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Sample records for anaerobic thermophilic bacteria

  1. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  2. Destruction by Anaerobic Mesophilic and Thermophilic Digestion of Viruses and Indicator Bacteria Indigenous to Domestic Sludges

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Gerald; Berman, Donald

    1980-01-01

    In raw sludges and in mesophilically and thermophilically digested anaerobic sludges, large variations in numbers of viruses occurred over narrow ranges of numbers of fecal coliforms, total coliforms, and fecal streptococci, demonstrating that the bacteria were poor quantitative reflectors of the numbers of the viruses detected. Mesophilic and thermophilic digestion of anaerobic sludges destroyed all three indicator bacteria more rapidly than such digestion destroyed the viruses. The relative...

  3. Characterisation of community structure of bacteria in parallel mesophilic and thermophilic pilot scale anaerobe sludge digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, T; Berta, Brigitta; Székely, Anna J; Gyarmati, I; Kékesi, Katalin; Márialigeti, K; Tóth, Erika M

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to compare the microbial communities of a mesophilic and a thermophilic pilot scale anaerobe sludge digester. For studying the communities cultivation independent chemotaxonomical methods (RQ and PLFA analyses) and T-RFLP were applied. Microbial communities of the mesophilic and thermophilic pilot digesters showed considerable differences, both concerning the species present, and their abundance. A Methanosarcina sp. dominated the thermophilic, while a Methanosaeta sp. the mesophilic digester among Archaea. Species diversity of Bacteria was reduced in the thermophilic digester. Based on the quinone patterns in both digesters the dominance of sulphate reducing respiratory bacteria could be detected. The PLFA profiles of the digester communities were similar though in minor components characteristic differences were shown. Level of branched chain fatty acids is slightly lower in the thermophilic digester that reports less Gram positive bacteria. The relative ratio of fatty acids characteristic to Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroidetes and Clostridia shows differences between the two digesters: their importance generally decreased under thermophilic conditions. The sulphate reducer marker (15:1 and 17:1) fatty acids are present in low quantity in both digesters.

  4. Conversion of hemicelluloses and D-xylose into ethanol by the use of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Ethanol is a CO{sub 2} neutral liquid fuel that can substitute the use of fossil fuels in the transportation sector, thereby reducing the CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere. CO{sub 2} emission is suspected to contribute significantly to the so-called greenhouse effect, the global heating. Substrates for production of ethanol must be cheap and plentiful. This can be met by the use of lignocellulosic biomass such as willow, wheat straw, hardwood and softwood. However, the complexity of these polymeric substrates and the presence of several types of carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose) require additional treatment to release the useful carbohydrates and ferment the major carbohydrates fractions. The costs related to the ethanol-production must be kept at a minimum to be price competitive compared to gasoline. Therefore all of the carbohydrates present in lignocellulose need to be converted into ethanol. Glucose can be fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which, however, is unable to ferment the other major carbohydrate fraction, D-xylose. Thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacteria can be used for fermentation of the hemicelluloses fraction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, physiological studies of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria have shown that the ethanol yield decreases at increasing substrate concentration. The biochemical limitations causing this phenomenon are not known in detail. Physiological and biochemical studies of a newly characterized thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter mathranii, was performed. This study included extraction of intracellular metabolites and enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis. These studies revealed several bottlenecks in the D-xylose metabolism. This knowledge makes way for physiological and genetic engineering of this strain to improve the ethanol yield and productivity at high concentration of D-xylose. (au)

  5. Enrichment of anaerobic syngas-converting bacteria from thermophilic bioreactor sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Joana I; Stams, Alfons J M; Plugge, Caroline M; Alves, M Madalena; Sousa, Diana Z

    2013-12-01

    Thermophilic (55 °C) anaerobic microbial communities were enriched with a synthetic syngas mixture (composed of CO, H2 , and CO2 ) or with CO alone. Cultures T-Syn and T-CO were incubated and successively transferred with syngas (16 transfers) or CO (9 transfers), respectively, with increasing CO partial pressures from 0.09 to 0.88 bar. Culture T-Syn, after 4 successive transfers with syngas, was also incubated with CO and subsequently transferred (9 transfers) with solely this substrate - cultures T-Syn-CO. Incubation with syngas and CO caused a rapid decrease in the microbial diversity of the anaerobic consortium. T-Syn and T-Syn-CO showed identical microbial composition and were dominated by Desulfotomaculum and Caloribacterium species. Incubation initiated with CO resulted in the enrichment of bacteria from the genera Thermincola and Thermoanaerobacter. Methane was detected in the first two to three transfers of T-Syn, but production ceased afterward. Acetate was the main product formed by T-Syn and T-Syn-CO. Enriched T-CO cultures showed a two-phase conversion, in which H2 was formed first and then converted to acetate. This research provides insight into how thermophilic anaerobic communities develop using syngas/CO as sole energy and carbon source can be steered for specific end products and subsequent microbial synthesis of chemicals. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Cervantes, F.J.; Madrid, de M.P.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was studied. Additionally, the effects of different electron-donating substrates and the redox mediator riboflavin on dye reduction were assessed by using either a

  7. Conversion of hemicellulose and D-xylose into ethanol by the use of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Peter

    1998-02-01

    Ethanol is a CO{sub 2} neutral liquid fuel that can substitute the use of fossil fuels in the transportation sector, thereby reducing the CO{sub 2} emission to the atmoshpere. CO{sub 2} emission is suspected to contribute significantly to the so-called greenhouse effect, the global heating. Substrates for production of ethanol must be cheap and plentiful. This can be met by the use of lignocellulosic biomass such as willow, wheat straw, hardwood and softwood. However, the complexity of these polymeric substrates and the presence of several types of carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose) require additional treatment to release the useful carbohydrates and ferment the major carbohydrates fractions. The costs related to the ethanol-production must be kept at a minimum to be price competitive compared to gasoline. Therefore all of the carbohydrates present in lignocellulose need to be converted into ethanol. Glucose can be fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which, however, is unable to ferment the other major carbohydrate fraction, D-xylose. The need for a microorganism able to ferment D-xylose is therefore apparent. Thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacteria can therefore be considered for fermentation of D-xylose. Screening of 130 thermophilic anaerobic bacterial strains, from hot-springs, mesophilic and thermophilic biogas plants, paper pulp industries and brewery waste, were examined for production of ethanol from D-xylose and wet-oxidized hemicellulose hydrolysate. Several strains were isolated and one particular strain was selected for best performance during the screening test. This strain was characterized as a new species, Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. However, the ethanol yield on wet-oxidized hemicellulose hydrolysate was not satisfactory. The bacterium was adapted by isolation of mutant strains, now resistant to the inhibitory compounds present in the hydrolysate. Growth and ethanol yield

  8. Status on Science and Application of Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1994-01-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic processes are often regarded as less stable than mesophilic processes. In the paper this postulate is examined and disproved based on real operational data from of full-scale mesophilic and thermophilic biogas plants. The start-up produce for the thermophilic plants was...... for thermophilic digestion along with the implications for the methanogenic bacteria active at these temperatures....

  9. Status on Science and Application of Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1994-01-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic processes are often regarded as less stable than mesophilic processes. In the paper this postulate is examined and disproved based on real operational data from of full-scale mesophilic and thermophilic biogas plants. The start-up produce for the thermophilic plants was, ho...... for thermophilic digestion along with the implications for the methanogenic bacteria active at these temperatures....

  10. Pretreatment of wheat straw and conversion of xylose and xylan to ethanol by thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Jensen, K.; Nielsen, P.

    1996-01-01

    Wheat straw was pretreated by wet oxidation (oxygen pressure, alkaline conditions, elevated temperature) or hydrothermal processing (without oxygen) in order to solubilize the hemicellulose, facilitating bio-conversion. The effect of oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate addition on hemicellulose....... Of five different thermophilic bacteria used in this study only two strains produced ethanol with xylan as substrate, one of them being the strain A3 isolated from an Icelandic hot-spring. Probably other degradation products formed in the presence of oxygen might act as inhibitors. Adaptation...

  11. Bacteria and archaea communities in full-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters treating food wastewater: Key process parameters and microbial indicators of process instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonyeob; Shin, Seung Gu; Han, Gyuseong; Koo, Taewoan; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2017-12-01

    In this study, four different mesophilic and thermophilic full-scale anaerobic digesters treating food wastewater (FWW) were monitored for 1-2years in order to investigate: 1) microbial communities underpinning anaerobic digestion of FWW, 2) significant factors shaping microbial community structures, and 3) potential microbial indicators of process instability. Twenty-seven bacterial genera were identified as abundant bacteria underpinning the anaerobic digestion of FWW. Methanosaeta harundinacea, M. concilii, Methanoculleus bourgensis, M. thermophilus, and Methanobacterium beijingense were revealed as dominant methanogens. Bacterial community structures were clearly differentiated by digesters; archaeal community structures of each digester were dominated by one or two methanogen species. Temperature, ammonia, propionate, Na + , and acetate in the digester were significant factors shaping microbial community structures. The total microbial populations, microbial diversity, and specific bacteria genera showed potential as indicators of process instability in the anaerobic digestion of FWW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential for using thermophilic anaerobic bacteria for bioethanol production from hemicellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, P.; Georgieva, Tania I.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2004-01-01

    anaerobic bacterial strains growing optimally at 70-80degreesC for their ethanol production from D-Xylose. The new isolates came from different natural and man-made systems such as hot springs, paper pulp mills and brewery waste water. The test was composed of three different steps; (i) test for conversion...

  13. ENDOSPORES OF THERMOPHILIC FERMENTATIVE BACTERIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volpi, Marta

    2016-01-01

    solely based on endospores of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which presumably constitute only a small fraction of the total thermophilic endospore community reaching cold environments. My PhD project developed an experimental framework for using thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) to trace...

  14. Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, J.

    1994-05-01

    The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

  15. Recent Advances in Second Generation Ethanol Production by Thermophilic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Michael Scully; Johann Orlygsson

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased interest in using thermophilic bacteria for the production of bioethanol from complex lignocellulosic biomass due to their higher operating temperatures and broad substrate range. This review focuses upon the main genera of thermophilic anaerobes known to produce ethanol, their physiology, and the relevance of various environmental factors on ethanol yields including the partial pressure of hydrogen, ethanol tolerance, pH and substrate inhibition. Additionally, recent de...

  16. Thermophilic Anaerobic Degradation of Butyrate by a Butyrate-Utilizing Bacterium in Coculture and Triculture with Methanogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Ahring, Birgitte K.; Westermann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    We studied syntrophic butyrate degradation in thermophilic mixed cultures containing a butyrate-degrading bacterium isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum or in triculture with M. thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacterium. Butyrate was β-oxidized to acetate with protons as the electron acceptors. Acetate was used concurrently with its production in the triculture. We found a higher butyrate degradation rate in th...

  17. Recent Advances in Second Generation Ethanol Production by Thermophilic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Michael Scully

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increased interest in using thermophilic bacteria for the production of bioethanol from complex lignocellulosic biomass due to their higher operating temperatures and broad substrate range. This review focuses upon the main genera of thermophilic anaerobes known to produce ethanol, their physiology, and the relevance of various environmental factors on ethanol yields including the partial pressure of hydrogen, ethanol tolerance, pH and substrate inhibition. Additionally, recent development in evolutionary adaptation and genetic engineering of thermophilic bacteria is highlighted. Recent developments in advanced process techniques used for ethanol production are reviewed with an emphasis on the advantages of using thermophilic bacteria in process strategies including separate saccharification and fermentation, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF, and consolidated bioprocessing (CBP.

  18. Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses using a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses by a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process was investigated in a series of two up‐flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The first reactor that was dominated with hydrogen‐producing bacteria of Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharo......Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses by a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process was investigated in a series of two up‐flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The first reactor that was dominated with hydrogen‐producing bacteria of Thermoanaerobacterium...

  19. [Start-up of a thermophilic anaerobic sludge digester].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Zhao, Peng-Juan; Tian, Lei; Shi, Lin; Shi, Han-Chang; Jiang, Yan

    2011-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion is one of the most widely-used technologies of the sludge reduction and stabilization, in which thermophilic digestion has advantage of fast stabilization. But it is lack of operation experience in China. Thus start-up of a thermophilic anaerobic sludge digester treating excess activated sludge was investigated. The digester was an internal circulation anaerobic sludge digester. It belongs to upflow reactor and its hydrodynamic conditions can be controlled by backflow biogas. A multistep strategy was applied to the start-up to enhance anaerobic bacteria to adapt the changes of temperature, reactor and treated sludge, including: to feed the digester with easily-degraded glucose to enhance bacteria reproduce at the first beginning with COD organic loading of 2.4 kg/(m3 x d); to accelerate the internal circulation; to control pH within a optimal range; to gradually increase excess sludge flow rate as well as to initiate pydrohydrolysis to enhance hydrolysis. The start-up took 63 days and when it finished, the VSS organic loading reached 1.60 kg/(m3 x d), the average VSS biogas rate was 0.51 L/g, i. e. 15.3 m3/m3 sludge (96% water content), VSS and SS removals were 60.8% and 45.8%. This shows that the strategy is valid.

  20. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of biologically pretreated abattoir wastewaters in an upflow anaerobic filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gannoun, H.; Bouallagui, H.; Okbi, A.; Sayadi, S.; Hamdi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The hydrolysis pretreatment of abattoir wastewaters (AW), rich in organic suspended solids (fats and protein) was studied in static and stirred batch reactors without aeration in the presence of natural microbial population acclimated in a storage tank of AW. Microbial analysis showed that the major populations which contribute to the pretreatment of AW belong to the genera Bacillus. Contrary to the static pretreatment, the stirred conditions favoured the hydrolysis and solubilization of 80% of suspended matter into soluble pollution. The pretreated AW, in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 days, was fed to an upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) at an HRT of 2 days. The performance of anaerobic digestion of biologically pretreated AW was examined under mesophilic (37 deg. C) and thermophilic (55 deg. C) conditions. The shifting from a mesophilic to a thermophilic environment in the UAF was carried out with a short start-up of thermophilic condition. The UAF ran at organic loading rates (OLRs) ranging from 0.9 to 6 g COD/L d in mesophilic conditions and at OLRs from 0.9 to 9 g COD/L d in thermophilic conditions. COD removal efficiencies of 80-90% were achieved for OLRs up to 4.5 g COD/L d in mesophilic conditions, while the highest OLRs i.e. 9 g COD/L d led to efficiencies of 70-72% in thermophilic conditions. The biogas yield in thermophilic conditions was about 0.32-0.45 L biogas/g of COD removed for OLRs up to 4.5 g COD/L d. For similar OLR, the UAF in mesophilic conditions showed lower percentage of methanization. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion has been shown to destroy pathogens partially, whereas the thermophilic process was more efficient in the removal of indicator microorganisms and pathogenic bacteria at different organic loading rates.

  1. Effect of biowaste sludge maturation on the diversity of thermophilic bacteria and archaea in an anaerobic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goberna, M; Insam, H; Franke-Whittle, I H

    2009-04-01

    Prokaryotic diversity was investigated near the inlet and outlet of a plug-flow reactor. After analyzing 800 clones, 50 bacterial and 3 archaeal phylogenetic groups were defined. Clostridia (>92%) dominated among bacteria and Methanoculleus (>90%) among archaea. Significant changes in pH and volatile fatty acids did not invoke a major shift in the phylogenetic groups. We suggest that the environmental filter imposed by the saline conditions (20 g liter(-1)) selected a stable community of halotolerant and halophilic prokaryotes.

  2. Diversity of Cultured Thermophilic Anaerobes in Hot Springs of Yunnan Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Lu, Y.; Dong, X.; Liu, X.; Wei, Y.; Ji, X.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    Thermophilic anaerobes including Archaea and Bacteria refer to those growing optimally at temperatures above 50°C and do not use oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor for growth. Study on thermophilic anaerobes will help to understand how life thrives under extreme conditions. Meanwhile thermophilic anaerobes are of importance in potential application and development of thermophilic biotechnology. We have surveyed culturable thermophilic anaerobes in hot springs (pH6.5-7.5; 70 - 94°C) in Rehai of Tengchong, Bangnazhang of Longlin, Eryuan of Dali,Yunnan, China. 50 strains in total were cultured from the hot springs water using Hungate anaerobic technique, and 30 strains were selected based on phenotypic diversity for analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 28 strains belonged to the members of five genera: Caldanaerobacter, Calaramator, Thermoanaerobacter, Dictyoglomus and Fervidobacterium, which formed five branches on the phylogenetic tree. Besides, 2 strains of methanogenic archaea were obtained. The majority of the isolates were the known species, however, seven strains were identified as novel species affiliated to the five genera based on the lower 16S rDNA sequence similarities (less than 93 - 97%) with the described species. This work would provide the future study on their diversity, distribution among different regions and the potential application of thermophilic enzyme. Supported by State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences(SKLMR-080605)and the Foundation of State Natural Science (30660009, 30960022, 31081220175).

  3. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF A BIODEGRADABLE MATERIAL UNDER ANAEROBIC - THERMOPHILIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RICARDO CAMACHO-MUÑOZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper dertermined the anaerobic biodegradation of a polymer obtained by extrusion process of native cassava starch, polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Initially a thermophilic - methanogenic inoculum was prepared from urban solid waste. The gas final methane concentration and medium’s pH reached values of 59,6% and 7,89 respectively. The assay assembly was carried out according ASTM D5511 standard. The biodegradation percent of used materials after 15 day of digestion were: 77,49%, 61,27%, 0,31% for cellulose, sample and polyethylene respectively. Due cellulose showed biodegradation levels higher than 70% it’s deduced that the inoculum conditions were appropriate. A biodegradation level of 61,27%, 59,35% of methane concentration in sample’s evolved gas and a medium’s finale pH of 7,71 in sample’s vessels, reveal the extruded polymer´s capacity to be anaerobically degraded under thermophilic- high solid concentration conditions.

  4. Enrichment of Thermophilic Syntrophic Anaerobic Glutamate-Degrading Consortia using a Dialysis Membrane Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plugge, C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A dialysis cultivation system was used to enrich slow-growing moderately thermophilic anaerobic bacteria at high cell densities. Bicarbonate buffered mineral salts medium with 5 mM glutamate as the sole carbon and energy source was used and the incubation temperature was 55 degrees C. The reactor

  5. Thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Thomas; Widdel, Friedrich; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Teske, Andreas; Boetius, Antje; Wegener, Gunter

    2011-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. AOM is performed by microbial consortia of archaea (ANME) associated with partners related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. In vitro enrichments of AOM were so far only successful at temperatures ≤25 °C; however, energy gain for growth by AOM with sulfate is in principle also possible at higher temperatures. Sequences of 16S rRNA genes and core lipids characteristic for ANME as well as hints of in situ AOM activity were indeed reported for geothermally heated marine environments, yet no direct evidence for thermophilic growth of marine ANME consortia was obtained to date. To study possible thermophilic AOM, we investigated hydrothermally influenced sediment from the Guaymas Basin. In vitro incubations showed activity of sulfate-dependent methane oxidation between 5 and 70 °C with an apparent optimum between 45 and 60 °C. AOM was absent at temperatures ≥75 °C. Long-term enrichment of AOM was fastest at 50 °C, yielding a 13-fold increase of methane-dependent sulfate reduction within 250 days, equivalent to an apparent doubling time of 68 days. The enrichments were dominated by novel ANME-1 consortia, mostly associated with bacterial partners of the deltaproteobacterial HotSeep-1 cluster, a deeply branching phylogenetic group previously found in a butane-amended 60 °C-enrichment culture of Guaymas sediments. The closest relatives (Desulfurella spp.; Hippea maritima) are moderately thermophilic sulfur reducers. Results indicate that AOM and ANME archaea could be of biogeochemical relevance not only in cold to moderate but also in hot marine habitats.

  6. Hemicellulases from the ethanologenic thermophile, Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and related anaerobic thermophiles. Final report, September 1992--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, J.

    1998-09-01

    The short term goals of this application were to characterize hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles on the biochemical and molecular level to extend the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophilic bacteria. This objective includes the following tasks: (1) Traditional purification and biochemical/biophysical characterization of xylanases from the newly isolated, slightly alkalitolerant strain NDF190, and the slightly acid-tolerant strain YS485, both with high xylanolytic activities, and of the 4-O-methyl glucuronidase and arabinosidase from strain NDF190 and the acetyl (xylan) esterase from T. ethanolicus. This also includes determining the N-terminal sequences and obtaining gene probes. (2) Elucidation of the regulation of hemicellulolytic enzymes in anaerobic thermophiles. (3) To clone into E. coli and identify the multiplicity of the enzymes involved in hemicellulose degradation by T. ethanolicus and other suitable organisms. (4) To purify and characterize the recombinant enzymes with the goal of identifying the best enzymes for cloning into the ethanologenic T. ethanolicus to obtain an optimized hemicellulose utilization by this bacterium.

  7. Hemicellulases from the ethanologenic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and related anaerobic thermophiles. Final report, September 1992--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, J.

    1998-05-01

    The SHORT TERM GOALS of this application were to characterize hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles on the biochemical and molecular level to extend the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophilic bacteria. This objective includes the following TASKS: (1) Traditional purification and biochemical/biophysical characterization of xylanases from the newly isolated, slightly alkalitolerant strain NDF190, and the slightly acid-tolerant strain YS485, both with high xylanolytic activities, and of the 4-0-methyl glucuronidase and arabinosidase from strain NDF190 and the acetyl (xylan) esterase from T. ethanolicus. This also includes determining the N-terminal sequences and obtaining gene probes. (2) Elucidation of the regulation of hemicellulolytic enzymes in anaerobic thermophiles. (3) To clone into E. coli and identify the multiplicity of the enzymes involved in hemicellulose degradation by T. ethanolicus and other suitable organisms. (4) To purify and characterize the recombinant enzymes with the goal of identifying the best enzymes for cloning into the ethanologenic T. ethanolicus to obtain an optimized hemicellulose utilization by this bacterium (one of our long term goals).

  8. Diversity and ecophysiological features of thermophilic carboxydotrophic anaerobes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokolova, T.G.; Henstra, A.M.; Sipma, J.; Parshina, S.N.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lebedinsky, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Both natural and anthropogenic hot environments contain appreciable levels of carbon monoxide (CO). Anaerobic microbial communities play an important role in CO conversion in such environments. CO is involved in a number of redox reactions. It is biotransformed by thermophilic methanogens,

  9. High ethanol tolerance of the thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producer Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    to exogenously added ethanol was studied in a continuous immobilized reactor system at a growth temperature of 70 degrees C. Ethanol tolerance was evaluated based on inhibition of fermentative performance e.g.. inhibition of substrate conversion. At the highest ethanol concentration tested (8.3% v/v), the strain...... was able to convert 42% of the xylose initially present, indicating that this ethanol concentration is not the upper limit tolerated by the strain. Long-term strain adaptation to high ethanol concentrations (6 - 8.3%) resulted in an improvement of xylose conversion by 25% at an ethanol concentration of 5......The low ethanol tolerance of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria, generally less than 2% (v/v) ethanol, is one of the main limiting factors for their potential use for second generation fuel ethanol production. In this work, the tolerance of thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG 1L1...

  10. Multiple approaches to characterize the microbial community in a thermophilic anaerobic digester running on swine manure: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc; Chang, Yi-Chia; Yu, Chang-Ping; Huang, Shir-Ly

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the first survey of microbial community in thermophilic anaerobic digester using swine manure as sole feedstock was performed by multiple approaches including denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), clone library and pyrosequencing techniques. The integrated analysis of 21 DGGE bands, 126 clones and 8506 pyrosequencing read sequences revealed that Clostridia from the phylum Firmicutes account for the most dominant Bacteria. In addition, our analysis also identified additional taxa that were missed by the previous researches, including members of the bacterial phyla Synergistetes, Planctomycetes, Armatimonadetes, Chloroflexi and Nitrospira which might also play a role in thermophilic anaerobic digester. Most archaeal 16S rRNA sequences could be assigned to the order Methanobacteriales instead of Methanomicrobiales comparing to previous studies. In addition, this study reported that the member of Methanothermobacter genus was firstly found in thermophilic anaerobic digester. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Light enhances biogas production from thermophilic anaerobic digester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, C.; Sawayama, S. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Biomass Research Group, Inst. for Energy Utilization

    2004-07-01

    The effect of light on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle waste and sewage sludge was studied. Light was used to produce methane during anaerobic digestion of the sludge at 55 degrees C. Two reactors were tested. A dark reactor was wrapped in aluminum foil, and a light reactor was illuminated at 1500 lux with 60 watt incandescent bulbs. After an incubation of 35 days, the volume of methane produced from the light bulb reactor was 3.7 times higher than that from the dark reactor. Neither ammonium and phosphorous concentrations, nor the pH were not substantially different between the two types of reactors. The key methanogens in both reactors were Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicum. This paper presents the results of the phylogenetic analysis. The results indicate that thermophilic methanogenesis can be enhanced by light. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Involvement of a novel fermentative bacterium in acidification in a thermophilic anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomoyuki; Akuzawa, Masateru; Haruta, Shin; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Ogata, Atsushi; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    Acidification results from the excessive accumulation of volatile fatty acids and the breakthrough of buffering capacity in anaerobic digesters. However, little is known about the identity of the acidogenic bacteria involved. Here, we identified an active fermentative bacterium during acidification in a thermophilic anaerobic digester by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of isotopically labeled rRNA. The digestion sludge retrieved from the beginning of pH drop in the laboratory-scale anaerobic digester was incubated anaerobically at 55 °C for 4 h during which 13 C-labeled glucose was supplemented repeatedly. 13 CH 4 and 13 CO 2 were produced after substrate addition. RNA extracts from the incubated sludge was density-separated by ultracentrifugation, and then bacterial communities in the density fractions were screened by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library analyses based on 16S rRNA transcripts. Remarkably, a novel lineage within the genus Thermoanaerobacterium became abundant with increasing the buoyant density and predominated in the heaviest fraction of RNA. The results in this study indicate that a thermoacidophilic bacterium exclusively fermented the simple carbohydrate glucose, thereby playing key roles in acidification in the thermophilic anaerobic digester. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  14. Thermophilic, lignocellulolytic bacteria for ethanol production: current state and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tinghong; Yao, Shuo

    2011-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass contains a variety of carbohydrates, and their conversion into ethanol by fermentation requires an efficient microbial platform to achieve high yield, productivity, and final titer of ethanol. In recent years, growing attention has been devoted to the development of cellulolytic and saccharolytic thermophilic bacteria for lignocellulosic ethanol production because of their unique properties. First of all, thermophilic bacteria possess unique cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic systems and are considered as potential sources of highly active and thermostable enzymes for efficient biomass hydrolysis. Secondly, thermophilic bacteria ferment a broad range of carbohydrates into ethanol, and some of them display potential for ethanologenic fermentation at high yield. Thirdly, the establishment of the genetic tools for thermophilic bacteria has allowed metabolic engineering, in particular with emphasis on improving ethanol yield, and this facilitates their employment for ethanol production. Finally, different processes for second-generation ethanol production based on thermophilic bacteria have been proposed with the aim to achieve cost-competitive processes. However, thermophilic bacteria exhibit an inherent low tolerance to ethanol and inhibitors in the pretreated biomass, and this is at present the greatest barrier to their industrial application. Further improvement of the properties of thermophilic bacteria, together with the optimization production processes, is equally important for achieving a realistic industrial ethanol production.

  15. Thermotoga lettingae sp. nov. : a novel thermophilic, methanol-degrading bacterium isolated from a thermophilic anaerobic reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, M.; Weijma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, mobile, Gram-negative, thermophilic bacterium, strain TMO(T), was isolated from a thermophilic sulfate-reducing bioreactor operated at 65 degrees C with methanol as the sole substrate. The G C content of the DNA of strain TMO(T) was 39.2 molÐThe optimum pH,

  16. Screening And Isolation Of Thermophilic Cellulolytic Bacteria From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermophilic cellulase producing bacteria were isolated from the heap of decaying cassava peels and cocoa pods in Ile-Ife, Southwest, Nigeria. Out of the fifteen thermophilic bacterial isolates - thirteen of which were from cassava peels and two from cocoa pods - only three (2NA3, Ca3 and Co4) hydrolyzed carboxymethyl ...

  17. Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Cold Marine Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ISAKSEN, MF; BAK, F.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    C to search for presence of psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. Detectable activity was initially only in the mesophilic range, but after a lag phase sulfate reduction by thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. No distinct activity of psychrophilic...... sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected. Time course experiments showed constant sulfate reduction rates at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C, whereas the activity at 60 degrees C increased exponentially after a lag period of one day. Thermophilic, endospore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria, designated strain...... P60, were isolated and characterized as Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii. The temperature response of growth and respiration of strain P60 agreed well with the measured sulfate reduction at 50 degrees-70 degrees C. Bacteria similar to strain P60 could thus be responsible for the measured thermophilic...

  18. Biological hydrogen production from biomass by thermophilic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, P.A.M.; Mars, A.E.; Budde, M.A.W.; Lai, M.; de Vrije, T.; van Niel, E.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    To meet the reduction of the emission of CO 2 imposed by the Kyoto protocol, hydrogen should be produced from renewable primary energy. Besides the indirect production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from renewable resources, such as sunlight, wind and hydropower, hydrogen can be directly produced from biomass. At present, there are two strategies for the production of hydrogen from biomass: the thermochemical technology, such as gasification, and the biotechnological approach using micro-organisms. Biological hydrogen production delivers clean hydrogen with an environmental-friendly technology and is very suitable for the conversion of wet biomass in small-scale applications, thus having a high chance of becoming an economically feasible technology. Many micro-organisms are able to produce hydrogen from mono- and disaccharides, starch and (hemi)cellulose under anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic production of hydrogen is a common phenomenon, occurring during the process of anaerobic digestion. Here, hydrogen producing micro-organisms are in syn-trophy with methanogenic bacteria which consume the hydrogen as soon as it is produced. In this way, hydrogen production remains obscure and methane is the end-product. By uncoupling hydrogen production from methane production, hydrogen becomes available for recovery and exploitation. This study describes the use of extreme thermophilic bacteria, selected because of a higher hydrogen production efficiency as compared to mesophilic bacteria, for the production of hydrogen from renewable resources. As feedstock energy crops like Miscanthus and Sorghum bicolor and waste streams like domestic organic waste, paper sludge and potato steam peels were used. The feedstock was pretreated and/or enzymatically hydrolyzed prior to fermentation to make a fermentable substrate. Hydrogen production by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, Thermotoga elfii and T. neapolitana on all substrates was observed. Nutrient

  19. Thermophilic anaerobic acetate-utilizing methanogens and their metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana

    Six strains of thermophilic anaerobic acetate-utilizing methanogens were isolated from different full-scale thermophilic biogas plants in China and Denmark. The strain isolated from the Chinese biogas plant was designated KN-6P and the isolates from the Danish full-scale biogas plants were......, utilizing the substrates acetate, methanol and methylamines but not hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Strain Methanosarcina sp. SO-2P was able to grow mixotrophically on methanol and hydrogen/carbon dioxide with methane formation from hydrogen and carbon dioxide occurring after methanol depletion. All six...... that the similarity level between strains from the Danish biogas plants and Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 was higher than 70%, and thus these strains should be considered as organisms belonging to the species Methanosarcina thermophila. DNA of strain KN-6P was only distantly related to the DNA of Methanosarcina...

  20. Startup and stability of thermophilic anaerobic digestion of OFMSW

    KAUST Repository

    El-Fadel, Mutasem E.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is promoted as an energy source and more recently as a greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation measure. In this context, AD systems operating at thermophilic temperatures (55-60°C)-compared to mesophilic temperatures (35-40°C)-have the unique feature of producing hygienic soil conditioners with greater process efficiency, higher energy yield, and more GHG savings. Startup of AD systems is often constrained by the lack of acclimated seeds, leading to process instability and failure. The authors focus on strategies to startup thermophilic digesters treating OFMSW in the absence of acclimated seeds and examines constraints associated with process stability and ways to overcome them. Relevant gaps in the literature and future research needs are delineated. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  1. Thermophilic, lignocellulolytic bacteria for ethanol production: current state and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Tinghong; Yao, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass contains a variety of carbohydrates, and their conversion into ethanol by fermentation requires an efficient microbial platform to achieve high yield, productivity, and final titer of ethanol. In recent years, growing attention has been devoted to the development...... of cellulolytic and saccharolytic thermophilic bacteria for lignocellulosic ethanol production because of their unique properties. First of all, thermophilic bacteria possess unique cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic systems and are considered as potential sources of highly active and thermostable enzymes...... for efficient biomass hydrolysis. Secondly, thermophilic bacteria ferment a broad range of carbohydrates into ethanol, and some of them display potential for ethanologenic fermentation at high yield. Thirdly, the establishment of the genetic tools for thermophilic bacteria has allowed metabolic engineering...

  2. Characterization of technetium(vII) reduction by cell suspensions of thermophilic bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyh, Nikolay A; Gavrilov, Sergei N; Sorokin, Vladimir V; German, Konstantin E; Sergeant, Claire; Simonoff, Monique; Robb, Frank; Slobodkin, Alexander I

    2007-08-01

    Washed cell suspensions of the anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus pacificus and Thermoproteus uzoniensis and the anaerobic thermophilic gram-positive bacteria Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens and Tepidibacter thalassicus reduced technetium [(99)Tc(VII)], supplied as soluble pertechnetate with molecular hydrogen as an electron donor, forming highly insoluble Tc(IV)-containing grayish-black precipitate. Apart from molecular hydrogen, T. ferrireducens reduced Tc(VII) with lactate, glycerol, and yeast extract as electron donors, and T. thalassicus reduced it with peptone. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis of cell suspensions of T. ferrireducens showed the presence of Tc-containing particles attached to the surfaces of non-lysed cells. This is the first report on the reduction in Tc(VII) by thermophilic microorganisms of the domain Bacteria and by archaea of the phylum Euryarchaeota.

  3. Global association between thermophilicity and vancomycin susceptibility in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chayan eRoy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of the aquatic microbiota of several circum-neutral (6.0-8.5 pH mid-temperature (55-85 OC springs revealed rich diversities of phylogenetic relatives of mesophilic bacteria, which surpassed the diversity of the truly-thermophilic taxa. To gain insight into the potentially-thermophilic adaptations of the phylogenetic relatives of Gram-negative mesophilic bacteria detected in culture-independent investigations we attempted pure-culture isolation by supplementing the enrichment media with 50 µg ml-1 vancomycin. Surprisingly, this Gram-positive-specific antibiotic eliminated the entire culturable-diversity of chemoorganotrophic and sulfur-chemolithotrophic bacteria present in the tested hot water inocula. Moreover, it also killed all the Gram-negative hot-spring isolates that were obtained in vancomycin-free media. Concurrent literature search for the description of Gram-negative thermophilic bacteria revealed that at least 16 of them were reportedly vancomycin-susceptible. While these data suggested that vancomycin-susceptibility could be a global trait of thermophilic bacteria (irrespective of their taxonomy, biogeography and Gram-character, MALDI Mass Spectroscopy of the peptidoglycans of a few Gram-negative thermophilic bacteria revealed that tandem alanines were present in the fourth and fifth positions of their muropeptide precursors (MPPs. Subsequent phylogenetic analyses revealed a close affinity between the D-alanine-D-alanine ligases (Ddl of taxonomically-diverse Gram-negative thermophiles and the thermostable Ddl protein of Thermotoga maritima, which is well-known for its high specificity for alanine over other amino acids. The Ddl tree further illustrated a divergence between the homologs of Gram-negative thermophiles and mesophiles, which broadly coincided with vancomycin-susceptibility and vancomycin-resistance respectively. It was thus hypothesized that thermophilic Ddls have been evolutionarily selected to favor a D

  4. Thermophilic Anaerobic Digester Performance Under Different Feed-Loading Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardiere, John; Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Domaschko, Max; Chatfield, Mark

    The effect of feed-loading frequency on digester performance was studied on a thermophilic anaerobic digester with a working volume of 27.43 m3. The digester was fed 0.93 m3 of chicken-litter slurry/d, containing 50.9 g/L chemical oxygen demand. The treatments were loading frequencies of 1, 2, 6, and 12 times/d. The hourly pH, biogas production, and methane percent of the biogas were less stable at lower feed frequencies. There was no statistical difference among treatments in methanogenic activity. The feed-loading frequency of six times per day treatment provided the greatest biogas production.

  5. Co-digestion of polylactide and kitchen garbage in hyperthermophilic and thermophilic continuous anaerobic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Hidaka, Taira; Tsuno, Hiroshi; Tsubota, Jun

    2012-05-01

    Two series of two-phase anaerobic systems, consisting of a hyperthermophilic (80°C) reactor and a thermophilic (55°C) reactor, fed with a mixture of kitchen garbage (KG) and polylactide (PLA), was compared with a single-phase thermophilic reactor for the overall performance. The result indicated that ammonia addition under hyperthermophilic condition promoted the transformation of PLA particles to lactic acid. The systems with hyperthermophilic treatment had advantages on PLA transformation and methane conversion ratio to the control system. Under the organic loading rate (OLR) of 10.3 g COD/(L day), the PLA transformation ratios of the two-phase systems were 82.0% and 85.2%, respectively, higher than that of the control system (63.5%). The methane conversion ratios of the two-phase systems were 82.9% and 80.8%, respectively, higher than 70.1% of the control system. The microbial community analysis indicated that hyperthermophilic treatment is easily installed to traditional thermophilic anaerobic digestion plants without inoculation of special bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of ammonia and sulphate concentration on thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, J A; Brekelmans, J; Martín, M A; Chica, A F; Martín, A

    2010-12-01

    The effect of increasing concentrations of ammonia and sulphate on thermophilic anaerobic digestion (52 degrees C) was studied at laboratory-scale. The substrate consisted of a synthetic solution supplemented with ammonia and sodium sulphate. In terms of biogas production, the results showed that the C/N and C/SO(4)(2-) thresholds were 4.40 and 1.60, respectively, corresponding to 620 mg FA (free ammonia)/L and 1400 mg SO(4)(2-)/L. No reduction in biogas production was observed until reaching the above concentration of sulphate in the sulphate toxicity test. However, when the concentration of ammonia was increased to 620 mg FA/L in the ammonia toxicity test, a gradual decrease of 21% was observed for the biogas. In order to characterise each set of experiments kinetically, a biogas production first-order kinetic model was used to fit the experimental data. The proposed model accurately predicted the behaviour of the microorganisms affecting the thermophilic anaerobic digestion, allowing its evolution to be predicted. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inferring microbial interactions in thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digestion of hog waste.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Tzun-Wen Shaw

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion (AnD is a microbiological process that converts organic waste materials into biogas. Because of its high methane content, biogas is a combustible energy source and serves as an important environmental technology commonly used in the management of animal waste generated on large animal farms. Much work has been done on hardware design and process engineering for the generation of biogas. However, little is known about the complexity of the microbiology in this process. In particular, how microbes interact in the digester and eventually breakdown and convert organic matter into biogas is still regarded as a "black box." We used 16S rRNA sequencing as a tool to study the microbial community in laboratory hog waste digesters under tightly controlled conditions, and systematically unraveled the distinct interaction networks of two microbial communities from mesophilic (MAnD and thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAnD. Under thermophilic conditions, the well-known association between hydrogen-producing bacteria, e.g., Ruminococcaceae and Prevotellaceae, and hydrotrophic methanogens, Methanomicrobiaceae, was reverse engineered by their interactive topological niches. The inferred interaction network provides a sketch enabling the determination of microbial interactive relationships that conventional strategy of finding differential taxa was hard to achieve. This research is still in its infancy, but it can help to depict the dynamics of microbial ecosystems and to lay the groundwork for understanding how microorganisms cohabit in the anaerobic digester.

  8. Modeling the fate of antibiotic resistance genes and class 1 integrons during thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal wastewater solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Tucker R; Sadowsky, Michael J; LaPara, Timothy M

    2015-10-19

    This study investigated the use of thermophilic anaerobic digestion for removing antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from residual municipal wastewater solids. Four laboratory-scale anaerobic digesters were operated in 8-day batch cycles at temperatures of 40, 56, 60, and 63 °C. Two tetracycline resistance genes (tet(W) and tet(X)), a fluoroquinolone resistance gene (qnrA), the integrase gene of class 1 integrons (intI1), 16S rRNA genes of all Bacteria, and 16S rRNA genes of methanogens were quantified using real-time quantitative PCR. ARG and intI1 quantities decreased at all temperatures and were described well by a modified form of the Collins-Selleck disinfection kinetic model. The magnitudes of Collins-Selleck kinetic parameters were significantly greater at thermophilic temperatures compared to 40 °C, but few statistically significant differences were observed among these parameters for the thermophilic anaerobic digesters. This model allows for the direct comparison of different operating conditions (e.g., temperature) on anaerobic digestion performance in mitigating the quantity of ARGs in wastewater solids and could be used to design full-scale anaerobic digesters to specifically treat for ARGs as a "pollutant" of concern.

  9. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  10. Rapid establishment of thermophilic anaerobic microbial community during the one-step startup of thermophilic anaerobic digestion from a mesophilic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yuyou; Chi, Yongzhi; Yang, Min

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how fast the thermophilic anaerobic microbial community could be established during the one-step startup of thermophilic anaerobic digestion from a mesophilic digester. Stable thermophilic anaerobic digestion was achieved within 20 days from a mesophilic digester treating sewage sludge by adopting the one-step startup strategy. The succession of archaeal and bacterial populations over a period of 60 days after the temperature increment was followed by using 454-pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. After the increase of temperature, thermophilic methanogenic community was established within 11 days, which was characterized by the fast colonization of Methanosarcina thermophila and two hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanothermobacter spp. and Methanoculleus spp.). At the same time, the bacterial community was dominated by Fervidobacterium, whose relative abundance rapidly increased from 0 to 28.52 % in 18 days, followed by other potential thermophilic genera, such as Clostridium, Coprothermobacter, Anaerobaculum and EM3. The above result demonstrated that the one-step startup strategy could allow the rapid establishment of the thermophilic anaerobic microbial community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  12. Methanomethylovorans thermophila sp. nov., a thermophilic, methylotrophic methanogen form an anaerobic reactor fed with methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, B.; Parshina, S.N.; Doesburg, van W.C.J.; Lomans, B.P.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A novel thermophilic, obligately methylotrophic, methanogenic archaeon, strain L2FAWT, was isolated from a thermophilic laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor fed with methanol as the carbon and energy source. Cells of strain L2FAWT were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0·7¿1·5 µm in

  13. Thermophilic two-stage dry anaerobic digestion of model garbage with ammonia stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabu, Hironori; Sakai, Chikako; Fujiwara, Tomoko; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2011-03-01

    To avoid the inhibition of methane production by ammonia that occurs during the degradation of garbage, anaerobic digestion with prior ammonia production and subsequent stripping was investigated. In the ammonia production phase, the maximum ammonia concentration was approximately 2800 mg N/kg of total wet sludge in the range of 4 days of sludge retention time, indicating that only 43% of total nitrogen in the model garbage was converted to ammonia. The model garbage from which ammonia was produced and stripped was subjected to semi-continuous thermophilic dry anaerobic digestion over 180 days. The gas yield was in the range of 0.68 to 0.75 Nm(3)/kg volatile solid, and it decreased with the decrease of the sludge retention time. The ammonia-nitrogen concentration in the sludge was kept below 3000 mg N/kg total wet sludge. Microbial community structure analysis revealed that the phylum Firmicutes dominated in the ammonia production, but the community structure changed at different sludge retention times. In dry anaerobic digestion, the dominant bacteria shifted from the phylum Thermotogae to Firmicutes. The dominant archaeon was the genus Methanothermobacter, but the ratio of Methanosarcina increased during the process of dry anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of Mn2+ and compatible solutes in the radiation resistance of thermophilic bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Kimberly M; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn(2+)-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  15. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Webb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  16. Moorella stamsii sp. nov., a new anaerobic thermophilic hydrogenogenic carboxydotroph isolated from digester sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, J.I.; Gelder, van A.H.; Alves, M.M.; Sousa, D.Z.; Plugge, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, thermophilic, carbon monoxide-utilizing bacterium, strain E3-O, was isolated from anaerobic sludge of a municipal solid waste digester. Cells were straight rods, 0.6 to 1µm in diameter and 2 to 3 µm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. Cells formed round terminal

  17. Comprehensive microbial analysis of combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process treating high-strength food wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon; Kim, Mi-Sun; Sommer, Sven G

    2015-04-15

    A combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process was used to treat high-strength food wastewater in this study. During the experimental period, most of solid residue from the mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R1) was separated by centrifugation and introduced into the thermophilic aerobic reactor (R2) for further digestion. Then, thermophilic aerobically-digested sludge was reintroduced into R1 to enhance reactor performance. The combined process was operated with two different Runs: Run I with hydraulic retention time (HRT) = 40 d (corresponding OLR = 3.5 kg COD/m(3) d) and Run II with HRT = 20 d (corresponding OLR = 7 kg COD/m(3)). For a comparison, a single-stage mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R3) was operated concurrently with same OLRs and HRTs as the combined process. During the overall digestion, all reactors showed high stability without pH control. The combined process demonstrated significantly higher organic matter removal efficiencies (over 90%) of TS, VS and COD and methane production than did R3. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) results indicated that higher populations of both bacteria and archaea were maintained in R1 than in R3. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed relatively high abundance of phylum Actinobacteria in both R1 and R2, and a predominance of phyla Synergistetes and Firmicutes in R3 during Run II. Furthermore, R1 and R2 shared genera (Prevotella, Aminobacterium, Geobacillus and Unclassified Actinobacteria), which suggests synergy between mesophilic anaerobic digestion and thermophilic aerobic digestion. For archaea, in R1 methanogenic archaea shifted from genus Methanosaeta to Methanosarcina, whereas genera Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium and Methanoculleus were predominant in R3. The results demonstrated dynamics of key microbial populations that were highly consistent with an enhanced reactor performance of the combined process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling temperature variations in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Guadarrama, Salvador; Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; López-Cruz, Irineo L; Domaschko, Max

    2011-05-01

    A model that predicts temperature changes in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester was developed based on fundamental thermodynamic laws. The methodology utilized two simulation strategies. In the first, model equations were solved through a searching routine based on a minimal square optimization criterion, from which the overall heat transfer coefficient values, for both biodigester and heat exchanger, were determined. In the second, the simulation was performed with variable values of these overall coefficients. The prediction with both strategies allowed reproducing experimental data within 5% of the temperature span permitted in the equipment by the system control, which validated the model. The temperature variation was affected by the heterogeneity of the feeding and extraction processes, by the heterogeneity of the digestate recirculation through the heating system and by the lack of a perfect mixing inside the biodigester tank. The use of variable overall heat transfer coefficients improved the temperature change prediction and reduced the effect of a non-ideal performance of the pilot plant modeled.

  19. Mesophilic and thermophilic activated sludge post treatment of anaerobic effluent : sludge and wastewater characterization using batch experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, J.C.T.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    Anaerobic pretreated paper process water was characterized in terms of readily biodegradable, slowly biodegradable, very slowly biodegradable and inert wastewater fractions under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The anaerobic pretreated paper process water contained a relatively high amount

  20. The impact of mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion on biogas production

    OpenAIRE

    P. Vindis; B. Mursec; M. Janzekovic; F. Cus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to compare mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of three maize varieties. Parameters such as biogas production and biogas composition from maize silage were measured and calculated. The amount of biogas production (methane) was observed by the mini digester.Design/methodology/approach: Biogas production and composition in mesophilic (35 degrees C) and thermophilic (55 degrees C) conditions were measured and compared. The measurements were performed with mi...

  1. Fate of antibiotic resistance genes in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Shin, Jingyeong; Choi, Sangki; Shin, Seung Gu; Park, Ki Young; Cho, Jinwoo; Kim, Young Mo

    2017-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) sludge and non-CEPT (conventional sedimentation) sludge were comparatively operated under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The highest methane yield (692.46±0.46mL CH 4 /g VS removed in CEPT sludge) was observed in mesophilic AD of CEPT sludge. Meanwhile, thermophilic conditions were more favorable for the removal of total antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, no measurable difference in the fates and removal of ARGs and class 1 integrin-integrase gene (intI1) was observed between treated non-CEPT and CEPT sludge. However, redundancy analysis indicated that shifts in bacterial community were primarily accountable for the variations in ARGs and intI1. Network analysis further revealed potential host bacteria for ARGs and intI1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ISOLATION OF OBLIGATELY ANAEROBIC PSYCHROPHILIC BACTERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SINCLAIR, N A; STOKES, J L

    1964-03-01

    Sinclair, N. A. (Washington State University, Pullman), and J. L. Stokes. Isolation of obligately anaerobic psychrophilic bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:562-565. 1964.-A total of 11 strains of strictly anaerobic psychrophilic bacteria have been isolated from soil, mud, and sewage. The organisms grow well at 0 C in liquid and on solid media, and grow only in the complete absence of oxygen. On the basis of shape, sporulation, flagellation, and strictly anaerobic growth, all of the organisms were classified as strains of Clostridium. Some of the biochemical properties of the strains and the effect of temperature on growth are described.

  3. Quantitative Metaproteomics Highlight the Metabolic Contributions of Uncultured Phylotypes in a Thermophilic Anaerobic Digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Live H; Frank, Jeremy A; Zamanzadeh, Mirzaman; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Pope, Phillip B; Horn, Svein J; Arntzen, Magnus Ø

    2017-01-15

    In this study, we used multiple meta-omic approaches to characterize the microbial community and the active metabolic pathways of a stable industrial biogas reactor with food waste as the dominant feedstock, operating at thermophilic temperatures (60°C) and elevated levels of free ammonia (367 mg/liter NH 3 -N). The microbial community was strongly dominated (76% of all 16S rRNA amplicon sequences) by populations closely related to the proteolytic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus. Multiple Coprothermobacter-affiliated strains were detected, introducing an additional level of complexity seldom explored in biogas studies. Genome reconstructions provided metabolic insight into the microbes that performed biomass deconstruction and fermentation, including the deeply branching phyla Dictyoglomi and Planctomycetes and the candidate phylum "Atribacteria" These biomass degraders were complemented by a synergistic network of microorganisms that convert key fermentation intermediates (fatty acids) via syntrophic interactions with hydrogenotrophic methanogens to ultimately produce methane. Interpretation of the proteomics data also suggested activity of a Methanosaeta phylotype acclimatized to high ammonia levels. In particular, we report multiple novel phylotypes proposed as syntrophic acetate oxidizers, which also exert expression of enzymes needed for both the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids to acetyl coenzyme A. Such an arrangement differs from known syntrophic oxidizing bacteria and presents an interesting hypothesis for future studies. Collectively, these findings provide increased insight into active metabolic roles of uncultured phylotypes and presents new synergistic relationships, both of which may contribute to the stability of the biogas reactor. Biogas production through anaerobic digestion of organic waste provides an attractive source of renewable energy and a sustainable waste management strategy. A comprehensive understanding

  4. Anaerobic bacteria, the colon and colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, W E

    1980-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria constitute more than 90% of the bacteria in the colon. An anaerobic environment is needed to maintain their growth and the production of short-chain fatty acids by these bacteria from carbohydrates. Short-chain fatty acids are rapidly absorbed and essential for metabolic as well as functional welfare of the colonic mucosa. The importance of these acids in water absorption and in the patogenesis of colitis is discussed in relation to the concept of "energy deficiency diseases" of the colonic mucosa.

  5. Evolvability of thermophilic proteins from archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kazufumi; Aoi, Atsushi; Koga, Yuichi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2013-07-16

    Proteins from thermophiles possess high thermostability. The stabilization mechanisms differ between archaeal and bacterial proteins, whereby archaeal proteins are mainly stabilized via hydrophobic interactions and bacterial proteins by ion pairs. High stability is an important factor in promoting protein evolution, but the precise means by which different stabilization mechanisms affect the evolution process remain unclear. In this study, we investigated a random mutational drift of esterases from thermophilic archaea and bacteria at high temperatures. Our results indicate that mutations in archaeal proteins lead to improved function with no loss of stability, while mutant bacterial proteins are largely destabilized with decreased activity at high temperatures. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that archaeal proteins possess higher "evolvability" than bacterial proteins under temperature selection and are additionally able to evolve into eukaryotic proteins.

  6. Thermophilic anaerobic fermentation of olive pulp for hydrogen and methane production: modelling of the anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2006-01-01

    the olive pulp; c) subsequent anaerobic treatment of the hydrogen-effluent with the simultaneous production of methane; and d) development of a mathematical model able to describe the anaerobic digestion of the olive pulp and the effluent of hydrogen producing process. Both continuous and batch experiments......The present study investigates the thermophilic biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp, which is the semi-solid. residue coming from the two-phase processing of olives. It focussed on: a) production of methane from the raw olive pulp; b) anaerobic bio-production of hydrogen from...

  7. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2011-11-01

    Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen-dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene-degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the 'key players' of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. © 2011 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans‐Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Summary Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen‐dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene‐degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ‘key players’ of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:21450012

  9. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of Lurgi coal gasification wastewater in a UASB reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Ma, W.C.; Han, H.J.; Li, H.Q.; Yuan, M. [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2011-02-15

    Lurgi coal gasification wastewater (LCGW) is a refractory wastewater, whose anaerobic treatment has been a severe problem due to its toxicity and poor biodegradability. Using a mesophilic (35 {+-} 2{sup o}C) reactor as a control, thermophilic anaerobic digestion (55 {+-} 2{sup o}C) of LCGW was investigated in a UASB reactor. After 120 days of operation, the removal of COD and total phenols by the thermophilic reactor could reach 50-55% and 50-60% respectively, at an organic loading rate of 2.5 kg COD/(m{sup 3} d) and HRT of 24h: the corresponding efficiencies were both only 20-30% in the mesophilic reactor. After thermophilic digestion, the wastewater concentrations of the aerobic effluent COD could reach below 200 mg/L compared with around 294 mg/L if mesophilic digestion was done and around 375 mg/L if sole aerobic pre-treatment was done. The results suggested that thermophilic anaerobic digestion improved significantly both anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation of LCGW.

  10. The anaerobic conversion of methanol under thermophilic conditions: pH and bicarbonate dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Villa, G.; Lier, van J.B.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    The thermophilic (55degreesC) anaerobic conversion of methanol was studied in an unbuffered medium (pH 4 +/- 0.2) and in a phosphate buffered medium (pH 6.4 +/- 0.1), in both cases without bicarbonate addition. Our cultivated sludge consortium was unable to degrade methanol under acidic conditions.

  11. Energy transduction in the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Clostridium fervidus is exclusively coupled to sodium ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPEELMANS, G; POOLMAN, B; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    1993-01-01

    The thermophilic, peptidolytic, anaerobic bacterium Clostridium fervidus is unable to generate a pH gradient in the range of 5.5-8.0, which limits growth of the organism to a narrow pH range (6.3-7.7). A significant membrane potential (DELTApsi almost-equal-to -60 mV) and chemical gradient of Na+

  12. Use of thermophilic bacteria for bioremediation of petroleum contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Maghrabi, I.M.A.; Bin Aqil, A.O.; Chaalal, O.; Islam, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    Several strains of thermophilic bacteria were isolated from the environment of the United Arab Emirates. These bacteria show extraordinary resistance to heat and have their maximum growth rate around 60--80 C. This article investigates the potential of using these facultative bacteria for both in situ and ex situ bioremediation of petroleum contaminants. In a series of batch experiments, bacterial growth was observed using a computer image analyzer following a recently developed technique. These experiments showed clearly that the growth rate is enhanced in the presence of crude oil. This is coupled with a rapid degradation of the crude oil. These bacteria were found to be ideal for breaking down long-chain organic molecules at a temperature of 40 C, which is the typical ambient temperature of the Persian Gulf region. The same strains of bacteria are also capable of surviving in the presence of the saline environment that can prevail in both sea water and reservoir connate water. This observation prompted further investigation into the applicability of the bacteria in microbial enhanced oil recovery. In the United Arab Emirates, the reservoirs are typically at a temperature of around 85 C. Finally, the performance of the bacteria is tested in a newly developed bioreactor that uses continuous aeration through a transverse slotted pipe. This reactor also uses mixing without damaging the filamentous bacteria. In this process, the mechanisms of bioremediation are identified

  13. Comparison of the microbial communities in solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) reactors operated at mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Nelson, Michael C; Chen, Po-Hsu; Graf, Joerg; Li, Yebo; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-01-01

    The microbiomes involved in liquid anaerobic digestion process have been investigated extensively, but the microbiomes underpinning solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) are poorly understood. In this study, microbiome composition and temporal succession in batch SS-AD reactors, operated at mesophilic or thermophilic temperatures, were investigated using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. A greater microbial richness and evenness were found in the mesophilic than in the thermophilic SS-AD reactors. Firmicutes accounted for 60 and 82 % of the total Bacteria in the mesophilic and in the thermophilic SS-AD reactors, respectively. The genus Methanothermobacter dominated the Archaea in the thermophilic SS-AD reactors, while Methanoculleus predominated in the mesophilic SS-AD reactors. Interestingly, the data suggest syntrophic acetate oxidation coupled with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis as an important pathway for biogas production during the thermophilic SS-AD. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that temperature was the most influential factor in shaping the microbiomes in the SS-AD reactors. Thermotogae showed strong positive correlation with operation temperature, while Fibrobacteres, Lentisphaerae, Spirochaetes, and Tenericutes were positively correlated with daily biogas yield. This study provided new insight into the microbiome that drives SS-AD process, and the findings may help advance understanding of the microbiome in SS-AD reactors and the design and operation of SS-AD systems.

  14. Hydrolytic bacteria in mesophilic and thermophilic degradation of plant biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zverlov, Vladimir V.; Hiegl, Wolfgang; Koeck, Daniela E.; Koellmeier, Tanja; Schwarz, Wolfgang H. [Department of Microbiology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Kellermann, Josef [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz, Martinsried (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Adding plant biomass to a biogas reactor, hydrolysis is the first reaction step in the chain of biological events towards methane production. Maize silage was used to enrich efficient hydrolytic bacterial consortia from natural environments under conditions imitating those in a biogas plant. At 55-60 C a more efficient hydrolyzing culture could be isolated than at 37 C. The composition of the optimal thermophilic bacterial consortium was revealed by sequencing clones from a 16S rRNA gene library. A modified PCR-RFLP pre-screening method was used to group the clones. Pure anaerobic cultures were isolated. 70% of the isolates were related to Clostridium thermocellum. A new culture-independent method for identification of cellulolytic enzymes was developed using the isolation of cellulose-binding proteins. MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis and end-sequencing of peptides from prominent protein bands revealed cellulases from the cellulosome of C. thermocellum and from a major cellulase of Clostridium stercorarium. A combined culture of C. thermocellum and C. stercorarium was shown to excellently degrade maize silage. A spore preparation method suitable for inoculation of maize silage and optimal hydrolysis was developed for the thermophilic bacterial consortium. This method allows for concentration and long-term storage of the mixed culture for instance for inoculation of biogas fermenters. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Rapid startup of thermophilic anaerobic digester to remove tetracycline and sulfonamides resistance genes from sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Qing-Peng; Bai, Yang; Liu, Jian-Bo; Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Yan-Ru; Xiong, Wei-Ping; Ahmad, Kito; Fan, Chang-Zheng

    2018-01-15

    Spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) originating from sewage sludge is highlighted as an eminent health threat. This study established a thermophilic anaerobic digester using one-step startup strategy to quickly remove tetracycline and sulfonamides resistance genes from sewage sludge. At least 20days were saved in the startup period from mesophilic to thermophilic condition. Based on the results of 16S rDNA amplicons sequencing and predicted metagenomic method, the successful startup largely relied on the fast colonization of core thermophilic microbial population (e.g. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria). Microbial metabolic gene pathways for substrate degradation and methane production was also increased by one-step mode. In addition, real-time quantitative PCR approach revealed that most targeted tetracycline and sulfonamides resistance genes ARGs (sulI, tetA, tetO, tetX) were substantially removed during thermophilic digestion (removal efficiency>80%). Network analysis showed that the elimination of ARGs was attributed to the decline of their horizontal (intI1 item) and vertical (potential hosts) transfer-related elements under high-temperature. This research demonstrated that rapid startup thermophilic anaerobic digestion of wastewater solids would be a suitable technology for reducing quantities of various ARGs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea: mechanisms for reductant disposal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaart, M.R.A.; Bielen, A.A.M.; Oost, van der J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from biomass by bacteria and archaea is an attractive renewable energy source. However, to make its application more feasible, microorganisms are needed with high hydrogen productivities. For several reasons, hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are

  17. Anaerobic carboxydotrophic bacteria in geothermal springs identified using stable isotope probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson Lee Brady

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a potential energy and carbon source for thermophilic bacteria in geothermal environments. Geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 45–65°C were investigated for the presence and activity of anaerobic CO-oxidizing bacteria. Anaerobic CO oxidation potentials were measured at up to 48.9 µmoles CO day-1 g (wet weight-1 within 5 selected sites. Active anaerobic carboxydotrophic bacteria were identified using 13CO DNA stable isotope probing (SIP combined with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from labeled DNA. Bacterial communities identified in heavy DNA fractions were predominated by Firmicutes, which comprised up to 95% of all sequences in 13CO incubations. The predominant bacteria that assimilated 13C derived from CO were closely related (>98% to genera of known carboxydotrophs including Thermincola, Desulfotomaculum, Thermolithobacter and Carboxydocella, although a few species with lower similarity to known bacteria were also found that may represent previously unconfirmed CO-oxidizers. While the distribution was variable, many of the same OTUs were identified across sample sites from different temperature regimes. These results show that bacteria capable of using CO as a carbon source are common in geothermal springs, and that thermophilic carboxydotrophs are probably already quite well known from cultivation studies.

  18. Probing the redox metabolism in the strictly anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, hydrogen-producing Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus using amperometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Willquist, Karin; Emnéus, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the redox metabolism in the anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, hydrogen-forming bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus were probed for the first time in vivo using mediated amperometry with ferricyanide as a thermotolerant external mediator. Clear differences in the intracellul...

  19. Investigations on the inactivation of selected bacteria and viruses during mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic alkaline cofermentation of biological waste materials, food residues and other animal residues; Seuchenhygienische Untersuchungen zur Inaktivierung ausgewaehlter Bakterien und Viren bei der mesophilen und thermophilen anaeroben alkalischen Faulung von Bio- und Kuechenabfaellen sowie anderen Rest- und Abfallstoffen tierischer Herkunft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoferer, M. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Umwelt- und Tierhygiene sowie Tiermedizin mit Tierklinik

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the inactivation kinetics of a number of different bacteria (Salmonella Senftenberg, Escherichia coli O157, Enterococcus faecium) and viruses (Bovine Enterovirus (ECBO), Equine Rhinovirus (ERV), Poliovirus, Bovine Parvovirus (BPV)) during the process of anaerobic cofermentation. Experiments were conducted in a semi-technical biogas plant at the University of Hohenheim. The fermenter was fed with a mixture of slurry from pigs or cattle (75%) and leftovers (25%) and was run under mesophilic (30 C + 35 C) as well as under thermophilic temperature conditions (50 C + 55 C). Volume and filter-sandwich germ-carriers were specifically developed and/or optimised for these analyses. Parallel to the experiments at the University of Hohenheim and under almost identical process conditions, various viruses (African Swine Fever Virus, Pseudorabies Virus, Classical Swine Fever Virus, Foot and Mouth Disease Virus, Swine Vesicular Disease Virus) were examined at the Federal Research Centre for Virus Diseases of Animals in Tuebingen. The results obtained at each research institution are directly compared. (orig.)

  20. Anaerobic digestion of nitrogen rich poultry manure: Impact of thermophilic biogas process on metal release and microbial resistances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Reshma; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Krakat, Niclas

    2017-02-01

    Poultry manure is a nitrogen rich fertilizer, which is usually recycled and spread on agricultural fields. Due to its high nutrient content, chicken manure is considered to be one of the most valuable animal wastes as organic fertilizer. However, when chicken litter is applied in its native form, concerns are raised as such fertilizers also include high amounts of antibiotic resistant pathogenic Bacteria and heavy metals. We studied the impact of an anaerobic thermophilic digestion process on poultry manure. Particularly, microbial antibiotic resistance profiles, mobile genetic elements promoting the resistance dissemination in the environment as well as the presence of heavy metals were focused in this study. The initiated heat treatment fostered a community shift from pathogenic to less pathogenic bacterial groups. Phenotypic and molecular studies demonstrated a clear reduction of multiple resistant pathogens and self-transmissible plasmids in the heat treated manure. That treatment also induced a higher release of metals and macroelements. Especially, Zn and Cu exceeded toxic thresholds. Although the concentrations of a few metals reached toxic levels after the anaerobic thermophilic treatment, the quality of poultry manure as organic fertilizer may raise significantly due to the elimination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) and self-transmissible plasmids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comprehensive microbial analysis of combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process treating high-strength food wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2015-01-01

    A combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process was used to treat high-strength food wastewater in this study. During the experimental period, most of solid residue from the mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R1) was separated by centrifugation and introduced into the thermophilic aerobic...... and thermophilic aerobic digestion. For archaea, in R1 methanogenic archaea shifted from genus Methanosaeta to Methanosarcina, whereas genera Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium and Methanoculleus were predominant in R3. The results demonstrated dynamics of key microbial populations that were highly consistent...

  2. A strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic hydrogen-producing culture enriched from digested household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Kotay, Shireen Meher; Trably, Eric

    2009-01-01

    sources. Growth on glucose produced acetate, H-2 and carbon dioxide. Maximal H-2 production rate on glucose was 1.1 mmol l(-1) h(-1) with a maximum H-2 yield of 1.9 mole H-2 per mole glucose. 16S ribosomal DNA clone library analyses showed that the culture members were phylogenetically affiliated......The aim of this study was to enrich, characterize and identify strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic hydrogen (H-2) producers from digested household solid wastes. A strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic H-2 producing bacterial culture was enriched from a lab-scale digester treating household...... wastes at 70 degrees C. The enriched mixed culture consisted of two rod-shaped bacterial members growing at an optimal temperature of 80 degrees C and an optimal pH 8.1. The culture was able to utilize glucose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, sucrose, pyruvate and glycerol as carbon...

  3. A Novel Process Configuration for Anaerobic Digestion of Source-Sorted Household Waste Using Hyper-Thermophilic Post-Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, H.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2005-01-01

    A novel reactor configuration was investigated for anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). An anaerobic hyper-thermophilic (68°C) reactor R68 was implemented as a post–treatment step for the effluent of a thermophilic reactor R1 (55°C) in order to enhance......). A single-stage thermophilic (55°C) reactor R2 was used as control. VS reduction and biogas yield of the combined system was 78 – 89% and 640 – 790 ml/g-VS, respectively. While the VS reduction in the combined system was up to 7% higher than in the single-stage treatment, no increase in methane yield......-thermophilic post-treatment. 7% of the ammonia load was removed in the hyper-thermophilic reactor with a flow of headspace gas through the reactor equivalent to four times the biogas flow produced in reactor R1....

  4. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts ...

  5. Enzyme activity screening of thermophilic bacteria isolated from Dusun Tua Hot Spring, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msarah, Marwan; Ibrahim, Izyanti; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2018-04-01

    Thermophilic bacteria have biotechnological importance due to the availability of unique enzymes which are stable in extreme circumstances. The aim of this study includes to isolate thermophilic bacteria from hot spring and screen for important enzyme activities. Water samples from the Dusun Tua Hot Spring were collected and the physiochemical characterisation of water was measured. Eight thermophilic bacteria were isolated and determined to have at least three strong enzyme activity including protease, lipase, amylase, cellulase, pectinase and xylanase. The results showed that HuluC2 displayed all the enzyme activities and can be further studied.

  6. Dry co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw under mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiangqian; Wu, Guangxue; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Zhen-Hu

    2015-12-01

    Dry anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge can recover biogas as energy; however, its low C/N ratio limits it as a single substrate in the anaerobic digestion. Rice straw is an abundant agricultural residue in China, which is rich in carbon and can be used as carbon source. In the present study, the performance of dry co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw was investigated under mesophilic (35 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. The operational factors impacting dry co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw such as C/N ratio, moisture content, and initial pH were explored under mesophilic conditions. The results show that low C/N ratios resulted in a higher biogas production rate, but a lower specific biogas yield; low moisture content of 65 % resulted in the instability of the digestion system and a low specific biogas yield. Initial pH ranging 7.0-9.0 did not affect the performance of the anaerobic digestion. The C/N ratio of 26-29:1, moisture content of 70-80 %, and pH 7.0-9.0 resulted in good performance in the dry mesophilic co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw. As compared with mesophilic digestion, thermophilic co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw significantly enhanced the degradation efficiency of the substrates and the specific biogas yield (p sewage sludge under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

  7. [Application of anaerobic bacteria detection in oral and maxillofacial infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhen-ying; Lin, Qin; Meng, Yan-hong; He, Chun; Su, Jia-zeng; Peng, Xin

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the distribution and drug resistance of anaerobic bacteria in the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures from 61 specimens of pus from the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School of Stomatology were identified. The culture type was evaluated by API 20A kit and drug resistance test was performed by Etest method. The clinical data and antibacterial agents for the treatment of the 61 cases were collected, and the final outcomes were recorded. The bacteria cultures were isolated from all the specimens, with aerobic bacteria only in 6 cases (9.8%), anaerobic bacteria only in 7 cases (11.5%), and both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in 48 cases (78.7%). There were 55 infected cases (90.2%) with anaerobic bacteria, and 81 anaerobic bacteria stains were isolated. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram positive anaerobic bacteria could be found in Peptostreptococcus, Bifidobacterium and Pemphigus propionibacterium. No cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was detected in the above three Gram positive anaerobic bacteria. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram negative anaerobic bacteria could be detected in Porphyromonas and Prevotella. No metronidazole, cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was found in the two Gram negative anaerobic bacteria. In the study, 48 patients with oral and maxillofacial infection were treated according to the results of drug resistance testing, and the clinical cure rate was 81.3%. Mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures are very common in most oral and maxillofacial infection patients. Anaerobic bacteria culture and drug resistance testing play an important role in clinical treatment.

  8. Kinetic characterization of thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digestion for coffee grounds and waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Qiao, Wei; Wang, Xiaochang; Takayanagi, Kazuyuki; Shofie, Mohammad; Li, Yu-You

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the kinetics of an anaerobic process (hydrolysis, acetogenesis, acidogenesis and methanogenesis) under thermophilic (55 °C) and mesophilic (35 °C) conditions with coffee grounds and waste activated sludge (WAS) as the substrates. Special focus was given to the kinetics of propionic acid degradation to elucidate the accumulation of VFAs. Under the thermophilic condition, the methane production rate of all substrates (WAS, ground coffee and raw coffee) was about 1.5 times higher than that under the mesophilic condition. However, the effects on methane production of each substrate under the thermophilic condition differed: WAS increased by 35.8-48.2%, raw coffee decreased by 76.3-64.5% and ground coffee decreased by 74.0-57.9%. Based on the maximum reaction rate (Rmax) of each anaerobic stage obtained from the modified Gompertz model, acetogenesis was found to be the rate-limiting step for coffee grounds and WAS. This can be explained by the kinetics of propionate degradation under thermophilic condition in which a long lag-phase (more than 18 days) was observed, although the propionate concentration was only 500 mg/L. Under the mesophilic condition, acidogenesis and hydrolysis were found to be the rate-limiting step for coffee grounds and WAS, respectively. Even though reducing the particle size accelerated the methane production rate of coffee grounds, but did not change the rate-limiting step: acetogenesis in thermophilic and acidogenesis in mesophilic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reductive Decouloristation of Dyes by Thermophilic Anaerobic Granular Sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezerra Dos Santos, A.

    2005-01-01

    The colour removal achieved under anaerobic conditions is also called reductive decolourisation, which is composed of a biological part, i.e. the reducing equivalents are biologically generated, and a chemical part, i.e. the formed electrons reduce chemically the dyes. The overall objective of this

  10. The fate of methanol in thermophilic-anaerobic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Methanol is a simple C1-compound, which sustains a complex web of possible degradation routes under anaerobic conditions. Methanol can be the main pollutant in some specific wastewaters, but it is also a compound that may be formed under natural conditions, as intermediate in the decomposition of

  11. Bioleaching of metals from electronic scrap by moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyas, Sadia; Anwar, Munir A.; Niazi, Shahida B.; Ghauri, M. Afzal

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of metals from electronic scrap by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and an unidentified acidophilic

  12. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of primary and secondary sludge. Effect of pre-treatment at elevated temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Yenal, U.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an appropriate technique for the treatment of sludge before final disposal and it is employed worldwide as the oldest and most important process for sludge stabilization. In general, mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge is more widely used compared to thermophilic...... digestion. Furthermore, thermal pre-treatment is suitable for the improvement of stabilization, enhancement of dewatering of the sludge, reduction of the numbers of pathogens and could be realized at relatively low cost especially at low temperatures. The present study investigates (a) the differences...... between mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sludge and (b) the effect of the pretreatment at 70 degreesC on mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of primary and secondary sludge. The pretreatment step showed very positive effect on the methane potential and production rate upon...

  13. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  14. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic ...

  15. Molecular diversity of thermophilic bacteria isolated from Pasinler hot spring (Erzurum, Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    ADIGÜZEL, Ahmet; İNAN, Kadriye; ŞAHİN, Fikrettin; ARASOĞLU, Tulin; GÜLLÜCE, Medine

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of thermophilic bacteria isolated from Pasinler hot spring, Erzurum, Turkey. Fatty acid profiles, BOX PCR fingerprints, and 16S rDNA sequence data were used for the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of thermophilic bacteria. Totally 9 different bacterial strains were selected based on morphological, physiological, and biochemical tests. These strains were characterized by molecular tests includi...

  16. Thermophilic bacteria in Moroccan hot springs, salt marshes and desert soils

    OpenAIRE

    Aanniz,Tarik; Ouadghiri,Mouna; Melloul,Marouane; Swings,Jean; Elfahime,Elmostafa; Ibijbijen,Jamal; Ismaili,Mohamed; Amar,Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of thermophilic bacteria was investigated in four hot springs, three salt marshes and 12 desert sites in Morocco. Two hundred and forty (240) thermophilic bacteria were recovered, identified and characterized. All isolates were Gram positive, rod-shaped, spore forming and halotolerant. Based on BOXA1R-PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the recovered isolates were dominated by the genus Bacillus (97.5%) represented by B. licheniformis (119), B. aerius (44), B. sonorensis (33), B. ...

  17. Performance comparison between mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic reactors for treatment of palm oil mill effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Joo-Young; Son, Sung-Min; Pyon, Jun-Hyeon; Park, Joo-Yang

    2014-08-01

    The anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent (POME) was carried out under mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions without long-time POME storage in order to compare the performance of each condition in the field of Sumatra Island, Indonesia. The anaerobic treatment system was composed of anaerobic hybrid reactor and anaerobic baffled filter. Raw POME was pretreated by screw decanter to reduce suspended solids and residual oil. The total COD removal rate of 90-95% was achieved in both conditions at the OLR of 15kg[COD]/m(3)/d. The COD removal in thermophilic conditions was slightly better, however the biogas production was much higher than that in the mesophilic one at high OLR. The organic contents in pretreated POME were highly biodegradable in mesophilic under the lower OLRs. The biogas production was 13.5-20.0l/d at the 15kg[COD]/m(3)/d OLR, and the average content of carbon dioxide was 5-35% in both conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Screening and characterization of phosphate solubilizing bacteria from isolate of thermophilic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, Evy; Rakhmawati, Anna

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this study were to select bacteria that has the ability to dissolve phosphate from thermophilic bacteria isolates after the Merapi eruption. Five isolates of selected bacteria was characterized and continued with identification. Selection was done by using a pikovskaya selective medium. Bacterial isolates were grown in selective medium and incubated for 48 hours at temperature of 55 ° C. Characterization was done by looking at the cell and colony morphology, physiological and biochemical properties. Identification was done with the Profile Matching method based on the reference genus Oscillospira traced through Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology. Dendogram was created based on similarity index SSM. The results showed there were 14 isolates of bacteria that were able to dissolve phosphate indicated by a clear zone surrounding the bacterial colony on selective media. Five isolates were selected with the largest clear zone. Isolates D79, D92, D110a, D135 and D75 have different characters. The result of phenotypic characters identification with Genus Oscillospira profile has a percentage of 100% similarity to isolate D92 and D110a; 92.31% for isolates D79, and 84.6% for isolates D75 and D135. Dendogram generated from average linkage algorithm / UPGMA using the Simple Matching Coefficient (SSM) algorithms showed, isolate thermophilic bacteria D75 and D135 are combined together to form cluster 1. D110a and D92 form a sub cluster A. Sub cluster A and D79 form cluster 2

  19. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene transfer between raw sludge bacteria and the digester microbial community. PMID:27014196

  20. Inactivation of Clostridium difficile in sewage sludge by anaerobic thermophilic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changyun; Salsali, Hamidreza; Weese, Scott; Warriner, Keith

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in community-associated Clostridium difficile infections with biosolids derived from wastewater treatment being identified as one potential source. The current study evaluated the efficacy of thermophilic digestion in decreasing levels of C. difficile ribotype 078 associated with sewage sludge. Five isolates of C. difficile 078 were introduced (final density of 5 log CFU/g) into digested sludge and subjected to anaerobic digestion at mesophilic (36 or 42 °C) or thermophilic (55 °C) temperatures for up to 60 days. It was found that mesophilic digestion at 36 °C did not result in a significant reduction in C. difficile spore levels. In contrast, thermophilic sludge digestion reduced endospore levels at a rate of 0.19-2.68 log CFU/day, depending on the strain tested. The mechanism of lethality was indirect - by stimulating germination then inactivating the resultant vegetative cells. Acidification of sludge by adding acetic acid (6 g/L) inhibited the germination of spores regardless of the sludge digestion temperature. In conclusion, thermophilic digestion can be applied to reduce C. difficile in biosolids, thereby reducing the environmental burden of the enteric pathogen.

  1. Feasibility of thermophilic anaerobic processes for treating waste activated sludge under low HRT and intermittent mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Wanderli; Magnus, Bruna Scandolara; Guimarães, Lorena Bittencourt; Gottardo, Marco; Belli Filho, Paulo

    2017-10-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) arises as an optimized solution for the waste activated sludge (WAS) management. However, there are few feasibility studies using low solids content typically found in the WAS, and that consider uncommon operational conditions such as intermittent mixing and low hydraulic retention time (HRT). In this investigation, a single-stage pilot reactor was used to treat WAS at low HRT (13, 9, 6 and 5 days) and intermittent mixing (withholding mixing 2 h prior feeding). Thermophilic anaerobic digestion (55 °C) was initiated from a mesophilic digester (35 °C) by the one-step startup strategy. Although instabilities on partial alkalinity (1245-3000 mgCaCO 3 /L), volatile fatty acids (1774-6421 mg/L acetic acid) and biogas production (0.21-0.09 m 3 /m 3 reactor .d) were observed, methanogenesis started to recover in 18 days. The thermophilic treatment of WAS at 13 and 9 days HRT efficiently converted VS into biogas (22 and 21%, respectively) and achieved high biogas yield (0.24 and 0.22 m 3 /kgVS fed , respectively). Intermittent mixing improved the retention of methanogens inside the reactor and reduced the washout effect even at low HRT (5% TS). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Recurrence of fecal coliforms and Salmonella species in biosolids following thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranpour, Reza; Cox, Huub H J

    2006-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Part 503 Biosolids Rule requires the fecal coliform (indicator) or Salmonella species (pathogen) density requirements for Class A biosolids to be met at the last point of plant control (truck-loading facility and/or farm for land application). The three Southern Californian wastewater treatment plants in this study produced biosolids by thermophilic anaerobic digestion and all met the Class A limits for both fecal coliforms and Salmonella sp. in the digester outflow biosolids. At two plants, however, a recurrence of fecal coliforms was observed in postdigestion biosolids, which caused exceedance of the Class A limit for fecal coliforms at the truck-loading facility and farm for land application. Comparison of observations at the three plants and further laboratory tests indicated that the recurrence of fecal coliforms can possibly be related to the following combination of factors: (1) incomplete destruction of fecal coliforms during thermophilic anaerobic digestion, (2) contamination of Class A biosolids with fecal coliforms from external sources during postdigestion, (3) a large drop of the postdigestion biosolids temperature to below the maximum for fecal coliform growth, (4) an unknown effect of biosolids dewatering in centrifuges. At Hyperion Treatment Plant (City of Los Angeles, California), fecal coliform recurrence could be prevented by the following: (1) complete conversion to thermophilic operation to exclude contamination by mesophilically digested biosolids and (2) insulation and electrical heat-tracing of postdigestion train for maintaining a high biosolids temperature in postdigestion.

  3. Fractionation of carbon isotopes by thermophilic methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, M.V.; Belyaev, S.S.; Zyakun, A.M.; Bondar, V.A.; Shipin, O.P.; Laurinavichus, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors investigated the pattern of fractionation of stable carbon isotopes by the thermophilic methane-forming bacteria under different growth conditions and at various rates of formation of methane. A pure culture of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was used in the experiments under the following growth conditions: temperature 65-70 0 C; pH 7.2-7.6; NaCl content 0-0.9 g/liter. The methanogenic bacteria were cultivated in 0.15 liter flasks in mineral medium. A mixture of CO 2 and H 2 in a 1:4 ratio by volume served as the sole carbon and energy source. In all experiments, not more than 5% of the initial CO 2 level was utilized. The rate of methane generation was altered by adjusting the physicochemical growth parameters (temperature from 45-70 0 C, salinity from 0.9 to 40 g/liter NaCl, pH from 6.3 to 7.2). Methane in the samples was quantitatively determined in a chromatograph which had a flame-ionization detector and a column containing Porapak Q sorbent at T = 120 0 C. The carrier gas was CO 2 . The average specific rate of methane formation was calculated as ml CH 4 per mg dry biomass of bacteria per h. Soluble mineral carbon was isolated form the acidified culture liquid in the form of CO 2 and was quantitatively determined in a Chrom-4 chromatography provided with a katharometer and a column containing activated charcoal at T = 150 0 . The gas carrier was helium. The isotopic composition of carbon was determined in a CH-7 mass-spectrometer and was expressed in 13 C values (per thousand) with respect to the international PDB standard

  4. AMMONIA INHIBITION IN THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF DAIRY CATTLE MANURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sutaryo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of five different concentrations of total ammonia nitrogen (TANand free ammonia (FA on the methane yield and digester performance under thermophilic conditions(50°C. Five identical continuously fed digesters were used. The experiment was run for four timeshydraulic retention time (HRT. Data were statitically analysed using the data Analysis Tool Packavailable with the Microsoft Excel program. Different ammonia levels were obtained by pulsing urea toobtain the target level of TAN and FA, and to subsequently maintaining the concentration of ammonialevels by daily urea additions. The result showed a strong negative correlation between both TAN andFA concentrations and methane yield. The methane yield was reduced by 24, 30, 52 and 66% indigesters that had TAN levels of 2.9, 3.6, 4.4 and 5.1 g/L, respectively, corresponding to 0.7, 1.1,1.5 and1.8 g/L FA. Total volatile fatty acid and especially isovaleric and isobutyric acid concentrations wereelevated during ammonia inhibition. Concentration of TAN in the biogas digester exceeding 3 g/Lindicating that very often the full biogas potential is not achieved due to ammonia inhibition and thatlonger HRT should be used to compensate or a lower process temperature should be chosen.

  5. Combined thermophilic aerobic process and conventional anaerobic digestion: effect on sludge biodegradation and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, C; Perez, S; Paul, E; Lefebvre, X

    2010-04-01

    The efficiency of hyper-thermophilic (65 degrees Celsius) aerobic process coupled with a mesophilic (35 degrees Celsius) digester was evaluated for the activated sludge degradation and was compared to a conventional mesophilic digester. For two Sludge Retention Time (SRT), 21 and 42 days, the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) solubilisation and biodegradation processes, the methanisation yield and the aerobic oxidation were investigated during 180 days. The best results were obtained at SRT of 44 days; the COD removal yield was 30% higher with the Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion/Thermophilic Aerobic Reactor (MAD-TAR) co-treatment. An increase of the sludge intrinsic biodegradability is also observed (20-40%), showing that the unbiodegradable COD in mesophilic conditions becomes bioavailable. However, the methanisation yield was quite similar for both processes at a same SRT. Finally, such a process enables to divide by two the volume of digester with an equivalent efficiency. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Alcohol dehydrogenases from thermophilic and hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radianingtyas, Helia; Wright, Phillip C

    2003-12-01

    Many studies have been undertaken to characterise alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) from thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, mainly to better understand their activities and thermostability. To date, there are 20 thermophilic archaeal and 17 thermophilic bacterial strains known to have ADHs or similar enzymes, including the hypothetical proteins. Some of these thermophiles are found to have multiple ADHs, sometimes of different types. A rigid delineation of amino acid sequences amongst currently elucidated thermophilic ADHs and similar proteins is phylogenetically apparent. All are NAD(P)-dependent, with one exception that utilises the cofactor F(420) instead. Within the NAD(P)-dependent group, the thermophilic ADHs are orderly clustered as zinc-dependent ADHs, short-chain ADHs, and iron-containing/activated ADHs. Distance matrix calculations reveal that thermophilic ADHs within one type are homologous, with those derived from a single genus often showing high similarities. Elucidation of the enzyme activity and stability, coupled with structure analysis, provides excellent information to explain the relationship between them, and thermophilic ADHs diversity.

  7. Isolation and characterization of novel thermophilic lipase-secreting bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Rabbani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to screen and identify the lipase-producing microorganisms from various regions of Iran. Samples collected from hot spring, Persian Gulf, desert area and oil-contaminated soil, were analyzed for thermophilic extracellular-lipase producing organisms. Six strains with high activity on rhodamine B plates were selected for chemical identification and further study. Among these isolated bacteria, four strains show higher activity in pH-Stat method at 55 °C. These strains were identified by PCR amplification of 16s rRNA genes using universal primers. Fermentation increased the activity up to 50%. The growth medium, designed for lipase production, increased the activity up to 4.55 folds. The crude supernatant of ZR-5 after fermentation and separation the cells, was lyophilized and the activity was measured. Total activity of this strain was 12 kU/g that shows its potential for industrial uses. Further study is required for purification of enzyme and calculation its specific activity. Immobilization is another approach should be considered.

  8. Performance and methanogenic community of rotating disk reactor packed with polyurethane during thermophilic anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yingnan; Tsukahara, Kenichiro; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2007-01-01

    A newly developed anaerobic rotating disk reactor (ARDR) packed with polyurethane was used in continuous mode for organic waste removal under thermophilic (55 o C) anaerobic conditions. This paper reports the effects of the rotational speed on the methanogenic performance and community in an ARDR supplied with acetic acid synthetic wastewater as the organic substrate. The best performance was obtained from the ARDR with the rotational speed (ω) of 30 rpm. The average removal of dissolved organic carbon was 98.5%, and the methane production rate was 393 ml/l-reactor/day at an organic loading rate of 2.69 g/l-reactor/day. Under these operational conditions, the reactor had a greater biomass retention capacity and better reactor performance than those at other rotational speeds (0, 5 and 60 rpm). The results of 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis indicated that the major methanogens in the reactor belonged to the genus Methanosarcina spp. The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis suggested that the cell density of methanogenic archaea immobilized on the polyurethane foam disk could be concentrated more than 2000 times relative to those in the original thermophilic sludge. Scanning electron microphotographs showed that there were more immobilized microbes at ω of 30 rpm than 60 rpm. A rotational speed on the outer layer of the disk of 6.6 m/min could be appropriate for anaerobic digestion using the polyurethane ARDR

  9. Macroscopic mass and energy balance of a pilot plant anaerobic bioreactor operated under thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Bombardiere, John; Chatfield, Mark; Domaschko, Max; Easter, Michael; Stafford, David A; Castillo-Angeles, Saul; Castellanos-Hernandez, Nehemias

    2006-01-01

    Intensive poultry production generates over 100,000 t of litter annually in West Virginia and 9 x 10(6) t nationwide. Current available technological alternatives based on thermophilic anaerobic digestion for residuals treatment are diverse. A modification of the typical continuous stirred tank reactor is a promising process being relatively stable and owing to its capability to manage considerable amounts of residuals at low operational cost. A 40-m3 pilot plant digester was used for performance evaluation considering energy input and methane production. Results suggest some changes to the pilot plant configuration are necessary to reduce power consumption although maximizing biodigester performance.

  10. In vitro activity of mecillinam against anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinkraus, G E; McCarthy, L R

    1980-01-01

    A microtiter broth dilution method was employed to determine the in vitro activity of mecillinam against 201 recent clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. Both the anerobic gram-positive and anaerobic gram-negative bacilli displayed a wide range of minimal inhibitory concentrations of mecillinam; most strains were resistant to the antibiotic. The anaerobic cocci exhibited a narrower range of minimal inhibitory concentrations than were observed with other anaerobes, but also exhibited mecill...

  11. Improving anaerobic sewage sludge digestion by implementation of a hyper-thermophilic prehydrolysis step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jingquan; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on a two-step process for treatment and stabilisation of primary sludge. The process consists of a hyperthermophilic hydrolysis step operated at 70 degrees C and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 clays followed by a thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic digestion step...... at a HRT of 13 days. A one-step anaerobic digester operated at 55 degrees C and 15 days HRT Was used as a reference process. The two-step process was characterized by a 12% higher organic suspended solids removal efficiency and better pathogen reduction effect than the conventional one-step digestion....... The microbial community of the digester fed with pre-treated sludge was characterised by it higher activity compared to that of the digester treating raw sludge. Moreover, the pre-treatment of the primary sludge resulted up to 48% increase of the methane potential (20.09 and 13.56 mmol CH4 g(-)VS(-1...

  12. Performance optimization and validation of ADM1 simulations under anaerobic thermophilic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Atallah, Nabil M.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, two experimental sets of data each involving two thermophilic anaerobic digesters treating food waste, were simulated using the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). A sensitivity analysis was conducted, using both data sets of one digester, for parameter optimization based on five measured performance indicators: methane generation, pH, acetate, total COD, ammonia, and an equally weighted combination of the five indicators. The simulation results revealed that while optimization with respect to methane alone, a commonly adopted approach, succeeded in simulating methane experimental results, it predicted other intermediary outputs less accurately. On the other hand, the multi-objective optimization has the advantage of providing better results than methane optimization despite not capturing the intermediary output. The results from the parameter optimization were validated upon their independent application on the data sets of the second digester.

  13. Start-up strategies for thermophilic anaerobic digestion of pig manure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moset, V.; Bertolini, E.; Cerisuelo, A.; Cambra, M.; Olmos, A.; Cambra-López, M.

    2014-01-01

    Sludge physicochemical composition, methane (CH 4 ) yield, and methanogenic community structure and dynamics using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were determined after start-up of anaerobic digestion of pig manure. Eight thermophilic continuous stirred anaerobic digesters were used during 126 days. Four management strategies were investigated: a feedless and a non-feedless period followed by a gradual or an abrupt addition of pig manure (two digesters per strategy). During the first 43 days, VFA (volatile fatty acids) accumulations and low CH 4 yield were observed in all digesters. After this period, digesters recovered their initial status being propionic acid the last parameter to be re-established. Non-feedless digesters with an abrupt addition of pig manure showed the best performances (lower VFA accumulation and higher CH 4 yield). Differences in microbial orders and dynamics, however, were less evident among treatments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, Methanomicrobiales first and Methanobacteriales second, was the dominant metabolic pathway in all digesters. Further research is needed to clarify the role and activity of hydrogenotrophic methanogens during the recovery start-up period and to identify the best molecular tools and methodologies to monitor microbial populations and dynamics reliably and accurately in anaerobic digesters. - Highlights: • Four start-up strategies for thermophilic anaerobic digestion of pig manure were tested. • Physicochemical composition, methane yield and methanogenic community were determined. • During the first 43 days, a decline in reactor's performance occurred. • The best start-up strategy was non-feedless with an abrupt addition of pig slurry. • Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant metabolic pathway

  14. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, José E; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-García, María Inmaculada

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic bacteria resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and even has appeared against the most active of those, like metronidazol and carbapenems. This fact forces to make and periodical sensibility tests -at least in the most aggressive and virulent species, in cases that they are isolated from life locations and in the absence of therapeutic response- to check the local sensibility and to establish suitable empiric therapies, all based on multicentric studies carried out in order to this or well to check the activity of new antibiotics. For the laboratory routine, the easiest sensibility method is the E-test/MIC evaluator. Another alternative is microdilution, that's only normalized for Bacteroides. There are preliminary facts that allow the use of disc diffusion method in some species of Bacteroides and Clostridium. For the temporal and multicentric studies, the procedure is dilution in agar plate, the reference method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of two-phase thermophilic anaerobic methane fermentation for the treatment of garbage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.J.; Hong, F. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Engineering]|[Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan). CREST; Tsuno, H.; Hidaka, T.; Cheon, J.H. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Urban and Environmental Engineering]|[Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan). CREST

    2004-07-01

    Municipal solid wastes (MSW) in Japan are generally incinerated. However, in recent years, garbage has been recognized as a renewable energy source. This has resulted in an increase in the use of biological processes, such as anaerobic digestion, to treat organic waste such as sewage sludge and garbage. The two phases of anaerobic digestion are the acidogenic phase and the methane producing phase. Both differ significantly in their nutritional and physiological requirements. This study evaluated the effectiveness of treating garbage with the two-phase thermophilic methane fermentation system (TPS). The performance of the acid fermentation phase in TPS was examined with particular reference to operational parameters such as pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading rate on volatile fatty acid fermentation. It was shown that TPS was more efficient than the single-phase thermophilic methane fermentation system (SPS). Acidification control in the first stage resulted in better stability of methane fermentation in the second stage. VFA formation was optimized at a pH of 6. The recovery ratios of VFAs and methane were achieved in the range of 42 to 44 per cent and 88 to 91 per cent of garbage by high organic loading rate respectively. 12 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs.

  16. Anaerobic digestion of the vegetable fraction of municipal refuses: mesophilic versus thermophilic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Converti, A.; Del Borghi, A.; Zilli, M.; Arni, S.; Del Borghi, M. [Univ. of Genoa (Italy). Inst. of Chemical and Process Engineering

    1999-10-01

    The phenomena limiting the anaerobic digestion of vegetable refuses are studied through batch tests carried out using anaerobic sludge previously selected under either mesophilic (37 C) or thermophilic (55 C) conditions. The compositions of the hydrolysed cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions of these materials are simulated by starch and hemicellulose hydrolysates, respectively. Non-hydrolysed mixtures of vegetable waste with sewage sludge are used to ascertain whether the hydrolysis of these polymeric materials is the limiting step of the digestion process or not. The experimental data of methane production are then worked out by a first-order equation derived from the Monod's model to estimate the kinetic rate constant and methane production yield for each material. Comparison of these results shows that passing from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions is responsible for a slight deceleration of methane production but remarkably enhances both methanation yield and methane content of biogas. The final part of the study deals with the fed-batch digestion of the same residues in static digester. Working under thermophilic conditions at a loading rate threshold of 6.0 g{sub COD}/l . d, the hemicellulose hydrolysate ensures the highest methane productivity (60 mmol{sub CH{sub 4}}/l . d) and methane content of biogas (60%), while unbalance towards the acidogenic phase takes place under the same conditions for the starch hydrolysate. The intermediate behaviour of the non-hydrolysed mixture of vegetable waste with sewage sludge demonstrates that hemicellulose hydrolysis is the limiting step of digestion and suggests the occurrence of ligninic by products inhibition on methane productivity. (orig.)

  17. Methane Emission from Digestion of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME in a Thermophilic Anaerobic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Irvan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available As the issue of global warming draws increasing concern, many studies to reduce CO2 and CH4 gases (greenhouse gases, GHG have been implemented in several countries, including in Indonesia. Considering that Indonesia has a huge numbers of palm oil mills, no doubt if their waste water treatment as one of the major sources in GHG.  This paper presents the results from a research project between Metawater Co., Ltd.-Japan and University of Sumatera Utara-Indonesia. The objective of the research is to study the methane emission of thermophilic fermentation in the treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME on a laboratory scale. Anaerobic digestion was performed in two-litre water jacketed biodigester type continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR and operated at a thermophilic temperature (55 oC. As raw material, a real liquid waste (POME from palm oil mill was used. Fresh POME was obtained from seeding pond of PTPN II waste water treatment facility which has concentration of 39.7 g of VS/L and COD value of 59,000 mg/L. To gain precise results, complete recording and reliable equipment of reactor was employed. As the experimental results, for hydraulic retention time (HRT 8 days, VS decomposition rate of 63.5% and gas generation of 6.05-9.82 L/day were obtained, while for HRT 6 and 4 days, VS decomposition rate of 61.2, 53.3% and gas generation of  6.93-8.94  and  13.95-16.14 L/day were obtained respectively. Keywords—methane (CH4, palm oil mill effluent (POME, anaerobic digestion, thermophilic, green house gases (GHG

  18. Comparison of the mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of spent cow bedding in leach-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, S; Hernandéz-Shek, M A; Torrijos, M; Vives, G; Esposito, G; van Hullebusch, E D; Steyer, J P; Escudié, R

    2017-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion of spent cow bedding in batch leach-bed reactors (LBRs) was compared in mesophilic and thermophilic conditions for the first time. Results show that the use of thermophilic conditions enhanced only the degradation kinetics of easily-degradable matter during the first days of the digestion, whereas similar methane yields (80% of the Biomethane Potential) were reached after 42days at both temperatures. Therefore, the anaerobic digestion in LBRs of spent cow bedding, a substrate rich in slowly-degradable compounds, was not improved in term of methane production considering the overall digestion time. Moreover, the high initial biogas production rate in thermophilic reactors was found to significantly reduce the energetic performance of the cogeneration unit at industrial scale, leading to a 5.9% decrease in the annual electricity production when compared to a mesophilic one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparing mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of chicken manure: Microbial community dynamics and process resilience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Qigui; Takemura, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kengo; Li, Yu-You

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microbial community dynamics and process functional resilience were investigated. • The threshold of TAN in mesophilic reactor was higher than the thermophilic reactor. • The recoverable archaeal community dynamic sustained the process resilience. • Methanosarcina was more sensitive than Methanoculleus on ammonia inhibition. • TAN and FA effects the dynamic of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria obviously. - Abstract: While methane fermentation is considered as the most successful bioenergy treatment for chicken manure, the relationship between operational performance and the dynamic transition of archaeal and bacterial communities remains poorly understood. Two continuous stirred-tank reactors were investigated under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions feeding with 10%TS. The tolerance of thermophilic reactor on total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) was found to be 8000 mg/L with free ammonia (FA) 2000 mg/L compared to 16,000 mg/L (FA1500 mg/L) of mesophilic reactor. Biomethane production was 0.29 L/gV S in in the steady stage and decreased following TAN increase. After serious inhibition, the mesophilic reactor was recovered successfully by dilution and washing stratagem compared to the unrecoverable of thermophilic reactor. The relationship between the microbial community structure, the bioreactor performance and inhibitors such as TAN, FA, and volatile fatty acid was evaluated by canonical correspondence analysis. The performance of methanogenic activity and substrate removal efficiency were changed significantly correlating with the community evenness and phylogenetic structure. The resilient archaeal community was found even after serious inhibition in both reactors. Obvious dynamics of bacterial communities were observed in acidogenic and hydrolytic functional bacteria following TAN variation in the different stages

  20. Formation of metabolites during biodegradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor under thermophilic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) was shown in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor under thermophilic conditions. The reactor was inoculated with granular biomass and fed with a synthetic medium and 3 mumol/L of a mixture of LAS with alkylchain length of 10 to 13 carbon...

  1. Operational strategies for thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in continuously stirred tank reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Cui, J.; Chen, X.

    2006-01-01

    Three operational strategies to reduce inhibition due to ammonia during thermophilic anaerobic digestion of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste (SS-OFMSW) rich in proteins were investigated. Feed was prepared by diluting SS-OFMSW (ratio of 1:4) with tap water or reactor process...

  2. Effect of different redox mediators during thermophilic azo dye reduction by anaerobic granular sludge and comparative study between mesophilic (30C) and thermophilic (55C) treatments for decolourisation of textile wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezerra Dos Santos, A.; Bisschops, I.A.E.; Cervantes, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of different redox mediators on colour removal of azo dye model compounds and textile wastewater by thermophilic anaerobic granular sludge (55 C) was investigated in batch assays. Additionally, a comparative study between mesophilic (30 C) and thermophilic (55 C) colour removal was

  3. Silver Sulfidation in Thermophilic Anaerobic Digesters and Effects on Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bojeong; Miller, Jennifer H.; Monsegue, Niven; Levard, Clément; Hong, Yanjuan; Hull, Matthew S.; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Brown, Gordon E.; Vikesland, Peter J.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy; Hochella, Michael F.

    2015-12-15

    Physical and chemical transformations and biological responses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in wastewater treatment systems are of particular interest because of the extensive existing and continually growing uses of AgNPs in consumer products. In this study, we investigated the transformation of AgNPs and AgNO3 during thermophilic anaerobic digestion and effects on selection or transfer of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Ag2S-NPs, sulfidation products of both AgNPs and AgNO3, were recovered from raw and digested sludges and were analyzed by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). TEM and XAS revealed rapid (≤20 min) Ag sulfidation for both Ag treatments. Once transformed, Ag2S-NPs (as individual NPs or an NP aggregate) persisted for the duration of the batch digestion. The digestion process produced Ag2S-NPs that were strongly associated with sludge organics and/or other inorganic precipitates. Ag treatments (up to 1,000 mg Ag/kg) did not have an impact on the performance of thermophilic anaerobic digesters or ARG response, as indicated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction measurements of sul1, tet(W), and tet(O) and also intI1, an indicator of horizontal gene transfer of ARGs. Thus, rapid Ag sulfidation and stabilization with organics effectively sequester Ag and prevent biological interactions with the digester microbial community that could induce horizontal gene transfer or adversely impact digester performance through antimicrobial activity. This finding suggests that sulfide-rich anaerobic environments, such as digesters, likely have a high buffer capacity to mitigate the biological effects of AgNPs.

  4. A constant flux of diverse thermophilic bacteria into the cold Arctic seabed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Loy, Alexander; Nickel, Maren

    2009-01-01

    supply of thermophilic bacteria into permanently cold Arctic marine sediment at a rate exceeding 108 spores per square meter per year. These metabolically and phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes show no detectable activity at cold in situ temperatures but rapidly mineralize organic matter by hydrolysis......, fermentation, and sulfate reduction upon induction at 50°C. The closest relatives to these bacteria come from warm subsurface petroleum reservoir and ocean crust ecosystems, suggesting that seabed fluid flow from these environments is delivering thermophiles to the cold ocean. These transport pathways may...

  5. Antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Audrey N

    2014-09-01

    Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can be severe and life-threatening. Susceptibility testing of anaerobes is not frequently performed in laboratories, but such testing is important to direct appropriate therapy. Anaerobic resistance is increasing globally, and resistance trends vary by geographic region. An overview of a variety of susceptibility testing methods for anaerobes is provided, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are reviewed. Specific clinical situations warranting anaerobic susceptibility testing are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Oxygen sensitivity of various anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesche, W J

    1969-11-01

    Anaerobes differ in their sensitivity to oxygen, as two patterns were recognizable in the organisms included in this study. Strict anaerobes were species incapable of agar surface growth at pO(2) levels greater than 0.5%. Species that were found to be strict anaerobes were Treponema macrodentium, Treponema denticola, Treponema oralis n. sp., Clostridium haemolyticum, Selenomonas ruminatium, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens, and Lachnospira multiparus. Moderate anaerobes would include those species capable of growth in the presence of oxygen levels as high as 2 to 8%. The moderate anaerobes could be exposed to room atmosphere for 60 to 90 min without appreciable loss of viability. Species considered as moderate anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, B. melaninogenicus, B. oralis, Fusobacteria nucleatum, Clostridium novyi type A, and Peptostreptococcus elsdenii. The recognition of at least two general types of anaerobes would seem to have practical import in regard to the primary isolation of anaerobes from source material.

  7. Moderately Thermophilic Magnetotactic Bacteria from Hot Springs in Nevada▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Abreu, Fernanda; Schmidt, Marian L.; Lins, Ulysses; Frankel, Richard B.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    Populations of a moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium were discovered in Great Boiling Springs, Nevada, ranging from 32 to 63°C. Cells were small, Gram-negative, vibrioid to helicoid in morphology, and biomineralized a chain of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes. Phylogenetically, based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the organism belongs to the phylum Nitrospirae. PMID:20382815

  8. Moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacteria from hot springs in Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Abreu, Fernanda; Schmidt, Marian L; Lins, Ulysses; Frankel, Richard B; Hedlund, Brian P; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2010-06-01

    Populations of a moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium were discovered in Great Boiling Springs, Nevada, ranging from 32 to 63 degrees C. Cells were small, Gram-negative, vibrioid to helicoid in morphology, and biomineralized a chain of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes. Phylogenetically, based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the organism belongs to the phylum Nitrospirae.

  9. Anaerobic digestion of spent mushroom substrate under thermophilic conditions: performance and microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zheng; Lin, Manhong; Fan, Jinlin; Chen, Yixuan; Zhao, Chao; Liu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Spent mushroom substrate (SMS) is the residue of edible mushroom production occurring in huge amounts. The SMS residue can be digested for biogas production in the mesophilic anaerobic digestion. In the present study, performance of batch thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD) of SMS was investigated as well as the interconnected microbial population structure changes. The analyzed batch TAD process lasted for 12 days with the cumulative methane yields of 177.69 mL/g volatile solid (VS). Hydrolytic activities of soluble sugar, crude protein, and crude fat in SMS were conducted mainly in the initial phase, accompanied by the excessive accumulation of volatile fatty acids and low methane yield. Biogas production increased dramatically from days 4 to 6. The degradation rates of cellulose and hemicellulose were 47.53 and 55.08%, respectively. The high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons revealed that Proteobacteria (56.7%-62.8%) was the dominant phylum in different fermentative stages, which was highly specific compared with other anaerobic processes of lignocellulosic materials reported in the literature. Crenarchaeota was abundant in the archaea. The most dominant genera of archaea were retrieved as Methanothermobacter and Methanobacterium, but the latter decreased sharply with time. This study shows that TAD is a feasible method to handle the waste SMS.

  10. Performance of thermophilic anaerobic digesters using inoculum mixes with enhanced methanogenic diversity

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanimeh, Sophia

    2017-05-30

    BACKGROUND Reportedly, various mixes of seeds were quasi-randomly selected to startup anaerobic digesters. In contrast, this study examines the impact of inoculating thermophilic anaerobic digesters with a designed mix of non-acclimated seeds based on their methanogen composition, using Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (QPCR) of 16S rRNA gene, to achieve high abundance and diversity of methanogens. RESULTS Based on QPCR results, two seed mixes were selected to inoculate two anaerobic digesters: digester (A) was inoculated with a control seed consisting of digestate, manure, and activated sludge; and digester (B) was inoculated with a further methanogen-enriched seed consisting of the control seed with added compost and leachate. Both seed combinations yielded a balanced microflora that is able to achieve a successful startup. However, upon reaching steady state, digester B exhibited lower propionate levels, resulting in lower VFA concentration and increased buffering capacity, indicating greater stability. Acetotrophs and hydrogenotrophs were dominated by Methanosarcinaceae and Methanobacteriales, respectively, in both digesters, exhibiting an average ratio of 66-to-34% in A and 76-to-24% in B during steady state. CONCLUSION The inoculation strategy in digester B resulted in improved stability, lower propionate concentration and 10% higher relative abundance of acetotrophs.

  11. Improved fermentation performance in an expanded ectopic fermentation system inoculated with thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui; Zhu, Changxiong; Geng, Bing; Liu, Xue; Ye, Jing; Tian, Yunlong; Peng, Xiawei

    2015-12-01

    Previous research showed that ectopic fermentation system (EFS) inoculated with thermophilic bacteria is an excellent alternative for cow wastewater treatment. In this study, the effects of thermophilic bacterial consortium on the efficiency and quality of the fermentation process in EFS were evaluated by measuring physicochemical and environmental factors and the changes in organic matter composition. In parallel, the microbial communities correlated with fermentation performance were identified. Inoculation of EFS with thermophilic bacterial consortium led to higher temperatures, increased wastewater requirements for continuous fermentation, and improved quality of the litters in terms of physicochemical factors, security test, functional group analysis, and bacterial community composition. The relationship between the transformation of organic component and the dominant bacteria species indicated that environmental factors contributed to strain growth, which subsequently promoted the fermentation process. The results highlight the great potential of EFS model for wide application in cow wastewater treatment and re-utilization as bio-fertilizer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Growth media in anaerobic fermentative processes : The underestimated potential of thermophilic fermentation and anaerobic digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, A.T.W.M.; van Lier, J.B.; de Kreuk, M.K.

    2018-01-01

    Fermentation and anaerobic digestion of organic waste and wastewater is broadly studied and applied. Despite widely available results and data for these processes, comparison of the generated results in literature is difficult. Not only due to the used variety of process conditions, but also

  13. Presence and potential role of thermophilic bacteria in temperate terrestrial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, M C; Santana, M; Gonzalez, J M

    2012-01-01

    Organic sulfur and nitrogen are major reservoirs of these elements in terrestrial systems, although their cycling remains to be fully understood. Both sulfur and nitrogen mineralization are directly related to microbial metabolism. Mesophiles and thermophiles were isolated from temperate environments. Thermophilic isolates were classified within the Firmicutes, belonging to the Geobacillus, Brevibacillus, and Ureibacillus genera, and showed optimum growth temperatures between 50°C and 60°C. Sulfate and ammonium produced were higher during growth of thermophiles both for isolated strains and natural bacterial assemblages. They were positively related to organic nutrient load. Temperature also affected the release of sulfate and ammonium by thermophiles. Quantitative, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction on environmental samples indicated that the examined thermophilic Firmicutes represented up to 3.4% of the total bacterial community RNA. Temperature measurements during summer days showed values above 40°C for more than 10 h a day in soils from southern Spain. These results support a potential role of thermophilic bacteria in temperate terrestrial environments by mineralizing organic sulfur and nitrogen ruled by the existence and length of warm periods.

  14. Thermophilic versus Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion of Sewage Sludge: A Comparative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreeyessus, Getachew D; Jenicek, Pavel

    2016-06-18

    During advanced biological wastewater treatment, a huge amount of sludge is produced as a by-product of the treatment process. Hence, reuse and recovery of resources and energy from the sludge is a big technological challenge. The processing of sludge produced by Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) is massive, which takes up a big part of the overall operational costs. In this regard, anaerobic digestion (AD) of sewage sludge continues to be an attractive option to produce biogas that could contribute to the wastewater management cost reduction and foster the sustainability of those WWTPs. At the same time, AD reduces sludge amounts and that again contributes to the reduction of the sludge disposal costs. However, sludge volume minimization remains, a challenge thus improvement of dewatering efficiency is an inevitable part of WWTP operation. As a result, AD parameters could have significant impact on sludge properties. One of the most important operational parameters influencing the AD process is temperature. Consequently, the thermophilic and the mesophilic modes of sludge AD are compared for their pros and cons by many researchers. However, most comparisons are more focused on biogas yield, process speed and stability. Regarding the biogas yield, thermophilic sludge AD is preferred over the mesophilic one because of its faster biochemical reaction rate. Equally important but not studied sufficiently until now was the influence of temperature on the digestate quality, which is expressed mainly by the sludge dewateringability, and the reject water quality (chemical oxygen demand, ammonia nitrogen, and pH). In the field of comparison of thermophilic and mesophilic digestion process, few and often inconclusive research, unfortunately, has been published so far. Hence, recommendations for optimized technologies have not yet been done. The review presented provides a comparison of existing sludge AD technologies and the gaps that need to be filled so as to optimize

  15. Thermophilic versus Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion of Sewage Sludge: A Comparative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreeyessus, Getachew D.; Jenicek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    During advanced biological wastewater treatment, a huge amount of sludge is produced as a by-product of the treatment process. Hence, reuse and recovery of resources and energy from the sludge is a big technological challenge. The processing of sludge produced by Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) is massive, which takes up a big part of the overall operational costs. In this regard, anaerobic digestion (AD) of sewage sludge continues to be an attractive option to produce biogas that could contribute to the wastewater management cost reduction and foster the sustainability of those WWTPs. At the same time, AD reduces sludge amounts and that again contributes to the reduction of the sludge disposal costs. However, sludge volume minimization remains, a challenge thus improvement of dewatering efficiency is an inevitable part of WWTP operation. As a result, AD parameters could have significant impact on sludge properties. One of the most important operational parameters influencing the AD process is temperature. Consequently, the thermophilic and the mesophilic modes of sludge AD are compared for their pros and cons by many researchers. However, most comparisons are more focused on biogas yield, process speed and stability. Regarding the biogas yield, thermophilic sludge AD is preferred over the mesophilic one because of its faster biochemical reaction rate. Equally important but not studied sufficiently until now was the influence of temperature on the digestate quality, which is expressed mainly by the sludge dewateringability, and the reject water quality (chemical oxygen demand, ammonia nitrogen, and pH). In the field of comparison of thermophilic and mesophilic digestion process, few and often inconclusive research, unfortunately, has been published so far. Hence, recommendations for optimized technologies have not yet been done. The review presented provides a comparison of existing sludge AD technologies and the gaps that need to be filled so as to optimize

  16. High-efficiency hydrogen production by an anaerobic, thermophilic enrichment culture from an Icelandic hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Perttu E P; Lay, Chyi-How; Puhakka, Jaakko A; Lin, Ping-Jei; Wu, Shu-Yii; Orlygsson, Jóhann; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2008-11-01

    Dark fermentative hydrogen production from glucose by a thermophilic culture (33HL), enriched from an Icelandic hot spring sediment sample, was studied in two continuous-flow, completely stirred tank reactors (CSTR1, CSTR2) and in one semi-continuous, anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) at 58 degrees C. The 33HL produced H2 yield (HY) of up to 3.2 mol-H2/mol-glucose along with acetate in batch assay. In the CSTR1 with 33HL inoculum, H2 production was unstable. In the ASBR, maintained with 33HL, the H2 production enhanced after the addition of 6 mg/L of FeSO4 x H2O resulting in HY up to 2.51 mol-H2/mol-glucose (H2 production rate (HPR) of 7.85 mmol/h/L). The H2 production increase was associated with an increase in butyrate production. In the CSTR2, with ASBR inoculum and FeSO4 supplementation, stable, high-rate H2 production was obtained with HPR up to 45.8 mmol/h/L (1.1 L/h/L) and HY of 1.54 mol-H2/mol-glucose. The 33HL batch enrichment was dominated by bacterial strains closely affiliated with Thermobrachium celere (99.8-100%). T. celere affiliated strains, however, did not thrive in the three open system bioreactors. Instead, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense (98.5-99.6%) affiliated strains, producing H2 along with butyrate and acetate, dominated the reactor cultures. This culture had higher H2 production efficiency (HY and specific HPR) than reported for mesophilic mixed cultures. Further, the thermophilic culture readily formed granules in CSTR and ASBR systems. In summary, the thermophilic culture as characterized by high H2 production efficiency and ready granulation is considered very promising for H2 fermentation from carbohydrates.

  17. Production of Bioethanol From Lignocellulosic Biomass Using Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.

    2006-01-01

    Bioethanol (ethanol produced from biomass) as a motor fuel is an attractive renewable fully sustainable energy sources as a means of lowering dependence on fossil fuels and air pollution towards greenhouse gasses, particularly CO2. Bioethanol, unlike gasoline, is an oxygenated fuel, which burns...... environment and public health problems. Increasing demand of bioethanol for transportation sector and higher bioethanol prices than gasoline require utilization of cheap and unlimited raw materials in order to become bioethanol economically competitive with gasoline. Such alternative raw materials...

  18. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria from gut of red palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pure cultures were obtained after incubating the plates at different atmospheric conditions (aerobic, and strictly anaerobic). The majority of isolated microbiota observed were aerobes and facultative anaerobes (Bacillus sp., Salmonella sp., Enterococcus sp., and Xanthomonas sp.). These qualitative differences of bacteria, ...

  19. Thermophilic Bacteria Colony Growwth and its Consequences in the Food Industry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melzoch, K.; Votruba, Jaroslav; Sekavová, B.; Piterková, L.; Rychtera, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2004), s. 1-8 ISSN 1212-1800 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/03/0375 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : thermophilic bacteria * colony growth Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  20. A constant flux of diverse thermophilic bacteria into the cold Arctic seabed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Loy, Alexander; Nickel, Maren

    2009-01-01

    , fermentation, and sulfate reduction upon induction at 50°C. The closest relatives to these bacteria come from warm subsurface petroleum reservoir and ocean crust ecosystems, suggesting that seabed fluid flow from these environments is delivering thermophiles to the cold ocean. These transport pathways may...

  1. Detection of putatively thermophilic anaerobic methanotrophs in diffuse hydrothermal vent fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Alexander Y; Huber, Julie A; Chernyh, Nikolay A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Lebedinsky, Alexander V

    2013-02-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is carried out by a globally distributed group of uncultivated Euryarchaeota, the anaerobic methanotrophic arachaea (ANME). In this work, we used G+C analysis of 16S rRNA genes to identify a putatively thermophilic ANME group and applied newly designed primers to study its distribution in low-temperature diffuse vent fluids from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We found that the G+C content of the 16S rRNA genes (P(GC)) is significantly higher in the ANME-1GBa group than in other ANME groups. Based on the positive correlation between the P(GC) and optimal growth temperatures (T(opt)) of archaea, we hypothesize that the ANME-1GBa group is adapted to thrive at high temperatures. We designed specific 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers for the ANME-1 cluster to detect all phylogenetic groups within this cluster, including the deeply branching ANME-1GBa group. The primers were successfully tested both in silico and in experiments with sediment samples where ANME-1 phylotypes had previously been detected. The primers were further used to screen for the ANME-1 microorganisms in diffuse vent fluid samples from deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Ocean, and sequences belonging to the ANME-1 cluster were detected in four individual vents. Phylotypes belonging to the ANME-1GBa group dominated in clone libraries from three of these vents. Our findings provide evidence of existence of a putatively extremely thermophilic group of methanotrophic archaea that occur in geographically and geologically distinct marine hydrothermal habitats.

  2. Anaerobic digestibility of Scenedesmus obliquus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamalloa, Carlos; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigate the digestion of two algae biomasses in hybrid flow-through reactors. ► We determine the bio-methane potential of these biomasses through batch assays. ► Conversion efficiencies of 20–50% with an HRT of 2.2 days are possible. ► We valorise microalgae biomass by anaerobic digestion in a high rate reactor. -- Abstract: Two types of non-axenic algal cultures, one dominated by the freshwater microalgae Scenedesmus obliquus and the other by the marine microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum, were cultivated in two types of simple photobioreactor systems. The production rates, expressed on dry matter (DM) basis, were in the order of 0.12 and 0.18 g DM L −1 d −1 for S. obliquus and P. tricornutum respectively. The biogas potential of algal biomass was assessed by performing standardized batch digestion as well as digestion in a hybrid flow-through reactor (combining a sludge blanket and a carrier bed), the latter under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. Biomethane potential assays revealed the ultimate methane yield (B 0 ) of P. tricornutum biomass to be about a factor of 1.5 higher than that of S. obliquus biomass, i.e. 0.36 and 0.24 L CH 4 g −1 volatile solids (VS) added respectively. For S. obliquus biomass, the hybrid flow-through reactor tests operated at volumetric organic loading rate (Bv) of 2.8 gVS L −1 d −1 indicated low conversion efficiencies ranging between 26–31% at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.2 days for mesophilic and thermophilic conditions respectively. When digesting P. tricornutum at a Bv of 1.9 gVS L −1 d −1 at either mesophilic or thermophilic conditions and at an HRT of 2.2 days, an overall conversion efficiency of about 50% was obtained. This work indicated that the hydrolysis of the algae cells is limiting the anaerobic processing of intensively grown S. obliquus and P. tricornutum biomass.

  3. Growing Chlorella vulgaris on thermophilic anaerobic digestion swine manure for nutrient removal and biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiang-Yuan; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Ren-Chuan; Addy, Min; Lu, Qian; Ren, Hong-Yan; Chen, Paul; Liu, Yu-Huan; Ruan, Roger

    2017-11-01

    Liquid swine manure was subjected to thermophilic anaerobic digestion, ammonia stripping and centrifugation in order to increase the available carbon sources and decrease the ammonia concentration and turbidity. Chlorella vulgaris (UTEX 2714) was grown on minimally diluted (2×, 3× and 4×) autoclaved and non-autoclaved pretreated anaerobic digestion swine manure (PADSM) in a batch-culture system for 7days. Results showed that C. vulgaris (UTEX 2714) grew best on 3× PADSM media, and effectively removed NH 4 + -N, TN, TP and COD by 98.5-99.8%, 49.2-55.4%, 20.0-29.7%, 31.2-34.0% and 99.8-99.9%, 67.4-70.8%, 49.3-54.4%, 73.6-78.7% in differently diluted autoclaved and non-autoclaved PADSM, respectively. Results of chemical compositions indicated that contents of pigment, carbohydrate, protein and lipid in C. vulgaris (UTEX 2714) changed with the culture conditions. Moreover, its fatty acid profiles suggested that this alga could be used as animal feed if cultivated in autoclaved PADSM or as good-quality biodiesel feedstock if cultivated in non-autoclaved PADSM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. State of the art review of biofuels production from lignocellulose by thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yujia; Xin, Fengxue; Lu, Jiasheng; Dong, Weiliang; Zhang, Wenming; Zhang, Min; Wu, Hao; Ma, Jiangfeng; Jiang, Min

    2017-12-01

    Biofuels, including ethanol and butanol, are mainly produced by mesophilic solventogenic yeasts and Clostridium species. However, these microorganisms cannot directly utilize lignocellulosic materials, which are abundant, renewable and non-compete with human demand. More recently, thermophilic bacteria show great potential for biofuels production, which could efficiently degrade lignocellulose through the cost effective consolidated bioprocessing. Especially, it could avoid contamination in the whole process owing to its relatively high fermentation temperature. However, wild types thermophiles generally produce low levels of biofuels, hindering their large scale production. This review comprehensively summarizes the state of the art development of biofuels production by reported thermophilic microorganisms, and also concludes strategies to improve biofuels production including the metabolic pathways construction, co-culturing systems and biofuels tolerance. In addition, strategies to further improve butanol production are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130-0.486, P = 0.075-0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene

  6. Survival of antibiotic resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer control antibiotic resistance gene content in anaerobic digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hafer Miller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp. and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp. anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate (tet(G remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O, tet(W, and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457 to 0.829, P<0.05 with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O or tet(W ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130 to 0.486, P = 0.075 to 0.612. However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O and tet(W ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  7. The identification of anaerobic bacteria using MALDI-TOF MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; Welling, G. W.; Degener, J. E.

    Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has gained more and more popularity for the identification of bacteria. Several studies show that bacterial diagnosticis is being revolutionized by the application of MALDI-TOF MS. For anaerobic bacteria,

  8. Global transport of thermophilic bacteria in atmospheric dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfumo, Amedea; Marchant, Roger

    2010-04-01

    Aerosols from dust storms generated in the Sahara-Sahel desert area of Africa are transported north over Europe and periodically result in dry dust precipitation in the Mediterranean region. Samples of dust collected in Turkey and Greece following two distinct desert storm events contained viable thermophilic organisms of the genus Geobacillus, namely G. thermoglucosidasius and G. thermodenitrificans, and the recently reclassified Aeribacillus pallidus (formerly Geobacillus pallidus). We present here evidence that African dust storms create an atmospheric bridge between distant geographical regions and that they are also probably the source of thermophilic geobacilli later deposited over northern Europe by rainfall or dust plumes themselves. The same organisms (99% similarity in the 16S rDNA sequence) were found in dust collected in the Mediterranean region and inhabiting cool soils in Northern Ireland. This study also contributes new insights to the taxonomic identification of Geobacillus sp. Attempts to identify these organisms using 16S rRNA gene sequences have revealed that they contain multiple and diverse copies of the ribosomal RNA operon (up to 10 copies with nine different sequences), which dictates care in interpreting data about the systematics of this genus. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Genomic Analysis of Caldithrix abyssi, the Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium of the Novel Bacterial Phylum Calditrichaeota

    OpenAIRE

    Kublanov, Ilya V.; Sigalova, Olga M.; Gavrilov, Sergey N.; Lebedinsky, Alexander V.; Rinke, Christian; Kovaleva, Olga; Chernyh, Nikolai A.; Ivanova, Natalia; Daum, Chris; Reddy, T.B.K.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Spring, Stefan; G?ker, Markus; Reva, Oleg N.; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L.

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 Kublanov, Sigalova, Gavrilov, Lebedinsky, Rinke, Kovaleva, Chernyh, Ivanova, Daum, Reddy, Klenk, Spring, Göker, Reva, Miroshnichenko, Kyrpides, Woyke, Gelfand, Bonch-Osmolovskaya. The genome of Caldithrix abyssi, the first cultivated representative of a phylum-level bacterial lineage, was sequenced within the framework of Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project. The genomic analysis revealed mechanisms allowing this anaerobic bacterium to ferment peptides or to impl...

  10. Dissecting and engineering metabolic and regulatory networks of thermophilic bacteria for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu; Xu, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Interest in thermophilic bacteria as live-cell catalysts in biofuel and biochemical industry has surged in recent years, due to their tolerance of high temperature and wide spectrum of carbon-sources that include cellulose. However their direct employment as microbial cellular factories in the highly demanding industrial conditions has been hindered by uncompetitive biofuel productivity, relatively low tolerance to solvent and osmic stresses, and limitation in genome engineering tools. In this work we review recent advances in dissecting and engineering the metabolic and regulatory networks of thermophilic bacteria for improving the traits of key interest in biofuel industry: cellulose degradation, pentose-hexose co-utilization, and tolerance of thermal, osmotic, and solvent stresses. Moreover, new technologies enabling more efficient genetic engineering of thermophiles were discussed, such as improved electroporation, ultrasound-mediated DNA delivery, as well as thermo-stable plasmids and functional selection systems. Expanded applications of such technological advancements in thermophilic microbes promise to substantiate a synthetic biology perspective, where functional parts, module, chassis, cells and consortia were modularly designed and rationally assembled for the many missions at industry and nature that demand the extraordinary talents of these extremophiles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermophilic versus Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion of Sewage Sludge: A Comparative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew D. Gebreeyessus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During advanced biological wastewater treatment, a huge amount of sludge is produced as a by-product of the treatment process. Hence, reuse and recovery of resources and energy from the sludge is a big technological challenge. The processing of sludge produced by Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs is massive, which takes up a big part of the overall operational costs. In this regard, anaerobic digestion (AD of sewage sludge continues to be an attractive option to produce biogas that could contribute to the wastewater management cost reduction and foster the sustainability of those WWTPs. At the same time, AD reduces sludge amounts and that again contributes to the reduction of the sludge disposal costs. However, sludge volume minimization remains, a challenge thus improvement of dewatering efficiency is an inevitable part of WWTP operation. As a result, AD parameters could have significant impact on sludge properties. One of the most important operational parameters influencing the AD process is temperature. Consequently, the thermophilic and the mesophilic modes of sludge AD are compared for their pros and cons by many researchers. However, most comparisons are more focused on biogas yield, process speed and stability. Regarding the biogas yield, thermophilic sludge AD is preferred over the mesophilic one because of its faster biochemical reaction rate. Equally important but not studied sufficiently until now was the influence of temperature on the digestate quality, which is expressed mainly by the sludge dewateringability, and the reject water quality (chemical oxygen demand, ammonia nitrogen, and pH. In the field of comparison of thermophilic and mesophilic digestion process, few and often inconclusive research, unfortunately, has been published so far. Hence, recommendations for optimized technologies have not yet been done. The review presented provides a comparison of existing sludge AD technologies and the gaps that need to be filled so

  12. Bioleaching of pollymetallic sulphide concentrate using thermophilic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Milovan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An extreme thermophilic, iron-sulphur oxidising bacterial culture was isolated and adapted to tolerate high metal and solids concentrations at 70°C. Following isolation and adaptation, the culture was used in a batch bioleach test employing a 5-l glass standard magnetic agitated and aerated reactor, for the bioleaching of a copper-lead-zinc collective concentrate. The culture exhibited stable leach performance over the period of leach operation and overall copper and zinc extractions higher than 97%. Lead sulphide is transformed into lead sulphate remaining in the bioleach residue due to the low solubility in sulphate media. Brine leaching of bioleach residue yields 95% lead extraction. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 34023

  13. Pathway engineering to improve ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynd, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    Continuation of a research project jointly funded by the NSF and DOE is proposed. The primary project goal is to develop and characterize strains of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum having ethanol selectivity similar to more convenient ethanol-producing organisms. An additional goal is to document the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be produced by thermophiles. These goals build on results from the previous project, including development of most of the genetic tools required for pathway engineering in the target organisms. As well, we demonstrated that the tolerance of C. thermosaccharolyticum to added ethanol is sufficiently high to allow practical utilization should similar tolerance to produced ethanol be demonstrated, and that inhibition by neutralizing agents may explain the limited concentrations of ethanol produced in studies to date. Task 1 involves optimization of electrotransformation, using either modified conditions or alternative plasmids to improve upon the low but reproducible transformation, frequencies we have obtained thus far.

  14. Thermostable 𝜶-Amylase Activity from Thermophilic Bacteria Isolated from Bora Hot Spring, Central Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazali, F. M.; Suwastika, I. N.

    2018-03-01

    α-Amylase is one of the most important enzyme in biotechnology field, especially in industrial application. Thermostability of α-Amylase produced by thermophilic bacteria improves industrial process of starch degradation in starch industry. The present study were concerned to the characterization of α-Amylase activity from indigenous thermophilic bacteria isolated from Bora hot spring, Central Sulawesi. There were 18 isolates which had successfully isolated from 90°C sediment samples of Bora hot spring and 13 of them showed amylolytic activity. The α-Amylase activity was measured qualitatively at starch agar and quantitatively based on DNS (3,5-Dinitrosalicylic acid) methods, using maltose as standard solution. Two isolates (out of 13 amylolytic bacteria), BR 002 and BR 015 showed amylolytic index of 0.8 mm and 0.5 mm respectively, after being incubated at 55°C in the 0.002% Starch Agar Medium. The α-Amylase activity was further characterized quantitatively which includes the optimum condition of pH and temperature of α-Amylase crude enzyme from each isolate. To our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation and characterization of a thermostable α-Amylase from thermophilic bacteria isolated from Central Sulawesi particularly from Bora hot spring.

  15. FERMENTATION OF INULIN BY CLOSTRIDIUM-THERMOSUCCINOGENES SP-NOV, A THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM VARIOUS HABITATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DRENT, WJ; LAHPOR, GA; WIEGANT, WM; GOTTSCHAL, JC

    Four closely related strains of thermophilic bacteria were isolated via enrichment in batch and continuous culture with inulin as the sole source of carbon and energy by using inoculations from various sources. These new strains were isolated from beet pulp from a sugar refinery, soil around a

  16. Evaluation of continuous ethanol fermentation of dilute-acid corn stover hydrolysate using thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    fermented yielding ethanol of 0.39–0.42 g/g-sugars consumed. Xylose was nearly completely utilized (89–98%) for PCS up to 10% TS, whereas at 15% TS, xylose conversion was lowered to 67%. The reactor was operated continuously for 135 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent......Dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover is potential feedstock of industrial interest for second generation fuel ethanol production. However, the toxicity of corn stover hydrolysate (PCS) has been a challenge for fermentation by recombinant xylose fermenting organisms. In this work...... for preventing bacterial infections. This study demonstrated that the use of immobilized thermophilic anaerobic bacteria for continuous ethanol fermentation could be promising in a commercial ethanol process in terms of system stability to process hardiness and reactor contamination. The tested microorganism has...

  17. Ability of industrial anaerobic ecosystems to produce methane from ethanol in psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabala, Jojo Charlie

    2012-01-01

    The process of anaerobic degradation of organic matter is a natural phenomenon widespread in many ecosystems (eg, marshes, lakes, rice fields, digestive systems of animals and humans). A high microbial diversity is maintained during this process, reflecting a diversity of metabolic pathways involved. When complete, the anaerobic digestion results in the formation of biogas (mixture of methane and carbon dioxide). In terms of biotechnology, anaerobic treatment of organic pollution reduces the volume of waste and generates energy as methane recoverable in several forms (electricity, heat, natural gas, biofuels). Industrial digesters are mostly operated at 35 deg. C or 55 deg. C which requires exogenous energy. The objective of the thesis is to study the adaptability of ecosystems sourced from anaerobic industrial scale reactors treating different range of wastes from different processes to convert ethanol into biogas at various temperatures. The first phase of the study was to adapt, in laboratory reactors ecosystems to their original temperature with a readily biodegradable substrate (ethanol). Then, the performances of microbial communities (the maximum methanogenic potential and degradation kinetics) were estimated on a temperature gradient from 5 deg. C to 55 deg. C in batch reactors. The adaptation phase of the ecosystems in lab-scale reactors showed that the biogas averaged theoretical production and this production was followed by a decrease in reaction time with successive addition of the substrate. In addition, the kinetics of the biogas obtained varied greatly from one ecosystem to another. Molecular fingerprinting profiles (CE-SSCP) of bacterial and archaeal communities were performed at the beginning and at the end of conditioning. These community profiles were compared with each other by principal component analysis (PCA). Bacterial populations that ensured efficient performance were different from those that ensured a good adaptability. In addition, the

  18. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the

  19. Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and chemically enhanced primary-treated sludge under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obulisamy, Parthiba Karthikeyan; Chakraborty, Debkumar; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste with primary sewage sludge is beneficial for urban centers, while the optimized conditions reported in the literature are not locally suitable for Hong Kong. Therefore, the present study was aimed to develop an optimized mixing ratio of food waste to chemically enhanced primary-treated sewer sludge (CEPT) for co-digestion using batch tests under mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The mixing ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 2:1 and 3:1 (v v(-1)) of food waste to CEPT sludge was tested under the following conditions: temperature - 35°C and 55°C; pH - not regulated; agitation - 150 rpm and time - 20 days. The thermophilic incubations led a good hydrolysis rate and 2-12-fold higher enzyme activities than in mesophilic incubations for different mixing ratios. While the acidogenesis were found retarded that leading to 'sour and stuck' digestion for all mixing ratio of food waste to CEPT sludge from thermophilic incubations. The measured zeta potential was most favourable (-5 to -16.8 mV) for methane production under thermophilic incubations; however the CH4 recovery was less than that in mesophilic incubations. The results suggested that the quick hydrolysis and subsequent acid accumulation under thermophilic incubation lead to inhibited methanogenesis at the early stage than in mesophilic systems. It is concluded that buffer addition is therefore required for any mixing ratio of food waste to CEPT sludge for improved CH4 recovery for both mesophilic and thermophilic operations.

  20. Thermophilic bacteria in Moroccan hot springs, salt marshes and desert soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Aanniz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of thermophilic bacteria was investigated in four hot springs, three salt marshes and 12 desert sites in Morocco. Two hundred and forty (240 thermophilic bacteria were recovered, identified and characterized. All isolates were Gram positive, rod-shaped, spore forming and halotolerant. Based on BOXA1R-PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the recovered isolates were dominated by the genus Bacillus (97.5% represented by B. licheniformis (119, B. aerius (44, B. sonorensis (33, B. subtilis (subsp. spizizenii (2 and subsp. inaquosurum (6, B. amyloliquefaciens (subsp. amyloliquefaciens (4 and subsp. plantarum (4, B. tequilensis (3, B. pumilus (3 and Bacillus sp. (19. Only six isolates (2.5% belonged to the genus Aeribacillus represented by A. pallidus (4 and Aeribacillus sp. (2. In this study, B. aerius and B. tequilensis are described for the first time as thermophilic bacteria. Moreover, 71.25%, 50.41% and 5.41% of total strains exhibited high amylolytic, proteolytic or cellulolytic activity respectively.

  1. Thermophilic bacteria in Moroccan hot springs, salt marshes and desert soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanniz, Tarik; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Melloul, Marouane; Swings, Jean; Elfahime, Elmostafa; Ibijbijen, Jamal; Ismaili, Mohamed; Amar, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of thermophilic bacteria was investigated in four hot springs, three salt marshes and 12 desert sites in Morocco. Two hundred and forty (240) thermophilic bacteria were recovered, identified and characterized. All isolates were Gram positive, rod-shaped, spore forming and halotolerant. Based on BOXA1R-PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the recovered isolates were dominated by the genus Bacillus (97.5%) represented by B. licheniformis (119), B. aerius (44), B. sonorensis (33), B. subtilis (subsp. spizizenii (2) and subsp. inaquosurum (6)), B. amyloliquefaciens (subsp. amyloliquefaciens (4) and subsp. plantarum (4)), B. tequilensis (3), B. pumilus (3) and Bacillus sp. (19). Only six isolates (2.5%) belonged to the genus Aeribacillus represented by A. pallidus (4) and Aeribacillus sp. (2). In this study, B. aerius and B. tequilensis are described for the first time as thermophilic bacteria. Moreover, 71.25%, 50.41% and 5.41% of total strains exhibited high amylolytic, proteolytic or cellulolytic activity respectively.

  2. Effects of continuous addition of nitrate to a thermophilic anaerobic digestion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The biodegradation of complex organic matter is regulated partially by the ability to dump electrons which build up in the form of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). The effects of the continuous addition of the oxidant, nitrate, were investigated on a single-stage, thermophilic, anaerobic digester. The digester acclimated rapidly to nitrate addition. The continuous addition of nitrate resulted in a constant inhibition of total gas (30%) and methane production (36%). Reduction in total gas and methane production was accompanied by increases in sludge pH and acetate, propionate, and ammonium ion pools. Effluent particle size distribution revealed a shift to smaller particle sizes in the nitrate-pumped sludge. The continuous addition of nitrate resulted in lower numbers of methanogens and sulfate reducers in the sludge, with increases in nitrate-reducing and cellulose-degrading microorganisms. These findings indicate that added nitrate underwent dissimilatory reduction to ammonium ion, as determined from gas analysis, ammonium pools, and 15 N-nitrate-label experiments. Continuous nitrate addition to a single-phase digestion system was determined to inhibit methane production from biomass and wastes. Thus for the single-stage digestion system in which maximum methane production is desired, the addition of nitrate is not recommended. However, in a multistage digestion system, the continuous addition of nitrate in the primary stage to increase the rate and extent of degradation of organic matter to volatile fatty acids, which then would serve as feed to a second stage, may be advantageous

  3. Mixing effect on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanimeh, Sophia A.

    2012-08-01

    This paper examines the effect of mixing on the performance of thermophilic anaerobic digestion of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the start-up phase and in the absence of an acclimated seed. For this purpose, two digesters were used under similar starting conditions and operated for 235days with different mixing schemes. While both digesters exhibited a successful startup with comparable specific methane yield of 0.327 and 0.314l CH 4/gVS, continuous slow stirring improved stability by reducing average VFA accumulation from 2890 to 825mg HAc/l, propionate content from 2073 to 488mg/l, and VFA-to-alkalinity ratio from 0.32 to 0.07. As a result, the startup with slow mixing was faster and smoother accomplishing a higher loading capacity of 2.5gVS/l/d in comparison to 1.9gVS/l/d for non-mixing. Mixing equally improved microbial abundance from 6.6 to 10gVSS/l and enhanced solids and soluble COD removal. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Glycerol acts as alternative electron sink during syngas fermentation by thermophilic anaerobe Moorella thermoacetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Kita, Akihisa; Iwasaki, Yuki; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Murakami, Katsuji

    2016-03-01

    Moorella thermoacetica is an anaerobic thermophilic acetogen that is capable of fermenting sugars, H(2)/CO(2) and syngas (H(2)/CO). For this reason, this bacterium is potentially useful for biotechnology applications, particularly the production of biofuel from CO(2). A soil isolate of M. thermoacetica, strain Y72, produces both ethanol and acetate from H(2)/CO(2); however, the maximum concentrations of these two products are too low to enable commercialization of the syngas fermentation process. In the present study, glycerol was identified as a novel electron sink among the fermentation products of strain Y72. Notably, a 1.5-fold increase in the production of ethanol (1.4 mM) was observed in cultures supplemented with glycerol during syngas fermentation. This discovery is expected to aid in the development of novel methods that allow for the regulation of metabolic pathways to direct and increase the production of desirable fermentative compounds. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Identification of Anaerobic Bacteria in Iranian patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahb Shafeian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Shafeian SH, Bandehpour M, Mirzaahmadi S, Tofighi A. Identification of Anaerobic Bacteria in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. . Novel Biomed 2013;1(2:39-42.Background: There is a report about the 2-5% prevalence for septic arthritis by anaerobic bacteria. The relevance between synivitis and intestinal microbial flora has been a hypothesis for ten years. The PCR with sensitivity and specificity 99% for microorganism detection in acute, chronic and relapse form of septic arthritis is helpful.Methods: In this research we designed to diagnosis intestinal anaerobic bacteria which are able to occur bacteremia or septicemia. So amplification of the 16srRNA and narG genes in this type of bacteria is the best way for detection of them and followed by the treatment of the patients.Results: 100 patients with septic arthritis incidences were studied here. From these numbers 61% were bacterial arthritis and 18% were infected by anaerobic bacteria. Conclusion: On the base of coding of nitrate reductase, the positive samples were identified Enterobacter cloacae and Methylovorus sp. O157   Escherichia coli and Borrelia garinii.

  6. A Novel Process Configuration for Anaerobic Digestion of Source-Sorted Household Waste Using Hyper-Thermophilic Post-Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, H.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2005-01-01

    A novel reactor configuration was investigated for anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). An anaerobic hyper-thermophilic (68°C) reactor R68 was implemented as a post–treatment step for the effluent of a thermophilic reactor R1 (55°C) in order to enhance...... hydrolysis of recalcitrant organic matter, improve sanitation and ease the stripping of ammonia from the reactor. The efficiency of the combined system was studied in terms of methane yield, volatile solids (VS) reduction and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production at different hydraulic retention times (HRT......). A single-stage thermophilic (55°C) reactor R2 was used as control. VS reduction and biogas yield of the combined system was 78 – 89% and 640 – 790 ml/g-VS, respectively. While the VS reduction in the combined system was up to 7% higher than in the single-stage treatment, no increase in methane yield...

  7. Cell biology of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niftrik, L.A.M.P. van

    2008-01-01

    Anammox bacteria perform anaerobic ammonium oxidation to dinitrogen gas and belong to the phylum Planctomycetes. Whereas most Prokaryotes consist of one compartment, the cytoplasm bounded by the cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall, the species within this phylum are compartmentalized by intracellular

  8. Comparison of the anaerobic digestion at the mesophilic and thermophilic temperature regime of organic wastes from the agribusiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Streitwieser, Daniela

    2017-10-01

    An overall kinetic power law model has been successfully applied to study the anaerobic digestion of agricultural wastes. In this comparative kinetic study feed composition, organic load rate, residence time and process temperature have been systematically varied in an automated semi-continuous fermentation system to obtain the dependency of the rate of degradation as biogas production on the organic load rate and temperature. The results show that the overall reaction order depend only on the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) at values between 3.6 and 3.7. The Arrhenius approach shows a shift in the rate determining step between the mesophilic and thermophilic temperature regimes. The activation energy at the temperature insensitive mesophilic regime is very small at 8.9 (kJ/mole), while the activation energy at the temperature sensitive thermophilic regime lies around 117 (kJ/mole). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improving the stability of thermophilic anaerobic digesters treating SS-OFMSW through enrichment with compost and leachate seeds

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanimeh, Sophia A.

    2013-03-01

    This paper examines the potential of improving the stability of thermophilic anaerobic digestion of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste (SS-OFMSW) by adding leachate and compost during inoculation. For this purpose, two stable thermophilic digesters, A (control) and B (with added leachate and compost), were subjected to a sustained substrate shock by doubling the organic loading rate for one week. Feeding was suspended then gradually resumed to reach the pre-shock loading rate (2. gVS/l/d). Digester A failed, exhibiting excessive increase in acetate and a corresponding decrease in pH and methane generation, and lower COD and solids removal efficiencies. In contrast, digester B was able to restore its functionality with 90% recovery of pre-shock methane generation rate at stable pH, lower hydrogen levels, and reduced VFAs and ammonia accumulation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Modelling of the acid base properties of two thermophilic bacteria at different growth times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Hannah T. M.; Bremer, Phil J.; McQuillan, A. James; Daughney, Christopher J.

    2008-09-01

    Acid-base titrations and electrophoretic mobility measurements were conducted on the thermophilic bacteria Anoxybacillus flavithermus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus at two different growth times corresponding to exponential and stationary/death phase. The data showed significant differences between the two investigated growth times for both bacterial species. In stationary/death phase samples, cells were disrupted and their buffering capacity was lower than that of exponential phase cells. For G. stearothermophilus the electrophoretic mobility profiles changed dramatically. Chemical equilibrium models were developed to simultaneously describe the data from the titrations and the electrophoretic mobility measurements. A simple approach was developed to determine confidence intervals for the overall variance between the model and the experimental data, in order to identify statistically significant changes in model fit and thereby select the simplest model that was able to adequately describe each data set. Exponential phase cells of the investigated thermophiles had a higher total site concentration than the average found for mesophilic bacteria (based on a previously published generalised model for the acid-base behaviour of mesophiles), whereas the opposite was true for cells in stationary/death phase. The results of this study indicate that growth phase is an important parameter that can affect ion binding by bacteria, that growth phase should be considered when developing or employing chemical models for bacteria-bearing systems.

  11. Biogas Production from Distilled Grain Waste by Thermophilic Dry Anaerobic Digestion: Pretreatment of Feedstock and Dynamics of Microbial Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Huang, Yu-Lian; Tan, Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2018-02-01

    Distilled grain waste (DGW) eluted from the Chinese liquor making process poses potential serious environmental problems. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of converting DGW to biogas by thermophilic dry anaerobic digestion. To improve biogas production, the effects of dilute H 2 SO 4 and thermal pretreatment on DGW were evaluated by biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests. The results indicate that 90 °C thermal pretreatment provided the highest methane production at 212.7 mL/g-VTS add . The long-term thermophilic dry anaerobic digestion process was conducted in a 5-L separable flask for more than 3 years at a volatile total solid (VTS) loading rate of 1 g/kg-sludge/d, using synthetic waste, untreated and 90 °C thermal pretreated DGW as the feedstock, respectively. A higher methane production, 451.6 mL/g-VTS add , was obtained when synthetic waste was used; the methane production decreased to 139.4 mL/g-VTS add when the untreated DGW was used. The 90 °C thermal pretreated DGW increased the methane production to 190.5 mL/g-VTS add , showing an increase of 36.7% in methane production compared with that using untreated DGW. The microbial community structure analysis indicates that the microbial community in the thermophilic dry anaerobic digestion system maintained a similar structure when untreated or pretreated DGW was used, whereas the structure differed significantly when synthetic waste was used as the feedstock.

  12. Continuous fermentative hydrogen production from cheese whey wastewater under thermophilic anaerobic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azbar, Nuri; Cetinkaya Dokgoez, F. Tuba; Keskin, Tugba; Korkmaz, Kemal S.; Syed, Hamid M. [Bioengineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Ege University, EBILTEM, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production from cheese processing wastewater via dark anaerobic fermentation was conducted using mixed microbial communities under thermophilic conditions. The effects of varying hydraulic retention time (HRT: 1, 2 and 3.5 days) and especially high organic load rates (OLR: 21, 35 and 47 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/l/day) on biohydrogen production in a continuous stirred tank reactor were investigated. The biogas contained 5-82% (45% on average) hydrogen and the hydrogen production rate ranged from 0.3 to 7.9 l H{sub 2}/l/day (2.5 l/l/day on average). H{sub 2} yields of 22, 15 and 5 mmol/g COD (at a constant influent COD of 40 g/l) were achieved at HRT values of 3.5, 2, and 1 days, respectively. On the other hand, H{sub 2} yields were monitored to be 3, 9 and 6 mmol/g COD, for OLR values of 47, 35 and 21 g COD/l/day, when HRT was kept constant at 1 day. The total measurable volatile fatty acid concentration in the effluent (as a function of influent COD) ranged between 118 and 27,012 mg/l, which was mainly composed of acetic acid, iso-butyric acid, butyric acid, propionic acid, formate and lactate. Ethanol and acetone production was also monitored from time to time. To characterize the microbial community in the bioreactor at different HRTs, DNA in mixed liquor samples was extracted immediately for PCR amplification of 16S RNA gene using eubacterial primers corresponding to 8F and 518R. The PCR product was cloned and subjected to DNA sequencing. The sequencing results were analyzed by using MegaBlast available on NCBI website which showed 99% identity to uncultured Thermoanaerobacteriaceae bacterium. (author)

  13. Caldicoprobacter algeriensis sp. nov. a new thermophilic anaerobic, xylanolytic bacterium isolated from an Algerian hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Grégoire, Patrick; Joseph, Manon; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Benayad, Tahar; Hacene, Hocine; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    A thermophilic anaerobic bacterium (strain TH7C1(T)) was isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma in the northeast of Algeria. Strain TH7C1(T) stained Gram-positive, was a non-motile rod appearing singly, in pairs, or as long chains (0.7-1 × 2-6 μm(2)). Spores were never observed. It grew at temperatures between 55 and 75°C (optimum 65°C) and at pH between 6.2 and 8.3 (optimum 6.9). It did not require NaCl for growth, but tolerated it up to 5 g l(-1). Strain TH7C1(T) is an obligatory heterotroph fermenting sugars including glucose, galactose, lactose, raffinose, fructose, ribose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, mannitol, cellobiose, mannose, melibiose, saccharose, but also xylan, and pyruvate. Fermentation of sugars only occurred in the presence of yeast extract (0.1%). The end-products from glucose fermentation were acetate, lactate, ethanol, CO(2), and H(2). Nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfate, and sulfite were not used as electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.7 mol% (HPLC techniques). Phylogenetic analysis of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence indicated that strain TH7C1(T) was affiliated to Firmicutes, order Clostridiales, family Caldicoprobacteraceae, with Caldicoprobacter oshimai (98.5%) being its closest relative. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genetic characteristics, strain TH7C1(T) is proposed as a novel species of genus Caldicoprobacter, Caldicoprobacter algeriensis, sp. nov. (strain TH7C1(T) = DSM 22661(T) = JCM 16184(T)).

  14. Phenols in anaerobic digestion processes and inhibition of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leven, Lotta; Nyberg, Karin; Korkea-aho, Lena; Schnuerer, Anna

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the presence of phenols in digestate from seven Swedish large-scale anaerobic digestion processes and their impact on the activity of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil. In addition, the importance of feedstock composition and phenol degradation capacity for the occurrence of phenols in the digestate was investigated in the same processes. The results revealed that the content of phenols in the digestate was related to the inhibition of the activity of AOB in soil (EC 5 = 26 μg phenols g -1 d.w. soil). In addition, five pure phenols (phenol, o-, p-, m-cresol and 4-ethylphenol) inhibited the AOB to a similar extent (EC 5 = 43-110 μg g -1 d.w. soil). The phenol content in the digestate was mainly dependent on the composition of the feedstock, but also to some extent by the degradation capacity in the anaerobic digestion process. Swine manure in the feedstock resulted in digestate containing higher amounts of phenols than digestate from reactors with less or no swine manure in the feedstock. The degradation capacity of phenol and p-cresol was studied in diluted small-scale batch cultures and revealed that anaerobic digestion at mesophilic temperatures generally exhibited a higher degradation capacity compared to digestion at thermophilic temperature. Although phenol, p-cresol and 4-ethylphenol were quickly degraded in soil, the phenols added with the digestate constitute an environmental risk according to the guideline values for contaminated soils set by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. In conclusion, the management of anaerobic digestion processes is of decisive importance for the production of digestate with low amounts of phenols, and thereby little risks for negative effects of the phenols on the soil ecosystem

  15. State of the art and future perspectives of thermophilic anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Iranpour, R.

    2002-01-01

    The slate of the art of thermophilic digestion is discussed. Thermophilic digestion is a well established technology in Europe for treatment of mixtures of waste in common large scale biogas plants or for treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Due to a large number of failures...... over time with thermophilic digestion of sewage sludge this process has lost its appeal in the USA. New demands on sanitation of biosolids before land use will, however, bring the attention back to the use of elevated temperatures during sludge stabilization. In the paper we show how the use of a start......-up strategy based on the actual activity of key microbes can be used to ensure proper and fast transfer of mesophilic digesters into thermophilic operation. Extreme thermophilic temperatures of 65degreesC or more may be necessary in the future to meet the demands for full sanitation of the waste material...

  16. Thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of garbage, screened swine and dairy cattle manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Tang, Yue-Qin; Matsui, Toru; Morimura, Shigeru; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Kida, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Methane fermentation characteristics of garbage, swine manure (SM), dairy cattle manure (DCM) and mixtures of these wastes were studied. SM and DCM showed much lower volatile total solid (VTS) digestion efficiencies and methane yield than those of garbage. VTS digestion efficiency of SM was significantly increased when it was co-digested with garbage (Garbage: SM=1:1). Co-digestion of garbage, SM and DCM with respect to the relative quantity of each waste discharged in the Kikuchi (1: 16: 27) and Aso (1: 19: 12) areas indicated that co-digestion with garbage would improve the digestion characteristic of SM and DCM as far as the ratio of DCM in the wastes was maintained below a certain level. When the mixed waste (Garbage: SM: DCM=1:19:12) was treated using a thermophilic UAF reactor, methanogens responsible for the methane production were Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina species. Bacterial species in the phylum Firmicutes were dominant bacteria responsible for the digestion of these wastes. As the percentage of garbage in the mixed wastes used in this study was low (2-3%) and the digestion efficiency of DCM was obviously improved, the co-digestion of SM and DCM with limited garbage was a prospective method to treat the livestock waste effectively and was an attractive alternative technology for the construction of a sustainable environment and society in stock raising area.

  17. Ethanol production from wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate by thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 in a continuous immobilized reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2008-01-01

    to sugar mixtures of glucose and xylose ranging from 12 to 41 g/l. The organism, thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1, exhibited significant resistance to high levels of acetic acid (up to 10 g/l) and other metabolic inhibitors present in the hydrolysate. Although the hydrolysate...... considerable potential to be a novel candidate for lignocellulose bioconversion into ethanol. The work reported here also demonstrates that the use of FBR configuration might be a viable approach for thermophilic anaerobic ethanol fermentation....

  18. Cellulose fermentation by nitrogen-fixing anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canale-Parola, E.

    1992-12-13

    In anaerobic natural environments cellulose is degraded to methane, carbon dioxide and other products by the combined activities of many diverse microorganisms. We are simulating processes occurring in natural environments by constructing biologically-defined, stable, heterogeneous bacterial communities (consortia) that we use as in vitro systems for quantitative studies of cellulose degradation under conditions of combined nitrogen deprivation. These studies include the investigation of (i) metabolic interactions among members of cellulose-degrading microbial populations, and (ii) processes that regulate the activity or biosynthesis of cellulolytic enzymes. In addition, we are studying the sensory mechanisms that, in natural environments, may enable motile cellulolytic bacteria to migrate toward cellulose. This part of our work includes biochemical characterization of the cellobiose chemoreceptor of cellulolytic bacteria. Finally, an important aspect of our research is the investigation of the mechanisms by which multienzyme complexes of anaerobic bacteria catalyze the depolymerization of crystalline cellulose and of other plant cell wall polysacchaddes. The research will provide fundamental information on the physiology and ecology of cellulose-fermenting, N{sub 2}-fixing bacteria, and on the intricate processes involved in C and N cycling in anaerobic environments. Furthermore, the information will be valuable for the development of practical applications, such as the conversion of plant biomass (e.g., agricultural, forestry and municipal wastes) to automotive fuels such as ethanol.

  19. Screening of Thermophilic Bacteria Produce Xylanase from Sapan Sungai Aro Hot Spring South Solok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irdawati, I.; Syamsuardi, S.; Agustien, A.; Rilda, Y.

    2018-04-01

    xylanase is one of the enzymes with great prospects as hemicellulose hydrolyzing enzyme. Global annual market demand for this enzyme reach US 200 million. This enzyme catalyzes the xylan (hemicellulose) reactions breaking into xilooligosakarida and xylose. Xylanase can be applied to various industrial sectors such as bread, sugar xylose, biofuels, especially in bleaching paper (bleaching) pulp. Xylanase Isable to replace conventional chemical bleaching using chlorine that is not friendly for the environment. Currently xylanase production is extracted from the thermophilic bacteria for enzyme stability at high temperatures that are suitable for industrial applications. Thermophilic bacteria can be isolated from a hot spring, one of the which is a source of Sapan Sungai Aro Hot Spring, located in the district South Solok. The aim of this study was to select and identification of thermophilic bacteria can produce xylanase.This roomates is a descriptive study, which was Carried out in the Laboratory of Microbiology, Mathematic and Science Faculty of Padang State University, and Laboratory of Bacteriology, BasoVeterinary Research Center. The research procedure consisted of the preparation and sterilization of materials and tools, medium manufacturing, regeneration, selection and identification. Selection is performed by using a semiquantitative screening plate that contains xylan substrate. Identification is based on microscopic and biochemical characteristics until the genus level.Selection results Showed 12 out of 16 isolates had xilanolitik activity, with the highest activity is SSA2 with xilanolitik index of 0.74. The top five index producehigestxilanolitik isolates that are SSA2, SSA3 and SSA4 identified as Bacillus sp. 1., and SSAS6 and SSA7 is Bacillus sp. 2.

  20. Isolation of cultivable thermophilic lactic acid bacteria from cheeses made with mesophilic starter and molecular comparison with dairy-related Lactobacillus helveticus strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Elisabeth Penderup; Ardö, Ylva Margareta; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2009-01-01

    was identical to the rep-PCR profile of the Lact. helveticus adjunct culture used in the specific cheese, but their pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles differed slightly. Conclusion: It was possible to isolate cultivable thermophilic bacteria from ripened cheeses manufactured with mesophilic starter...... and thermophilic adjunct cultures by using an enumeration step. Significance and Impact of the Study: Isolation of cultivable thermophilic bacteria from ripened cheeses made with mesophilic starters offers an original source for new dairy-relevant cultures....

  1. Hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea: mechanisms for reductant disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaart, Marcel R A; Bielen, Abraham A M; van der Oost, John; Stams, Alfons J M; Kengen, Servé W M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from biomass by bacteria and archaea is an attractive renewable energy source. However, to make its application more feasible, microorganisms are needed with high hydrogen productivities. For several reasons, hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are promising is this respect. In addition to the high polysaccharide-hydrolysing capacities of many of these organisms, an important advantage is their ability to use most of the reducing equivalents (e.g. NADH, reduced ferredoxin) formed during glycolysis for the production of hydrogen, enabling H2/hexose ratios of between 3.0 and 4.0. So, despite the fact that the hydrogen-yielding reactions, especially the one from NADH, are thermodynamically unfavourable, high hydrogen yields are obtained. In this review we focus on three different mechanisms that are employed by a few model organisms, viz. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, Thermotoga maritima, and Pyrococcus furiosus, to efficiently produce hydrogen. In addition, recent developments to improve hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are discussed.

  2. Space agriculture for habitation on Mars with hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Space Agriculture Task Force; Ishikawa, Y.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kitaya, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Nagatomo, M.; Oshima, T.; Wada, H.

    Manned Mars exploration, especially for extended periods of time, will require recycle of materials to support human life. Here, a conceptual design is developed for a Martian agricultural system driven by biologically regenerative functions. One of the core biotechnologies function is the use of hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacterial ecology. These thermophilic bacteria can play an important role in increasing the effectiveness of the processing of human metabolic waste and inedible biomass and of converting them to fertilizer for the cultivation of plants. This microbial technology has been already well established for the purpose of processing sewage and waste materials for small local communities in Japan. One of the characteristics of the technology is that the metabolic heat release that occurs during bacterial fermentation raises the processing temperature sufficiently high at 80 100 °C to support hyper-thermophilic bacteria. Such a hyper-thermophilic system is found to have great capability of decomposing wastes including even their normally recalcitrant components, in a reasonably short period of time and of providing a better quality of fertilizer as an end-product. High quality compost has been shown to be a key element in creating a healthy regenerative food production system. In ground-based studies, the soil microbial ecology after the addition of high quality compost was shown to improve plant growth and promote a healthy symbiosis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Another advantage of such high processing temperature is the ability to sterilize the pathogenic organisms through the fermentation process and thus to secure the hygienic safety of the system. Plant cultivation is one of the other major systems. It should fully utilize solar energy received on the Martian surface for supplying energy for photosynthesis. Subsurface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide mined on Mars should be also used in the plant cultivation system. Oxygen and

  3. Interaction of neptunium with humic acid and anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Takumi; Sasaki, Takayuki; Kudo, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Humic acid and bacteria play an important role in the migration of radionuclides in groundwaters. The interaction of neptunium with humic acid and anaerobic bacteria has been investigated by liquid/liquid and solid/liquid extraction systems. For liquid/liquid extraction, the apparent complex formation constant, β α was obtained from the distribution between two phases of neptunium. For solid/liquid extraction, the ratio of sorption to bacteria, K d , was measured. K d of humic acid can be evaluated from β α . The large value of β α and K d means strong interaction of neptunium with organisms. In order to examine the effect of the nature of organism on interaction, the interaction with humic acid was compared to that with non-sterilized or sterilized mixed anaerobic bacteria. The value of β α of humate depended on neptunium ion concentration as well as pH, which showed the effect of polyelectrolyte properties and heterogeneous composition of humic acid. The comparison of interaction with humic acid and bacteria indicated that the K d value of humic acid was larger than that of bacteria and more strongly depend on pH. (author)

  4. Biohydrogen production from desugared molasses (DM) using thermophilic mixed cultures immobilized on heat treated anaerobic sludge granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    . The enriched hydrogen producing mixed culture achieved from the 16.7 g-sugars/L DM batch cultivation was immobilized on heat treated anaerobic sludge granules in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The UASB reactor, operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 h fed with 16.7 g......-sugars/L DM showed good performance with a satisfactory hydrogen yield of 269.5 ml-H2/g-sugar and rate of 4500 ml H2/l⋅d. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of the microbial community of sludge from batch fermentation and the UASB-granules after 54 days of operation, was dominated...... by Thermoanaerobacterium spp., which are key players in fermentative hydrogen production of DM under thermophilic conditions. Furthermore, the granules in the UASB reactor were also significantly containing Thermoanaerobacterium spp. and phylum Firmecutes (most Clotridium, Bacillus and Desulfobacterium...

  5. Anaerobic digestion of whole stillage from dry-grind corn ethanol plant under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskicioglu, Cigdem; Kennedy, Kevin J; Marin, Juan; Strehler, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of whole stillage from a dry-grind corn-based ethanol plant was evaluated by batch and continuous-flow digesters under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions. At whole corn stillage concentrations of 6348 to 50,786 mg total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD)/L, at standard temperature (0 °C) and pressure (1 atm), preliminary biochemical methane potential assays produced 88±8 L (49±5 L CH4) and 96±19 L (65±14 L CH4) biogas per L stillage from mesophilic and thermophilic digesters, respectively. Continuous-flow studies for the full-strength stillage (TCOD=254 g/L) at organic loadings of 4.25, 6.30 and 9.05 g TCOD/L days indicated unstable performance for the thermophilic digester. Among the sludge retention times (SRTs) of 60, 45 and 30 days tested, the mesophilic digestion was successful only at 60 days-SRT which does not represent a practical operation time for a large scale bioethanol plant. Future laboratory studies will focus on different reactor configurations to reduce the SRT needed in the digesters. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Distribution and removal of anaerobic antibiotic resistant bacteria during mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juan; Wang, Yuan-Yue; Wei Yuan, Song

    2014-10-01

    Sewage sludge is one of the major sources that releasing antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistant genes (ARG) into the environment since it contains large amount of ARB, but there is little information about the fate of the anaerobic ARB in the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge. Therefore, the distribution, removal and seasonal changes of tetracycline and β-lactam antibiotics resistant bacteria in the mesophilic egg-shaped digesters of a municipal wastewater treatment plant were investigated for one year in this study. Results showed that there were higher amounts of ARB and higher resistance rate of β-lactam antibiotics than that of tetracycline antibiotics in the sewage sludge. All ARB could be significantly reduced during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion process by 1.48-1.64 log unit (P resistance rates were significantly increased after anaerobic digestion by 12.0% and 14.3%, respectively (P resistant bacteria, there were more ARB in the sewage sludge in cold season than in warm season (P < 0.05).

  7. [Anaerobic bacteria 150 years after their discovery by Pasteur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Sánchez, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Ángel; García-Merino, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In 2011 we celebrated the 150th anniversary of the discovery of anaerobic bacteria by Louis Pasteur. The interest of the biomedical community on such bacteria is still maintained, and is particularly focused on Clostridium difficile. In the past few years important advances in taxonomy have been made due to the genetic, technological and computing developments. Thus, a significant number of new species related to human infections have been characterised, and some already known have been reclassified. At pathogenic level some specimens of anaerobic microflora, that had not been isolated from human infections, have been now isolated in some clinical conditions. There was emergence (or re-emergence) of some species and clinical conditions. Certain anaerobic bacteria have been associated with established infectious syndromes. The virulence of certain strains has increased, and some hypotheses on their participation in certain diseases have been given. In terms of diagnosis, the routine use of MALDI-TOF has led to a shortening of time and a cost reduction in the identification, with an improvement directly related to the improvement of data bases. The application of real-time PCR has been another major progress, and the sequencing of 16srRNA gene and others is currently a reality for several laboratories. Anaerobes have increased their resistance to antimicrobial agents, and the emergence of resistance to carbapenems and metronidazole, and multi-resistance is a current reality. In this situation, linezolid could be an effective alternative for Bacteroides. Fidaxomicin is the only anti-anaerobic agent introduced in the recent years, specifically for the diarrhoea caused by C.difficile. Moreover, some mathematical models have also been proposed in relation with this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. State of the art and future perspectives of thermophilic anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Iranpour, R.

    2002-01-01

    over time with thermophilic digestion of sewage sludge this process has lost its appeal in the USA. New demands on sanitation of biosolids before land use will, however, bring the attention back to the use of elevated temperatures during sludge stabilization. In the paper we show how the use of a start......-up strategy based on the actual activity of key microbes can be used to ensure proper and fast transfer of mesophilic digesters into thermophilic operation. Extreme thermophilic temperatures of 65degreesC or more may be necessary in the future to meet the demands for full sanitation of the waste material...

  9. Anaerobic bacteria colonizing the lower airways in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Malm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobes comprise most of the endogenous oropharyngeal microflora, and can cause infections of airways in lung cancer patients who are at high risk for respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and species diversity of anaerobes in specimens from the lower airways of lung cancer patients. Sensitivity of the isolates to conventional antimicrobial agents used in anaerobe therapy was assessed. Respiratory secretions obtained by bronchoscopy from 30 lung cancer patients were cultured onto Wilkins- -Chalgren agar in anaerobic conditions at 37°C for 72–96 hours. The isolates were identified using microtest Api 20A. The minimal inhibitory concentrations for penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoxitin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole were determined by E-test. A total of 47 isolates of anaerobic bacteria were detected in 22 (73.3% specimens. More than one species of anaerobe was found in 16 (53.3% samples. The most frequently isolated were Actinomyces spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp., followed by Eubacterium lentum, Veillonella parvula, Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Lactobacillus jensenii. Among antibiotics used in the study amoxicillin/clavulanate and imipenem were the most active in vitro (0% and 2% resistant strains, respectively. The highest resistance rate was found for penicillin G and metronidazole (36% and 38% resistant strains, respectively. The results obtained confirm the need to conduct analyses of anaerobic microflora colonizing the lower respiratory tract in patients with lung cancer to monitor potential etiologic factors of airways infections, as well as to propose efficient, empirical therapy. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 263–266

  10. Survival of weed seeds and animal parasites as affected by anaerobic digestion at meso- and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders; Nielsen, Henrik B; Hansen, Christian M; Andreasen, Christian; Carlsgart, Josefine; Hauggard-Nielsen, Henrik; Roepstorff, Allan

    2013-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion of residual materials from animals and crops offers an opportunity to simultaneously produce bioenergy and plant fertilizers at single farms and in farm communities where input substrate materials and resulting digested residues are shared among member farms. A surplus benefit from this practice may be the suppressing of propagules from harmful biological pests like weeds and animal pathogens (e.g. parasites). In the present work, batch experiments were performed, where survival of seeds of seven species of weeds and non-embryonated eggs of the large roundworm of pigs, Ascaris suum, was assessed under conditions similar to biogas plants managed at meso- (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. Cattle manure was used as digestion substrate and experimental units were sampled destructively over time. Regarding weed seeds, the effect of thermophilic conditions (55°C) was very clear as complete mortality, irrespective of weed species, was reached after less than 2 days. At mesophilic conditions, seeds of Avena fatua, Sinapsis arvensis, Solidago canadensis had completely lost germination ability, while Brassica napus, Fallopia convolvulus and Amzinckia micrantha still maintained low levels (~1%) of germination ability after 1 week. Chenopodium album was the only weed species which survived 1 week at substantial levels (7%) although after 11 d germination ability was totally lost. Similarly, at 55°C, no Ascaris eggs survived more than 3h of incubation. Incubation at 37°C did not affect egg survival during the first 48 h and it took up to 10 days before total elimination was reached. In general, anaerobic digestion in biogas plants seems an efficient way (thermophilic more efficient than mesophilic) to treat organic farm wastes in a way that suppresses animal parasites and weeds so that the digestates can be applied without risking spread of these pests. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Haiyan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Lin, Hui [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zheng, Wang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tomanicek, Stephen J [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johs, Alexander [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Xinbin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Elias, Dwayne A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liang, Liyuan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gu, Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-08-04

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  12. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by anammox bacteria in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Sliekers, A. Olav; Lavik, Gaute; Schmid, Markus; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Strous, Marc; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2003-04-01

    The availability of fixed inorganic nitrogen (nitrate, nitrite and ammonium) limits primary productivity in many oceanic regions. The conversion of nitrate to N2 by heterotrophic bacteria (denitrification) is believed to be the only important sink for fixed inorganic nitrogen in the ocean. Here we provide evidence for bacteria that anaerobically oxidize ammonium with nitrite to N2 in the world's largest anoxic basin, the Black Sea. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences shows that these bacteria are related to members of the order Planctomycetales performing the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process in ammonium-removing bioreactors. Nutrient profiles, fluorescently labelled RNA probes, 15N tracer experiments and the distribution of specific `ladderane' membrane lipids indicate that ammonium diffusing upwards from the anoxic deep water is consumed by anammox bacteria below the oxic zone. This is the first time that anammox bacteria have been identified and directly linked to the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the environment. The widespread occurrence of ammonium consumption in suboxic marine settings indicates that anammox might be important in the oceanic nitrogen cycle.

  13. Biohydrogen production from arabinose and glucose using extreme thermophilic anaerobic mixed cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu Angela A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second generation hydrogen fermentation technologies using organic agricultural and forestry wastes are emerging. The efficient microbial fermentation of hexoses and pentoses resulting from the pretreatment of lingocellulosic materials is essential for the success of these processes. Results Conversion of arabinose and glucose to hydrogen, by extreme thermophilic, anaerobic, mixed cultures was studied in continuous (70°C, pH 5.5 and batch (70°C, pH 5.5 and pH 7 assays. Two expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB reactors, Rarab and Rgluc, were continuously fed with arabinose and glucose, respectively. No significant differences in reactor performance were observed for arabinose and glucose organic loading rates (OLR ranging from 4.3 to 7.1 kgCOD m-3 d-1. However, for an OLR of 14.2 kgCOD m-3 d-1, hydrogen production rate and hydrogen yield were higher in Rarab than in Rgluc (average hydrogen production rate of 3.2 and 2.0 LH2 L-1 d-1 and hydrogen yield of 1.10 and 0.75 molH2 mol-1substrate for Rarab and Rgluc, respectively. Lower hydrogen production in Rgluc was associated with higher lactate production. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE results revealed no significant difference on the bacterial community composition between operational periods and between the reactors. Increased hydrogen production was observed in batch experiments when hydrogen partial pressure was kept low, both with arabinose and glucose as substrate. Sugars were completely consumed and hydrogen production stimulated (62% higher when pH 7 was used instead of pH 5.5. Conclusions Continuous hydrogen production rate from arabinose was significantly higher than from glucose, when higher organic loading rate was used. The effect of hydrogen partial pressure on hydrogen production from glucose in batch mode was related to the extent of sugar utilization and not to the efficiency of substrate conversion to hydrogen. Furthermore, at pH 7.0, sugars

  14. Fervidicella metallireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium from geothermal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, Christopher D; Patel, Bharat K C

    2010-06-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium, designated strain AeB(T), was isolated from microbial mats colonizing a run-off channel formed by free-flowing thermal water from a bore well (registered number 17263) of the Great Artesian Basin, Australia. Cells of strain AeB(T) were slightly curved rods (2.5-6.0x1.0 mum) that stained Gram-negative and formed spherical terminal to subterminal spores. The strain grew optimally in tryptone-yeast extract-Casamino acids medium at 50 degrees C (range 37-55 degrees C) and pH 7 (range pH 5-9). Strain AeB(T) grew poorly on yeast extract (0.2 %) and tryptone (0.2 %) as sole carbon sources, which were obligately required for growth on other energy sources. Growth of strain AeB(T) increased in the presence of various carbohydrates and amino acids, but not organic acids. End products detected from glucose fermentation were ethanol, acetate, CO2 and H2. In the presence of 0.2 % yeast extract, iron(III), manganese(IV), vanadium(V) and cobalt(III) were reduced, but not sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, elemental sulfur, nitrate or nitrite. Iron(III) was also reduced in the presence of tryptone, peptone, Casamino acids and amyl media (Research Achievement), but not starch, xylan, chitin, glycerol, ethanol, pyruvate, benzoate, lactate, acetate, propionate, succinate, glycine, serine, lysine, threonine, arginine, glutamate, valine, leucine, histidine, alanine, aspartate, isoleucine or methionine. Growth was inhibited by chloramphenicol, streptomycin, tetracycline, penicillin, ampicillin and NaCl concentrations >2 %. The DNA G+C content was 35.4+/-1 mol%, as determined by the thermal denaturation method. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain AeB(T) is a member of the family Clostridiaceae, class Clostridia, phylum 'Firmicutes', and is positioned approximately equidistantly between the genera Sarcina, Anaerobacter, Caloramator and Clostridium (16S rRNA gene similarity values of 87.8-90.9 %). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene

  15. Improving biogas production from anaerobic co-digestion of Thickened Waste Activated Sludge (TWAS) and fat, oil and grease (FOG) using a dual-stage hyper-thermophilic/thermophilic semi-continuous reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqaralleh, Rania Mona; Kennedy, Kevin; Delatolla, Robert

    2018-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility and advantages of using a dual-stage hyper-thermophilic/thermophilic semi-continuous reactor system for the co-digestion of Thickened Waste Activated Sludge (TWAS) and Fat, Oil and Grease (FOG) to produce biogas in high quantity and quality. The performance of the dual-stage hyper-thermophilic (70°C)/thermophilic (55°C) anaerobic co-digestion system is evaluated and compared to the performance of a single-stage thermophilic (55°C) reactor that was used to co-digest the same FOG-TWAS mixtures. Both co-digestion reactors were compared to a control reactor (the control reactor was a single-stage thermophilic reactor that only digested TWAS). The effect of FOG% in the co-digestion mixture (based on total volatile solids) and the reactor hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the biogas/methane production and the reactors' performance were thoroughly investigated. The FOG% that led to the maximum methane yield with a stable reactor performance was determined for both reactors. The maximum FOG% obtained for the single-stage thermophilic reactor at 15 days HRT was found to be 65%. This 65% FOG resulted in 88.3% higher methane yield compared to the control reactor. However, the dual-stage hyper-thermophilic/thermophilic co-digestion reactor proved to be more efficient than the single-stage thermophilic co-digestion reactor, as it was able to digest up to 70% FOG with a stable reactor performance. The 70% FOG in the co-digestion mixture resulted in 148.2% higher methane yield compared to the control at 15 days HRT. 70% FOG (based on total volatile solids) is so far the highest FOG% that has been proved to be useful and safe for semi-continuous reactor application in the open literature. Finally, the dual-stage hyper-thermophilic/thermophilic co-digestion reactor also proved to be efficient and stable in co-digesting 40% FOG mixtures at lower HRTs (i.e., 9 and 12 days) and still produce high methane yields and Class A effluents

  16. Optimisation of the two-phase dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion process of sulphate-containing municipal solid waste: population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, S; Sales, D; Romero, L I; Solera, R

    2013-11-01

    Microbial population dynamics and anaerobic digestion (AD) process to eight different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (from 25d to 3.5d) in two-phase dry-thermophilic AD from sulphate-containing solid waste were investigated. Maximum values of gas production (1.9 ± 0.2 l H2/l/d; 5.4 ± 0.3 l CH4/l/d and 82 ± 9 ml H2S/l/d) and microbial activities were obtained at 4.5d HRT; where basically comprised hydrolysis step in the first phase (HRT=1.5d) and acidogenic step finished in the second phase as well as acetogenic-methanogenic steps (HRT=3d). In the first phase, hydrolytic-acidogenic bacteria (HABs) was the main group (44-77%) and Archaea, acetogens and sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) contents were not significant; in the second phase (except to 2d HRT), microbial population was able to adapt to change in substrate and HRTs to ensure the proper functioning of the system and both acetogens and Archaea were dominated over SRBs. Decreasing HRT resulted in an increase in microbial activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Changes of resistome, mobilome and potential hosts of antibiotic resistance genes during the transformation of anaerobic digestion from mesophilic to thermophilic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Min

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to reveal how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and their horizontal and vertical transfer-related items (mobilome and bacterial hosts) respond to the transformation of anaerobic digestion (AD) from mesophilic to thermophilic using one-step temperature increase. The resistomes and mobilomes of mesophilic and thermophilic sludge were investigated using metagenome sequencing, and the changes in 24 representative ARGs belonging to three categories, class 1 integron and bacterial genera during the transition period were further followed using quantitative PCR and 454-pyrosequencing. After the temperature increase, resistome abundance in the digested sludge decreased from 125.97 ppm (day 0, mesophilic) to 50.65 ppm (day 57, thermophilic) with the reduction of most ARG types except for the aminoglycoside resistance genes. Thermophilic sludge also had a smaller mobilome, including plasmids, insertion sequences and integrons, than that of mesophilic sludge, suggesting the lower horizontal transfer potential of ARGs under thermophilic conditions. On the other hand, the total abundance of 18 bacterial genera, which were suggested as the possible hosts for 13 ARGs through network analysis, decreased from 23.27% in mesophilic sludge to 11.92% in thermophilic sludge, indicating fewer hosts for the vertical expansion of ARGs after the increase in temperature. These results indicate that the better reduction of resistome abundance by thermophilic AD might be associated with the decrease of both the horizontal and vertical transferability of ARGs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The transformation and toxicity of anthraquinone dyes during thermophilic (55ºC) and mesophilic (30ºC) anaerobic treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezerra Dos Santos, A.; Bisschops, I.A.E.; Cervantes, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2005-01-01

    We studied in batch assays the transformation and toxicity of anthraquinone dyes during incubations with anaerobic granular sludge under mesophilic (30degreesC) and thermophilic (55degreesC) conditions. Additionally, the electron shuttling capacity of the redox mediator anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid

  19. Azo Dye reduction by thermophilic anaerobic sludge, and the impact of the redox mediator antraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) on the reductive biochemical transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezerra Dos Santos, A.; Cervantes-Carillo, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Azo dye reduction at 55degreesC by thermophilic anaerobic granular sludge was investigated distinguishing between the biotic and abiotic mechanisms. The impact of the redox mediator anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) on colour removal and co-substrate oxidation was also investigated. Metabolic

  20. Effect of redox mediator, AQDS, on the decolourisation of a reactive azo dye containing triazine group in a thermophilic anaerobic EGSB reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezerra Dos Santos, A.; Cervantes-Carillo, F.J.; Yaya Beas, R.E.; Lier, van J.B.

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of thermophilic (55 degreesC) anaerobic treatment applied to colour removal of a triazine contained reactive azo dye was investigated in two 0.531 expanded granular sludge blanket (EGSB) reactors in parallel at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 h. Generally, this group of azo

  1. Thermophillic treatment by anaerobic granular sludge as an effective approach to accelerate the electron transfer and improve the reductive decolorization of azo dyes in bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Traverse, J.; Cervantes, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydraulic retention time (HRT), and the redox mediator, thraquinone- 2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), on electron transfer and subsequent reductive decolorization of dyes rom textile wastewater was assessed in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic bioreactors. The results clearly

  2. Thermophilic anaerobic fermentation of olive pulp for hydrogen and methane production: modelling of the anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2006-01-01

    the olive pulp; c) subsequent anaerobic treatment of the hydrogen-effluent with the simultaneous production of methane; and d) development of a mathematical model able to describe the anaerobic digestion of the olive pulp and the effluent of hydrogen producing process. Both continuous and batch experiments...

  3. Genomic Analysis of Caldithrix abyssi, the Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium of the Novel Bacterial Phylum Calditrichaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kublanov, Ilya V; Sigalova, Olga M; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Rinke, Christian; Kovaleva, Olga; Chernyh, Nikolai A; Ivanova, Natalia; Daum, Chris; Reddy, T B K; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Reva, Oleg N; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2017-01-01

    The genome of Caldithrix abyssi , the first cultivated representative of a phylum-level bacterial lineage, was sequenced within the framework of Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project. The genomic analysis revealed mechanisms allowing this anaerobic bacterium to ferment peptides or to implement nitrate reduction with acetate or molecular hydrogen as electron donors. The genome encoded five different [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases, one of which, group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase, is presumably involved in lithoheterotrophic growth, three other produce H 2 during fermentation, and one is apparently bidirectional. The ability to reduce nitrate is determined by a nitrate reductase of the Nap family, while nitrite reduction to ammonia is presumably catalyzed by an octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase εHao. The genome contained genes of respiratory polysulfide/thiosulfate reductase, however, elemental sulfur and thiosulfate were not used as the electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration with acetate or H 2 , probably due to the lack of the gene of the maturation protein. Nevertheless, elemental sulfur and thiosulfate stimulated growth on fermentable substrates (peptides), being reduced to sulfide, most probably through the action of the cytoplasmic sulfide dehydrogenase and/or NAD(P)-dependent [NiFe]-hydrogenase (sulfhydrogenase) encoded by the genome. Surprisingly, the genome of this anaerobic microorganism encoded all genes for cytochrome c oxidase, however, its maturation machinery seems to be non-operational due to genomic rearrangements of supplementary genes. Despite the fact that sugars were not among the substrates reported when C. abyssi was first described, our genomic analysis revealed multiple genes of glycoside hydrolases, and some of them were predicted to be secreted. This finding aided in bringing out four carbohydrates that supported the growth of C. abyssi : starch, cellobiose, glucomannan and xyloglucan. The genomic analysis

  4. Activity of endodontic antibacterial agents against selected anaerobic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Cláudio Maniglia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of substances used as antibacterial agents (solutions of 10% calcium hydroxide, camphorated paramonochlorophenol - PMCC, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate and 10% castor oil plant detergent on anaerobic bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586, Prevotella nigrescens ATCC 33563, Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124 and Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285, using a broth dilution technique, was evaluated in vitro. For determination of minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericide concentrations (MIC and MBC, two culture broths, Reinforced Clostridial Medium (RCM and supplemented Brucella, standardized inoculum and serially diluted solutions were used. All antibacterial agents presented antimicrobial activity that varied for different bacteria. There were no differences in the performance of the two broths. Chlorhexidine digluconate was the most effective, with the lowest MICs, followed by castor oil detergent, PMCC and calcium hydroxide. C. perfringens and B. fragilis were the most resistant bacteria to all agents.

  5. Performance and kinetic study of semi-dry thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajeena Beevi, B.; Madhu, G.; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Performance of the reactor was evaluated by the degradation of volatile solids. • Biogas yield at the end of the digestion was 52.9 L/kg VS. • Value of reaction rate constant, k, obtained was 0.0249 day −1 . • During the digestion 66.7% of the volatile solid degradation was obtained. - Abstract: Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is promoted as an energy source and waste disposal. In this study semi dry anaerobic digestion of organic solid wastes was conducted for 45 days in a lab-scale batch experiment for total solid concentration of 100 g/L for investigating the start-up performances under thermophilic condition (50 °C). The performance of the reactor was evaluated by measuring the daily biogas production and calculating the degradation of total solids and the total volatile solids. The biogas yield at the end of the digestion was 52.9 L/kg VS (volatile solid) for the total solid (TS) concentration of 100 g/L. About 66.7% of the volatile solid degradation was obtained during the digestion. A first order model based on the availability of substrate as the limiting factor was used to perform the kinetic studies of batch anaerobic digestion system. The value of reaction rate constant, k, obtained was 0.0249 day −1

  6. Activation of Acetone and Other Simple Ketones in Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Johann; Schühle, Karola; Frey, Jasmin; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Acetone and other ketones are activated for subsequent degradation through carboxylation by many nitrate-reducing, phototrophic, and obligately aerobic bacteria. Acetone carboxylation leads to acetoacetate, which is subsequently activated to a thioester and degraded via thiolysis. Two different types of acetone carboxylases have been described, which require either 2 or 4 ATP equivalents as an energy supply for the carboxylation reaction. Both enzymes appear to combine acetone enolphosphate with carbonic phosphate to form acetoacetate. A similar but more complex enzyme is known to carboxylate the aromatic ketone acetophenone, a metabolic intermediate in anaerobic ethylbenzene metabolism in denitrifying bacteria, with simultaneous hydrolysis of 2 ATP to 2 ADP. Obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria activate acetone to a four-carbon compound as well, but via a different process than bicarbonate- or CO2-dependent carboxylation. The present evidence indicates that either carbon monoxide or a formyl residue is used as a cosubstrate, and that the overall ATP expenditure of this pathway is substantially lower than in the known acetone carboxylase reactions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Caloramator australicus sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium from the Great Artesian Basin of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, Christopher D; Patel, Bharat K C

    2009-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium, designated strain RC3T, was isolated from microbial mats colonizing thermal waters of a run-off channel formed by free-flowing waters from a bore well (registered no. 17263) of the Great Artesian Basin, Australia. The slightly curved rods (2.5-4.2x0.8-1.0 microm) of strain RC3T stained Gram-positive and grew optimally in tryptone-yeast extract-glucose medium at 60 degrees C (range 45-70 degrees C) and pH 7 (range pH 5-9). Strain RC3T grew poorly on yeast extract (0.2 %) but did not grow on tryptone (0.2 %) as a sole carbon source; yeast extract was required for growth on other energy sources, which included glucose, fructose, galactose, xylose, maltose, sucrose, raffinose, mannose, cellobiose, cellulose, starch, amylopectin, xylan, peptone, amyl media (Research Achievement), threonine and pyruvate but did not include arabinose, ribose, lactose, CM-cellulose, myo-inositol, mannitol, chitin, casein, formate, acetate, succinate, propionate, lactate, benzoate, glycerol, ethanol, Casamino acids, arginine, alanine, serine, glycine, glutamine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine or aspartate. The end products of glucose fermentation were ethanol and acetate. In the presence of 0.2 % yeast extract, iron(III), manganese(IV) and elemental sulfur were reduced but not sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, nitrate or nitrite. Iron(III) was also reduced in the presence of peptone, tryptone, amyl media, threonine and glycerol but not chitin, xylan, pectin, starch, pyruvate, acetate, benzoate, lactate, propionate, succinate, inositol, ethanol, mannitol, arginine, glutamine or serine. Strain RC3T was not able to utilize molecular hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide in the presence or absence of iron(III). In the presence of iron(III) and glycerol, increased concentrations of Fe(II) corresponded to increased cell numbers, demonstrating that strain RC3(T) was able to conserve energy to support growth from the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe

  8. Partial characterization of xylanase produced by Caldicoprobacter algeriensis, a new thermophilic anaerobic bacterium isolated from an Algerian hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Boucherba, Nawel; Joseph, Manon; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Kecha, Mouloud; Benallaoua, Said; Hacène, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2014-11-01

    To date, xylanases have expanded their use in many processing industries, such as pulp, paper, food, and textile. This study aimed the production and partial characterization of a thermostable xylanase from a novel thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Caldicoprobacter algeriensis strain TH7C1(T) isolated from a northeast hot spring in Algeria. The obtained results showed that C. algeriensis xylanase seems not to be correlated with the biomass growth profile whereas the maximum enzyme production (140.0 U/ml) was recorded in stationary phase (18 h). The temperature and pH for optimal activities were 70 °C and 11.0, respectively. The enzyme was found to be stable at 50, 60, 70, and 80 °C, with a half-life of 10, 9, 8, and 4 h, respectively. Influence of metal ions on enzyme activity revealed that Ca(+2) enhances greatly the relative activity to 151.3 %; whereas Hg(2+) inhibited significantly the enzyme. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the production of xylanase by the thermophilic bacterium C. algeriensis. This thermo- and alkaline-tolerant xylanase could be used in pulp bleaching process.

  9. An innovative intermittent-vacuum assisted thermophilic anaerobic digestion process for effective animal manure utilization and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renchuan; Anderson, Erik; Addy, Min; Deng, Xiangyuan; Kabir, Fayal; Lu, Qian; Ma, Yiwei; Cheng, Yanling; Liu, Yuhuan; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2017-11-01

    Intermittent-vacuum stripping (IVS) was developed as a pretreatment for thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD) to improve methanogenesis and hydrolysis activity through preventing free ammonia and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) inhibition from liquid swine manure (LSM). Over 98% of ammonia and 38% organic nitrogen were removed in 60min from 55°C to 85°C with vacuum pressure (from 100.63±3.79mmHg to 360.91±7.39mmHg) at initial pH 10.0 by IVS. Thermophilic methanogenesis and hydrolysis activity of pretreated LSM increased 52.25% (from 11.56±1.75% to 17.60±0.49%) in 25days and 40% (from 10days to 6days) in bio-methane potential assay. Over 80% H 2 S and total nitrogen were removed by IVS assistance, while around 70% nitrogen was recycled as ammonium sulfate. Therefore, IVS-TAD combination could be an effective strategy to improve TAD efficiency, whose elution is more easily utilized in algae cultivation and/or hydroponic system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetics of thermophilic, anaerobic oxidation of straight and branched chain butyrate and valerate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batstone, Damien J.; Pind, Peter Frode; Angelidaki, Irini

    2003-01-01

    is also addressed, extending previous pure-culture and batch studies. A previously published mathematical model was modified to allow competitive uptake of i-valerate, and used to model a thermophilic manure digester operated over 180 days. The digester was periodically pulsed with straight and branched...

  11. Formation of metabolites during biodegradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor under thermophilic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2002-01-01

    , the removal of LAS in the reactor inoculated with active granular biomass exceeded the removal in the sterile reactor inoculated with sterile granular biomass. The effect of sorption ceased after 185 to 555 h depending on the LAS homologs. 40% of the LAS was biodegraded, and the removal rate was 0.5 x 10......Biodegradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) was shown in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor under thermophilic conditions. The reactor was inoculated with granular biomass and fed with a synthetic medium and 3 mumol/L of a mixture of LAS with alkylchain length of 10 to 13 carbon...... atoms. The reactor was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 12 h with effluent recirculation in an effluent to influent ratio of 5 to 1. A sterile reactor operated in parallel revealed that sorption to sludge particles initially accounted for a major LAS removal. After 8 days of reactor operation...

  12. Adaption of microbial community during the start-up stage of a thermophilic anaerobic digester treating food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Wang, Xing; Deng, Ya-Yue; He, Xiao-Lan; Li, Zheng-Wei; Li, Qiang; Qin, Han; Chen, Jing-Tao; He, Ming-Xiong; Zhang, Min; Hu, Guo-Quan; Yin, Xiao-Bo

    2016-10-01

    A successful start-up enables acceleration of anaerobic digestion (AD) into steady state. The microbial community influences the AD performance during the start-up. To investigate how microbial communities changed during the start-up, microbial dynamics was analyzed via high-throughput sequencing in this study. The results confirmed that the AD was started up within 25 d. Thermophilic methanogens and bacterial members functioning in hydrolysis, acidogenesis, and syntrophic oxidation became predominant during the start-up stage, reflecting a quick adaption of microorganisms to operating conditions. Such predominance also indicated the great contribution of these members to the fast start-up of AD. Redundancy analysis confirmed that the bacterial abundance significantly correlated with AD conditions. The stable ratio of hydrogenotrophic methanogens to aceticlastic methanogens is also important to maintain the stability of the AD process. This work will be helpful to understand the contribution of microbial community to the start-up of AD.

  13. Use of respirometer in evaluation of process and toxicity of thermophilic anaerobic digestion for treating kitchen waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Chien; Cheng, Kae-Yiin

    2007-07-01

    A thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAnD, 55 degrees C) system was adopted to hydrolyze the kitchen waste for 3 days, which was then fermented for a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days. The TAnD system performed much better than a similar system without thermal pre-treatment. A bubble respirometer was employed to study the effects of thermal pre-treatment, which showed that pre-treatment at 60 degrees C yielded the highest Total COD (TCOD) removal efficiency (79.2%) after 300h reaction. Respirometer results also indicated that oil and grease (O and G) began to inhibit the TAnD system at a concentration of approximately 1000mg/L and the gas production was inhibited by 50% at a concentration of approximately 7500mg/L of sodium.

  14. Deep Conversion of Carbon Monoxide to Hydrogen and Formation of Acetate by the Anaerobic Thermophile Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Henstra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans is a thermophilic strictly anaerobic bacterium that catalyses the water gas shift reaction, the conversion of carbon monoxide with water to molecular hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The thermodynamically favorable growth temperature, compared to existing industrial catalytic processes, makes this organism an interesting alternative for production of cheap hydrogen gas suitable to fuel CO-sensitive fuel cells in a future hydrogen economy, provided sufficiently low levels of CO are reached. Here we study CO conversion and final CO levels in cultures of C. hydrogenoformans grown in batch cultures that were started with a 100% CO gas phase with and without removal of formed CO2. Final CO levels were 117 ppm without CO2 removal and below 2 ppm with CO2 removal. The Gibbs free energy change calculated with measured end concentrations and the detection of acetate suggest that C. hydrogenoformans shifted from a hydrogenogenic to an acetogenic metabolism.

  15. Biogeography of anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puntipar eSonthiphand

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox bacteria are able to oxidize ammonia and reduce nitrite to produce N2 gas. After being discovered in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP, anammox bacteria were subsequently characterized in natural environments, including marine, estuary, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. Anammox bacteria play an important role in removing fixed N from both engineered and natural ecosystems, but broad scale anammox bacterial distributions, based on available data, have not yet been summarized. The objectives of this study were to explore global distributions and diversity of anammox bacteria and to identify factors that influence their biogeography. Over 6,000 anammox 16S rRNA gene sequences from the public database were analyzed in this current study. Data ordinations indicated that salinity was an important factor governing anammox bacterial distributions, with distinct populations inhabiting natural and engineered ecosystems. Gene phylogenies and rarefaction analysis demonstrated that freshwater environments and the marine water column harbored the highest and the lowest diversity of anammox bacteria, respectively. A co-occurrence network analysis indicated that Ca. Scalindua strongly correlated with other Ca. Scalindua taxa, whereas Ca. Brocadia co-occurred with taxa from both known and unknown anammox genera. Our survey provides a better understanding of ecological factors affecting anammox bacterial distributions and provides a comprehensive baseline for understanding the relationships among anammox communities in global environments.

  16. Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria in Cow Manure Composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Cheng, Lijun; Zhang, Wenhao; Xu, Xiuhong; Meng, Qingxin; Sun, Xuewei; Liu, Huajing; Li, Hongtao; Sun, Yu

    2017-07-28

    Composting is widely used to transform waste into valuable agricultural organic fertilizer. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria play an important role in the global nitrogen cycle, but their role in composting remains poorly understood. In the present study, the community structure, diversity, and abundance of anammox bacteria were analyzed using cloning and sequencing methods by targeting the 16S rRNA gene and the hydrazine oxidase gene ( hzo ) in samples isolated from compost produced from cow manure and rice straw. A total of 25 operational taxonomic units were classified based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and 14 operational taxonomic units were classified based on hzo gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic tree analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and deduced HZO protein sequences from the corresponding encoding genes indicated that the majority of the obtained clones were related to the known anammox bacteria Candidatus "Brocadia," Candidatus "Kuenenia," and Candidatus "Scalindua." The abundances of anammox bacteria were determined by quantitative PCR, and between 2.13 × 10 5 and 1.15 × 10 6 16S rRNA gene copies per gram of compost were found. This study provides the first demonstration of the existence of anammox bacteria with limited diversity in cow manure composting.

  17. Oral Anaerobic Bacteria in the Etiology of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Öğrendik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is associated with periodontitis. Anti– Porphyromonas gingivalis and anti– Prevotella intermedia antibody titers were higher in patients with spondyloarthritis than in healthy people. Sulfasalazine is an effective antibiotic treatment for AS. Moxifloxacin and rifamycin were also found to be significantly effective. The etiology hypothesis suggests that oral anaerobic bacteria such as Porphyromonas spp and Prevotella spp contribute to the disease. These bacteria have been identified in AS, and we will discuss their pathogenic properties with respect to our knowledge of the disease. Periodontal pathogens are likely to be responsible for the development of AS in genetically susceptible individuals. This finding should guide the development of more comprehensive and efficacious treatment strategies for AS.

  18. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria......Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate......-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types...

  19. Hydrogen production from diluted molasses by anaerobic hydrogen producing bacteria in an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianzheng; Zhu, Gefu; Ren, Nanqi; Bo, Lixin; He, Junguo [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering; Li, Baikun [University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2007-10-15

    Hydrogen production from diluted molasses by anaerobic fermentation bacteria was investigated in a three-compartment anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) with an effective volume of 27.48 L. After being inoculated with aerobic activated sludge and operated at chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 5000 mg/L and temperature of 35 C for 26 days, the ABR achieved stable ethanol-type fermentation. The liquid fermentation products, including volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and ethanol, stabilized at 1254, 2053, and 2761 mg/L in the three compartments, respectively. Effluent pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), and alkalinity ranged at 4.3-4.4, -241 to -249mV, and 306-334mgCaCO{sub 3}/L, respectively. The hydrogen yield of the ABR was 32.51 L/d at the stable operation status, specific hydrogen production rate of anaerobic activated sludge was 0.13 L/g MLVSS d, and the substrate conversion rate was 0.13 L/g COD. Hydrogen yields, fermentation types, and acclimatization durations varied in each compartment, with the 1st compartment having lowest hydrogen yield but longest acclimatization duration and the 2nd and 3rd compartments having higher hydrogen yields but shorter acclimatization durations. The study found that the individual compartment configuration in the ABR system provided a favorable environment for different types of anaerobic bacteria. Compared with complete stirring tank reactor (CSTR), the ABR system had a better operation stability and microbial activity, which led to higher substrate conversion rate and hydrogen production ability. (author)

  20. Microbial leaching of iron from pyrite by moderate thermophile chemolithotropic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, S.; Niazi, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of iron from pyrite by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans (chemolithotroph) and an un-identified strain of acidophilic heterotroph (code 6A1TSB) isolated from local environments. As compared to inoculated flasks, dissolution of metal (due to acid leaching) was significantly low in the un-inoculated control flasks in all the experiments in ore. A decrease in the bioleaching activity was observed at the later stages of bioleaching of metal from ore. Among the strategies adopted to enhance the metal leaching rates, a mixed consortium of the metal adapted cultures of the above-mentioned bacteria was found to exhibit the maximum metal leaching efficiency. In all the flasks where high metal leaching rates were observed, concomitantly biomass production rates were also high indicating high growth rates. It showed that the metal bioleaching capability of the bacteria was associated with their growth. Pyrite contained 42% iron. (author)

  1. Chemical Changes during Anaerobic Decomposition of Hardwood, Softwood, and Old Newsprint under Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino B. De la Cruz; Daniel J. Yelle; Hanna S. Gracz; Morton A. Barlaz

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic decomposition of plant biomass is an important aspect of global organic carbon cycling. While the anaerobic metabolism of cellulose and hemicelluloses to methane and carbon dioxide are well-understood, evidence for the initial stages of lignin decomposition is fragmentary. The objective of this study was to look for evidence of chemical transformations of...

  2. Anaerobic sulfide-oxidation in marine colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    Colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in Indian waters and have the ability to oxidize sulfide under anaerobic conditions. These bacteria can not only mediate the sulfur cycle oxidatively but also the nitrogen cycle reductively without...

  3. Ammonia inhibition on hydrogen enriched anaerobic digestion of manure under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-11-15

    Capturing of carbon dioxide by hydrogen derived from excess renewable energy (e.g., wind mills) to methane in a microbially catalyzed process offers an attractive technology for biogas production and upgrading. This bioconversion process is catalyzed by hydrogenotrophic methanogens, which are known to be sensitive to ammonia. In this study, the tolerance of the biogas process under supply of hydrogen, to ammonia toxicity was studied under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. When the initial hydrogen partial pressure was 0.5 atm, the methane yield at high ammonia load (7 g NH 4 + -N L -1 ) was 41.0% and 22.3% lower than that at low ammonia load (1 g NH 4 + -N L -1 ) in mesophilic and thermophilic condition, respectively. Meanwhile no significant effect on the biogas composition was observed. Moreover, we found that hydrogentrophic methanogens were more tolerant to the ammonia toxicity than acetoclastic methanogens in the hydrogen enriched biogas production and upgrading processes. The highest methane production yield was achieved under 0.5 atm hydrogen partial pressure in batch reactors at all the tested ammonia levels. Furthermore, the thermophilic methanogens at 0.5 atm of hydrogen partial pressure were more tolerant to high ammonia levels (≥5 g NH 4 + -N L -1 ), compared with mesophilic methanogens. The present study offers insight in developing resistant hydrogen enriched biogas production and upgrading processes treating ammonia-rich waste streams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of gamma ray and electron-beam irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Michiko; Miyahara, Makoto [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    An extension of the approval for food irradiation is desired due to the increase in the incidence of food poisoning in the world. One anaerobic (Clostridium perfringens) and four facultatively anaerobic (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis) bacteria irradiated with gamma ray or electron beam (E-beam) were tested in terms of survival on agar under packaging atmosphere. Using pouch pack, effects of two irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria were evaluated comparatively. E-beam irradiation was more effective than gamma ray irradiation in decreasing the lethal dose 10% (D{sub 10}) value of B. cereus at 4 deg C, slightly more effective in that of E. coli O157, and similarly effective in that of the other three bacteria at 4 deg C. The gamma irradiation of the bacteria without incubation at 4 deg C before irradiation was more effective than that of the bacteria with incubation overnight at 4 deg C before irradiation in decreasing the D10 values of these bacteria (B. cereus, E. coli O157, and L. monocytogenes). Furthermore, ground beef patties inoculated with bacteria were irradiated with 1 kGy by E-beam (5 MeV) at 4 deg C. The inoculated bacteria in the 1-9 mm beef patties were killed by 1 kGy E-beam irradiation and some bacteria in more than 9 mm beef patties were not killed by the irradiation. (author)

  5. Effects of gamma ray and electron-beam irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Michiko; Miyahara, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    An extension of the approval for food irradiation is desired due to the increase in the incidence of food poisoning in the world. One anaerobic (Clostridium perfringens) and four facultatively anaerobic (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis) bacteria irradiated with gamma ray or electron beam (E-beam) were tested in terms of survival on agar under packaging atmosphere. Using pouch pack, effects of two irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria were evaluated comparatively. E-beam irradiation was more effective than gamma ray irradiation in decreasing the D10 value of B. cereus at 4 degrees C, slightly more effective in that of E. coli O157, and similarly effective in that of the other three bacteria at 4 degrees C. The gamma irradiation of the bacteria without incubation at 4 degrees C before irradiation was more effective than that of the bacteria with incubation overnight at 4 degrees C before irradiation in decreasing the D10 values of these bacteria (B. cereus, E. coli O157, and L. monocytogenes). Furthermore, ground beef patties inoculated with bacteria were irradiated with 1 kGy by E-beam (5 MeV) at 4 degrees C. The inoculated bacteria in the 1-9 mm beef patties were killed by 1 kGy E-beam irradiation and some bacteria in more than 9 mm beef patties were not killed by the irradiation.

  6. Biosynthesis of omega-alicyclic fatty acids induced by cyclic precursors and change of membrane fluidity in thermophilic bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Meiothermus ruber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siřišťová, L.; Luhový, R.; Sigler, Karel; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2011), 423-429 ISSN 1431-0651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Thermophilic bacteria * Geobacillus * Meiothermus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.941, year: 2011

  7. The production of anaerobic bacteria and biogas from dairy cattle waste in various growth mediums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayati, Y. A.; Kurnani, T. B. A.; Marlina, E. T.; Rahmah, K. N.; Harlia, E.; Joni, I. M.

    2018-02-01

    The growth of anaerobic bacteria except the ruminal fluid quailty is strongly influenced by the media formulations. Previous researchers have set a standard media formulation for anaerobic bacteria from rumen, however the use of standard media formulations require chemicals with high cost. Moreover, other constraint of using standard media formulations is requires large quantities of media for anaerobic bacteria to grow. Therefore, it is necessary to find media with a new culture media formulation. Media used in this research were minimalist media consist of Nutrient Agar (NA), Lactose broth and rumen fluid; enriched media Rumen Fluid-Glucose-Agar (RGCA); and enriched media 98-5. The dairy cattle waste is utilized as source of anaerobic bacteria. The obtained data was analyzed by descriptive approach. The results showed that minimalist media produced anaerobic bacteria 2148 × 104 cfu/ml and biogas production: 1.06% CH4, 9.893% CO2; enriched media Rumen Fluid-Glucose-Agar (RGCA) produced anaerobic bacteria 1848 × 104 cfu/ml and biogas production 4.644% CH4, 9.5356% CO2; enriched media 98-5 produced anaerobic bacteria growth 15400 × 104 cfu/ml and biogas production 0.83% of CH4, 42.2% of CO2. It is conclude that the minimalist media was showed the best performance for the dairy cattle waste as source of anaerobic bacteria.

  8. Isolation of Thermophilic Lignin Degrading Bacteria from Oil-Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) Compost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C. M. T.; Chua, H. B.; Danquah, M. K.; Saptoro, A.

    2017-06-01

    Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) is a potential and sustainable feedstock for bioethanol production due to its high cellulosic content and availability in Malaysia. Due to high lignin content of EFB and the lack of effective delignification process, commercial bioethanol production from EFB is presently not viable. Enzymatic delignification has been identified as one of the key steps in utilising EFB as a feedstock for bioethanol conversion. To date, limited work has been reported on the isolation of lignin degrading bacteria. Hence, there is a growing interest to search for new lignin degrading bacteria with greater tolerance to temperature and high level of ligninolytic enzymes for more effective lignin degradation. This study aimed to isolate and screen thermophilic ligninolytic microorganisms from EFB compost. Ten isolates were successfully isolated from EFB compost. Although they are not capable of decolorizing Methylene Blue (MB) dye under agar plate assay method, they are able to utilize lignin mimicked compound - guaiacol as a sole carbon on the agar plate assay. This infers that there is no correlation of ligninolytic enzymes with dye decolourization for all the isolates that have been isolated. However, they are able to produce ligninolytic enzymes (Lignin peroxidase, Manganese peroxidase, Laccase) in Minimal Salt Medium with Kraft Lignin (MSM-KL) with Lignin Peroxidase (LiP) as the predominant enzyme followed by Manganese Peroxidase (MnP) and Laccase (Lac). Among all the tested isolates, CLMT 29 has the highest LiP production up to 8.7673 U/mL following 24 h of growth.

  9. Establishment of thermophilic anaerobic terephthalic acid degradation system through one-step temperature increase startup strategy - Revealed by Illumina Miseq Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kai-Li; Li, Xiang-Kun; Wang, Ke; Meng, Ling-Wei; Liu, Gai-Ge; Zhang, Jie

    2017-10-01

    Over recent years, thermophilic digestion was constantly focused owing to its various advantage over mesophilic digestion. Notably, the startup approach of thermophilic digester needs to be seriously considered as unsuitable startup ways may result in system inefficiency. In this study, one-step temperature increase startup strategy from 37 °C to 55 °C was applied to establish a thermophilic anaerobic system treating terephthalic acid (TA) contained wastewater, meanwhile, the archaeal and bacterial community compositions at steady periods of 37 °C and 55 °C during the experimental process was also compared using Illumina Miseq Sequencing. The process operation demonstrated that the thermophilic TA degradation system was successfully established at 55 °C with over 95% COD reduction. For archaea community, the elevation of operational temperature from 37 °C to 55 °C accordingly increase the enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens but decrease the abundance of the acetotrophic ones. While for bacterial community, the taxonomic analysis suggested that Syntrophorhabdus (27.40%) was the dominant genus promoting the efficient TA degradation under mesophilic condition, whereas OPB95 (24.99%) and TA06 (14.01%) related populations were largely observed and probably take some crucial role in TA degradation under thermophilic condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of the planktonic microbiome in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors during adaptation of mesophilic methanogenic granules to thermophilic operational conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinyu; Treu, Laura; Kougias, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) technology refers to reactor technology where granules, i.e. self-immobilised microbial associations, are the biological catalysts involved in the anaerobic digestion process. During the start-up period, UASB reactors operate at relatively long HRT...... and therefore the liquid phase of the reactor becomes a favourable environment for microbial growth. The current study aimed to elucidate the dynamicity of the suspended microbial community in UASB reactors, during the transition from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions. High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon...

  11. Ecology and biotechnological potential of the thermophilic fermentative Coprothermobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, M C; Braguglia, C M; Petruccioli, M; Rossetti, S

    2015-05-01

    Thermophilic bacteria have been isolated from several terrestrial, marine and industrial environments. Anaerobic digesters treating organic wastes are often an important source of these microorganisms, which catalyze a wide array of metabolic processes. Moreover, organic wastes are primarily composed of proteins, whose degradation is often incomplete. Coprothermobacter spp. are proteolytic anaerobic thermophilic microbes identified in several studies focused on the analysis of the microbial community structure in anaerobic thermophilic reactors. They are currently classified in the phylum Firmicutes; nevertheless, several authors showed that the Coprothermobacter group is most closely related to the phyla Dictyoglomi and Thermotoga. Since only a few proteolytic anaerobic thermophiles have been characterized so far, this microorganism has attracted the attention of researchers for its potential applications with high-temperature environments. In addition to proteolysis, Coprothermobacter spp. showed several metabolic abilities and may have a biotechnological application either as source of thermostable enzymes or as inoculum in anaerobic processes. Moreover, they can improve protein degradation by establishing a syntrophy with hydrogenotrophic archaea. To gain a better understanding of the phylogenesis, metabolic capabilities and adaptations of these microorganisms, it is of importance to better define the role in thermophilic environments and to disclose properties not yet investigated. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Dry thermophilic semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of food waste: Performance evaluation, modified Gompertz model analysis, and energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Dinh Duc; Chang, Soon Woong; Jeong, Seong Yeob; Jeung, Jaehoon; Kim, Sungsu; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy self-sufficiency/energy recovery with thermophilic DScAD of FW was evaluated. • The maximum biogas production rate was positively influenced by OLRs. • Maximum (average) electrical energy recoverable from a 1 tons of FW was 1050 kW h. • Thermophilic DScAD can substantially reduce the VS and recover energy to serve itself. • A modified Gompertz model fitted well with the experimental results for all phases. - Abstract: A thermophilic, dry semi-continuous anaerobic digestion (DScAD) method was used to effectively transform food waste (FW) into renewable energy. This study aims to thoroughly evaluate the system performance and model simulation to predict biogas production, intermediate products and their outcomes, energy recovery potential, and energy balance, while operating with organic loading rates ranging from 2.3 to 9.21 kg-TS/m 3 day. The results indicate that volatile solids (VS) reduction and biogas production both improved as the organic loading rates (OLR) increased, and the cost of FW valorization remained low. The greatest VS reduction achieved was 87.01%, associated with 170 m 3 of biogas yield per ton of sludge (69% methane) at an ORL of 9.21 ± 0.89 kg-TS/m 3 day (8.62 ± 0.34 kg-VS/m 3 day) although the amounts of ammonia (3700 mg/L), hydrogen sulfide (420 ppm), and total volatile fatty acids (7101 mg/L) during fermentation were relatively high. Furthermore, 75% of total energy requirement for the system could be recovered via biomethane production, resulting in a considerably reduced specific energy supply (kW h/ton of treating FW). The results suggest that a modified Gompertz model is suitable for estimating the biogas and methane production potential and rate. The results also reveal that the DScAD of FW at 55 °C is a reliable, stable, and robust option for both solids reduction and energy recovery via biogas generation.

  13. Technique for preparation of anaerobic microbes: Rodshaped cellulolytic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlius Thalib

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of anaerobic-rod cellulolytic bacteria with coating technique has been conducted. Steps of the processes involved were cultivation, coating, evaporation, and drying. Coating agent used was Gum Arabic, and drying techniquesconducted were freeze drying and sun drying. pH of culture media was firstly optimized to obtain the maximal population ofbacteria. Both coated and uncoated preparates were subjected to drying. Morphological and Gram type identifications showed that uncoated preparate dried with freeze drying is not contaminated (ie. all bacteria are rod shape with Gram-negative type while the one dried with sun drying is not morphologically pure (ie. containing of both rod and coccus shapes with Gram negative and positive. The coated preparates dried by both freeze and sun drying, were not contaminated (ie. all are rods with Gram-negative. The coating and drying processes decreased viability of preparates significantly. However, the decreasing of viability of coated preparate are lower than uncoated preparate (ie. 89 vs. 97%. Total count of bacteria in sun-drying coated preparate are higher (P<0.05 than the uncoated preparate (ie. 3.38 x 1010 vs. 1.97 x 1010 colony/g DM. Activity of sun-drying coated preparate to digest elephant grass and rice straw was higher (P<0.01 than the sun-drying uncoated preparate with the in vitro DMD values were 42.7 vs. 35.5% for elephant grass substrate and 29.3 vs. 24.6% for rice straw substrate. Therefore, it is concluded that coating technique has a positive effects on the preparation of rumen bacteria.

  14. Widespread distribution of archaeal reverse gyrase in thermophilic bacteria suggests a complex history of vertical inheritance and lateral gene transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Brochier-Armanet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse gyrase, an enzyme of uncertain funtion, is present in all hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria. Previous phylogenetic studies have suggested that the gene for reverse gyrase has an archaeal origin and was transferred laterally (LGT to the ancestors of the two bacterial hyperthermophilic phyla, Thermotogales and Aquificales. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of the evolutionary history of reverse gyrase in light of genomic progress. We found genes coding for reverse gyrase in the genomes of several thermophilic bacteria that belong to phyla other than Aquificales and Thermotogales. Several of these bacteria are not, strictly speaking, hyperthermophiles because their reported optimal growth temperatures are below 80 °C. Furthermore, we detected a reverse gyrase gene in the sequence of the large plasmid of Thermus thermophilus strain HB8, suggesting a possible mechanism of transfer to the T. thermophilus strain HB8 involving plasmids and transposases. The archaeal part of the reverse gyrase tree is congruent with recent phylogenies of the archaeal domain based on ribosomal proteins or RNA polymerase subunits. Although poorly resolved, the complete reverse gyrase phylogeny suggests an ancient acquisition of the gene by bacteria via one or two LGT events, followed by its secondary distribution by LGT within bacteria. Finally, several genes of archaeal origin located in proximity to the reverse gyrase gene in bacterial genomes have bacterial homologues mostly in thermophiles or hyperthermophiles, raising the possibility that they were co-transferred with the reverse gyrase gene. Our new analysis of the reverse gyrase history strengthens the hypothesis that the acquisition of reverse gyrase may have been a crucial evolutionary step in the adaptation of bacteria to high-temperature environments. However, it also questions the role of this enzyme in thermophilic bacteria and the selective advantage its presence could provide.

  15. Widespread distribution of archaeal reverse gyrase in thermophilic bacteria suggests a complex history of vertical inheritance and lateral gene transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Forterre, Patrick

    2007-05-01

    Reverse gyrase, an enzyme of uncertain funtion, is present in all hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria. Previous phylogenetic studies have suggested that the gene for reverse gyrase has an archaeal origin and was transferred laterally (LGT) to the ancestors of the two bacterial hyperthermophilic phyla, Thermotogales and Aquificales. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of the evolutionary history of reverse gyrase in light of genomic progress. We found genes coding for reverse gyrase in the genomes of several thermophilic bacteria that belong to phyla other than Aquificales and Thermotogales. Several of these bacteria are not, strictly speaking, hyperthermophiles because their reported optimal growth temperatures are below 80 degrees C. Furthermore, we detected a reverse gyrase gene in the sequence of the large plasmid of Thermus thermophilus strain HB8, suggesting a possible mechanism of transfer to the T. thermophilus strain HB8 involving plasmids and transposases. The archaeal part of the reverse gyrase tree is congruent with recent phylogenies of the archaeal domain based on ribosomal proteins or RNA polymerase subunits. Although poorly resolved, the complete reverse gyrase phylogeny suggests an ancient acquisition of the gene by bacteria via one or two LGT events, followed by its secondary distribution by LGT within bacteria. Finally, several genes of archaeal origin located in proximity to the reverse gyrase gene in bacterial genomes have bacterial homologues mostly in thermophiles or hyperthermophiles, raising the possibility that they were co-transferred with the reverse gyrase gene. Our new analysis of the reverse gyrase history strengthens the hypothesis that the acquisition of reverse gyrase may have been a crucial evolutionary step in the adaptation of bacteria to high-temperature environments. However, it also questions the role of this enzyme in thermophilic bacteria and the selective advantage its presence could provide.

  16. Population dynamics during startup of thermophilic anaerobic digesters: The mixing factor

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanimeh, Sophia A.

    2013-11-01

    Two thermophilic digesters were inoculated with manure and started-up under mixed and stagnant conditions. The Archaea in the mixed digester (A) were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanobateriaceae (61%) with most of the methane being produced via syntrophic pathways. Methanosarcinales (35%) were the only acetoclastic methanogens present. Acetate dissipation seems to depend on balanced hydrogenotrophic-to-acetotrophic abundance, which in turn was statistically correlated to free ammonia levels. Relative abundance of bacterial community was associated with the loading rate. However, in the absence of mixing (digester B), the relationship between microbial composition and operating parameters was not discernible. This was attributed to the development of microenvironments where environmental conditions are significantly different from average measured parameters. The impact of microenvironments was accentuated by the use of a non-acclimated seed that lacks adequate propionate degraders. Failure to disperse the accumulated propionate, and other organics, created high concentration niches where competitive and inhibiting conditions developed and favored undesired genera, such as Halobacteria (65% in B). As a result, digester B experienced higher acid levels and lower allowable loading rate. Mixing was found necessary to dissipate potential inhibitors, and improve stability and loading capacity, particularly when a non-acclimated seed, often lacking balanced thermophilic microflora, is used. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Population dynamics during startup of thermophilic anaerobic digesters: the mixing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanimeh, Sophia A; Saikaly, Pascal E; Li, Dong; El-Fadel, Mutasem

    2013-11-01

    Two thermophilic digesters were inoculated with manure and started-up under mixed and stagnant conditions. The Archaea in the mixed digester (A) were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanobateriaceae (61%) with most of the methane being produced via syntrophic pathways. Methanosarcinales (35%) were the only acetoclastic methanogens present. Acetate dissipation seems to depend on balanced hydrogenotrophic-to-acetotrophic abundance, which in turn was statistically correlated to free ammonia levels. Relative abundance of bacterial community was associated with the loading rate. However, in the absence of mixing (digester B), the relationship between microbial composition and operating parameters was not discernible. This was attributed to the development of microenvironments where environmental conditions are significantly different from average measured parameters. The impact of microenvironments was accentuated by the use of a non-acclimated seed that lacks adequate propionate degraders. Failure to disperse the accumulated propionate, and other organics, created high concentration niches where competitive and inhibiting conditions developed and favored undesired genera, such as Halobacteria (65% in B). As a result, digester B experienced higher acid levels and lower allowable loading rate. Mixing was found necessary to dissipate potential inhibitors, and improve stability and loading capacity, particularly when a non-acclimated seed, often lacking balanced thermophilic microflora, is used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of mixing on methane production during thermophilic anaerobic digestion of manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Buendia, Inmaculada M.; Ellegaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The effect of mixing on anaerobic digestion of manure was evaluated in lab-scale and pilot-scale experiments at 55 °C. The effect of continuous (control), minimal (mixing for 10 min prior to extraction/feeding) and intermittent mixing (withholding mixing for 2 h prior to extraction...... (10 min mixing before feeding) was advantageous compared to vigorous mixing (110 times per minute). On the other hand, under low substrate to inoculum ratio (10/90), gentle mixing was the best. The study thus indicated that mixing schemes and intensities have some effect on anaerobic digestion...

  19. LC-ESI-MS/MS identification of polar lipids of two thermophilic Anoxybacillus bacteria containing a unique lipid pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanka, Tomáš; Kambourova, Margarita; Derekova, Anna; Kolouchová, Irena; Sigler, Karel

    2012-07-01

    Phospholipids and glycolipids from two recently described species belonging to the thermophilic genus Anoxybacillus were analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS). Analysis of total lipids from the facultatively anaerobic A. bogrovensis on a HILIC (Hydrophilic Interaction LIquid Chromatography) column succeeded in separating diacyl- and plasmalogen phospholipids. The LC/ESI-MS/MS analysis of the strict aerobe A. rupiensis revealed the presence of different unique polar lipids, predominantly alanyl-, lysyl-, and glucosyl-phosphatidylglycerols and cardiolipins. Each of the classes of polar lipids was then analyzed by means of the ESI-MS/MS and more than 140 molecular species of six lipid classes from A. bogrovensis and nearly 200 molecular species of nine classes of polar lipids from A. rupiensis were identified. Five classes of unidentified polar lipids were detected in both strains. Plasmalogens were thus determined for the first time in a facultatively anaerobic bacterium, i.e. A. bogrovensis.

  20. Biogeochemical evidence that thermophilic Archaea mediate the anaerobic oxidation of methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.; Wakeham, S.G.; Hopmans, E.C.

    2003-01-01

    Distributions and isotopic analyses of lipids from sediment cores at a hydrothermally active site in the Guaymas Basin with a steep sedimentary temperature gradient revealed the presence of archaea that oxidize methane anaerobically. The presence of strongly 13C-depleted lipids at greater depths in

  1. Amino Acid Transport in the Thermophilic Anaerobe Clostridium fervidus Is Driven by an Electrochemical Sodium Gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPEELMANS, G; POOLMAN, B; KONINGS, WN

    Amino acid transport was studied in membranes of the peptidolytic, thermophitic, anaerobic bacterium Clostridium fervidus. Uptake of the negatively charged amino acid L-glutamate, the neutral amino acid L-serine, and the positively charged amino acid L-arginine was examined in membrane vesicles

  2. Characterization of Exopolysaccharides Produced by Thermophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Tropical Fruits of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthavee, Wanchai; Noda, Masafumi; Danshiitsoodol, Narandalai; Kumagai, Takanori; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we have obtained two exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that were isolated from tropical fruits of Thailand. The two strains, designated LY45 and PY45, were identified as Pediococcus pentosaceus and Lactobacillus amylovorus, respectively. Both plant-derived LAB strains, which produce neutral EPSs together with the acidic one, can grow vigorously at 45°C and even at 50°C. Hyaluronidase (EC 3.2.1.35), which catalyzes the degradation of hyaluronic acid, activates an inflammatory reaction. Interestingly, EPSs produced by the LY45 and PY45 strains were found to inhibit hyaluronidase activity at the same order of IC 50 values as did sodium cromoglicate and dipotassium glycyrrhizinate, which are well-known as anti-inflammatory agents. The LY45-derived neutral EPS consists of glucose and mannose as monosaccharide components, whereas the acidic one contains mainly mannose, together with glucose and galactose. On the other hand, although Lactobacillus amylovorus PY45 also produces neutral and acidic EPSs, the main monosaccharide in both EPSs is mannose, and glucose is a minor component. Furthermore, the PY45 strain may be probiotically and industrially useful because the microorganism can utilize starch and glycogen as carbon sources.

  3. Thermophilic anaerobes in arctic marine sediments induced to mineralize complex organic matter at high temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Arnosti, Carol; Brüchert, Volker

    2010-01-01

    temperature-induced food chain mirrors sediment microbial processes occurring at cold in situ temperatures (near 0°C), yet it is catalysed by a completely different set of microorganisms. Using sulfate reduction rates (SRR) as a proxy for organic matter mineralization showed that differences in organic matter......Marine sediments harbour diverse populations of dormant thermophilic bacterial spores that become active in sediment incubation experiments at much higher than in situ temperature. This response was investigated in the presence of natural complex organic matter in sediments of two Arctic fjords...... enzymatic capacities for organic polymer degradation could allow specific heterotrophic populations like these to play a role in sustaining microbial metabolism in the deep, warm, marine biosphere....

  4. Reorganization of the bacterial and archaeal populations associated with organic loading conditions in a thermophilic anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomoyuki; Haruta, Shin; Sasaki, Daisuke; Hanajima, Dai; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Ogata, Atsushi; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2015-03-01

    Organic loading conditions are an important factor influencing reactor performances in methanogenic bioreactors. Yet the underlying microbiological basis of the process stability, deterioration, and recovery remains to be understood. Here, structural responses of the bacterial and archaeal populations to the change of organic loading conditions in a thermophilic anaerobic digester were investigated by process analyses and 16S rRNA gene-based molecular approaches. The biogas was produced stably without the accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) at low organic loading rates (OLRs) in the beginning of reactor operation. Increasing OLR in stages disrupted the stable reactor performance, and high OLR conditions continued the deteriorated performance with slight biogas production and high accumulation of VFAs. Thereafter, the gradual decrease of OLR resulted in the recovery from the deterioration, giving rise to the stable performance again. The stable performances before and after the high OLR conditions conducted were associated with compositionally similar but not identical methanogenic consortia. The bacterial and archaeal populations were synchronously changed at both the transient phases toward the deteriorated performance and in recovery process, during which the dynamic shift of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens including the recently identified Methanomassiliicoccus might contribute to the maintenance of the methanogenic activity. The distinctive bacterial population with a high predominance of Methanobacterium formicicum as archaeal member was found for the deteriorated performance. The results in this study indicate the coordinated reorganization of the bacterial and archaeal populations in response to functional states induced by the change of organic loading conditions in the anaerobic digester. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of feed to microbe ratios on anaerobic digestion of Chinese cabbage waste under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions: biogas potential and kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Gopi Krishna; Bhattarai, Sujala; Kim, Sang Hun; Chen, Lide

    2014-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the feed-to-microbe (F/M) ratios on anaerobic digestion of Chinese cabbage waste (CCW) generated from a kimchi factory. The batch test was conducted for 96 days under mesophilic (36.5 °C) (Experiment I) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions (Experiment II) at F/M ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. The first-order kinetic model was evaluated for methane yield. The biogas yield in terms of volatile solids (VS) added increased from 591 to 677 mL/g VS under mesophilic conditions and 434 to 639 mL/g VS under thermophilic conditions when the F/M ratio increased from 0.5 to 2.0. Similarly, the volumetric biogas production increased from 1.479 to 6.771 L/L under mesophilic conditions and from 1.086 to 6.384 L/L under thermophilic conditions when F/M ratio increased from 0.5 to 2.0. The VS removal increased from 59.4 to 75.6% under mesophilic conditions and from 63.5 to 78.3% under thermophilic conditions when the F/M ratio increased from 0.5 to 2.0. The first-order kinetic constant (k, 1/day) decreased under the mesophilic temperature conditions and increased under thermophilic conditions when the F/M ratio increased from 0.5 to 2.0. The difference between the experimental and predicted methane yield was in the range of 3.4-14.5% under mesophilic conditions and in the range of 1.1-3.0% under thermophilic conditions. The predicted methane yield derived from the first-order kinetic model was in good agreement with the experimental results. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Can oral anaerobic bacteria cause adverse pregnancy outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonova, I; Iliev, V; Živković, N; Sušič, E; Bego, I; Kotevska, V

    2015-01-01

    Maternal periodontal infection has been recognized as a risk factor for premature and low birthweight infants. It is suspected that pathogens causing periodontal disease may translocate to the amniotic cavity and so contribute to triggering an adverse pregnancy outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the presence of specific periodontal pathogens may influence the incidence of preterm labor and premature birth. This study was designed as a hospital-based case-control study. A total of 70 pregnant women, aged 18-40 with single live pregnancy were recruited from the Departement of Gynecolgy and Obstetrics at a General hospital in Sibenik, Croatia, between March 2013 to March 2014. The case group: 30 pregnant women who were hospitalised with signs of premature labor. 40 patients with normal pregnancy post-delivery up to 48 hrs, who had given birth at term, and the baby had a weight of more than 2500 gr. These women had undergone microbiological examination at the time of recruitment, microbial samples, paper point subgingival swabs were obtained in both groups and processed by anaerobic culturing. Standard procedures were used for culture and identification of bacteria. Information was collected on demographics, health behaviors, and obstetric and systemic diseases that may have influence the premature delivery. The levels of periodontal pathogens tended to be higher in the premature (case group) labor compared to the term deliveries (control group). Levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fuscobacterium nucleatum, Actinomyces actinomycetecomitans were statistically significantly higher in premature births as compared to term deliveries, adjusting for baseline levels. The joint effects of red and orange microbial clusters were significantly higher in the premature group compared to the term group. The study shows a significant association betwen periodontal anaerobic infection and adverse pregnancy outcome. High levels of periodontal pathogens during

  7. Roles of thermophilic thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the biocorrosion of oil pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Renxing; Grizzle, Robert S; Duncan, Kathleen E; McInerney, Michael J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Thermophilic sulfide-producing microorganisms from an oil pipeline network were enumerated with different sulfur oxyanions as electron acceptors at 55°C. Most-probable number (MPN) analysis showed that thiosulfate-reducing bacteria were the most numerous sulfidogenic microorganisms in pipeline inspection gauge (PIG) scrapings. Thiosulfate-reducing and methanogenic enrichments were obtained from the MPN cultures that were able to use yeast extract as the electron donor. Molecular analysis revealed that both enrichments harbored the same dominant bacterium, which belonged to the genus Anaerobaculum. The dominant archaeon in the methanogenic enrichment was affiliated with the genus Methanothermobacter. With yeast extract as the electron donor, the general corrosion rate by the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment (8.43 ± 1.40 milli-inch per year, abbreviated as mpy) was about 5.5 times greater than the abiotic control (1.49 ± 0.15 mpy), while the comparable measures for the methanogenic culture were 2.03 ± 0.49 mpy and 0.62 ± 0.07 mpy, respectively. Total iron analysis in the cultures largely accounted for the mass loss of iron measured in the weight loss determinations. Profilometry analysis of polished steel coupons incubated in the presence of the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment revealed 59 pits over an area of 71.16 mm(2), while only 6 pits were evident in the corresponding methanogenic incubations. The results show the importance of thiosulfate-utilizing, sulfide-producing fermentative bacteria such as Anaerobaculum sp. in the corrosion of carbon steel, but also suggest that Anaerobaculum sp. are of far less concern when growing syntrophically with methanogens.

  8. Roles of thermophilic thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the biocorrosion of oil pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renxing eLiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic sulfide-producing microorganisms from an oil pipeline network were enumerated with different sulfur oxyanions as electron acceptors at 55 oC. Most-probable number (MPN analysis showed that thiosulfate-reducing bacteria were the most numerous sulfidogenic microorganisms in pipeline inspection gauge (PIG scrapings. Thiosulfate-reducing and methanogenic enrichments were obtained from the MPN cultures that were able to use yeast extract as the electron donor. Molecular analysis revealed that both enrichments harbored the same dominant bacterium, which belonged to the genus Anaerobaculum. The dominant archaeon in the methanogenic enrichment was affiliated with the genus Methanothermobacter. With yeast extract as the electron donor, the general corrosion rate by the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment (8.43 ± 1.40 milli-inch per year, abbreviated as mpy was about 5.5 times greater than the abiotic control (1.49 ± 0.15 mpy, while the comparable measures for the methanogenic culture were 2.03 ± 0.49 mpy and 0.62 ± 0.07 mpy, respectively. Total iron analysis in the cultures largely accounted for the mass loss of iron measured in the weight loss determinations. Profilometry analysis of polished steel coupons incubated in the presence of the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment revealed 59 pits over an area of 71.16 mm2, while only 6 pits were evident in the corresponding methanogenic incubations. The results show the importance of thiosulfate-utilizing, sulfide-producing fermentative bacteria such as Anaerobaculum sp. in the corrosion of carbon steel, but also suggest that Anaerobaculum sp. are of far less concern when growing syntrophically with methanogens.

  9. Optimization of two-phase thermophilic anaerobic digestion of biowaste for hydrogen and methane production through reject water recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavinato, C; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F; Cecchi, F; Pavan, P

    2011-09-01

    The optimization of a two-phase thermophilic anaerobic process treating biowaste for hydrogen and methane production was carried out at pilot scale using two stirred reactors (CSTRs) and without any physical/chemical pre-treatment of inoculum. During the experiment the hydrogen production at low hydraulic retention time (3d) was tested, both with and without reject water recirculation and at two organic loading rate (16 and 21 kgTVS/m3 d). The better yields were obtained with recirculation where the pH reached an optimal value (5.5) thanks to the buffering capacity of the recycle stream. The specific gas production of the first reactor was 51 l/kgVS(fed) and H2 content in biogas 37%. The mixture of gas obtained from the two reactors met the standards for the biohythane mix only when lower loading rate were applied to the first reactor, with a composition of 6.7% H2, 40.1% CO2 and 52.3% CH4 the overall SGP being 0.78 m3/kgVS(fed). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlation between system performance and bacterial composition under varied mixing intensity in thermophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanimeh, Sophia A.

    2017-12-07

    This study examines the stability and efficiency of thermophilic anaerobic digesters treating food waste under various mixing velocities (50–160 rpm). The results showed that high velocities (120 and 160 rpm) were harmful to the digestion process with 18–30% reduction in methane generation and 1.8 to 3.8 times increase in volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentrations, compared to mild mixing (50 and 80 rpm). Also, the removal rate of soluble COD dropped from 75 to 85% (at 50–80 rpm) to 20–59% (at 120–160 rpm). Similarly, interrupted mixing caused adverse impacts and led to near-failure conditions with excessive VFA accumulation (15.6 g l), negative removal rate of soluble COD and low methane generation (132 ml gVS). The best efficiency and stability were achieved under mild mixing (50 and 80 rpm). In particular, the 50 rpm stirring speed resulted in the highest methane generation (573 ml gVS). High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the digesters were dominated by one bacterial genus (Petrotoga; phylym Thermotogae) at all mixing velocities except at 0 rpm, where the community was dominated by one bacterial genus (Anaerobaculum; phylum Synergistetes). The Petrotoga genus seems to have played a major role in the degradation of organic matter.

  11. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics.

  12. Thermophilic versus Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion of Sewage Sludge: A Comparative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gebreeyessus, Getachew D.; Jenicek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    During advanced biological wastewater treatment, a huge amount of sludge is produced as a by-product of the treatment process. Hence, reuse and recovery of resources and energy from the sludge is a big technological challenge. The processing of sludge produced by Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) is massive, which takes up a big part of the overall operational costs. In this regard, anaerobic digestion (AD) of sewage sludge continues to be an attractive option to produce biogas that could c...

  13. Effect of alkaline pretreatment on mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of a submerged macrophyte: Inhibition and recovery against dissolved lignin during semi-continuous operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Mitsuhiko; Watanabe, Keiko; Kurosawa, Norio; Ishikawa, Kanako; Ban, Syuhei; Toda, Tatsuki

    2017-08-01

    The long-term effect of alkaline pretreatment on semi-continuous anaerobic digestion (AD) of the lignin-rich submerged macrophyte Potamogeton maackianus was investigated using mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. In pretreated reactors, dissolved lignin accumulated to high levels. CH 4 production under the pretreated condition was higher than that of the untreated condition, but decreased from Days 22 (mesophilic) and 42 (thermophilic). However, CH 4 production subsequently recovered, although dissolved lignin accumulated. Further, the change in the microbial community was observed between conditions. These results suggest that dissolved lignin temporarily inhibited AD, although acclimatization to dissolved lignin occurred during long-term operation. During the steady state period, mesophilic conditions achieved a 42% increase in the CH 4 yield using pretreatment, while thermophilic conditions yielded an 8% increment. Because volatile fatty acids accumulated even after acclimatization during the thermophilic pretreated condition and was discharged with the effluent, improvement of the methanogenic step would enable enhanced CH 4 recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of system performance and microbial communities of a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion system treating dairy manure: thermophilic digester operated at acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wen; Zhang, Wenfei; Yu, Zhongtang

    2013-08-01

    A temperature-phased anaerobic digestion system with the thermophilic digester acidified by acidogenesis products (referred to as AT-TPAD) was evaluated to treat high-strength dairy cattle manure at a 15-day retention time. Three temperatures (50, 55, and 60°C) were tested on the thermophilic digester, and 50°C was found to be the optimal temperature for overall performance of the AT-TPAD system, achieving 31% VS removal and 0.22 L methane/g VS fed. The mesophilic digester contributed significantly more to the overall system performance than the thermophilic digester. The thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters had different microbial communities under all conditions, and both microbial communities exhibited dynamic changes in response to different conditions. Certain microbial groups were found significantly correlated with the system performance. Methanosarcina was the most important methanogen genus of the AT-TPAD system and its population abundance was inversely correlated with high concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of multiple carbon monoxide consumption pathways in anaerobic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Techtmann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO, well known as a toxic gas, is increasingly recognized as a key metabolite and signaling molecule. Microbial utilization of CO is quite common, evidenced by the rapid escalation in description of new species of CO-utilizing bacteria and archaea. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH, the protein complex that enables anaerobic CO utilization has been well-characterized from an increasing number of microorganisms, however the regulation of multiple CO-related gene clusters in single isolates remains unexplored. Many species are extroraordinarily resistant to high CO concentrations, thiriving under pure CO at more than one atmosphere. We hypothesized that, in strains that can grow exclusively on CO, both carbon acquisition via the CODH/Acetyl CoA synthase complex and energy conservation via a CODH-linked hydrogenase must be differentially regulated in response to the availability of CO. The CO-sensing transcriptional activator, CooA is present in most CO-oxidizing bacteria. Here we present a genomic and phylogenetic survey of CODH operons and cooA genes found in CooA-containing bacteria. Two distinct groups of CooA homologs were found: One clade (CooA-1 is found in the majority of CooA containing bacteria, whereas the other clade (CooA-2 is found only in genomes that encode multiple CODH clusters, suggesting that the CooA-2 might be important for cross-regulation of competing CODH operons. Recombinant CooA-1 and CooA-2 regulators from the prototypical CO-utilizing bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans were purified, and promoter binding analyses revealed that CooA-1 specifically regulates the hydrogenase-linked CODH, whereas CooA-2 is able to regulate both the hydrogenase-linked CODH and the CODH/ACS operons. These studies point to the ability of dual CooA homologs to partition CO into divergent CO-utilizing pathways resulting in efficient consumption of a single limiting growth substrate available across a wide range of

  16. A new approach for concurrently improving performance of South Korean food waste valorization and renewable energy recovery via dry anaerobic digestion under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh Duc; Yeop, Jeong Seong; Choi, Jaehoon; Kim, Sungsu; Chang, Soon Woong; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2017-08-01

    Dry semicontinuous anaerobic digestion (AD) of South Korean food waste (FW) under four solid loading rates (SLRs) (2.30-9.21kg total solids (TS)/m 3 day) and at a fixed TS content was compared between two digesters, one each under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. Biogas production and organic matter reduction in both digesters followed similar trends, increasing with rising SLR. Inhibitor (intermediate products of the anaerobic fermentation process) effects on the digesters' performance were not observed under the studied conditions. In all cases tested, the digesters' best performance was achieved at the SLR of 9.21kg TS/m 3 day, with 74.02% and 80.98% reduction of volatile solids (VS), 0.87 and 0.90m 3 biogas/kg VS removed , and 0.65 (65% CH 4 ) and 0.73 (60.02% CH 4 ) m 3 biogas/kg VS fed , under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively. Thermophilic dry AD is recommended for FW treatment in South Korea because it is more efficient and has higher energy recovery potential when compared to mesophilic dry AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Conductive iron oxides accelerate thermophilic methanogenesis from acetate and propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chihaya; Kato, Souichiro; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Anaerobic digester is one of the attractive technologies for treatment of organic wastes and wastewater, while continuous development and improvements on their stable operation with efficient organic removal are required. Particles of conductive iron oxides (e.g., magnetite) are known to facilitate microbial interspecies electron transfer (termed as electric syntrophy). Electric syntrophy has been reported to enhance methanogenic degradation of organic acids by mesophilic communities in soil and anaerobic digester. Here we investigated the effects of supplementation of conductive iron oxides (magnetite) on thermophilic methanogenic microbial communities derived from a thermophilic anaerobic digester. Supplementation of magnetite accelerated methanogenesis from acetate and propionate under thermophilic conditions, while supplementation of ferrihydrite also accelerated methanogenesis from propionate. Microbial community analysis revealed that supplementation of magnetite drastically changed bacterial populations in the methanogenic acetate-degrading cultures, in which Tepidoanaerobacter sp. and Coprothermobacter sp. dominated. These results suggest that supplementation of magnetite induce electric syntrophy between organic acid-oxidizing bacteria and methanogenic archaea and accelerate methanogenesis even under thermophilic conditions. Findings from this study would provide a possibility for the achievement of stably operating thermophilic anaerobic digestion systems with high efficiency for removal of organics and generation of CH4. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Size-dependent antibacterial activities of silver nanoparticles against oral anaerobic pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Rong, Kaifeng; Li, Ju; Yang, Hao; Chen, Rong

    2013-06-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease are widespread diseases for which microorganism infections have been identified as the main etiology. Silver nanoparticles (Ag Nps) were considered as potential control oral bacteria infection agent due to its excellent antimicrobial activity and non acute toxic effects on human cells. In this work, stable Ag Nps with different sizes (~5, 15 and 55 nm mean values) were synthesized by using a simple reduction method or hydrothermal method. The Nps were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The antibacterial activities were evaluated by colony counting assay and growth inhibition curve method, and corresponding minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against five anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria and aerobic bacteria E. coli were determined. The results showed that Ag Nps had apparent antibacterial effects against the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria and aerobic bacteria. The MIC values of 5-nm Ag against anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria A. actinomycetemcomitans, F. nuceatum, S. mitis, S. mutans and S. sanguis were 25, 25, 25, 50 and 50 μg/mL, respectively. The aerobic bacteria were more susceptible to Ag NPs than the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria. In the mean time, Ag NPs displayed an obvious size-dependent antibacterial activity against the anaerobic bacteria. The 5-nm Ag presents the highest antibacterial activity. The results of this work indicated a potential application of Ag Nps in the inhibition of oral microorganism infections.

  19. Microbial community structure of a pilot-scale thermophilic anaerobic digester treating poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ami M; Sharma, Deepak; Lappin-Scott, Hilary; Burton, Sara; Huber, David H

    2014-03-01

    The microbial community structure of a stable pilot-scale thermophilic continuous stirred tank reactor digester stabilized on poultry litter was investigated. This 40-m(3) digester produced biogas with 57% methane, and chemical oxygen demand removal of 54%. Bacterial and archaeal diversity were examined using both cloning and pyrosequencing that targeted 16S rRNA genes. The bacterial community was dominated by phylum Firmicutes, constituting 93% of the clones and 76% of the pyrotags. Of the Firmicutes, class Clostridia (52% pyrotags) was most abundant followed by class Bacilli (13% pyrotags). The bacterial libraries identified 94 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and pyrosequencing identified 577 OTUs at the 97% minimum similarity level. Fifteen OTUs were dominant (≥2% abundance), and nine of these were novel unclassified Firmicutes. Several of the dominant OTUs could not be classified more specifically than Clostridiales, but were most similar to plant biomass degraders, including Clostridium thermocellum. Of the rare pyrotag OTUs (99% of the archaeal clones. Based on the primary methanogen, as well as digester chemistry (high VA and ammonia levels), we propose that bacterial acetate oxidation is the primary pathway in this digester for the control of acetate levels.

  20. In vitro production of thymine dimer by ultroviolet irradiation of DNA from mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yein, F.S.; Stenesh, J.

    1989-01-01

    Thymine dimer was produced in vitro by ultraviolet irradiation of DNA, isolated from the mesophile Bacillus licheniformis and the thermophile B. stearothermophilus. Irradiation was performed at three different temperaturs (35, 45 and 55 C) and the thymine dimer was isolated and determined. An HPLC procedure was developed that permitted temperature was greater for the thermophile than for the mesophile. Formation of thymine dimer increased with temperature for both organisms but more so for the thermophile; over the temperature range of 35-55 C, the average increase in thymine dimer production for the themrophile was about 4-times that for the mesophile. The melting out temperature, as a function of increasing irradiation temperature, was essentially unchanged for the mesophilic DNA, but decreased progressively for the thermophilic DNA. These results are discussed in terms of the macromolecular theory of to the macromolecular theory of the thermophily. (author). 31 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  1. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket-hollow centered packed bed (UASB-HCPB) reactor for thermophilic palm oil mill effluent (POME) treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poh, P.E.; Chong, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket-hollow centered packed bed (UASB-HCPB) reactor was developed with the aim to minimize operational problems in the anaerobic treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) under thermophilic conditions. The performance of UASB-HCPB reactor on POME treatment was investigated at 55 °C. Subsequent to start-up, the performance of the UASB-HCPB reactor was evaluated in terms of i) effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT); ii) effect of organic loading rate (OLR); and iii) effect of mixed liquor volatile suspended solid (MLVSS) concentration on thermophilic POME treatment. Start-up up of the UASB-HCPB reactor was completed in 36 days, removing 88% COD and 90% BOD respectively at an OLR of 28.12 g L −1  d −1 , producing biogas with 52% of methane. Results from the performance study of the UASB-HCPB reactor on thermophilic POME treatment indicated that HRT of 2 days, OLR of 27.65 g L −1  d −1 and MLVSS concentration of 14.7 g L −1 was required to remove 90% of COD and BOD, 80% of suspended solid and at the same time produce 60% of methane. - Highlights: • UASB-HCPB was proposed for POME treatment under thermophilic conditions. • Start-up up of the UASB-HCPB reactor was completed in 36 days. • 88% COD and 90% BOD were removed at an OLR of 28.12 g COD/L.day during start-up. • HRT of 2 days and OLR of 27.65 g COD/L.day was required to produce 60% methane. • Methanosarcina sp. forms the majority of microbial population in the UASB section

  2. Defluviitalea raffinosedens sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, saccharolytic bacterium isolated from an anaerobic batch digester treating animal manure and rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shichun; Huang, Yan; Wang, Cong; Fan, Hui; Dai, Lirong; Zhou, Zheng; Liu, Xing; Deng, Yu

    2017-05-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, fermentative bacterium, strain A6T, was obtained from an anaerobic batch digester treating animal manure and rice straw. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, slightly curved rods with a size of 0.6-1×2.5-8.2 µm, non-motile and produced terminal spores. The temperature, pH and NaCl concentration ranges for growth were 40-60 °C, 6.5-8.0 and 0-15.0 g l-1, with optimum growth noted at 50-55 °C, pH 7.5 and in the absence of NaCl, respectively. Yeast extract was required for growth. d-Glucose, maltose, d-xylose, d-galactose, d-fructose, d-ribose, lactose, raffinose, sucrose, d-arabinose, cellobiose, d-mannose and yeast extract were used as carbon and energy sources. The fermentation products from glucose were ethanol, lactate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, iso-butyrate, iso-valerate, H2 and CO2. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 36.6 mol%. The predominant fatty acids were C16 : 0, iso-C17 : 1, C14 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 N-alcohol and C13 : 0 3-OH. Respiratory quinones were not detected. The polar lipid profile comprised phosphoglycolipids, phospholipids, glycolipids, a diphosphatidylglycerol, a phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified lipid. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain was closely related to Defluviitalea saccharophila DSM 22681T with a similarity of 96.0 %. Based on the morphological, physiological and taxonomic characterization, strain A6T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Defluviitalea, for which the name Defluviitalea raffinosedens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is A6T (=DSM 28090T=ACCC 19951T).

  3. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of winery wastewater sludge and wine lees: An integrated approach for sustainable wine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Ros, C; Cavinato, C; Pavan, P; Bolzonella, D

    2017-12-01

    In this work, winery wastes generated by a cellar producing approximately 300,000 hL of wine per year was monitored for a period of one year. On average, 196 L of wastewater, 0.1 kg of waste activated sludge (dry matter) and 1.6 kg of wine lees were produced per hectoliter of wine produced. Different winery wastes, deriving from different production steps, namely waste activated sludge from wastewater treatment and wine lees, were co-treated using an anaerobic digestion process. Testing was conducted on a pilot scale for both mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The process was stable for a long period at 37 °C, with an average biogas production of 0.386 m 3 /kg COD fed . On the other hand, for thermophilic conditions, volatile fatty acids accumulated in the reactor and the process failed after one hydraulic retention time (23 days). In order to fix the biological process, trace elements (iron, cobalt and nickel) were added to the feed of the thermophilic reactor. Metals augmentation improved process stability and yields at 55 °C. The pH ranged between 7.8 and 8.0, and specific gas production was 0.450 m 3 /kg COD fed , which corresponded to dry matter and COD removals of 34% and 88%, respectively. Although the observed performances in terms of biogas production were good, the thermophilic process exhibited some limitations related to both the necessity of metals addition and the worse dewaterability properties. In fact, while the mesophilic digestates reached a good dewatering quality via the addition of 6.5 g of polymer per kg of dry matter, the required dosage for the thermophilic sludge was greater than 10 g/kg of dry matter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, xylanolytic bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-06-01

    A hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium, designated D2C22(T), was isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma in north-east Algeria. The isolate was a Gram-stain-positive, non-sporulating, non-motile rod, appearing singly or in pairs (0.3-0.4 × 8.0-9.0 µm). Strain D2C22(T) grew anaerobically at 45-85 °C (optimum 65 °C), at pH 5-9 (optimum pH 6.8) and with 0-20 g NaCl l(-1). Strain D2C22(T) used glucose, galactose, lactose, fructose, ribose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, cellobiose, mannose, melibiose, sucrose, xylan and pyruvate (only in the presence of yeast extract or biotrypticase) as electron donors. The end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, lactate, CO2 and H2. Nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfate and sulfite were not used as electron acceptors. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 41.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain D2C22(T) was most closely related to Caldicoprobacter oshimai JW/HY-331(T), Caldicoprobacter algeriensis TH7C1(T) and Acetomicrobium faecale DSM 20678(T) (95.5, 95.5 and 95.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain D2C22(T) is proposed to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Caldicoprobacter within the order Clostridiales, for which the name Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D2C22(T) (=DSM 24605(T)=JCM 17646(T)).

  5. Plant pathogenic anaerobic bacteria use aromatic polyketides to access aerobic territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabuer, Gulimila; Ishida, Keishi; Pidot, Sacha J; Roth, Martin; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-06

    Around 25% of vegetable food is lost worldwide because of infectious plant diseases, including microbe-induced decay of harvested crops. In wet seasons and under humid storage conditions, potato tubers are readily infected and decomposed by anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium puniceum). We found that these anaerobic plant pathogens harbor a gene locus (type II polyketide synthase) to produce unusual polyketide metabolites (clostrubins) with dual functions. The clostrubins, which act as antibiotics against other microbial plant pathogens, enable the anaerobic bacteria to survive an oxygen-rich plant environment. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Characterization of Probiotic Fermented Milk Prepared by Different Inoculation Size of Mesophilic and Thermophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nasiri Boosjin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Importance of development of novel probiotic fermented milk and challenge made for its acceptability is well known. In this research, the impact of different inoculation sizes of yogurt and DL-type starter culture (mesophilic and thermophilic LAB on titratable acidity, viscosity, sensorial and microbial properties of fermented milk was investigated; and finally, probiotic Langfil was produced.Materials and Methods: Fermented milk produced by 1, 2 and 3% v v-1 inocula consisting thermophilic: mesophilic starter cultures 10:90 (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris. Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus were analyzed for determination of titratable acidity, viscosity, viability of mesophilic starter cultures and sensory properties on days 5, 10, and 15 of storage at 4°C. Then, the most suitable treatments were selected for the producing probiotic Langfil, containing probiotic starter culture (2% v v-1 inoculums with equal ratio of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum. Lactococcus lactis and L. cremoris were counted on M17 agar, while Leuconostoc and Lactobacillus were counted aerobically on tomato juice agar and MRS bile agar, respectively. Bifidobacterium was cultured anaerobically on MRS bile agar. Sensory evaluation was carried out by ten trained panelists, based on a nine-point hedonic scale during the cold storage.Results and Conclusion: According to results, the best organoleptic properties were achieved in the product prepared with 2% the mesophilic and thermophilic starter cultures and 2% probiotic. This product had a high viscosity. An Iranian probiotic Langfil with desired properties was produced using the best treatment prepared.Conflict of interests: The authors declare no conflict of

  7. Long-chain fatty acids inhibition and adaptation process in anaerobic thermophilic digestion: Batch tests, microbial community structure and mathematical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltsi, Jordi; Illa, J.; Prenafeta-Boldu, F.X.

    2010-01-01

    Biomass samples taken during the continuous operation of thermophilic anaerobic digestors fed with manure and exposed to successive inhibitory pulses of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) were characterized in terms of specific metabolic activities and 16S rDNA DGGE profiling of the microbial community......-oxidation bacterial genera (Syntrophomonas and Clostridium), while a single predominant syntrophic archaeae was related with the genus Methanosarcina. The hypothesis that biomass adaptation was fundamentally of physiological nature was tested using mathematical modelling, taking the IWA ADM1 as general model. New...

  8. Comprehensive review and compilation of pretreatments for mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, É L; Droste, R L

    2011-01-01

    Organic matter hydrolysis prior to anaerobic digestion has been shown to improve biogas production (30-50%) and reduce solids (20-60%) by ultrasound, chemical, conventional heating, and microwave pretreatments. Numerous studies have been performed to determine the extent of digestion improvement but few focus on financial feasibility of these processes. A comprehensive model was created using Microsoft Excel and its Visual Basic Assistant to evaluate pretreatment permutations for conventional wastewater treatment plants. The four above-mentioned processes were evaluated for energetic and financial demands. Well-established energy equations and wastewater characteristics, both average and high, were used. Average and high flows were 460 and 750×10(3) m3/d, respectively. Net costs per influent flow for ultrasound, chemical, conventional heating, and microwave were 0.0166, 0.0217, 0.0124, 0.0119 $/m3 and 0.0264, 0.0357, 0.0187, and 0.0162 $/m3 for average and high conditions, respectively. The average cost increase from results excluding pretreatment use for all processes was 0.003 and 0.0055 $/m3 for average and high conditions, respectively. No matter the permutation, pretreatments requiring more energy to achieve required hydrolysis levels were costlier. If energetic recoveries are substantial, dewaterability is positively affected, and solids meet environmental constraints to be handled and disposed at lower costs, pretreatments can be viable.

  9. DIRECT FLOW-CYTOMETRY OF ANAEROBIC-BACTERIA IN HUMAN FECES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERWAAIJ, LA; MESANDER, G; LIMBURG, PC; VANDERWAAIJ, D

    1994-01-01

    We describe a flow cytometry method for analysis of noncultured anaerobic bacteria present in human fecal suspensions. Nonbacterial fecal compounds, bacterial fragments, and large aggregates could be discriminated from bacteria by staining with propidium iodide (PI) and setting a discriminator on PI

  10. Anaerobic Bacteria in Clinical Specimens – Frequent, But a Neglected Lot: A Five Year Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Padmaja Ananth; Gawda, Ashwini; Shetty, Seema; Anegundi, Renuka; Varma, Muralidhar; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Chawla, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Anaerobic bacteria which constitute a significant proportion of the normal microbiota also cause variety of infections involving various anatomic sites. Considering the tedious culture techniques with longer turnaround time, anaerobic cultures are usually neglected by clinicians and microbiologists. Aim To study the frequency of isolation of different anaerobic bacteria from various clinical specimens. Materials and Methods A retrospective study to analyse the frequency of isolation of different anaerobic bacteria, was conducted over a period of five years from 2011 to 2015 including various clinical specimens submitted to anaerobic division of Microbiology laboratory. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified following standard bacteriological techniques. Results Pathogenic anaerobes (n=336) were isolated from 278 (12.48%) of overall 2227 specimens processed with an average yield of 1.2 isolates. Anaerobes were isolated as polymicrobial flora with or without aerobic bacterial pathogens in 159 (57.2%) patients. Anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli (140, 41.7%) were the predominant isolates. B. fragilis group (67, 19.9%) were the most commonly isolated anaerobic pathogens. Anaerobes were predominantly isolated from deep seated abscess (23.9%). Conclusion Pathogenic anaerobes were isolated from various infection sites. Unless culture and susceptibility tests are performed as a routine, true magnitude of antimicrobial resistance among anaerobic pathogens will not be known. Knowledge of the distribution of these organisms may assist in the selection of appropriate empirical therapy for anaerobic infections. PMID:28892897

  11. Anaerobic Bacteria in Clinical Specimens - Frequent, But a Neglected Lot: A Five Year Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Padmaja Ananth; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Gawda, Ashwini; Shetty, Seema; Anegundi, Renuka; Varma, Muralidhar; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Chawla, Kiran

    2017-07-01

    Anaerobic bacteria which constitute a significant proportion of the normal microbiota also cause variety of infections involving various anatomic sites. Considering the tedious culture techniques with longer turnaround time, anaerobic cultures are usually neglected by clinicians and microbiologists. To study the frequency of isolation of different anaerobic bacteria from various clinical specimens. A retrospective study to analyse the frequency of isolation of different anaerobic bacteria, was conducted over a period of five years from 2011 to 2015 including various clinical specimens submitted to anaerobic division of Microbiology laboratory. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified following standard bacteriological techniques. Pathogenic anaerobes (n=336) were isolated from 278 (12.48%) of overall 2227 specimens processed with an average yield of 1.2 isolates. Anaerobes were isolated as polymicrobial flora with or without aerobic bacterial pathogens in 159 (57.2%) patients. Anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli (140, 41.7%) were the predominant isolates. B. fragilis group (67, 19.9%) were the most commonly isolated anaerobic pathogens. Anaerobes were predominantly isolated from deep seated abscess (23.9%). Pathogenic anaerobes were isolated from various infection sites. Unless culture and susceptibility tests are performed as a routine, true magnitude of antimicrobial resistance among anaerobic pathogens will not be known. Knowledge of the distribution of these organisms may assist in the selection of appropriate empirical therapy for anaerobic infections.

  12. Behavior of plutonium interacting with bentonite and sulfate-reducing anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, A.; Zheng, J.; Cayer, I.; Fujikawa, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Ito, M.

    1997-01-01

    The interactions between sulfate reducing anaerobic bacteria and plutonium, with or without bentonite present, were investigated using distribution coefficients [Kd (ml/g)] as an index of the radionuclide behavior. Plutonium Kds for living bacteria varied within a large range, from 1,804 to 112,952, depending on the pH, while the Kds ranged from 1,180 to 5,931 for dead bacteria. In general, living bacteria had higher plutonium Kds than dead bacteria. Furthermore, the higher Kd values of 39,677 to 106,915 for living bacteria were obtained for a pH range between 6.83 and 8.25, while no visible pH effect was observed for dead bacteria. These Kd values were obtained using tracers for both 236 Pu and 239 Pu, which can check the experimental procedures and mass balance. Another comparison was conducted for plutonium Kd values of mixtures of living bacteria with bentonite and sterilized bacteria with bentonite. The range of Kd values for the non-sterilized bacteria with bentonite were 1,194 to 83,648 while Kd values for the sterilized bacteria with bentonite were from 624 to 17,236. Again, the Kd values for the living bacteria with bentonite were higher than those of sterilized bacteria with bentonite. In other words, the presence of living anaerobic bacteria with bentonite increased, by roughly 50 times, the Kd values of 239 Pu when compared to the mixture of dead bacteria with bentonite. The results indicate that the effects of anaerobic bacteria within the engineered barrier system (in this case bentonite) will play a significant role in the behavior of plutonium in geologic repositories

  13. Isolation and identification of intestinal bacteria from Japanese tree frog (Hlya japonica) with the special reference to anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benno, Y; Izumi-Kurotani, A; Yamashita, M

    1992-08-01

    The bacteria in the large intestines of eight Japanese tree frogs (Hlya japonica) were enumerated by using an anaerobic culture system. The microorganisms at approximately 3.1 x 10(9) bacteria per g (wet weight) of intestinal contents were present in the intestine of all the frogs tested. No difference of the total bacteria in the frog intestine was observed between two different incubation-temperatures (room temperature and 37 degrees C). Eleven genera and 16 species were isolated from the frog intestine. In most frogs, Bacteroides (B.) caccae and B. vulgatus were detected as the predominant organisms. Escherichia coli was also present in greater numbers in the intestine. Other bacteria isolated at high dilutions were strict anaerobes, including Fusobacterium and Clostridium. Enterococcus faecalis was frequently isolated from the frog intestine. However, four genera of Bifidobacterium, Eubacterium, Peptostreptococcus, and Lactobacillus were not isolated from the frog intestine.

  14. Present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    If the primordial atmosphere was reducing, then the first microbial ecosystem was probably composed of anaerobic bacteria. However, despite the presence of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, anaerobic habitats are important, commonplace components of the Earth's present biosphere. The geochemical activities displayed by these anaerobes impact the global cycling of certain elements (e.g., C, N, S, Fe, Mn, etc.). Methane provides an obvious example of how human-enhanced activities on a global scale can influence the content of a "radiative" (i.e., infrared absorbing) trace gas in the atmosphere. Methane can be oxidized by anaerobic bacteria, but this does not appear to support their growth. Acetylene, however, does support such growth. This may form the basis for future exobiological investigations of the atmospheres of anoxic, hydrocarbon-rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the latter's satellite Titan. ?? 1989.

  15. New techniques for growing anaerobic bacteria: experiments with Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, H.I.; Crow, W.D.; Hadden, C.T.; Hall, J.; Machanoff, R.

    1983-01-01

    Stable membrane fragments derived from Escherichia coli produce and maintain strict anaerobic conditions when added to liquid or solid bacteriological media. Techniques for growing Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum in membrane-containing media are described. Liquid cultures initiated by very small inocula can be grown in direct contact with air. In solid media, colonies develop rapidly from individual cells even without incubation in anaerobic jars or similar devices. Observations on growth rates, spontaneous mutations, radiation, and oxygen sensitivity of anaerobic bacteria have been made using these new techniques

  16. Multicenter study of antimicrobial susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria in Korea in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangsoon; Park, Yeon Joon; Kim, Mi Na; Uh, Young; Kim, Myung Sook; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-09-01

    Periodic monitoring of regional or institutional resistance trends of clinically important anaerobic bacteria is recommended, because the resistance of anaerobic pathogens to antimicrobial drugs and inappropriate therapy are associated with poor clinical outcomes. There has been no multicenter study of clinical anaerobic isolates in Korea. We aimed to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of clinically important anaerobes at multiple centers in Korea. A total of 268 non-duplicated clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria were collected from four large medical centers in Korea in 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by the agar dilution method according to the CLSI guidelines. The following antimicrobials were tested: piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefoxitin, cefotetan, imipenem, meropenem, clindamycin, moxifloxacin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, and tigecycline. Organisms of the Bacteroides fragilis group were highly susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and meropenem, as their resistance rates to these three antimicrobials were lower than 6%. For B. fragilis group isolates and anaerobic gram-positive cocci, the resistance rates to moxifloxacin were 12-25% and 11-13%, respectively. Among B. fragilis group organisms, the resistance rates to tigecycline were 16-17%. Two isolates of Finegoldia magna were non-susceptible to chloramphenicol (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 16-32 mg/L). Resistance patterns were different among the different hospitals. Piperacillin-tazobactam, cefoxitin, and carbapemems are highly active beta-lactam agents against most of the anaerobes. The resistance rates to moxifloxacin and tigecycline are slightly higher than those in the previous study.

  17. Molecular studies on protein- and carbohydrate-converting ezymes from thermophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluskens, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    Microorganisms that are able to grow at hightemperatures are calledthermophiles(>55

  18. Space agriculture for habitation on Mars with hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kitaya, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Nagatomo, M.; Oshima, T.; Wada, H.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    Manned Mars exploration requires recycle of materials to support human life A conceptual design is developed for space agriculture which is driven by the biologically regenerative function Hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacterial ecology is the core of materials recycling system to process human metabolic waste and inedible biomass and convert them to fertilizer for plants cultivation A photosynthetic reaction of plants will be driven by solar energy Water will be recycled by cultivation of plants and passing it through plant bodies Sub-surface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide are the natural resource available on Mars and these resources will be converted to oxygen and foods We envision that the agricultural system will be scaled up by importing materials from Martian environment Excess oxygen will be obtained from growing trees for structural and other components Minor elements including N P K and other traces will be introduced as fertilizers or nutrients into the agricultural materials circulation Nitrogen will be collected from Martian atmosphere We will assess biological fixation of nitrogen using micro-organisms responsible in Earth biosphere Hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacterial ecology is effective to convert waste materials into useful forms to plants This microbial technology has been well established on ground for processing sewage and waste materials For instance the hyper-thermophilic bacterial system is applied to a composting machine in a size of a trash box in home kitchen Since such a home electronics

  19. The inhibitory effects of free ammonia on ammonia oxidizing bacteria and nitrite oxidizing bacteria under anaerobic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wenting; Peng, Yongzhen; Li, Xiyao; Zhang, Qiong; Ma, Bin

    2017-11-01

    The free ammonia (FA) inhibition on ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) under anaerobic condition was investigated in this study. The results indicated that NOB was more sensitive to the FA anaerobic treatment than AOB. The FA anaerobic inhibition on nitrifier gradually heightened with the increase of FA concentration. Accompanied with FA concentration increase from 0 to 16.82mgNH 3 -N·L -1 (the highest concentration adopted in this study), the activity of AOB reduced by 15.9%, while NOB decreased by 29.2%. After FA anaerobic treatment, nitrite was accumulated during nitrification. However, the nitrite accumulation disappeared on the sixth cycle of activity recovery tests with excessive aeration. Based on this result, a novel strategy for achieving nitritation is proposed, which involves recirculating a portion of the activated sludge through a side-line sludge treatment unit, where the sludge is subjected to treatment with FA under anaerobic condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stability of the 'L12 stalk' in ribosomes from mesophilic and (hyper)thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, D; Dontsova, M; Tribus, M; Garber, M; Piendl, W

    2006-01-01

    The ribosomal stalk complex, consisting of one molecule of L10 and four or six molecules of L12, is attached to 23S rRNA via protein L10. This complex forms the so-called 'L12 stalk' on the 50S ribosomal subunit. Ribosomal protein L11 binds to the same region of 23S rRNA and is located at the base of the 'L12 stalk'. The 'L12 stalk' plays a key role in the interaction of the ribosome with translation factors. In this study stalk complexes from mesophilic and (hyper)thermophilic species of the archaeal genus Methanococcus and from the Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, as well as from the Bacteria Escherichia coli, Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Thermus thermophilus, were overproduced in E.coli and purified under non-denaturing conditions. Using filter-binding assays the affinities of the archaeal and bacterial complexes to their specific 23S rRNA target site were analyzed at different pH, ionic strength and temperature. Affinities of both archaeal and bacterial complexes for 23S rRNA vary by more than two orders of magnitude, correlating very well with the growth temperatures of the organisms. A cooperative effect of binding to 23S rRNA of protein L11 and the L10/L12(4) complex from mesophilic and thermophilic Archaea was shown to be temperature-dependent.

  1. Nitrogen source effects on the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation culture and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria enrichment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-05-01

    The co-culture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) has a potential application in wastewater treatment plant. This study explored the effects of permutation and combination of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium on the culture enrichment from freshwater sediments. The co-existence of NO 3 - , NO 2 - , and NH 4 + shortened the enrichment time from 75 to 30 days and achieved a total nitrogen removal rate of 106.5 mg/L/day on day 132. Even though ammonium addition led to Anammox bacteria increase and a higher nitrogen removal rate, DAMO bacteria still dominated in different reactors with the highest proportion of 64.7% and the maximum abundance was 3.07 ± 0.25 × 10 8 copies/L (increased by five orders of magnitude) in the nitrite reactor. DAMO bacteria showed greater diversity in the nitrate reactor, and one was similar to M. oxyfera; DAMO bacteria in the nitrite reactor were relatively unified and similar to M. sinica. Interestingly, no DAMO archaea were found in the nitrate reactor. This study will improve the understanding of the impact of nitrogen source on DAMO and Anammox co-culture enrichment.

  2. Study of hydrogen producing bacteria in anaerobic digester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kexin, L.; Jieguan, X.; Duoqun, L.; Guochao, S.; Tingjie, S.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen was produced vigorously by adding tuber mill of Dioscorea zingiberensis to enrich a culture of biogas sludge. Hydrogen-producig bacteria were able to be enriched in this way and twenty-four strains of hydrogen-producing bacteria were isolated. The amount of hydrogen produced varied with the species of bacteria and the media used. These bacteria were identified as Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freudii, Hafina alvei and Clostridium acetobutylicum. E. cloacae may be the major component. Its relative number was about 58.3% of the total number of bacteria isolated, and S. marcescens, about 16.7% and C. acetobutylicum, about 12.5%. The methane content in the biogas was greatly increased by adding a mixed culture of hydrogen-producing bacteria to an enriched culture of biogas sludge. The carbon dioxide content in it was obviously reduced. 8 references.

  3. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of obligate anaerobic bacteria from clinical samples of animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Melissa; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; López-Ureña, Diana; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of veterinary infectious diseases has been the focus of considerable research, yet relatively little is known about the causative agents of anaerobic infections. Susceptibility studies have documented the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and indicate distinct differences in resistance patterns related to veterinary hospitals, geographic regions, and antibiotic-prescribing regimens. The aim of the present study was to identify the obligate anaerobic bacteria from veterinary clinical samples and to determinate the in vitro susceptibility to eight antimicrobials and their resistance-associated genes. 81 clinical specimens obtained from food-producing animals, pets and wild animals were examined to determine the relative prevalence of obligate anaerobic bacteria, and the species represented. Bacteroides spp, Prevotella spp and Clostridium spp represented approximately 80% of all anaerobic isolates. Resistance to metronidazole, clindamycin, tetracycline and fluoroquinolones was found in strains isolated from food-producing animals. Ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and cephalotin showed the highest resistance in all isolates. In 17%, 4% and 14% of tetracycline-resistant isolates, the resistance genes tetL, tetM and tetW were respectively amplified by PCR whereas in 4% of clindamycin-resistant strains the ermG gene was detected. 26% of the isolates were positive for cepA, while only 6% harbored the cfxA (resistance-conferring genes to beta-lactams). In this study, the obligate anaerobic bacteria from Costa Rica showed a high degree of resistance to most antimicrobials tested. Nevertheless, in the majority of cases this resistance was not related to the resistance acquired genes usually described in anaerobes. It is important to address and regulate the use of antimicrobials in the agricultural industry and the empirical therapy in anaerobic bacterial infections in veterinary medicine, especially since antibiotics and resistant bacteria can persist in the

  4. The role of zero valent iron on the fate of tetracycline resistance genes and class 1 integrons during thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of waste sludge and kitchen waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pin; Gu, Chaochao; Wei, Xin; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Jia, Hanzhong; Liu, Zhenhong; Xue, Gang; Ma, Chunyan

    2017-03-15

    Activated sludge has been identified as a potential significant source of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to the environment. Anaerobic digestion is extensively used for sludge stabilization and resource recovery, and represents a crucial process for controlling the dissemination of ARGs prior to land application of digested sludge. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of zero valent iron (Fe 0 ) on the attenuation of seven representative tetracycline resistance genes (tet, tet(A), tet(C), tet(G), tet(M), tet(O), tet(W), and tet(X)), and the integrase gene intI1 during thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of waste sludge and kitchen waste. Significant decrease (P  0.05) were found for all gene targets between digesters with Fe 0 dosages of 5 and 60 g/L. A first-order kinetic model favorably described the trends in concentrations of tet and intI1 gene targets during thermophilic anaerobic digestion with or without Fe 0 . Notably, tet genes encoding different resistance mechanisms behaved distinctly in anaerobic digesters, although addition of Fe 0 could enhance their reduction. The overall results of this research suggest that thermophilic anaerobic digestion with Fe 0 can be a potential alternative technology for the attenuation of tet and intI1 genes in waste sludge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficient hydrogen production from the lignocellulosic energy crop Miscanthus by the extreme thermophilic bacteria Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vrije Truus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The production of hydrogen from biomass by fermentation is one of the routes that can contribute to a future sustainable hydrogen economy. Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive feedstock because of its abundance, low production costs and high polysaccharide content. Results Batch cultures of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana produced hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetic acid as the main products from soluble saccharides in Miscanthus hydrolysate. The presence of fermentation inhibitors, such as furfural and 5-hydroxylmethyl furfural, in this lignocellulosic hydrolysate was avoided by the mild alkaline-pretreatment conditions at a low temperature of 75°C. Both microorganisms simultaneously and completely utilized all pentoses, hexoses and oligomeric saccharides up to a total concentration of 17 g l-1 in pH-controlled batch cultures. T. neapolitana showed a preference for glucose over xylose, which are the main sugars in the hydrolysate. Hydrogen yields of 2.9 to 3.4 mol H2 per mol of hexose, corresponding to 74 to 85% of the theoretical yield, were obtained in these batch fermentations. The yields were higher with cultures of C. saccharolyticus compared to T. neapolitana. In contrast, the rate of substrate consumption and hydrogen production was higher with T. neapolitana. At substrate concentrations exceeding 30 g l-1, sugar consumption was incomplete, and lower hydrogen yields of 2.0 to 2.4 mol per mol of consumed hexose were obtained. Conclusion Efficient hydrogen production in combination with simultaneous and complete utilization of all saccharides has been obtained during the growth of thermophilic bacteria on hydrolysate of the lignocellulosic feedstock Miscanthus. The use of thermophilic bacteria will therefore significantly contribute to the energy efficiency of a bioprocess for hydrogen production from biomass.

  6. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by anammox bacteria in the Black Sea RID B-8834-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, MMM; Sliekers, AO; Lavik, G.

    2003-01-01

    ). Here we provide evidence for bacteria that anaerobically oxidize ammonium with nitrite to N(2) in the world's largest anoxic basin, the Black Sea. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences shows that these bacteria are related to members of the order Planctomycetales performing...... the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process in ammonium-removing bioreactors(3). Nutrient profiles, fluorescently labelled RNA probes, (15)N tracer experiments and the distribution of specific 'ladderane' membrane lipids(4) indicate that ammonium diffusing upwards from the anoxic deep water is consumed...... by anammox bacteria below the oxic zone. This is the first time that anammox bacteria have been identified and directly linked to the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the environment. The widespread occurrence of ammonium consumption in suboxic marine settings(5-7) indicates that anammox might...

  7. Removal of organics and nutrients from food wastewater using combined thermophilic two-phase anaerobic digestion and shortcut biological nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fenghao; Lee, Seungho; Kim, Moonil

    2011-10-15

    A process combining pilot-scale two-phase anaerobic digestion and shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) was developed to treat organics and nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from food wastewater. The thermophilic two-phase anaerobic digestion process was investigated without adjusting the pH of the wastewater for the pre-acidification process. The digested food wastewater was treated using the SBNR process without supplemental carbon sources or alkalinity. Under these circumstances, the combined system was able to remove about 99% of COD, 88% of TN, and 97% of TP. However, considerable amounts of nutrients were removed due to chemical precipitation processes between the anaerobic digestion and SBNR. The average TN removal efficiency of the SBNR process was about 74% at very low C/N (TCOD/TN) ratio of 2. The SBNR process removed about 39% of TP from the digested food wastewater. Conclusively, application of the combined system improved organic removal efficiency while producing valuable energy (biogas), removed nitrogen at a low C/N ratio, and conserved additional resources (carbon and alkalinity). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fervidicola ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium from geothermal waters of the Great Artesian Basin, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, Christopher D; Patel, Bharat K C

    2009-05-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium, designated strain Y170(T), was isolated from a microbial mat colonizing thermal waters of a run-off channel created by the free-flowing waters of a Great Artesian Basin (GAB) bore well (New Lorne bore; registered number 17263). Cells of strain Y170(T) were slightly curved rods (1.2-12x0.8-1.1 mum) and stained Gram-negative. The strain grew optimally in tryptone-yeast extract-glucose medium at 70 degrees C (temperature range for growth was 55-80 degrees C) and pH 7 (pH range for growth was 5-9). Strain Y170(T) grew poorly on yeast extract as a sole carbon source, but not on tryptone (0.2 %). Yeast extract could not be replaced by tryptone and was obligately required for growth on tryptone, peptone, glucose, fructose, galactose, cellobiose, mannose, sucrose, xylose, mannitol, formate, pyruvate, Casamino acids and threonine. No growth was observed on arabinose, lactose, maltose, raffinose, chitin, xylan, pectin, starch, acetate, benzoate, lactate, propionate, succinate, myo-inositol, ethanol, glycerol, amyl media, aspartate, leucine, glutamate, alanine, arginine, serine and glycine. End products detected from glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol and presumably CO(2) and H(2). Iron(III), manganese(IV), thiosulfate and elemental sulfur, but not sulfate, sulfite, nitrate or nitrite, were used as electron acceptors in the presence of 0.2 % yeast extract. Iron(III) in the form of amorphous Fe(III) oxhydroxide and Fe(III) citrate was also reduced in the presence of tryptone, peptone and Casamino acids, but not with chitin, xylan, pectin, formate, starch, pyruvate, acetate, benzoate, threonine, lactate, propionate, succinate, inositol, ethanol, glycerol, mannitol, aspartate, leucine, glutamate, alanine, arginine, serine or glycine. Strain Y170(T) was not able to utilize molecular hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide in the presence or absence of iron(III). Chloramphenicol, streptomycin, tetracycline, penicillin and ampicillin and

  9. PepS from Streptococcus thermophilus. A new member of the aminopeptidase T family of thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Espla, M D; Rul, F

    1999-07-01

    The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria is essential for bacterial growth in milk but also for the development of the organoleptic properties of dairy products. Streptococcus thermophilus is widely used in the dairy industry. In comparison with the model lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis, S. thermophilus possesses two additional peptidases (an oligopeptidase and the aminopeptidase PepS). To understand how S. thermophilus grows in milk, we purified and characterized this aminopeptidase. PepS is a monomeric metallopeptidase of approximately 45 kDa with optimal activity in the range pH 7.5-8.5 and at 55 degrees C on Arg-paranitroanilide as substrate. PepS exhibits a high specificity towards peptides possessing arginine or aromatic amino acids at the N-terminus. From the N-terminal protein sequence of PepS, we deduced degenerate oligonucleotides and amplified the corresponding gene by successive PCR reactions. The deduced amino-acid sequence of the PepS gene has high identity (40-50%) with the aminopeptidase T family from thermophilic and extremophilic bacteria; we thus propose the classification of PepS from S. thermophilus as a new member of this family. In view of its substrate specificity, PepS could be involved both in bacterial growth by supplying amino acids, and in the development of dairy products' flavour, by hydrolysing bitter peptides and liberating aromatic amino acids which are important precursors of aroma compounds.

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria in Ontario, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand-Austin, Alex; Rawte, Prasad; Toye, Baldwin; Jamieson, Frances B; Farrell, David J; Patel, Samir N

    2014-08-01

    The local epidemiology of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in anaerobic bacteria is important in guiding the empiric treatment of infections. However, susceptibility data are very limited on anaerobic organisms, particularly among non-Bacteroides organisms. To determine susceptibility profiles of clinically-significant anaerobic bacteria in Ontario Canada, anaerobic isolates from sterile sites submitted to Public Health Ontario Laboratory (PHOL) for identification and susceptibility testing were included in this study. Using the E-test method, isolates were tested for various antimicrobials including, penicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and metronidazole. The MIC results were interpreted based on guidelines published by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Of 2527 anaerobic isolates submitted to PHOL, 1412 were either from sterile sites or bronchial lavage, and underwent susceptibility testing. Among Bacteroides fragilis, 98.2%, 24.7%, 1.6%, and 1.2% were resistant to penicillin, clindamycin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and metronidazole, respectively. Clostridium perfringens was universally susceptible to penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem, whereas 14.2% of other Clostridium spp. were resistant to penicillin. Among Gram-positive anaerobes, Actinomyces spp., Parvimonas micra and Propionibacterium spp. were universally susceptible to β-lactams. Eggerthella spp., Collinsella spp., and Eubacterium spp. showed variable resistance to penicillin. Among Gram-negative anaerobes, Fusobacterium spp., Prevotella spp., and Veillonella spp. showed high resistance to penicillin but were universally susceptible to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. The detection of metronidazole resistant B. fragilis is concerning as occurrence of these isolates is extremely rare. These data highlight the importance of ongoing surveillance to provide clinically relevant information to clinicians for empiric management of

  11. Bioaugmentation of a Two-Stage Thermophilic (68°C/55°C) Anaerobic Digestion Concept for Improvement of the Methane Yield From Cattle Manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of improving a two-stage (68°C/55°C) anaerobic digestion concept for treatment of cattle manure was studied. In batch experiments, a 10-24% increase of the specific methane yield from cattle manure and its fractions was obtained, when the substrates were inoculated with bacteria...

  12. Underground Corrosion by Microorganisms Part II : Role of Anaerobic Sulphate Reducing Bacteria-Desulfotomaculum SP

    OpenAIRE

    H. M. Dayal; K. C. Tiwari; Kamlesh Mehta; Mr. Chandrashekhar

    1988-01-01

    During the course of studies on the corrosion causing soil microflora from different geoclimatic regions of India, several strains of anaerobic sulphate reducing bacteria belonging to genus Desulfotomaculum were isolated and characterised. Their corrosive action on mild steel, galvanised iron and structural aluminium, the three main metals of construction of underground structures, have been studied under laboratory conditions.

  13. In vivo IgA coating of anaerobic bacteria in human faeces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderWaaij, LA; Limburg, PC; Mesander, G; vanderWaaij, D

    The bacterial flora in the human colon, although extremely diverse, has a relatively stable composition and non-infectious anaerobic bacteria are dominant. The flora forms a pool of numerous different antigens separated from mucosal immunocompetent cells by just a single layer of epithelial cells.

  14. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria from gut of red palm weevil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... in the intestinal termite gut play key physiological functions. These functions are: cellulose and ... facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from termite's intestine including Burkholderia sp. and Citrobacter sp. .... The diversity of intestinal microbiota signifies the need for special requirements for cultivation.

  15. Enrichment and detection of microorganisms involved in direct and indirect methanogenesis from methanol in an anaerobic thermophilic bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, de K.; Altinbas, M.; Paulo, P.L.; Heilig, H.G.H.J.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Smidt, H.; Vos, de W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the microorganisms involved in direct and indirect methane formation from methanol in a laboratory-scale thermophilic (55°C) methanogenic bioreactor, reactor sludge was disrupted and serial dilutions were incubated in specific growth media containing methanol and possible

  16. Establishment and Characterization of an Anaerobic Thermophilic (55 degrees C) Enrichment Culture Degrading Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1995-01-01

    A thermophilic, long-chain fatty acid-oxidizing culture was enriched. Stearate was used as the substrate, and methane and carbon dioxide were the sole end products. Cultivation was possible only when a fed-batch system was used or with addition of activated carbon or bentonite. The enrichment...

  17. Extensive evaluation of fastidious anaerobic bacteria recovery from the Copan eSwab® transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuyser, Thomas; De Geyter, Deborah; Van Dorpe, Daisy; Vandoorslaer, Kristof; Wybo, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Anaerobic infections are difficult to diagnose and treat, because of the often slow in vitro growth, the polymicrobial nature and the increasing antimicrobial resistance. Furthermore because of their fastidiousness, anaerobic bacteria often stay unrecognized in clinical practice. Clinical specimens potentially harboring these species require special handling to permit satisfactory recovery of these potential important pathogens. In a clinical setting, temporary storage and transportation to the laboratory are unavoidable before these specimens can be cultured. In the current study we expand the knowledge about the recovery of a wide range of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria from an eSwab® container after different storage durations and temperatures. Our findings support the use of the eSwab® container as a relative short-term storage unit for anaerobic species. When stored at 2-4°C immediately after inoculation, all anaerobic species (except for Clostridium clostridioforme) can be recovered from the liquid Amies medium until 1day post-specimen collection. Because most samples in the clinical setting are processed in this time span, the eSwab® container is sufficiently capable of retaining viability in daily routine. However; because of inevitable centralization of clinical laboratories, adequate storage of these specimens for an extended period of time will be essential in the future. Therefore in certain cases, when viability is desired for longer periods (>1day), storage of the containers at 2-4°C is certainly advisable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Anaerobic Bacteria: Rubik’s Cube of Clinical Microbiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdács, Márió; Spengler, Gabriella; Urbán, Edit

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria have pivotal roles in the microbiota of humans and they are significant infectious agents involved in many pathological processes, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Their isolation, cultivation and correct identification differs significantly from the workup of aerobic species, although the use of new technologies (e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, whole genome sequencing) changed anaerobic diagnostics dramatically. In the past, antimicrobial susceptibility of these microorganisms showed predictable patterns and empirical therapy could be safely administered but recently a steady and clear increase in the resistance for several important drugs (β-lactams, clindamycin) has been observed worldwide. For this reason, antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic isolates for surveillance purposes or otherwise is of paramount importance but the availability of these testing methods is usually limited. In this present review, our aim was to give an overview of the methods currently available for the identification (using phenotypic characteristics, biochemical testing, gas-liquid chromatography, MALDI-TOF MS and WGS) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (agar dilution, broth microdilution, disk diffusion, gradient tests, automated systems, phenotypic and molecular resistance detection techniques) of anaerobes, when should these methods be used and what are the recent developments in resistance patterns of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:29112122

  19. Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Anaerobic Bacteria: Rubik's Cube of Clinical Microbiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdács, Márió; Spengler, Gabriella; Urbán, Edit

    2017-11-07

    Anaerobic bacteria have pivotal roles in the microbiota of humans and they are significant infectious agents involved in many pathological processes, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Their isolation, cultivation and correct identification differs significantly from the workup of aerobic species, although the use of new technologies (e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, whole genome sequencing) changed anaerobic diagnostics dramatically. In the past, antimicrobial susceptibility of these microorganisms showed predictable patterns and empirical therapy could be safely administered but recently a steady and clear increase in the resistance for several important drugs (β-lactams, clindamycin) has been observed worldwide. For this reason, antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic isolates for surveillance purposes or otherwise is of paramount importance but the availability of these testing methods is usually limited. In this present review, our aim was to give an overview of the methods currently available for the identification (using phenotypic characteristics, biochemical testing, gas-liquid chromatography, MALDI-TOF MS and WGS) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (agar dilution, broth microdilution, disk diffusion, gradient tests, automated systems, phenotypic and molecular resistance detection techniques) of anaerobes, when should these methods be used and what are the recent developments in resistance patterns of anaerobic bacteria.

  20. Frequency of resistance in obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs, cats, and horses to antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhon, S D; Taylor, A; Fajt, V R

    2013-11-01

    Clinical specimens from dogs, cats, and horses were examined for the presence of obligate anaerobic bacteria. Of 4,018 specimens cultured, 368 yielded 606 isolates of obligate anaerobic bacteria (248 from dogs, 50 from cats, and 308 from horses). There were 100 specimens from 94 animals from which only anaerobes were isolated (25 dogs, 8 cats, and 61 horses). The most common sites tested were abdominal fluid (dogs and cats) and intestinal contents (horses). The most common microorganism isolated from dogs, cats, and horses was Clostridium perfringens (75, 13, and101 isolates, respectively). The MICs of amoxicillin with clavulanate, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, and penicillin were determined using a gradient endpoint method for anaerobes. Isolates collected at necropsy were not tested for antimicrobial susceptibility unless so requested by the clinician. There were 1/145 isolates tested that were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate (resistance breakpoint ≥ 16/8 μg/ml), 7/77 isolates tested were resistant to ampicillin (resistance breakpoint ≥ 2 μg/ml), 4/242 isolates tested were resistant to chloramphenicol (resistance breakpoint ≥ 32 μg/ml), 12/158 isolates tested were resistant to clindamycin (resistance breakpoint ≥ 8 μg/ml), 10/247 isolates tested were resistant to metronidazole (resistance breakpoint ≥ 32 μg/ml), and 54/243 isolates tested were resistant to penicillin (resistance breakpoint ≥ 2 μg/ml). These data suggest that anaerobes are generally susceptible to antimicrobial drugs in vitro.

  1. Immobilization of anaerobic bacteria on rubberized-coir for psychrophilic digestion of night soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Ramana, Karna Venkat; Tomar, Arvind; Waghmare, Chandrakant; Kamboj, Dev Vrat; Singh, Lokendra

    2005-08-01

    Low-ambient temperatures, biodigesters due to low-growth rate of the constituent bacterial consortium. Immobilization of anaerobic bacteria has been attempted in the biodigester operating at 10 degrees C. Various matrices were screened and evaluated for the immobilization of bacteria in digesters. Anaerobic digestion of night soil was carried out with hydraulic retention time in the range of 9-18 days. Among the tested matrices, rubberized-coir was found to be the most useful at 10 degrees C with optimum hydraulic retention time of 15 days. Optimum amount of coir was found as 25 g/L of the working volume of biodigesters. Immobilization of bacteria on the coir was observed by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent microscopy. The study indicates that rubberized-coir can be utilized to increase biodegradation of night soil at higher organic loading. Another advantage of using this matrix is that it is renewable and easily available in comparison to other synthetic polymeric matrices.

  2. Improved cellulose conversion to bio-hydrogen with thermophilic bacteria and characterization of microbial community in continuous bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hongyu; Gadow, Samir I.; Tanaka, Yasumitsu; Cheng, Jun; Li, Yu-You

    2015-01-01

    Thermophilic hydrogen fermentation of cellulose was evaluated by a long term continuous experiment and batch experiments. The continuous experiment was conducted under 55 °C using a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 day. A stable hydrogen yield of 15.4 ± 0.23 mol kg −1 of cellulose consumed was maintained for 190 days with acetate and butyrate as the main soluble byproducts. An analysis of the 16S rRNA sequences showed that the hydrogen-producing thermophilic cellulolytic microorganisms (HPTCM) were close to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, Clostridium sp. and Enterobacter cloacae. Batch experiment demonstrated that the highest H 2 producing activity was obtained at 55 °C and the ultimate hydrogen yield and the metabolic by-products were influenced greatly by temperatures. The effect of temperature variation showed that the activation energy for cellulose and glucose were estimated at 103 and 98.8 kJ mol −1 , respectively. - Highlights: • Continuous cellulosic-hydrogen fermentation was conducted at 55 °C. • Hydrogen yield was improved to 15.4 mol kg −1 of consumed-cellulose. • The cellulosic hydrogen bacteria were close to Clostridia and Enterobacter genus. • The mixed microflora produced H 2 within a wide range of temperatures (35 °C–65 °C). • Activation energy of cellulose and glucose were 103 and 98.8 kJ mol −1 , respectively

  3. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by Anammox bacteria in the Black Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kuypers, M.M.M.; Sliekers, O.; Lavik, G.; Schmid, M.; Jørgensen, B.B.; Kuenen, J.G.; Strous, M.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2003-01-01

    The availability of fixed inorganic nitrogen (nitrate, nitrite and ammonium) limits primary productivity in many oceanic regions1. The conversion of nitrate to N2 by heterotrophic bacteria (denitrification) is believed to be the only important sink for fixed inorganic nitrogen in the ocean2. Here we

  4. Anaerobic degradation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) by denitrifying bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, A.; Plugge, C.M.; Garcia Encina, P.A.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Two denitrifying bacteria were isolated using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as substrate. Strains SN1 and SN2 were isolated from an activated sludge reactor of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) with Anaerobic–Anoxic–Oxic (A2/O) steps. Based on 16S rRNA gene analysis strain SN1 is 99% similar to

  5. Immunochemical Investigations of Cell Surface Antigens of Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-15

    has also been visulalized . With use of a radioactive anti’qen bindinq assay, antibody to this capsularpolysaccharide has been demonstrated in anti- sera...With many bacteria, serogrouning is based on cansular oolysaccharide antigens. Serogrouping has led to much valuable epidemiologic information

  6. Bacteremia due to anaerobic bacteria: epidemiology in a northern Bari Hospital, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonietta Distasi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anaerobic bacteria are part of the commensal bacterial flora of skin and mucosae. Iatrogenic and pathological conditions altering this commensal relationship cause life-threatening diseases. Materials and Methods. We analysed the blood cultures sent to the microbiology of our hospital between 2008 and the first quarter of 2013 to measure the frequency of bacteraemia caused by anaerobia. We examined 3138 vials of blood cultures for anaerobia, inoculated following in-house standard procedures. The colonies grown in absence of air were subjected to biochemical analysis. The MICs of metronidazole for 23 of the 26 organisms was tested. Results. Twelve bacteria of the Bacteroides genus were identified, 9 Propionibacterium acnes, 1 Peptosctreptococcus micros, 1 Lactobacillus acidophilus, 1 Clostridium perfringens, 1 Prevotella oralis, 1 Eubacterium lentum. Conclusions. The analysis of the results suggests that the incidence of cultures positive to anaerobia was constant across the years. We note that advanced age, altered mucocutaneous tropism, alterations to the oral and intestinal bacterial flora intensify the risk of anaerobial pathogenicity. The analysis of the metronidazole-determined MIC suggests that the intestinal anaerobic flora responds well to therapy and prophylaxis with Metronidazole, while the anaerobic bacteria residing on skin and other mucosae are resistant. It is however hard to determine the clinical impact of anaerobic bacteremiae and their effect on the outcome of the patient, due to the scarcity of available clinical data.

  7. Stress hormone epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) effects on the anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, Lyudmila

    2017-04-01

    Microbial endocrinology is a relatively new research area that already encompasses the anaerobes. Stress hormones, epinephrine and norepinephrine, can affect the growth of anaerobic bacteria such as Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella spp., Porhyromonas spp., Tanerella forsythia and Propionibacterium acnes and can increase virulence gene expression, iron acquisition and many virulence factors of some anaerobic species such as Clostridium perfringens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Brachyspira pilosicoli. Epinephrine and norepinephrine effects can lead to a growth increase or decrease, or no effect on the growth of the anaerobes. The effects are species-specific and perhaps strain-specific. Discrepancies in the results of some studies can be due to the different methods and media used, catecholamine concentrations, measurement techniques and the low number of strains tested. Biological effects of the stress hormones on the anaerobes may range from halitosis and a worsening of periodontal diseases to tissue damages and atherosclerotic plaque ruptures. Optimizations of the research methods and a detailed assessment of the catecholamine effects in conditions mimicking those in affected organs and tissues, as well as the effects on the quorum sensing and virulence of the anaerobes and the full spectrum of biological consequences of the effects are interesting topics for further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooteghem Van, Suellen

    2005-09-13

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  9. The effects of micro-aeration on the phylogenetic diversity of microorganisms in a thermophilic anaerobic municipal solid-waste digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yueqin; Shigematsu, Toru; Ikbal; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2004-05-01

    We demonstrated previously that micro-aeration allows construction of an effective thermophilic methane-fermentation system for treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) without production of H(2)S. In the present study, we compared the microbial communities in a thermophilic MSW digester without aeration and with micro-aeration by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), phylogenetic analysis of libraries of 16S rRNA gene clones and quantitative real-time PCR. Moreover, we studied the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) by analysis of the transcription of the gene for dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr). Experiments using FISH revealed that microorganisms belonging to the domain Bacteria dominated in the digester both without aeration and with micro-aeration. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene and analysis of bacteria by DGGE did not reveal any obvious difference within the microbial communities under the two aeration conditions, and bacteria affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes were dominant. In Archaea, the population of Methanosarcina decreased while the population of Methanoculleus increased as a result of micro-aerations as revealed by the analysis of 16S rRNA gene clones and quantitative real-time PCR. Reverse transcription and PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated the transcription of dsrA not only in the absence of aeration but also in the presence of micro-aeration, even under conditions where no H(2)S was detected in the biogas. In conclusion, micro-aeration has no obvious effects on the phylogenetic diversity of microorganisms. Furthermore, the activity of SRBs in the digester was not repressed even though the concentration of H(2)S in the biogas was very low under the micro-aeration conditions.

  10. Multidrug Efflux Systems in Microaerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    Active drug efflux constitutes an important mechanism of antibiotic and multidrug resistance in bacteria. Understanding the distribution, expression, and physiological functions of multidrug efflux pumps, especially under physiologically and clinically relevant conditions of the pathogens, is the key to combat drug resistance. In animal hosts, most wounded, infected and inflamed tissues display low oxygen tensions. In this article, we summarize research development on multidrug efflux pumps i...

  11. Simultaneous Production of Hydrogen and Methane from Sugar Beet Molasses in a Two Phase Anaerobic Digestion System in UASB Reactors under Thermophilic Temperature (55 Deg C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongjan, P.; Villafa, S.; Beltran, P.; Min, B.; Angelidaki, I. (Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Technical Univ. of Denmark, DK-2800, Lyngby (Denmark)). e-mail: pak@env.dtu.dk

    2008-10-15

    Simultaneous production of hydrogen and methane in two sequential stages of acidogenic and methanogenic step was investigated in two serial operated up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors at thermophilic temperature (55 deg C). Hydrogen production from molasses was carried out in the first reactor at the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1 day. Molasses were converted into hydrogen with the yield of 1.3 mole-H{sub 2}/mole-hexose{sub added} or 82.7 ml- H{sub 2}/g-VS{sub added} of molasses, and the hydrogen productivity was 2696 ml-H{sub 2}/dxl{sub reactor}. The effluent (mainly butyrate, acetate and lactate) after the acidogenic process was subsequently fed to the second reactor for methane production at HRT of 3 days. Methane production yield of 255 ml-H{sub 2}/g-VS{sub added} of influent or 130.1 ml-H{sub 2}/g-VS{sub added} of molasses and methane production rate of 1056 ml/dxl{sub reactor} were obtained. Significant decrease of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) was also observed in the effluent of the second reactor. A two phase anaerobic digestion was successfully demonstrated for molasses as a potential substrate to produce hydrogen and subsequent methane in the UASB reactors

  12. The Start-up of Hybrid, Anaerobic up-flow Sludge Blanket (HUASB under a Range of Mesophiclic and Thermophilic Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Habeeb

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effect of gradual increase of the temperature on the performance of anaerobic process of palm oil mill effluent (POME, and sludge granules development. Two hybrid up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB reactors R1 and R2 were employed to be run at 27±2 and 37±1°C, respectively. R1 was kept at room temperature for the whole experiment, where the temperature of R2 was increased up to 49ºC (3ºC after every steady-state occurrence. Maximum COD removal of 91% was obtained in R2 at optimum temperature of 46°C, while 84% was recorded in R1. Additional parameters were applied to evaluate the performance of the process, i.e. total suspended solids (TSS, Turbidity, and Color. The imaging of sludge aggregate has revealed the effect of temperature on granulation development during the experiment. Throughout the operation period, it can be seen that the microbial growth rate was significantly affected by temperature. Hence, the use of HUASB reactor could be productively implemented for POME treatment as an efficient system under the mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures.

  13. Antimicrobial resistance determinants among anaerobic bacteria isolated from footrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, María; García, Nuria; Ayala, Juan Alfonso; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Quesada, Alberto

    2012-05-25

    Antibiotic resistance has been evaluated among 36 Gram negative and anaerobic bacilli (10 Bacteroides, 11 Prevotella, 7 Porphyromonas and 8 Fusobacterium strains) isolated from clinical cases of caprine and ovine footrot (necrotic pododermatitis). The initial analysis on this bacterial consortium evaluates the relationships existing among antimicrobial resistance determinants, phenotype expression and mobilization potential. The Bacteroides strains were generally resistant to penicillins, first-generation cephalosporins, tetracycline and erythromycin, and expressed low level of β-lactamase activity. The main determinants found among the Bacteroides strains were cepA and tetQ genes, conferring resistance to β-lactams and tetracycline, respectively. A general susceptibility to β-lactams was shown for most Prevotella, Porphyromonas and Fusobacterium strains, where none of the β-lactamase genes described in Bacteroides was detected. Resistance to tetracycline and/or erythromycin was found among the three bacterial groups. Although tetQ genes were detected for several Prevotella and Porphyromonas strains, a unique ermF positive was revealed among Prevotella strains. The expression of resistance markers was not related with the polymorphism of their coding sequences. However, the finding of sequence signatures for conjugative transposons in the vicinities of tetQ and ermF suggests a mobilization potential that might have contributed to the spread of antimicrobial resistance genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Incidence of anaerobic bacteria in patients with suspected pneumonia in surgical Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, T; Gouin, P; Frebourg, N; Rey, N; Royon, V; Bergis, A; Hobeika, S; Dureuil, B; Veber, B

    2014-10-01

    Few studies have investigated the incidence of pulmonary anaerobes in a specific population in surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The objective of this work was to determine the incidence of anaerobes in surgical ICU patients with suspected pneumonia. This was a prospective observational, single-center study. Analysis was based on data collected over 30 months from the surgical ICU of a tertiary care hospital (Rouen University Hospital), including data on risk factors for anaerobes in the lungs. Patients with suspected pneumonia (community-acquired or nosocomial) were included. Bacteriological sampling was performed by protected distal bronchial sampling (PDBS) with minilavage under bronchoscopy. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were performed for each sample. Clinicians were only aware of aerobic results. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis compared groups with and without anaerobes. A total of 134 samples were obtained from 117 patients. Surgery was performed on 74 patients (63.2%), within 24 hours of admission. Fifty-four patients (46.2%) had a chest trauma and 20 patients (17.1%) were admitted for a digestive pathology. Average age was 53.6±20.9 years and sex ratio was 5.9 (100 men/17 women). Average SAPS II was 41.6±15.1, median length of ICU stay was 23 days (25th percentile=13, 75th percentile=33), and median duration of mechanical ventilation was 21 days (25th percentile=11, 75th percentile=28). Mortality rate in ICU was 14.5%. After sampling, diagnosis of pneumonia was confirmed in 70 cases (52.2%). Anaerobe cultures were positive in 11 samples taken from 11 different patients (overall incidence 8.2%). Aerobic bacteria were also involved in 9 patients (81.8%). In univariate analysis, enteral feeding (P=0.02) and absence of catecholamines at time of sampling (P=0.003) were significantly associated with the presence of anaerobes in PDBS. Enteral nutrition was also found to be a risk factor in multivariate analysis (OR=11.8, 95% CI [1.36 to 102

  15. Thermophilic two-phase anaerobic digestion using an innovative fixed-bed reactor for enhanced organic matter removal and bioenergy recovery from sugarcane vinasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Kiyuna, Luma Sayuri Mazine; Ferraz, Antônio Djalma Nunes; Persinoti, Gabriela Felix

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An innovative fixed-film anaerobic reactor was applied to sugarcane vinasse. • Stable operation was observed for OLRs as high as 30 kg COD m −3 day −1 . • Propionate buildup did not impact the stability of the structured-bed reactor. • Enhanced bioenergy recovery was estimated from biodigestion with phase separation. • Energy extraction was over 20% higher compared to single-phase systems. - Abstract: This study considered the application of anaerobic digestion (AD) with phase separation combined with the use of an anaerobic structured-bed reactor (ASTBR) as the methanogenic phase for the treatment of sugarcane vinasse, a high-strength wastewater resulting from ethanol production. Two combined thermophilic acidogenic-methanogenic systems formed by one single acidogenic reactor followed by two methanogenic reactors operated in parallel were compared, namely, a conventional UASB reactor and an upflow ASTBR reactor. Increasing organic loading rate (OLR) conditions (15–30 kg COD m −3 d −1 ) were applied to the methanogenic reactors. The results highlighted the feasibility of applying the ASTBR to vinasse, indicating a global COD removal higher than 80%. The ASTBR exhibited a stable long-term operation (240 days), even for OLR values as high as 30 kg COD m −3 d −1 . The application of similar conditions to the UASB reactor indicated severe performance losses, leading to the accumulation of acids for every increase in the OLR. An energetic potential of 181.5 MJ for each cubic meter of vinasse was estimated from both hydrogen and methane. The provision of bicarbonate alkalinity proved to be a key factor in obtaining stable performance, offsetting the limitations of relatively low hydraulic retention times (<24 h).

  16. Comparison of two-stage thermophilic (68 degrees C/55 degrees C) anaerobic digestion with one-stage thermophilic (55 degrees C) digestion of cattle manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Westermann, Peter

    2004-01-01

    C for periods of 36, 108, and 168 h, and subsequently digested at 55degreesC. In a lab-scale experiment, the performance of a two-stage reactor system, consisting of a digester operating at 68degreesC with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3 days, connected to a 55degreesC reactor with 12-day HRT......, was compared with a conventional single-stage reactor running at 55degreesC with 15-days HRT. When an organic loading of 3 g volatile solids (VS) per liter per day was applied, the two-stage setup had a 6% to 8% higher specific methane yield and a 9% more effective VS-removal than the conventional single......A two-stage 68degreesC/55degreesC anaerobic degradation process for treatment of cattle manure was studied. In batch experiments, an increase of the specific methane yield, ranging from 24% to 56%, was obtained when cattle manure and its fractions (fibers and liquid) were pretreated at 68degrees...

  17. In-vitro activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Andrej; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Nord, Carl Erik

    2016-12-01

    Solithromycin is a novel fluoroketolide with high activity against bacteria associated with community-acquired respiratory tract infections as well as gonorrhea. However, data on the activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota are scarce. In this study, 1024 Gram-positive and Gram-negative anaerobic isolates from the normal intestinal microbiota were analyzed for in-vitro susceptibility against solithromycin and compared to azithromycin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone, metronidazole and levofloxacin by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Solithromycin was active against Bifidobacteria (MIC 50 , 0.008 mg/L) and Lactobacilli (MIC 50 , 0.008 mg/L). The MIC 50 for Clostridia, Bacteroides, Prevotella and Veillonella were 0.5, 0.5, 0.125 and 0.016 mg/L, respectively. Gram-positive anaerobes were more susceptible to solithromycin as compared to the other antimicrobials tested. The activity of solithromycin against Gram-negative anaerobes was equal or higher as compared to other tested agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Stable carbon isotopic fractionations associated with inorganic carbon fixation by anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Stefan; Strous, Marc; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Baas, Marianne; Schubert, Carsten J; Jetten, Mike S M; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2004-06-01

    Isotopic analyses of Candidatus "Brocadia anammoxidans," a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that anaerobically oxidizes ammonium (anammox), show that it strongly fractionates against (13)C; i.e., lipids are depleted by up to 47 per thousand versus CO(2). Similar results were obtained for the anammox bacterium Candidatus "Scalindua sorokinii," which thrives in the anoxic water column of the Black Sea, suggesting that different anammox bacteria use identical carbon fixation pathways, which may be either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl coenzyme A pathway.

  19. Advances in methods for detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Meng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), the biochemical process oxidizing ammonium into dinitrogen gas using nitrite as an electron acceptor, has only been recognized for its significant role in the global nitrogen cycle not long ago, and its ubiquitous distribution in a wide range of environments has changed our knowledge about the contributors to the global nitrogen cycle. Currently, several groups of methods are used in detection of anammox bacteria based on their physiological and biochem...

  20. Performance and microbial community analysis of two-stage process with extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from hydrolysate in UASB reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    The two-stage process for extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. Specific hydrogen and methane yields of 89ml-H2/g-VS (190ml-H2/g-sugars) and 307ml-CH4/g-VS, respectively were...... energy of 13.4kJ/g-VS. Dominant hydrogen-producing bacteria in the H2-UASB reactor were Thermoanaerobacter wiegelii, Caldanaerobacter subteraneus, and Caloramator fervidus. Meanwhile, the CH4-UASB reactor was dominated with methanogens of Methanosarcina mazei and Methanothermobacter defluvii. The results...

  1. Strong antimicrobial activity of xanthohumol and other derivatives from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) on gut anaerobic bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, P.; Olšovská, J.; Mikyška, A.; Dušek, M.; Kadlečková, Z.; Vaníček, J.; Nyč, O.; Sigler, Karel; Bostíková, V.; Bostík, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 125, č. 11 (2017), s. 1033-1038 ISSN 0903-4641 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Xanthohumol * gut * anaerobic bacteria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 1.795, year: 2016

  2. [Effect of the medium redox potential on the growth and metabolism of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilian, A; Trchunian, A

    2008-01-01

    Based on the available literature data on a decrease in the redox potential of medium to low negative values and a decrease in pH during the growth of sugar-fermenting anaerobic bacteria, it was concluded that these processes cannot be described by the theory of redox potential. A theory was developed according to which the regulation of bacterial metabolism is accomplished through changes in the redox potential. The theory considers the redox potential as a factor determining the growth of anaerobic bacteria, which is regulated by oxidizers and reducers. The assumption is put forward that, under anaerobic conditions, bacteria are sensitive to changes in the redox potential and have a redox taxis. The effect of the redox potential on the transport of protons and other substances through membranes and the activity of membrane-bound enzymes, including the proton F1-F0-ATPase, whose mechanisms of action involve changes in the proton conductance of the membrane, the generation of proton-driving force, and dithiol-disulfide transitions in proteins was studied.

  3. [Utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Mariela S; Romano, Vanesa; Nievas, Jimena; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2014-01-01

    The analysis by MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-assited laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) has become a reference method for the identification of microorganisms in Clinical Microbiology. However, data on some groups of microorganisms are still controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. One-hundred and six anaerobic bacteria isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and by conventional biochemical tests. In those cases where identification by conventional methodology was not applicable or in the face of discordance between sequencing methodologies, 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis was performed. The conventional method and MALDI-TOF MS agreed at genus and species level by 95.3 %. Concordance in gram-negative bacilli was 91.4% and 100% among gram-positive bacilli; there was also concordance both in the 8 isolates studied in gram-positive cocci and in the single gram-negative cocci included. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS offers the possibility of adequate identification of anaerobic bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. [Isolation and identification of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria in the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenxin; Wu, Fanzi; Zhou, Xinxuan; Wu, Lan; Li, Mingyun; Ren, Biao; Guo, Qiang; Huang, Ruijie; Li, Jiyao; Xiao, Liying; Li, Yan

    2015-12-01

    To establish a systematic method for isolation and identification of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria in the oral cavity. Samples of the saliva, dental plaque and periapical granulation tissue were collected from 20 subjects with healthy oral condition and from 8 patients with different oral diseases. The bacteria in the samples were identified by morphological identification, VITEK automatic microorganism identification and 16s rRNA gene sequencing. VITEK automatic microorganism identification and 16s rRNA gene sequencing showed an agreement rate of 22.39% in identifying the bacteria in the samples. We identified altogether 63 bacterial genus (175 species), among which Streptococcus, Actinomyces and Staphylococcus were the most common bacterial genus, and Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomyces oris, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis were the most common species. Streptococcus anginosus was commonly found in patients with chronic periapical periodontitis. Streptococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus aureus were common in patients with radiation caries, and in patients with rampant caries, Streptococcus mutans was found at considerably higher rate than other species. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria are commonly found in the oral cavity, and most of them are gram-positive. 16s rRNA gene sequencing is more accurate than VITEK automatic microorganism identification in identifying the bacteria.

  5. Diversity of aerobic and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Naglaa M; Saito, Keiko; Tal, Yossi; Hill, Russell T

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) are known to have an important function in the marine nitrogen cycle. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) carried out by some members of Planctomycetales is also an important process in marine ecosystems. Ammonia-monooxygenase gene (amoA) fragments were amplified to investigate the potential for nitrification and the diversity of the AAOB in two marine sponges Ircinia strobilina and Mycale laxissima. All of the AmoA sequences obtained from the two sponges clustered with the AmoA sequences of the Betaproteobacteria Nitrosospira spp. To investigate the anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) in sponges, 16S rRNA gene fragments of Planctomycetales and anammox bacteria were also amplified with specific primers, and clone libraries were constructed. The Planctomycetales diversity detected in the two sponges was different. The Planctomycetales community in M. laxissima was affiliated with Pirellula, Planctomyces and anammox bacteria, while all of the I. strobilina Planctomycetales clones were solely affiliated with the candidate phylum 'Poribacteria'. Interestingly, sequences related to anammox genera were recovered only from M. laxissima. This is the first report of anammox bacteria in marine sponges. It is intriguing to find AAOB and AnAOB in M. laxissima, but the nature of their interaction with the sponge host and with each other remains unclear. This work further supports the potential of sponge-associated microorganisms for nitrification and sheds light on anammox as a new aspect of the nitrogen cycle in marine sponges.

  6. Thermophilic hydrogen-producing bacteria inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal environments represented by Caloranaerobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijing; Xu, Hongxiu; Zeng, Xiang; Wu, Xiaobing; Long, Minnan; Shao, Zongze

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen is an important energy source for deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. However, little is known about microbes and their role in hydrogen turnover in the environment. In this study, the diversity and physiological characteristics of fermentative hydrogen-producing microbes from deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields were described for the first time. Seven enrichments were obtained from hydrothermal vent sulfides collected from the Southwest Indian Ocean, East Pacific and South Atlantic. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that members of the Caloranaerobacter genus were the dominant component in these enrichments. Subsequently, three thermophilic hydrogen producers, strains H363, H53214 and DY22619, were isolated. They were phylogenetically related to species of the genus Caloranaerobacter. The H2 yields of strains H363, H53214, DY22619 and MV107, which was the type species of genus Caloranaerobacter, were 0.11, 1.21, 3.13 and 2.85 mol H2/mol glucose, respectively. Determination of the main soluble metabolites revealed that strains H363, H53214 and MV107 performed heterolactic fermentations, while strain DY22619 performed butyric acid fermentation, indicating distinct fermentation patterns among members of the genus. Finally, a diversity of forms of [FeFe]-hydrogenase with different modular structures was revealed based on draft genomic data of Caloranaerobacter strains. This highlights the complexity of hydrogen metabolism in Caloranaerobacter, reflecting adaptations to environmental conditions in hydrothermal vent systems. Collectively, results suggested that Caloranaerobacter species might be ubiquitous and play a role in biological hydrogen generation in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Fermentative hydrogen production from anaerobic bacteria using a membrane bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi-Sun Kim; You-Kwan Oh; Young-Su Yun; Dong-Yeol Lee

    2006-01-01

    Continuous H 2 production from glucose was studied at short hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 4.69 - 0.79 h using a membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a hollow-fiber filtration unit and mixed cells as inoculum. The reactor was inoculated with sewage sludge, which were heat-treated at 90 C for harvesting spore-forming, H 2 -producing bacteria, and fed with synthetic wastewater containing 1% (w/v) glucose. With decreasing HRT, volumetric H 2 production rate increased but the H 2 production yield to glucose decreased gradually. The H 2 content in biogas was maintained at 50 - 70% (v/v) and no appreciable CH 4 was detected during the operation. The maximal volumetric H 2 production rate and H 2 yield to glucose were 1714 mmol H 2 /L.d and 1.1 mol H 2 /mol glucose, respectively. These results indicate that the MBR should be considered as one of the most promising systems for fermentative H 2 production. (authors)

  8. Biogeography of thermophilic, endospore-forming bacteria in deepwater hydrocarbon seep sediments of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, A.; Hubert, C. R.; Ellefson, E.

    2016-12-01

    Dormant endospores of thermophilic bacteria (thermospores) are routinely detected in permanently cold marine surface sediments and are an example of the microbial rare biosphere. These endospores remain undetected in nucleic-acid based community surveys, but can germinate and proliferate during high-temperature incubations. Prominent genera of thermospores include sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum and Pelotomaculum as well as fermentative Caloranaerobacter and Thermicanus, within the phylum Firmicutes. Many thermospores are closely related to microorganisms indigenous to subseafloor petroleum reservoirs. If thermospores found in the cold seabed originate warm subsurface petroleum reservoirs, hydrocarbon seeps are likely natural conduits for their passive dispersal up into the ocean. As such, thermospore distributions in marine sediments might have utility in detection of natural hydrocarbon seeps. Marine surface sediments from 112 locations in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico ranging from 100 to 3300 m water depth and situated 6 to 600 km away from each other were sampled and classified according to geochemical indications of oil seepage. Sediment microcosms amended with 20 mM sulfate and a mixture of organic substrates were pasteurized at 80°C then incubated at 50-55°C for 14 days. Sulfate reduction was monitored and detected in 84 (75%) of the sediment samples. The rate and extent of sulfate reduction at this high temperature was greater in the oil-containing sediments than in the sediments without oil. Sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene on an Illumina MiSeq benchtop sequencer before and after high temperature incubations revealed enrichments of various thermospore genera with the majority being closely related to bacteria previously detected in deep subsurface environments. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that thermospores in the vicinity of hydrocarbon seeps originate from warm deep biosphere habitats.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of thermophilic-anaerobic digestion to produce Class A biosolids. 1. Stabilization performance of a continuous-flow reactor at low residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Michael D; Walters, Glenn W; Crunk, Phillip L; Willis, John L; Farrell, Joseph B; Schafer, Perry L; Arnett, Cliff; Turner, Billy G

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the United States in producing biosolids from municipal wastewater treatment that meet the criteria for Class A designation established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Class A biosolids are intended to be free of pathogens and also must meet requirements for reduction of the vector-attraction potential associated with untreated sludge. High-temperature processes are considered to produce Class A biosolids if the combination of operating temperature and treatment time exceeds minimum criteria, but this option is not applicable to mixed, continuous-flow reactors. Such reactors, or any combination of reactors that does not meet the holding time requirement at a specific temperature, must be demonstrated to inactivate pathogens to levels consistent with the Class A criteria. This study was designed to evaluate pathogen inactivation by thermophilic anaerobic digestion in a mixed, continuous-flow reactor followed by batch or plug-flow treatment. In this first of a two-part series, we describe the performance of a continuous-flow laboratory reactor with respect to physical and chemical operating parameters; microbial inactivation in the combined continuous-flow and batch treatment system is described in the second part. Sludges from three different sources were treated at 53 degrees C, while sludge from one of the sources was also treated at 55 and 51 degrees C. Relatively short hydraulic retention times (four to six days) were used to represent a conservative operating condition with respect to pathogen inactivation. Treatment of a fermented primary sludge led to an average volatile-solids (VS) destruction efficiency of 45%, while VS destruction for the other two sources was near or below 38%, the Class A criterion for vector attraction reduction. Consistent with other studies on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sludges at short residence times, effluent concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were relatively high

  10. Enrichment of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria for application after direct low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampman, Christel; Hendrickx, Tim L.G.; Luesken, Francisca A.; Alen, Theo A. van; Op den Camp, Huub J.M.; Jetten, Mike S.M.; Zeeman, Grietje; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Temmink, Hardy

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment is proposed. ► In this concept, denitrification and methane oxidation are performed by Methylomirabilis oxyfera. ► The bacteria were enriched from fresh water sediment using sequencing fed-batch reactors. ► The volumetric consumption rate has to be increased by an order of magnitude for practical application. ► Further research should focus on systems with improved biomass retention. - Abstract: Despite many advantages of anaerobic sewage treatment over conventional activated sludge treatment, it has not yet been applied in temperate zones. This is especially because effluent from low-temperature anaerobic treatment contains nitrogen and dissolved methane. The presence of nitrogen and methane offers the opportunity to develop a reactor in which methane is used as electron donor for denitrification. Such a reactor could be used in a new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment, consisting of a UASB-digester system, a reactor for denitrification coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation, and a nitritation reactor. In the present study denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria similar to ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera’ were enriched. Maximum volumetric nitrite consumption rates were 33.5 mg NO 2 − -N/L d (using synthetic medium) and 37.8 mg NO 2 − -N/L d (using medium containing effluent from a sewage treatment plant), which are similar to the maximum rate reported so far. Though the goal was to increase the rates, in both reactors, after reaching these maximum rates, volumetric nitrite consumption rates decreased in time. Results indicate biomass washout may have significantly decelerated enrichment. Therefore, to obtain higher volumetric consumption rates, further research should focus on systems with complete biomass retention.

  11. Enrichment of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria for application after direct low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampman, Christel, E-mail: christel.kampman@wur.nl [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Hendrickx, Tim L.G. [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Luesken, Francisca A.; Alen, Theo A. van; Op den Camp, Huub J.M.; Jetten, Mike S.M. [Department of Microbiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Zeeman, Grietje; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Temmink, Hardy [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this concept, denitrification and methane oxidation are performed by Methylomirabilis oxyfera. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bacteria were enriched from fresh water sediment using sequencing fed-batch reactors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The volumetric consumption rate has to be increased by an order of magnitude for practical application. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further research should focus on systems with improved biomass retention. - Abstract: Despite many advantages of anaerobic sewage treatment over conventional activated sludge treatment, it has not yet been applied in temperate zones. This is especially because effluent from low-temperature anaerobic treatment contains nitrogen and dissolved methane. The presence of nitrogen and methane offers the opportunity to develop a reactor in which methane is used as electron donor for denitrification. Such a reactor could be used in a new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment, consisting of a UASB-digester system, a reactor for denitrification coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation, and a nitritation reactor. In the present study denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria similar to 'Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera' were enriched. Maximum volumetric nitrite consumption rates were 33.5 mg NO{sub 2}{sup -}-N/L d (using synthetic medium) and 37.8 mg NO{sub 2}{sup -}-N/L d (using medium containing effluent from a sewage treatment plant), which are similar to the maximum rate reported so far. Though the goal was to increase the rates, in both reactors, after reaching these maximum rates, volumetric nitrite consumption rates decreased in time. Results indicate biomass washout may have significantly decelerated enrichment. Therefore, to obtain higher volumetric consumption rates, further research should focus on systems with complete biomass

  12. [Markers of antimicrobial drug resistance in the most common bacteria of normal facultative anaerobic intestinal flora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavsić, Teodora

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria of normal intestinal flora are frequent carriers of markers of antimicrobial drug resistance. Resistance genes may be exchanged with other bacteria of normal flora as well as with pathogenic bacteria. The increase in the number of markers of resistance is one of the major global health problems, which induces the emergence of multi-resistant strains. The aim of this study is to confirm the presence of markers of resistance in bacteria of normal facultative anaerobic intestinal flora in our region. The experiment included a hundred fecal specimens obtained from a hundred healthy donors. A hundred bacterial strains were isolated (the most numerous representatives of the normal facultative-anaerobic intestinal flora) by standard bacteriological methods. The bacteria were cultivated on Endo agar and SS agar for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Having been incubated, the selected characteristic colonies were submitted to the biochemical analysis. The susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs was tested by standard disc diffusion method, and the results were interpreted according to the Standard of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute 2010. The marker of resistance were found in 42% of the isolated bacteria. The resistance was the most common to ampicillin (42% of isolates), amoxicillin with clavulanic acid (14% of isolates), cephalexin (14%) and cotrimoxazole (8%). The finding of 12 multiresistant strains (12% of isolates) and resistance to ciprofloxacin were significant. The frequency of resistance markers was statistically higher in Klebsiella pneumoniae compared to Escherichia coli of normal flora. The finding of a large number of markers of antimicrobial drug resistance among bacteria of normal intestinal flora shows that it is necessary to begin with systematic monitoring of their antimicrobial resistance because it is an indicator of resistance in the population.

  13. A dispersion based model for anaerobic digestion of solid cattle waste in a stratified thermophillic accumulation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Mashad, H.M.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Zeeman, G.; Bot, G.P.A.; Lettinga, G.

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic model has been developed to describe the anaerobic digestion of solid cattle waste in an accumulation system (AC), To calibrate the model an experiment was carried out at a lab-scale AC at 50 degrees C. The predicted methane production shows a very good agreement (i.e. R-2 = 0.998) with

  14. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Kimberly M.; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-m...

  15. 16S RRNA Gene Analysis of Chlorate Reducing Thermophilic Bacteria From Local Hot Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Aminin, Agustina L. N; Katulistiwasari, Puri; Mulyani, Nies Suci

    2011-01-01

    Chlorates waste remediation by biological processes has been the object of current research. Strain CR, the chlorate reducing bacteria was isolated from Gedongsongo hot spring using minimal medium broth containing chlorates and acetate at 55oC. The determination of chlorate reduction from medium was carried out using turbidimetric method. CR isolate showed reducing ability 18% after four days of incubation. The phenotypic character of CR isolate including rod-shaped cells, gram-positive bacte...

  16. Effect of Recycle Sludge on Anaerobic Digestion of Palm Oil Mill Effluent in A Thermophilic Continuous Digester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvan; Trisakti, B.; Tomiuchi, Y.; Harahap, U.; Daimon, H.

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this research is to maintain short retention time and high degradation of palm oil mill effluent (POME) to biogas by applying recycle sludge. Fresh POME from Rambutan Mill without further treatment was used as feed. Two lab-scale digesters supported from Metawater Co. Ltd. have been applied to treat POME at thermophilic (55°C) condition. Both digesters were operated under intermittent operation mode. Experiments were performed in two methods: with and without recycle sludge. Hydraulic retention time (HRT) of both methods was maintained at 6 days, while sludge retention time (SRT) was maintained at various days. The result showed that by extending SRT in return sludge process where 25% of digested slurry recycled to the digester, improvement of volatile solid (VS) decomposition was obtained around 84% at HRT of 6 days and SRT of 21 days. Then, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency could be reached until 85% by using recycle sludge.

  17. Diversity of thermophilic bacteria in raw, pasteurized and selectively-cultured milk, as assessed by culturing, PCR-DGGE and pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Susana; Rachid, Caio T C C; Fernández, Elena; Rychlik, Tomasz; Alegría, Angel; Peixoto, Raquel S; Mayo, Baltasar

    2013-10-01

    Thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species, such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus helveticus, enjoy worldwide economic importance as dairy starters. To assess the diversity of thermophilic bacteria in milk, milk samples were enriched in thermophilic organisms through a stepwise procedure which included pasteurization of milk at 63 °C for 30 min (PM samples) and pasteurization followed by incubation at 42 °C for 24 h (IPM samples). The microbial composition of these samples was analyzed by culture-dependent (at 42 °C) and culture-independent (PCR-DGGE and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons) microbial techniques. The results were then compared to those obtained for their corresponding starting raw milk counterparts (RM samples). Twenty different species were scored by culturing among 352 isolates purified from the counting plates and identified by molecular methods. Mesophilic LAB species (Lactococcus lactis, Lactococcus garvieae) were dominant (87% of the isolates) among the RM samples. However, S. thermophilus and Lb. delbrueckii were found to be the dominant recoverable organisms in both PM and IPM samples. The DGGE profiles of RM and PM samples were found to be very similar; the most prominent bands belonging to Lactococcus, Leuconostoc and Streptococcus species. In contrast, just three DGGE bands were obtained for IPM samples, two of which were assigned to S. thermophilus. The pyrosequencing results scored 95 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 3% sequence divergence in an RM sample, while only 13 were encountered in two IPM samples. This technique identified Leuconostoc citreum as the dominant microorganism in the RM sample, while S. thermophilus constituted more than 98% of the reads in the IPM samples. The procedure followed in this study allowed to estimate the bacterial diversity in milk and afford a suitable strategy for the isolation of new thermophilic LAB strains, among which adequate

  18. Antibiotic management of lung infections in cystic fibrosis. II. Nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, James F; Aksamit, Timothy R; Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Dasenbrook, Elliott C; Elborn, J Stuart; LiPuma, John J; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Waters, Valerie J; Ratjen, Felix A

    2014-10-01

    Airway infections are a key component of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Whereas the approach to common pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa is guided by a significant body of evidence, other infections often pose a considerable challenge to treating physicians. In Part I of this series on the antibiotic management of difficult lung infections, we discussed bacterial organisms including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacterial infections, and treatment of multiple bacterial pathogens. Here, we summarize the approach to infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi. Nontuberculous mycobacteria can significantly impact the course of lung disease in patients with CF, but differentiation between colonization and infection is difficult clinically as coinfection with other micro-organisms is common. Treatment consists of different classes of antibiotics, varies in intensity, and is best guided by a team of specialized clinicians and microbiologists. The ability of anaerobic bacteria to contribute to CF lung disease is less clear, even though clinical relevance has been reported in individual patients. Anaerobes detected in CF sputum are often resistant to multiple drugs, and treatment has not yet been shown to positively affect patient outcome. Fungi have gained significant interest as potential CF pathogens. Although the role of Candida is largely unclear, there is mounting evidence that Scedosporium species and Aspergillus fumigatus, beyond the classical presentation of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, can be relevant in patients with CF and treatment should be considered. At present, however there remains limited information on how best to select patients who could benefit from antifungal therapy.

  19. Anaerobic bacteria and antibiotics: What kind of unexpected resistance could I find in my laboratory tomorrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, L; Odou, M F

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to set out some important considerations on the main emerging antibiotic resistance patterns among anaerobic bacteria. The first point concerns the Bacteroides fragilis group and its resistance to the combination of β-lactam+β-lactamase inhibitor. When there is overproduction of cephalosporinase, it results in increased resistance to the β-lactams while maintaining susceptibility to β-lactams/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. However, if another resistance mechanism is added, such as a loss of porin, resistances to β-lactam+β-lactamase inhibitor combinations may occur. The second point is resistance to metronidazole occurring due to nim genes. PCR detection of nim genes alone is not sufficient for predicting resistance to metronidazole; actual MIC determinations are required. Therefore, it can be assumed that other resistance mechanisms can also be involved. Although metronidazole resistance remains rare for the B. fragilis group, it has nevertheless been detected worldwide and also been observed spreading to other species. In some cases where there is only a decreased susceptibility, clinical failures may occur. The last point concerns resistance of Clostridium species to glycopeptides and lipopeptides. Low levels of resistance have been detected with these antibiotics. Van genes have been detected not only in clostridia but also in other species. In conclusion, antibiotic resistance involves different mechanisms and affects many anaerobic species and is spreading worldwide. This demonstrates the need to continue with antibiotic resistance testing and surveys in anaerobic bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO 2 . Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions

  1. Mechanism and Effect of Temperature on Variations in Antibiotic Resistance Genes during Anaerobic Digestion of Dairy Manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Xun; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Duan, Man-Li

    2016-07-01

    Animal manure comprises an important reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but the variation in ARGs during anaerobic digestion at various temperatures and its underlying mechanism remain unclear. Thus, we performed anaerobic digestion using dairy manure at three temperature levels (moderate: 20 °C, mesophilic: 35 °C, and thermophilic: 55 °C), to analyze the dynamics of ARGs and bacterial communities by quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We found that 8/10 detected ARGs declined and 5/10 decreased more than 1.0 log during thermophilic digestion, whereas only four and five ARGs decreased during moderate and mesophilic digestion, respectively. The changes in ARGs and bacterial communities were similar under the moderate and mesophilic treatments, but distinct from those in the thermophilic system. Potential pathogens such as Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Corynebacterium were removed by thermophilic digestion but not by moderate and mesophilic digestion. The bacterial community succession was the dominant mechanism that influenced the variation in ARGs and integrons during anaerobic digestion. Thermophilic digestion decreased the amount of mesophilic bacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria) carrying ARGs. Anaerobic digestion generally decreased the abundance of integrons by eliminating the aerobic hosts of integrons (Actinomycetales and Bacilli). Thermophilic anaerobic digestion is recommended for the treatment and reuse of animal manure.

  2. Mechanism and Effect of Temperature on Variations in Antibiotic Resistance Genes during Anaerobic Digestion of Dairy Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Xun; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Duan, Man-Li

    2016-07-22

    Animal manure comprises an important reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but the variation in ARGs during anaerobic digestion at various temperatures and its underlying mechanism remain unclear. Thus, we performed anaerobic digestion using dairy manure at three temperature levels (moderate: 20 °C, mesophilic: 35 °C, and thermophilic: 55 °C), to analyze the dynamics of ARGs and bacterial communities by quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We found that 8/10 detected ARGs declined and 5/10 decreased more than 1.0 log during thermophilic digestion, whereas only four and five ARGs decreased during moderate and mesophilic digestion, respectively. The changes in ARGs and bacterial communities were similar under the moderate and mesophilic treatments, but distinct from those in the thermophilic system. Potential pathogens such as Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Corynebacterium were removed by thermophilic digestion but not by moderate and mesophilic digestion. The bacterial community succession was the dominant mechanism that influenced the variation in ARGs and integrons during anaerobic digestion. Thermophilic digestion decreased the amount of mesophilic bacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria) carrying ARGs. Anaerobic digestion generally decreased the abundance of integrons by eliminating the aerobic hosts of integrons (Actinomycetales and Bacilli). Thermophilic anaerobic digestion is recommended for the treatment and reuse of animal manure.

  3. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kei; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Noguchi, Shingo; Nagata, Shuya; Nishida, Chinatsu; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%), Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%)], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6%) and oral bacteria (15.6%) than previous reports. Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  4. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Yamasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. METHODS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. RESULTS: In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%, Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6% and oral bacteria (15.6% than previous reports. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  5. Anaerobic degradation of naphthalene by the mixed bacteria under nitrate reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Junfeng; Liu Xiang; Ding Aizhong

    2009-01-01

    Mixed bacteria were enriched from soil samples contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The anaerobic degradation characteristics by the enriched bacteria with different initial naphthalene concentrations were investigated under nitrate reducing conditions. The results showed that the mixed bacteria could degrade nearly all the naphthalene over the incubations of 25 days when the initial naphthalene concentration was below 30 mg/L. The degradation rates of naphthalene increased with increasing initial concentrations. A high naphthalene concentration of 30 mg/L did not inhibit neither on the bacterial growth nor on the naphthalene degradation ability. The accumulation of nitrite was occurred during the reduction of nitrate, and a nitrite concentration of 50 mg/L had no inhibition effect on the degradation of naphthalene. The calculation of electron balances revealed that most of the naphthalene was oxidized whereas a small proportion was used for cell synthesis.

  6. Enhancement in hydrogen production by thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge--optimization of treatment conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Vinay Kumar; Angériz Campoy, Rubén; Álvarez-Gallego, C J; Romero García, L I

    2014-07-01

    Batch dry-thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion (55°C) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and sewage sludge (SS) for hydrogen production was studied under several sludge combinations (primary sludge, PS; waste activated sludge, WAS; and mixed sludge, MS), TS concentrations (10-25%) and mixing ratios of OFMSW and SS (1:1, 2.5:1, 5:1, 10:1). The co-digestion of OFMSW and SS showed a 70% improvement in hydrogen production rate over the OFMSW fermentation only. The co-digestion of OFMSW with MS showed 47% and 115% higher hydrogen production potential as compared with OFMSW+PS and OFMSW+WAS, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 51 mL H2/g VS consumed was observed at TS concentration of 20% and OFMSW to MS mixing ratio of 5:1, respectively. The acetic and butyric acids were the main acids in VFAs evolution; however, the higher butyric acid evolution indicated that the H2 fermentation was butyrate type fermentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of separate hydrogen and methane production from cassava wastewater using two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) system under thermophilic operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intanoo, Patcharee; Rangsanvigit, Pramoch; Malakul, Pomthong; Chavadej, Sumaeth

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the separate hydrogen and methane productions from cassava wastewater by using a two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) system under thermophilic operation. Recycle ratio of the effluent from methane bioreactor-to-feed flow rate was fixed at 1:1 and pH of hydrogen UASB unit was maintained at 5.5. At optimum COD loading rate of 90 kg/m3 d based on the feed COD load and hydrogen UASB volume, the produced gas from the hydrogen UASB unit mainly contained H2 and CO2 which provided the maximum hydrogen yield (54.22 ml H2/g COD applied) and specific hydrogen production rate (197.17 ml/g MLVSSd). At the same optimum COD loading rate, the produced gas from the methane UASB unit mainly contained CH4 and CO2 without H2 which were also consistent with the maximum methane yield (164.87 ml CH4/g COD applied) and specific methane production rate (356.31 ml CH4/g MLVSSd). The recycling operation minimized the use of NaOH for pH control in hydrogen UASB unit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimisation of single-phase dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion under high organic loading rates of industrial municipal solid waste: population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, S; Sales, D; Romero, L I; Solera, R

    2013-10-01

    Different high feed organic loading rates (OLRs) (from 5.7 g to 46.0 g TVS/l/d) or hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (from 15 d to 2 d) in single-phase dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic fraction municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were investigated. The specific gas production (SGP) values (0.25-0.53 m(3)/kg TVS) and the percentages of Eubacteria, Archaea, H2-utilising methanogens (HUMs) and acetate-utilising methanogens (AUMs) were stable within the ranges 80.2-91.1%, 12.4-18.5%, 4.4-9.8% and 5.5-10.9%, respectively. A HUM/AUM ratio greater than 0.7 seems to be necessary to maintain very low partial pressures of H2 required for dry AD process. Increasing OLR resulted in an increase in all the populations, except for propionate-utilising acetogens (PUAs). Optimal conditions were obtained at 3d HRT (OLR=30.7 g TVS/l/d), which is lower than the doubling time of acetogens and methanogens. The methane production (MP) was clearly higher than those reported in AD of OFMSW. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with food waste (FW): Enhancement of bio-hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeriz-Campoy, Rubén; Álvarez-Gallego, Carlos J; Romero-García, Luis I

    2015-10-01

    Bio-hydrogen production from dry thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion (55°C and 20% total solids) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and food waste (FW) was studied. OFMSW coming from mechanical-biological treatment plants (MBT plants) presents a low organic matter concentration. However, FW has a high organic matter content but several problems by accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and system acidification. Tests were conducted using a mixture ratio of 80:20 (OFSMW:FW), to avoid the aforementioned problems. Different solid retention times (SRTs) - 6.6, 4.4, 2.4 and 1.9 days - were tested. It was noted that addition of food waste enhances the hydrogen production in all the SRTs tested. Best results were obtained at 1.9-day SRT. It was observed an increase from 0.64 to 2.51 L H2/L(reactor) day in hydrogen productivity when SRTs decrease from 6.6 to 1.9 days. However, the hydrogen yield increases slightly from 33.7 to 38 mL H2/gVS(added). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of coffee grounds with and without waste activated sludge as co-substrate using a submerged AnMBR: system amendments and membrane performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Wei; Takayanagi, Kazuyuki; Shofie, Mohammad; Niu, Qigui; Yu, Han Qing; Li, Yu-You

    2013-12-01

    Coffee grounds are deemed to be difficult for degradation by thermophilic anaerobic process. In this research, a 7 L AnMBR accepting coffee grounds was operated for 82 days and failed with pH dropping to 6.6. The deficiency of micronutrients in the reactor was identified. The system was recovered by supplying micronutrient, pH adjustment and influent ceasing for 22 days. In the subsequent 160 days of co-digestion experiment, waste activated sludge (15% in the mixture) was mixed into coffee grounds. The COD conversion efficiency of 67.4% was achieved under OLR of 11.1 kg-COD/m(3) d and HRT of 20 days. Tannins was identified affecting protein degradation by a batch experiment. Quantitative supplements of NH4HCO3 (0.12 g-N/g-TSin) were effective to maintain alkalinity and pH. The solid concentration in the AnMBR reached 75 g/L, but it did not significantly affect membrane filtration under a flux of 5.1 L/m(2) h. Soluble carbohydrate, lipid and protein were partially retained by the membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Copper (II) Removal In Anaerobic Continuous Column Reactor System By Using Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, A.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Copper is an essential element for the synthesis of the number of electrons carrying proteins and the enzymes. However, it has a high level of toxicity. In this study; it is aimed to treat copper heavy metal in anaerobic environment by using anaerobic continuous column reactor. Sulfate reducing bacteria culture was obtained in anaerobic medium using enrichment culture method. The column reactor experiments were carried out with bacterial culture obtained from soil by culture enrichment method. The system is operated with continuous feeding and as parallel. In the first rector, only sand was used as packing material. The first column reactor was only fed with the bacteria nutrient media. The same solution was passed through the second reactor, and copper solution removal was investigated by continuously feeding 15-600 mg/L of copper solution at the feeding inlet in the second reactor. When the experiment was carried out by adding the 10 mg/L of initial copper concentration, copper removal in the rate of 45-75% was obtained. In order to determine the use of carbon source during copper removal of mixed bacterial cultures in anaerobic conditions, total organic carbon TOC analysis was used to calculate the change in carbon content, and it was calculated to be between 28% and 75%. When the amount of sulphate is examined, it was observed that it changed between 28-46%. During the copper removal, the amounts of sulphate and carbon moles were equalized and more sulfate was added by changing the nutrient media in order to determine the consumption of sulphate or carbon. Accordingly, when the concentration of added sulphate is increased, it is calculated that between 35-57% of sulphate is spent. In this system, copper concentration of up to 15-600 mg / L were studied.

  12. Thermophilic archaea activate butane via alkyl-coenzyme M formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laso-Pérez, Rafael; Wegener, Gunter; Knittel, Katrin; Widdel, Friedrich; Harding, Katie J; Krukenberg, Viola; Meier, Dimitri V; Richter, Michael; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Riedel, Dietmar; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Adrian, Lorenz; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J; Musat, Florin

    2016-11-17

    The anaerobic formation and oxidation of methane involve unique enzymatic mechanisms and cofactors, all of which are believed to be specific for C 1 -compounds. Here we show that an anaerobic thermophilic enrichment culture composed of dense consortia of archaea and bacteria apparently uses partly similar pathways to oxidize the C 4 hydrocarbon butane. The archaea, proposed genus 'Candidatus Syntrophoarchaeum', show the characteristic autofluorescence of methanogens, and contain highly expressed genes encoding enzymes similar to methyl-coenzyme M reductase. We detect butyl-coenzyme M, indicating archaeal butane activation analogous to the first step in anaerobic methane oxidation. In addition, Ca. Syntrophoarchaeum expresses the genes encoding β-oxidation enzymes, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and reversible C 1 methanogenesis enzymes. This allows for the complete oxidation of butane. Reducing equivalents are seemingly channelled to HotSeep-1, a thermophilic sulfate-reducing partner bacterium known from the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Genes encoding 16S rRNA and methyl-coenzyme M reductase similar to those identifying Ca. Syntrophoarchaeum were repeatedly retrieved from marine subsurface sediments, suggesting that the presented activation mechanism is naturally widespread in the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain hydrocarbons.

  13. The influence of incubation time, sample preparation and exposure to oxygen on the quality of the MALDI-TOF MS spectrum of anaerobic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; Elgersma, P. E.; Friedrich, A. W.; Nagy, E.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    With matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), bacteria can be identified quickly and reliably. This accounts especially for anaerobic bacteria. Because growth rate and oxygen sensitivity differ among anaerobic bacteria, we aimed to study the

  14. Hydrogen Production by Thermophilic Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Willquist, K.; Zeidan, A.A.; Vrije, de T.; Mars, A.E.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Of the many ways hydrogen can be produced, this chapter focuses on biological hydrogen production by thermophilic bacteria and archaea in dark fermentations. The thermophiles are held as promising candidates for a cost-effective fermentation process, because of their relatively high yields and broad

  15. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone- immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria....... The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a sudden lack of oxygen. In contrast, nitrate-respiring, fermenting bacteria, e.g., Bacillus and Escherichia...... spp, formed microcolonies under anaerobic conditions with or without the presence of nitrate and irrespective of aerobic or anaerobic preculture conditions....

  16. Validation of a for anaerobic bacteria optimized MALDI-TOF MS biotyper database: The ENRIA project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloo, A C M; Jean-Pierre, H; Justesen, U S; Morris, T; Urban, E; Wybo, I; Kostrzewa, M; Friedrich, A W

    2018-03-12

    relevance of these less common anaerobic bacteria. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Højberg, O; Binnerup, S J; Sørensen, J

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria. The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a...

  18. Diversity and Distribution of Thermophilic Bacteria in Hot Springs of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Arshia; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Salam, Nimaichand; Kim, Byung-Yong; Singh, Dharmesh; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Xiao, Min; Li, Wen-Jun

    2017-07-01

    Chilas and Hunza areas, located in the Main Mantle Thrust and Main Karakoram Thrust of the Himalayas, host a range of geochemically diverse hot springs. This Himalayan geothermal region encompassed hot springs ranging in temperature from 60 to 95 °C, in pH from 6.2 to 9.4, and in mineralogy from bicarbonates (Tato Field), sulfates (Tatta Pani) to mixed type (Murtazaabad). Microbial community structures in these geothermal springs remained largely unexplored to date. In this study, we report a comprehensive, culture-independent survey of microbial communities in nine samples from these geothermal fields by employing a bar-coded pyrosequencing technique. The bacterial phyla Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi were dominant in all samples from Tato Field, Tatta Pani, and Murtazaabad. The community structures however depended on temperature, pH, and physicochemical parameters of the geothermal sites. The Murtazaabad hot springs with relatively higher temperature (90-95 °C) favored the growth of phylum Thermotogae, whereas the Tatta Pani thermal spring site TP-H3-b (60 °C) favored the phylum Proteobacteria. At sites with low silica and high temperature, OTUs belonging to phylum Chloroflexi were dominant. Deep water areas of the Murtazaabad hot springs favored the sulfur-reducing bacteria. About 40% of the total OTUs obtained from these samples were unclassified or uncharacterized, suggesting the presence of many undiscovered and unexplored microbiota. This study has provided novel insights into the nature of ecological interactions among important taxa in these communities, which in turn will help in determining future study courses in these sites.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria play a significant role in many endogenous polymicrobial infections. Since antimicrobial resistance among anaerobes has increased worldwide, it is useful to provide local susceptibility data to guide empirical therapy. The present study reports recent data on the susceptibility of clinically relevant anaerobes in a University Hospital Centre (UHC) Split, Croatia. A total of 63 Gram-negative and 59 Gram-positive anaerobic clinical isolates from various body sites were consecutively collected from January to December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using standardized methods and interpreted using EUCAST criteria. Patient's clinical and demographic data were recorded by clinical microbiologist. Among 35 isolates of Bacteroides spp., 97.1% were resistant to penicillin (PCN), 5.7% to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), 8.6% to piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP), 29.0% to clindamycin (CLI) and 2.9% to metronidazole (MZ). Percentages of susceptible strains to imipenem (IPM), meropenem (MEM) and ertapenem (ETP) were 94.3. Resistance of other Gram-negative bacilli was 76.0% to PCN, 8.0% to AMC, 12.0% to TZP, 28.0% to CLI and 8% to MZ. All other Gram-negative strains were fully susceptible to MEM and ETP, while 96.0% were susceptible to IPM. Clostridium spp. isolates were 100% susceptible to all tested antibiotics except to CLI (two of four tested isolates were resistant). Propionibacterium spp. showed resistance to CLI in 4.3%, while 100% were resistant to MZ. Among other Gram-positive bacilli, 18.2% were resistant to PCN, 9.1% to CLI and 54.5% to MZ, while 81.8% of isolates were susceptible to carbapenems. Gram-positive cocci were 100% susceptible to all tested antimicrobials except to MZ, where 28.6% of resistant strains were recorded. Abdomen was the most common source of isolates (82.5%). The most prevalent types of infection were abscess (22.1%), sepsis (14.8%), appendicitis (13.9%) and peritonitis (6.6%). Twenty four patients (19

  20. Biogas production performance of mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion with fat, oil, and grease in semi-continuous flow digesters: effects of temperature, hydraulic retention time, and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Champagne, P; Anderson, B C

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic co-digestions with fat, oil, and grease (FOG) were investigated in semi-continuous flow digesters under various operating conditions. The effects of hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 12 and 24 days, organic loading rates (OLRs) between 1.19 and 8.97 gTVS/Ld, and digestion temperatures of 37 degrees C and 55 degrees C on biogas production were evaluated. It was proposed that, compared to anaerobic digestion with wastewater treatment plant sludge (primary raw sludge), semi-continuous flow anaerobic co-digestion with FOG could effectively enhance biogas and methane production. Thermophilic (55 degrees C) co-digestions exhibited higher biogas production and degradation of organics than mesophilic co-digestions. The best biogas production rate of 17.4 +/- 0.86 L/d and methane content 67.9 +/- 1.46% was obtained with a thermophilic co-digestion at HRT = 24 days and OLR = 2.43 +/- 0.15 g TVS/Ld. These were 32.8% and 7.10% higher than the respective values from the mesophilic co-digestion under similar operating conditions.

  1. Ultraviolet irradiation of bacteria under anaerobic conditions: implications for Prephanerozoic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambler, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The history of the rise of atmospheric oxygen and subsequent time of development of an ultraviolet light screening ozone layer has far reaching consequences in interpreting Prephanerozoic (4.5 to 0.6 billion years ago) evolution and ecology. A special anaerobic glove box was constructed to study the relative sensitivities of different groups of bacteria to uv light under varying conditions. Although there is no concensus concerning the oxygen concentration in the early atmosphere, total anoxic conditions were assumed in these studies. The flux of the uv radiation at 253.7 nm within the chamber is slightly higher than calculated from estimates of the present solar luminosity constant at this wavelength. Strict anaerobes, possibly direct decendants from early reducing conditions on Earth (e.g. Clostridium), facultative anaerobes (e.g. Escherichia, Enterobacter), and aerobes (e.g. Pseudomonas) were irradiated and examined for survival as a function of uv dosage. In these studies, photoreactivation, the amelioration of uv damage by visible light, was demonstrated for the first time to exist in an obligate anaerobe. The number of cells in unprotected cultures, exposed to 20 minutes of uv radiation is generally reduced by 99.9%. However, several mechanisms of protection were found: (1) photoreactivation, (2) absorption of uv by nitrates in aqueous irradiation media, (3) intertwiningof growing filaments into cohesive structures called mats, e.g. the matting habit, (4) dark enzymatic repair of photodamage; and (5) inherent radiation resistance. These experimental results coupled with a literature review of uv effects strongly suggests that the Berkner-Marshall hypothesis is no longer tenable

  2. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria gain antibiotic resistance during long-term acclimatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng-Zhe; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Guo, Qiong; Chen, Qian-Qian; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2015-09-01

    Three broad-spectrum antibiotics, amoxicillin (AMX), florfenicol (FF) and sulfamethazine (SMZ), that inhibit bacteria via different target sites, were selected to evaluate the acute toxicity and long-term effects on anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) granules. The specific anammox activity (SAA) levels reduced by approximately half within the first 3 days in the presence of antibiotics but no nitrite accumulation was observed in continuous-flow experiments. However, the SAA levels and heme c content gradually recovered as the antibiotic concentrations increased. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) analysis suggested that anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria gradually developed a better survival strategy during long-term acclimatization, which reduced the antibiotic stress via increased EPS secretion that provided a protective 'cocoon.' In terms of nitrogen removal efficiency, anammox granules could resist 60 mg-AMX L(-1), 10 mg-FF L(-1) and 100 mg-SMZ L(-1). This study supported the feasibility of using anammox granules to treat antibiotic-containing wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anaerobic consortia of fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria in deep granite fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Henrik; Ivarsson, Magnus; Bengtson, Stefan; Heim, Christine; Siljeström, Sandra; Whitehouse, Martin J; Broman, Curt; Belivanova, Veneta; Åström, Mats E

    2017-07-04

    The deep biosphere is one of the least understood ecosystems on Earth. Although most microbiological studies in this system have focused on prokaryotes and neglected microeukaryotes, recent discoveries have revealed existence of fossil and active fungi in marine sediments and sub-seafloor basalts, with proposed importance for the subsurface energy cycle. However, studies of fungi in deep continental crystalline rocks are surprisingly few. Consequently, the characteristics and processes of fungi and fungus-prokaryote interactions in this vast environment remain enigmatic. Here we report the first findings of partly organically preserved and partly mineralized fungi at great depth in fractured crystalline rock (-740 m). Based on environmental parameters and mineralogy the fungi are interpreted as anaerobic. Synchrotron-based techniques and stable isotope microanalysis confirm a coupling between the fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria. The cryptoendolithic fungi have significantly weathered neighboring zeolite crystals and thus have implications for storage of toxic wastes using zeolite barriers.Deep subsurface microorganisms play an important role in nutrient cycling, yet little is known about deep continental fungal communities. Here, the authors show organically preserved and partly mineralized fungi at 740 m depth, and find evidence of an anaerobic fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria consortium.

  4. Lebetimonas natsushimae sp. nov., a novel strictly anaerobic, moderately thermophilic chemoautotroph isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent polychaete nest in the Mid-Okinawa Trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Ryousuke; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Tame, Akihiro; Nunoura, Takuro; Muto, Hisashi; Mino, Sayaka; Sawayama, Shigeki; Takai, Ken; Nakagawa, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    A moderately thermophilic, strictly anaerobic, chemoautotrophic bacterium, designated strain HS1857 T , was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent at the Noho site in the Mid-Okinawa Trough. Strain HS1857 T grew between 35 and 63°C (optimum 55°C), in the presence of 10-55gl -1 NaCl (optimum 25gl -1 ), and pH 5.5-7.1 (optimum 6.4). Growth occurred with molecular hydrogen as the electron donor and elemental sulfur, nitrate, or selenate as the electron acceptors. Formate could serve as an alternative electron donor with nitrate as an electron acceptor. During growth with nitrate as the electron acceptor, strain HS1857 T produced ammonium and formed a biofilm. CO 2 was utilized as the sole carbon source. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 33.2mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain HS1857 T is a member of the order Nautiliales, showing a sequence similarity of 95.0% with Lebetimonas acidiphila Pd55 T . The fatty acid composition was similar to that of L. acidiphila, which was dominated by C 18:0 (47.0%) and C 18:1 (23.7%). Based on the genomic, chemotaxonomic, phenotypic characteristics, the name Lebetimonas natsushimae sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is HS1857 T (=NBRC 112478 T =DSM 104102 T ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Regional differences within the dentition for plaque, gingivitis, and anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, P K; DeVizio, W; Prasad, K V V; Patil, S; Chhabra, K G; Rajesh, G; Javali, S B; Kulkarni, R D

    2010-01-01

    This investigation assessed regional differences in dental plaque and gingivitis within the human dentition in conjunction with microbiological analyses of dental plaque. Forty-one adults (23 males and 18 females; age range 19-44 years) were enrolled, and a calibrated dental examiner completed whole mouth examinations for dental plaque (PI) and gingivitis (GI) using the Turesky modification of the Quigley-Hein Index (TMQH) and the L6e-Silness (LS) Index, respectively. Dental plaque samples were collected from the anterior surfaces and posterior teeth to determine viable anaerobic bacteria. During this visit, subjects underwent a whole mouth dental prophylaxis and were provided a marketed fluoride dentifrice for twice-daily oral hygiene. Subjects were recalled on day 15 and day 30 for whole mouth assessments of PI and GI, followed by the collection of dental plaque from the anterior and posterior teeth for microbiological analyses during these visits. Low plaque and gingival scores were common on anterior surfaces, in contrast to greater frequencies of higher PI and GI scores on the posterior regions or the entire dentition. Correspondingly, mean scores for PI and GI were significantly lower among the anterior surfaces in comparison to all other regions of the mouth (posterior, Ramfjord surfaces, or the entire dentition) over each phase of the study (p gingival scores maintained broad reductions, with anterior scores consistently lower than the corresponding posterior regions (p gingival inflammation levels were also correlated with increased plaque deposits associated with posterior teeth. Microbiological analyses confirm clinical observations with significantly higher numbers of viable bacteria in the dental plaque collected from the posterior regions. The human dentition demonstrates significant regional differences in the prevalence of dental plaque, gingivitis, and corresponding anaerobic bacteria, with posterior surfaces consistently reporting higher scores

  6. Improved methane production from sugarcane vinasse with filter cake in thermophilic UASB reactors, with predominance of Methanothermobacter and Methanosarcina archaea and Thermotogae bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Valciney Gomes de; Duda, Rose Maria; Vantini, Juliana da Silva; Omori, Wellington Pine; Ferro, Maria Inês Tiraboschi; Oliveira, Roberto Alves de

    2017-11-01

    Biogas production from sugarcane vinasse has enormous economic, energy, and environmental management potential. However, methane production stability and biodigested vinasse quality remain key issues, requiring better nutrient and alkalinity availability, operational strategies, and knowledge of reactor microbiota. This study demonstrates increased methane production from vinasse through the use of sugarcane filter cake and improved effluent recirculation, with elevated organic loading rates (OLR) and good reactor stability. We used UASB reactors in a two-stage configuration, with OLRs up to 45gCODL -1 d -1 , and obtained methane production as high as 3LL -1 d -1 . Quantitative PCR indicated balanced amounts of bacteria and archaea in the sludge (10 9 -10 10 copiesg -1 VS), and of the predominant archaea orders, Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (10 6 -10 8 copiesg -1 VS). 16S rDNA sequencing also indicated the thermophilic Thermotogae as the most abundant class of bacteria in the sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Overcoming organic and nitrogen overload in thermophilic anaerobic digestion of pig slurry by coupling a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, Míriam; Viñas, Marc; Bonmatí, August

    2016-09-01

    The combination of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process with a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) coupled to an ammonia stripping unit as a post-treatment was assessed both in series operation, to improve the quality of the effluent, and in loop configuration recirculating the effluent, to increase the AD robustness. The MEC allowed maintaining the chemical oxygen demand removal of the whole system of 46±5% despite the AD destabilization after doubling the organic and nitrogen loads, while recovering 40±3% of ammonia. The AD-MEC system, in loop configuration, helped to recover the AD (55% increase in methane productivity) and attained a more stable and robust operation. The microbial population assessment revealed an enhancement of AD methanogenic archaea numbers and a shift in eubacterial population. The AD-MEC combined system is a promising strategy for stabilizing AD against organic and nitrogen overloads, while improving the quality of the effluent and recovering nutrients for their reutilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Low antibiotic resistance among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria in periodontitis 5 years following metronidazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, G; Preus, H R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess antibiotic susceptibility among predominant Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontitis patients who 5 years prior had been subject to mechanical therapy with or without adjunctive metronidazole. One pooled sample was taken from the 5 deepest sites of each of 161 patients that completed the 5 year follow-up after therapy. The samples were analyzed by culture. A total number of 85 anaerobic strains were isolated from the predominant subgingival flora of 65/161 patient samples, identified, and tested for antibiotic susceptibility by MIC determination. E-tests against metronidazole, penicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid and clindamycin were employed. The 73/85 strains were Gram-negative rods (21 Porphyromonas spp., 22 Prevotella/Bacteroides spp., 23 Fusobacterium/Filifactor spp., 3 Campylobacter spp. and 4 Tannerella forsythia). These were all isolated from the treated patients irrespective of therapy procedures (+/-metronidazole) 5 years prior. Three strains (Bifidobacterium spp., Propionibacterium propionicum, Parvimonas micra) showed MIC values for metronidazole over the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing break point of >4 μg/mL. All Porphyromonas and Tannerella strains were highly susceptible. Metronidazole resistant Gram-negative strains were not found, while a few showed resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. In this population of 161 patients who had been subject to mechanical periodontal therapy with or without adjunct metronidazole 5 years prior, no cultivable antibiotic resistant anaerobes were found in the predominant subgingival microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Co-occurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria in two Qinghai-Tibetan saline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Jiang, Hongchen; Wu, Geng; Hou, Weiguo; Sun, Yongjuan; Lai, Zhongping; Dong, Hailiang

    2012-12-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing (n-damo) bacteria and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are two groups of microorganisms involved in global carbon and nitrogen cycling. In order to test whether the n-damo and anammox bacteria co-occur in natural saline environments, the DNA and cDNA samples obtained from the surficial sediments of two saline lakes (with salinity of 32 and 84 g/L, respectively) on the Tibetan Plateau were PCR-amplified with the use of anammox- and n-damo-specific primer sets, followed by clone library construction and phylogenetic analysis. DNA and cDNA-based clones affiliated with n-damo and anammox bacteria were successfully retrieved from the two samples, indicating that these two groups of bacteria can co-occur in natural saline environments with salinity as high as 84 g/L. Our finding has great implications for our understanding of the global carbon and nitrogen cycle in nature.

  10. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-09-16

    Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

  11. An in Vitro Experimental Study on the Antimicrobial Activity of Silicone Oil against Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arici, Ceyhun; Aras, Cengiz; Tokman, Hrisi Bahar; Torun, Muzeyyen Mamal

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of silicone oil against anaerobic agents, specifically Propionibacterium acnes, Peptostreptococcus spp., Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Bacteroides fragilis, Fuobacterium spp., and Clostridium tertium. A 0.5 McFarland turbidity of Propionibacterium acnes, Peptostreptococcus spp., Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Bacteroides fragilis, Fuobacterium spp., and Clostridium tertium was prepared, and 0.1 mL was inoculated into 0.9 mL of silicone oil. Control inoculations were performed in anaerobic blood agar and fluid thioglycollate medium without silicone oil. Propionibacterium acnes retained their viability on the 3rd day in the presence of silicone oil. In total, 9.7 × 10(6) colonies were enumerated from 1 mL of silicone oil. After a prolonged incubation of 7 days, the number of colonies observed was 9.2 × 10(6). The other bacteria disappeared after the 3rd day of incubation in silicone oil. Propionibacterium acnes, which is the most common chronic postoperative endophthalmitis agent, is thought to be resistant to silicone oil.

  12. Anaerobic benzene degradation by Gram-positive sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Laban, Nidal; Selesi, Drazenka; Jobelius, Carsten; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2009-06-01

    Despite its high chemical stability, benzene is known to be biodegradable with various electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. However, our understanding of the initial activation reaction and the responsible prokaryotes is limited. In the present study, we enriched a bacterial culture that oxidizes benzene to carbon dioxide under sulfate-reducing conditions. Community analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and FISH revealed 95% dominance of one phylotype that is affiliated to the Gram-positive bacterial genus Pelotomaculum showing that sulfate-reducing Gram-positive bacteria are involved in anaerobic benzene degradation. In order to get indications of the initial activation mechanism, we tested the substrate utilization, performed cometabolism tests and screened for putative metabolites. Phenol, toluene, and benzoate could not be utilized as alternative carbon sources by the benzene-degrading culture. Cometabolic degradation experiments resulted in retarded rates of benzene degradation in the presence of phenol whereas toluene had no effect on benzene metabolism. Phenol, 2-hydroxybenzoate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, and benzoate were identified as putative metabolites in the enrichment culture. However, hydroxylated aromatics were shown to be formed abiotically. Thus, the finding of benzoate as an intermediate compound supports a direct carboxylation of benzene as the initial activation mechanism but additional reactions leading to its formation cannot be excluded definitely.

  13. Active transport, substrate specificity, and methylation of Hg(II) in anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jeffra K.; Rocks, Sara S.; Zheng, Wang; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Morel, François M. M.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of methylmercury (MeHg), which is biomagnified in aquatic food chains and poses a risk to human health, is effected by some iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB) in anaerobic environments. However, very little is known regarding the mechanism of uptake of inorganic Hg by these organisms, in part because of the inherent difficulty in measuring the intracellular Hg concentration. By using the FeRB Geobacter sulfurreducens and the SRB Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as model organisms, we demonstrate that Hg(II) uptake occurs by active transport. We also establish that Hg(II) uptake by G. sulfurreducens is highly dependent on the characteristics of the thiols that bind Hg(II) in the external medium, with some thiols promoting uptake and methylation and others inhibiting both. The Hg(II) uptake system of D. desulfuricans has a higher affinity than that of G. sulfurreducens and promotes Hg methylation in the presence of stronger complexing thiols. We observed a tight coupling between Hg methylation and MeHg export from the cell, suggesting that these two processes may serve to avoid the build up and toxicity of cellular Hg. Our results bring up the question of whether cellular Hg uptake is specific for Hg(II) or accidental, occurring via some essential metal importer. Our data also point at Hg(II) complexation by thiols as an important factor controlling Hg methylation in anaerobic environments. PMID:21555571

  14. Candidatus "Scalindua brodaea", spec. nov., Candidatus "Scalindua wagneri", spec. nov., two new species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schmid, M.; Walsh, K.; Webb, R.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Pas-Schoonen, K. van de; Verbruggen, M.J.; Hill, T.; Moffett, B.; Fuerst, J.; Schouten, S.; Harris, James; Shaw, P.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is both a promising process in wastewater treatment and a long overlooked microbial physiology that can contribute significantly to biological nitrogen cycling in the world's oceans. Anammox is mediated by a monophyletic group of bacteria that branches deeply

  15. 16S rRNA gene sequencing in routine identification of anaerobic bacteria isolated from blood cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Knudsen, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    A comparison between conventional identification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of anaerobic bacteria isolated from blood cultures in a routine setting was performed (n = 127). With sequencing, 89% were identified to the species level, versus 52% with conventional identification. The times...

  16. Fervidicoccus fontis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, thermophilic crenarchaeote from terrestrial hot springs, and proposal of Fervidicoccaceae fam. nov. and Fervidicoccales ord. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevalova, Anna A; Bidzhieva, Salima Kh; Kublanov, Ilya V; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Liu, Xiaolei L; Mardanov, Andrey V; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2010-09-01

    Two novel thermophilic and slightly acidophilic strains, Kam940(T) and Kam1507b, which shared 99 % 16S rRNA gene sequence identity, were isolated from terrestrial hot springs of the Uzon caldera on the Kamchatka peninsula. Cells of both strains were non-motile, regular cocci. Growth was observed between 55 and 85 degrees C, with an optimum at 65-70 degrees C (doubling time, 6.1 h), and at pH 4.5-7.5, with optimum growth at pH 5.5-6.0. The isolates were strictly anaerobic organotrophs and grew on a narrow spectrum of energy-rich substrates, such as beef extract, gelatin, peptone, pyruvate, sucrose and yeast extract, with yields above 10(7) cells ml(-1). Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate and nitrate added as potential electron acceptors did not stimulate growth when tested with peptone. H(2) at 100 % in the gas phase inhibited growth on peptone. Glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) with zero to four cyclopentyl rings were present in the lipid fraction of isolate Kam940(T). The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain Kam940(T) was 37 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolates were archaea of the phylum Crenarchaeota, only distantly related to the cultured members of the class Thermoprotei (no more than 89 % identity), and formed an independent lineage adjacent to the orders Desulfurococcales and Acidilobales and clustering only with uncultured clones from hot springs of Yellowstone National Park and Iceland as the closest relatives. On the basis of their phylogenetic position and novel phenotypic features, isolates Kam940(T) and Kam1507b are proposed to be assigned to a new genus and species, Fervidicoccus fontis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Fervidicoccus fontis is strain Kam940(T) (=DSM 19380(T) =VKM B-2539(T)). The phylogenetic data as well as phenotypic properties suggest that the novel crenarchaeotes form the basis of a new family, Fervidicoccaceae fam. nov., and order, Fervidicoccales ord. nov

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Thermophilic Bacteria from Jordanian Hot Springs: Bacillus licheniformis and Thermomonas hydrothermalis Isolates as Potential Producers of Thermostable Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balsam T. Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the isolation and characterization of thermophilic bacteria from hot springs in Jordan. Ten isolates were characterized by morphological, microscopic, biochemical, molecular, and physiological characteristics. Sequencing of the 16S rDNA of the isolates followed by BLAST search revealed that nine strains could be identified as Bacillus licheniformis and one isolate as Thermomonas hydrothermalis. This is the first report on the isolation of Thermomonas species from Jordanian hot springs. The isolates showed an ability to produce some thermostable enzymes such as amylase, protease, cellulose, gelatins, and lecithin. Moreover, the UPGMA dendrogram of the enzymatic characteristics of the ten isolates was constructed; results indicated a high phenotypic diversity, which encourages future studies to explore further industrial and environmental applications.

  18. Environmental evaluation of coexistence of denitrifying anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in a paddy field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Lu, Yong-Ze; Cheng, Shuk H; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The nitrate-dependent denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) process, which is metabolized together by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and NC10 phylum bacteria, is expected to be important for the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. However, there are little studies about the existence of this process and the functional microbes in environments. Therefore, the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field was evaluated in this study. Next-generation sequencing showed that the two orders, Methanosarcinales and Nitrospirales, to which DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria belong, were detected in the four soil samples. Then the in vitro experiments demonstrated both of nitrite- and nitrate-dependent DAMO activities, which confirmed the coexistence of DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria. It was the first report about the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field. Furthermore, anammox bacteria were detected in two of the four samples. The in vitro experiments did not show anammox activity in the initial period but showed low anammox activity after 20 days' enrichment. These results implicated that anammox bacteria may coexist with DAMO microorganisms in this field, but at a very low percentage.

  19. Copper extraction from coarsely ground printed circuit boards using moderate thermophilic bacteria in a rotating-drum reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Michael L.M., E-mail: mitchel.marques@yahoo.com.br [Bio& Hydrometallurgy Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Campus Morro do Cruzeiro, Ouro Preto, MG 35400-000 (Brazil); Leão, Versiane A., E-mail: versiane@demet.em.ufop.br [Bio& Hydrometallurgy Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Campus Morro do Cruzeiro, Ouro Preto, MG 35400-000 (Brazil); Gomes, Otavio [Centre for Mineral Technology – CETEM, Av Pedro Calmon, 900, 21941-908 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lambert, Fanny; Bastin, David; Gaydardzhiev, Stoyan [Mineral Processing and Recycling, University of Liege, SartTilman, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Copper bioleaching from PCB (20 mm) by moderate thermophiles was demonstrated. • Larger PCB sheets enable a cost reduction due to the elimination of fine grinding. • Crushing generated cracks in PCB increasing the copper extraction. • A pre-treatment step was necessary to remove the lacquer coating. • High copper extractions (85%) were possible with pulp density of up to 25.0 g/L. - Abstract: The current work reports on a new approach for copper bioleaching from Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by moderate thermophiles in a rotating-drum reactor. Initially leaching of PCB was carried out in shake flasks to assess the effects of particle size (−208 μm + 147 μm), ferrous iron concentration (1.25–10.0 g/L) and pH (1.5–2.5) on copper leaching using mesophile and moderate thermophile microorganisms. Only at a relatively low solid content (10.0 g/L) complete copper extraction was achieved from the particle size investigated. Conversely, high copper extractions were possible from coarse-ground PCB (20 mm-long) working with increased solids concentration (up to 25.0 g/L). Because there was as the faster leaching kinetics at 50 °C Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was selected for experiments in a rotating-drum reactor with the coarser-sized PCB sheets. Under optimal conditions, copper extraction reached 85%, in 8 days and microscopic observations by SEM–EDS of the on non-leached and leached material suggested that metal dissolution from the internal layers was restricted by the fact that metal surface was not entirely available and accessible for the solution in the case of the 20 mm-size sheets.

  20. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of anaerobic bacteria isolated from perforated corneal ulcers by culture and multiplex PCR: an evaluation in cases with keratitis and endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokman, Hrisi Bahar; İskeleli, Güzin; Dalar, Zeynep Güngördü; Kangaba, Achille Aime; Demirci, Mehmet; Akay, Hatice K; Borsa, Bariş Ata; Algingil, Reyhan Çalişkan; Kocazeybek, Bekir S; Torun, Müzeyyen Mamal; Kiraz, Nuri

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria play an important role in eye infections; however, there is limited epidemiologic data based on the the role of these bacteria in the etiology of keratitis and endophthalmitis. The aim of this re- search is to determine the prevalence of anaerobic bacteria in perforated corneal ulcers of patients with keratitis and endophthalmitis and to evaluate their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Corneal scrapings were taken by the ophthalmologist using sterile needles. For the isolation of anaerobic bacteria, samples were inoculated on specific media and were incubated under anaerobic conditions obtained with Anaero-Gen (Oxoid & Mitsubishi Gas Company) in anaerobic jars (Oxoid USA, Inc. Columbia, MD, USA). The molecular identification of anaerobic bacteria was performed by multiplex PCR and the susceptibilities of an- aerobic bacteria to penicillin, chloramphenicol, and clindamycin were determined with the E test (bioMerieux). 51 strains of anaerobic bacteria belonging to four different genuses were detected by multiplex PCR and only 46 strains were isolated by culture. All of them were found susceptible to chloramphenicol whereas penicillin resistance was found in 13.3% of P.anaerobius strains, clindamycin resistance was found in 34.8% of P.acnes and 13.3% of P. anaerobius strains. Additionnaly, one strain of P. granulosum was found resistant to clindamycin, one strain of B. fragilis and one strain of P.melaninogenica were found resistant to penicillin and clindamycin. Routine analyses of anaerobes in perforated corneal ulcers is inevitable and usage of appropriate molecular methods, for the detection of bacteria responsible from severe infections which might not be deter- mined by cultivation, may serve for the early decision of the appropriate treatment. Taking into account the in- creasing antimicrobial resistance of anaerobic bacteria, alternative eye specific antibiotics effective against anaer- obes are needed to achieve a successful treatment.

  1. Strong antimicrobial activity of xanthohumol and other derivatives from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) on gut anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Pavel; Olsovska, Jana; Mikyska, Alexandr; Dusek, Martin; Kadleckova, Zuzana; Vanicek, Jiri; Nyc, Otakar; Sigler, Karel; Bostikova, Vanda; Bostik, Pavel

    2017-11-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, such as Bacteroides fragilis or Clostridium perfringens, are part of indigenous human flora. However, Clostridium difficile represents also an important causative agent of nosocomial infectious antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Treatment of C. difficile infection is problematic, making it imperative to search for new compounds with antimicrobial properties. Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) contain substances with antibacterial properties. We tested antimicrobial activity of purified hop constituents humulone, lupulone and xanthohumol against anaerobic bacteria. The antimicrobial activity was established against B. fragilis, C. perfringens and C. difficile strains according to standard testing protocols (CLSI, EUCAST), and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were calculated. All C. difficile strains were toxigenic and clinically relevant, as they were isolated from patients with diarrhoea. Strongest antimicrobial effects were observed with xanthohumol showing MIC and MBC values of 15-107 μg/mL, which are close to those of conventional antibiotics in the strains of bacteria with increased resistance. Slightly higher MIC and MBC values were obtained with lupulone followed by higher values of humulone. Our study, thus, shows a potential of purified hop compounds, especially xanthohumol, as alternatives for treatment of infections caused by select anaerobic bacteria, namely nosocomial diarrhoea caused by resistant strains. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Recent developments in the thermophilic microbiology of deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2006-04-01

    The diversity of thermophilic prokaryotes inhabiting deep-sea hot vents was actively studied over the last two decades. The ever growing interest is reflected in the exponentially increasing number of novel thermophilic genera described. The goal of this paper is to survey the progress in this field made in the years 2000-2005. In this period, representatives of several new taxa of hyperthermophilic archaea were obtained from deep-sea environments. Two of these isolates had phenotypic features new for this group of organisms: the presence of an outer cell membrane (the genus Ignicoccus) and the ability to grow anaerobically with acetate and ferric iron (the genus Geoglobus). Also, our knowledge on the diversity of thermophilic bacteria from deep-sea thermal environments extended significantly. The new bacterial isolates represented diverse bacterial divisions: the phylum Aquificae, the subclass Epsilonproteobacteria, the order Thermotogales, the families Thermodesulfobacteriaceae, Deferribacteraceae, and Thermaceae, and a novel bacterial phylum represented by the genus Caldithrix. Most of these isolates are obligate or facultative lithotrophs, oxidizing molecular hydrogen in the course of different types of anaerobic respiration or microaerobic growth. The existence and significant ecological role of some of new bacterial thermophilic isolates was initially established by molecular methods.

  3. Influence of Thermal and Bacterial Pretreatment of Microalgae on Biogas Production in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Beti; Marinšek Logar, Romana; Panjičko, Mario; Fanedl, Lijana

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae biomass has a great potential in search for new alternative energy sources. They can be used as a substrate for the biogas production in anaerobic digestion. When using microalgae, the efficiency of this process is hampered due to the resistant cell wall. In order to accelerate the hydrolysis of cell wall and increase the efficiency of biogas production we applied two different pretreatments - biological and thermal under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. During biological pretreatment we incubated microalgae with anaerobic hydrolytic bacteria Pseudobutyrivibrio xylanivorans Mz5T. In thermal pretreatment we incubated microalgae at 90 °C. We also tested a combined thermal and biological pretreatment in which we incubated P. xylanivorans Mz5T with thermally pretreated microalgae. Thermal pretreatment in mesophilic and thermophilic process has increased methane production by 21% and 6%, respectively. Biological pretreatment of microalgae has increased methane production by 13%, but only under thermophilic conditions (pretreatment under mesophilic conditions showed no effect on methane production). Thermal-biological pretreatment increased methane production by 12% under thermophilic conditions and by 6% under mesophilic conditions.

  4. A multi-center ring trial for the identification of anaerobic bacteria using MALDI-TOF MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veloo, A; Jean-Pierre, H; Justesen, U S

    2017-01-01

    Inter-laboratory reproducibility of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of anaerobic bacteria has not been shown before. Therefore, ten anonymized anaerobic strains were sent to seven participating laboratories, an initiative of the European Network...... for the Rapid Identification of Anaerobes (ENRIA). On arrival the strains were cultured and identified using MALDI-TOF MS. The spectra derived were compared with two different Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS databases, the db5627 and the db6903. The results obtained using the db5627 shows a reasonable variation between...... the different laboratories. However, when a more optimized database is used, the variation is less pronounced. In this study we show that an optimized database not only results in a higher number of strains which can be identified using MALDI-TOF MS, but also corrects for differences in performance between...

  5. Evaluation of lactic acid and thermophilic bacteria antibacterial activity and compatibility with prebiotic oligosaccharides for development of new synbiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Pranckutė, Raminta

    2017-01-01

    Increased demand of nowadays consumers for less processed, with no chemical preservatives but beneficial to health food products forces the research on compatibility studies of functional food components – probiotic bacteria and prebiotics, aiming to create effective synbiotics. Probiotic bacteria produce various antibacterial substances and bacteriocins among them. These proteinaceous molecules attracted enormous attention due to the widespread pathogenic bacteria resistance to conventional ...

  6. Prevalence and persistence of potentially pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria during anaerobic digestion treatment of cattle manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Juliana Alves; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; de Oliveira, Tamara Lopes Rocha; de Oliveira Fortunato, Samuel; da Costa Carneiro, Jailton; Otenio, Marcelo Henrique; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo

    2014-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion figures as a sustainable alternative to avoid discharge of cattle manure in the environment, which results in biogas and biofertilizer. Persistence of potentially pathogenic and drug-resistant bacteria during anaerobic digestion of cattle manure was evaluated. Selective cultures were performed for enterobacteria (ENT), non-fermenting Gram-negative rods (NFR) and Gram-positive cocci (GPC). Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined and a decay of all bacterial groups was observed after 60days. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected both the influent and effluent. GPC, the most prevalent group was highly resistant against penicillin and levofloxacin, whereas resistance to ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam and chloramphenicol was frequently observed in the ENT and NFR groups. The data point out the need of discussions to better address management of biodigesters and the implementation of sanitary and microbiological safe treatments of animal manures to avoid consequences to human, animal and environmental health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High prevalence and resistance rates to antibiotics in anaerobic bacteria in specimens from patients with chronic balanitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Mitev, Angel; Gergova, Galina; Mateev, Grisha; Mitov, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    Aim of the study was to assess both prevalence and antibiotic resistance in anaerobic bacteria from glans penis skin of 70 adults. Strain susceptibility was determined by breakpoint susceptibility test or E test. In 9 asymptomatic, 48 untreated and 13 treated symptomatic patients, anaerobes were found in 22.2%, 70.8% and 53.3%, respectively. Gram-positive strains (GPAs) were 2.2-fold more common than Gram-negative ones. Prevalent Gram-negative (GNAs) and GPAs were Prevotella spp. and anaerobic cocci, respectively. Clostridium difficile strain was found in an untreated patient. In GNAs, resistance rates to amoxicillin, metronidazole, clindamycin, tetracycline, levofloxacin, and amoxicillin/clavulanate were 42.1, 0, 52.6, 53.3, 86.7 and 5.2%, respectively. In GPAs, the resistance rates to metronidazole, clindamycin, tetracycline, levofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanate were 18.2, 34.1, 52.6, 36.8 and 0%, respectively. In conclusion, anaerobes were 1.6-fold more frequent in untreated symptomatic patients compared with other patients, suggesting their participation in development of chronic balanitis. GPAs were more common than GNAs. The resistance rates to amoxicillin, clindamycin, tetracycline, and levofloxacin were high. Most active agents were metronidazole and amoxicillin/clavulanate. Resistance in anaerobes varies according to sites of specimens and years of study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stoke's and anti-Stoke's characteristics of anaerobic and aerobic bacterias at excitation of fluorescence by low-intensity red light: I. Research of anaerobic bacterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masychev, Victor I.; Alexandrov, Michail T.

    2000-04-01

    Biopsy or photo dynamic therapy of tumors are usually investigated by fluorescent diagnostics methods. Information on modified method of fluorescence diagnostics of inflammatory diseases is represented in this research. Anaerobic micro organisms are often the cause of these pathological processes. These micro organisms also accompany disbiotic processes in intestines.

  9. Effect of MAP and Multi-layer Flexible Films on the Growth of Anaerobic Bacteria of Fresh Ostrich Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Zand

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The usage of different concentrations of two gas mixture (Carbon dioxide, Nitrogen, and also vacuum conditions and the effect of flexible multi-layer pouches has been studied on the growth of anaerobic bacteria in fresh ostrich meat at refrigerator (T=4 0C. Ordinary condition as a control packaging was compared with three types of modified atmosphere packaging: {(N270% + CO230%, (N230% + CO270%} and vacuum conditions in this project. Ostrich fresh meat were packaged into 3 kinds of polymeric flexible pouch” 4-layers with thickness 131μ, {PET (12 / AL (7 / PET (12 / LLD (100}, 3-layer with thickness 124μ {PET (12 / AL (12 / LLD (100 and 3- layer with thickness 119 μ {PET (12 / AL (7 / LLD (100}. Samples were performed microbial tests (Total count of anaerobic bacteria, in different times with 12 treatment ,3 run, statistical analysis and comparison of data, were done by software SAS (Ver:9/1 and Duncan’s new multiple range test, with confidence level of 95% (P <0.05. The usage of MAP was not adequate for controlling spoilage, but the spoilage process was delayed. Anaerobic bacteria population of ostrich meat under (% 30 CO2 +% 70 N2 and also vacuum conditions in this container were more than 104 (not acceptable.However, the best condition belonged to ( N2 30% + CO2 70% ,and was acceptable till15 days. Maximum anaerobic bacteria s which were grown in these meat samples was related to % 30 CO2 conditions in 3-layer Al(7 μ, and the lowest growth belonged to treatment under % 70 CO2 in 4-layer. The Characteristic of this multi-layer flexible pouch (4-layers with less water vapor and oxygen permeability and also increasing more percentage of CO2 due to antibacterial properties of carbon dioxide gas, caused to control microbial growth in samples, so could be extended shelf life of fresh ostrich meat.

  10. Current advances in molecular methods for detection of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing bacteria in natural environments

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jing; Dick, Richard; Lin, Jih-Gaw; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) process uniquely links microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles. Research on n-damo bacteria progresses quickly with experimental evidences through enrichment cultures. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detecting them in various natural ecosystems and engineered systems play a very important role in the discovery of their distribution, abundance, and biodiversity in the ecosystems. Important characteristics of n-damo enrichmen...

  11. Role of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria in the acidogenesis of glucose: changes induced by discontinuous or low-rate feed supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, A.; Distel, B.; van Deursen, A.; Breure, A. M.; van Andel, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    A mineral salts medium containing 1% (w/v) glucose providing carbon-limited growth conditions was subjected to anaerobic acidogenesis by mixed populations of bacteria in chemostat cultures. The formation of butyrate was shown to be dependent on the presence of saccharolytic anaerobic sporeformers in

  12. Sulfate addition as an effective method to improve methane fermentation performance and propionate degradation in thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of coffee grounds, milk and waste activated sludge with AnMBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Yu-You; Qiao, Wei; Wang, Xiaochang; Takayanagi, Kazuyuki

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of sulfate on propionate degradation and higher organic loading rate (OLR) achievement in a thermophilic AnMBR for 373days using coffee grounds, milk and waste activated sludge (WAS) as the co-substrate. Without the addition of sulfate, the anaerobic system failed at an OLR of 14.6g-COD/L/d, with propionate accumulating to above 2.23g-COD/L, and recovery by an alkalinity supplement was not successful. After sulfate was added into substrates at a COD/SO4(2-) ratio of 200:1 to 350:1, biogas production increased proportionally with OLR increasing from 4.06 to 15.2g-COD/L/d. Propionic acid was maintained at less than 100mg-COD/L due to the effective conversion of propionic acid to methane after the sulfate supplement was added. The long-term stable performance of the AnMBR indicated that adding sulfate was beneficial for the degradation of propionate and achieving a higher OLR under the thermophilic condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adaptation of Bacteria of Anaerobic Digestion to Higher Salinity for the Application to Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Ivanova, Yanina; Spirov, Pavel

    For this study, bacteria of anaerobic digestion from Ribe Biogas plant, Denmark, were chosen. The volume of the produced gas from the bacteria was measured in a water displacement setup every day. After the gas production ceased in the second day, the maximum produced gas was measured at 70 and 90...... digestion can be an attractive candidate for MEOR implementation due to their ability to withstand high temperature and salinity, and produce gas in a large volume. Economical comparison between MEOR and foam injection revealed that MEOR is a cheaper and more sustainable method....

  14. Effect of temperature on removal of antibiotic resistance genes by anaerobic digestion of activated sludge revealed by metagenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Yang, Ying; Pruden, Amy

    2015-09-01

    As antibiotic resistance continues to spread globally, there is growing interest in the potential to limit the spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from wastewater sources. In particular, operational conditions during sludge digestion may serve to discourage selection of resistant bacteria, reduce horizontal transfer of ARGs, and aid in hydrolysis of DNA. This study applied metagenomic analysis to examine the removal efficiency of ARGs through thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digestion using bench-scale reactors. Although the relative abundance of various ARGs shifted from influent to effluent sludge, there was no measureable change in the abundance of total ARGs or their diversity in either the thermophilic or mesophilic treatment. Among the 35 major ARG subtypes detected in feed sludge, substantial reductions (removal efficiency >90%) of 8 and 13 ARGs were achieved by thermophilic and mesophilic digestion, respectively. However, resistance genes of aadA, macB, and sul1 were enriched during the thermophilic anaerobic digestion, while resistance genes of erythromycin esterase type I, sul1, and tetM were enriched during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Efflux pump remained to be the major antibiotic resistance mechanism in sludge samples, but the portion of ARGs encoding resistance via target modification increased in the anaerobically digested sludge relative to the feed. Metagenomic analysis provided insight into the potential for anaerobic digestion to mitigate a broad array of ARGs.

  15. Biochemical identification and determination of antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria obtained from the Hospital San Juan de Dios in the period 2009 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meza Pena, Maria Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Clinical isolates of 81 anaerobic bacteria isolated are identified to patients of the Hospital San Juan de Dios, between 2009 to 2011; by algorithms that have employed biochemical methods of reference chemical samples. Antimicrobial resistance is determined. The miniaturized methods and biochemical algorithms proposed were compared to identify differences between methods. The minimum inhibitory concentration of metronidazole, clindamycin, amoxicillin, tetracycline and cefotaxime are determined to 81 anaerobic bacteria isolated from the Hospital mentioned [es

  16. Extremely Thermophilic Microorganisms as Metabolic Engineering Platforms for Production of Fuels and Industrial Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Zeldes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye towards potential technological

  17. Genetic identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria: A prospective multicenter surveillance study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Tomoyuki; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tanaka, Michio; Hamano, Kyoko; Nakano, Satoshi; Noguchi, Taro; Nagao, Miki; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    This prospective multicenter surveillance study was designed to provide antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of clinical anaerobic bacteria with genetic species identification in Japan. In 2014, a total of 526 non-duplicate clinical anaerobic isolates were collected from 11 acute-care hospitals in the Kyoto and Shiga regions of Japan. Genetic identification was performed using 16S rRNA sequencing. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined in the central laboratory and were interpreted using the CLSI criteria. Genetic analysis provided species-level identification for 496 isolates (83 species in 40 genera) and genus-level identification for 21 isolates (13 genera). Among these 517 isolates, the most frequent anaerobes were Bacteroides spp. (n = 207), Prevotella spp. (n = 43), Clostridium spp. (n = 40), and Peptoniphilus spp. (n = 40). B. fragilis was the most common species (n = 107) and showed 91.6%-97.2% susceptibility to β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations (BLBLIs; ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and piperacillin-tazobactam) and carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem) as well as 100% susceptibility to metronidazole. Gram-negative anaerobes were highly susceptible to metronidazole (99.0%) followed by BLBLIs and carbapenems (>90% each). BLBLIs or carbapenems also retained activity against Gram-positive anaerobes (99.5%-100%) except Clostridioides difficile. All isolates were susceptible to combinations of metronidazole with BLBLIs or carbapenems. Thus, BLBLIs or carbapenems are first choices for empirical therapy of anaerobic infections in Japan, and these antimicrobials in combination with metronidazole should be reserved for very severe infections and targeted therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans/ Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaria, María C; Bianchini, Hebe M; Castello, Liliana; Carloni, Graciela; Di Martino, Ana; Fernández Canigia, Liliana; Litterio, Mirta; Rollet, Raquel; Rossetti, Adelaida; Predari, Silvia C

    2011-01-01

    Through time, anaerobic bacteria have shown good susceptibility to clinically useful antianaerobic agents. Nevertheless, the antimicrobial resistance profile of most of the anaerobic species related to severe infections in humans has been modified in the last years and different kinds of resistance to the most active agents have emerged, making their effectiveness less predictable. With the aim of finding an answer and for the purpose of facilitating the detection of anaerobic antimicrobial resistance, the Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología developed the First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans. This document resulted from the compatibilization of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations, the international literature and the work and experience of the Subcommittee. The Consensus document provides a brief taxonomy review, and exposes why and when anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests should be conducted, and which antimicrobial agents can be used according to the species involved. The recommendations on how to perform, read and interpret in vitro anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests with each method are exposed. Finally, the antibiotic susceptibility profile, the classification of antibiotics according to their in vitro activities, the natural and acquired mechanisms of resistance, the emerging resistance and the regional antibiotic resistance profile of clinically relevant anaerobic species are shown.

  19. Enrichment of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria for application after direct low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, C.; Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Luesken, F.; Alen, T.A.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Camp, op den H.J.M.; Zeeman, G.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Temmink, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite many advantages of anaerobic sewage treatment over conventional activated sludge treatment, it has not yet been applied in temperate zones. This is especially because effluent from low-temperature anaerobic treatment contains nitrogen and dissolved methane. The presence of nitrogen and

  20. Thermophilic microorganisms in biomining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Edgardo Rubén; Castro, Camila; Urbieta, María Sofía

    2016-11-01

    Biomining is an applied biotechnology for mineral processing and metal extraction from ores and concentrates. This alternative technology for recovering metals involves the hydrometallurgical processes known as bioleaching and biooxidation where the metal is directly solubilized or released from the matrix for further solubilization, respectively. Several commercial applications of biomining can be found around the world to recover mainly copper and gold but also other metals; most of them are operating at temperatures below 40-50 °C using mesophilic and moderate thermophilic microorganisms. Although biomining offers an economically viable and cleaner option, its share of the world´s production of metals has not grown as much as it was expected, mainly considering that due to environmental restrictions in many countries smelting and roasting technologies are being eliminated. The slow rate of biomining processes is for sure the main reason of their poor implementation. In this scenario the use of thermophiles could be advantageous because higher operational temperature would increase the rate of the process and in addition it would eliminate the energy input for cooling the system (bioleaching reactions are exothermic causing a serious temperature increase in bioreactors and inside heaps that adversely affects most of the mesophilic microorganisms) and it would decrease the passivation of mineral surfaces. In the last few years many thermophilic bacteria and archaea have been isolated, characterized, and even used for extracting metals. This paper reviews the current status of biomining using thermophiles, describes the main characteristics of thermophilic biominers and discusses the future for this biotechnology.

  1. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, F.B.; Li, X.M.; Zhou, S.G.; Zhuang, L.; Cao, F.; Huang, D.Y.; Xu, W.; Liu, T.X.; Feng, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    The transformation of DDT was studied in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella decolorationis S12) and iron oxide (α-FeOOH). The results showed that S. decolorationis could reduce DDT into DDD, and DDT transformation rate was accelerated by the presence of α-FeOOH. DDD was observed as the primary transformation product, which was demonstrated to be transformed in the abiotic system of Fe 2+ + α-FeOOH and the system of DIRB + α-FeOOH. The intermediates of DDMS and DBP were detected after 9 months, likely suggesting that reductive dechlorination was the main dechlorination pathway of DDT in the iron-reducing system. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT was mainly due to biogenic Fe(II) sorbed on the surface of α-FeOOH, which can serve as a mediator for the transformation of DDT. This study demonstrated the important role of DIRB and iron oxide on DDT and DDD transformation under anaerobic iron-reducing environments. - This is the first case reporting the reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide.

  2. Gammasphaerolipovirus, a newly proposed bacteriophage genus, unifies viruses of halophilic archaea and thermophilic bacteria within the novel family Sphaerolipoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Alice; Rissanen, Ilona; Bamford, Jaana K H; Krupovic, Mart; Jalasvuori, Matti

    2014-06-01

    A new family of viruses named Sphaerolipoviridae has been proposed recently. It comprises icosahedral, tailless haloarchaeal viruses with an internal lipid membrane located between the protein capsid and the dsDNA genome. The proposed family Sphaerolipoviridae was divided into two genera: Alphasphaerolipovirus, including Haloarcula hispanica viruses SH1, PH1 and HHIV-2, and Betasphaerolipovirus, including Natrinema virus SNJ1. Here, we propose to expand the family Sphaerolipoviridae to include a group of bacteriophages infecting extreme thermophilic Thermus thermophilus and sharing a number of structural and genomic properties with archaeal sphaerolipoviruses. This new group comprises two members, lytic phage P23-77 and temperate phage IN93, as well as putative members P23-72 and P23-65H. In addition, several related proviruses have been discovered as integrated elements in bacterial genomes of the families Thermus and Meiothermus. Morphology of the virus particles and the overall capsid architecture of these bacteriophages resembles that of archaeal members of the Sphaerolipoviridae, including an unusual capsid arrangement in a T = 28 dextro lattice. Alpha- and betasphaerolipoviruses share with P23-77-like bacteriophages a conserved block of core genes that encode a putative genome-packaging ATPase and the two major capsid proteins (MCPs). The recently determined X-ray structure of the small and large MCPs of P23-77 revealed a single beta-barrel (jelly-roll) fold that is superimposable with the cryo-EM density maps of the SH1 capsomers. Given the common features of these viruses, we propose to include the so far unclassified P23-77-like bacteriophages into a new genus, "Gammasphaerolipovirus", within the family Sphaerolipoviridae.

  3. Characteristics of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the hyporheic zone of a contaminated river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyuan; Qi, Yun; Wang, Jun; Pei, Yuansheng

    2012-09-01

    Both β-proteobacterial aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (ANAMMOX) bacteria were investigated in the hyporheic zone of a contaminated river in China containing high ammonium levels and low chemical oxygen demand. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and cloning-sequencing were employed in this study. FISH analysis illustrated that AOB (average population of 3.5 %) coexisted with ANAMMOX bacteria (0.7 %). The DGGE profile revealed a high abundance and diversity of bacteria at the water-air-soil interface rather than at the water-soil interface. The redundancy analysis correlated analysis showed that the diversity of ANAMMOX bacteria was positively related to the redox potential. The newly detected sequences of ANAMMOX organisms principally belonged to the genus Candidatus "Brocadia", while most ammonia monooxygenase subunit-A gene amoA sequences were affiliated with Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas. These results suggest that the water-air-soil interface performs an important function in the nitrogen removal process and that the bioresources of AOB and ANAMMOX bacteria can potentially be utilized for the eutrophication of rivers.

  4. Methanogenic H2 syntrophy among thermophiles: a model of metabolism, adaptation and survival in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, B. D.; Stewart, L. C.; Butterfield, D. A.; Huber, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 1 giga ton (Gt, 1015 g) of CH4 is formed globally per year from H2, CO2 and acetate through methanogenesis, largely by methanogens growing in syntrophic association with anaerobic microbes that hydrolyze and ferment biopolymers. However, our understanding of methanogenesis in hydrothermal regions of the subseafloor and potential syntrophic methanogenesis at thermophilic temperatures (i.e., >50°C) is nascent. In this study, the growth of natural assemblages of thermophilic methanogens from Axial Seamount was primarily limited by H2 availability. Heterotrophs supported thermophilic methanogenesis by H2 syntrophy in microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 55°C and 80°C supplemented with tryptone only. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only heterotrophic archaea that produce H2, H2-consuming methanogens, and sulfate reducing archaea were found in 80°C tryptone microcosms from Marker 113 vent. No bacteria were found. In 55°C tryptone microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. In order to model the impact of H2 syntrophy at hyperthemophilic temperatures, a co-culture was established consisting of the H2-producing hyperthermophilic heterotroph Thermococcus paralvinellae and a H2-consuming hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens. When grown alone in a chemostat, the growth rates and steady-state cell concentrations of T. paralvinellae decreased significantly when a high H2 (70 µM) background was present. H2 inhibition was ameliorated by the production of formate, but in silico modeling suggests less energetic yield for the cells. H2 syntrophy relieved H2 inhibition for both the heterotroph and the methanogenic partners. The results demonstrate that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important alternative energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  5. Thermophilic cellobiohydrolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapra, Rajat; Park, Joshua I.; Datta, Supratim; Simmons, Blake A.

    2017-04-18

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a polypeptide comprising a first amino acid sequence having at least 70% identity with the amino acid sequence of Csac GH5 wherein said first amino acid sequence has a thermostable or thermophilic cellobiohydrolase (CBH) or exoglucanase activity.

  6. Megasphaera indica sp. nov., an obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanjekar, V B; Marathe, N P; Ramana, V Venkata; Shouche, Y S; Ranade, D R

    2014-07-01

    Two coccoid, non-motile, obligately anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative bacteria, occurring singly or in pairs, or as short chains, with a mean size of 1.4-2.5 µm were isolated from the faeces of two healthy human volunteers, aged 26 and 56 years, and were designated NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7, respectively. Both the strains were affiliated to the sub-branch Sporomusa of the class Clostridia as revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The isolates NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7 showed 99.1 and 99.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively, with Megasphaera elsdenii JCM 1772(T). DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic analysis showed that both the strains were distinct from their closest relative, M. elsdenii JCM 1772(T) (42 and 53% DNA-DNA relatedness with NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7, respectively), but belong to the same species (DNA-DNA relatedness of 80.9 % between the isolates). According to DNA-DNA hybridization results, the coccoid strains belong to the same genospecies, and neither is related to any of the recognized species of the genus Megasphaera. Strains NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7 grew in PYG broth at temperatures of between 15 and 40 °C (optimum 37 °C), but not at 45 °C. The strains utilized a range of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy including glucose, lactose, cellobiose, rhamnose, galactose and sucrose. Glucose fermentation resulted in the formation of volatile fatty acids, mainly caproic acid and organic acids such as succinic acid. Phylogenetic analysis, specific phenotypic characteristics and/or DNA G+C content also differentiated the strains from each other and from their closest relatives. The DNA G+C contents of strains NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7 are 57.7 and 54.9 mol%, respectively. The major fatty acids were 12 : 0 FAME and 17 : 0 CYC FAME. On the basis of these data, we conclude that strains NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7 should be classified as representing a novel species of the genus Megasphaera, for which the name Megsphaera indica sp. nov

  7. Candidatus "Scalindua brodae", sp. nov., Candidatus "Scalindua wagneri", sp. nov., two new species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Markus; Walsh, Kerry; Webb, Rick; Rijpstra, W Irene C; van de Pas-Schoonen, Katinka; Verbruggen, Mark Jan; Hill, Thomas; Moffett, Bruce; Fuerst, John; Schouten, Stefan; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Harris, James; Shaw, Phil; Jetten, Mike; Strous, Marc

    2003-11-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is both a promising process in wastewater treatment and a long overlooked microbial physiology that can contribute significantly to biological nitrogen cycling in the world's oceans. Anammox is mediated by a monophyletic group of bacteria that branches deeply in the Planctomycetales. Here we describe a new genus and species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing planctomycetes, discovered in a wastewater treatment plant (wwtp) treating landfill leachate in Pitsea, UK. The biomass from this wwtp showed high anammox activity (5.0 +/- 0.5 nmol/mg protein/min) and produced hydrazine from hydroxylamine, one of the unique features of anammox bacteria. Eight new planctomycete 16S rRNA gene sequences were present in the 16S rRNA gene clone library generated from the biomass. Four of these were affiliated to known anammox 16S rRNA gene sequences, but branched much closer to the root of the planctomycete line of descent. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with oligonucleotide probes specific for these new sequences showed that two species (belonging to the same genus) together made up > 99% of the planctomycete population which constituted 20% of the total microbial community. The identification of these organisms as typical anammox bacteria was confirmed with electron microscopy and lipid analysis. The new species, provisionally named Candidatus "Scalindua brodae" and "Scalindua wagneri" considerably extend the biodiversity of the anammox lineage on the 16S rRNA gene level, but otherwise resemble known anammox bacteria. Simultaneously, another new species of the same genus, Candidatus "Scalindua sorokinii", was detected in the water column of the Black Sea, making this genus the most widespread of all anammox bacteria described so far.

  8. Diversity, Localization, and Physiological Properties of Filamentous Microbes Belonging to Chloroflexi Subphylum I in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Methanogenic Sludge Granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Kamagata, Yoichi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Harada, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that the thermophilic filamentous anaerobe Anaerolinea thermophila, which is the first cultured representative of subphylum I of the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi, not only was one of the predominant constituents of thermophilic sludge granules but also was a causative agent of filamentous sludge bulking in a thermophilic (55°C) upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor in which high-strength organic wastewater was treated (Y. Sekiguchi, H. Takahashi, Y. Kamagata, A. Ohashi, and H. Harada, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67:5740-5749, 2001). To further elucidate the ecology and function of Anaerolinea-type filamentous microbes in UASB sludge granules, we surveyed the diversity, distribution, and physiological properties of Chloroflexi subphylum I microbes residing in UASB granules. Five different types of mesophilic and thermophilic UASB sludge were used to analyze the Chloroflexi subphylum I populations. 16S rRNA gene cloning-based analyses using a 16S rRNA gene-targeted Chloroflexi-specific PCR primer set revealed that all clonal sequences were affiliated with the Chloroflexi subphylum I group and that a number of different phylotypes were present in each clone library, suggesting the ubiquity and vast genetic diversity of these populations in UASB sludge granules. Subsequent fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of the three different types of mesophilic sludge granules using a Chloroflexi-specific probe suggested that all probe-reactive cells had a filamentous morphology and were widely distributed within the sludge granules. The FISH observations also indicated that the Chloroflexi subphylum I bacteria were not always the predominant populations within mesophilic sludge granules, in contrast to thermophilic sludge granules. We isolated two mesophilic strains and one thermophilic strain belonging to the Chloroflexi subphylum I group. The physiological properties of these isolates suggested that these populations may contribute to the

  9. Affinity of ribosomal protein S8 from mesophilic and (hyper)thermophilic archaea and bacteria for 16S rRNA correlates with the growth temperatures of the organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thomas; Köhrer, Caroline; Lung, Birgit; Shcherbakov, Dmitri; Piendl, Wolfgang

    2003-08-14

    The ribosomal protein S8 plays a pivotal role in the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Using filter binding assays, S8 proteins from mesophilic, and (hyper)thermophilic species of the archaeal genus Methanococcus and from the bacteria Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus were tested for their affinity to their specific 16S rRNA target site. S8 proteins from hyperthermophiles exhibit a 100-fold and S8 from thermophiles exhibit a 10-fold higher affinity than their mesophilic counterparts. Thus, there is a striking correlation of affinity of S8 proteins for their specific RNA binding site and the optimal growth temperatures of the respective organisms. The stability of individual rRNA-protein complexes might modulate the stability of the ribosome, providing a maximum of thermostability and flexibility at the growth temperature of the organism.

  10. Potential Application of Anaerobic Extremophiles for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    During substrate fermentation many anaerobes produce the hydrogen as a waste product, which often regulates the growth of the cultures as an inhibitor. In nature the hydrogen is usually removed from the ecosystem due to its physical properties or by consumption of hydrogen by secondary anaerobes, which sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors as is seen in the classical example in anaerobic microbial communities via the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur- reducers. It was demonstrated previously on mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH that bacterial hydrogen production could provide an alternative energy source. But at neutral pH the original cultures can easily be contaminated by methanogens, a most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and the cultivation of human pathogens on a global scale is very dangerous. In our laboratory, experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria that excrete hydrogen as the end metabolic product were performed at different temperature regimes. Mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacterial cultures have been studied and compared for the most effective hydrogen production. For high-mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many methanogens are known to exist. Furthermore, the development of pathogenic contaminant microorganisms is virtually impossible: carbonate-saturated solutions are used as antiseptics in medicine. Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as most safe process for global Scale industry in future. Here we present experimental data on the rates of hydrogen productivity for mesophilic, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirocheta americana ASpG1 and moderately thermophilic, alkaliphilic, facultative anaerobe Anoxybacillus pushchinoensis K1 and

  11. Converting mesophilic upflow sludge blanket (UASB) reactors to thermophilic by applying axenic methanogenic culture bioaugmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinyu; Treu, Laura; Kougias, Panagiotis G.

    2018-01-01

    . The aim of the current study was to rapidly convert the operational temperature of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions by applying microbial community manipulation techniques. Three different bioaugmentation strategies were compared and it was proven...... be encapsulated in granular structures and concomitantly promote the growth of syntrophic fatty acid oxidizing bacteria. The results derived from the current study indicated that microbial community manipulation is an efficient alternative method to speed up transition of UASB reactors from mesophilic...

  12. Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weathers, Lenly J.; Katz, Lynn E.

    2002-01-01

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated

  13. A preliminary study of anaerobic thiosulfate-oxidising bacteria as denitrifiers in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.; Nair, S.

    Bacteria which oxidize thiosulfate and reduce nitrate (TONRB) and bacteria which oxidize thiosulfate and denitrify (TODB) sampled at 5-, 100-, 200-and 300-m depths were enumerated in agar shake cultures by colony counting and by applying MPN...

  14. Rapid adaptation of activated sludge bacteria into a glycogen accumulating biofilm enabling anaerobic BOD uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Iqbal; Paparini, Andrea; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAO) are known to allow anaerobic uptake of biological oxygen demand (BOD) in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems. In this study, we report a rapid transition of suspended activated sludge biomass to a GAO dominated biofilm by selective enrichment using sequences of anaerobic loading followed by aerobic exposure of the biofilm to air. The study showed that within eight weeks, a fully operational, GAO dominated biofilm had developed, enabling complete anaerobic BOD uptake at a rate of 256mg/L/h. The oxygen uptake by the biofilm directly from the atmosphere had been calculated to provide significant energy savings. This study suggests that wastewater treatment plant operators can convert activated sludge systems readily into a "passive aeration" biofilm that avoids costly oxygen transfer to bulk wastewater solution. The described energy efficient BOD removal system provides an opportunity to be coupled with novel nitrogen removal processes such as anammox. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of the routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing results of clinically significant anaerobic bacteria in a Slovenian tertiary-care hospital in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeverica, Samo; Kolenc, Urša; Mueller-Premru, Manica; Papst, Lea

    2017-10-01

    The aim of our study was to determined antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of 2673 clinically significant anaerobic bacteria belonging to the major genera, isolated in 2015 in a large tertiary-care hospital in Slovenia. The species identification was performed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined immediately at the isolation of the strains against: penicillin, co-amoxiclav, imipenem, clindamycin and metronidazole, using gradient diffusion methodology and EUCAST breakpoints. The most frequent anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis group with 31% (n = 817), Gram positive anaerobic cocci (GPACs) with 22% (n = 589), Prevotella with 14% (n = 313) and Propionibacterium with 8% (n = 225). Metronidazole has retained full activity (100%) against all groups of anaerobic bacteria intrinsically susceptible to it. Co-amoxiclav and imipenem were active against most tested anaerobes with zero or low resistance rates. However, observed resistance to co-amoxiclav (8%) and imipenem (1%) is worrying especially among B. fragilis group isolates. High overall resistance (23%) to clindamycin was detected in our study and was highest among the genera Prevotella, Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, GPACs and Clostridium. Routine testing of antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria is feasible and provides good surveillance data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation and characterization of biosurfactant production under extreme environmental conditions by alkali-halo-thermophilic bacteria from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elazzazy, Ahmed M; Abdelmoneim, T S; Almaghrabi, O A

    2015-07-01

    Twenty three morphologically distinct microbial colonies were isolated from soil and sea water samples, which were collected from Jeddah region, Saudi Arabia for screening of the most potent biosurfactant strains. The isolated bacteria were selected by using different methods as drop collapse test, oil displacement test, blue agar test, blood hemolysis test, emulsification activity and surface tension. The results showed that the ability of Virgibacillus salarius to grow and reduce surface tension under a wide range of pH, salinities and temperatures gives bacteria isolate an advantage in many applications such as pharmaceutical, cosmetics, food industries and bioremediation in marine environment. The biosurfactant production by V. salarius decreased surface tension and emulsifying activity (30 mN/m and 80%, respectively). In addition to reducing the production cost of biosurfactants by tested several plant-derived oils such as jatropha oil, castor oils, jojoba oil, canola oil and cottonseed oil. In this respect the feasibility to reusing old frying oil of sunflower for production rhamnolipids and sophorolipids, their use that lead to solve many ecological and industrial problems.

  17. Isolation and characterization of biosurfactant production under extreme environmental conditions by alkali-halo-thermophilic bacteria from Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elazzazy, Ahmed M.; Abdelmoneim, T.S.; Almaghrabi, O.A.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty three morphologically distinct microbial colonies were isolated from soil and sea water samples, which were collected from Jeddah region, Saudi Arabia for screening of the most potent biosurfactant strains. The isolated bacteria were selected by using different methods as drop collapse test, oil displacement test, blue agar test, blood hemolysis test, emulsification activity and surface tension. The results showed that the ability of Virgibacillus salarius to grow and reduce surface tension under a wide range of pH, salinities and temperatures gives bacteria isolate an advantage in many applications such as pharmaceutical, cosmetics, food industries and bioremediation in marine environment. The biosurfactant production by V. salarius decreased surface tension and emulsifying activity (30 mN/m and 80%, respectively). In addition to reducing the production cost of biosurfactants by tested several plant-derived oils such as jatropha oil, castor oils, jojoba oil, canola oil and cottonseed oil. In this respect the feasibility to reusing old frying oil of sunflower for production rhamnolipids and sophorolipids, their use that lead to solve many ecological and industrial problems. PMID:26150754

  18. Thermophilic Alkaline Fermentation Followed by Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion for Efficient Hydrogen and Methane Production from Waste-Activated Sludge: Dynamics of Bacterial Pathogens as Revealed by the Combination of Metagenomic and Quantitative PCR Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jingjing; Jing, Yuhang; Rao, Yue; Zhang, Shicheng; Luo, Gang

    2018-03-15

    Thermophilic alkaline fermentation followed by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (TM) for hydrogen and methane production from waste-activated sludge (WAS) was investigated. The TM process was also compared to a process with mesophilic alkaline fermentation followed by a mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MM) and one-stage mesophilic anaerobic digestion (M) process. The results showed that both hydrogen yield (74.5 ml H 2 /g volatile solids [VS]) and methane yield (150.7 ml CH 4 /g VS) in the TM process were higher than those (6.7 ml H 2 /g VS and 127.8 ml CH 4 /g VS, respectively) in the MM process. The lowest methane yield (101.2 ml CH 4 /g VS) was obtained with the M process. Taxonomic results obtained from metagenomic analysis showed that different microbial community compositions were established in the hydrogen reactors of the TM and MM processes, which also significantly changed the microbial community compositions in the following methane reactors compared to that with the M process. The dynamics of bacterial pathogens were also evaluated. For the TM process, the reduced diversity and total abundance of bacterial pathogens in WAS were observed in the hydrogen reactor and were further reduced in the methane reactor, as revealed by metagenomic analysis. The results also showed not all bacterial pathogens were reduced in the reactors. For example, Collinsella aerofaciens was enriched in the hydrogen reactor, which was also confirmed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis. The study further showed that qPCR was more sensitive for detecting bacterial pathogens than metagenomic analysis. Although there were some differences in the relative abundances of bacterial pathogens calculated by metagenomic and qPCR approaches, both approaches demonstrated that the TM process was more efficient for the removal of bacterial pathogens than the MM and M processes. IMPORTANCE This study developed an efficient process for bioenergy (H 2 and CH 4 ) production from WAS and elucidates the

  19. Anaerobic nitrite-dependent methane-oxidizing bacteria - novel participants in methane cycling of drained peatlands ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Menko, Ekaterina; Sirin, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the key sources of atmospheric methane. Process-based studies of methane dynamic are based on the hypothesis of the balance between microbial methane production and oxidation, but this doesn't explain all variations in and constraints on peatland CH4 emissions. One of the reasons for this discrepancy could be anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) - the process which is still poorly studied and remained controversial. Very little is known about AOM in peatlands, where it could work as an important 'internal' sink for CH4. This lack of knowledge primarily originated from researchers who generally consider AOM quantitatively insignificant or even non-existent in northern peatland ecosystems. But not far ago, Smemo and Yavitt (2007) presented evidence for AOM in freshwater peatlands used indirect techniques including isotope dilution assays and selective methanogenic inhibitors. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation NC10 group bacteria (n-damo) were detected in a minerotrophic peatland in the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water (Zhu et al., 2012). Present study represents the first, to our knowledge, characterization of AOM in human disturbed peatlands, including hydrological elements of artificial drainage network. The experiments were conducted with samples of peat from drained peatlands, as well as of water and bottom sediments of ditches from drained Dubnensky mire massif, Moscow region (Chistotin et al., 2006; Sirin et al., 2012). This is the key testing area of our research group in European part of Russia for the long-term greenhouse gases fluxes measurements supported by testing physicochemical parameters, intensity and genomic diversity of CH4-cycling microbial communities. Only in sediments of drainage ditches the transition anaerobic zone was found, where methane and nitrate occurred, suggested the possible ecological niche for n-damo bacteria. The NC10 group methanotrophs were analyzed by PCR

  20. ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOIL: ASSESSMENT OF THE DEGRADATION OF CONTAMINANTS AND BIOGAS PRODUCTION UNDER THERMOPHILIC AND MESOPHILIC CONDITIONS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sayara, T.; Čvančarová, Monika; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Sarra, M.; Sánchez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2015), s. 153-165 ISSN 1582-9596 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/1058 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : anaerobic digestion * central composite design * PAH-contaminated soil Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.008, year: 2015

  1. Cefoperazone and cefoperazone-sulbactam susceptibility tests with anaerobic bacteria by the thioglycolate disk elution method.

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, A L; Packer, R R; Jones, R N

    1985-01-01

    Tests were performed with 104 anaerobic microorganisms to evaluate the thioglycolate disk elution technique for the detection of resistance to cefoperazone and cefoperazone-sulbactam. An unacceptably high false-resistance rate and a poor reproducibility record make the disk elution procedure unsatisfactory for routine testing of this drug or combination of drugs.

  2. PCR-based detection of resistance genes in anaerobic bacteria isolated from intra-abdominal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Chau Minh; Tanaka, Kaori; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2013-04-01

    Little information is available on the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes in anaerobes in Japan. To understand the background of antimicrobial resistance in anaerobes involved in intra-abdominal infections, we investigated the distribution of eight antimicrobial resistance genes (cepA, cfiA, cfxA, ermF, ermB, mefA, tetQ, and nim) and a mutation in the gyrA gene in a total of 152 organisms (Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium spp., Porphyromonas spp., Bilophila wadsworthia, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Veillonella spp., gram-positive cocci, and non-spore-forming gram-positive bacilli) isolated between 2003 and 2004 in Japan. The cepA gene was distributed primarily in Bacteroides fragilis. Gene cfxA was detected in about 9 % of the Bacteroides isolates and 75 % of the Prevotella spp. isolates and did not appear to contribute to cephamycin resistance. Two strains of B. fragilis contained the metallo-β-lactamase gene cfiA, but they did not produce the protein product. Gene tetQ was detected in about 81, 44, and 63 % of B. fragilis isolates, other Bacteroides spp., and Prevotella spp. isolates, respectively. The ermF gene was detected in 25, 13, 56, 64, and 16 % of Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium spp., B. wadsworthia, and anaerobic cocci, respectively. Gene mefA was found in only 10 % of the B. fragilis strains and 3 % of the non-B. fragilis strains. Genes nim and ermB were not detected in any isolate. Substitution at position 82 (Ser to Phe) in gyrA was detected in B. fragilis isolates that were less susceptible or resistant to moxifloxacin. This study is the first report on the distribution of resistance genes in anaerobes isolated from intra-abdominal infections in Japan. We expect that the results might help in understanding the resistance mechanisms of specific anaerobes.

  3. Comparing the Bio-Hydrogen Production Potential of Pretreated Rice Straw Co-Digested with Seeded Sludge Using an Anaerobic Bioreactor under Mesophilic Thermophilic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Sattar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three common pretreatments (mechanical, steam explosion and chemical used to enhance the biodegradability of rice straw were compared on the basis of bio-hydrogen production potential while co-digesting rice straw with sludge under mesophilic (37 °C and thermophilic (55 °C temperatures. The results showed that the solid state NaOH pretreatment returned the highest experimental reduction of LCH (lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose content and bio-hydrogen production from rice straw. The increase in incubation temperature from 37 °C to 55 °C increased the bio-hydrogen yield, and the highest experimental yield of 60.6 mL/g VSremoved was obtained under chemical pretreatment at 55 °C. The time required for maximum bio-hydrogen production was found on the basis of kinetic parameters as 36 h–47 h of incubation, which can be used as a hydraulic retention time for continuous bio-hydrogen production from rice straw. The optimum pH range of bio-hydrogen production was observed to be 6.7 ± 0.1–5.8 ± 0.1 and 7.1 ± 0.1–5.8 ± 0.1 under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively. The increase in temperature was found useful for controlling the volatile fatty acids (VFA under mechanical and steam explosion pretreatments. The comparison of pretreatment methods under the same set of experimental conditions in the present study provided a baseline for future research in order to select an appropriate pretreatment method.

  4. Characterization and detection of a widely distributed gene cluster that predicts anaerobic choline utilization by human gut bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Bodea, Smaranda; Hamer, Hilary A; Marks, Jonathan A; Haiser, Henry J; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Balskus, Emily P

    2015-04-14

    Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the human gut microbiota's effects on health and disease has been complicated by difficulties in linking metabolic functions associated with the gut community as a whole to individual microorganisms and activities. Anaerobic microbial choline metabolism, a disease-associated metabolic pathway, exemplifies this challenge, as the specific human gut microorganisms responsible for this transformation have not yet been clearly identified. In this study, we established the link between a bacterial gene cluster, the choline utilization (cut) cluster, and anaerobic choline metabolism in human gut isolates by combining transcriptional, biochemical, bioinformatic, and cultivation-based approaches. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis and in vitro biochemical characterization of two cut gene products linked the entire cluster to growth on choline and supported a model for this pathway. Analyses of sequenced bacterial genomes revealed that the cut cluster is present in many human gut bacteria, is predictive of choline utilization in sequenced isolates, and is widely but discontinuously distributed across multiple bacterial phyla. Given that bacterial phylogeny is a poor marker for choline utilization, we were prompted to develop a degenerate PCR-based method for detecting the key functional gene choline TMA-lyase (cutC) in genomic and metagenomic DNA. Using this tool, we found that new choline-metabolizing gut isolates universally possessed cutC. We also demonstrated that this gene is widespread in stool metagenomic data sets. Overall, this work represents a crucial step toward understanding anaerobic choline metabolism in the human gut microbiota and underscores the importance of examining this microbial community from a function-oriented perspective. Anaerobic choline utilization is a bacterial metabolic activity that occurs in the human gut and is linked to multiple diseases. While bacterial genes responsible for

  5. Identity, Abundance, and Reactivation Kinetics of Thermophilic Fermentative Endospores in Cold Marine Sediment and Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Marta; Lomstein, Bente Aa; Sichert, Andreas; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo B; Kjeldsen, Kasper U

    2017-01-01

    Cold marine sediments harbor endospores of fermentative and sulfate-reducing, thermophilic bacteria. These dormant populations of endospores are believed to accumulate in the seabed via passive dispersal by ocean currents followed by sedimentation from the water column. However, the magnitude of this process is poorly understood because the endospores present in seawater were so far not identified, and only the abundance of thermophilic sulfate-reducing endospores in the seabed has been quantified. We investigated the distribution of thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) in water column and sediment of Aarhus Bay, Denmark, to test the role of suspended dispersal and determine the rate of endospore deposition and the endospore abundance in the sediment. We furthermore aimed to determine the time course of reactivation of the germinating TFEs. TFEs were induced to germinate and grow by incubating pasteurized sediment and water samples anaerobically at 50°C. We observed a sudden release of the endospore component dipicolinic acid immediately upon incubation suggesting fast endospore reactivation in response to heating. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and H 2 began to accumulate exponentially after 3.5 h of incubation showing that reactivation was followed by a short phase of outgrowth before germinated cells began to divide. Thermophilic fermenters were mainly present in the sediment as endospores because the rate of VFA accumulation was identical in pasteurized and non-pasteurized samples. Germinating TFEs were identified taxonomically by reverse transcription, PCR amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA. The water column and sediment shared the same phylotypes, thereby confirming the potential for seawater dispersal. The abundance of TFEs was estimated by most probable number enumeration, rates of VFA production, and released amounts of dipicolinic acid during germination. The surface sediment contained ∼10 5 -10 6 inducible TFEs cm -3 . TFEs thus outnumber

  6. Biohydrogen production by anaerobic fermentation of waste. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakashev, D.; Angelidaki, I.

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this project was to investigate and increase dark fermentative hydrogen production from organic wastes by optimizing important process parameters (reactor type, pH, temperature, organic loading, retention time, inoculation strategy, microbial composition). Labscale experiments were carried out at the Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark. A two steps process for hydrogen production in the first step and methane production in the second step in serial connected fully mixed reactors was developed and could successfully convert organic matter to approx. 20-25 % hydrogen and 15-80 % to methane. Sparging with methane produced in the second stage could significantly increase the hydrogen production. Additionally it was shown that upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system was very promising for high effective biohydrogen production from glucose at 70 deg C. Glucose-fed biofilm reactors filled with plastic carriers demonstrated high efficient extreme thermophilic biohydrogen production with mixed cultures. Repeated batch cultivations via exposure of the cultures to increased concentrations of household solid waste was found to be most useful method to enhance hydrogen production rate and reduce lag phase of extreme thermophilic fermentation process. Low level of pH (5.5) at 3-day HRT was enough to inhibit completely the methanogenesis and resulted in stable extreme thermophilic hydrogen production. Homoacetogenisis was proven to be an alternative competitor to biohydrogen production from organic acids under thermophilic (55 deg. C) conditions. With respect to microbiology, 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed to monitor the spatial distribution of hydrogen producing bacteria in sludge and granules from anaerobic reactors. An extreme thermophilic (70 deg. C), strict anaerobic, mixed microbial culture with high hydrogen producing potential was enriched from digested household waste. Culture

  7. Comparative microbiological-hygienic studies in mesophilic and thermophilic fouling of sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlig-Schmitt, M.; Philipp, W.; Wekerle, J.; Strauch, D.

    Investigations concerning the inactivation of microbial pathogens (bacteria, viruses and parasites) during anaerobic, alkaline dignestion of sludge are described. A thermophilic (54/sup 0/C) and a mesophilic (34/sup 0/C) operated biogas model plant were compared from the point of view of hygiene. Is was found that in the thermophilic process Salmonella senftenberg survived 13,5 h, Streptococcus faecium 55 h, Streptococcus faecalis 42 h and Klebsiella pneumoniae 0,5 h. Within 30 min eggs of Ascaris suum lost their infectivity Bovine Parvovirus was inactivated after 1 d to 2 d treatment. Survival times under mesophilic conditions of 13 d for Salmonella senftenberg and more than 8 mouth for Streptococcus faecium were found. Poliovirus Type 1 was inactivated in 8 d while Bovine Parvovirus survived no longer than 15 d. The results obtained in the thermophilic process were compared to those after heat treatment of the test microorganisms in ampules exposed in a wather-bath under defined conditions to 54/sup 0/C. It was found, that the bacteria survived only about half the time in this case. Poliovirus Type 1 was inactivated after 0,75 h and Bovine Parvovirus after 7 d exposure. (orig.RB)

  8. Comparison of Schaedler agar and trypticase soy-yeast extract agar for the cultivation of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, S E; Killgore, G E; Dowell, V R

    1971-10-01

    Schaedler agar (SA) and Trypticase soy-yeast extract agar (TSYEA), both supplemented with rabbit blood (5%, v/v) and menadione (0.5 mg/liter), were compared with respect to quantitative recovery, quality of growth, and rapidity of growth of selected anaerobic bacteria. The media were stored for 2 to 4 days prior to use in an anaerobic glove box, where all subsequent bacteriological procedures were performed. After 24 hr of incubation, colonies of Clostridium cadaveris (C. capitovale), C. haemolyticum, C. novyi A, and C. perfringens were larger on SA than on TSYEA, and the appearance of C. novyi B colonies on SA at 24 hr antedated their appearance on TSYEA. Quantitative recovery of C. novyi B was improved on SA; recovery of the other clostridia tested was comparable on the two media (inconclusive results were obtained with C. novyi A). Rough colonial types of some of the clostridia emerged on SA. No appreciable differences in results with the two media were noted for Bacteroides fragilis, B. melaninogenicus, or Fusobacterium fusiforme.

  9. Hydrogen production from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in anaerobic thermophilic acidogenesis: influence of organic loading rate and microbial content of the solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, S; Sales, D; Romero, L I; Solera, R

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen production (HP) from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) under thermophilic acidogenic conditions was studied. The effect of nine different organic loading rates (OLRs) (from 9 to 220 g TVS/l/d) and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (from 10d to 0.25 d) was investigated. Normally, butyrate was the main acid product. The biogas produced was methane- and sulfide-free at all tested OLR. Increasing the OLR resulted in an increase in both the quantity and quality of hydrogen production, except at the maximum OLR tested (220 g TVS/l/d). The maximum hydrogen content was 57% (v/v) at an OLR of 110 g TVS/l/d (HRT=0.5 d). HP was in the range of 0.1-5.7 l H2/l/d. The results have clearly shown that the increase in OLR was directly correlated with HP and microbial activity. The bacterial concentration inside the reactor is strongly influenced by the content of microorganisms in the OFMSW. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of size and thermophilic pre-hydrolysis of banana peel during anaerobic digestion, and biomethanation potential of key tropical fruit wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odedina, Mary Jesuyemi; Charnnok, Boonya; Saritpongteeraka, Kanyarat; Chaiprapat, Sumate

    2017-10-01

    Methane production potential of tropical fruit wastes, namely lady-finger banana peel, rambutan waste and longan waste were compared using BMP assay and stoichiometric modified Buswell and Mueller equation. Methane yields based on volatile solid (VS) were in the order of ground banana peel, chopped banana peel, chopped longan waste, and chopped rambutan waste (330.6, 268.3, 234.6 and 193.2 mLCH 4 /gVS) that corresponded to their calculated biodegradability. In continuous operations of banana peel digestion at feed concentrations based on total solid (TS) 1-2%, mesophilic single stage digester run at 20-day hydraulic retention time (20-day HRT) failed at 2%TS, but successfully recovered at 1.5%TS. Pre-hydrolysis thermophilic reactor (4-d HRT) was placed as pre-treatment to mesophilic reactor (20-d HRT). Higher biogas (with an evolution of H 2 ) and energy yields were obtained and greater system stability was achieved over the single stage digestion, particularly at higher solid feedstock. The best performance of two stage digestion was 68.5% VS destruction and energy yield of 2510.9kJ/kgVS added at a feed concentration of 2%TS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impacts of zero valent iron, natural zeolite and Dnase on the fate of antibiotic resistance genes during thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digestion of swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junya; Sui, Qianwen; Zhong, Hui; Meng, Xiaoshan; Wang, Ziyue; Wang, Yawei; Wei, Yuansong

    2018-06-01

    This study investigated the fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during mesophilic (mAD) and thermophilic digestion (tAD) of swine manure through zero valent iron (ZVI), natural zeolite and Dnase addition. Changes of microbial community, intI1, heavy metal resistance genes (MRGs) and virulence factors (VFs) were followed to clarify the influencing factors to ARGs reduction. Results showed that AD could realize ARGs reduction with tAD superior to mAD, and ZVI and natural zeolite could further enhance the reduction, especially for natural zeolite addition at mAD. The reduction efficiency of the relative abundance of ARGs was increased by 33.3% and 138.5% after ZVI and natural zeolite addition, respectively, but Dnase deteriorated ARGs reduction at mAD. Most of ARGs could be reduced effectively except sulII and tetM. Network analysis and partial redundancy analysis indicated that co-occurrence of MRGs followed by microbial community contributed the most to the variation of ARGs fate among treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fate of antibiotic resistance bacteria and genes during enhanced anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge by microwave pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juan; Liu, Jibao; Zheng, Xiang; Zhang, Junya; Ni, Xiaotang; Chen, Meixue; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-10-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were investigated during the sludge anaerobic digestion (AD) with microwave-acid (MW-H), microwave (MW) and microwave-H2O2-alkaline (MW-H2O2) pretreatments. Results showed that combined MW pretreatment especially for the MW-H pretreatment could efficiently reduce the ARB concentration, and most ARG concentrations tended to attenuate during the pretreatment. The subsequent AD showed evident removal of the ARB, but most ARGs were enriched after AD. Only the concentration of tetX kept continuous declination during the whole sludge treatment. The total ARGs concentration showed significant correlation with 16S rRNA during the pretreatment and AD. Compared with unpretreated sludge, the AD of MW and MW-H2O2 pretreated sludge presented slightly better ARB and ARGs reduction efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by marine and fresh water planctomycete-like bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Sliekers, O.; Kuypers, M.; Dalsgaard, T.; Niftrik, L. van; Cirpus, I.; Pas-Schoonen, K. van de; Lavik, G.; Thamdrup, B.; Le Paslier, D.; Camp, S. op den; Hulth, S.; Nielen, L.P.; Abma, W.; Third, K.; Engström, P.; Kuenen, J.G.; Jørgensen, B.B.; Canfield, D.E.; Revsbech, N.P.; Fuerst, J.; Weissenbach, J.; Wagner, M.; Schmidt, I.; Schmid, M.; Strous, M.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, two fresh water species, 'Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans' and 'Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis', and one marine species, 'Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii', of planctomycete anammox bacteria have been identified. 'Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii' was discovered in the Black Sea, and

  14. Comparison of two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry methods for the identification of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; Knoester, M.; Degener, J. E.; Kuijper, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Two commercially available MALDI-TOF MS systems, Bruker MS and Shimadzu MS, were compared for the identification of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria. A selection of 79 clinical isolates, representing 19 different genera, were tested and compared with identification obtained by 16S rRNA gene

  15. Monitoring Methanotrophic Bacteria in Hybrid Anaerobic-Aerobic Reactors with PCR and a Catabolic Gene Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez, Carlos B.; Shen, Chun F.; Bourque, Denis; Guiot, Serge R.; Groleau, Denis

    1999-01-01

    We attempted to mimic in small upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors the metabolic association found in nature between methanogens and methanotrophs. UASB bioreactors were inoculated with pure cultures of methanotrophs, and the bioreactors were operated by using continuous low-level oxygenation in order to favor growth and/or survival of methanotrophs. Unlike the reactors in other similar studies, the hybrid anaerobic-aerobic bioreactors which we used were operated synchronously, not sequentially. Here, emphasis was placed on monitoring various methanotrophic populations by using classical methods and also a PCR amplification assay based on the mmoX gene fragment of the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO). The following results were obtained: (i) under the conditions used, Methylosinus sporium appeared to survive better than Methylosinus trichosporium; (ii) the PCR method which we used could detect as few as about 2,000 sMMO gene-containing methanotrophs per g (wet weight) of granular sludge; (iii) inoculation of the bioreactors with pure cultures of methanotrophs contributed greatly to increases in the sMMO-containing population (although the sMMO-containing population decreased gradually with time, at the end of an experiment it was always at least 2 logs larger than the initial population before inoculation); (iv) in general, there was a good correlation between populations with the sMMO gene and populations that exhibited sMMO activity; and (v) inoculation with sMMO-positive cultures helped increase significantly the proportion of sMMO-positive methanotrophs in reactors, even after several weeks of operation under various regimes. At some point, anaerobic-aerobic bioreactors like those described here might be used for biodegradation of various chlorinated pollutants. PMID:9925557

  16. Potential of biohydrogen production from effluents of citrus processing industry using anaerobic bacteria from sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquato, Lilian D M; Pachiega, Renan; Crespi, Marisa S; Nespeca, Maurílio Gustavo; de Oliveira, José Eduardo; Maintinguer, Sandra I

    2017-01-01

    Citrus crops are among the most abundant crops in the world, which processing is mainly based on juice extraction, generating large amounts of effluents with properties that turn them into potential pollution sources if they are improperly discarded. This study evaluated the potential for bioconversion of effluents from citrus-processing industry (wastewater and vinasse) into hydrogen through the dark fermentation process, by applying anaerobic sewage sludge as inoculum. The inoculum was previously heat treated to eliminate H 2 -consumers microorganisms and improve its activity. Anaerobic batch reactors were operated in triplicate with increasing proportions (50, 80 and 100%) of each effluent as substrate at 37°C, pH 5.5. Citrus effluents had different effects on inoculum growth and H 2 yields, demonstrated by profiles of acetic acid, butyric acid, propionic acid and ethanol, the main by-products generated. It was verified that there was an increase in the production of biogas with the additions of either wastewater (7.3, 33.4 and 85.3mmolL -1 ) or vinasse (8.8, 12.7 and 13.4mmolL -1 ) in substrate. These effluents demonstrated remarkable energetic reuse perspectives: 24.0MJm -3 and 4.0MJm -3 , respectively. Besides promoting the integrated management and mitigation of anaerobic sludge and effluents from citrus industry, the biohydrogen production may be an alternative for the local energy supply, reducing the operational costs in their own facilities, while enabling a better utilization of the biological potential contained in sewage sludges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-molecule imaging can be achieved in live obligate anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S.; Coupland, Ben R.; Cameron, Elizabeth A.; Martens, Eric C.; Koropatkin, Nicole K.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) permits imaging with nanometer-scale resolution. This technique is particularly useful for cellular imaging as it provides a non-invasive, minimally perturbative means to examine macromolecular localization and dynamics, even in live cells. Here, we demonstrate that nanometer-scale SMF imaging can be extended to a new category of experiments: intracellular imaging of live, obligate anaerobic cells on the benchtop. We investigate the starch-utilization system (Sus) proteins in the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and discuss three different labels that we implemented to detect these proteins: fluorescent proteins, the tetracysteine-based FlAsH tag, and the enzymatic HaloTag.

  18. Influence of sodium chloride, pH, and lactic acid bacteria on anaerobic lactic acid utilization during fermented cucumber spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D; Franco, Wendy; Perez-Diaz, Ilenys; McFeeters, Roger F

    2012-07-01

    Cucumbers are preserved commercially by natural fermentations in 5% to 8% sodium chloride (NaCl) brines. Occasionally, fermented cucumbers spoil after the primary fermentation is complete. This spoilage has been characterized by decreases in lactic acid and a rise in brine pH caused by microbial instability. Objectives of this study were to determine the combined effects of NaCl and pH on fermented cucumber spoilage and to determine the ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) spoilage isolates to initiate lactic acid degradation in fermented cucumbers. Cucumbers fermented with 0%, 2%, 4%, and 6% NaCl were blended into slurries (FCS) and adjusted to pH 3.2, 3.8, 4.3, and 5.0 prior to centrifugation, sterile-filtration, and inoculation with spoilage organisms. Organic acids and pH were measured initially and after 3 wk, 2, 6, 12, and 18 mo anaerobic incubation at 25 °C. Anaerobic lactic acid degradation occurred in FCS at pH 3.8, 4.3, and 5.0 regardless of NaCl concentration. At pH 3.2, reduced NaCl concentrations resulted in increased susceptibility to spoilage, indicating that the pH limit for lactic acid utilization in reduced NaCl fermented cucumbers is 3.2 or lower. Over 18 mo incubation, only cucumbers fermented with 6% NaCl to pH 3.2 prevented anaerobic lactic acid degradation by spoilage bacteria. Among several LAB species isolated from fermented cucumber spoilage, Lactobacillus buchneri was unique in its ability to metabolize lactic acid in FCS with concurrent increases in acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol. Therefore, L. buchneri may be one of multiple organisms that contribute to development of fermented cucumber spoilage. Microbial spoilage of fermented cucumbers during bulk storage causes economic losses for producers. Current knowledge is insufficient to predict or control these losses. This study demonstrated that in the absence of oxygen, cucumbers fermented with 6% sodium chloride to pH 3.2 were not subject to spoilage. However, lactic acid was degraded

  19. Influence of feedstock-to-inoculum ratio on performance and microbial community succession during solid-state thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of pig urine and rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingyu; Xie, Li; Kinh, Co Thi; Suenaga, Toshikazu; Hori, Tomoyuki; Riya, Shohei; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of the feedstock-to-inoculum (F/I) ratio on performance of the solid-state anaerobic co-digestion of pig urine and rice straw inoculated with a solid digestate, and clarified the microbial community succession. A 44-day biochemical methane potential test at F/I ratios of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 at 55 °C and a 35-day large-scale batch test at F/I ratios of 0.5 and 3 at 55 °C were conducted to investigate the effects of F/I ratio on anaerobic digestibility and analyze microbial community succession, respectively. The highest cumulative methane yield was 353.7 m 3 /t VS in the large-scale batch test. Volatile fatty acids did not accumulate at any F/I ratios. The volatile solids reduction rate was highest at a F/I ratio of 0.5. Microbial community structures were similar between F/I ratios of 3 and 0.5, despite differences in digestion performance, suggesting that stable operation can be achieved at these ratios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfate-reducing ocean bacterium Thermodesulfatator indicus type strain (CIR29812T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2012-01-01

    Thermodesulfatator indicus Moussard et al. 2004 is a member of the genomically so far poorly characterized family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria. Members of this phylum are of interest because they represent a distinct, deep-branching, Gram-negative lineage. T. indicus is an anaerobic, thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,322,224 bp long chromosome with its 2,233 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfate-reducing ocean bacterium Thermodesulfatator indicus type strain (CIR29812(T)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chang, Yun-Juan; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-05-25

    Thermodesulfatator indicus Moussard et al. 2004 is a member of the Thermodesulfobacteriaceae, a family in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria that is currently poorly characterized at the genome level. Members of this phylum are of interest because they represent a distinct, deep-branching, Gram-negative lineage. T. indicus is an anaerobic, thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,322,224 bp long chromosome with its 2,233 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Thermophilic (55 - 65°C) and extreme thermophilic (70 - 80°C) sulfate reduction in methanol and formate-fed UASB reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallero, M.V.G.; Camarero, E.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of thermophilic (55-65 degreesC) and extreme thermophilic (70-80 degreesC) sulfate-reducing processes was investigated in three lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors fed with either methanol or formate as the sole substrates and inoculated with mesophilic granular

  3. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by marine and freshwater planctomycete-like bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetten, M S M; Sliekers, O; Kuypers, M; Dalsgaard, T; van Niftrik, L; Cirpus, I; van de Pas-Schoonen, K; Lavik, G; Thamdrup, B; Le Paslier, D; Op den Camp, H J M; Hulth, S; Nielsen, L P; Abma, W; Third, K; Engström, P; Kuenen, J G; Jørgensen, B B; Canfield, D E; Sinninghe Damsté, J S; Revsbech, N P; Fuerst, J; Weissenbach, J; Wagner, M; Schmidt, I; Schmid, M; Strous, M

    2003-12-01

    Recently, two fresh water species, " Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans" and " Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis", and one marine species, " Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii", of planctomycete anammox bacteria have been identified. " Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii" was discovered in the Black Sea, and contributed substantially to the loss of fixed nitrogen. All three species contain a unique organelle--the anammoxosome--in their cytoplasm. The anammoxosome contains the hydrazine/hydroxylamine oxidoreductase enzyme, and is thus the site of anammox catabolism. The anammoxosome is surrounded by a very dense membrane composed almost exclusively of linearly concatenated cyclobutane-containing lipids. These so-called 'ladderanes' are connected to the glycerol moiety via both ester and ether bonds. In natural and man-made ecosystems, anammox bacteria can cooperate with aerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria, which protect them from harmful oxygen, and provide the necessary nitrite. The cooperation of these two groups of ammonium-oxidising bacteria is the microbial basis for a sustainable one reactor system, CANON (completely autotrophic nitrogen-removal over nitrite) to remove ammonia from high strength wastewater.

  4. Caldisericum exile gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, thermophilic, filamentous bacterium of a novel bacterial phylum, Caldiserica phyl. nov., originally called the candidate phylum OP5, and description of Caldisericaceae fam. nov., Caldisericales ord. nov. and Caldisericia classis nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koji; Yamaguchi, Kaoru; Sakiyama, Yayoi; Urabe, Tetsuro; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro

    2009-11-01

    An anaerobic, thermophilic, thiosulfate-reducing bacterium, strain AZM16c01(T), isolated from a hot spring in Japan [Mori, K., Sunamura, M., Yanagawa, K., Ishibashi, J., Miyoshi, Y., Iino, T., Suzuki, K. & Urabe, T. (2008). Appl Environ Microbiol 74, 6223-6229] was characterized in detail. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis had revealed that strain AZM16c01(T) was the first cultivated representative of the candidate phylum OP5. The cells were multicellular filaments with a single polar flagellum. The strain contained iso-C(17 : 0) as the major fatty acid and menaquinone-8(H(6)), menaquinone-8(H(8)) and menaquinone-8(H(10)) as the respiratory quinones. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain AZM16c01(T) was 34.6 mol%. Optimum growth was obtained at 65 degrees C, pH 6.5 and in the absence of NaCl, with a doubling time of 10.6 h. On the basis of the results of phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and the characterization of the strain in this study, we propose the name Caldisericum exile gen. nov., sp. nov. for strain AZM16c01(T) (=NBRC 104410(T)=DSM 21853(T)). In addition, we propose the new phylum name Caldiserica phyl. nov. for the candidate phylum OP5 represented by C. exile gen. nov., sp. nov., and Caldisericaceae fam. nov., Caldisericales ord. nov. and Caldisericia classis nov.

  5. Early Microbial Evolution: The Age of Anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F; Sousa, Filipa L

    2015-12-18

    In this article, the term "early microbial evolution" refers to the phase of biological history from the emergence of life to the diversification of the first microbial lineages. In the modern era (since we knew about archaea), three debates have emerged on the subject that deserve discussion: (1) thermophilic origins versus mesophilic origins, (2) autotrophic origins versus heterotrophic origins, and (3) how do eukaryotes figure into early evolution. Here, we revisit those debates from the standpoint of newer data. We also consider the perhaps more pressing issue that molecular phylogenies need to recover anaerobic lineages at the base of prokaryotic trees, because O2 is a product of biological evolution; hence, the first microbes had to be anaerobes. If molecular phylogenies do not recover anaerobes basal, something is wrong. Among the anaerobes, hydrogen-dependent autotrophs--acetogens and methanogens--look like good candidates for the ancestral state of physiology in the bacteria and archaea, respectively. New trees tend to indicate that eukaryote cytosolic ribosomes branch within their archaeal homologs, not as sisters to them and, furthermore tend to root archaea within the methanogens. These are major changes in the tree of life, and open up new avenues of thought. Geochemical methane synthesis occurs as a spontaneous, abiotic exergonic reaction at hydrothermal vents. The overall similarity between that reaction and biological methanogenesis fits well with the concept of a methanogenic root for archaea and an autotrophic origin of microbial physiology. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. Growth of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in a high-pressure membrane capsule bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Peer H A; Gieteling, Jarno; Widjaja-Greefkes, H C Aura; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M; Lens, Piet N L; Meulepas, Roel J W

    2015-02-01

    Communities of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits the ability to perform physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated SRB are affected by it. Here, we report on the growth of ANME-SRB in a membrane capsule bioreactor inoculated with Eckernförde Bay sediment that combines high-pressure incubation (10.1 MPa methane) and thorough mixing (100 rpm) with complete cell retention by a 0.2-m-pore-size membrane. The results were compared to previously obtained data from an ambient-pressure (0.101 MPa methane) bioreactor inoculated with the same sediment. The rates of oxidation of labeled methane were not higher at 10.1 MPa, likely because measurements were done at ambient pressure. The subtype ANME-2a/b was abundant in both reactors, but subtype ANME-2c was enriched only at 10.1 MPa. SRB at 10.1 MPa mainly belonged to the SEEP-SRB2 and Eel-1 groups and the Desulfuromonadales and not to the typically found SEEP-SRB1 group. The increase of ANME-2a/b occurred in parallel with the increase of SEEP-SRB2, which was previously found to be associated only with ANME-2c. Our results imply that the syntrophic association is flexible and that methane pressure and sulfide concentration influence the growth of different ANME-SRB consortia. We also studied the effect of elevated methane pressure on methane production and oxidation by a mixture of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludge. Here, methane oxidation rates decreased and were not coupled to sulfide production, indicating trace methane oxidation during net methanogenesis and not anaerobic methane oxidation, even at a high methane partial pressure.

  7. Characterization of microbial biofilms in a thermophilic biogas system by high-throughput metagenome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Antje; Zakrzewski, Martha; Schlüter, Andreas; Schönberg, Mandy; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Klocke, Michael

    2012-03-01

    DNAs of two biofilms of a thermophilic two-phase leach-bed biogas reactor fed with rye silage and winter barley straw were sequenced by 454-pyrosequencing technology to assess the biofilm-based microbial community and their genetic potential for anaerobic digestion. The studied biofilms matured on the surface of the substrates in the hydrolysis reactor (HR) and on the packing in the anaerobic filter reactor (AF). The classification of metagenome reads showed Clostridium as most prevalent bacteria in the HR, indicating a predominant role for plant material digestion. Notably, insights into the genetic potential of plant-degrading bacteria were determined as well as further bacterial groups, which may assist Clostridium in carbohydrate degradation. Methanosarcina and Methanothermobacter were determined as most prevalent methanogenic archaea. In consequence, the biofilm-based methanogenesis in this system might be driven by the hydrogenotrophic pathway but also by the aceticlastic methanogenesis depending on metabolite concentrations such as the acetic acid concentration. Moreover, bacteria, which are capable of acetate oxidation in syntrophic interaction with methanogens, were also predicted. Finally, the metagenome analysis unveiled a large number of reads with unidentified microbial origin, indicating that the anaerobic degradation process may also be conducted by up to now unknown species. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct observation and quantification of extracellular long-range electron flow in anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Yalcin, Sibel; Vargas, Madeline; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2013-03-01

    Some anaerobic microorganisms are capable of transporting electrons outside their cell to distant electron acceptors such as metals, minerals or partner species. Previous studies have focused primarily on transport over short distances ( 10 μm) using pili filaments that show organic metal-like conductivity. Pili also enable direct exchange of electrons among syntrophic Geobacter co-cultures. In order to establish the physical principles underlying this remarkable electron transport, we have employed a novel scanning probe microscopy-based method to perform quantitative measurements of electron flow at a single cell level under physiological conditions. Using this nanoscopic approach, we have directly observed the propagation and distribution of injected electrons in individual native bacterial extracellular proteins. Our direct measurements demonstrate unambiguously for the first time that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are a novel class of electronically functional proteins that can sustain electron flow in a surprising manner that has not been observed previously in any other natural protein. Funded by Office of Naval Research, DOE Genomic Sciences and NSF-NSEC Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing grant no. CMMI-1025020.

  9. Kinetic analysis of hydrogen production using anaerobic bacteria in reverse micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi, Xiaohua; Yang, Haijun; Yuan, Zhuliang; Shen, Jianquan [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Laboratory of New Materials, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun North First Street 2, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The micellar formation and entrapment of bacteria cell in reverse micelles were investigated by ultraviolet spectrum (UV), fluorescence spectrum, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hydrogen production in reverse micelles was confirmed. The Gompertz equation was employed to evaluate the hydrogen-producing behavior in reverse micellar systems. Different systems including dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT)-isooctane, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-benzene and SDS-carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) reverse micelles were analysized. The results revealed that the maximum rate of hydrogen production (R{sub m}) was also suitable to formulate the relationship between hydrogen-producing rate and hydrogen productivity in reverse micelles. (author)

  10. Contamination pathways of spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Loïc; Planchon, Stella; Guinebretiere, Marie-Hélène; André, Stéphane; Carlin, Frédéric; Remize, Fabienne

    2015-06-02

    Spoilage of low-acid canned food during prolonged storage at high temperatures is caused by heat resistant thermophilic spores of strict or facultative bacteria. Here, we performed a bacterial survey over two consecutive years on the processing line of a French company manufacturing canned mixed green peas and carrots. In total, 341 samples were collected, including raw vegetables, green peas and carrots at different steps of processing, cover brine, and process environment samples. Thermophilic and highly-heat-resistant thermophilic spores growing anaerobically were counted. During vegetable preparation, anaerobic spore counts were significantly decreased, and tended to remain unchanged further downstream in the process. Large variation of spore levels in products immediately before the sterilization process could be explained by occasionally high spore levels on surfaces and in debris of vegetable combined with long residence times in conditions suitable for growth and sporulation. Vegetable processing was also associated with an increase in the prevalence of highly-heat-resistant species, probably due to cross-contamination of peas via blanching water. Geobacillus stearothermophilus M13-PCR genotypic profiling on 112 isolates determined 23 profile-types and confirmed process-driven cross-contamination. Taken together, these findings clarify the scheme of contamination pathway by thermophilic spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization and high-quality draft genome sequence of Herbivorax saccincola A7, an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, thermophilic, cellulolytic, and xylanolytic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Shimpei; Baramee, Sirilak; Sermsathanaswadi, Junjarus; Thianheng, Phakhinee; Tachaapaikoon, Chakrit; Shikata, Ayumi; Waeonukul, Rattiya; Pason, Patthra; Ratanakhanokchai, Khanok; Kosugi, Akihiko

    2018-02-11

    An anaerobic, cellulolytic-xylanolytic bacterium, designated strain A7, was isolated from a cellulose-degrading bacterial community inhabiting bovine manure compost on Ishigaki Island, Japan, by enrichment culture using unpretreated corn stover as the sole carbon source. The strain was Gram-positive, non-endospore forming, non-motile, and formed orange colonies on solid medium. Strain A7 was identified as Herbivorax saccincola by DNA-DNA hybridization, and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that it was closely related to H. saccincola GGR1 (= DSM 101079 T ). H. saccincola A7 (= JCM 31827=DSM 104321) had quite similar phenotypic characteristics to those of strain GGR1. However, the optimum growth of A7 was at alkaline pH (9.0) and 55°C, compared to pH 7.0 at 60°C for GGR1, and the fatty acid profile of A7 contained 1.7-times more C 17:0 iso than GGR1. The draft genome sequence revealed that H. saccincola A7 possessed a cellulosome-like extracellular macromolecular complex, which has also been found for Clostridium thermocellum and C. clariflavum. H. saccincola A7 contained more glycoside hydrolases (GHs) belonging to GH families-11 and -2, and more diversity of xylanolytic enzymes, than C. thermocellum and C. clariflavum. H. saccincola A7 could grow on xylan because it encoded essential genes for xylose metabolism, such as a xylose transporter, xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, and ribulose-phosphate 3-epimerase, which are absent from C. thermocellum. These results indicated that H. saccincola A7 has great potential as a microorganism that can effectively degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of pH Management Interval on Biohydrogen Production from Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Wastes by Mesophilic Thermophilic Anaerobic Codigestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Chaudhry; Sattar, Asma; Changying, Ji; Nasir, Abdul; Ali Mari, Irshad; Zia Bakht, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The biohydrogen productions from the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) were studied under pH management intervals of 12 h (PM12) and 24 h (PM24) for temperature of 37 ± 0.1°C and 55 ± 0.1°C. The OFMSW or food waste (FW) along with its two components, noodle waste (NW) and rice waste (RW), was codigested with sludge to estimate the potential of biohydrogen production. The biohydrogen production was higher in all reactors under PM12 as compared to PM24. The drop in pH from 7 to 5.3 was observed to be appropriate for biohydrogen production via mesophilic codigestion of noodle waste with the highest biohydrogen yield of 145.93 mL/g CODremoved under PM12. When the temperature was increased from 37°C to 55°C and pH management interval was reduced from 24 h to 12 h, the biohydrogen yields were also changed from 39.21 mL/g CODremoved to 89.67 mL/g CODremoved, 91.77 mL/g CODremoved to 145.93 mL/g CODremoved, and 15.36 mL/g CODremoved to 117.62 mL/g CODremoved for FW, NW, and RW, respectively. The drop in pH and VFA production was better controlled under PM12 as compared to PM24. Overall, PM12 was found to be an effective mean for biohydrogen production through anaerobic digestion of food waste. PMID:26819952

  13. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Neil Lyles

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11 or a methanogen (M. hungatei. The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons.

  14. Optimization of three FISH procedures for in situ detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria in biological wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlekovic, Marko; Schmid, Markus C; Schmider-Poignee, Nadja; Spring, Stefan; Pilhofer, Martin; Gaul, Tobias; Fiandaca, Mark; Löffler, Frank E; Jetten, Mike; Schleifer, K-H; Lee, Natuschka M

    2009-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using fluorochrome-labeled DNA oligonucleotide probes has been successfully applied for in situ detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria. However, application of the standard FISH protocols to visualize anammox bacteria in biofilms from a laboratory-scale wastewater reactor produced only weak signals. Increased signal intensity was achieved either by modifying the standard FISH protocol, using peptide nucleic acid probes (PNA FISH), or applying horse radish peroxidase- (HRP-) labeled probes and subsequent catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH). A comparative analysis using anammox biofilm samples and suspended anammox biomass from different laboratory wastewater bioreactors revealed that the modified standard FISH protocol and the PNA FISH probes produced equally strong fluorescence signals on suspended biomass, but only weak signals were obtained with the biofilm samples. The probe signal intensities in the biofilm samples could be enhanced by enzymatic pre-treatment of fixed cells, and by increasing the hybridization time of the PNA FISH protocol. CARD-FISH always produced up to four-fold stronger fluorescent signals but unspecific fluorescence signals, likely caused by endogenous peroxidases as reported in several previous studies, compromised the results. Interference of the development of fluorescence intensity with endogenous peroxidases was also observed in cells of aerobic ammonium oxidizers like Nitrosomonas europea, and sulfate-reducers like Desulfobacter postgatei. Interestingly, no interference was observed with other peroxidase-positive microorganisms, suggesting that CARD-FISH is not only compromised by the mere presence of peroxidases. Pre-treatment of cells to inactivate peroxidase with HCl or autoclavation/pasteurization failed to inactive peroxidases, but H(2)O(2) significantly reduced endogenous peroxidase activity. However, for optimal inactivation, different H(2)O(2

  15. Removal of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes Affected by Varying Degrees of Fouling on Anaerobic Microfiltration Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2017-11-07

    An anaerobic membrane bioreactor was retrofitted with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane units, each of which was fouled to a different extent. The membranes with different degrees of fouling were evaluated for their efficiencies in removing three antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), namely, bla NDM-1 -positive Escherichia coli PI-7, bla CTX-M-15 -positive Klebsiella pneumoniae L7, and bla OXA-48 -positive E. coli UPEC-RIY-4, as well as their associated plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The results showed that the log removal values (LRVs) of ARGs correlated positively with the extent of membrane fouling and ranged from 1.9 to 3.9. New membranes with a minimal foulant layer could remove more than 5 log units of ARB. However, as the membranes progressed to subcritical fouling, the LRVs of ARB decreased at increasing operating transmembrane pressures (TMPs). The LRV recovered back to 5 when the membrane was critically fouled, and the achieved LRV remained stable at different operating TMPs. Furthermore, characterization of the surface attributed the removal of both the ARB and ARGs to adsorption, which was facilitated by an increasing hydrophobicity and a decreasing surface ζ potential as the membranes fouled. Our results indicate that both the TMP and the foulant layer synergistically affected ARB removal, but the foulant layer was the main factor that contributed to ARG removal.

  16. Removal of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes affected by varying degrees of fouling on anaerobic microfiltration membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Hong

    2017-09-28

    An anaerobic membrane bioreactor was retrofitted with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane units, each of which was fouled to a different extent. The membranes with different degrees of fouling were evaluated for their efficiencies in removing three antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), namely, blaNDM-1-positive Escherichia coli PI-7, blaCTX-M-15-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae L7, and blaOXA-48-positive E. coli UPEC-RIY-4, as well as their associated plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The results showed that the log removal values (LRVs) of ARGs correlated positively with the extent of membrane fouling and ranged from 1.9 to 3.9. New membranes with a minimal foulant layer could remove more than 5 log units of ARB. However, as the membranes progressed to subcritical fouling, the LRVs of ARB decreased at increasing operating transmembrane pressures (TMPs). The LRV recovered back to 5 when the membrane was critically fouled, and the achieved LRV remained stable at different operating TMPs. Furthermore, characterization of the surface attributed the removal of both the ARB and ARGs to adsorption, which was facilitated by an increasing hydrophobicity and a decreasing surface ζ potential as the membranes fouled. Our results indicate that both the TMP and the foulant layer synergistically affected ARB removal, but the foulant layer was the main factor that contributed to ARG removal.

  17. Microbial community changes in methanogenic granules during the transition from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinyu; Kougias, Panagiotis; Treu, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor is one of the most applied technologies for various high-strength wastewater treatments. The present study analysed the microbial community changes in UASB granules during the transition from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions. Dynamicity...

  18. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eJaekel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5×0.8 m. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkanes propane and n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes.

  19. Activity of Telithromycin (HMR 3647) against Anaerobic Bacteria Compared to Those of Eight Other Agents by Time-Kill Methodology†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim L.; Ednie, Lois M.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    1999-01-01

    Time-kill studies examined the activities of telithromycin (HMR 3647), erythromycin A, azithromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, clindamycin, pristinamycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and metronidazole against 11 gram-positive and gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. Time-kill studies were carried out with the addition of Oxyrase in order to prevent the introduction of CO2. Macrolide-azalide-ketolide MICs were 0.004 to 32.0 μg/ml. Of the latter group, telithromycin had the lowest MICs, especially against non-Bacteroides fragilis group strains, followed by azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin A, and roxithromycin. Clindamycin was active (MIC ≤ 2.0 μg/ml) against all anaerobes except Peptostreptococcus magnus and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, while pristinamycin MICs were 0.06 to 4.0 μg/ml. Amoxicillin-clavulanate had MICs of ≤1.0 μg/ml, while metronidazole was active (MICs, 0.03 to 2.0 μg/ml) against all except Propionibacterium acnes. After 48 h at twice the MIC, telithromycin was bactericidal (≥99.9% killing) against 6 strains, with 99% killing of 9 strains and 90% killing of 10 strains. After 24 h at twice the MIC, 90, 99, and 99.9% killing of nine, six, and three strains, respectively, occurred. Lower rates of killing were seen at earlier times. Similar kill kinetics relative to the MIC were seen with other macrolides. After 48 h at the MIC, clindamycin was bactericidal against 8 strains, with 99 and 90% killing of 9 and 10 strains, respectively. After 24 h, 90% killing of 10 strains occurred at the MIC. The kinetics of clindamycin were similar to those of pristinamycin. After 48 h at the MIC, amoxicillin-clavulanate showed 99.9% killing of seven strains, with 99% killing of eight strains and 90% killing of nine strains. At four times the MIC, metronidazole was bactericidal against 8 of 10 strains tested after 48 h and against all 10 strains after 24 h; after 12 h, 99% killing of all 10 strains occurred. PMID:10428930

  20. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production.

  1. Prevalence of Thermophilic Campylobacter species in carcasses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. namely, Campylobacter jejuni and coli cause acute diarrheal diseases in humans worldwide; although these species are known to occur in the intestinal tract of a wide variety of domestic and wild animals. Objective: Little is known about the presence of these bacteria in ...

  2. Effect of silver nanoparticles and antibiotics on antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Young, Katherine; Hong, Yanjuan; Vikesland, Peter J; Hull, Matthew S; Pruden, Amy

    2013-05-01

    Water resource recovery facilities have been described as creating breeding ground conditions for the selection, transfer, and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) among various bacteria. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of direct addition of antibiotic and silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, or nanosilver) on the occurrence of ARGs in thermophilic anaerobic digesters. Test thermophilic digesters were amended with environmentally-relevant concentrations of Ag NP (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg-Ag/L; corresponding to approximately 0.7, 7.0, and 70 mg-Ag/kg total solids) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) that span susceptible to resistant classifications (1, 5, and 50 mg/L) as potential selection pressures for ARGs. Tetracycline (tet(O), tet(W)) and sulfonamide (sulI, sulII) ARGs and the integrase enzyme gene (intI1) associated with Class 1 integrons were measured in raw sludge, test thermophilic digesters, a control thermophilic digester, and a control mesophilic digester. There was no apparent effect of Ag NPs on thermophilic anaerobic digester performance. The maximum SMX addition (50 mg/L) resulted in accumulation of volatile fatty acids and low pH, alkalinity, and volatile solids reduction. There was no significant difference between ARG gene copy numbers (absolute or normalized to 16S rRNA genes) in amended thermophilic digesters and the control thermophilic digester. Antibiotic resistance gene copy numbers in digested sludge ranged from 10(3) to 10(6) copies per microL (approximately 8 x10(1) to 8 x 10(4) copies per microg) of sludge as result of a 1-log reduction of ARGs (2-log reduction for intI1). Quantities of the five ARGs in raw sludge ranged from 10(4) to 10(8) copies per microL (approximately 4 x 10(2) to 4 x 10(6) per microg) of sludge. Test and control thermophilic digesters (53 degrees C, 12-day solids retention time [SRT]) consistently reduced but did not eliminate levels of all analyzed genes. The mesophilic digester (37 degrees C

  3. Activity of telithromycin (HMR 3647) against anaerobic bacteria compared to those of eight other agents by time-kill methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, K L; Ednie, L M; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C

    1999-08-01

    Time-kill studies examined the activities of telithromycin (HMR 3647), erythromycin A, azithromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, clindamycin, pristinamycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and metronidazole against 11 gram-positive and gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. Time-kill studies were carried out with the addition of Oxyrase in order to prevent the introduction of CO(2). Macrolide-azalide-ketolide MICs were 0.004 to 32.0 microg/ml. Of the latter group, telithromycin had the lowest MICs, especially against non-Bacteroides fragilis group strains, followed by azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin A, and roxithromycin. Clindamycin was active (MIC /=99.9% killing) against 6 strains, with 99% killing of 9 strains and 90% killing of 10 strains. After 24 h at twice the MIC, 90, 99, and 99.9% killing of nine, six, and three strains, respectively, occurred. Lower rates of killing were seen at earlier times. Similar kill kinetics relative to the MIC were seen with other macrolides. After 48 h at the MIC, clindamycin was bactericidal against 8 strains, with 99 and 90% killing of 9 and 10 strains, respectively. After 24 h, 90% killing of 10 strains occurred at the MIC. The kinetics of clindamycin were similar to those of pristinamycin. After 48 h at the MIC, amoxicillin-clavulanate showed 99.9% killing of seven strains, with 99% killing of eight strains and 90% killing of nine strains. At four times the MIC, metronidazole was bactericidal against 8 of 10 strains tested after 48 h and against all 10 strains after 24 h; after 12 h, 99% killing of all 10 strains occurred.

  4. Efektivitas penggunaan tongue scraper terhadap penurunan indeks tongue coating dan jumlah koloni bakteri anaerob lidah Effectivity of tongue scraper on reducing tongue coating and anaerobic bacteria colony count

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdini Hamid; Rabia’tul Aulia; Rasmidar Samad

    2011-01-01

    Many microorganisms have been found colonizing the dorsum of tongue. To prevent infection and development of other pathologies in oral cavity, tongue cleaning has been advocated to reduce the amount of coating and microorganism loading in the mouth. The aim of this study is to find out the impact of tongue cleaning using tongue scraper against tongue coating index and anaerobic bacterial colony count on tongue dorsum. This study was carried out on 24 male and 16 female participant...

  5. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, Curcuma longa, and Camellia sinensis as irrigating solutions on isolated anaerobic bacteria from infected primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhariwal, Neha Shashikant; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Harakuni, Sheetal; Sogi, Suma; Assudani, Harsha G; Mistry, Laresh Naresh

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, most of the commercial intra-canal medicaments have cytotoxic reactions and because of their inability to eliminate bacteria from dentinal tubules, recent medicine has turned its attention to the usage of biologic medication prepared from natural plants. The literature to testify the efficacy of natural alternatives in primary teeth is meagre and its effects as irrigating solutions need to be evaluated. To evaluate the antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, ethanolic extracts of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and Camellia sinensis (green tea) as irrigating solutions against the anaerobic bacteria isolated from the root canals of infected primary teeth. Thirty patients were selected based on the selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were taken. Rubber dam isolation and working length estimation were done, following which thirty samples were taken from the root canals of infected primary teeth using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate transport medium. The bacteria were then isolated using standard microbiological protocols and were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing using the three test irrigants. SPSS 18 software using Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. The most commonly isolated bacteria included Porphyromonas sp., Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Sodium hypochlorite and C. longa (turmeric) showed good antibacterial effect and were effective against most of the isolated bacteria. There was statistically significant difference in the antibacterial effect among the three tested groups (P < 0.001). The least effective was C. sinensis (green tea). The infected primary teeth almost always present with a polymicrobial structure with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria. The chemo-mechanical preparation plays an important role in eradicating the population of predominant micro-organisms in treating these teeth with

  6. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, Curcuma longa, and Camellia sinensis as irrigating solutions on isolated anaerobic bacteria from infected primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Shashikant Dhariwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In endodontics, most of the commercial intra-canal medicaments have cytotoxic reactions and because of their inability to eliminate bacteria from dentinal tubules, recent medicine has turned its attention to the usage of biologic medication prepared from natural plants. The literature to testify the efficacy of natural alternatives in primary teeth is meagre and its effects as irrigating solutions need to be evaluated. Aim: To evaluate the antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, ethanolic extracts of Curcuma longa (turmeric and Camellia sinensis (green tea as irrigating solutions against the anaerobic bacteria isolated from the root canals of infected primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients were selected based on the selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were taken. Rubber dam isolation and working length estimation were done, following which thirty samples were taken from the root canals of infected primary teeth using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate transport medium. The bacteria were then isolated using standard microbiological protocols and were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing using the three test irrigants. Statistical Analysis: SPSS 18 software using Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The most commonly isolated bacteria included Porphyromonas sp., Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Sodium hypochlorite and C. longa (turmeric showed good antibacterial effect and were effective against most of the isolated bacteria. There was statistically significant difference in the antibacterial effect among the three tested groups (P < 0.001. The least effective was C. sinensis (green tea. Conclusion: The infected primary teeth almost always present with a polymicrobial structure with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria. The chemo-mechanical preparation plays an important

  7. Phosphate inhibition on thermophilic acetoclastic methanogens: a warning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Santos, dos A.B.; Ide, C.N.; Lettinga, G.

    2005-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of phosphate on acetoclastic-methanogens was investigated for three different thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic consortia. When 70 mM of phosphate was tested, acetoclastic methanogens was completely inhibited in "Eerbeek" sludge which is dominated by Methanosaeta-like

  8. Anaerobic and aerobic acetylene hydratase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Acetaldehyde is the first metabolite produced during acetylene degradation by bacteria either aerobically or anaerobically. Conversion of acetylene into acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate, and biomass occurs in anaerobic cultures of Palobacter acetylinicus or aerobically with Mycobacterium lacticola, Nocardia rhodochrous, ...

  9. Distribution and characteristic of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria by comparative analysis of wastewater treatment plants and agriculture fields in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo is a recently discovered biological process which has been arousing global attention because of its potential in minimizing greenhouse gases emissions. In this study, molecular biological techniques and potential n-damo activity batch experiments were conducted to investigate the presence and diversity of M. oxyfera bacteria in paddy field, corn field, and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP sites in northern China, as well as lab-scale n-damo enrichment culture. N-damo enrichment culture showed the highest abundance of M. oxyfera bacteria, and positive correlation was observed between potential n-damo rate and abundance of M. oxyfera bacteria. Both paddy field and corn field sites were believed to be better inoculum than WWTP for the enrichment of M. oxyfera bacteria due to their higher abundance and the diversity of M. oxyfera bacteria. Comparative analysis revealed that long biomass retention time, low NH ${}_{4}^{+}$ 4 + and high NO ${}_{2}^{-}$ 2 − content were suitable for the growth of M. oxyfera bacteria.

  10. Implications from distinct sulfate-reducing bacteria populations between cattle manure and digestate in the elucidation of H2S production during anaerobic digestion of animal slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Benoit; Wright, André-Denis G

    2017-07-01

    Biogas produced from the anaerobic digestion of animal slurry consists mainly of methane (CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), but also includes other minor gases, such as hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). Since it can act as a potent corrosive agent and presents a health hazard even at low concentrations, H 2 S is considered an undesirable by-product of anaerobic digestion. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) have been identified as the main biological source of H 2 S in a number of natural, biological, and human-made habitats, and thus represent likely candidate microorganisms responsible for the production of H 2 S in anaerobic manure digesters. Phylogenetically, SRBs form a divergent group of bacteria that share a common anaerobic respiration pathway that allows them to use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. While the composition and activity of SRBs have been well documented in other environments, their metabolic potential remains largely uncharacterized and their populations poorly defined in anaerobic manure digesters. In this context, a combination of in vitro culture-based studies and DNA-based approaches, respectively, were used to gain further insight. Unexpectedly, only low to nondetectable levels of H 2 S were produced by digestate collected from a manure biogas plant documented to have persistently high concentrations of H 2 S in its biogas (2000-3000 ppm). In contrast, combining digestate with untreated manure (a substrate with comparatively lower sulfate and SRB cell densities than digestate) was found to produce elevated H 2 S levels in culture. While a 16S rRNA gene-based community composition approach did not reveal likely candidate SRBs in digestate or untreated manure, the use of the dsrAB gene as a phylogenetic marker provided more insight. In digestate, the predominant SRBs were found to be uncharacterized species likely belonging to the genus Desulfosporosinus (Peptococcaceae, Clostridiales, Firmicutes), while Desulfovibrio-related SRBs

  11. Species identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria: a comparison of two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Holm, Anette; Knudsen, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    We compared two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems (Shimadzu/SARAMIS and Bruker) on a collection of consecutive clinically important anaerobic bacteria (n = 290). The Bruker system had more correct identifications to the species level...... (67.2% versus 49.0%), but also more incorrect identifications (7.9% versus 1.4%). The system databases need to be optimized to increase identification levels. However, MALDI-TOF MS in its present version seems to be a fast and inexpensive method for identification of most clinically important...

  12. Modelling the competition between sulphate reducers and methanogens in a thermophilic methanol-fed bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.; Weijma, J.; Abusam, A.

    2002-01-01

    Sulphate can be removed from wastewater by means of biological anaerobic reduction to sulphide. The reduction requires the presence of a substrate that can serve as an electron donor. Methanol a suitable electron donor for sulphate reduction under thermophilic conditions. In an anaerobic system

  13. Bicarbonate dosing: a tool to performance recovery of a thermophilic methanol-fed UASB reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Lier, van J.B.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    The thermophilic-anaerobic treatment of methanol-containing wastewater in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, was found to be quite sensitive to pH shocks, both acid and alkaline. The results of the recovery experiments of sludge exposed to an alkaline shock, indicated that the

  14. Desulfotomaculum thermobenzoicum subsp. thermosyntrophicum subsp. nov., a thermophilic, syntrophic, propionate-oxidizing, spore-forming bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plugge, C.M.; Balk, M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    From granular sludge from a laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor operated at 55 degrees C with a mixture of volatile fatty acids as feed, a novel anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, syntrophic, spore-forming bacterium, strain TPO, was enriched on propionate in co-culture with

  15. Effect of NaCl on thermophilic (55°C) methanol degradation in sulfate reducing granular sludge reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallero, M.V.G.; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of NaCl on thermophilic (55degreesC) methanol conversion in the presence of excess of sulfate (COD/SO42-=0.5) was investigated in two 6.5L lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors inoculated with granular sludge previously not adapted to NaCl
    The effect of NaCl on thermophilic

  16. The antimicrobial peptide Ci-MAM-A24 is highly active against multidrug-resistant and anaerobic bacteria pathogenic for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedders, Henning; Podschun, Rainer; Leippe, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    Ci-MAM-A24, a synthetic antimicrobial peptide derived from a peptide precursor from immune cells of the marine invertebrate Ciona intestinalis, has been shown to be potently active against representatives of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by permeabilising their cytoplasmic membrane. In the present study, the activity of Ci-MAM-A24 against different bacterial pathogens frequently causing therapeutic problems was tested. In particular, the killing capacity of Ci-MAM-A24 against clinically important anaerobic bacteria as well as multiresistant aerobic strains such as meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producers and multiple-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains was monitored. Virtually all strains proved to be highly susceptible to Ci-MAM-A24 at low concentrations [minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)<10 microg/mL]. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Ceftaroline plus Avibactam Demonstrates Bactericidal Activity against Pathogenic Anaerobic Bacteria in a One-Compartment In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic pathogens are often associated with polymicrobial infections, such as diabetic foot infections. Patients with these infections are often treated with broad-spectrum, multidrug therapies targeting resistant Gram-positive bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as well as Gram-negative bacteria and anaerobes. The broad-spectrum, non-beta-lactam, beta-lactamase inhibitor avibactam has been combined with ceftaroline and may provide a single-product alternative for complicated polymicrobial infections. We compared the activity of ceftaroline-avibactam (CPA) to that of ertapenem (ERT) against common anaerobic pathogens in an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model. Simulations of doses of ceftaroline-fosamil at 600 mg every 8 h (q8h) (maximum free drug concentration [fCmax], 17.04 mg/liter, and half-life [t1/2], 2.66 h) plus avibactam at 600 mg q8h (fCmax, 11.72 mg/liter, and t1/2, 1.8 h) and of ertapenem at 1 g q24h (fCmax, 13 mg/liter, and t1/2, 4 h) were evaluated against two strains of Bacteroides fragilis, one strain of Prevotella bivia, and one strain of Finegoldia magna in an anaerobic one-compartment in vitro PK/PD model over 72 h with a starting inoculum of ∼8 log10 CFU/ml. Bactericidal activity was defined as a reduction of ≥3 log10 CFU/ml from the starting inoculum. Both CPA and ERT were bactericidal against all four strains. CPA demonstrated improved activity against Bacteroides strains compared to that of ERT but had similar activity against Finegoldia magna and P. bivia, although modest regrowth was observed with CPA against P. bivia. No resistance emerged from any of the models. The pharmacokinetics achieved were 92 to 105% of the targets. CPA has potent in vitro activity against common anaerobic pathogens at clinically relevant drug exposures and may be a suitable single product for the management of complicated polymicrobial infections. PMID:24217692

  18. In vitro efficacy of cefovecin against anaerobic bacteria isolated from subgingival plaque of dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazandi, Manouchehr; Bird, Philip S; Owens, Jane; Wilson, Gary; Meyer, James N; Trott, Darren J

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal disease is a common disease of dogs and cats often requiring antimicrobial treatment as an adjunct to mechanical debridement. However, correct compliance with oral antimicrobial therapy in companion animals is often difficult. Cefovecin is a recently introduced veterinary cephalosporin that has demonstrated prolonged concentrations in extracellular fluid, allowing for dosing intervals of up to 14 days. Subgingival samples were collected from the oral cavity of 29 dogs and eight cats exhibiting grade 2 or grade 3 periodontal disease. Samples were cultivated on Wilkin Chalgrens agar and incubated in an anaerobic chamber for seven days. Selected anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified to species level using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for cefovecin and six additional antimicrobials using the agar dilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The 65 clinical isolates were identified as Porphyromonas gulae (n = 45), Porphyromonas crevioricanis (n = 12), Porphyromonas macacae (n = 1), Porphyromonas cangingivalis (n = 1) Fusobacterium nucleatum (n = 2), Fusobacterium russii (n = 1) and Solobacterium moorei (n = 3). This is the first report of S. moorei being isolated from companion animals with periodontal disease. All isolates were highly susceptible to cefovecin, with a MIC90 of ≤0.125 μg/ml. Conversely, different resistance rates to ampicillin, amoxicillin and erythromycin between isolates were detected. Cefovecin is thus shown to be effective in vitro against anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs and cats with periodontal disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pigments in Thermophilic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Somasundaram, T; Rao, Sanjay SR; Maheshwari, R

    1986-01-01

    UV and visible absorption spectra of thermophilic fungi were obtained by photoacoustic spectroscopy. Based on these data as well as on the chem. properties and IR spectra, it is suggested that the pigments may be hydroxylated polycyclic quinones.

  20. Hexavalent uranium reduction from solid phase by thermophilic bacterium Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khijniak, T.V.; Slobodkin, A.I.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E.A.; Medvedeva-Lyalikova, N.N.; Coker, V.; Lloyd, J.R.; Birkeland, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been reported that in uranium-contaminated sites, solid-phase U(VI) present in sediments is resistant to microbial reduction. Also, it was demonstrated that mesophilic iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria can reduce hexavalent uranium and sulphate-reducing bacteria were able to grow via uranium reduction. Among thermophilic microorganisms reduction of hexavalent uranium has been demonstrated only for cell suspensions of two genera: Pyrobaculum and Thermus. In the present study, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens was tested for reduction of U(VI), a thermophilic, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium capable for growth with the reduction of various electron acceptors including Fe(III). Kinetic of bacterial growth, uranium reduction and influence of different uranium concentrations were investigated at 65 deg. C. Due to presence of phosphate in the basal medium yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was formed after addition of uranyl acetate. After 68 h of incubation control tubes without bacteria were contained yellow precipitate whereas in presence of bacteria precipitate turned to the grey color. In the control tubes uranium phosphates and other elements formed a uniform mixture of crystals, but in presence of bacteria the round shape particles, containing uranium, were found by Environmental Scan Electron Microscopy of air-dried or frozen samples. To determine valent state speciation spectroscopic investigations were performed also. Initial yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was separated and identified as uramphite - (NH 4 )(UO 2 )(PO 4 )*3H 2 O by X-Ray Powder Diffraction. Grey precipitate, which was formed by bacterial reduction, was identified as ningyoite - CaU(PO 4 ) 2 *H 2 O. The fact that final grey precipitate contain U(IV) was also confirmed by EXAFS investigation. High concentration of uranium has toxic effect. 1 and 2.5 mM of uranium (VI) support bacterial growth and bacterial biomass was accumulated, but if 5 or 10

  1. Molecular and stable isotopic evidence for the occurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria in the mangrove sediment of Zhangjiang Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Manping; Luo, Yi; Lin, Li'an; Lin, Xiaolan; Hetharua, Buce; Zhao, Weijun; Zhou, Mengkai; Zhan, Qing; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling; Tian, Yun

    2018-03-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo), which is mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like" bacteria, is unique in linking the carbon and nitrogen cycles. However, the niche and activity of n-damo bacteria in the mangrove ecosystem have not been confirmed. Here, we report the occurrence of the n-damo process in the mangrove wetland of the Zhangjiang Estuary, China. The widespread occurrence of n-damo bacteria in mangrove wetland was confirmed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay, which showed that the abundance of Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like bacterial 16S rRNA and pmoA genes ranged from 2.43 × 10 6 to 2.09 × 10 7 and 2.07 × 10 6 to 3.38 × 10 7 copies per gram of dry soil in the examined sediment cores. The highest amount of targeting genes was all detected in the upper layer (0-20 cm). Phylogenetic analyses of n-damo bacterial 16S rRNA and pmoA genes illustrated the depth-specific distribution and high diversity of n-damo bacteria in the mangrove wetland. Stable isotope experiments further confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined mangrove sediments, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 25.93 to 704.08 nmol CO 2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of the sediment cores, with the n-damo being more active in the upper layer of the mangrove sediments. These results illustrate the existence of active M. oxyfera-like bacteria and indicate that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in the mangrove wetlands.

  2. Impact of a high ammonia-ammonium-pH system on methane-producing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in mesophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaohu; Hu, Chongliang; Zhang, Dong; Dai, Lingling; Duan, Nina

    2017-12-01

    A novel strategy for acclimation to ammonia stress was implemented by stimulating a high ammonia-ammonium-pH environment in a high-solid anaerobic digestion (AD) system in this study. Three semi-continuously stirred anaerobic reactors performed well over the whole study period under mesophilic conditions, especially in experimental group (R-2) when accommodated from acclimation period which the maximum total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) and free ammonia nitrogen (FAN) increased to 4921 and 2996mg/L, respectively. Moreover, when it accommodated the high ammonia-ammonium-pH system, the daily biogas production and methane content were similar to those in R-1 (the blank control to R-2), but the hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) content lower than the blank control. Moreover, mechanistic studies showed that high ammonia stress enhanced the activity of coenzyme F 420 . The results of real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that ammonia stress decreased the abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria and increased the abundance of methane-producing archaea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Moroccan rock phosphate solubilization during a thermo-anaerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to investigate the presence of thermo-tolerant rock phosphate (RP) solubilizing anaerobic microbes during the fermentation process, we used grassland as sole organic substrate to evaluate the RP solubilization process under anaerobic thermophilic conditions. The result shows a significant decrease of pH from ...

  4. Differences in substrate specificity of C(5)-substituted or C(5)-unsubstituted pyrimidine nucleotides by DNA polymerases from thermophilic bacteria, archaea, and phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Hiroaki; Nagashima, Junichi; Kuwahara, Msayasu; Kitagata, Rina; Tamura, Takehiro; Matsui, Ikuo

    2007-09-01

    The pyrimidine bases of RNA are uracil (U) and cytosine (C), while thymine (T) and C are used for DNA. The C(5) position of C and U is unsubstituted, whereas the C(5) of T is substituted with a Me group. Miller et al. hypothesized that various C(5)-substituted uracil derivatives were formed during chemical evolution, and that C(5)-substituted U derivatives may have played important roles in the transition from an 'RNA world' to a 'DNA-RNA-protein world'. Hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea are considered to be primitive organisms that are evolutionarily close to the universal ancestor of all life on earth. Thus, we examined the substrate specificity of several C(5)-substituted or C(5)-unsubstituted dUTP and dCTP analogs for several DNA polymerases from hyperthermophilic bacteria, hyperthermophilic archaea, and viruses during PCR or primer extension reaction. The substrate specificity of the C(5)-substituted or C(5)-unsubstituted pyrimidine nucleotides varied greatly depending on the type of DNA polymerase. The significance of this difference in substrate specificity in terms of the origin and evolution of the DNA replication system is discussed briefly.

  5. The Effect of Bamboo Leaf Extract Solution and Sodium Copper Chlorophyllin Solution on Growth and Volatile Sulfur Compounds Production of Oral Malodor Associated Some Anaerobic Periodontal Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majbauddin, Abir; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Bamboo leaf extract solution (BLES) and sodium copper chlorophyllin solution (SCCS) are known for their anti-oxidant activities. Oral malodor is often related with periodontal pathogens. The present study was undertaken to investigate the anti-bacterial effect of both BLES and SCCS on anaerobic periodontal bacteria producing oral malodorous volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 (PG), Prevotella intermidai TDC19B (PI), Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC25586 (FN) and Prevotella nigrescence ATCC33563 (PN) were investigated as oral isolated bacteria. VSC production ability of the oral strains was investigated by gas chromatography. With serial dilution of BLES or SCCS, the strains PG, PI, FN or PN were cultured anaerobically with AnaeroPack at 37 ℃ for 3 days. For the determination of anti-bacterial action of BLES or SCCS, the inoculum was cultured with original concentrations of BLES 0.16% (w/v) or SCCS 0.25% (w/v). Gas chromatography exhibited that all strains, PG, PI, FN and PN were responsible for producing a high range of H2S and a moderate range of CH3SH. Anti-bacterial effect of BLES or SCCS on the strains was observed. Inhibition of BLES or SCCS on the strains was revealed as concentration dependent. BLES or SCCS inhibited bacterial proliferation at higher concentrations (PG; 0.04% BLES or 0.03% SCCS, PI; 0.002% BLES or 0.03% SCCS, FN; 0.005% BLES or 0.01% SCCS, PN; 0.01% BLES or 0.015% SCCS). No viable bacterial colony observed at original concentration of BLES 0.16% or SCCS 0.25%. Strain growth was eliminated from inhibition at lower concentrations (PG; 0.02% BLES or 0.015% SCCS, PI; 0.001% BLES or 0.015% SCCS, FN; 0.002% BLES or 0.007% SCCS, PN; 0.005% BLES or 0.007% SCCS). High concentrations of both BLES (0.16%) and SCCS (0.25%) show superior inhibiting capability on all four oral malodor associated periodontal anaerobes during testing, suggesting that these compounds might have a beneficial effect on oral health care.

  6. Thermophilic Biohydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    Dark fermentative hydrogen production at thermophilic conditions is attractive process for biofuel production. From thermodynamic point of view, higher temperatures favor biohydrogen production. Highest hydrogen yields are always associated with acetate, or with mixed acetate- butyrate type...... fermentation. On the contrary the hydrogen yield decreases, with increasing concentrations of lactate, ethanol or propionate. Major factors affecting dark fermentative biohydrogen production are organic loading rate (OLR), pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT), dissolved hydrogen and dissolved carbon dioxide...... concentrations, and soluble metabolic profile (SMP). A number of thermophilic and extreme thermophilic cultures (pure and mixed) have been studied for biohydrogen production from different feedstocks - pure substrates and waste/wastewaters. Variety of process technologies (operational conditions...

  7. (Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  8. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  9. Thermophilic subseafloor microorganisms from the 1996 North Gorda Ridge eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit, Melanie; Baross, John A.

    1998-12-01

    High-temperature microbes were present in two hydrothermal event plumes (EP96A and B) resulting from the February-March 1996 eruptions along the North Gorda Ridge. Anaerobic thermophiles were cultured from 17 of 22 plume samples at levels exceeding 200 organisms per liter; no thermophiles were cultured from any of 12 samples of background seawater. As these microorganisms grow at temperatures of 50-90°C, they could not have grown in the event plume and instead most probably derived from a subseafloor environment tapped by the event plume source fluids. Event plumes are thought to derive from a pre-existing subseafloor fluid reservoir, which implies that these thermophiles are members of a native subseafloor community that was present before the eruptive event. Thermophiles also were cultured from continuous chronic-style hydrothermal plumes in April 1996; these plumes may have formed from cooling lava piles. To better understand the nutritional, chemical, and physical constraints of pre-eruptive crustal environments, seven coccoidal isolates from the two event plumes were partially characterized. Results from nutritional and phylogenetic studies indicate that these thermophiles are heterotrophic archaea that represent new species, and probably a new genus, within the Thermococcales.

  10. Constraints on mechanisms and rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane by microbial consortia: process-based modeling of ANME-2 archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Orcutt

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is the main process responsible for the removal of methane generated in Earth's marine subsurface environments. However, the biochemical mechanism of AOM remains elusive. By explicitly resolving the observed spatial arrangement of methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria found in consortia mediating AOM, potential intermediates involved in the electron transfer between the methane oxidizing and sulfate reducing partners were investigated via a consortium-scale reaction transport model that integrates the effect of diffusional transport with thermodynamic and kinetic controls on microbial activity. Model simulations were used to assess the impact of poorly constrained microbial characteristics such as minimum energy requirements to sustain metabolism and cell specific rates. The role of environmental conditions such as the influence of methane levels on the feasibility of H2, formate and acetate as intermediate species, and the impact of the abundance of intermediate species on pathway reversal were examined. The results show that higher production rates of intermediates via AOM lead to increased diffusive fluxes from the methane oxidizing archaea to sulfate reducing bacteria, but the build-up of the exchangeable species can cause the energy yield of AOM to drop below that required for ATP production. Comparison to data from laboratory experiments shows that under the experimental conditions of Nauhaus et al. (2007, none of the potential intermediates considered here is able to support metabolic activity matching the measured rates.

  11. Biomass production and energy source of thermophiles in a Japanese alkaline geothermal pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Mori, Kousuke; Nashimoto, Hiroaki; Hattori, Shohei; Yamada, Keita; Koba, Keisuke; Yoshida, Naohiro; Kato, Kenji

    2010-02-01

    Microbial biomass production has been measured to investigate the contribution of planktonic bacteria to fluxations in dissolved organic matter in marine and freshwater environments, but little is known about biomass production of thermophiles inhabiting geothermal and hydrothermal regions. The biomass production of thermophiles inhabiting an 85 degrees C geothermal pool was measured by in situ cultivation using diffusion chambers. The thermophiles' growth rates ranged from 0.43 to 0.82 day(-1), similar to those of planktonic bacteria in marine and freshwater habitats. Biomass production was estimated based on cellular carbon content measured directly from the thermophiles inhabiting the geothermal pool, which ranged from 5.0 to 6.1 microg C l(-1) h(-1). This production was 2-75 times higher than that of planktonic bacteria in other habitats, because the cellular carbon content of the thermophiles was much higher. Quantitative PCR and phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that thermophilic H2-oxidizing bacteria closely related to Calderobacterium and Geothermobacterium were dominant in the geothermal pool. Chemical analysis showed the presence of H2 in gases bubbling from the bottom of the geothermal pool. These results strongly suggested that H2 plays an important role as a primary energy source of thermophiles in the geothermal pool.

  12. Acid pre-treatment of sewage anaerobic sludge to increase hydrogen producing bacteria HPB: effectiveness and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasi, T; Sassi, G; Ruggeri, B

    2008-01-01

    The present study is aimed to test the effectiveness and the reproducibility of the acid pre-treatment of sewage sludge to suppress the methanogenic bacteria activity, in order to increase the hydrogen forming bacteria activity, mainly Clostridium species. The treated sludge has been tested on glucose reach medium under mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C), in batch mode to quantify the biological fermentative hydrogen production. In the whole series of experiments, the main components of biogas are hydrogen (52-60%) and carbon dioxide (40-48%); no methane and hydrogen sulphide were present in it. The rate of biogas production reached a maximum of 75 ml/lh. An overall mean hydrogen conversion efficiency was 11.20% on the assumption of maximum of 3 mol H2/mol glucose. Clostridium spp. multiplied ten times after 10 h of fermentation and over that thousand times at the end of fermentation. IWA Publishing 2008.

  13. Influence of support materials on continuous hydrogen production in anaerobic packed-bed reactor with immobilized hydrogen producing bacteria at acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Petra; Marinšek-Logar, Romana; Djinović, Petar; Pintar, Albin

    2018-04-01

    This study assesses the impact of different support materials (Mutag BioChip™, expanded clay and activated carbon) on microbial hydrogen production in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor (APBR) treating synthetic waste water containing glucose as the main carbon source at low pH value. The APBRs were inoculated with acid pretreated anaerobic sludge and operated at pH value of 4±0.2 and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3h. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.80mol H 2 /mol glucose was achieved for the APBR packed with Mutag BioChip™ (R1), followed by expanded clay (R2, 1.74mol H 2 /mo