018-02-01

    Direct induction of macrophage ramification has been shown to promote an alternative (M2) polarization, suggesting that the ramified morphology may determine the function of immune cells. The ketone body metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) elevated in conditions including fasting and low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) can reduce neuroinflammation. However, how exactly BHB impacts microglia remains unclear. We report that BHB as well as its producing stimuli fasting and KD induced obvious ramifications of murine microglia in basal and inflammatory conditions in a reversible manner, and these ramifications were accompanied with microglial profile toward M2 polarization and phagocytosis. The protein kinase B (Akt)-small RhoGTPase axis was found to mediate the effect of BHB on microglial shape change, as (i) BHB activated the microglial small RhoGTPase (Rac1, Cdc42) and Akt; (ii) Akt and Rac1-Cdc42 inhibition abolished the pro-ramification effect of BHB; (iii) Akt inhibition prevented the activation of Rac1-Cdc42 induced by BHB treatment. Incubation of microglia with other classical histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors, but not G protein-coupled receptor 109a (GPR109a) activators, also induced microglial ramification and Akt activation, suggesting that the BHB-induced ramification of microglia may be triggered by HDACs inhibition. Functionally, Akt inhibition was found to abrogate the effects of BHB on microglial polarization and phagocytosis. In neuroinflammatory models induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), BHB prevented the microglial process retraction and depressive-like behaviors, and these effects were abolished by Akt inhibition. Our findings for the first time showed that BHB exerts anti-inflammatory actions via promotion of microglial ramification. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Flow- and acetylcholine-induced dilation in small arteries from rats with renovascular hypertension - effect of tempol treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Frank Holden; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Hansen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    -treated animals, while only the relaxation was improved by the NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). In conclusion renovascular hypertension selectively inhibits flow-induced NO-mediated vasodilatation, while EDHF-type vasodilatation remains unaffected, suggesting that high blood pressure leads...... blood pressure and tempol treatment. Simultaneous measurements of NO-concentration and relaxation were performed in isolated coronary arteries from the same animals. As compared to vehicle-treated rats, both acetylcholine-induced relaxation and NO-concentration increased in arteries from tempol......-induced dilatation remained normal. Measured by dihydroethidium staining there was an increased amount of superoxide in arteries from vehicle-treated rats, but not from tempol-treated rats. Expression by immunoblotting of endothelial NO synthase and the NAD(P)H oxidase subunit p47phox remained unaffected by high...

  18. Glucose-induced thermogenesis in patients with small cell lung carcinoma. The effect of acute beta-adrenergic inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Bülow, J; Tuxen, C

    1994-01-01

    -induced thermogenesis in the 120 min following the glucose load was significantly reduced by beta-adrenergic inhibition with approximately 50% from 63.9 +/- 5.8 kJ 120 min-1 (mean +/- SE) to 27.8 +/- 9.8 kJ 120 min-1 (P ...-induced forearm oxygen uptake in the period 60-120 min following the glucose load was significantly reduced after beta-adrenergic inhibition from 103 +/- 28 mumol 100 g-1 60 min-1 to 29 +/- 29 mumol 100 g-1 60 min-1 (P

  19. Antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote: inhibition of muscle contraction and enterotoxin-induced fluid secretion in rabbit small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, N; Shibata, T

    2001-01-01

    Wood creosote has long been used as an antidiarrheal agent, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanism of its antidiarrheal activity, we have addressed questions whether it inhibits fluid secretion induced by Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in rabbit jejunum in vivo, and whether it inhibits muscle contraction of isolated rabbit ileum ex vivo. Wood creosote (10-100 mg/l) instilled in a ligated loop of jejunum inhibited STa-induced fluid secretion (p creosote is attributable to its antisecretory and antimotility effects. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Tumor endothelial marker 5 expression in endothelial cells during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallon, Mario, E-mail: m.vallon@arcor.de [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Rohde, Franziska; Janssen, Klaus-Peter [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Essler, Markus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    Tumor endothelial marker (TEM) 5 is an adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor upregulated in endothelial cells during tumor and physiologic angiogenesis. So far, the mechanisms leading to upregulation of TEM5 and its function during angiogenesis have not been identified. Here, we report that TEM5 expression in endothelial cells is induced during capillary-like network formation on Matrigel, during capillary morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen I matrix, and upon confluence on a two-dimensional matrix. TEM5 expression was not induced by a variety of soluble angiogenic factors, including VEGF and bFGF, in subconfluent endothelial cells. TEM5 upregulation was blocked by toxin B from Clostridium difficile, an inhibitor of the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. The Rho inhibitor C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum did not affect TEM5 expression, whereas the Rac inhibitor NSC23766 suppressed TEM5 upregulation. An excess of the soluble TEM5 extracellular domain or an inhibitory monoclonal TEM5 antibody blocked contact inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation resulting in multilayered islands within the endothelial monolayer and increased vessel density during capillary formation. Based on our results we conclude that TEM5 expression during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of proliferation in endothelial cells.

  1. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Shear-Induced Phase Separation in Aqueous Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.; Lindner, P.; Richtering, W.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of shear flow on the structure of concentrated aqueous poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) solutions near the lower critical solution temperature was investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering. Two samples, both in the semi-dilute regime above the overlap concentration, were

  2. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels with small conductance in bradykinin-induced vasodilation of porcine retinal arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Thomas; Kroigaard, Christel; Bek, Toke

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vasodilation may be involved in the pathogenesis of retinal vascular diseases. In the present study, the mechanisms underlying bradykinin vasodilation were examined and whether calcium-activated potassium channels of small (SK(Ca)) and intermediate (IK...

  3. SIRT1 overexpression protects non-small cell lung cancer cells against osteopontin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition by suppressing NF-κB signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Xuejiao Li,1 Zhongxiu Jiang,2 Xiangmin Li,2 Xiaoye Zhang2 1The Second Clinical College, China Medical University, 2Fourth Department of Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Osteopontin (OPN is a promoter for tumor progression. It has been reported to promote non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC progression via the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB signaling. As the increased acetylation of NF-κB p65 is linked to NF-κB activation, the regulation of NF-κB p65 acetylation could be a potential treatment target for OPN-induced NSCLC progression. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 is a deacetylase, and the role of SIRT1 in tumor progression is still controversial. The effect and mechanism of SIRT1 on OPN-induced tumor progression remains unknown. The results presented in this research demonstrated that OPN inhibited SIRT1 expression and promoted NF-κB p65 acetylation in NSCLC cell lines (A549 and NCI-H358. In this article, overexpression of SIRT1 was induced by infection of SIRT1-overexpressing lentiviral vectors. The overexpression of SIRT1 protected NSCLC cells against OPN-induced NF-κB p65 acetylation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, as indicated by the reduction of OPN-induced changes in the expression levels of EMT-related markers and cellular morphology. Furthermore, SIRT1 overexpression significantly attenuated OPN-induced cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, overexpression of SIRT1 inhibited OPN-induced NF-κB activation. As OPN induced NSCLC cell EMT through activation of NF-κB signaling, OPN-induced SIRT1 downregulation may play an important role in NSCLC cell EMT via NF-κB signaling. The results suggest that SIRT1 could be a tumor suppressor to attenuate OPN-induced NSCLC progression through the regulation of NF-κB signaling. Keywords: OPN, SIRT1, EMT, NF-κB, NSCLC

  4. New small molecules, ISA27 and SM13, inhibit tumour growth inducing mitochondrial effects of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriento, D; Del Giudice, C; Bertamino, A; Ciccarelli, M; Gomez-Monterrey, I; Campiglia, P; Novellino, E; Illario, M; Trimarco, B; De Luca, N; Iaccarino, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: p53 is a transcription factor with tumour suppressor properties, which is able to induce mitochondrial apoptosis independently of its transcriptional activity. We recently synthesised two new compounds (ISA27 and SM13), which block p53-MDM2 interaction and induce apoptosis in p53 wild-type (WT) tumour cells. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of these compounds in tumours carrying a mutated form of p53 gene with no transcriptional activity. Methods: In vitro we evaluated the effectiveness of our compounds in cancer cell lines carrying WT, mutated and null p53 gene. In vivo study was performed in Balb/c nude mice and the mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic signalling was evaluated by western blot. Results: Both ISA27 and SM13 reduced cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in vitro in cells carrying either p53 WT or mutated gene, suggesting that its effect is independent from p53 transcriptional activity. On the contrary, SM13 had no effect in a p53 null cell line. In vivo, ISA27 and SM13 induced cancer cell death in a dose-dependent manner through the activation of the mitochondrial-dependent death signalling in p53-mutated cells. In vivo, SM13 reduced tumour growth. Conclusions: Our study proposes SM13 as anticancer compound to use for the treatment of p53-dependent tumours, even in the absence of p53 transcriptional activity. PMID:25422906

  5. Discovery of Small Molecules That Induce Lysosomal Cell Death in Cancer Cell Lines Using an Image-Based Screening Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagliero, Romina J; D'Astolfo, Diego S; Lelieveld, Daphne; Pratiwi, Riyona D; Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja; Martin, Nathaniel I; Klumperman, Judith; Egan, David A

    2016-01-01

    The lysosomal cell death (LCD) pathway is a caspase 3-independent cell death pathway that has been suggested as a possible target for cancer therapy, making the development of sensitive and specific high-throughput (HT) assays to identify LCD inducers highly desirable. In this study, we report a

  6. Serosal zinc attenuate serotonin and vasoactive intestinal peptide induced secretion in piglet small intestinal epithelium in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Sehested, Jakob; Feng, Z

    2008-01-01

    This study addressed the mechanisms by which dietary zinc affects diarrhoea and aimed to study possible interactions between zinc status and the presence of zinc in vitro on secretagogue-induced secretion from piglet intestinal epithelium in Ussing chambers....

  7. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  8. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1992-06-01

    A variety of different media were used to isolate facultatively (FAB) and obligately anaerobic bacteria (OAB). These bacteria were isolated from core subsamples obtained from boreholes at the Idaho National Engineering Lab. (INEL) or at the Hanford Lab. (Yakima). Core material was sampled at various depths to 600 feet below the surface. All core samples with culturable bacteria contained at least FAB making thisthe most common physiological type of anaerobic bacteria present in the deep subsurface at these two sites. INEL core samples are characterized by isolates of both FAB and OAB. No isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, or sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. Yakima core samples are characterized by a marked predominance of FAB in comparison to OAB. In addition, isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, and sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. The Yakima site has the potential for complete anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds whereas this potential appears to be lacking at INEL.

  9. Multivariate monitoring of anaerobic co-digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Michael; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    Anaerobic digestion processes for production of renewable energy in the form of biogas, and in the future hydrogen, are becoming increasingly important worldwide. Sustainable solutions for renewable energy production systems are given high political priority, amongst other things due to global...... warming and environmental concerns. Anaerobic digestion applied in agriculture can simultaneously convert heterogeneous biomasses and wastes from the primary agricultural sector and from the bio processing industries, for instance food processing, pharma, and biofuel production, into valuable organic...... fertiliser and renewable energy. Meanwhile, in order for the biogas sector to become a significant player in the energy supply chain, the anaerobic digestion process has to be controlled to a greater extent than what is implemented as state-of-the-art today. Through application of the philosophy behind...

  10. An integrative perspective of the anaerobic threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Marcelo Magalhães; Sousa, Caio Victor; da Silva Aguiar, Samuel; Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Alves, Polissandro Mortoza; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2017-12-14

    The concept of anaerobic threshold (AT) was introduced during the nineteen sixties. Since then, several methods to identify the anaerobic threshold (AT) have been studied and suggested as novel 'thresholds' based upon the variable used for its detection (i.e. lactate threshold, ventilatory threshold, glucose threshold). These different techniques have brought some confusion about how we should name this parameter, for instance, anaerobic threshold or the physiological measure used (i.e. lactate, ventilation). On the other hand, the modernization of scientific methods and apparatus to detect AT, as well as the body of literature formed in the past decades, could provide a more cohesive understanding over the AT and the multiple physiological systems involved. Thus, the purpose of this review was to provide an integrative perspective of the methods to determine AT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucose metabolism in anaerobic rice seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayne, R.G.; Kende, Hans

    1986-01-01

    More than 80% of the radioactivity from (U- 14 C)glucose metabolised by anaerobic rice seedlings or by excised roots or coleoptiles was recovered as ethanol plus CO 2 ; less than 5% was recovered as water-soluble acidic components. Rates of 14 CO 2 formation from (U- 14 C)glucose were similar in roots and coleoptiles in both N 2 and air atmospheres. More 14 C0 2 was formed from (U- 14 C)glucose than could be accounted for by ethanolic fermentation, and the specific yields of 14 CO 2 from (6- 14 C)glucose and (1- 14 C)glucose gave unusually high C-6/C-1 ratios (1.7) in the anaerobic coleoptile. The results may indicate that appreciable pentan synthesis occurs in the anaerobic coleoptile. (author)

  12. Effects of Organic Loading Rate on the Performance of a Pressurized Anaerobic Filter in Two-Phase Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of organic loading rate (OLR on a pressurized anaerobic filter was studied in a laboratory two-phase anaerobic digestion system. The anaerobic filter was operated successively at two working pressures (9 bar and 1.5 bar. The OLR(COD for each pressure was increased from 5 to 17.5 kg·m−3·day−1. The best performance of the reactor at 9 bar was observed at OLR(COD of 12.5 kg·m−3·day−1 and hydraulic retention time (HRT of 1.8 day, with specific biogas productivity (SBP of 5.3 L·L−1·day−1 and COD degradation grade of 90.6%. At higher OLRs and shorter HRTs, the process became unstable. In contrast, there was no indication of digester failure during the experiments at 1.5 bar. The SBP peaked at OLR(COD of 17.5 kg·m−3·day−1 with 8.2 L·L−1·day−1, where COD degradation grade was 90.4%. The biogas collected from the reactor at 9 bar and 1.5 bar contained approximately 74.5% CH4 and 66.2% CH4, respectively, regardless of OLR variation. At OLR(COD of 5–12.5 kg·m−3·day−1, the reactor at 9 bar had the same specific methane yield as at 1.5 bar, which was in the range of 0.31–0.32 LN·g−1COD. Raising the working pressure in the reactor resulted in an increase of methane content of the produced biogas. However, the low pH value (approximately 6.5 inside the reactor, induced by high CO2 partial pressure seemed to limit the reactor performance at high OLRs and short HRT.

  13. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  14. Characterization and Optimization of Dual Anaerobic/Aerobic Biofilm Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Togna, A

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Phase I STTR effort was to develop and characterize a dual anaerobic/aerobic biofilm process that promotes anaerobic reductive dehalogenation and aerobic cometabolic biodegradation...

  15. A simple anaerobic system for onsite treatment of domestic wastewater

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    UASB), carbon footprint. INTRODUCTION. Domestic wastewater refers to the wastewater from toilet, bathroom and kitchen of household. Anaerobic treatment of organic material proceeds in the absence of oxygen and the presence of anaerobic ...

  16. The effect of tannic compounds on anaerobic wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is an alternative to the conventional aerobic treatment processes for the removal of easily biodegradable organic matter in medium to high strength industrial wastestreams. Anaerobic treatment has several advantages, however one important disadvantage is the

  17. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic ...

  18. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule Inducers of Heme Oxygenase-1 That Protect Human iPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes from Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, R Jason; Divlianska, Daniela B; Whig, Kanupriya; Bryan, Nadezda; Morfa, Camilo J; Koo, Ada; Nguyen, Kevin H; Maloney, Patrick; Peddibhotla, Satayamaheshwar; Sessions, E Hampton; Hershberger, Paul M; Smith, Layton H; Malany, Siobhan

    2018-01-01

    Oxidative injury to cardiomyocytes plays a critical role in cardiac pathogenesis following myocardial infarction. Transplantation of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes has recently progressed as a novel treatment to repair damaged cardiac tissue but its efficacy has been limited by poor survival of transplanted cells owing to oxidative stress in the post-transplantation environment. Identification of small molecules that activate cardioprotective pathways to prevent oxidative damage and increase survival of stem cells post-transplantation is therefore of great interest for improving the efficacy of stem cell therapies. This report describes a chemical biology phenotypic screening approach to identify and validate small molecules that protect human-induced pluripotent stem cell cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) from oxidative stress. A luminescence-based high-throughput assay for cell viability was used to screen a diverse collection of 48,640 small molecules for protection of hiPSC-CMs from peroxide-induced cell death. Cardioprotective activity of "hit" compounds was confirmed using impedance-based detection of cardiomyocyte monolayer integrity and contractile function. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the identification of a potent class of compounds with 4-(pyridine-2-yl)thiazole scaffold. Examination of gene expression in hiPSC-CMs revealed that the hit compound, designated cardioprotectant 312 (CP-312), induces robust upregulation of heme oxygenase-1, a marker of the antioxidant response network that has been strongly correlated with protection of cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress. CP-312 therefore represents a novel chemical scaffold identified by phenotypic high-throughput screening using hiPSC-CMs that activates the antioxidant defense response and may lead to improved pharmacological cardioprotective therapies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago-Martínez, M. Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico); Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando [Facultad de Medicina, UNAM, Mexico City (Mexico); Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico); Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo, E-mail: rjass_cardiol@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The protist Euglena gracilis had the ability to grow and remove large amounts of Cd{sup 2+} under anaerobic conditions. • High biomass was attained by combination of glycolytic and mitochondrial carbon sources. • Routes of degradation of glucose, glutamate and malate under anaerobic conditions in E. gracilis are described. • Biosorption was the main mechanism of Cd{sup 2+} removal in anaerobiosis, whereas the Cd{sup 2+} intracellularly accumulated was inactivated by thiol-molecules and polyphosphate. - Abstract: The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd{sup 2+}) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1}) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O{sub 2}, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25–33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd{sup 2+} which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd{sup 2+} induced a higher MDA production. Cd{sup 2+} stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd{sup 2+} from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd{sup 2+} under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O{sub 2} concentration is particularly low.

  20. The Mechanism of Gefitinib Resistance Induced by Hepatocyte Growth Factor 
in Sensitive Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglan XUAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Previous studies have reported that Met might be related to gefitinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The present study aims to explore the mechanism of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-induced gefitinib resistance in different gene types of sensitive NSCLC in vitro. Methods The PC-9 and H292 cell lines were chosen and induced by HGF. The cell survival was measured using MTT assay, the cell cycle distribution was measured using PI assay, and cell apoptosis with an Annexin V-PE assay, respectively. The c-Met and p-Met protein expression was determined via Western blot analysis. Results Gefitinib inhibited the growth of PC-9 and H292 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration-survival curves of both cell lines shifted to the right when induced with HGF. HGF did not affect PC-9 and H292 cell proliferation. The cell also had a higher cell survival rate when treated with HGF and gefitinib compared with that under gefitinib alone (P<0.05. The apoptotic rate and cell cycle progression showed no significant difference between the HG and G group (P>0.05. HGF stimulated Met phosphorylation in the PC-9 and H292 cells. Gefitinib inhibited the HGF-induced Met phosphorylation in PC-9 cells, but not in H292 cells. Conclusion HGF induces gefitinib resistance in PC-9 and H292 cells. HGF-induced Met phosphorylation may be an important mechanism of gefitinib resistance in sensitive NSCLC.

  1. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    The report describes the work of a two year programme investigating the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel embedded in a range of candidate repository cements and concretes at laboratory ambient temperatures. The factors investigated in the study were the rate of the anaerobic corrosion reaction, the effect of hydrogen overpressure on the reaction rate and the form of the corrosion product. Both electrochemical and sample weight loss corrosion rate measurements were used. The cements and concretes used were prepared both with and without small additions of chloride (2% by weight of mix water). The results indicate that the corrosion rate is low, <1 μm/year, the effect of hydrogen overpressure is not significant over the range of pressures investigated, 1-100 atmospheres, and that the corrosion product is dependent on the cement used to cast the samples. Magnetite was identified in the case of blast furnace slag replacement cements but for pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cements no corrosion product was evident either from X-ray diffraction or laser Raman measurements. (Author)

  2. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    for these processes. Only a few percent of Bacteria and Archaea have so far been isolated, and almost nothing is known about the dynamics and interactions between these and other microorganisms. This lack of knowledge is most clearly exemplified by the sometimes unpredictable and unexplainable failures...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  3. Anaerobic digestion of cider apple residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras Lopez, A. (E.T.S.I.I., U.N.E.D., Madrid (Spain). Dept. Quimica Applicada a la Ingenieria); Lopez Bobo, R. (E.T.S. Ingeneiros Industriales, Asturias (Spain). Dept. de Energia)

    1992-12-01

    Apple residue from the cider industry is used here for anaerobic fermentation. The effect of retention time and volatile solids concentration on the production of biogas and methane was investigated by using continuously mixed anaerobic fermentors with a working volume of 1 1. The maximum proportions of biogas and methane obtained were 430 1 biogas/kg per day (12 days' retention time and 3% of volatile solids) and 281 1 of methane per day (a retention time of 30 days and 2% of volatile solids), respectively. (author)

  4. Anaerobic bacteria, the colon and colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, W E

    1980-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria constitute more than 90% of the bacteria in the colon. An anaerobic environment is needed to maintain their growth and the production of short-chain fatty acids by these bacteria from carbohydrates. Short-chain fatty acids are rapidly absorbed and essential for metabolic as well as functional welfare of the colonic mucosa. The importance of these acids in water absorption and in the patogenesis of colitis is discussed in relation to the concept of "energy deficiency diseases" of the colonic mucosa.

  5. Methane from Syngas by Anaerobic Digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sanjay; Bergland, Wenche Hennie; Bakke, Rune

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a prominent green technology used for methane production from organic waste. Previous studies have shown that the amount of CH4 produced during anaerobic digestion can be increased by adding inorganic electron donors such as H2 and CO, both which can be produced as syngas from wood. Syngas inflow is implemented in the ADM1 model and simulations are carried out with different syngas additions to a well-documented case of wastewater treatment plant sludge AD. Three d...

  6. Renewable methane from anaerobic digestion of biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Owens, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Production of methane via anaerobic digestion of energy crops and organic wastes would benefit society by providing a clean fuel from renewable feedstocks. This would replace fossil fuel-derived energy and reduce environmental impacts including global warming and acid rain. Although biomass energy is more costly than fossil fuel-derived energy, trends to limit carbon dioxide and other emissions through emission regulations, carbon taxes, and subsidies of biomass energy would make it cost competitive. Methane derived from anaerobic digestion is competitive in efficiencies and costs to other biomass energy forms including heat, synthesis gases, and ethanol. (author)

  7. Anaerobic digestion of industrial activated aerobic sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodloe, J.G.; Roberts, R.S.

    1990-04-01

    The Tennessee Eastman Company manufactures a variety of organic chemicals, plastics and fibers at their Kingsport Tennessee Facility. The wastewater generated during the manufacture of these compounds is currently treated using an activated sludge process. The objective of the project is to evaluate the economic potential of an anaerobic digestion process to convert industrial sludge at the Tennessee Eastman Company into biogas. The evaluation will require collection and analysis of experimental data on the anaerobic digestion of industrial sludge obtained from Kingsport. Although the experiments will be conducted using Tennessee Eastman sludge, these results should be also generally applicable to similar industrial sludge

  8. In vitro activity of mecillinam against anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinkraus, G E; McCarthy, L R

    1980-01-01

    A microtiter broth dilution method was employed to determine the in vitro activity of mecillinam against 201 recent clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. Both the anerobic gram-positive and anaerobic gram-negative bacilli displayed a wide range of minimal inhibitory concentrations of mecillinam; most strains were resistant to the antibiotic. The anaerobic cocci exhibited a narrower range of minimal inhibitory concentrations than were observed with other anaerobes, but also exhibited mecill...

  9. Systemic disease-induced salivary biomarker profiles in mouse models of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Gao; Hui Zhou; Lei Zhang; Jin Wook Lee; Qing Zhou; Shen Hu; Lawrence E Wolinsky; James Farrell; Guido Eibl; David T Wong

    2009-01-01

    Background Saliva (oral fluids) is an emerging biofluid poised for detection of clinical diseases. Although the rationale for oral diseases applications (e.g. oral cancer) is intuitive, the rationale and relationship between systemic diseases and saliva biomarkers are unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used mouse models of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer and compared the transcriptome biomarker profiles of tumor-bearing mice to those of control mice. Microarray ...

  10. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Induced Angioedema of the Small Bowel-A Surgical Abdomen Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Adam S; Schranz, Craig

    2015-06-01

    Angioedema is an infrequent complication of the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) that has an incidence of up to 0.5%. The oropharynx is most commonly affected. Angioedema of the small bowel is a much rarer occurrence; it uniformly presents with abdominal pain of variable duration. A 51-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with generalized abdominal pain, emesis, diarrhea, and bloating. Medical history was significant for hypertension and medications included captopril, metoprolol and aspirin. Vital signs and laboratory tests were unremarkable. Due to the presence of significant abdominal tenderness with guarding on examination, a FAST (focused assessment with ultrasound in trauma) examination was performed and revealed free fluid in the abdomen. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen was quickly obtained, which revealed a large amount of simple-appearing free fluid within the abdomen and mucosal edema throughout the small bowel. The patient underwent an emergent diagnostic laparoscopy and was ultimately diagnosed with angioedema of the small bowel, deemed secondary to captopril usage. Captopril was discontinued and symptoms gradually resolved with supportive care. When imaging is obtained in cases such as this one, small bowel submucosal edema and ascites are often present. Supportive care and cessation of ACEi usage are the cornerstones of treatment. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: In patients on ACEi, it is important to keep this diagnosis in mind to potentially avoid an unneeded surgical intervention, as the condition is self-limiting and can be treated primarily with supportive measures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Seleno-short-chain chitosan induces apoptosis in human non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yana; Zhang, Shaojing; Wang, Pengfei; Fu, Shengnan; Wu, Di; Liu, Anjun

    2017-12-01

    Seleno-short-chain chitosan (SSCC) is a synthesized chitosan derivative. In this study, antitumor activity and underlying mechanism of SSCC on human non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells were investigated in vitro. The MTT assay showed that SSCC could inhibit cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and 200 μg/ml SSCC exhibited significantly toxic effects on A549 cells. The cell cycle assay showed that SSCC triggered S phase cell cycle arrest in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was related to a downregulation of S phase associated cyclin A. The DAPI staining and Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining identified that the SSCC could induce A549 cells apoptosis. Further studies found that SSCC led to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by DCFH-DA and Rhodamin 123 staining, respectively. Meanwhile, free radical scavengers N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) pretreatment confirmed that SSCC-induced A549 cells apoptosis was associated with ROS generation. Furthermore, real-time PCR and western blot assay showed that SSCC up-regulated Bax and down-regulated Bcl-2, subsequently incited the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytoplasm, activated the increase of cleaved-caspase 3 and finally induced A549 cells apoptosis in vitro. In general, the present study demonstrated that SSCC induced A549 cells apoptosis via ROS-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

  12. Molecular Switch Role of Akt in Polygonatum odoratum Lectin-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zheng; Wang, Hailian; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Kailiang; Qi, Wei; Bao, Jinku; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Polygonatum odoratum lectin (POL), isolated from traditional Chinese medicine herb (Mill.) Druce, has drawn rising attention due to its wide biological activities. In the present study, anti-tumor effects, including apoptosis- and autophagy-inducing properties of POL, were determined by a series of cell biology methods such as MTT, cellular morphology observation, flow cytometry, immunoblotting. Herein, we found that POL could simultaneously induce apoptosis and autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. POL initiated apoptosis through inhibiting Akt-NF-κB pathway, while POL triggered autophagy via suppressing Akt-mTOR pathway, suggesting the molecular switch role of Akt in regulating between POL-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Moreover, ROS was involved in POL-induced inhibition of Akt expression, and might therefore mediate both apoptosis and autophagy in A549 cells. In addition, POL displayed no significant cytotoxicity toward normal human embryonic lung fibroblast HELF cells. Due to the anti-tumor activities, POL might become a potent anti-cancer drug in future therapy, which might pave the way for exploring GNA-related lectins into effective drugs in cancer treatment. PMID:24992302

  13. A Small Molecule Polyamine Oxidase Inhibitor Blocks Androgen-Induced Oxidative Stress and Delays Prostate Cancer Progression in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Hirak S.; Thompson, Todd A.; Church, Dawn R.; Clower, Cynthia C.; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Amlong, Corey A.; Martin, Christopher T.; Woster, Patrick M.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Wilding, George

    2009-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) present in human prostate epithelia are an important etiological factor in prostate cancer (CaP) occurrence, recurrence and progression. Androgen induces ROS production in the prostate by a yet unknown mechanism. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that androgen induces an overexpression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyamine oxidation pathway. As prostatic epithelia produce a large excess of polyamines, the androgen-induced polyamine oxidation that produces H2O2 could be a major reason for the high ROS levels in the prostate epithelia. A small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor N,N'-butanedienyl butanediamine (MDL 72,527 or CPC-200) effectively blocks androgen-induced ROS production in human CaP cells as well as significantly delays CaP progression and death in animals developing spontaneous CaP. These data demonstrate that polyamine oxidation is not only a major pathway for ROS production in prostate, but inhibiting this pathway also successfully delays prostate cancer progression. PMID:19773450

  14. A small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor blocks androgen-induced oxidative stress and delays prostate cancer progression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Hirak S; Thompson, Todd A; Church, Dawn R; Clower, Cynthia C; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Amlong, Corey A; Martin, Christopher T; Woster, Patrick M; Lindstrom, Mary J; Wilding, George

    2009-10-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) present in human prostate epithelia are an important etiologic factor in prostate cancer (CaP) occurrence, recurrence, and progression. Androgen induces ROS production in the prostate by a yet unknown mechanism. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that androgen induces an overexpression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyamine oxidation pathway. As prostatic epithelia produce a large excess of polyamines, the androgen-induced polyamine oxidation that produces H2O2 could be a major reason for the high ROS levels in the prostate epithelia. A small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor N,N'-butanedienyl butanediamine (MDL 72,527 or CPC-200) effectively blocks androgen-induced ROS production in human CaP cells, as well as significantly delays CaP progression and death in animals developing spontaneous CaP. These data show that polyamine oxidation is not only a major pathway for ROS production in prostate, but inhibiting this pathway also successfully delays CaP progression.

  15. Effects of tetrodotoxin and ion replacements on the short-circuit current induced by Escherichiacoli heat stable enterotoxin across small intestine of the gerbil (Gerbillus cheesmani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Yaqoub Al-Balool

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mucosally added Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa 30 ng ml-1 on the basal short-circuit current (Isc in µA cm-2 across stripped and unstripped sheets of jejuna and ilea taken from fed, starved (4 days, water ad lib and undernourished (50% control food intake for 21 days gerbil (Gerbillus cheesmani were investigated. The effect of neurotoxin tetrodotoxin (TTX 10 µM and the effects of replacing chloride by gluconate or the effects of removing bicarbonate from bathing buffers on the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa were also investigated. The maximum increase in Isc which resulted from the addition of STa were significantly higher in jejuna and ilea taken from starved and undernourished gerbils when compared with the fed control both using stripped and unstripped sheets. In the two regions of the small intestine taken from fed and starved animals TTX reduced the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa across unstripped sheets only. Moreover in jejuna and ilea taken from undernourished gerbils TTX reduced significantly the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa across stripped and unstripped sheets. Replacing chloride by gluconate decreased the maximum increase in Isc induced by STa across jejuna and ilea taken from undernourished gerbils only. Removing bicarbonates from bathing buffer decreased the maximum increase in Isc across the jejuna and ilea taken from starved and undernourished gerbils.

  16. Kinetic study of treatment of wastewater contains food preservative agent by anaerobic baffled reactor : An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumantri, Indro; Purwanto,; Budiyono [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Diponegoro University Jl. Prof. H. Soedarto, SH, Kampus Baru Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    The characteristic of wastewater of food industries with preservative substances is high content of organic substances, degradable and high total suspended solid. High organic content in this waste forced the treatment is biologically and pointed out to anaerobic treatment. Anaerobic showed the better performance of degradation than aerobic for high content organic and also for toxic materials. During that day the treatment of food wastewater is aerobically which is high consume of energy required and high volume of sludge produced. The advantage of anaerobic is save high energy, less product of sludge, less requirement of nutrients of microorganism and high efficiency reduction of organic load. The high efficiency of reduction will reduce the load of further treatment, so that, the threshold limit based on the regulation would be easy to achieve. Research of treatment of wastewater of food industries would be utilized by both big scale industries and small industries using addition of preservative substances. The type reactor of anaerobic process is anaerobic baffled reactor that will give better contact between wastewater and microorganism in the sludge. The variables conducted in this research are the baffled configuration, sludge height, preservative agent contents, hydralic retention time and influence of micro nutrients. The respons of this research are the COD effluent, remaining preservative agent, pH, formation of volatile fatty acid and total suspended solid. The result of this research is kinetic model of the anaerobic baffled reactor, reaction kinetic of preservative agent degradation and technology of treatment wastewater contains preservative agent. The benefit of this research is to solve the treatment of wastewater of food industries with preservative substance in order to achieve wastewater limit regulation and also to prevent the environmental deterioration.

  17. Kinetic study of treatment of wastewater contains food preservative agent by anaerobic baffled reactor : An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumantri, Indro; Purwanto,; Budiyono

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic of wastewater of food industries with preservative substances is high content of organic substances, degradable and high total suspended solid. High organic content in this waste forced the treatment is biologically and pointed out to anaerobic treatment. Anaerobic showed the better performance of degradation than aerobic for high content organic and also for toxic materials. During that day the treatment of food wastewater is aerobically which is high consume of energy required and high volume of sludge produced. The advantage of anaerobic is save high energy, less product of sludge, less requirement of nutrients of microorganism and high efficiency reduction of organic load. The high efficiency of reduction will reduce the load of further treatment, so that, the threshold limit based on the regulation would be easy to achieve. Research of treatment of wastewater of food industries would be utilized by both big scale industries and small industries using addition of preservative substances. The type reactor of anaerobic process is anaerobic baffled reactor that will give better contact between wastewater and microorganism in the sludge. The variables conducted in this research are the baffled configuration, sludge height, preservative agent contents, hydralic retention time and influence of micro nutrients. The respons of this research are the COD effluent, remaining preservative agent, pH, formation of volatile fatty acid and total suspended solid. The result of this research is kinetic model of the anaerobic baffled reactor, reaction kinetic of preservative agent degradation and technology of treatment wastewater contains preservative agent. The benefit of this research is to solve the treatment of wastewater of food industries with preservative substance in order to achieve wastewater limit regulation and also to prevent the environmental deterioration

  18. (S)-crizotinib induces apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating ROS independent of MTH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xuanxuan; Guo, Guilong; Zou, Peng; Cui, Ri; Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Xi; Yin, Changtian; He, Wei; Vinothkumar, Rajamanickam; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaohua; Liang, Guang

    2017-09-07

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80-85% of all lung cancers and is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage with poor prognosis. Targeted therapy has produced unprecedented outcomes in patients with NSCLC as a number of oncogenic drivers have been found. Crizotinib, a selective small-molecule inhibitor, has been widely used for the treatment of NSCLC patients with ALK gene rearrangements. A recent study has also shown that (S)-enantiomer of crizotinib exhibits anticancer activity by targeting the protein mutT homologue (MTH1). Since this discovery, contradictory studies have cast a doubt on MTH1 as a therapeutic target of (S)-crizotinib. NCI-H460, H1975, and A549 cells and immunodeficient mice were chosen as a model to study the (S)-crizotinib treatment. The changes induced by (S)-crizotinib treatment in cell viability, apoptosis as well as ROS, and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway in the cells were analyzed by MTT assay, FACSCalibur, Western blotting, ROS imaging and electron microscopy. Here, we report that MTH1 does not affect survival of NSCLC cells. We found that (S)-crizotinib induces lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER) response in cultured NSCLC cells by increasing intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Blockage of ROS production markedly reversed (S)-crizotinib-induced ER stress and cell apoptosis, independent of MTH1. We confirmed these findings in NSCLC xenograft studies and showed that (S)-crizotinib-induced ER stress and cell apoptosis. Our results reveal a novel antitumor mechanism of (S)-crizotinib in NSCLC which involves activation of ROS-dependent ER stress apoptotic pathway and is independent of MTH1 inhibition.

  19. Methotrexate administration induces differential and selective protein tyrosine nitration and cysteine nitrosylation in the subcellular organelles of the small intestinal mucosa of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Kasthuri; Abraham, Premila

    2016-05-05

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is one of the most frequent dose limiting side effects of methotrexate (MTX), a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug. Peroxynitrite (PON) overproduction is reported to contribute to MTX induced gastrointestinal mucositis. However, the consequence of PON overproduction i.e. protein tyrosine nitration and protein cysteine nitrosylation, the subcellular distribution of these modified proteins and their molecular weights have not been investigated yet. Mucositis was induced in Wistar rats by the administration of 3 consecutive i.p. injections of MTX. Tyrosine nitrated proteins and cysteine nitrosylated proteins were determined in the subcellular organelles fractions of mucosa using immunoprecipitation and western blot. The proteins in the subcellular fractions were separated by 1D electrophoresis, and probed with anti -nitrotyrosine antibody and anti-nitrosocysteine antibody. After MTX treatment, a general increase in protein tyrosine nitration as well as a change in the spectrum of proteins that underwent nitration was observed. The relative densities of the 3 nitrotyrosine protein adducts were as follows: Mitochondria > cytosol > microsomes > nucleus. In the mitochondrial fraction increased nitration of 12 kDa, 25 kDa 29Kda, 47 kDa, and 62Kda proteins, in the cytosol increased nitration of 12 kDa, 19 kDa, 45 kDa, and 60 kDa proteins and in the nuclear fraction increased nitration of 17 kDa, 35 kDa, and 58 kDa proteins was observed. On the other hand, MTX treatment resulted to a general decrease in protein cysteine nitrosylation in all the subcellular fractions. These results suggest that MTX induced, PON mediated small intestinal injury is mediated by differential nitration and nitrosylation of proteins in the subcellular organelles with increased protein tyrosine nitration and decreased cysteine nitrosylation. In addition MTX treatment results in selective nitration and nitrosylation of proteins in the intestinal mucosa. This differential

  20. Differences in Cold Adaptation of Bacillus subtilis under Anaerobic and Aerobic Conditions▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranová, Jana; Mansilla, María C.; de Mendoza, Diego; Elhottová, Dana; Konopásek, Ivo

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis, which grows under aerobic conditions, employs fatty acid desaturase (Des) to fluidize its membrane when subjected to temperature downshift. Des requires molecular oxygen for its activity, and its expression is regulated by DesK-DesR, a two-component system. Transcription of des is induced by the temperature downshift and is decreased when membrane fluidity is restored. B. subtilis is also capable of anaerobic growth by nitrate or nitrite respiration. We studied the mechanism of cold adaptation in B. subtilis under anaerobic conditions that were predicted to inhibit Des activity. We found that in anaerobiosis, in contrast to aerobic growth, the induction of des expression after temperature downshift (from 37°C to 25°C) was not downregulated. However, the transfer from anaerobic to aerobic conditions rapidly restored the downregulation. Under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the induction of des expression was substantially reduced by the addition of external fluidizing oleic acid and was fully dependent on the DesK-DesR two-component regulatory system. Fatty acid analysis proved that there was no desaturation after des induction under anaerobic conditions despite the presence of high levels of the des protein product, which was shown by immunoblot analysis. The cold adaptation of B. subtilis in anaerobiosis is therefore mediated exclusively by the increased anteiso/iso ratio of branched-chain fatty acids and not by the temporarily increased level of unsaturated fatty acids that is typical under aerobic conditions. The degrees of membrane fluidization, as measured by diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy, were found to be similar under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:20581210

  1. Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2013-06-05

    Jun 5, 2013 ... grown in the bottom part of UASB reactor were more compact and tense than those that occurred in the ... anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic biological treatment, biogas, granulated anaerobic sludge, industrial wastewater. INTRODUCTION ... structure of filaments of methanogenic bacteria,.

  2. The developments of anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... Key words: Anaerobic baffled reactor, anaerobic process, reactor development, performance, solids retention, full-scale. INTRODUCTION. With the ... erobic reactors for the treatment of wastewater. As one of the high-rate anaerobic reactors, the ABR was extensively used in treating wastewater. The ABR ...

  3. The IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No 1 (ADM1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batstone, D.J.; Keller, J.; Angelidaki, I.; Kalyuzhnyi, S.V.; Pavalostathis, S.G.; Rozzi, A.; Sanders, W.T.M.; Siegrist, H.; Vavilin, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    The IWA Anaerobic Digestion Modelling Task Group was established in 1997 at the 8th World Congress on Anaerobic Digestion (Sendai, Japan) with the goal of developing a generalised anaerobic digestion model. The structured model includes multiple steps describing biochemical as well as

  4. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  5. The IWA Anaerobic digestion model no 1. (ADM1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batstone, Damien J.; Keller, J.; Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    The IWA Anaerobic Digestion Modelling Task Group was established in 1997 at the 8th World Congress on Anaerobic Digestion (Sendai, Japan) with the goal of developing a generalised anaerobic digestion model. The structured model includes multiple steps describing biochemical as well...

  6. Compensatory periplasmic nitrate reductase activity supports anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in the absence of membrane nitrate reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alst, Nadine E.; Sherrill, Lani A.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Haidaris, Constantine G.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrate serves as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reduction of nitrate to nitrite generates a transmembrane proton motive force allowing ATP synthesis and anaerobic growth. Inner membrane-bound nitrate reductase NarGHI is encoded within the narK1K2GHJI operon and the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapAB is encoded within the napEFDABC operon. The role of the two dissimilatory nitrate reductases in anaerobic growth, and the regulation of their expression were examined by using a set of deletion mutants in P. aeruginosa PAO1. NarGHI mutants were unable to grow anaerobically, but plate cultures remained viable up to 120 hr. In contrast, nitrate sensor-response regulator mutant ΔnarXL displayed growth arrest initially, but resumed growth after 72 hr and reached early stationary phase in liquid culture after 120 hr. Genetic, transcriptional, and biochemical studies demonstrated that anaerobic growth recovery by the NarXL mutant was the result of NapAB periplasmic nitrate reductase expression. A novel transcriptional start site for napEFDABC expression was identified in the NarXL mutant grown anaerobically. Furthermore, mutagenesis of a consensus NarL-binding site monomer upstream of the novel transcriptional start site restored anaerobic growth recovery in the NarXL mutant. The data suggest that during anaerobic growth of wild type P. aeruginosa PAO1, nitrate response regulator NarL directly represses expression of periplasmic nitrate reductase, while inducing maximal expression of membrane nitrate reductase. PMID:19935885

  7. Smectite alteration by anaerobic iron corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, D.; Kaufhold, S.; Hassel, A.W.; Dohrmann, R.

    2010-01-01

    . Opposing to reported suggestions, such a large increase in iron fraction can not sufficiently be explained by a simple cation exchange between Fe(II) and the layer charge compensating cations. XRD diffraction of the green bentonite in comparison to the raw bentonite material exposed a new broad peak corresponding to a 7.2 A - 7.4 A phase. This new phase is not swellable with ethylene glycol. The major mineral of the bentonite is still smectite which swells upon treatment with ethylene glycol. The results are consistent with either an intercalated tri-octahedral iron hydroxide or an intercalated single layered double hydroxide phase such as Fe( II-III )(OH) 2 (analogue to fougerite, a green rust mineral), respectively. A possible model explaining the formation is discussed based on the initial cation exchange of interlayer cations with Fe(II) and subsequent growth and formation of an tri-octahedral iron hydroxide sheet. The consumed ratio of iron to hydroxide matches the ratio produced by anaerobic corrosion. The model is similar to the initial reaction pathway proposed for the smectite to chlorite alteration via a solid state transformation. Therefore it is possible to assume that the Fe-smectite represents an intermediate to the formation of a Fe-chlorite, which was identified e.g. by Lantenois et al., at exposure experiments at elevated temperatures. However, in contrast to the proposed mechanism our model does not involve the energy demanding dissolution and subsequent recrystallization of silicate layers but follows the well known cation exchange and a subsequent crystallization. This could explain the high degree of alteration of smectite to Fe-smectite that can be deduced by the amount of incorporated iron. However, additional dissolution - precipitation processes, particularly induced by the high pH, can not be excluded. With respect to unaltered bentonite, the altered bentonite exhibits increased hydraulic conductivity and lower swelling pressures together with a

  8. Proceedings of the 10. world congress on anaerobic digestion 2004 : anaerobic bioconversion, answer for sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This conference reviewed the broad scope of anaerobic process-related activities taking place globally and confirmed the possibilities of using anaerobic processes to add value to industrial wastewaters, municipal solid wastes and organic wastes while minimizing pollution and greenhouse gases. It focused on biomolecular tools, instrumentation of anaerobic digestion processes, anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated organics, and thermophilic and mesophilic digestion. Several papers focused on the feasibility of using waste products to produce hydrogen and methane for electricity generation. The sessions of the conference were entitled acidogenesis; microbial ecology; process control; sulfur content; technical development; domestic wastewater; agricultural waste; organic municipal solid wastes; instrumentation; molecular biology; sludges; agricultural feedstock; bioremediation; industrial wastewater; hydrogen production; pretreatments; sustainability; and integrated systems. The conference featured 387 posters and 192 oral presentations, of which 111 have been indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  9. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, F.E. [VFA Services Ltd., Herts (United Kingdom)

    1996-01-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion within the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  10. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Slug induces apoptosis and sensitizes human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells to doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yinghua; Liu, Peiji; Chen, Deng; Dou, Linying

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human cancers and often shows resistance to multimodal therapeutic approaches. It has been shown that the transcriptional repressor Slug inhibits the chemotherapeutic agent-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. We evaluated whether targeting of Slug could augment doxorubicin (DOX)-induced apoptosis of ATC cells. We also determined changes in PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) expression levels to identify possible mechanisms of their combined actions. SW1736 cells were transfected with Slug siRNA or/and PUMA siRNA and then exposed to DOX (0.1, 1, and 5 μ M) for selected times. Scrambled siRNA was used as a control. The effects on cell viability were determined via MTT assay. Apoptosis was assessed using TUNEL assays and annexin V staining, and was confirmed by flow cytometry analyses. Slug and PUMA levels were determined using western blotting, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. We used a subcutaneous implanted tumor model of SW1736 cells in nude mice to assess the effects of Slug silencing in combination with DOX on tumor development. Apoptosis was assessed via TUNEL assay. Targeting of Slug using siRNA inhibits growth of SW1736 cells and sensitizes SW1736 cells to DOX in vitro and vivo. Targeting of Slug combined with DOX led to lower cell viability than treatment with DOX alone in SW1736 cells. TUNEL and flow cytometry analyses showed that targeting of Slug enhanced DOX-induced apoptosis of SW1736 cells. In addition, targeting of Slug increased PUMA expression, and targeting of PUMA restored the chemoresistance of SW1736/Slug siRNA cells to DOX. Knockdown of Slug enhanced the antitumor activity of DOX in SW1736 cells via induction of PUMA upregulation. Our results suggest that targeting of Slug has good potential for the development of new therapeutic strategies for ATC.

  11. Greater eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage by large versus small range of motion with the same end-point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochi, AG; Damas, F; Berton, R; Alvarez, I; Miquelini, M; Salvini, TF

    2016-01-01

    Several factors can affect the magnitude of eccentric exercise (ECC)-induced muscle damage, but little is known regarding the effect of the range of motion (ROM) in ECC-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether elbow flexor ECC with 120° of ROM (from 60° of elbow flexion until elbow full extension - 180° [120ROM]) induces a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM (120-180° of elbow flexion [60ROM]). Twelve healthy young men (age: 22 ± 3.1 years; height: 1.75 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 75.6 ± 13.6 kg) performed the ECC with 120ROM and 60ROM using different arms in a random order separated by 2 weeks and were tested before and 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after ECC for maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC-ISO), ROM and muscle soreness. The 120ROM protocol showed greater changes and effect sizes (ES) for MVC-ISO (-35%, ES: 1.97), ROM (-11.5°, ES: 1.27) and muscle soreness (19 mm, ES: 1.18) compared with the 60ROM protocol (-23%, ES: 0.93; -12%, ES: 0.56; 17°, ES: 0.63; 8 mm, ES: 1.07, respectively). In conclusion, ECC of the elbow flexors with 120° of ROM promotes a greater magnitude of muscle damage compared with a protocol with 60° of ROM, even when both protocols are performed at long muscle lengths. PMID:27601784

  12. Kinetics of the urea-induced dissociation of human plasma alpha-2-macroglobulin as measured by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöberg, B.; Pap, S.; Järnberg, S.-E.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the urea-induced dissociation of human plasma alpha-2-macroglobulin into two half-molecular fragments was investigated at 21.0-degrees-C by using small-angle neutron scattering. The relative change in molecular mass that occurs upon dissociation was monitored by recording the forw......The kinetics of the urea-induced dissociation of human plasma alpha-2-macroglobulin into two half-molecular fragments was investigated at 21.0-degrees-C by using small-angle neutron scattering. The relative change in molecular mass that occurs upon dissociation was monitored by recording...... the forward scattering of neutrons as a function of time. All these kinetic data can be explained by a reaction that is first-order with respect to the concentration of undissociated alpha-2-macroglobulin. The velocity constant is a function of urea concentration and it varies within wide limits. For instance...... that there is a pronounced kinetic isotope effect, i.e. the dissociation is 4 times faster in the H-1-containing medium as compared with the H-2-containing medium at the same molar concentration of urea. From the angular dependence of the neutron scattering it can be concluded that the dissociation is associated...

  13. Small-bowel necrosis complicating a cytomegalovirus-induced superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in an immunocompetent patient: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Superior mesenteric venous thrombosis as a result of acute cytomegalovirus infection is rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. Case presentation We present the case of a 40-year-old Caucasian man who was admitted to our hospital with a 5-day history of fever. His serological test and pp65 antigen detection of cytomegalovirus were positive, suggesting acute infection. On the sixth day after his admission, the patient complained of acute, progressive abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. An emergency laparotomy showed diffuse edema and ischemic lesions of the small bowel and its associated mesentery with a 50-cm-long segmental infarction of the proximal jejunum. An extensive enterectomy of about 100 cm of jejunum that included the necrotic segment was performed, followed by an end-to-end anastomosis. Anti-coagulation therapy was administered pre-operatively in the form of small-fractionated heparin and continued postoperatively. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the 11th postoperative day. Conclusion Acute cytomegalovirus infection can contribute to the occurrence of mesenteric venous thrombosis in immunocompetent patients. It is important for physicians and internists to be aware of the possible thrombotic complications of cytomegalovirus infection. A high level of clinical suspicion is essential to successfully treat a potentially lethal condition such as superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. PMID:22531275

  14. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an estuarine sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Meyer, R.L.; Schmid, M.C.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Enrich-Prast, A.; Rysgaard, S.; Revsbech, N.P.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process relative to denitrification was studied in photosynthetically active sediment from 2 shallow-water estuaries: Randers Fjord and Norsminde Fjord, Denmark. Anammox accounted for 5 to 24 % of N-2 production in Randers

  15. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an estuarine sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Meyer, R.L.; Schmid, M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Enrich-Prast, A.; Rysgaard, S.; Revsbech, N.P.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process relative to denitrification was studied in photosynthetically active sediment from 2 shallow-water estuaries: Randers Fjord and Norsminde Fjord, Denmark. Anammox accounted for 5 to 24% of N2 production in Randers

  16. Enhanced anaerobic biological treatment of phenolic wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindzierski, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    The combined treatment requirements for a high strength phenolic wastewater were examined in batch and semicontinuous anaerobic methanogenic bioassays. Solvent extraction pretreatment and in-situ addition of activated carbon during anaerobic treatment were effective in removing phenol from a coal liquefaction wastewater from the H-coal process. The selective pH adjustment of high strength phenolic wastewater followed by diisopropyl ether extraction reduced the phenolic concentration to non-inhibitory levels, and removed non-phenolic inhibitory compounds. The weakly acid nature of phenol and substituted phenols allows for their selective removal by solvent extraction. Anaerobic bacteria were able to degrade phenol in the solvent extracted wastwater, however, the bacteria exhibited instability under semicontinuous feeding conditions. The addition of activated carbon to the stressed phenol-degrading cultures improved their ability to remove phenol from solution. Further investigation into the role activated carbon performed during anaerobic phenol treatment demonstrated its importance as a biological support, in addition to providing adsorptive capacity for organic (including inhibitory) compounds. The similar study of other support materials (ion exchange resins) which did not possess an adsorptive capacity for organic compounds supported these findings. Excellent agreement was demonstrated among physical evaluation methods, performance bioassays, radiolabelled cell adsorption studies, and scanning electron microscopy observations in judging the value of the materials as biological supports.

  17. Monitoring and control of anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pind, Peter Frode; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    The current status in monitoring and control of anaerobic reactors is reviewed. The influence of reactor design and waste composition on the possible monitoring and control schemes is examined. After defining the overall control structure, and possible control objectives, the possible process...

  18. Potential for anaerobic conversion of xenobiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Dolfing, J.; Haagensen, Frank

    2003-01-01

    regarding the treatment of xenobiotics is shown with the focus on the UASB reactor, but the applicability of other reactor designs for treatment of hazardous waste is also included. Bioaugmentation has proved to be a viable technique to enhance a specific activity in anaerobic reactors and recent research...

  19. Anaerobic digestion submarine in Abbey farmyard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-07-01

    An anaerobic digestion system and fiber separation plant installed at Bethlehem Abbey (Northern Ireland) produces biogas for central heating and grain drying, and a compost which is bagged and sold. According to one report, it even keeps the monks warm at night. Designed by James Murcott of Farm Gas Ltd., the digester (shaped like a submarine) receives 10% solids slurry.

  20. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the

  1. The fate of methanol in anaerobic bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florencio, L.

    1994-01-01

    Methanol is an important component of certain industrial wastewaters. In anaerobic environments, methanol can be utilized by methanogens and acetogens. In wastewater treatment plants, the conversion of methanol into methane is preferred because this conversion is responsible for chemical

  2. CAN THE END PRODUCTS OF ANAEROBIC METABOLISM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether the accumulation of end products of anaerobic metabolism can be used as an early indicator of deteriorating conditions during transport of live abalone Haliotis midae. A first series of experiments revealed that the enzyme tauropine dehydrogenase, responsible for the ...

  3. Anaerobic prefermentation and primary sedimentation of wastewater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was carried out with the aim of evaluating the solubilisation and acidification capacity of fermenting organisms in suspension in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), which had a volume of 1 800 ℓ. Using 8 h cycles with 340 min of anaerobic reaction time, the wastewater fed to the SBR presented an average of ...

  4. The anaerobic treatment of sulfate containing wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.

    1995-01-01


    In the anaerobic treatment of sulfate containing wastewater sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) will compete with methanogenic- (MB) and acetogenic bacteria (AB) for the available substrates such as hydrogen, acetate, propionate and butyrate. The outcome of this competition will

  5. Comparative effects of undigested and anaerobically digested ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of the effects of undigested and anaerobically digested poultry manure and conventional inorganic fertilizer on the growth characteristics and yield of maize was investigated at Ibadan, Nigeria. The pot experiment consisted of sixty (60) nursery bags, set out in the greenhouse. The treatments, thoroughly ...

  6. Comparative effects of undigested and anaerobically digested ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    Magd et al., 2005). Improvement of environmental con- ditions and public health as well as the need to reduce cost of fertilizing crops are also important reasons for ..... Machin. Assoc. 51(4): 99-104. Thomsen IK (2000). C and N Transformations in 15N Cross-Labeled. Solid Ruminant Manure During Anaerobic Storage., ...

  7. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged p...

  8. Anaerobic digestion in sustainable biomass chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pabon Pereira, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the potential contribution of anaerobic digestion (AD) to the sustainability of biomass chains. Results provide insights in the technological potential to recover energy and valuable by-products from energy crops and residues, and evaluate biomass cascades involving AD

  9. Aerobic and anaerobic performances in tethered swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoti, M; da Silva, A S R; Araujo, G G; Santiago, V; Martins, L E B; Cunha, S A; Gobatto, C A

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the critical force (CritF) and anaerobic impulse capacity (AIC) - estimated by tethered swimming - reflect the aerobic and anaerobic performance of swimmers. 12 swimmers performed incremental test in tethered swimming to determine lactate anaerobic threshold (AnTLAC), maximal oxygen uptake ( ˙VO2MAX) and force associated with the ˙VO2MAX (i ˙VO2MAX). The swimmers performed 4 exhaustive (tlim) exercise bouts (100, 110, 120 and 130% i ˙VO2MAX) to compute the CritF and AIC (F vs. 1/tlim model); a 30-s all-out tethered swimming bout to determine their anaerobic fitness (ANF); 100, 200, and 400-m time-trials to determine the swimming performance. CritF (57.09±11.77 N) did not differ from AnTLAC (53.96±11.52 N, (P>0.05) but was significantly lower than i ˙VO2MAX (71.02±8.36 N). In addition, CritF presented significant correlation with AnTLAC (r=0.76; Pswimming. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Anaerobic Digestion in a Flooded Densified Leachbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chynoweth, David P.; Teixeira, Arthur A.; Owens, John M.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the adaptation of a patented biomass-digesting process, denoted sequential batch anaerobic composting (SEBAC), to recycling of wastes aboard a spacecraft. In SEBAC, high-solids-content biomass wastes are converted into methane, carbon dioxide, and compost.

  11. Anaerobic prefermentation and primary sedimentation of wastewater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-09-01

    Sep 1, 2006 ... EASTMAN J A and FERGUSON J F (1981) Solubilisation of particu- late organic carbon during the acid phase of anaerobic digestion. J. Water Pollut. Control Fed. 53 352-366. GONCALVES RF, CHARLIER AC and SAMMUT F (1994) Primary fermentation of soluble and particulate organic matter for waste-.

  12. Applications of the anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Ellegaard, L.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    and resource/energy recovery have been developed. Treatment of biowastes by anaerobic digestion processes is in many cases the optimal way to convert organic waste into useful products such as energy (in the form of biogas) and a fertilizer product. Other waste management options, such as land filling...

  13. Early Microbial Evolution: The Age of Anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F; Sousa, Filipa L

    2015-12-18

    In this article, the term "early microbial evolution" refers to the phase of biological history from the emergence of life to the diversification of the first microbial lineages. In the modern era (since we knew about archaea), three debates have emerged on the subject that deserve discussion: (1) thermophilic origins versus mesophilic origins, (2) autotrophic origins versus heterotrophic origins, and (3) how do eukaryotes figure into early evolution. Here, we revisit those debates from the standpoint of newer data. We also consider the perhaps more pressing issue that molecular phylogenies need to recover anaerobic lineages at the base of prokaryotic trees, because O2 is a product of biological evolution; hence, the first microbes had to be anaerobes. If molecular phylogenies do not recover anaerobes basal, something is wrong. Among the anaerobes, hydrogen-dependent autotrophs--acetogens and methanogens--look like good candidates for the ancestral state of physiology in the bacteria and archaea, respectively. New trees tend to indicate that eukaryote cytosolic ribosomes branch within their archaeal homologs, not as sisters to them and, furthermore tend to root archaea within the methanogens. These are major changes in the tree of life, and open up new avenues of thought. Geochemical methane synthesis occurs as a spontaneous, abiotic exergonic reaction at hydrothermal vents. The overall similarity between that reaction and biological methanogenesis fits well with the concept of a methanogenic root for archaea and an autotrophic origin of microbial physiology. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  14. Anaerobic hydrolysis during digestion of complex substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, W.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Complex waste(water) such as, raw sewage, dairy wastewater, slaughterhouse wastewater, fish processing wastewater, primary sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste have been proven to be degradable under anaerobic conditions. However, during the digestion process the

  15. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stams, Alfons J M; de Bok, Frank A M; Plugge, Caroline M; van Eekert, Miriam H A; Dolfing, Jan; Schraa, Gosse

    2006-03-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory syntrophic consortia of proton-reducing acetogenic bacteria and hydrogen-consuming methanogenic archaea. Anaerobic microorganisms that use insoluble electron acceptors for growth, such as iron- and manganese-oxide as well as inert graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells, also transfer electrons exocellularly. Soluble compounds, like humic substances, quinones, phenazines and riboflavin, can function as exocellular electron mediators enhancing this type of anaerobic respiration. However, direct electron transfer by cell-cell contact is important as well. This review addresses the mechanisms of exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities. There are fundamental differences but also similarities between electron transfer to another microorganism or to an insoluble electron acceptor. The physical separation of the electron donor and electron acceptor metabolism allows energy conservation in compounds as methane and hydrogen or as electricity. Furthermore, this separation is essential in the donation or acceptance of electrons in some environmental technological processes, e.g. soil remediation, wastewater purification and corrosion.

  16. Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, J.

    1994-05-01

    The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

  17. Teleosts in hypoxia : Aspects of anaerobic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Thillart, G.; van Waarde, Aren

    1985-01-01

    Moderate hypoxia can be tolerated by many fish species, while only some species survive severe hypoxia or anoxia. Hypoxia usually activates anaerobic glycolysis, which may be temporary when the animals are able to improve their oxygen extraction capacity. Switching over to aerobic metabolism allows

  18. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become more attractive and feasible, due to advantages provided by the combination with regard to developments for energy-efficient wastewater treatment. The major drawbacks of MBR technology are related w...

  19. Outcome in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with successful rechallenge after recovery from epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Semba, Hiroshi; Fujii, Shinji; Tsumura, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    Several non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases of successful rechallenge with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) after recovery from gefitinib or erlotinib-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) have been reported, but it is not clear whether the rechallenge affects the outcome. We retrospectively evaluated the difference in the outcome between advanced NCLC patients with active EGFR mutations who received EGFR-TKI rechallenge after recovery from EGFR-TKI-induced ILD and those who did not. EGFR-TKI-induced ILD occurred in 11 (10%) of 110 patients receiving gefitinib, five (7%) of 73 patients receiving erlotinib and one (8%) of 13 patients receiving afatinib. Diffuse alveolar damage pattern ILD was observed in six cases, four of which had chemotherapy-related death. Five of 13 patients who had recovered from ILD received EGFR-TKI rechallenge with concurrent oral administration of prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg after the strict informed consent of the risk for the recurrence of severe ILD. All of the five patients achieved a partial response. The median overall survival from the occurrence of EGFR-TKI-induced ILD was longer in patients with EGFR-TKI rechallenge than that in patients without (15.5 vs. 3.5 months, p = 0.029). The adverse events of EGFR-TKI rechallenge were tolerable, but one case receiving EGFR-TKI rechallenge with the suspected drug exhibited the recurrence of grade 3 ILD after the discontinuation of prednisolone. EGFR-TKI rechallenge with concurrent prednisolone therapy might be salvage therapy in advanced NSCLC patients with active EGFR mutations after recovery from EGFR-TKI-induced ILD.

  20. Using Electron Induced Dissociation (EID) on an LC Time-Scale to Characterize a Mixture of Analogous Small Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Aruna S.; Smith, Michael J. P.; Kaabia, Zied; Hurst, Glenn; Yan, Ci; Sims, Martin; Bristow, Anthony W. T.; Stokes, Peter; Parker, David; Mosely, Jackie A.

    2012-05-01

    LC ESI FTICR MS of a sample of cediranib identified this pharmaceutical target molecule plus an additional 10 compounds of interest, all of which were less than 10% total ion current (TIC) peak intensity relative to cediranib. LC FTICR tandem mass spectrometry using electron induced dissociation (EID) has been achieved and has proven to be the best way to generate useful product ion information for all of these singly protonated molecules. Cediranib [M + H]+ fragmented by EID to give 29 product ions whereas QTOF-CID generated only one very intense product ion, and linear ion trap-CID, which generated 10 product ions, but all with poor S/N. Twenty-six of the EID product ions were unique to this fragmentation technique alone. By considering the complementary LC-EID and LC-CID data together, all 10 unknown compounds were structurally characterized and proven to be analogous to cediranib. Of particular importance, EID produced unique product ion information for one of the low level cediranib analogues that enabled full characterization of the molecule such that the presence of an extra propylpyrrolidine group was discovered and proven to be located on the pyrrolidine ring of cediranib, solving an analytical problem that could not be solved by collision induced dissociation (CID). Thus, it has been demonstrated that EID is in harmony with the chromatography duty-cycle and the dynamic concentration range of synthetic compounds containing trace impurities, providing crucial analytical information that cannot be obtained by more traditional methodologies.

  1. Novel synthetic chalcones induce apoptosis in the A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells harboring a KRAS mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqiang; Hedblom, Andreas; Koerner, Steffi K; Li, Mailin; Jernigan, Finith E; Wegiel, Barbara; Sun, Lijun

    2016-12-01

    A series of novel chalcones were synthesized by the Claisen-Schmidt condensation reaction of tetralones and 5-/6-indolecarboxaldehydes. Treatment of human lung cancer cell line harboring KRAS mutation (A549) with the chalcones induced dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analyses and Western blotting suggested the critical role of the chalcones in interrupting G2/M transition of cell cycle. SAR study demonstrated that substituent on the indole N atom significantly affects the anticancer activity of the chalcones, with methyl and ethyl providing the more active compounds (EC 50 : 110-200nM), Compound 1g was found to be >4-fold more active in the A549 cells (EC 50 : 110nM) than in prostate (PC3) or pancreatic cancer (CLR2119, PAN02) cells. Furthermore, compound 1l selectively induced apoptosis of lung cancer cells A549 (EC 50 : 0.55μM) but did not show measurable toxicity in the normal lung bronchial epithelial cells (hBEC) at doses as high as 10μM, indicating specificity towards cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Audrey N

    2014-09-01

    Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can be severe and life-threatening. Susceptibility testing of anaerobes is not frequently performed in laboratories, but such testing is important to direct appropriate therapy. Anaerobic resistance is increasing globally, and resistance trends vary by geographic region. An overview of a variety of susceptibility testing methods for anaerobes is provided, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are reviewed. Specific clinical situations warranting anaerobic susceptibility testing are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Anaerobic Cysteine Degradation and Potential Metabolic Coordination in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddeke, Melissa; Schneider, Barbara; Oguri, Tamiko; Mehta, Iti; Xuan, Zhenyu; Reitzer, Larry

    2017-08-15

    Salmonella enterica has two CyuR-activated enzymes that degrade cysteine, i.e., the aerobic CdsH and an unidentified anaerobic enzyme; Escherichia coli has only the latter. To identify the anaerobic enzyme, transcript profiling was performed for E. coli without cyuR and with overexpressed cyuR Thirty-seven genes showed at least 5-fold changes in expression, and the cyuPA (formerly yhaOM ) operon showed the greatest difference. Homology suggested that CyuP and CyuA represent a cysteine transporter and an iron-sulfur-containing cysteine desulfidase, respectively. E. coli and S. enterica Δ cyuA mutants grown with cysteine generated substantially less sulfide and had lower growth yields. Oxygen affected the CyuR-dependent genes reciprocally; cyuP-lacZ expression was greater anaerobically, whereas cdsH-lacZ expression was greater aerobically. In E. coli and S. enterica , anaerobic cyuP expression required cyuR and cysteine and was induced by l-cysteine, d-cysteine, and a few sulfur-containing compounds. Loss of either CyuA or RidA, both of which contribute to cysteine degradation to pyruvate, increased cyuP-lacZ expression, which suggests that CyuA modulates intracellular cysteine concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CyuA homologs are present in obligate and facultative anaerobes, confirming an anaerobic function, and in archaeal methanogens and bacterial acetogens, suggesting an ancient origin. Our results show that CyuA is the major anaerobic cysteine-catabolizing enzyme in both E. coli and S. enterica , and it is proposed that anaerobic cysteine catabolism can contribute to coordination of sulfur assimilation and amino acid synthesis. IMPORTANCE Sulfur-containing compounds such as cysteine and sulfide are essential and reactive metabolites. Exogenous sulfur-containing compounds can alter the thiol landscape and intracellular redox reactions and are known to affect several cellular processes, including swarming motility, antibiotic sensitivity, and

  4. Composting of solids separated from anaerobically digested animal manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chowdhury, Md Albarune; de Neergaard, Andreas; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of bulking agents (BA) and mixing ratios on greenhouse gas (GHG) and NH3 emissions from composting digested solids (DS), separated from anaerobically digested manure and other bio-wastes, in small-scale laboratory composters. BA evaluated were plastic tube pieces (PT......), woodchips (WC), bio-char (BC), barley straw (BS) and lupin residues (LR) and were included at a DS:BA of 3:1 or 6:1, resulting in nine treatments: CTDS (control, DS only), PT3:1, PT6:1, WC3:1, WC6:1, BC3:1, BC6:1, BS3:1 and LR3:1. Depending on treatment, C losses via CO2 and CH4 emissions accounted for 41...

  5. ANIMAL MANURE – REDUCED QUALITY BY ANAEROBIC DIGESTION?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løes, Anne-Kristin; Johansen, Anders; Pommeresche, Reidun

    2014-01-01

    caused the death of both surface-dwelling and soil-living earthworms shortly after application, but the long-term effect of manure application seemed more positive, especially at low application levels. So far, we have observed only small differences in the effects of digested and undigested manure......Anaerobic digestion may reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, but we know little about its impact on soil fertility. Reduced concentrations of easily degradable C in the manure may imply less food for the soil fauna and microflora. A field experiment to study its effect on crop yields and soil...... characteristics, established in 2011, showed comparable yield levels in perennial ley over 3 years when digested slurry was compared with undigested slurry. Digestion had no influence on either soil nutrient concentrations or soil organic matter levels over the first 2 years. Application of high amounts of manure...

  6. A new VFA sensor technique for anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pind, Peter Frode; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    to monitor VFA online in one of the most difficult media: animal slurry or manure. A novel in situ filtration technique has made it possible to perform microfiltration inside a reactor system. This filter enables sampling from closed reactor systems without large-scale pumping and filters. Furthermore, due...... to its small size it can be placed in lab-scale reactors without disturbing the process. Using this filtration technique together with commercially available membrane filters we have constructed a VFA sensor system that can perform automatic analysis of animal slurry at a frequency as high as every 15......A key parameter for understanding and controling the anaerobic biogas process is the concentration of volatile fatty acids (VFA). However, this information has so far been limited to off-line measurements using labor-intensive methods. We have developed a new technique that has made it possible...

  7. Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation by Geobacter Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Timothy S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Barlett, Melissa A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of Geobacter species in contaminated aquifers in which benzene is anaerobically degraded has led to the suggestion that some Geobacter species might be capable of anaerobic benzene degradation, but this has never been documented. A strain of Geobacter, designated strain Ben, was isolated from sediments from the Fe(III)-reducing zone of a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which there was significant capacity for anaerobic benzene oxidation. Strain Ben grew in a medium with benzene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the sole electron acceptor. Furthermore, additional evaluation of Geobacter metallireducens demonstrated that it could also grow in benzene-Fe(III) medium. In both strain Ben and G. metallireducens the stoichiometry of benzene metabolism and Fe(III) reduction was consistent with the oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the sole electron acceptor. With benzene as the electron donor, and Fe(III) oxide (strain Ben) or Fe(III) citrate (G. metallireducens) as the electron acceptor, the cell yields of strain Ben and G. metallireducens were 3.2 × 109 and 8.4 × 109 cells/mmol of Fe(III) reduced, respectively. Strain Ben also oxidized benzene with anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as the sole electron acceptor with cell yields of 5.9 × 109 cells/mmol of AQDS reduced. Strain Ben serves as model organism for the study of anaerobic benzene metabolism in petroleum-contaminated aquifers, and G. metallireducens is the first anaerobic benzene-degrading organism that can be genetically manipulated. PMID:23001648

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Releasing 2-Mercaptoacrylic Acid-Based Derivative Possesses Cytoprotective Activity in a Small Intestine of Rats with Medication-Induced Enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Sklyarova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal injury is known to be one of the most commonly appearing pathologies, resulting in the use of medications such as: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, antitumor drugs and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors. The principal objective of this study is to evaluate the action of a novel mercaptoacrylic acid derivative able to release H2S on parameters of NO-synthase system and oxidative stress. Inducing enteropathy, three types of medications were used: indomethacin, an NSAID (35 mg/kg; methotrexate, an antitumor drug (10 mg/kg; and enalapril, an ACE inhibitor (2 mg/kg/day. 2-[(4-chlorophenyl-carbamoyl-methyl]-3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl-acrylic acid (2C3DHTA was introduced based on the background of medication-induced enteropathy (10 mg/kg/day. The survey showed that malondialdehyde (MDA concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, and NO-synthases (NOS were determined in the small intestinal mucosa. The increase in inducible NO-synthase (iNOS activity was due to indomethacin and methotrexate administration. Constitutive NO-synthase (cNOS activity was decreased by an ACE-inhibitor. The cytoprotective effect was demonstrated by 2C3DHTA, which returned iNOS activity to its control level and increased cNOS activity. The enterotoxic action of studied medication was accompanied by the development of oxidative stress manifested, activity of MPO was increased. MPO activity and manifestations of oxidative stress were decreased by 2C3DHTA. Effects of 2C3DHTA can be explained by the action of H2S, released from this compound in the gastrointestinal (GI system.

  9. Selective and membrane-permeable small molecule inhibitors of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase reverse high fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Harshini; Vance, Virginia; Wetzel, Michael D; Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; McHardy, Stanton F; Finnerty, Celeste C; Hommel, Jonathan D; Watowich, Stanley J

    2018-01-01

    There is a critical need for new mechanism-of-action drugs that reduce the burden of obesity and associated chronic metabolic comorbidities. A potentially novel target to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes is nicotinamide-N-methyltransferase (NNMT), a cytosolic enzyme with newly identified roles in cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis. To validate NNMT as an anti-obesity drug target, we investigated the permeability, selectivity, mechanistic, and physiological properties of a series of small molecule NNMT inhibitors. Membrane permeability of NNMT inhibitors was characterized using parallel artificial membrane permeability and Caco-2 cell assays. Selectivity was tested against structurally-related methyltransferases and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) salvage pathway enzymes. Effects of NNMT inhibitors on lipogenesis and intracellular levels of metabolites, including NNMT reaction product 1-methylnicotianamide (1-MNA) were evaluated in cultured adipocytes. Effects of a potent NNMT inhibitor on obesity measures and plasma lipid were assessed in diet-induced obese mice fed a high-fat diet. Methylquinolinium scaffolds with primary amine substitutions displayed high permeability from passive and active transport across membranes. Importantly, methylquinolinium analogues displayed high selectivity, not inhibiting related SAM-dependent methyltransferases or enzymes in the NAD + salvage pathway. NNMT inhibitors reduced intracellular 1-MNA, increased intracellular NAD + and S-(5'-adenosyl)-l-methionine (SAM), and suppressed lipogenesis in adipocytes. Treatment of diet-induced obese mice systemically with a potent NNMT inhibitor significantly reduced body weight and white adipose mass, decreased adipocyte size, and lowered plasma total cholesterol levels. Notably, administration of NNMT inhibitors did not impact total food intake nor produce any observable adverse effects. These results support development of small molecule NNMT inhibitors as therapeutics to

  10. Extent and computed tomography appearance of early radiation induced lung injury for non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Lübeck Christiansen, Rasmus; Asmussen, Jon Thor

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The present study investigates the extent and appearance of radiologic injury in the lung after radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and correlates radiologic response with clinical and dosimetric factors. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eligible follow-up CT...... and time to follow-up predicted lung injury of all categories. Older age increased the risk of interstitial changes and current smoking reduced the risk of consolidation in the lung. CONCLUSION: Radiologic injuries were frequently found in follow-up CT scans after radiotherapy for NSCLC patients. The risk...... of a radiologic response increased with increasing time and lung dose metrics, and depended on patient age and smoking status....

  11. Potassium and calcium channel gene expression in small arteries in porcine and rat models of diet-induced obesity (Poster)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Salomonsson, Max; Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an increasing problem worldwide leading to cardiovascular morbidity. Only limited information exists on the transcriptional regulation of arterial K+ and Ca2+ channels in obesity. We quantified, by real-time PCR, mRNA expression of K+ channels and L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCC) in small...... mesenteric (MA), middle cerebral (MCA), and left coronary arteries (LCA) of lean vs. obese rats and minipigs. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a high-fat (FAT; N=5), high-fructose (FRUC; N=7), high-fat/high-fructose (FAT/FRUC; N=7) or standard diet (STD; N=7-11) for 28 Weeks. FAT and FAT/FRUC became obese......, whereas FRUC and STD were lean. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) averaged over 14 weeks was increased (P

  12. Epithelial mesenchymal transition of non-small-cell lung cancer cells A549 induced by SPHK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Min; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Qu, Zhi-Gang; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Zi-Qian; Hu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    To explore the effect and molecular mechanism of SPHK1 in the invasion and metastasis process of non-small-cell lung cancer cells (A549). Recombinant retrovirus was used to mediate the production of A549/vector, A549/SPHK1, A549/scramble, and A549/SPHKl/RNAi that stably expressed or silenced SPHK1. The invasion and migration capacities of A549 cells overexpressing or silencing SPHK1 were determined using Transwell invasion assay and scratch wound repair experiment. The protein and mRNA expression levels of E-cadherin, fibronectin, vimentin in A549/vector, A549/SPHK1, A549/scramble, A549/SPHK1/RNAi were detected with Western blot (WB) and quantitative PCR (QPCR) methods, respectively. Transwell invasion assay and scratch wound repair experiments showed that over-expression of SPHK1 obviously enhanced the invasion and migration capacities of A549 cells. WB and QPCR detection results showed that, the expression of E-cadherin (a molecular marker of epithelial cells) and fibronectin, vimentin (molecular markers of mesenchymal cells) in A549 cells was upregulated after overexpression of SPHK1; while SPHK1 silencing significantly reduced the invasion and metastasis capacities of A549 cells, upregulated the expression of molecular marker of epithelial cells, and downregulated the expression of molecular marker of mesenchymal cells. SPHK1 promotes epithelial mesenchymal transition of non-small-cell lung cancer cells and affects the invasion and metastasis capacities of these cells. Copyright © 2015 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. HER2 induces cell proliferation and invasion of non-small-cell lung cancer by upregulating COX-2 expression via MEK/ERK signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi F

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Feng Chi, Rong Wu, Xueying Jin, Min Jiang, Xike Zhu Department of Medical Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: HER2 positivity has been well studied in various cancers, but its importance in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still being explored. In this study, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR was performed to detect HER2 and COX-2 expression in NSCLC tissues. Then, pcDNA3.1-HER2 was used to overexpress HER2, while HER2 siRNA and COX-2 siRNA were used to silence HER2 and COX-2 expression. MTT assay and invasion assay were used to detect the effects of HER2 on cell proliferation and invasion. Our study revealed that HER2 and COX-2 expression were upregulated in NSCLC tissues and HER2 exhibited a significant positive correlation with the levels of COX-2 expression. Overexpression of HER2 evidently elevated COX-2 expression, while silencing of HER2 evidently decreased COX-2 expression. Furthermore, overexpressed HER2 induced the ERK phosphorylation, and this was abolished by the treatment with U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of MEK, an upstream kinase of ERK. HER2-induced expression and promoter activity of COX-2 were also suppressed by U0126, suggesting that the MEK/ERK signaling pathway regulates COX-2 expression. In addition, HER2 induced activation of AKT signaling pathway, which was reversed by pretreatment with U0126 and COX-2 siRNA. MTT and invasion assays revealed that HER2 induced cell proliferation and invasion that were reversed by pretreatment with U0126 and COX-2 siRNA. In this study, our results demonstrated for the first time that HER2 elevated COX-2 expression through the activation of MEK/ERK pathway, which subsequently induced cell proliferation and invasion via AKT pathway in NSCLC tissues. Keywords: HER2, MEK/ERK, COX-2, AKT signaling pathway, non-small-cell lung cancer

  14. Calf Spleen Extractive Injection (CSEI, a small peptides enriched extraction, induces human hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis via ROS/MAPKs dependent mitochondrial pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxu Jia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Calf Spleen Extractive Injection (CSEI, a small peptides enriched extraction, performs immunomodulatory activity on cancer patients suffering from radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The present study aims to investigate the anti-hepatocellular carcinoma effects of CSEI in cells and tumor-xenografted mouse models. In HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells, CSEI reduced cell viability, enhanced apoptosis rate, caused reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, inhibited migration ability, and induced caspases cascade and mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation. CSEI significantly inhibited HepG2-xenografted tumor growth in nude mice. In cell and animal experiments, CSEI increased the activations of pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase 8, caspase 9 and caspase 3; meanwhile, it suppressed the expressions of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 and anti-oxidation proteins, such as nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2 and catalase (CAT. The enhanced phosphorylation of P38 and c-JunN-terminalkinase (JNK, and decreased phosphorylation of extra cellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERKs were observed in CSEI-treated cells and tumor tissues. CSEI-induced cell viability reduction was significantly attenuated by N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (a ROS inhibitor pretreatment. All data demonstrated that the upregulated oxidative stress status and the altered mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs phosphorylation contributed to CSEI-driven mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, CSEI exactly induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via ROS/MAPKs dependent mitochondrial pathway.

  15. Evaluation of a curcumin analog as an anti-cancer agent inducing ER stress-mediated apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Yi; Sun, Yusheng; Ren, Luqing; Huang, Yi; Cai, Yuepiao; Weng, Qiaoyou; Shen, Xueqian; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have highlighted the importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cell death processes. Pharmacological interventions that effectively enhance tumor cell death through activating ER stress have attracted a great deal of attention for anti-cancer therapy. A bio-evaluation on 113 curcumin analogs against four cancer cell lines was performed through MTT assay. Furthermore, real time cell assay and flow cytometer were used to evaluate the apoptotic induction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(5-bromo-2-ethoxyphenyl)penta-1,4-dien-3-one (B82). Western blot, RT-qPCR, and siRNA were then utilized to confirm whether B82-induced apoptosis is mediated through activating ER stress pathway. Finally, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of B82 was evaluated. B82 exhibited strong anti-tumor activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cells. Treatment with B82 significantly induced apoptosis in H460 cells in vitro and inhibited H460 tumor growth in vivo. Further studies demonstrated that the B82-induced apoptosis is mediated by activating ER stress both in vitro and in vivo. A new monocarbonyl analog of curcumin, B82, exhibited anti-tumor effects on H460 cells via an ER stress-mediated mechanism. B82 could be further explored as a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of NSCLC

  16. Small molecule XIAP inhibitors cooperate with TRAIL to induce apoptosis in childhood acute leukemia cells and overcome Bcl-2-mediated resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakler, Melanie; Loeder, Sandra; Vogler, Meike; Schneider, Katja; Jeremias, Irmela; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fulda, Simone

    2009-02-19

    Defects in apoptosis contribute to poor outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), calling for novel strategies that counter apoptosis resistance. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that small molecule inhibitors of the antiapoptotic protein XIAP cooperate with TRAIL to induce apoptosis in childhood acute leukemia cells. XIAP inhibitors at subtoxic concentrations, but not a structurally related control compound, synergize with TRAIL to trigger apoptosis and to inhibit clonogenic survival of acute leukemia cells, whereas they do not affect viability of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggesting some tumor selectivity. Analysis of signaling pathways reveals that XIAP inhibitors enhance TRAIL-induced activation of caspases, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytochrome c release in a caspase-dependent manner, indicating that they promote a caspase-dependent feedback mitochondrial amplification loop. Of note, XIAP inhibitors even overcome Bcl-2-mediated resistance to TRAIL by enhancing Bcl-2 cleavage and Bak conformational change. Importantly, XIAP inhibitors kill leukemic blasts from children with ALL ex vivo and cooperate with TRAIL to induce apoptosis. In vivo, they significantly reduce leukemic burden in a mouse model of pediatric ALL engrafted in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Thus, XIAP inhibitors present a promising novel approach for apoptosis-based therapy of childhood ALL.

  17. A noncognate interaction with anti-receptor antibody-activated helper T cells induces small resting murine B cells to proliferate and to secrete antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1988-01-01

    on resting B cells (even in the presence of intact F23.1 antibody), but could induce antibody secretion by anti-Ig-preactivated B cells. Both F23.1+ clones (E9.D4 and 4.35F2) and one F23.1- clone (D2.2) could synergize with supernatants from activated E9.D4 T cells to induce B cell activation. F(ab')2......Culture of small resting allogeneic B cells (of an irrelevant haplotype) with two clones of T helper (Th) cells that were activated by the F23.1 anti-T cell receptor antibody led to the activation of B cells to proliferate and to secrete antibody. Th cell supernatants by themselves had no effect...... fragments of F23.1 induced E9.D4 to activate B cells as efficiently as intact F23.1 and B cell populations that had been incubated with F23.1 were not activated when cultured with E9.D4, although T cells recognized cell-presented F23.1 and were weakly activated. Reduction of the density of F23.1 adsorbed...

  18. Small kinetochore associated protein (SKAP promotes UV-induced cell apoptosis through negatively regulating pre-mRNA processing factor 19 (Prp19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Lu

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a regulated cellular suicide program that is critical for the development and maintenance of healthy tissues. Previous studies have shown that small kinetochore associated protein (SKAP cooperates with kinetochore and mitotic spindle proteins to regulate mitosis. However, the role of SKAP in apoptosis has not been investigated. We have identified a new interaction involving SKAP, and we propose a mechanism through which SKAP regulates cell apoptosis. Our experiments demonstrate that both overexpression and knockdown of SKAP sensitize cells to UV-induced apoptosis. Further study has revealed that SKAP interacts with Pre-mRNA processing Factor 19 (Prp19. We find that UV-induced apoptosis can be inhibited by ectopic expression of Prp19, whereas silencing Prp19 has the opposite effect. Additionally, SKAP negatively regulates the protein levels of Prp19, whereas Prp19 does not alter SKAP expression. Finally, rescue experiments demonstrate that the pro-apoptotic role of SKAP is executed through Prp19. Taken together, these findings suggest that SKAP promotes UV-induced cell apoptosis by negatively regulating the anti-apoptotic protein Prp19.

  19. The small-molecule TNF-alpha modulator, UTL-5g, reduces side effects induced by cisplatin and enhances the therapeutic effect of cisplatin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, JiaJiu; Chen, Ben; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Lee, An-Rong; Media, Joseph; Valeriote, Frederick A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated a small-molecule modulator of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), UTL-5g (also referred to as GBL-5g), as a potential chemoprotective agent against cisplatin-induced side effects including nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity. Pretreatment of UTL-5g i.p. in BDF1 mice reduced the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine induced by cisplatin treatment. The levels of both aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) in these animals were also reduced by UTL-5g. Pretreatment of UTL-5g did not significantly affect the number of white blood cells (WBC) under current experimental conditions, yet it markedly increased blood platelet counts by more than threefold. Therapeutic assessment in SCID mice inoculated with human HCT-15 tumor cells showed that UTL-5g did not attenuate the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin but increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. The LD50 of UTL-5g was determined to be > 2,000 mg/kg by an acute toxicity study. In summary, our studies showed that 1) UTL-5g significantly reduces nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity induced by cisplatin in mice, presumably by lowering the levels of TNF-alpha, 2) UTL-5g markedly increased blood platelet counts in mice and 3) UTL-5g treatment increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin against HCT-15 cells inoculated in SCID mice.

  20. Podophyllotoxin acetate blocks IR-induced invasion of non-small cell lung cancer cell, A549

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Jae Yeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Some research result presented that local radiotherapy administered to primary tumors speeds their metastatic growth in vivo (4-6), thereby suggesting that besides its therapeutic effects, IR promotes the malignant behaviors of surviving cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate podophyllotoxin acetate (PA), one of new natural products, prevented side effects of IR such as invasion or metastasis promotion for improve the efficacy of radiotherapy. In this study, we demonstrated that PA inhibits IR-induced invasion and migration of A549 cells. We also observed that IR stimulates several intracellular pathway involving EMT and MAPKinses; EMT-associated events including an increase of vimentin levels and increased phosphorylation of p38 ERK, JNK in A549 cells. PA could decrease these activations of several intracellular signaling molecules. Therefore, PA might inhibit IRinduced invasion and migration via blocking EMT and MAPKiase pathway of A549 cells.

  1. Winery and distillery wastewater treatment by anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moletta, R

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is widely used for wastewater treatment, especially in the food industries. Generally after the anaerobic treatment there is an aerobic post-treatment in order to return the treated water to nature. Several technologies are applied for winery wastewater treatment. They are using free cells or flocs (anaerobic contact digesters, anaerobic sequencing batch reactors and anaerobic lagoons), anaerobic granules (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket--UASB), or biofilms on fixed support (anaerobic filter) or on mobile support as with the fluidised bed. Some technologies include two strategies, e.g. a sludge bed with anaerobic filter as in the hybrid digester. With winery wastewaters (as for vinasses from distilleries) the removal yield for anaerobic digestion is very high, up to 90-95% COD removal. The organic loads are between 5 and 15 kgCOD/m3 of digester/day. The biogas production is between 400 and 600 L per kg COD removed with 60 to 70% methane content. For anaerobic and aerobic post-treatment of vinasses in the Cognac region, REVICO company has 99.7% COD removal and the cost is 0.52 Euro/m3 of vinasses.

  2. Anaerobic survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by pyruvate fermentation requires an Usp-type stress protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K; Boes, N; Escbach, M

    2006-01-01

    activity was detected in the deeper layers of a P. aeruginosa biofilm using a PPA3309-gfp (green fluorescent protein gene) fusion and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. This is the first description of an Anr-dependent, anaerobically induced, and functional Usp-like protein in bacteria....... the induced synthesis of three enzymes involved in arginine fermentation, ArcA, ArcB, and ArcC, and the outer membrane protein OprL. Moreover, formation of two proteins of unknown function, PA3309 and PA4352, increased by factors of 72- and 22-fold, respectively. Both belong to the group of universal stress...... proteins (Usp). Long-term survival of a PA3309 knockout mutant by pyruvate fermentation was found drastically reduced. The oxygen-sensing regulator Anr controls expression of the PPA3309-lacZ reporter gene fusion after a shift to anaerobic conditions and further pyruvate fermentation. PA3309 expression...

  3. A novel small molecule inhibitor of influenza A viruses that targets polymerase function and indirectly induces interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila Brum Ortigoza

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule.

  4. Techniques for controlling variability in gram staining of obligate anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M J; Thatcher, E; Cox, M E

    1995-01-01

    Identification of anaerobes recovered from clinical samples is complicated by the fact that certain gram-positive anaerobes routinely stain gram negative; Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus, Eubacterium plautii, Clostridium ramosum, Clostridium symbiosum, and Clostridium clostridiiforme are among the nonconformists with regard to conventional Gram-staining procedures. Accurate Gram staining of American Type Culture Collection strains of these anaerobic bacteria is possible by implementing fixing and staining techniques within a gloveless anaerobic chamber. Under anaerobic conditions, gram-positive staining occurred in all test organisms with "quick" fixing techniques with both absolute methanol and formalin. The results support the hypothesis that, when anaerobic bacteria are exposed to oxygen, a breakdown of the physical integrity of the cell wall occurs, introducing Gram stain variability in gram-positive anaerobes. PMID:7538512

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates radiation-induced invasiveness through the SDF-1α/CXCR4 pathway in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing; He, Yan; Ji, Jianfeng; Yao, Yifan; Shen, Wenhao; Luo, Jialin; Zhu, Wei; Cao, Han; Geng, Yangyang; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2015-05-10

    Radiotherapy is an important procedure for the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, recent evidence has shown that irradiation can promote the invasion and metastasis of several types of cancer, and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which radiation enhances the invasiveness of NSCLC cells. We found that after irradiation, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) was increased and translocated into the nucleus, where it bound to the hypoxia response element (HRE) in the CXCR4 promoter and promoted the transcription of CXCR4. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) also plays a role in the radiation-induced expression of CXCR4. Our results revealed that 2 Gy X-ray irradiation promoted the metastasis and invasiveness of H1299, A549 and H460 cells, which were significantly enhanced by SDF-1α treatment. Blocking the SDF-1α/CXCR4 interaction could suppress the radiation-induced invasiveness of NSCLC cells. The PI3K/pAkt and MAPK/pERK1/2 pathways were found to be involved in radiation-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. In vivo, irradiation promoted the colonization of H1299 cells in the liver and lung, which was mediated by CXCR4. Altogether, our findings have elucidated the underlying mechanisms of the irradiation-enhanced invasiveness of NSCLC cells.

  6. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfide by the purple photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Small inverse isotope effects of 1-3 per thousand were consistently observed for the oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur during anaerobic photometabolism by Chromatium vinosum. The inverse fractionation can be accounted for by an equilibrium isotope effect between H 2 S and HS - , and may indicate that C. vinosum (and other photosynthetic bacteria) utilizes H 2 S rather than HS - as the substrate during sulfide oxidation. (Auth.)

  7. Caffeine and anaerobic performance: ergogenic value and mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J K; Green, J Matt

    2009-01-01

    The effect caffeine elicits on endurance performance is well founded. However, comparatively less research has been conducted on the ergogenic potential of anaerobic performance. Some studies showing no effect of caffeine on performance used untrained subjects and designs often not conducive to observing an ergogenic effect. Recent studies incorporating trained subjects and paradigms specific to intermittent sports activity support the notion that caffeine is ergogenic to an extent with anaerobic exercise. Caffeine seems highly ergogenic for speed endurance exercise ranging in duration from 60 to 180 seconds. However, other traditional models examining power output (i.e. 30-second Wingate test) have shown minimal effect of caffeine on performance. Conversely, studies employing sport-specific methodologies (i.e. hockey, rugby, soccer) with shorter duration (i.e. 4-6 seconds) show caffeine to be ergogenic during high-intensity intermittent exercise. Recent studies show caffeine affects isometric maximal force and offers introductory evidence for enhanced muscle endurance for lower body musculature. However, isokinetic peak torque, one-repetition maximum and muscular endurance for upper body musculature are less clear. Since relatively few studies exist with resistance training, a definite conclusion cannot be reached on the extent caffeine affects performance. It was previously thought that caffeine mechanisms were associated with adrenaline (epinephrine)-induced enhanced free-fatty acid oxidation and consequent glycogen sparing, which is the leading hypothesis for the ergogenic effect. It would seem unlikely that the proposed theory would result in improved anaerobic performance, since exercise is dominated by oxygen-independent metabolic pathways. Other mechanisms for caffeine have been suggested, such as enhanced calcium mobilization and phosphodiesterase inhibition. However, a normal physiological dose of caffeine in vivo does not indicate this mechanism plays a

  8. Effects of psychological priming, video, and music on anaerobic exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, G; Karageorghis, C I

    2015-12-01

    Peak performance videos accompanied by music can help athletes to optimize their pre-competition mindset and are often used. Priming techniques can be incorporated into such videos to influence athletes' motivational state. There has been limited empirical work investigating the combined effects of such stimuli on anaerobic performance. The present study examined the psychological and psychophysiological effects of video, music, and priming when used as a pre-performance intervention for an anaerobic endurance task. Psychological measures included the main axes of the circumplex model of affect and liking scores taken pre-task, and the Exercise-induced Feeling Inventory, which was administered post-task. Physiological measures comprised heart rate variability and heart rate recorded pre-task. Fifteen males (age = 26.3 ± 2.8 years) were exposed to four conditions prior to performing the Wingate Anaerobic Test: music-only, video and music, video with music and motivational primes, and a no-video/no-music control. Results indicate that the combined video, music, and primes condition was the most effective in terms of influencing participants' pre-task affect and subsequent anaerobic performance; this was followed by the music-only condition. The findings indicate the utility of such stimuli as a pre-performance technique to enhance athletes' or exercisers' psychological states. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 induces TGF-β expression in dendritic cells and activates TLR2 signal to produce IgA in the small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko Sakai

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria provide benefits in enhancing host immune responses and protecting against infection. Induction of IgA production by oral administration of probiotic bacteria in the intestine has been considered to be one reason for this beneficial effect, but the mechanisms of the effect are poorly understood. Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 (LG2055 is a probiotic bacterium with properties such as bile tolerance, ability to improve the intestinal environment, and it has preventive effects related to abdominal adiposity. In this study, we have found that oral administration of LG2055 induced IgA production and increased the rate of IgA(+ cell population in Peyer's patch and in the lamina propria of the mouse small intestine. The LG2055 markedly increased the amount of IgA in a co-culture of B cells and bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC, and TLR2 signal is critical for it. In addition, it is demonstrated that LG2055 stimulates BMDC to promote the production of TGF-β, BAFF, IL-6, and IL-10, all critical for IgA production from B cells. Combined stimulation of B cells with BAFF and LG2055 enhanced the induction of IgA production. Further, TGF-β signal was shown to be critical for LG2055-induced IgA production in the B cell and BMDC co-culture system, but TGF-β did not induce IgA production in a culture of only B cells stimulated with LG2055. Furthermore, TGF-β was critical for the production of BAFF, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β itself from LG2055-stimulated BMDC. These results demonstrate that TGF-β was produced by BMDC stimulated with LG2055 and it has an autocrine/paracrine function essential for BMDC to induce the production of BAFF, IL-6, and IL-10.

  10. Ski prevents TGF-β-induced EMT and cell invasion by repressing SMAD-dependent signaling in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiping; Zhan, Lei; Yang, Tianjie; Wang, Longqiang; Li, Chang; Zhao, Jun; Lei, Zhe; Li, Xiangdong; Zhang, Hong-Tao

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key event in cancer metastasis, which confers cancer cells with increased motility and invasiveness, and EMT is characterized by loss of epithelial marker E-cadherin and gain of mesenchymal marker N-cadherin. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is a crucial inducer of EMT in various types of cancer. Ski is an important negative regulator of TGF-β signaling, which interacts with SMADs to repress TGF-β signaling activity. Although there is accumulating evidence that Ski functions as a promoter or suppressor in human types of cancer, the molecular mechanisms by which Ski affects TGF-β-induced EMT and invasion in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are not largely elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the mechanistic role of Ski in NSCLC metastasis. Ski was significantly reduced in metastatic NSCLC cells or tissues when compared with non-metastatic NSCLC cells or tissues. Moreover, following TGF-β stimulation Ski-silenced A549 cells had more significant features of EMT and a higher invasive activity when compared with A549 cells overexpressing Ski. Mechanistically, Ski-silenced and overexpressed A549 cells showed an increase and a reduction in the SMAD3 phosphorylation level, respectively. This was supported by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter activity obtained in Ski-silenced and overexpressed A549 cells. However, after treatment of SIS3 (inhibitor of SMAD3 phosphorylation) followed by TGF-β1 stimulation, we did not observe any effect of Ski on TGF-β-induced EMT, and invasion in Ski-silenced and overexpressed A549 cells. In conclusion, our findings suggest that Ski represses TGF-β-induced EMT and invasion by inhibiting SMAD-dependent signaling in NSCLC.

  11. Blocking NF-κB sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer cells to histone deacetylase inhibitor induced extrinsic apoptosis through generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Selvaraju; Sankar, Renu; Varunkumar, Krishnamoorthy; Anusha, Chidambaram; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2015-02-01

    NF-κB signalling is one of the main cell survival pathways that attenuate the anticancer efficacy of therapeutic drugs. Previous studies demonstrated that the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor induces apoptosis in some malignancies through multiple mechanisms including up-regulation of death receptors, disruption of Hsp90 function and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, HDAC inhibitor also induces a cell survival signal through NF-κB activation. In this report, we found that romidepsin, a class I HDAC inhibitor, induces NF-κB activation in A549 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We also found that inhibition of A549 cells with bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor) has blocked IκB degradation that leads to the loss of NF-κB activation and translocation which enhanced the romidepsin induced mitochondrial injury and sensitizes NSCLC cells to apoptosis. Romidepsin significantly enhances NF-κB reporter gene transcription and these effects were inhibited by bortezomib as determined by reporter gene assay. Consistently, the combined exposure of romidepsin and bortezomib reversed the effects on IκB degradation as evident with IL-8, p50 and p65 (NF-κB) expression. Apoptosis was markedly sensitized with greater ROS generation and more cell death in A549 cell lines. These events are most closely related in that bortezomib prevents the romidepsin mediated RelA acetylation and NF-κB activation, resulting in caspase activation. A strategy of blocking NF-κB activation to enhance HDAC inhibitor activity warrants further attention in NSCLC cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Luteolin Inhibits Tumorigenesis and Induces Apoptosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells via Regulation of MicroRNA-34a-5p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Qun Jiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Luteolin (LTL exerts remarkable tumor suppressive activity on various types of cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, it is not completely understood whether the mechanism of its action against NSCLC is related to microRNAs (miRNAs. In the present study, we investigated the anti-tumor effects of LTL on NSCLC in vitro and in vivo. The results revealed that LTL could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in both A549 and H460 cells. In a H460 xenograft tumor model of nude mice, LTL significantly suppressed tumor growth, inhibited cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis. miRNA microarray and quantitative PCR (qPCR analysis indicated that miR-34a-5p was dramatically upregulated upon LTL treatment in tumor tissues. Furthermore, MDM4 was proved to be a direct target of miR-34a-5p by luciferase reporter gene assay. LTL treatment was associated with increased p53 and p21 protein expressions and decreased MDM4 protein expression in both NSCLC cells and tumor tissues. When miR-34a-5p was inhibited in vitro, the protein expressions of Bcl-2 and MDM4 were recovered, while that of p53, p21, and Bax were attenuated. Moreover, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation induced by LHL treatment in vitro were also suppressed by miR-34a-5p inhibition. Overall, LTL could inhibit tumorigenesis and induce apoptosis of NSCLC cells by upregulation of miR-34a-5p via targeting MDM4. These findings provide novel insight into the molecular functions of LTL that suggest its potential as a therapeutic agent for human NSCLC.

  13. Plasticity-induced characteristic changes of pattern dynamics and the related phase transitions in small-world neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xu-Hui; Hu Gang

    2014-01-01

    Phase transitions widely exist in nature and occur when some control parameters are changed. In neural systems, their macroscopic states are represented by the activity states of neuron populations, and phase transitions between different activity states are closely related to corresponding functions in the brain. In particular, phase transitions to some rhythmic synchronous firing states play significant roles on diverse brain functions and disfunctions, such as encoding rhythmical external stimuli, epileptic seizure, etc. However, in previous studies, phase transitions in neuronal networks are almost driven by network parameters (e.g., external stimuli), and there has been no investigation about the transitions between typical activity states of neuronal networks in a self-organized way by applying plastic connection weights. In this paper, we discuss phase transitions in electrically coupled and lattice-based small-world neuronal networks (LBSW networks) under spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). By applying STDP on all electrical synapses, various known and novel phase transitions could emerge in LBSW networks, particularly, the phenomenon of self-organized phase transitions (SOPTs): repeated transitions between synchronous and asynchronous firing states. We further explore the mechanics generating SOPTs on the basis of synaptic weight dynamics. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  14. Conformational Changes in Sindbis Virus Induced by Decreased pH Are Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lilin; Piper, Amanda; Meilleur, Flora; Hernandez, Raquel; Heller, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Alphaviruses, such as Sindbis virus, undergo dramatic changes in three-dimensional structure upon exposure to low pH, and such exposure can establish conditions allowing fusion of the virus membrane with a cell plasma membrane upon return to neutral pH. While exposure to low pH is not required for entry of Sindbis virus into vertebrate or invertebrate cells, the conformational changes occurring at low pH may mimic those occurring upon virus-receptor interaction. Here, we employed small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation to probe how the structure of a mammalian-grown Sindbis virus responds to moderately acidic pH. Several changes took place throughout the virion structure when the pH decreased from 7.2 to 6.4. Specifically, the RNA in the virion core underwent a conformational change. Additionally, the protein was redistributed. A significant amount of protein moved from the layer containing the lipid bilayer to the exterior of the virion. The results improve our understanding of the pH-driven alteration of Sindbis virus structure. PMID:22156534

  15. Minocycline-Induced Hyperpigmentation in a Patient Treated with Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann T. Bell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors have improved progression-free survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, one of the most common adverse effects is papulopustular skin eruption, which is frequently severe enough to be treated with oral minocycline or doxycycline. Case: We present a case of an 87-year-old man who developed a severe papulopustular skin eruption secondary to erlotinib therapy for NSCLC. Control of the eruption with 100 mg of minocycline twice daily for 8 months eventually led to blue-gray skin hyperpigmentation. After 30 months, this side effect was recognized as minocycline drug deposition, which was confirmed with skin biopsy. Discussion: Compliance with EGFR inhibitor therapy in NSCLC is often challenging due to common side effects, most notably cutaneous skin eruptions. Treatment of cutaneous toxicities is important to preserve patient compliance with targeted cancer therapy. Use of minocycline to treat the most common cutaneous side effect (papulopustular eruption can in turn cause blue-black skin, eye, or tooth discoloration that can nullify its benefits, resulting in suboptimal patient adherence to cancer therapy. Although this adverse effect is well known in dermatology literature as a risk when using minocycline to treat acne, rosacea, or blistering disorders, it is less well documented in oncology literature. We present this case to highlight the need for greater consideration of unique patient characteristics in selecting an oral antibiotic as a treatment modality for EGFR inhibitor skin toxicities.

  16. Activation of PI3-kinase/Akt induced small bowel cell apoptosis during laparoscopic ischaemia-reperfusion of swine jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, F; Lacitigniola, L; Loverre, A; Capuano, P; Martines, G; Staffieri, F; Rossi, G; Crovace, A

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to detect small bowel cell apoptosis by evaluating the nuclear activation of transcription factors, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and Akt pathways as well as detecting apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay, during ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury by Arterio-Venous Occlusion (AVO) of ajejunal loop in swine, using a laparoscopic procedure. A jejunal loop was isolated and a biopsy sample (T0) obtained. Biopsies were obtained at 30 minutes (T30I) and 60 minutes (T60I) after clamping and again during reperfusion (R), T30R and T60R. Standard H&E stains and immunohistochemical study for infiltrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes and TUNEL assays were performed. The activation of Akt and NF-kappaB in the animal model was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Our results confirmed that I/R injury of the jejunum did not only cause epithelial damage, but also activated the molecular pathways triggering an apoptotic reaction (by pro-inflammatory cytokines) and an anti-apoptotic mechanism that can lead to the regeneration of injured tissue.

  17. Acidification of methanol-fed anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors by cobalt deprivation: Induction and microbial community dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Fermoso, F.; Collins, G.; Bartacek, J.; O'Flaherty, V.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    The acidification of mesophilic (30 degrees C) methanol-fed upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors induced by cobalt deprivation from the influent was investigated by coupling the reactor performance (pH 7.0; organic loading rate 4.5 g COD . L-1 . d(-1)) to the microbial ecology of the

  18. ANAEROBIC GLYCOLYSIS AND POSTANOXIC RECOVERY OF RESPIRATION OF RAT CORTICAL SYNAPTOSOMES ARE REDUCED BY SYNAPTOSOMAL SODIUM LOAD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GLEITZ, J; BEILE, A; KHAN, S; WILFFERT, B; TEGTMEIER, F

    1993-01-01

    Synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex were used to study the effect of veratridine-induced Na+ load on postanoxic recovery of respiration and on aerobic and anaerobic ATP turnover, calculated from rates of oxygen consumption and lactate production. Non-stimulated synaptosomes: after onset of anoxia

  19. Can Body Condition and Somatic Indices be Used to Evaluate Metal-Induced Stress in Wild Small Mammals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Tête

    Full Text Available Wildlife is exposed to natural (e.g., food availability and quality, parasitism and anthropogenic stressors (e.g., habitat fragmentation, toxicants. Individual variables (e.g., age, gender affect behaviour and physiology of animals. Together, these parameters can create both great inter-individual variations in health indicators and interpretation difficulties. We investigated the relevance of body condition and somatic indices (liver, kidneys as indicators of health status in wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus, n = 560 captured along a metal pollution gradient in four landscape types (30 sampling squares 500-m sided. The indices were calculated using a recently proposed standard major axis regression instead of an ordinary least square regression. After considering age and gender for the body condition index, no landscape type influence was detected in the indices. However, important index variability was observed between sampling squares; this effect was included as a random effect in linear models. After integrating all individual and environmental variables that may affect the indices, cadmium (Cd concentrations in both the liver and kidneys were negatively related to body condition and liver indices only for individuals from highly contaminated sites. Lead in the liver was negatively related to the liver index, and Cd in kidneys was positively linked to the kidney index, potentially suggesting metal-induced stress. However, interpretation of these indices as a wildlife ecotoxicology tool should be performed with caution due to the sensitivity of potentially confounding variables (e.g., individual factors and environmental parameters.

  20. Dual small-molecule targeting of SMAD signaling stimulates human induced pluripotent stem cells toward neural lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Methichit Wattanapanitch

    Full Text Available Incurable neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD, Huntington's disease (HD, and Alzheimer's disease (AD are very common and can be life-threatening because of their progressive disease symptoms with limited treatment options. To provide an alternative renewable cell source for cell-based transplantation and as study models for neurological diseases, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs and then differentiated them into neural progenitor cells (NPCs and mature neurons by dual SMAD signaling inhibitors. Reprogramming efficiency was improved by supplementing the histone deacethylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA, and inhibitor of p160-Rho associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK, Y-27632, after retroviral transduction. We obtained a number of iPS colonies that shared similar characteristics with human embryonic stem cells in terms of their morphology, cell surface antigens, pluripotency-associated gene and protein expressions as well as their in vitro and in vivo differentiation potentials. After treatment with Noggin and SB431542, inhibitors of the SMAD signaling pathway, HDF-iPSCs demonstrated rapid and efficient differentiation into neural lineages. Six days after neural induction, neuroepithelial cells (NEPCs were observed in the adherent monolayer culture, which had the ability to differentiate further into NPCs and neurons, as characterized by their morphology and the expression of neuron-specific transcripts and proteins. We propose that our study may be applied to generate neurological disease patient-specific iPSCs allowing better understanding of disease pathogenesis and drug sensitivity assays.

  1. Alpha5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mediates nicotine-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Xiaoli; Jia, Yanfei; Zu, Shanshan; Li, Ruisheng; Jia, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Dongjie; Dang, Ningning; Wang, Yunshan

    2014-01-01

    By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. However, the mechanisms through which α5-nAChRs may influence lung carcinogenesis are far from clear. In the present study, we investigated the roles of α5-nAChR in the nicotine-induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α in 60 specimens of lung cancer and para-carcinoma tissue. The correlations between the expression levels of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α and other clinicopathological data were analyzed. In a cell line that highly expressed α5-nAChR, the loss of α5-nAChR function by siRNA was used to study whether α5-nAChR is involved in the nicotine-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF through the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Cell growth was detected using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). α5-nAChR (78.3%) and HIF-1α (88.3%) were both overexpressed in NSCLC, and their expression levels were found to be correlated with each other (P < 0.05). In the A549 cell line, α5-nAChR and HIF-1α were found to be expressed under normal conditions, and their expression levels were significantly increased in response to nicotine treatment. The silencing of α5-nAChR significantly inhibited the nicotine-induced cell proliferation compared with the control group and attenuated the nicotine-induced upregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF, and these effects required the cooperation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results show that the α5-nAChR/HIF-1α/VEGF axis is involved in nicotine-induced tumor cell proliferation, which suggests that α5-nAChR may serve as a potential anticancer target in nicotine-associated lung cancer. - Highlights

  2. Alpha5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mediates nicotine-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoli; Jia, Yanfei; Zu, Shanshan [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China); Li, Ruisheng [Institute of Infectious Diseases, 302 Military Hospital, Beijing 100039 (China); Jia, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Dongjie [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China); Dang, Ningning [Department of Dermatology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China); Wang, Yunshan [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250013 (China)

    2014-07-15

    By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. However, the mechanisms through which α5-nAChRs may influence lung carcinogenesis are far from clear. In the present study, we investigated the roles of α5-nAChR in the nicotine-induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α in 60 specimens of lung cancer and para-carcinoma tissue. The correlations between the expression levels of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α and other clinicopathological data were analyzed. In a cell line that highly expressed α5-nAChR, the loss of α5-nAChR function by siRNA was used to study whether α5-nAChR is involved in the nicotine-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF through the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Cell growth was detected using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). α5-nAChR (78.3%) and HIF-1α (88.3%) were both overexpressed in NSCLC, and their expression levels were found to be correlated with each other (P < 0.05). In the A549 cell line, α5-nAChR and HIF-1α were found to be expressed under normal conditions, and their expression levels were significantly increased in response to nicotine treatment. The silencing of α5-nAChR significantly inhibited the nicotine-induced cell proliferation compared with the control group and attenuated the nicotine-induced upregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF, and these effects required the cooperation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results show that the α5-nAChR/HIF-1α/VEGF axis is involved in nicotine-induced tumor cell proliferation, which suggests that α5-nAChR may serve as a potential anticancer target in nicotine-associated lung cancer. - Highlights

  3. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  4. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2015-05-15

    The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd(2+)) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5×10(6)cellsmL(-1)) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O₂, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25-33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd(2+) which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd(2+) induced a higher MDA production. Cd(2+) stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd(2+) from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd(2+) under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O₂ concentration is particularly low. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of a chemically induced model of lung squamous cell carcinoma in mice by 18F-FDG small-animal PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Valentina; Nanni, Cristina; Pettinato, Cinzia; Fini, Milena; D'Errico, Antonia; Trepidi, Silvia; Spinelli, Antonello; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Rubello, Domenico; Zompatori, Maurizio; Fabbri, Mario; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano

    2007-08-01

    Small-animal imaging has become a relevant research field in pre-clinical oncology. In particular, metabolic information provided by small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) is very useful to closely monitor tumour growth and assess therapy response in murine models of human disease. There are various murine models for human lung adenocarcinoma, but those for squamous cell lung carcinoma, the most common form of human cancer, are lacking. To assess the feasibility of 18F-FDG small-animal PET to monitor tumour growth in a chemically induced model of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Nineteen NIH Swiss mice were skin painted by N-nitroso-tris-chloroethylurea (NTCU) twice a week, with a 3 day interval, for 8 months and 10 NIH Swiss mice skin painted with NTCU solvent (acetone) were used as controls. 18F-FDG PET was performed under sevofluorane anaesthesia and oxygen supplementation at 2, 4, 6 and 8 months from initial treatment. Images were assessed by visual analysis and semi-quantitatively. When a diffuse distribution of tumour was noted, the mean of the counts/pixel measured at three lung levels, corrected for the effective dose injected and for decay, was used for comparison between mutagen-painted and control mice. Pathological evaluation was carried out from the time of the first positive PET results in a subgroup of the whole population to assess correlation with PET findings. Small animal CT was performed at 8 months in another subgroup. In both terms of visual analysis and measurement of total lung activity, 18F-FDG PET at 2 and 4 months from initial treatment were comparable in mutagen-painted and controls. At 6 months, PET images showed a faint and diffuse uptake over both lung fields in mutagen-painted mice with multiple focal areas of increased tracer uptake that merged into confluent masses at 8 months and seriously subverting lung architecture on computed tomography. Total lung activity was significantly higher in mutagen-painted versus

  6. NTCP modelling and pulmonary function tests evaluation for the prediction of radiation induced pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsougos, Ioannis [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Nilsson, Per [Department of Radiation Physics, Lund University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Theodorou, Kiki [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Kjellen, Elisabeth [Department of Oncology, Lund University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Ewers, Sven-Boerje [Department of Oncology, Lund University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Jarlman, Olof [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Lund University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Lind, Bengt K [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Kappas, Constantin [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Mavroidis, Panayiotis [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Larissa, Larissa (Greece)

    2007-02-21

    This work aims to evaluate the predictive strength of the relative seriality, parallel and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models regarding the incidence of radiation pneumonitis (RP), in a group of patients following lung cancer radiotherapy and also to examine their correlation with pulmonary function tests (PFTs). The study was based on 47 patients who received radiation therapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. For each patient, lung dose volume histograms (DVHs) and the clinical treatment outcome were available. Clinical symptoms, radiological findings and pulmonary function tests incorporated in a post-treatment follow-up period of 18 months were used to assess the manifestation of radiation induced complications. Thirteen of the 47 patients were scored as having radiation induced pneumonitis, with RTOG criteria grade {>=} 3 and 28 of the 47 with RTOG criteria grade {>=} 2. Using this material, different methods of estimating the likelihood of radiation effects were evaluated, by analysing patient data based on their full dose distributions and associating the calculated complication rates with the clinical follow-up records. Lungs were evaluated as a paired organ as well as individual lungs. Of the NTCP models examined in the overall group considering the dose distribution in the ipsilateral lung, all models were able to predict radiation induced pneumonitis only in the case of grade 2 radiation pneumonitis score, with the LKB model giving the best results ({chi}{sup 2}-test: probability of agreement between the observed and predicted results P{sub {chi}}({chi}{sup 2}) = 0.524 using the 0.05 significance level). The NTCP modelling considering lungs as a paired organ did not give statistically acceptable results. In the case of lung cancer radiotherapy, the application of different published radiobiological parameters alters the NTCP results, but not excessively as in the case of breast cancer radiotherapy. In

  7. Transpulmonary thermodilution enables to detect small short-term changes in extravascular lung water induced by a bronchoalveolar lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dres, Martin; Teboul, Jean-Louis; Guerin, Laurent; Anguel, Nadia; Amilien, Virginie; Clair, Marie-Philippine; Grüner, Aurélie; Richard, Christian; Monnet, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    To take the opportunity of a bronchoalveolar lavage to challenge the transpulmonary thermodilution for detecting the time course of changes in extravascular lung water. Observational study. Medical ICU. Mechanically ventilated patients in whom a bronchoalveolar lavage by bronchoscopy was performed. Transpulmonary thermodilution before and after bronchoalveolar lavage. Before and at different times after bronchoalveolar lavage, transpulmonary thermodilution was performed to record the value of indexed extravascular lung water. For each measurement, the values of three thermodilution measurements were averaged at the following steps: before bronchoalveolar lavage, after bronchoalveolar lavage, and 1 hour, 2 hours, 4 hours, and 6 hours after bronchoalveolar lavage. The amount of saline infusion left in the lungs after bronchoalveolar lavage was also recorded. Twenty-five patients with suspicion of pneumonia were included. Twenty-eight bronchoalveolar lavages were finally analyzed. On average, 200 mL (180-200 mL) of saline were injected and 130 mL (100-160 mL) were left in the lungs. Between before and immediately after bronchoalveolar lavage, indexed extravascular lung water significantly increased from 12 ± 4 to 15 ± 5 mL/kg, respectively, representing a 169 ± 166 mL increase in nonindexed extravascular lung water. After bronchoalveolar lavage, the value of indexed extravascular lung water was significantly different from the baseline value until 2 hours after bronchoalveolar lavage and became similar to the baseline value thereafter. Transpulmonary thermodilution enabled to detect small short-term changes of indexed extravascular lung water secondary to bronchoalveolar lavage.

  8. Bicarbonate induces high-level resistance to the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 in Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wright, John A; Tymon, Anna; Nair, Sean P

    2017-12-04

    Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants (SCVs) cause persistent infections and are resistant to cationic antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been suggested as promising alternatives for treating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We investigated the capacity of the human cationic AMP LL-37 to kill SCVs in the presence of physiological concentrations of bicarbonate, which are reported to alter bacterial membrane permeability and change resistance of bacteria to AMPs. MBCs of LL-37 for S. aureus SCVs with mutations in different genes in the presence and absence of bicarbonate were determined. In the absence of bicarbonate, SCVs of S. aureus strains LS-1 and 8325-4 had the same level of resistance to LL-37 as the parental strain (8 mg/L). In the presence of bicarbonate, hemB, menD and aroD SCVs of LS-1 had high-level resistance to LL-37 (≥128 mg/L) compared with the parental strain (16 mg/L). However, only the aroD SCV of strain 8324-5 showed high-level resistance. 8325-4 harbours mutations in two genes, tcaR and rsbU, which are involved in antimicrobial sensing and the stress response, respectively. When rsbU was repaired in 8325-4 it displayed high-level resistance to LL-37 in the presence of bicarbonate. This phenotype was lost when tcaR was also repaired, demonstrating that RsbU and TcaR are involved in LL-37 resistance in the presence of bicarbonate. S. aureus SCVs would be resistant to high concentrations of LL-37 in niches where there are physiological concentrations of bicarbonate and therefore this AMP may not be effective in combating SCVs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  9. Dynamics of field-induced ordering in magnetic colloids studied by new time-resolved small-angle neutron-scattering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenmann, A; Keiderling, U; Habicht, K; Russina, M; Gähler, R

    2006-08-04

    The reversal of magnetic moments of nanoparticles in concentrated Co ferrofluids was monitored in an oscillating magnetic field by new time-resolved stroboscopic small-angle neutron-scattering techniques. Time resolution in the micros range was achieved by using a pulsed beam technique, TISANE, while in continuous mode resolution was limited by the wavelength spread to about 1 ms. The frequency dependence of anisotropic scattering patterns has been modeled using Langevin dynamics. The dynamics follows a two step mechanism: field-induced ordering is governed by fast Brownian rotation of nanoparticles with a characteristic time of about 160 micros. Magnetic relaxation of locally ordered domains of about 100 nm in size takes place within a few seconds by Brownian rotation or by Néel type rotation of magnetic moments.

  10. Investigation on the Doppler shifts induced by 1-D ocean surface wave displacements by the first order small slope approximation theory: comparison of hydrodynamic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun-Hua, Wang; Yan-Min, Zhang; Li-Xin, Guo

    2010-01-01

    Based on the first order small slope approximation theory (SSA-I) for oceanic surface electromagnetic scattering, this paper predicts the Doppler shifts induced by wave displacements. Theoretical results from three distinct hydrodynamic models are compared: a linear model, the nonlinear Barrick model, and the nonlinear Creamer model. Meanwhile, the predicted Doppler shifts are also compared with the results associated to the resonant Bragg waves and the so-called long waves in the framework of the two-scale model. The dependences of the predicted Doppler shifts on the incident angle, the radar frequency, and the wind speed are discussed. At large incident angles, the predicted Doppler shifts for the linear and nonlinear Barrick models are found to be insensitive to the wind speed and this phenomenon is not coincident with the experimental data. The conclusions obtained in this paper are promising for better understanding the properties of time dependent radar echoes from oceanic surfaces. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  11. Kinetics of the urea-induced dissociation of human plasma alpha-2-macroglobulin as measured by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöberg, B.; Pap, S.; Järnberg, S.-E.

    1991-01-01

    that there is a pronounced kinetic isotope effect, i.e. the dissociation is 4 times faster in the H-1-containing medium as compared with the H-2-containing medium at the same molar concentration of urea. From the angular dependence of the neutron scattering it can be concluded that the dissociation is associated......The kinetics of the urea-induced dissociation of human plasma alpha-2-macroglobulin into two half-molecular fragments was investigated at 21.0-degrees-C by using small-angle neutron scattering. The relative change in molecular mass that occurs upon dissociation was monitored by recording...... the forward scattering of neutrons as a function of time. All these kinetic data can be explained by a reaction that is first-order with respect to the concentration of undissociated alpha-2-macroglobulin. The velocity constant is a function of urea concentration and it varies within wide limits. For instance...

  12. Minocycline enhances mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity through down-regulating ERK1/2-mediated Rad51 expression in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Jian, Yi-Jun; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Minocycline is a semisynthetic tetracycline derivative; it has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects distinct from its antimicrobial function. However, the molecular mechanism of minocycline-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Rad51 plays a central role in homologous recombination and high levels of Rad51 expression are observed in chemo- or radioresistant carcinomas. Our previous studies have shown that the MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signal pathway maintains the expression of Rad51 in NSCLC cells. In this study, minocycline treatment inhibited cell viability and proliferation of two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Treatment with minocycline decreased Rad51 mRNA and protein levels through MKK1/2-ERK1/2 inactivation. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active MKK1 (MKK1-CA) vectors significantly rescued the decreased Rad51 protein and mRNA levels in minocycline-treated NSCLC cells. However, combined treatment with MKK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and minocycline further decreased the Rad51 expression and cell viability of NSCLC cells. Knocking down Rad51 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of Rad51 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of minocycline. Mitomycin C (MMC) is typically used as a first or second line regimen to treat NSCLC. Compared to a single agent alone, MMC combined with minocycline resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced activation of phospho-ERK1/2, and reduced Rad51 protein levels. Overexpression of MKK1-CA or Flag-tagged Rad51 could reverse the minocycline and MMC-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. These findings may have implications for the rational design of future drug regimens incorporating minocycline and MMC for the treatment of NSCLC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Plumbagin from Plumbago Zeylanica L induces apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines through NF- κB inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tong-Peng; Shen, Hua; Liu, Ling-Xiang; Shu, Yong-Qian

    2013-01-01

    To detect effects of plumbagin on proliferation and apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, and investigate the underlying mechanisms. Human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines A549, H292 and H460 were treated with various concentrations of plumbagin. Cell proliferation rates was determined using both cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and clonogenic assays. Apoptosis was detected by annexin V/propidium iodide double-labeled flow cytometry and TUNEL assay. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by flow cytometry. Activity of NF-κB was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and luciferase reporter assay. Western blotting was used to assess the expression of both NF-κB regulated apoptotic-related gene and activation of p65 and IκBκ. Plumbagin dose-dependently inhibited proliferation of the lung cancer cells. The IC50 values of plumbagin in A549, H292, and H460 cells were 10.3 μmol/L, 7.3 μmol/L, and 6.1 μmol/L for 12 hours, respectively. The compound concentration-dependently induced apoptosis of the three cell lines. Treatment with plumbagin increased the intracellular level of ROS, and inhibited the activation of NK-κB. In addition to inhibition of NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation, the compound also suppressed the degradation of IκBκ. ROS scavenger NAC highly reversed the effect of plumbagin on apoptosis and inactivation of NK-κB in H460 cell line. Treatment with plumbagin also increased the activity of caspase-9 and caspase-3, downregulated the expression of Bcl-2, upregulated the expression of Bax, Bak, and CytC. Plumbagin inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in human lung cancer cells through an NF-κB-regulated mitochondrial-mediated pathway, involving activation of ROS.

  14. Anaerobic Digestion: Mass Balances and Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Jansen, Jes la Cour

    2011-01-01

    While the basic processes involved in anaerobic digestion of waste are described in Chapter 9.4 and the main digestion technologies are presented in Chapter 9.5, this chapter focuses on mass balances, gas production and energy aspects, environmental emissions and unit process inventories....... Understanding these issues and being able to account for them is a prerequisite in digestion engineering and for establishing and running a successful anaerobic digestion facility. Of specific importance is the final use of the digestate. Use in agriculture as a fertilizer is described in Chapter 9.10 and use...... after composting of the digestate as a soil amendment product is analogous to issues presented in Chapter 9.9 for compost....

  15. Instrumentation and Control in Anaerobic Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anaerobic digestion is a multistep process, and is most applied to solids destruction and wastewater treatment for energy production. Despite wide application, and long-term industrial proof of application, some industries are still reluctant to apply this technology. One of the classical reasons...... benchmark. There has therefore been, overall, a quantum advance in application and sophistication of instrumentation and control in anaerobic digestion, and it is an effective option for improved process loading rate and conversion efficiency....... are still a limitation, but this is being partly addressed by the increased complexity of digestion processes. Methods for control benchmarking have also been improved, as there is now an industry standard model (the IWA ADM1), and this is being applied in an improved whole wastewater treatment plant...

  16. Syntrophy of aerobic and anaerobic ammonia oxidisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wett, B; Hell, M; Nyhuis, G; Puempel, T; Takacs, I; Murthy, S

    2010-01-01

    Deammonification is known as an efficient and resource saving sidestream process option to remove the nitrogen load from sludge liquors. The transfer of the intermediate product nitrite between both syntrophic groups of organisms - aerobic and anaerobic ammonia oxidizers (AOB) - appears very sensitive to process conditions such as temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) and operating nitrite level. Growth kinetics for aerobic and anaerobic AOBs differ by one order of magnitude and require an adequate selection of sludge retention time. This paper provides measurement- and model-based results on how selected sludge wasting impacts population dynamics in a suspended growth deammonification system. Anammox enrichment up to a doubled portion in mixed liquor solids can substantially improve process stability in difficult conditions. A case-study on low temperature operations outlines two possible strategies to balance syntrophic consumption of ammonium and nitrite.

  17. The role of anaerobic sludge recycle in improving anaerobic digester performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michelle N; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Liu, Wenjun; Doyle, Michael L; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Solids retention time (SRT) is a critical parameter for the performance of anaerobic digesters (AD) in wastewater treatment plants. AD SRT should increase when active biomass is input to the AD by recycling anaerobic sludge via the wastewater-treatment tanks, creating a hybrid aerobic/anaerobic system. When 85% of the flow through the AD was recycled in pilot-scale hybrid systems, the AD SRT increased by as much as 9-fold, compared to a parallel system without anaerobic-sludge recycle. Longer AD SRTs resulted in increased hydrolysis and methanogenesis in the AD: net solids yield decreased by 39-96% for overall and 23-94% in the AD alone, and AD methane yield increased 1.5- to 5.5-fold. Microbial community assays demonstrated higher, more consistent Archaea concentrations in all tanks in the wastewater-treatment system with anaerobic-sludge recycle. Thus, multiple lines of evidence support that AD-sludge recycle increased AD SRT, solids hydrolysis, and methane generation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an estuarine sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Meyer, R.L.; Schmid, M.C.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Enrich-Prast, A.; Rysgaard, S.; Revsbech, N.P.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process relative to denitrification was studied in photosynthetically active sediment from 2 shallow-water estuaries: Randers Fjord and Norsminde Fjord, Denmark. Anammox accounted for 5 to 24 % of N-2 production in Randers Fjord sediment, whereas no indication was seen of the process in sediment from Norsminde Fjord, It is suggested that the presence of anammox in Randers Fjord and its absence from Norsminde Fjord i...

  19. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    % of the added C-12 LAS was bioavailable and 20% was biotransformed when spiking with 100 mg/L of C-12 LAS and a TS concentration of 14.2 mg/L. Enhanced bioavailability of C-12 LAS was obtained in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor inoculated with granular sludge and sewage sludge. Biodegradation...... under thermophilic conditions was 37% with LAS as sole carbon source. Benzaldehyde was produced in the UASB reactor during LAS transformation....

  20. Polyamines and Anaerobic Elongation of Rice Coleoptile

    OpenAIRE

    Remo, Reggiani; Alejandro, Hochkoeppler; Alcide, Bertani; Istituto Biosintesi Vegetali, C. N. R.; Istituto Biosintesi Vegetali, C. N. R.; Istituto Biosintesi Vegetali, C. N. R.

    1989-01-01

    The role of polyamines in the anaerobic elongation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) coleoptiles was studied. The reduced growth of rice coleoptiles under anoxic conditions was accompanied by a massive accumulation of free putrescine. Putrescine was synthesized from arginine in a reaction catalyzed by arginine decarboxylase (ADC). The anoxic titer of putrescine was closely correlated with elongation of coleoptiles. In experiments in which putrescine and inhibitors [a-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) and...

  1. Conditions of the Anaerobic Digestion of Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    N. Boontian

    2014-01-01

    Biological conversion of biomass to methane has received increasing attention in recent years. Grasses have been explored for their potential anaerobic digestion to methane. In this review, extensive literature data have been tabulated and classified. The influences of several parameters on the potential of these feedstocks to produce methane are presented. Lignocellulosic biomass represents a mostly unused source for biogas and ethanol production. Many factors, including...

  2. Monitoring and control of anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pind, Peter Frode; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    The current status in monitoring and control of anaerobic reactors is reviewed. The influence of reactor design and waste composition on the possible monitoring and control schemes is examined. After defining the overall control structure, and possible control objectives, the possible process mea...... control approaches that have been used are comprehensively described. These include simple and adaptive controllers, as well as more recent developments such as fuzzy controllers, knowledge-based controllers and controllers based on neural networks....

  3. Anaerobic co-digestion of organic wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, L.

    2009-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica Anaerobic digestion is an already established process but the increasing need of bio‐waste recovery has determined the emergence of new substrates, revamping the research in this field. Contrary to some other European countries, in Portugal this technology is still scarcely in use. Nonetheless, the current legislation endorses this application as a waste management and as an energy recovery process. The rapid growth of the ...

  4. Griffipavixanthone from Garcinia oblongifolia champ induces cell apoptosis in human non-small-cell lung cancer H520 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun-Min; Huang, Hui-Juan; Qiu, Sheng-Xiang; Feng, Shi-Xiu; Li, Xu-E

    2014-01-27

    Griffipavixanthone (GPX) is a dimeric xanthone which was isolated in a systematic investigation of Garcinia oblongifolia Champ. In this study, we investigate the effect of GPX on cell proliferation and apoptosis on human Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in vitro and determine the mechanisms of its action. GPX inhibited the growth of H520 cells in dose- and time-dependent manners, with IC50 values of 3.03 ± 0.21 μM at 48 h. The morphologic characteristics of apoptosis and apoptotic bodies were observed by fluorescence microscope and transmission electron microscope. In addition, Annexin V/PI double staining assay revealed that cells in early stage of apoptosis were significantly increased upon GPX treatment dose-dependently. Rh123 staining assay indicated that GPX reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential. DCFH-DA staining revealed that intracellular ROS increased with GPX treatment. Moreover, GPX cleaved and activated caspase-3. In summary, this study showed that GPX inhibited H520 cell proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manner. Further mechanistic study indicated that GPX induced cell apoptosis through mitochondrial apoptotic pathway accompanying with ROS production. Our results demonstrate the potential application of GPX as an anti-non-small cell lung cancer agent.

  5. The Mechanism of Sevoflurane Preconditioning-Induced Protections against Small Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Is Independent of Mast Cell in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Gan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate whether sevoflurane preconditioning can protect against small intestinal ischemia reperfusion (IIR injury and to explore whether mast cell (MC is involved in the protections provided by sevoflurane preconditioning. Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to sevoflurane or treated with MC stabilizer cromolyn sodium (CS were subjected to 75-minute superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 2-hour reperfusion in the presence or absence of MC degranulator compound 48/80 (CP. Small intestinal ischemia reperfusion resulted in severe intestinal injury as demonstrated by significant elevations in intestinal injury scores and p47phox and gp91phox, ICAM-1 protein expressions and malondialdehyde and IL-6 contents, and MPO activities as well as significant reductions in SOD activities, accompanied with concomitant increases in mast cell degranulation evidenced by significant increases in MC counts, tryptase expression, and β-hexosaminidase concentrations, and those alterations were further upregulated in the presence of CP. Sevoflurane preconditioning dramatically attenuated the previous IIR-induced alterations except MC counts, tryptase, and β-hexosaminidase which were significantly reduced by CS treatment. Furthermore, CP exacerbated IIR injury was abrogated by CS but not by sevoflurane preconditioning. The data collectively indicate that sevoflurane preconditioning confers protections against IIR injury, and MC is not involved in the protective process.

  6. Anaerobic treatment of textile dyeing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S R; Szpyrkowicz, L; Rodighiero, I

    2003-01-01

    Aerobic treatment commonly applied to textile wastewater results in good or even excellent removal of organic load. This is not, however, accompanied by an equally good removal of colour. Traditional or advanced chemical methods of decolourisation are costly and not always reliable in justifying an interest in microbial decolourisation. Among several processes anaerobic methods seem most promising. In this paper, the results of a study conducted in two pilot-scale plants comprising anaerobic fixed bed biofilters of 15 L and 5 m3 operating as continuous reactors are presented, along with evaluation of the microbial kinetics. As is shown the process proved efficient in a long-term study with no stability problems of the biofilters. The six-month performance of the pilot plant confirmed also that the pre-treated wastewater could be applied in the operation of dyeing. For the majority of the colours applied in the factory no problems were encountered when the dyeing baths were prepared by substituting 90% of fresh water to the effluent treated by a sequence of activated sludge processes: anaerobic-aerobic.

  7. Biogeochemistry of anaerobic crude oil biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Ian; Gray, Neil; Aitken, Caroline; Sherry, Angela; Jones, Martin; Larter, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Anaerobic degradation of crude oil and petroleum hydrocarbons is widely recognized as a globally significant process both in the formation of the world's vast heavy oil deposits and for the dissipation of hydrocarbon pollution in anoxic contaminated environments. Comparative analysis of crude oil biodegradation under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions has revealed differences not only in the patterns of compound class removal but also in the microbial communities responsible. Under methanogenic conditions syntrophic associations dominated by bacteria from the Syntropheaceae are prevalent and these are likely key players in the initial anaerobic degradation of crude oil alkanes to intermediates such as hydrogen and acetate. Syntrophic acetate oxidation plays an important role in these systems and often results in methanogenesis dominated by CO2 reduction by members of the Methanomicrobiales. By contrast the bacterial communities from sulfate-reducing crude oil-degrading systems were more diverse and no single taxon dominated the oil-degrading sulfate-reducing systems. All five proteobacterial subdivisions were represented with Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria being detected most consistently. In sediments which were pasteurized hydrocarbon degradation continued at a relatively low rate. Nevertheless, alkylsuccinates characteristic of anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation accumulated to high concentrations. This suggested that the sediments harbour heat resistant, possibly spore-forming alkane degrading sulfate-reducers. This is particularly interesting since it has been proposed recently, that spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria found in cold arctic sediments may have originated from seepage of geofluids from deep subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  8. Anaerobic Capacity of Sailors with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokopowicz Grzegorz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A review of Polish and international literature does not give a clear indication of the level of anaerobic capacity that sailors with disabilities demonstrate with regard to their functional capacities. This study sought to determine differences in functional capacity levels between sailors from three medical and functional groups. Material and methods. The research was carried out during a sports camp at the National Sailing Centre in Górki Zachodnie in 2014. Eighteen males with locomotor disabilities were included in the study. The athletes were members of the National Team of Sailors with Disabilities of the Polish Yachting Association. The sportsmen competed in the Skud 18 and 2.4mR Paralympic classes. A 30-second Wingate test for upper limbs was employed in the study. Results. Significant differences in mean power (MP values were noted between the groups under investigation. The group of wheelchair sailors with improper core stability (A and the group of wheelchair sailors with proper core stability (B had significantly lower scores than the group of study participants who were able to move freely, that is to walk (C. Conclusions. The study revealed that a 30-second anaerobic capacity test performed on an arm ergometer differentiated disabled sailors from selected groups in terms of mean power. Research on anaerobic capacity may be used to verify the current classification in Paralympic sailing and will make it possible to differentiate present competition categories.

  9. APE1 modulates cellular responses to organophosphate pesticide-induced oxidative damage in non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Shweta; Dhiman, Monisha; Mantha, Anil K

    2018-04-01

    Monocrotophos (MCP) and chlorpyrifos (CP) are widely used organophosphate pesticides (OPPs), speculated to be linked with human pathologies including cancer. Owing to the fact that lung cells are most vulnerable to the environmental toxins, the development and progression of lung cancer can be caused by the exposure of OPPs. The present study investigates the oxidative DNA damage response evoked by MCP and CP in human non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells. A549 cells were exposed to MCP and CP; cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were measured to select the non-toxic dose. In order to establish whether MCP and CP can initiate the DNA repair and cell survival signalling pathways in A549 cells, qRT-PCR and Western blotting techniques were used to investigate the mRNA and protein expression levels of DNA base excision repair (BER)-pathway enzymes and transcription factors (TFs) involved in cell survival mechanisms. A significant increase in cell viability and ROS generation was observed when exposed to low and moderate doses of MCP and CP at different time points (24, 48 and 72 h) studied. A549 cells displayed a dose-dependent accumulation of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites after 24 h exposure to MCP advocating for the activation of AP endonuclease-mediated DNA BER-pathway. Cellular responses to MCP- and CP-induced oxidative stress resulted in an imbalance in the mRNA and protein expression of BER-pathway enzymes, viz. PARP1, OGG1, APE1, XRCC1, DNA pol β and DNA ligase III α at different time points. The treatment of OPPs resulted in the upregulation of TFs, viz. Nrf2, c-jun, phospho-c-jun and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Immunofluorescent confocal imaging of A549 cells indicated that MCP and CP induces the translocation of APE1 within the cytoplasm at an early 6 h time point, whereas it promotes nuclear localization after 24 h of treatment, which suggests that APE1 subcellular distribution is dynamically regulated in response to

  10. miR-212 increases tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand sensitivity in non-small cell lung cancer by targeting the antiapoptotic protein PED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Garofalo, Michela; Urso, Loredana; Romano, Giulia; Quintavalle, Cristina; Zanca, Ciro; Iaboni, Margherita; Nuovo, Gerald; Croce, Carlo Maria; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2010-05-01

    PED/PEA-15 (PED) is a death effector domain family member of 15 kDa with a broad antiapoptotic function found overexpressed in a number of different human tumors, including lung cancer. To date, the mechanisms that regulate PED expression are unknown. Therefore, we address this point by the identification of microRNAs that in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) modulate PED levels. In this work, we identify miR-212 as a negative regulator of PED expression. We also show that ectopic expression of this miR increases tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell death in NSCLC cells. In contrast, inhibition of endogenous miR-212 by use of antago-miR results in increase of PED protein expression and resistance to TRAIL treatment. Besides, in NSCLC, we show both in vitro and in vivo that PED and miR-212 expressions are inversely correlated, that is, PED is upregulated and miR-212 is rarely expressed. In conclusion, these findings suggest that miR-212 should be considered as a tumor suppressor because it negatively regulates the antiapoptotic protein PED and regulates TRAIL sensitivity. (c)2010 AACR.

  11. A temporary decrease in twitch response following reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block with a small dose of sugammadex in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hajime; Takahoko, Kenichi; Otomo, Shigeaki; Sasakawa, Tomoki; Kunisawa, Takayuki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    We report a temporary decrease in twitch response following reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block with a small dose of sugammadex in our dose-finding study in pediatric patients. A 19-month-old female infant (9.6 kg, 80 cm) was scheduled for elective cheiloplasty surgery. Anesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 50% and sevoflurane 5% and maintained with air, oxygen, sevoflurane 3%, and fentanyl (total, 3 μg/kg). Neuromuscular monitoring was performed at the adductor pollicis muscle after induction of anesthesia but before the administration of rocuronium. Total dose of rocuronium during the surgery was 0.9 mg/kg. Neuromuscular block was reversed with 0.5 mg/kg sugammadex when one response was observed with post-tetanic count stimulation. Twitch responses after sugammadex administration showed a temporary decrease after its initial recovery. Maximum decreases in twitch responses were observed 17 min after initial dose of sugammadex. Twitch responses recovered to their control values after additional doses of 3.5 mg/kg sugammadex (4 mg/kg in total). Time from sugammadex administration to maximum decreases in twitch responses is earlier than has been reported in adults (20-70 min). It is demonstrated that following neuromuscular block reversal with insufficient dose of sugammadex, there is a possibility of the recurrence of residual paralysis within less than 20 min in pediatric patients.

  12. Effect of urea on heat-induced gelation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) studied by rheology and small angle neutron scattering (SANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnyigide, Osita Sunday; Oh, Yuna; Song, Hyeong Yong; Park, Eun-kyoung; Choi, Soo-Hyung; Hyun, Kyu

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports the effects of urea on the heat-induced gelation of bovine serum albumin (BSA), which was studied by the tube inversion method, rheological measurements, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). An increase in the urea concentration accelerated the rate of gelation because the protein molecules have already been unfolded to some extent during sample preparation in the urea solution. In addition, the BSA solution in the presence of urea underwent a sol-gel-sol transition during the time sweep test at a constant temperature of 80oC. On the other hand, the BSA solution without urea turned into a hard and brittle gel that did not return to the solution state during isothermal heating at a constant temperature of 80oC. Aggregation and re-bonding of the denatured and unfolded protein chains led to gel formation. Urea added to the protein denatures its tertiary and secondary structures by simultaneously disrupting the hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions, and altering the solvent properties. Furthermore, urea induces thermoreversible chemical interactions in BSA solutions leading to the formation of a gel with dynamic properties under these experimental conditions.

  13. Chaetocin induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and leads to death receptor 5-dependent apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianfang; Guo, Sen; Liu, Xiangguo; Su, Ling

    2015-11-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities are associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) initiation and progression. Epigenetic drugs are being studied and in clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis by the epigenetic agents remains unclear. SUV39H1 is an important methyl-transferase for lysine 9 on histone H3 and usually related to gene transcriptional suppression, and chaetocin acts as the inhibitor of SUV39H1. We demonstrated here that chaetocin effectively suppressed the growth of multiple lung cancer cells through inducing apoptosis in a death receptor 5 (DR5)-dependent manner. Chaetocin treatment activated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which gave rise to the up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP. Furthermore, ATF3 and CHOP contributed to the induction of DR5 and subsequent apoptosis. When SUV39H1 was silenced with siRNA, the expression of ATF3, CHOP and DR5 was elevated. Thereafter, knockdown of SUV39H1 induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells. In summary, chaetocin pharmacologically inhibits the activity of SUV39H1 which provokes ER stress and results in up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP, leading to DR5-dependent apoptosis eventually. These findings provide a novel interpretation on the anti-neoplastic activity of epigenetic drugs as a new therapeutic approach in NSCLC.

  14. Tamoxifen enhances erlotinib-induced cytotoxicity through down-regulating AKT-mediated thymidine phosphorylase expression in human non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Chiu, Hsien-Chun; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Huang, Yi-Jhen; Wo, Ting-Yu; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2014-03-01

    Tamoxifen is a triphenylethylene nonsteroidal estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist used worldwide as an adjuvant hormone therapeutic agent in the treatment of breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of tamoxifen-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is an enzyme of the pyrimidine salvage pathway which is upregulated in cancers. In this study, tamoxifen treatment inhibited cell survival in two NSCLC cells, H520 and H1975. Treatment with tamoxifen decreased TP mRNA and protein levels through AKT inactivation. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active AKT (AKT-CA) vectors significantly rescued the decreased TP protein and mRNA levels in tamoxifen-treated NSCLC cells. In contrast, combination treatment with PI3K inhibitors (LY294002 or wortmannin) and tamoxifen further decreased the TP expression and cell viability of NSCLC cells. Knocking down TP expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of TP enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of tamoxifen. Erlotinib (Tarceva, OSI-774), an orally available small molecular inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase, is approved for clinical treatment of NSCLC. Compared to a single agent alone, tamoxifen combined with erlotinib resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced activation of phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, and reduced TP protein levels. These findings may have implications for the rational design of future drug regimens incorporating tamoxifen and erlotinib for the treatment of NSCLC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding the anaerobic biodegradability of food waste: Relationship between the typological, biochemical and microbial characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisgativa, Henry; Tremier, Anne; Le Roux, Sophie; Bureau, Chrystelle; Dabert, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an extensive characterisation of food waste (FW) was performed with the aim of studying the relation between FW characteristics and FW treatability through an anaerobic digestion process. In addition to the typological composition (paper, meat, fruits, vegetables contents, etc) and the physicochemical characteristics, this study provides an original characterisation of microbial populations present in FW. These intrinsic populations can actively participate to aerobic and anaerobic degradation with the presence of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes species for the bacteria and of Ascomycota phylum for the fungi. However, the characterisation of FW bacterial and fungi community shows to be a challenge because of the biases generated by the non-microbial DNA coming from plant and by the presence of mushrooms in the food. In terms of relations, it was demonstrated that some FW characteristics as the density, the volatile solids and the fibres content vary as a function of the typological composition. No direct relationship was demonstrated between the typological composition and the anaerobic biodegradability. However, the Pearson's matrix results reveal that the anaerobic biodegradation potential of FW was highly related to the total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD), the total solid content (TS), the high weight organic matter molecules soluble in water (SOL W >1.5 kDa) and the C/N ratio content. These relations may help predicting FW behaviour through anaerobic digestion process. Finally, this study also showed that the storage of FW before collection, that could induce pre-biodegradation, seems to impact several biochemical characteristics and could improve the biodegradability of FW. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Astaxanthin down-regulates Rad51 expression via inactivation of AKT kinase to enhance mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exhibit a wide range of beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. However, the molecular mechanism of astaxanthin-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Rad51 plays a central role in homologous recombination, and studies show that chemo-resistant carcinomas exhibit high levels of Rad51 expression. In this study, astaxanthin treatment inhibited cell viability and proliferation of two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Astaxanthin treatment (2.5-20 μM) decreased Rad51 expression and phospho-AKT(Ser473) protein level in a time and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active AKT (AKT-CA) vector rescued the decreased Rad51 mRNA and protein levels in astaxanthin-treated NSCLC cells. Combined treatment with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors (LY294002 or wortmannin) further decreased the Rad51 expression in astaxanthin-exposed A549 and H1703 cells. Knockdown of Rad51 expression by transfection with si-Rad51 RNA or cotreatment with LY294002 further enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of astaxanthin. Additionally, mitomycin C (MMC) as an anti-tumor antibiotic is widely used in clinical NSCLC chemotherapy. Combination of MMC and astaxanthin synergistically resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced phospho-AKT(Ser473) level and Rad51 expression. Overexpression of AKT-CA or Flag-tagged Rad51 reversed the astaxanthin and MMC-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, pretreatment with LY294002 further decreased the cell viability in astaxanthin and MMC co-treated cells. In conclusion, astaxanthin enhances MMC-induced cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression and AKT activation. These findings may provide rationale to combine astaxanthin with MMC for the treatment of NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chlorella sorokiniana induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in vivo.

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    Lin, Ping-Yi; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; Chuang, Wan-Ling; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Lin, Chi-Chen; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2017-02-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Marine microalgae are a source of biologically active compounds and are widely consumed as a nutritional supplement in East Asian countries. It has been reported that Chlorella or Chlorella extracts have various beneficial pharmacological compounds that modulate immune responses; however, no studies have investigated the anti-cancer effects of Chlorella sorokiniana (CS) on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects of CS in two human NSCLC cell lines (A549 and CL1-5 human lung adenocarcinoma cells), and its effects on tumor growth in a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model. We also investigated the possible molecular mechanisms governing the pharmacological function of CS. Our results showed that exposure of the two cell lines to CS resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability. In addition, the percentage of apoptotic cells increased in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that CS might induce apoptosis in human NSCLC cells. Western blot analysis revealed that exposure to CS resulted in increased protein expression of the cleaved/activated forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP, except caspase-8. ZDEVD (caspase-3 inhibitor) and Z-LEHD (caspase-9 inhibitor) were sufficient at preventing apoptosis in both A549 and CL1-5 cells, proving that CS induced cell death via the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Exposure of A549 and CL1-5 cells to CS for 24 h resulted in decreased expression of Bcl-2 protein and increased expression of Bax protein as well as decreased expression of two IAP family proteins, survivin and XIAP. We demonstrated that CS induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in NSCLC cells via downregulation of Bcl-2, XIAP and survivin. In addition, we also found that the tumors growth of subcutaneous xenograft in vivo was markedly inhibited after oral intake of CS.

  18. Evaluation of brain SERT occupancy by resveratrol against MDMA-induced neurobiological and behavioral changes in rats: A 4-[¹⁸F]-ADAM/small-animal PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jui-Hu; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Chen, Chien-Fu F; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Pao, Li-Heng; Weng, Shao-Ju; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Yeh, Ming-Kung; Li, I-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    The misuse of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) has drawn a growing concern worldwide for its psychophysiological impacts on humans. MDMA abusers are often accompanied by long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity, which is associated with reduced density of cerebral serotonin transporters (SERT) and depressive disorders. Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural polyphenolic phytoalexin that has been known for its antidepressant and neuroprotective effects. However, biological targets of RSV as well as its neuroprotective effects against MDMA remained largely unknown. In this study, we examined binding potency of RSV and MDMA to SERT using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) with the SERT radioligand, N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-[(18)F]fluorophenylthio)benzylamine (4-[(18)F]-ADAM) and investigated the protection of RSV against the acute and long-term adverse effects of MDMA. We found that RSV exhibit binding potentials to SERT in vivo in a dose-dependent manner with variation among brain regions. When the MDMA-treated rats (10mg/kg, s.c.) were co-injected with RSV (20mg/kg, i.p.) twice daily for 4 consecutive days, MDMA-induced acute elevation in plasma corticosterone was significantly reduced. Further, 4-[(18)F]-ADAM PET imaging revealed that RSV protected against the MDMA-induced decrease in SERT availability in the midbrain and the thalamus 2 weeks following the co-treatment. The PET data were comparable to the observation from the forced swim test that RSV sufficiently ameliorated the depressive-like behaviors of the MDMA-treated rats. Together, these findings suggest that RSV is a potential antidepressant and may confer protection against neurobiological and behavioral changes induced by MDMA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  19. Anaerobic and Aerobic Performances in Elite Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes de Araujo Gustavo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to propose a specific lactate minimum test for elite basketball players considering the: Running Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST as a hyperlactatemia inductor, short distances (specific distance, 20 m during progressive intensity and mathematical analysis to interpret aerobic and anaerobic variables. The basketball players were assigned to four groups: All positions (n=26, Guard (n= 7, Forward (n=11 and Center (n=8. The hyperlactatemia elevation (RAST method consisted of 6 maximum sprints over 35 m separated by 10 s of recovery. The progressive phase of the lactate minimum test consisted of 5 stages controlled by an electronic metronome (8.0, 9.0, 10.0, 11.0 and 12.0 km/h over a 20 m distance. The RAST variables and the lactate values were analyzed using visual and mathematical models. The intensity of the lactate minimum test, determined by a visual method, reduced in relation to polynomial fits (2nd degree for the Small Forward positions and General groups. The Power and Fatigue Index values, determined by both methods, visual and 3rd degree polynomial, were not significantly different between the groups. In conclusion, the RAST is an excellent hyperlactatemia inductor and the progressive intensity of lactate minimum test using short distances (20 m can be specifically used to evaluate the aerobic capacity of basketball players. In addition, no differences were observed between the visual and polynomial methods for RAST variables, but lactate minimum intensity was influenced by the method of analysis

  20. Anaerobic microsites have an unaccounted role in soil carbon stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Wanzek, Tom; Kleber, Markus; Nico, Peter; Fendorf, Scott

    2017-11-24

    Soils represent the largest carbon reservoir within terrestrial ecosystems. The mechanisms controlling the amount of carbon stored and its feedback to the climate system, however, remain poorly resolved. Global carbon models assume that carbon cycling in upland soils is entirely driven by aerobic respiration; the impact of anaerobic microsites prevalent even within well-drained soils is missed within this conception. Here, we show that anaerobic microsites are important regulators of soil carbon persistence, shifting microbial metabolism to less efficient anaerobic respiration, and selectively protecting otherwise bioavailable, reduced organic compounds such as lipids and waxes from decomposition. Further, shifting from anaerobic to aerobic conditions leads to a 10-fold increase in volume-specific mineralization rate, illustrating the sensitivity of anaerobically protected carbon to disturbance. The vulnerability of anaerobically protected carbon to future climate or land use change thus constitutes a yet unrecognized soil carbon-climate feedback that should be incorporated into terrestrial ecosystem models.